Science.gov

Sample records for painful electrical stimulation

  1. Electrical stimulation in the treatment of pain.

    PubMed

    Rushton, David N

    2002-05-20

    To review the published literature concerning the treatment of painful conditions using devices that deliver electrical stimulation to nervous structures. The review briefly surveys the results obtained using surface electrodes ("TENS") as well as implanted devices. The method used is a critical review of the important published literature up to mid-1999. References were obtained using Medline and the keywords "pain", together with "electrical", "stimulation", "neurostimulation" or "TENS". Electrical stimulation has been found to be of potential benefit in the management of a range of painful conditions. Adequately controlled trials of electrical stimulation are often difficult to achieve. Implanted devices tend to be used in the more severe intractable pain conditions. It is likely that there is more than one mechanism of action. The mechanisms of action are however still often poorly understood, even though historically theoretical and experimental advances in the understanding of pain mechanisms prompted the development of clinical systems and the institution of clinical studies. TENS has proved to be remarkably safe, and provides significant analgesia in about half of patients experiencing moderate predictable pain. Implanted devices can be more effective, but they carry a risk of device failure, implant infection or surgical complication, and are reserved for the more severe intractable chronic pains. The main implanted devices used clinically are the spinal cord stimulator and the deep brain stimulator.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for acute pain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark I; Paley, Carole A; Howe, Tracey E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-06-15

    This is a second update of a Cochrane Review originally published in Issue 2, 2009. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological agent, based on delivering low voltage electrical currents to the skin. TENS is used by people to treat a variety of pain conditions. To assess the analgesic effectiveness of TENS, as a sole treatment, for acute pain in adults. We searched the following databases up to 3 December 2014: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; and AMED. We also checked the reference lists of included trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with acute pain (< 12 weeks) if they examined TENS given as a sole treatment and assessed pain with subjective pain scales. Trials were eligible if they compared TENS to placebo TENS, no treatment controls, pharmacological interventions or non-pharmacological interventions. We excluded trials on experimental pain, case reports, clinical observations, letters, abstracts or reviews. Also we excluded trials investigating the effect of TENS on pain during childbirth (labour), primary dysmenorrhoea or dental procedures. Studies where TENS was given with another treatment as part of the formal trial design were excluded. We did not restrict any articles based on language of publication. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility and carried out study selection, data extraction, 'Risk of bias' assessment and analyses of data. We extracted data on the following: types of participants and pain condition, trial design and methods, treatment parameters, adverse effects, and outcome measures. We contacted trial authors for additional information if necessary. We included 12 trials in the original review (2009) and included no further trials in the first update (2011). An additional seven new trials met the inclusion criteria in this second update. In total, we included 19 RCTs involving

  3. Nonpainful remote electrical stimulation alleviates episodic migraine pain.

    PubMed

    Yarnitsky, David; Volokh, Lana; Ironi, Alon; Weller, Boaz; Shor, Merav; Shifrin, Alla; Granovsky, Yelena

    2017-03-28

    To evaluate the efficacy of remote nonpainful electrical upper arm skin stimulation in reducing migraine attack pain. This is a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, crossover, sham-controlled trial. Migraineurs applied skin electrodes to the upper arm soon after attack onset for 20 minutes, at various pulse widths, and refrained from medications for 2 hours. Patients were asked to use the device for up to 20 attacks. In 71 patients (299 treatments) with evaluable data, 50% pain reduction was obtained for 64% of participants based on best of 200-μs, 150-μs, and 100-μs pulse width stimuli per individual vs 26% for sham stimuli. Greater pain reduction was found for active stimulation vs placebo; for those starting at severe or moderate pain, reduction (1) to mild or no pain occurred in 58% (25/43) of participants (66/134 treatments) for the 200-μs stimulation protocol and 24% (4/17; 8/29 treatments) for placebo ( p = 0.02), and (2) to no pain occurred in 30% (13/43) of participants (37/134 treatments) and 6% (1/17; 5/29 treatments), respectively ( p = 0.004). Earlier application of the treatment, within 20 minutes of attack onset, yielded better results: 46.7% pain reduction as opposed to 24.9% reduction when started later ( p = 0.02). Nonpainful remote skin stimulation can significantly reduce migraine pain, especially when applied early in an attack. This is presumably by activating descending inhibition pathways via the conditioned pain modulation effect. This treatment may be proposed as an attractive nonpharmacologic, easy to use, adverse event free, and inexpensive tool to reduce migraine pain. NCT02453399. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with an acute migraine headache, remote nonpainful electrical stimulation on the upper arm skin reduces migraine pain. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. One-shot percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for low back pain: comparison of therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2002-11-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of one shot of low-frequency percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation one shot of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with low back pain. In total, 133 low back pain patients were recruited for this randomized, control study. Group 1 patients received medication only. Group 2 patients received medication plus one shot of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Group 3 patients received medication plus one shot of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Therapeutic effects were measured using a visual analog scale, body surface score, pain pressure threshold, and the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale. Immediately after one-shot treatment, the visual analog scale improved 1.53 units and the body surface score improved 3.06 units in the percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group. In the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group, the visual analog scale improved 1.50 units and the body surface score improved 3.98 units. The improvements did not differ between the two groups. There were no differences in improvement at 3 days or 1 wk after the treatment among the three groups. Simple one-shot treatment with percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation provided immediate pain relief for low back pain patients. One-shot transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment is recommended due to the rarity of side effects and its convenient application.

  5. Evoked potentials after painful cutaneous electrical stimulation depict pain relief during a conditioned pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Höffken, Oliver; Özgül, Özüm S; Enax-Krumova, Elena K; Tegenthoff, Martin; Maier, Christoph

    2017-08-29

    Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) evaluates the pain modulating effect of a noxious conditioning stimulus (CS) on another noxious test stimulus (TS), mostly based solely on subjective pain ratings. We used painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (PCES) to induce TS in a novel CPM-model. Additionally, to evaluate a more objective parameter, we recorded the corresponding changes of cortical evoked potentials (PCES-EP). We examined the CPM-effect in 17 healthy subjects in a randomized controlled cross-over design during immersion of the non-dominant hand into 10 °C or 24 °C cold water (CS). Using three custom-built concentric surface electrodes, electrical stimuli were applied on the dominant hand, inducing pain of 40-60 on NRS 0-100 (TS). At baseline, during and after CS we assessed the electrically induced pain intensity and electrically evoked potentials recorded over the central electrode (Cz). Only in the 10 °C-condition, both pain (52.6 ± 4.4 (baseline) vs. 30.3 ± 12.5 (during CS)) and amplitudes of PCES-EP (42.1 ± 13.4 μV (baseline) vs. 28.7 ± 10.5 μV (during CS)) attenuated during CS and recovered there after (all p < 0.001). In the 10 °C-condition changes of subjective pain ratings during electrical stimulation and amplitudes of PCES-EP correlated significantly with each other (r = 0.5) and with CS pain intensity (r = 0.5). PCES-EPs are a quantitative measure of pain relief, as changes in the electrophysiological response are paralleled by a consistent decrease in subjective pain ratings. This novel CPM paradigm is a feasible method, which could help to evaluate the function of the endogenous pain modulation processes. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS-ID: DRKS00012779 , retrospectively registered on 24 July 2017.

  6. Referred pain and cutaneous responses from deep tissue electrical pain stimulation in the groin.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, E K; Werner, M U; Kehlet, H

    2015-08-01

    Persistent postherniotomy pain is located around the scar and external inguinal ring and is often described as deep rather than cutaneous, with frequent complaints of pain in adjacent areas. Whether this pain is due to local pathology or referred/projected pain is unknown, hindering mechanism-based treatment. Deep tissue electrical pain stimulation by needle electrodes in the right groin (rectus muscle, ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve and perispermatic cord) was combined with assessment of referred/projected pain and the cutaneous heat pain threshold (HPT) at three prespecified areas (both groins and the lower right arm) in 19 healthy subjects. The assessment was repeated 10 days later to assess the reproducibility of individual responses. Deep electrical stimulation elicited pain at the stimulation site in all subjects, and in 15 subjects, pain from areas outside the stimulation area was reported, with 90-100% having the same response on both days, depending on the location. Deep pain stimulation significantly increased the cutaneous HPT (P<0.014). Individual HPT responses before and during deep electrical pain stimulation were significantly correlated (ρ>0.474, P≤0.040) at the two test days for the majority of test areas. Our results corroborate a systematic relationship between deep pain and changes in cutaneous nociception. The individual referred/projected pain patterns and cutaneous responses are variable, but reproducible, supporting individual differences in anatomy and sensory processing. Future studies investigating the responses to deep tissue electrical stimulation in persistent postherniotomy pain patients may advance our understanding of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and strategies for treatment and prevention. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01701427). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  12. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: nonparallel antinociceptive effects on chronic clinical pain and acute experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Cheing, G L; Hui-Chan, C W

    1999-03-01

    To investigate to what extent a single 60-minute session of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) would modify chronic clinical pain, acute experimental pain, and the flexion reflex evoked in chronic low back pain patients. Thirty young subjects with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups, receiving either TENS or placebo stimulation to the lumbosacral region for 60 minutes. The flexion reflex was elicited by an electrical stimulation applied to the subject's right sole and recorded electromyographically from the biceps femoris and the tibialis anterior muscles. Subjective sensation of low back pain and the electrically induced pain were measured by two separate visual analog scales, termed VAS(LBP) and VAS(FR), respectively. Data obtained before, during, and 60 minutes after TENS and placebo stimulations were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. The VAS(LBP) score was significantly reduced to 63.1% of the prestimulation value after TENS (p<.001), but the reduction was negligible after placebo stimulation (to 96.7%, p = .786). In contrast, no significant change was found in the VASFR score (p = .666) and the flexion reflex area (p = .062) during and after stimulation within each group and between the two groups (p = .133 for VASFR and p = .215 for flexion reflex area). The same TENS protocol had different degrees of antinociceptive influence on chronic and acute pain in chronic low back pain patients.

  13. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improves low back pain during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Keskin, E A; Onur, O; Keskin, H L; Gumus, I I; Kafali, H; Turhan, N

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficiency of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) with those of exercise and acetaminophen for the treatment of pregnancy-related low back pain (LBP) during the third trimester of pregnancy. This prospective study included 79 subjects (≥32 gestational weeks) with visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores ≥5. Participants were divided randomly into a control group (n = 21) and three treatment groups [exercise (n = 19); acetaminophen (n = 19); TENS (n = 20)]. The VAS and the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ) were completed before and 3 weeks after treatment to assess the impact of pain on daily activities. During the study period, pain intensity increased in 57% of participants in the control group, whereas pain decreased in 95% of participants in the exercise group and in all participants in the acetaminophen and TENS groups. Post-treatment VAS and RMDQ values were significantly lower in the treatment groups (p < 0.001). VAS and RMDQ scores indicated a significantly greater degree of pain relief in the TENS group than in the exercise and acetaminophen groups (p < 0.001). No adverse effect of TENS application on pregnant women was observed during the study. TENS is an effective and safe treatment modality for LBP during pregnancy. TENS improved LBP more effectively than did exercise and acetaminophen. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Electrical stimulation (ES) in the management of sexual pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Rossella E; Ferdeghini, Francesea; Abbiati, Ileana; Vercesi, Claudia; Farina, Claudio; Polatti, Franco

    2003-01-01

    We performed an open study to investigate the use of electrical stimulation (ES) on the vestibular area and vaginal introitus in women with sexual pain disorders. We recruited 29 women (age range 20-45 years) from among the patients at our Reproductive Psychobiology Unit to participate in the present study. They each experienced vestibular pain, inducing dyspareunia and vaginism. We performed ES with an ECL43400 apparatus (Elite, EssediEsse srl, Milan, Italy) once a week for 10 weeks. To evaluate the muscular activity of the perineal floor and sexual function, we employed the same apparatus with a vaginal probe for recording myoelectrical activity (muV), we employed a VAS scale for evaluating pain, and we administered the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI; Rosen et al., 2000) before and after the study protocol. We analyzed data by parametric and nonparametric comparisons and correlations, as appropriate. Our major findings were as follows: (a) the contractile ability of pelvic floor muscles (p < 0.001), as well as the resting ability (p < 0.001), significantly improved following ES; (b) the current intensity tolerated significantly increased (p < 0.001) throughout the study, from 41.3 +/- 7.4 mA at the start of the study to 50 +/- 7.4 mA at the end of the stimulation protocol; (c) the Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) for pain significantly declined (p < 0.001), whereas FSFI pain scores (p < 0.001) and full scale scores (p < 0.001) significantly improved following ES, and 4 out of 9 women with vaginism went back to coital activity; (d) FSFI pain score and the current intensity tolerated, both before (R = .59; p < 0.006) and at the end (R = .53; p < 0.02) of the stimulation protocol, positively correlated. ES may be effective in the management of sexual pain disorders. Further controlled studies are necessary to standardize stimulation protocols according to the severity of pain and to better clarify the long-term clinical effects of ES.

  15. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief in labour.

    PubMed

    Dowswell, Therese; Bedwell, Carol; Lavender, Tina; Neilson, James P

    2009-04-15

    Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been proposed as a means of reducing pain in labour. The TENS unit emits low-voltage electrical impulses which vary in frequency and intensity. During labour, TENS electrodes are generally placed on the lower back, although TENS may be used to stimulate acupuncture points or other parts of the body. The physiological mechanisms whereby TENS relieves pain are uncertain. The TENS unit is frequently operated by women, which may increase sense of control in labour. To assess the effects of TENS on pain in labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (November 2008). Randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain relief in labour versus routine care, alternative pharmacological methods of pain relief, or placebo devices. We included all types of TENS machines. Two review authors assessed for inclusion all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. We have recorded reasons for excluding studies. The search identified 25 studies; we excluded six and included 19 studies including 1671 women. Fifteen examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points and two to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.55). The majority of women using TENS said they would be willing to use it again in a future labour. Where TENS was used as an adjunct to epidural analgesia there was no evidence that it reduced pain. There was no consistent evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and babies. No adverse events were reported. There is only limited evidence that TENS reduces pain in labour and it does not seem to have any impact (either positive or

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Bedwell, Carol; Lavender, Tina; Neilson, James P

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been proposed as a means of reducing pain in labour. The TENS unit emits low-voltage electrical impulses which vary in frequency and intensity. During labour, TENS electrodes are generally placed on the lower back, although TENS may be used to stimulate acupuncture points or other parts of the body. The physiological mechanisms whereby TENS relieves pain are uncertain. TENS machines are frequently operated by women, which may increase a sense of control in labour. Objectives To assess the effects of TENS on pain in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain management in labour versus routine care, alternative non-pharmacological methods of pain relief, or placebo devices. We included all types of TENS machines. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed for inclusion all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. We have recorded reasons for excluding studies. Main results Seventeen trials with 1466 women contribute data to the review. Thirteen examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points, and two to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (average risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.54; measured in two studies). The majority of women using TENS said they would be willing to use it again in a future labour. Where TENS was used as an adjunct to epidural analgesia there was no evidence that it reduced pain. There was no consistent evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and babies. No

  17. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William; Wand, Benedict M; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-09-14

    Neuropathic pain, which is due to nerve disease or damage, represents a significant burden on people and society. It can be particularly unpleasant and achieving adequate symptom control can be difficult. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are often employed by people with neuropathic pain and may include transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This review supersedes one Cochrane Review 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic pain' (Nnoaham 2014) and one withdrawn protocol 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults' (Claydon 2014). This review replaces the original protocol for neuropathic pain that was withdrawn. To determine the analgesic effectiveness of TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, PEDro, LILACS (up to September 2016) and various clinical trials registries. We also searched bibliographies of included studies for further relevant studies. We included randomised controlled trials where TENS was evaluated in the treatment of central or peripheral neuropathic pain. We included studies if they investigated the following: TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. Two review authors independently screened all database search results and identified papers requiring full-text assessment. Subsequently, two review authors independently applied inclusion/exclusion criteria to these studies. The same review authors then independently extracted data, assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane standard tool and rated the quality of evidence using GRADE. We included 15 studies with 724 participants. We found a

  18. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) for labour pain.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard

    2012-05-01

    Because TENS is applied inconsistently and not always in line with optimal TENS application theory, this may explain why TENS for labour pain appears to be effective in some individuals and not in others. This article reviews TENS theory, advises upon optimal TENS application for labour pain and discusses some of the limitations of TENS research on labour pain. TENS application for labour pain may include TENS applied to either side of the lower spine, set to 200 mus pulse duration and 100 pulses per second. As pain increases, TENS intensity should be increased and as pain decreases, TENS intensity should be reduced to maintain a strong but pain free intensity of stimulation. This application may particularly reduce back pain during labour.

  19. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) for cancer pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Robb, Karen A; Bennett, Michael I; Johnson, Mark I; Simpson, Karen J; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2008-07-16

    Cancer-related pain is complex and multi-dimensional but the mainstay of cancer pain management has predominately used a biomedical approach. There is a need for non-pharmacological and innovative approaches. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS) may have a role for a significant number of patients but the effectiveness of TENS is currently unknown. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of TENS for cancer-related pain in adults. We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED and PEDRO databases (11/04/08). Only randomised controlled trials (RCTS) investigating the use of TENS for the management of cancer-related pain in adults were included. The search strategy identified 37 possible published studies which were divided between two pairs of review authors that decided on study selection. A study eligibility form was used to screen each abstract and where study eligibility could not be determined from the abstract, the full paper was obtained and assessed by one pair of review authors. A standardised data extraction sheet was used to collect information on the studies and the quality of the studies was assessed independently by two review authors using the validated five-point Oxford Quality Scale. Final scores were discussed and agreed between all four review authors. The small sample sizes and differences in patient study populations of the two included studies prevented meta-analysis. Only two RCTs met the eligibility criteria (64 participants). These studies were heterogenous with respect to study population, sample size, study design, methodological quality, mode of TENS, treatment duration, method of administration and outcome measures used. In one RCT, there were no significant differences between TENS and placebo in women with chronic pain secondary to breast cancer treatment. In the other RCT, there were no significant differences between acupuncture-type TENS and sham in palliative care

  20. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) for cancer pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Hurlow, Adam; Bennett, Michael I; Robb, Karen A; Johnson, Mark I; Simpson, Karen H; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2012-03-14

    Cancer-related pain is complex and multi-dimensional but the mainstay of cancer pain management has predominantly used a biomedical approach. There is a need for non-pharmacological and innovative approaches. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS) may have a role in pain management but the effectiveness of TENS is currently unknown. This is an update of the original review published in Issue 3, 2008. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of TENS for cancer-related pain in adults. The initial review searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED and PEDRO databases in April 2008. We performed an updated search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PEDRO databases in November 2011. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTS) investigating the use of TENS for the management of cancer-related pain in adults. The search strategy identified a further two studies for possible inclusion. One of the review authors screened each abstract using a study eligibility tool. Where eligibility could not be determined, a second author assessed the full paper. One author used a standardised data extraction sheet to collect information on the studies and independently assess the quality of the studies using the validated five-point Oxford Quality Scale. The small sample sizes and differences in patient study populations of the three included studies (two from the original review and a third included in this update) prevented meta-analysis. For the original review the search strategy identified 37 possible published studies; we divided these between two pairs of review authors who decided on study selection; all four review authors discussed and agreed final scores. Only one additional RCT met the eligibility criteria (24 participants) for this updated review. Although this was a feasibility study, not designed to investigate intervention effect, it suggested that TENS may improve bone pain on movement in a

  1. WITHDRAWN: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gadsby, J G; Flowerdew, M W

    2007-07-18

    In view of the claims and counter-claims of the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, it would seem appropriate to systematically review the literature. To determine the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in reducing pain and improving range of movement in patients with chronic low back pain. Electronic searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE, CISCOM, AMED for all studies of TENS in the English language, identifying those treating chronic low back pain and hand searching their references. The inclusion criterion for studies included in this review, 6 of 68 identified, was comparisons of TENS/ALTENS versus placebo in patients with chronic low back pain. Outcome data on pain reduction, range of movement, functional status and work was extracted by two independent reviewers together with trial design qualities to construct a Quality Index. The ratio of odds of improvement in pain for each comparison was calculated: TENS vs. placebo at 1.62 (95% CI 0.90, 2.68); ALTENS vs. placebo at 7.22 (95% CI 2.60, 20.01) and TENS/ALTENS vs. placebo at 2.11 (95% CI 1.32, 3.38) times that of placebo. An improvement in pain reduction was seen in 45.80% (CI 37.00%, 55.00%) of TENS; 86.70% (CI 80.00%, 93.00%) of ALTENS; 54.00% (CI 46.20%, 61.80%) of TENS/ ALTENS and 36.40% (95%CI 28.40%, 44.40%) of placebo subjects. The odds of improvement in range of movement on ALTENS vs. placebo was 6.61 times (95% CI 2.36, 18.55) that of placebo. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation appears to reduce pain and improve the range of movement in chronic low back pain subjects. A definitive randomised controlled study of ALTENS, TENS, placebo/no treatment controls, of sufficient power, is needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark I; Mulvey, Matthew R; Bagnall, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-18

    This is the first update of a Cochrane review published in Issue 5, 2010 on transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults. Pain may present in a body part that has been amputated (phantom pain) or at the site of amputation (stump pain), or both. Phantom pain and stump pain are complex and multidimensional and the underlying pathophysiology remains unclear. The condition remains a severe burden for those who are affected by it. The mainstay treatments are predominately pharmacological, with increasing acknowledgement of the need for non-drug interventions. TENS has been recommended as a treatment option but there has been no systematic review of available evidence. Hence, the effectiveness of TENS for phantom pain and stump pain is currently unknown. To assess the analgesic effectiveness of TENS for the treatment of phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults. For the original version of the review we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, PEDRO and SPORTDiscus (February 2010). For this update, we searched the same databases for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 2010 to 25 March 2015. We only included RCTs investigating the use of TENS for the management of phantom pain and stump pain following an amputation in adults. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We planned that where available and appropriate, data from outcome measures were to be pooled and presented as an overall estimate of the effectiveness of TENS. In the original review there were no RCTs that examined the effectiveness of TENS for the treatment of phantom pain and stump pain in adults. For this update, we did not identify any additional RCTs for inclusion. There were no RCTs to judge the effectiveness of TENS for the management of phantom pain and stump pain. The published literature on TENS

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Milne, S; Welch, V; Brosseau, L; Saginur, M; Shea, B; Tugwell, P; Wells, G

    2001-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) affects a large proportion of the population. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was introduced more than 30 years ago as an alternative therapy to pharmacological treatments for chronic pain. However, despite its widespread use, the effectiveness of TENS is still controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of TENS in the treatment of chronic LBP. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to June 1, 2000. Only randomized controlled clinical trials of TENS for the treatment of patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic LBP were included. Abstracts were excluded unless further data could be obtained from the authors. Two reviewers independently selected trials and extracted data using predetermined forms. Heterogeneity was tested with Cochran's Q test. A fixed effects model was used throughout for continuous variables, except where heterogeneity existed, in which case, a random effects model was used. Results are presented as weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), where the difference between the treated and control groups was weighted by the inverse of the variance. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated by dividing the difference between the treated and control by the baseline variance. SMD were used when different scales were used to measure the same concept. Dichotomous outcomes were analyzed with odds ratios. Five trials were included, with 170 subjects randomized to the placebo group receiving sham-TENS and 251 subjects receiving active TENS (153 for conventional mode, 98 for acupuncture-like TENS). The schedule of treatments varied greatly between studies ranging from one treatment/day for two consecutive days, to three treatments/day for four weeks. There were no statistically significant differences between the active TENS group when compared to the placebo TENS group for any outcome measures

  4. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gadsby, J G; Flowerdew, M W

    2000-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), originally based on the gate-control theory of pain, is widely used for the treatment of chronic low back pain. Despite its wide use and theoretical rationale, there appears at first glance little scientific evidence to support its use. This Cochrane review examines the available evidence on TENS for the treatment of chronic back pain through an exhaustive search of the literature. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) for chronic low back pain management have experienced a tremendous growth over the past 25 years. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of TENS and ALTENS for reducing pain and improving function in patients with chronic back pain. We searched MEDLINE up to November 1997, EMBASE from 1985 to September 1995, Amed and Ciscom to January 1995, reference lists of the retrieved articles, proceedings of conferences and contacted investigators in the field. Randomised trials comparing TENS or ALTENS therapy to placebo in patients with chronic low back pain. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data on pain reduction, range of movement, functional and work status. Six trials were included. The trials included 288 participants with an average age range of 45 to 50 years and approximately equal numbers of women and men. The overall odds ratio for improvement in pain for each comparison was: TENS/ALTENS versus placebo 2.11 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 3. 38), ALTENS versus placebo 7.22 (95% confidence interval 2.60 to 20.01) and TENS versus placebo 1.52 (95% confidence interval 0.90 to 2.58). The odds ration for improvement in range of motion on ALTENS versus placebo was 6.61 (95% confidence interval 2.36 to 18.55). There is evidence from the limited data available that TENS/ALTENS reduces pain and improves range of motion in chronic back pain patients, at least in the short

  5. Effect of Fixed Versus Adjusted Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Amplitude on Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Elserty, Noha; Kattabei, Omaima; Elhafez, Hytham

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of adjusting pulse amplitude of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation versus fixed pulse amplitude in treatment of chronic mechanical low back pain. Randomized clinical trial. El-sahel Teaching Hospital, Egypt. Forty-five patients with chronic low back pain assigned to three equal groups. Their ages ranged from 20 to 50 years. The three groups received the same exercise program. Group A received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with fixed pulse amplitude for 40 minutes. Group B received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with adjusted pulse amplitude for 40 minutes, with the pulse amplitude adjusted every 5 minutes. Group C received exercises only. Treatment sessions were applied three times per week for 4 weeks for the three groups. A visual analogue scale was used to assess pain severity, the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess functional level, and a dual inclinometer was used to measure lumbar range of motion. Evaluations were performed before and after treatment. Visual analogue scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and back range of motion significantly differed between the two groups that received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and the control group and did not significantly differ between fixed and adjusted pulse amplitude of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Adjusting pulse amplitude of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation does not produce a difference in the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation used to treat chronic low back pain.

  6. The effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, C; Choi, J B; Lee, Y-S; Chang, H-S; Shin, C S; Kim, S; Han, D W

    2015-04-01

    Posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy is common because full neck extension is required during the procedure. We evaluated the effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on postoperative neck pain in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy under general anaesthesia. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups; 50 patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle and 50 patients acted as controls. Postoperative posterior neck pain and anterior wound pain were evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale at 30 min, 6 h, 24 h and 48 h following surgery. The numerical rating scale for posterior neck pain was significantly lower in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group compared with the control group at all time points (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the numerical rating scale for anterior wound pain at any time point. No adverse effects related to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation were observed. We conclude that intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle reduced posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Effects of smoke exposure and other lifestyle factors on pain response to electrical stimulation in women.

    PubMed

    Wee, J Y; Hopman, W M

    2008-01-01

    A relationship between smoking and development of pain syndromes has been suggested in the literature. The present study examined associations between smoke exposure and other related variables, and pain response to suprathreshold electrical stimulation. Subjects were prospectively recruited from a population referred to an electrodiagnostic clinic. Information about age, smoke exposure, caffeine and alcohol consumption was obtained, as well as documented objective signs of stress through physical assessment. One investigator applied two standardized 0.1 ms electrical stimulations (50 mA followed by 100 mA) to asymptomatic extremities at the beginning of each electrodiagnostic session, using consistent technique. Subjects used a visual analogue scale to indicate the level of pain felt after each stimulation. Two hundred fifteen women were included. Current smokers and those currently exposed to second-hand smoke had significantly higher pain ratings (P=0.003 for 50 mA, P=0.005 for 100 mA) than those not currently exposed to smoke. Time since exposure was negatively associated with pain ratings. Those with objective signs of stress reported higher levels of pain, which was significant for the 100 mA stimulation (P=0.046). Linear regression modelling indicated that current smoke exposure and alcohol use were associated with higher pain ratings at both 50 mA and 100 mA, while stress was associated with higher pain ratings and older age was associated with lower pain ratings at 100 mA only. Exposure to cigarette smoke is significantly related to higher reported levels of pain experienced in response to electrical stimulation in this study population. Exposure to smoke can add 10 points to the 100-point visual analogue scale compared with subjects without exposure, with alcohol use adding another eight points. Reported pain decreases as length of time since previous exposure to smoke increases.

  8. Comparison of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for long-term pain relief in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Masataka; Sun, Xiaohui; Oku, Satoru; Taga, Naoyuki; Sato, Kenji; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2004-06-01

    The long-term effect of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) on chronic low back pain (LBP) is unclear. We evaluated the number of sessions for which PENS should be performed to alleviate chronic LBP and how long analgesia is sustained. Patients underwent treatment on a twice-weekly schedule for 8 wk. Group A (n = 18) received PENS for 8 wk, group B (n = 17) received PENS for the first 4 wk and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for the second 4 wk, and group C (n = 18) received TENS for 8 wk. Pain level, degree of physical impairment, and the daily intake of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were assessed before the first treatment, 3 days after Week 2, Week 4, and Week 8 treatments, and at 1 and 2 mo after the sessions. During PENS therapy, the pain level decreased significantly from Week 2 in Groups A and B (P < 0.05 or 0.01), and physical impairment and required NSAIDs decreased significantly from Week 4 (P < 0.05 or 0.01) in Group A but only at Week 4 in Group B (P < 0.05 or 0.01). These effects were sustained until 1-mo follow-up (P < 0.01) in Group A but not in Group B; these effects were not observed at 2-mo follow-up even in Group A. In Group C, pain level decreased significantly only at Week 8 (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that repeated PENS is more effective than TENS for chronic LBP but must be continued to sustain the analgesic effect. A cumulative analgesic effect was observed in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) after repeated percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS), but this effect gradually faded after the treatment was terminated. Results indicate that although PENS is effective for chronic LBP, treatments need to be continued to sustain analgesia.

  9. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) A Possible Aid for Pain Relief in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, O; Johnson, MI

    2009-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) refers to the delivery of electrical currents through the skin to activate peripheral nerves. The technique is widely used in developed countries to relieve a wide range of acute and chronic pain conditions, including pain resulting from cancer and its treatment. There are many systematic reviews on TENS although evidence is often inconclusive because of shortcomings in randomised control trials methodology. In this overview the basic science behind TENS will be discussed, the evidence of its effectiveness in specific clinical conditions analysed and a case for its use in pain management in developing countries will be made. PMID:21483510

  10. Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lien-Chen; Weng, Pei-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yi-You; Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Chiang, Chang-Jung

    2018-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. Methods Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. Results Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = −0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15–1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = −1.24; 95% CI, −1.83 to −0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. Conclusions These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability. PMID:29394211

  11. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Conditioned Pain Modulation Influence the Perception of Pain in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Liebano, Richard E.; Vance, Carol G.T.; Rakel, Barbara; Lee, Jennifer E.; Cooper, Nicholas A.; Marchand, Serge; Walsh, Deirdre M.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Research in animal models suggest that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) produce analgesia via two different supraspinal pathways. No known studies have examined whether TENS and CPM applied simultaneously in human subjects will enhance the analgesic effect of either treatment alone. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the simultaneous application of TENS and CPM will enhance the analgesic effect of that produced by either treatment alone. Methods Sixty healthy adults were randomly allocated into 2 groups: 1) CPM plus Active TENS; 2) CPM plus Placebo TENS. Pain threshold for heat (HPT) and pressure (PPT) was recorded from subject’s left forearm at baseline, during CPM, during Active or Placebo TENS, and during CPM plus Active or Placebo TENS. CPM was induced by placing the subjects’ contralateral arm in a hot water bath (46.5°C) for two minutes. TENS (100µs, 100Hz) was applied to the forearm for 20 minutes at a strong but comfortable intensity. Results Active TENS alone increased PPT (but not HPT) more than Placebo TENS alone (p=0.011). Combining CPM and Active TENS did not significantly increase PPT (p=0.232) or HPT (p=0.423) beyond CPM plus Placebo TENS. There was a significant positive association between PPT during CPM and during Active TENS (r2=0.46, p=0.003). Conclusions TENS application increases PPT, however combining CPM and TENS does not increase the CPM’s hypoalgesic response. CPM effect on PPT is associated with effects of TENS on PPT. PMID:23650092

  12. Feasibility study of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for cancer bone pain.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael I; Johnson, Mark I; Brown, Sarah R; Radford, Helen; Brown, Julia M; Searle, Robert D

    2010-04-01

    This multicenter study assessed the feasibility of conducting a phase III trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with cancer bone pain recruited from palliative care services. Eligible patients received active and placebo TENS for 1 hour at site of pain in a randomized crossover design; median interval between applications 3 days. Responses assessed at 30 and 60 minutes included numerical and verbal ratings of pain at rest and on movement, and pain relief. Recruitment, tolerability, adverse events, and effectiveness of blinding were also evaluated. Twenty-four patients were randomised and 19 completed both applications. The intervention was well tolerated. Five patients withdrew: 3 due to deteriorating performance status, and 2 due to increased pain (1 each following active and placebo TENS). Confidence interval estimation around the differences in outcomes between active and placebo TENS suggests that TENS has the potential to decrease pain on movement more than pain on rest. Nine patients did not consider that a placebo was used; the remaining 10 correctly identified placebo TENS. Feasibility studies are important in palliative care prior to undertaking clinical trials. Our findings suggest that further work is required on recruitment strategies and refining the control arm before evaluating TENS in cancer bone pain. Cancer bone pain is common and severe, and partly mediated by hyperexcitability. Animal studies suggest that Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation can reduce hyperalgesia. This study examined the feasibility of evaluating TENS in patients with cancer bone pain in order to optimize methods before a phase III trial. Copyright 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrical or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of primary motor cortex for intractable neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Youichi; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Yokoe, Masaru; Matsuzaki, Taiga; Sekino, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    To assess the pain-relieving effects of motor cortex electrical stimulation (MCS) and the predictive factors retrospectively. Thirty-four patients with intractable neuropathic pain underwent MCS; 19 patients had cerebral lesions, and 15 had non-cerebral lesions. In selected 12 patients, test electrodes were implanted within the central sulcus and on the precentral gyrus. Twelve patients received both MCS and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex. Pain reduction of >50% was observed in 12 of 32 (36%) patients with >12 months follow-ups (2 patients were excluded because of short follow-up). In 10 of the 12 patients who received test electrodes within the central sulcus and on the precentral gyrus, the optimal stimulation was MCS within the central sulcus. In 4 of these (40%) patients, positive effects were maintained at follow-ups. The pain reduction of rTMS significantly correlated with that of MCS during test stimulation. The test stimulation within the central sulcus was more effective than that of the precentral gyrus. In the selected patients, chronic stimulation within the central sulcus did not significantly improve long-term results. Repeated rTMS seems to be same effective as MCS.

  14. Gastric Electrical Stimulation for Abdominal Pain in Patients with Symptoms of Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Christopher J.; Griffith, James; Subramony, Charu; Halley, Lindsey; Adams, Kristen; Paine, Elizabeth R.; Schmieg, Robert; Islam, Saleem; Salameh, Jay; Spree, Danielle; Kothari, Truptesh; Kedar, Archana; Nikitina, Yana; Abell, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain physiology may be better understood studying electrophysiology, histology, and symptom scores in patients with the symptoms of gastroparesis (Gp) treated with gastric electrical stimulation (GES). Ninety-five Gp patients’ symptoms were recorded at baseline and during temporary and permanent GES. Gastric-emptying times and cutaneous, mucosal, and serosal electrogastrograms were obtained. S100-stained, full-thickness gastric biopsies were compared with autopsy controls. Sixty-eight patients reported severe pain at baseline. Severe pain patients’ mean pain scores decreased with temporary GES from 3.62 to 1.29 (P < 0.001) and nonsevere pain from 1.26 to 0.67 (P = 0.01). With permanent GES, severe mean pain scores fell to 2.30 (P < 0.001); nonsevere pain changed to 1.60 (P = 0.221). Mean follow-up was 275 days. Mean cutaneous, mucosal, and serosal frequencies and frequency-to-amplitude ratios were markedly higher than literature controls. For patients with Gp overall and subdivided by etiology and severity of pain, S-100 neuronal fibers were significantly reduced in both muscularis propria layers. GES improved severe pain associated with symptoms of Gp. This severe pain is associated with abnormal electrogastrographic activity and loss of S100 neuronal fibers in the stomach’s inner and outer muscularis propria and, therefore, could be the result of gastric neuropathy. PMID:23635579

  15. A Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Chughtai, Morad; Mistry, Jaydev B; Elmallah, Randa K; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil; Mont, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) may provide a safe alternative to current side-effect-heavy narcotics and anti-inflammatories utilized in chronic low back pain. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of TENS for the treatment of chronic low back pain. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, and randomized crossover studies on TENS for the management of low back pain. We utilized a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain as our primary outcome. Effectiveness of treatment was quantified using improvement in outcome scores for each study. Of the studies that met the criteria, 13 allowed for calculation of weighted mean differences in pain reduction. We used a random model effect to evaluate changes in pain produced by the intervention. Included were nine level I and four level II, encompassing 267 patients (39% male) who had a mean follow-up of seven weeks (range; 2 to 24 weeks). The mean duration of treatment was six weeks (range; 2 to 24 weeks). The standardized mean difference in pain from pre- to post-treatment for TENS was 0.844, which demonstrated significant improvement of TENS on pain reduction. When subdividing treatment duration, patients that were treated for < 5 weeks had significant effects on pain, while those treated for > 5 weeks did not. Treatment of chronic low back pain with TENS demonstrated significant pain reduction. The application of TENS may lead to less pain medication usage and should be incorporated into the treatment armamentarium for chronic low back pain.

  16. Electrical stimulation for preventing and treating post-stroke shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Price, C I; Pandyan, A D

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder pain after stroke is common and disabling. The optimal management is uncertain, but electrical stimulation (ES) is often used to treat and prevent pain. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of any form of surface ES in the prevention and / or treatment of pain around the shoulder at any time after stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Review Group trials register and undertook further searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL. Contact was established with equipment manufacturers and centres that have published on the topic of ES. We considered all randomised trials that assessed any surface ES technique (functional electrical stimulation (FES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or other), applied at any time since stroke for the purpose of prevention or treatment of shoulder pain. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Four trials (a total of 170 subjects) fitted the inclusion criteria. Study design and ES technique varied considerably, often precluding the combination of studies. Population numbers were small. There was no significant change in pain incidence (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.64; 95% CI 0.19 to 2.14) or change in pain intensity (Standardised Mean Difference (SMD) 0.13; 95% CI -1.0 to 1.25) after ES treatment compared to control. There was a significant treatment effect in favour of ES for improvement in pain-free range of passive humeral lateral rotation (Weighted Mean Difference (WMD) 9.17; 95% CI 1.43 to 16.91). In these studies ES reduced the severity of glenohumeral subluxation (SMD -1.13; 95% CI -1.66 to -0.60), but there was no significant effect on upper limb motor recovery (SMD 0.24; 95% CI -0.14 to 0.62) or upper limb spasticity (WMD 0.05; 95% CI -0.28 to 0.37). There did not appear to be any negative effects of electrical stimulation at the shoulder. The evidence from randomised controlled trials so far does not confirm or refute that ES

  17. Electrical stimulation for preventing and treating post-stroke shoulder pain: a systematic Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Price, C I; Pandyan, A D

    2001-02-01

    Shoulder pain after stroke is common and disabling. The optimal management is uncertain, but electrical stimulation (ES) is often used to treat and prevent pain. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of any form of surface ES in the prevention and/or treatment of pain around the shoulder at any time after stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Review Group trials register and undertook further searches of Medline, Embase and CINAHL. Contact was established with equipment manufacturers and centres that have published on the topic of ES. We considered all randomized trials that assessed any surface ES technique (functional electrical stimulation (FES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or other), applied at any time since stroke for the purpose of prevention or treatment of shoulder pain. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Four trials (a total of 170 subjects) fitted the inclusion criteria. Study design and ES technique varied considerably, often precluding the combination of studies. Population numbers were small. There was no significant change in pain incidence (odds ratio (OR) 0.64; 95% CI 0.19-2.14) or change in pain intensity (standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.13; 95% CI -1.0-1.25) after ES treatment compared with control. There was a significant treatment effect in favour of ES for improvement in pain-free range of passive humeral lateral rotation (weighted mean difference (WMD) 9.17; 95% CI 1.43-16.91). In these studies ES reduced the severity of glenohumeral subluxation (SMD -1.13; 95% CI -1.66 to -0.60), but there was no significant effect on upper limb motor recovery (SMD 0.24; 95% CI -0.14-0.62) or upper limb spasticity (WMD 0.05; 95% CI -0.28-0.37). There did not appear to be any negative effects of electrical stimulation at the shoulder. The evidence from randomized controlled trials so far does not confirm or refute that ES around the

  18. Effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Treatment of Hyperalgesia and Pain

    PubMed Central

    DeSantana, Josimari M.; Walsh, Deirdre M.; Vance, Carol; Rakel, Barbara A.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmacologic treatment for pain relief. TENS has been used to treat a variety of painful conditions. This review updates the basic and clinical science regarding the use of TENS that has been published in the past 3 years (ie, 2005−2008). Basic science studies using animal models of inflammation show changes in the peripheral nervous system, as well as in the spinal cord and descending inhibitory pathways, in response to TENS. Translational studies show mechanisms to prevent analgesic tolerance to repeated application of TENS. This review also highlights data from recent randomized, placebo-controlled trials and current systematic reviews. Clinical trials suggest that adequate dosing, particularly intensity, is critical to obtaining pain relief with TENS. Thus, evidence continues to emerge from both basic science and clinical trials supporting the use of TENS for the treatment of a variety of painful conditions while identifying strategies to increase TENS effectiveness. PMID:19007541

  19. Transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation pain management after surgical abortion: A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaozhen; Ye, Tianshen; Wang, Zedong; Chen, Xiufang; Cong, Wenjie; Chen, Yong; Chen, Pinjie; Chen, Chong; Shi, Beibei; Xie, Wenxia

    2016-06-01

    Transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation (TEAS) is a standard therapy for painful conditions. This study evaluated pain-relieving effects of treatment with TEAS before and after surgical abortion. In this cohort study 140 nulliparae requesting pregnancy termination with intravenous anesthesia from August to December 2013 at the outpatient clinic of Wenzhou Medical University First Affiliated Hospital were recruited and divided into three cohorts who received TEAS pre-, post-, and both pre- and post-operation, alongside a control group. The cohorts underwent TEAS treatment for 30 min before and/or after the procedure while the control group received no TEAS treatment. Pain levels were evaluated upon recovery at 10, 30, and 45 min, respectively, after abortion. Mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores in pre-operation cohorts, but not the post-operation cohort, were significantly lower than those obtained for the control group at 10 min (p < 0.01). VAS scores at 30 min and 45 min postoperatively were similar in each cohort but lower than control values (p < 0.001). More cohort patients reported mild or no pain than control patients (p < 0.05); the pre-operation cohorts had more women with no pain compared with the post-operation group (p < 0.05). There were no differences among groups in medical treatment required after 45 min. There were fewer complications of nausea and vomiting in the cohorts compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Performing TEAS before and after surgical abortion provides postoperative pain relief. However, receiving TEAS before surgery allowed more women to experience mild or no pain. Transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation shows potential as an adjunct to conventional pain treatment following surgical abortion in nulliparae. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain, fatigue and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol G T; Liebano, Richard E; Amrit, Anand S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Because transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design to test the effects of a single treatment of TENS with people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS and no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and in movement; pressure pain thresholds, 6-m walk test, range of motion; 5-time sit-to-stand test, and single-leg stance. Conditioned pain modulation was completed at the end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. Pressure pain thresholds increased at the site of TENS (spine) and outside the site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During active TENS, conditioned pain modulation was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to the way in which TENS is used clinically on pain, fatigue, function, and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effects of subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in rodent models of chronic neuropathic or inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Cordero, Toni; Billstrom, Tina; Swearingen, Kim; Wacnik, Paul W; Johanek, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for many years for the treatment of pain. Present-day research demonstrates that stimulation targets and parameters impact the induction of specific pain-modulating mechanisms. New targets are increasingly being investigated clinically, but the scientific rationale for a particular target is often not well established. This present study compares the behavioral effects of targeting peripheral axons by electrode placement in the subcutaneous space vs. electrode placement on the surface of the skin in a rodent model. Rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain were used to investigate subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS) vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Electrical parameters and relative location of the leads were held constant under each condition. SQS had cumulative antihypersensitivity effects in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain rodent models, with significant inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity observed on days 3-4 of treatment. In contrast, reduction of thermal hyperalgesia in the inflammatory model was observed during the first four days of treatment with SQS, and reduction of cold allodynia in the neuropathic pain model was seen only on the first day with SQS. TENS was effective in the inflammation model, and in agreement with previous studies, tolerance developed to the antihypersensitivity effects of TENS. With the exception of a reversal of cold hypersensitivity on day 1 of testing, TENS did not reveal significant analgesic effects in the neuropathic pain rodent model. The results presented show that TENS and SQS have different effects that could point to unique biologic mechanisms underlying the analgesic effect of each therapy. Furthermore, this study is the first to demonstrate in an animal model that SQS attenuates neuropathic and inflammatory-induced pain behaviors. © 2013 Medtronic, Inc.

  2. Influence of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the threshold and pain intensity in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira; Silvestre, Ana Caroline; da Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Gomes, Mariany Ribeiro; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation frequencies in nociception front of a pressure pain threshold and cold in healthy individuals. Methods Twenty healthy subjects were divided into four groups, all of which have gone through all forms of electrical stimulation at different weeks. Assessments were pre and post-therapy, 20 and 60 minutes after stimulation. To evaluate the pressure pain threshold, an algometer was used with one tapered tip, pressing the hypothenar region until voluntary report the word “pain”. Cold pain intensity was assessed by immersion in water at 5°C for 30 seconds; at the end, the subject was asked to quantify the pain intensity on a Visual Analog Scale for Pain. For electrical stimulation, two electrodes were used near the elbow, for 20 minutes, with an intensity strong, but not painful. The frequency was in accordance with the group: 0Hz (placebo); 7Hz; 100Hz; and 255Hz. Results Both for the assessment of pressure pain threshold as the cold pain intensity, there was no significant difference (p>0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on dermatomes C6 to C8 produced no significant change in pressure pain threshold or cold discomfort. PMID:25295453

  3. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Reduces Post-Thoractomy Ipsilateral Shoulder Pain. A Prospective Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Esteban González, Pedro; Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo

    2015-12-01

    The patient's position during an axillary thoracotomy can cause postoperative pain and decrease mobility of the ipsilateral shoulder. In this study, we assessed whether the implementation of a standardized analgesia program using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) decreases local pain and improves ipsilateral shoulder mobility. Randomized, single-blind, single-center clinical trial of 50 patients who had undergone anatomical lung resection via axillary muscle-sparing thoracotomy. Patients were treated with TENS devices for 30 minutes every 8 hours, beginning on postoperative day 1. Pain and mobility of the affected limb were recorded at the same time on postoperative days 1 through 3. A visual analogue scale was used for pain assessment and shoulder mobility was assessed with a goniometer. Results were compared using a non-parametric test. Twenty-five patients were randomized to each group. Mean age of the control group was 62.7±9.3 years and 63.4±10.2 years in the experimental group. Shoulder mobility parameters were similar in both groups on all postoperative days. However, pain during flexion significantly decreased on day 2 (P=.03) and day 3 (P=.04) in the experimental group. The use of TENS decreases pain from shoulder flexion in patients undergoing axillary thoracotomy for pulmonary resection. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces acute low back pain during emergency transport.

    PubMed

    Bertalanffy, Alexander; Kober, Alexander; Bertalanffy, Petra; Gustorff, Burkhard; Gore, Odette; Adel, Sharam; Hoerauf, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    Patients with acute low back pain may require emergency transport because of pain and immobilization. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmaceutical therapy for patients with low back pain. To evaluate the efficacy of paramedic-administered TENS in patients with acute low back pain during emergency transport. This was a prospective, randomized study involving 74 patients transported to hospital. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 36) was treated with true TENS, while group 2 (n = 36) was treated with sham TENS. The authors recorded pain and anxiety as the main outcome variables using a visual analog scale (VAS). The authors recorded a significant (p < 0.01) pain reduction (mean +/- standard deviation) during transport in group 1 (79.2 +/- 6.5 mm VAS to 48.9 +/- 8.2 mm VAS), whereas pain scores remained unchanged in group 2 (75.9 +/- 16.4 mm VAS and 77.1 +/- 11.2 mm VAS). Similarly, the scores for anxiety were significantly reduced (p < 0.01) in group 1 (81.7 +/- 7.9 mm VAS to 69.2 +/- 12.1 mm VAS) after treatment. No significant change was noted (84.5 +/- 5.8 mm VAS and 83.5 +/- 8.9 mm VAS, respectively) in group 2. TENS was found to be effective and rapid in reducing pain during emergency transport of patients with acute low back pain and should be considered due to its ease of use and lack of side effects in the study population.

  5. A controlled trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and exercise for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Deyo, R A; Walsh, N E; Martin, D C; Schoenfeld, L S; Ramamurthy, S

    1990-06-07

    A number of treatments are widely prescribed for chronic back pain, but few have been rigorously evaluated. We examined the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), a program of stretching exercises, or a combination of both for low back pain. Patients with chronic low back pain (median duration, 4.1 years) were randomly assigned to receive daily treatment with TENS (n = 36), sham TENS (n = 36), TENS plus a program of exercises (n = 37), or sham TENS plus exercises (n = 36). After one month no clinically or statistically significant treatment effect of TENS was found on any of 11 indicators of outcome measuring pain, function, and back flexion; there was no interactive effect of TENS with exercise. Overall improvement in pain indicators was 47 percent with TENS and 42 percent with sham TENS (P not significant). The 95 percent confidence intervals for group differences excluded a major clinical benefit of TENS for most outcomes. By contrast, after one month patients in the exercise groups had significant improvement in self-rated pain scores, reduction in the frequency of pain, and greater levels of activity as compared with patients in the groups that did not exercise. The mean reported improvement in pain scores was 52 percent in the exercise groups and 37 percent in the nonexercise groups (P = 0.02). Two months after the active intervention, however, most patients had discontinued the exercises, and the initial improvements were gone. We conclude that for patients with chronic low back pain, treatment with TENS is no more effective than treatment with a placebo, and TENS adds no apparent benefit to that of exercise alone.

  6. High frequency electrical stimulation concurrently induces central sensitization and ipsilateral inhibitory pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Vo, L; Drummond, P D

    2013-03-01

    In healthy humans, analgesia to blunt pressure develops in the ipsilateral forehead during various forms of limb pain. The aim of the current study was to determine whether this analgesic response is induced by ultraviolet B radiation (UVB), which evokes signs of peripheral sensitization, or by high-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS), which triggers signs of central sensitization. Before and after HFS and UVB conditioning, sensitivity to heat and to blunt and sharp stimuli was assessed at and adjacent to the treated site in the forearm. In addition, sensitivity to blunt pressure was measured bilaterally in the forehead. The effect of ipsilateral versus contralateral temple cooling on electrically evoked pain in the forearm was then examined, to determine whether HFS or UVB conditioning altered inhibitory pain modulation. UVB conditioning triggered signs of peripheral sensitization, whereas HFS conditioning triggered signs of central sensitization. Importantly, ipsilateral forehead analgesia developed after HFS but not UVB conditioning. In addition, decreases in electrically evoked pain at the HFS-treated site were greater during ipsilateral than contralateral temple cooling, whereas decreases at the UVB-treated site were similar during both procedures. HFS conditioning induced signs of central sensitization in the forearm and analgesia both in the ipsilateral forehead and the HFS-treated site. This ipsilateral analgesia was not due to peripheral sensitization or other non-specific effects, as it failed to develop after UVB conditioning. Thus, the supra-spinal mechanisms that evoke central sensitization might also trigger a hemilateral inhibitory pain modulation process. This inhibitory process could sharpen the boundaries of central sensitization or limit its spread. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  7. Microcurrent transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in painful diabetic neuropathy: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Gossrau, Gudrun; Wähner, Michael; Kuschke, Marion; Konrad, Birgit; Reichmann, Heinz; Wiedemann, Bärbel; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2011-06-01

    Diabetes is a common health care problem in western countries. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) might be one of the consequences of long ongoing diabetes; it is estimated that approximately 20% of European diabetic patients suffer from PDN. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is often used as additional pain treatment. However, recent studies show inconsistent results. We aimed to assess the effect of micro-TENS in reducing neuropathic pain in patients with PDN in a placebo-controlled, single-blinded, and randomized design. DESIGN/SETTING/PATIENTS/OUTCOME MEASURES: 22 diabetic patients have been treated with a micro-TENS therapy and 19 patients have been treated with a placebo therapy. Treatment duration was 4 weeks with three therapeutical settings per week. Standardized questionnaires (Pain Disability Index [PDI], neuropathic pain score [NPS], Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]) were used to assess pain intensity, pain disability, as well as quality of life at baseline at the end of the treatment period and 4 weeks after treatment termination. Patients with a minimum of 30% reduction in NPS were defined as therapy responders. After 4 weeks of treatment, 6/21 patients in the verum group vs 10/19 patients in the placebo group responded to therapy. The median PDI score after 4 weeks of treatment showed a reduction of 23% in the verum vs 25% in the placebo group. The differences did not reach statistical significance. The pain reduction with the applied transcutaneous electrotherapy regimen is not superior to a placebo treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for pain relief after liposuction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Milla Pompilio; Liebano, Richard Eloin; Rodrigues, Victor Ales; Abla, Luiz Eduardo Felipe; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-04-01

    Liposuction is a common cosmetic surgical procedure, which requires analgesia for postoperative pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been used for postoperative pain relief; however, there is no evidence of its effectiveness in liposuction patients and this is the focus of this paper. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial was conducted with 42 adult patients who underwent liposuction. Patients were randomly allocated to either the TENS group (active TENS) or control group (sham TENS). All patients received morphine (0.1 mg/kg) and dipyrone 1 g immediately after surgery; TENS was delivered 2 h later. The primary outcome was pain intensity. Secondary outcomes were analgesic requirement, number and types of adverse effects of TENS, quality of pain, treatment success, and patient satisfaction. Postoperative pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Brazilian version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (Br-MPQ). Patients in the TENS group reported significantly lower pain intensity (P < 0.001, effect size = 0.92) compared with those in the control group. TENS significantly decreased the consumption of analgesics in the postoperative period (P < 0.001). No withdrawals or adverse effects were observed in the TENS group, but 33.3% of patients in the control group reported drowsiness and nausea. About 95 and 38% of patients in the TENS and control groups, respectively, were satisfied with the analgesic treatment. The results indicate that TENS is effective as an adjunct to analgesics for pain relief after liposuction. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  9. Meta-analysis of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for relief of spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Resende, L; Merriwether, E; Rampazo, É P; Dailey, D; Embree, J; Deberg, J; Liebano, R E; Sluka, K A

    2018-04-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis analysing the existing data on transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or interferential current (IFC) for chronic low back pain (CLBP) and/or neck pain (CNP) taking into account intensity and timing of stimulation, examining pain, function and disability. Seven electronic databases were searched for TENS or IFC treatment in non-specific CLBP or CNP. Four reviewers independently selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TENS or IFC intervention in adult individuals with non-specific CLBP or CNP. Primary outcomes were for self-reported pain intensity and back-specific disability. Two reviewers performed quality assessment, and two reviewers extracted data using a standardized form. Nine RCTs were selected (eight CLBP; one CNP), and seven studies with complete data sets were included for meta-analysis (655 participants). For CLBP, meta-analysis shows TENS/IFC intervention, independent of time of assessment, was significantly different from placebo/control (p < 0.02). TENS/IFC intervention was better than placebo/control, during therapy (p = 0.02), but not immediately after therapy (p = 0.08), or 1-3 months after therapy (p = 0.99). Analysis for adequate stimulation parameters was not significantly different, and there was no effect on disability. This systematic review provides inconclusive evidence of TENS benefits in low back pain patients because the quality of the studies was low, and adequate parameters and timing of assessment were not uniformly used or reported. Without additional high-quality clinical trials using sufficient sample sizes and adequate parameters and outcome assessments, the outcomes of this review are likely to remain unchanged. These data highlight the need for additional high-quality RCTs to examine the effects of TENS in CLBP. Trials should consider intensity of stimulation, timing of outcome assessment and assessment of pain, disability and function. © 2017

  10. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  11. Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for low back pain: a randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Ghoname, E A; Craig, W F; White, P F; Ahmed, H E; Hamza, M A; Henderson, B N; Gajraj, N M; Huber, P J; Gatchel, R J

    1999-03-03

    Low back pain (LBP) contributes to considerable disability and lost wages in the United States. Commonly used opioid and nonopioid analgesic drugs produce adverse effects and are of limited long-term benefit in the management of this patient population. To compare the effectiveness of a novel nonpharmacologic pain therapy, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS), with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and flexion-extension exercise therapies in patients with long-term LBP. A randomized, single-blinded, sham-controlled, crossover study from March 1997 to December 1997. An ambulatory pain management center at a university medical center. Twenty-nine men and 31 women with LBP secondary to degenerative disk disease. Four therapeutic modalities (sham-PENS, PENS, TENS, and exercise therapies) were each administered for a period of 30 minutes 3 times a week for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and posttreatment visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain, physical activity, and quality of sleep; daily analgesic medication usage; a global patient assessment questionnaire; and Health Status Survey Short Form (SF-36). PENS was significantly more effective in decreasing VAS pain scores after each treatment than sham-PENS, TENS, and exercise therapies (after-treatment mean +/- SD VAS for pain, 3.4+/-1.4 cm, 5.5+/-1.9 cm, 5.6+/-1.9 cm, and 6.4+/-1.9 cm, respectively). The average +/- SD daily oral intake of nonopioid analgesics (2.6+/-1.4 pills per day) was decreased to 1.3+/-1.0 pills per day with PENS (P<.008) compared with 2.5+/-1.1, 2.2+/-1.0, and 2.6+/-1.2 pills per day with sham-PENS, TENS, and exercise, respectively. Compared with the other 3 modalities, 91 % of the patients reported that PENS was the most effective in decreasing their LBP. The PENS therapy was also significantly more effective in improving physical activity, quality of sleep, and sense of well-being (P<.05 for each). The SF-36 survey confirmed that PENS improved posttreatment function more

  12. Dose-specific effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on experimental pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Leica S; Chesterton, Linda S; Barlas, Panos; Sim, Julius

    2011-09-01

    To determine the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) parameter combinations on experimental models in healthy humans. Searches were performed using the electronic databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, and Web of Science (from inception to December 2009). Manual searches of journals and reference lists of retrieved trials were also performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the review if they compared the hypoalgesic effect of TENS relative with placebo and control, using an experimental pain model in healthy human participants. Two reviewers independently selected the trials, assessed their methodologic quality and extracted data. Forty-three RCTs were eligible for inclusion. A best evidence synthesis revealed: Overall "conflicting" (inconsistent findings in multiple RCTs) evidence of TENS efficacy on experimental pain irrespective of TENS parameters used. Overall intense TENS has "moderate" evidence of efficacy (1 high-quality and 2 low-quality trials). Conventional TENS has overall conflicting evidence of efficacy, this is derived from "strong" evidence of efficacy (generally consistent findings in multiple high-quality RCTs) on pressure pain but strong evidence of inefficacy on other pain models. "Limited" evidence (positive findings from 1 RCT) of hypoalgesia exists for some novel parameters. Low-intensity, low-frequency, local TENS has strong evidence of inefficacy. Inappropriate TENS (using "barely perceptible" intensities) has moderate evidence of inefficacy. The level of hypoalgesic efficacy of TENS is clearly dependent on TENS parameter combination selection (defined in terms of intensity, frequency, and stimulation site) and experimental pain model. Future clinical RCTs may consider these TENS dose responses.

  13. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  14. Do the Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Knee Osteoarthritis Pain and Function Last?

    PubMed

    Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Harrison, Paige E; Benjamin, Samantha A; Bhave, Anil; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been shown to decrease pain associated with knee osteoarthritis, which potentially leads to better function, improved quality of life, and postpones the need for surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to perform a 1-year follow-up of a previous prospective group of patients with knee osteoarthritis, randomized to TENS or standard of care, who were asked to rate their changes in: (1) patient pain perception; (2) subjective medication use; (3) subjective functional abilities; (4) quality of life; (5) device use; and (6) conversion to TKA. A population of 70 patients were randomized to receive either a TENS device or a standard conservative therapy regimen. Patients were evaluated based on various subjective outcomes at minimum 1-year (mean, 19 months) follow-up. The TENS cohort had lower visual analog pain scores compared with the matching cohort. Subjective functional outcomes, as well as functional and activity scores, were also greater in the TENS cohort. Patients in TENS cohort showed significant improvements in their subjective and functional outcomes as compared with their initial status, while the control group did not show significant change. A majority of the TENS patients were able to reduce the amount of pain medications. Additionally, a large portion of the patients assigned to the TENS group continue to use the device, after completion of the trial. This study demonstrated the benefit of TENS for improving subjective outcomes in patients with pain due to knee osteoarthritis, compared with standard conservative treatments. The results of the study suggest that TENS is a safe and effective adjunct as part of the spectrum of current nonoperative treatment methods for knee osteoarthritis. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229. PMID:27445610

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain control after vaginal delivery and cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Kayman-Kose, Seda; Arioz, Dagistan Tolga; Toktas, Hasan; Koken, Gulengul; Kanat-Pektas, Mine; Kose, Mesut; Yilmazer, Mehmet

    2014-10-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficiency and reliability of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the management of pain related with uterine contractions after vaginal delivery and the pain related with both abdominal incision uterine contractions after cesarean section. A hundred healthy women who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to the placebo group (Group 1) or the TENS group (Group 2), while 100 women who delivered by vaginal route without episiotomy were randomized into the placebo group (Group 3) or the TENS group (Group 4). The patients in Group 2 had statistically lower visual analog scale (VAS) and verbal numerical scale (VNS) scores than the patients in Group 1 (p < 0.001 for both). The patients in Group 4 had statistically lower VAS and VNS scores than the patients in Group 3 (p = 0.022 and p = 0.005, respectively). The analgesic requirement at the eighth hour of cesarean section was significantly lower in the patients who were treated with TENS (p = 0.006). The need for analgesics at the eighth hour of vaginal delivery was statistically similar in the patients who were treated with TENS and the patients who received placebo (p = 0.830). TENS is an effective, reliable, practical and easily available modality of treatment for postpartum pain.

  17. Implementation fidelity of self-administered transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with chronic back pain: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Pallett, Edward J; Rentowl, Patricia; Johnson, Mark I; Watson, Paul J

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief has not been reliably established. Inconclusive findings could be due to inadequate TENS delivery and inappropriate outcome assessment. Electronic monitoring devices were used to determine patient compliance with a TENS intervention and outcome assessment protocol, to record pain scores before, during, and after TENS, and measure electrical output settings. Patients with chronic back pain consented to use TENS daily for 2 weeks and to report pain scores before, during, and after 1-hour treatments. A ≥ 30% reduction in pain scores was used to classify participants as TENS responders. Electronic monitoring devices "TLOG" and "TSCORE" recorded time and duration of TENS use, electrical settings, and pain scores. Forty-two patients consented to participate. One of 35 (3%) patients adhered completely to the TENS use and pain score reporting protocol. Fourteen of 33 (42%) were TENS responders according to electronic pain score data. Analgesia onset occurred within 30 to 60 minutes for 13/14 (93%) responders. It was not possible to correlate TENS amplitude, frequency, or pulse width measurements with therapeutic response. Findings from TENS research studies depend on the timing of outcome assessment; pain should be recorded during stimulation. TENS device sophistication might be an issue and parameter restriction should be considered. Careful protocol design is required to improve adherence and monitoring is necessary to evaluate the validity of findings. This observational study provides objective evidence to support concerns about poor implementation fidelity in TENS research.

  18. Late administration of high-frequency electrical stimulation increases nerve regeneration without aggravating neuropathic pain in a nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Hong-Lin; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Lu, Zong-Han; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2018-06-25

    High-frequency transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is currently used for the administration of electrical current in denervated muscle to alleviate muscle atrophy and enhance motor function; however, the time window (i.e. either immediate or delayed) for achieving benefit is still undetermined. In this study, we conducted an intervention of sciatic nerve crush injury using high-frequency TENS at different time points to assess the effect of motor and sensory functional recovery. Animals with left sciatic nerve crush injury received TENS treatment starting immediately after injury or 1 week later at a high frequency(100 Hz) or at a low frequency (2 Hz) as a control. In SFI gait analysis, either immediate or late admission of high-frequency electrical stimulation exerted significant improvement compared to either immediate or late administration of low-frequency electrical stimulation. In an assessment of allodynia, immediate high frequency electrical stimulation caused a significantly decreased pain threshold compared to late high-frequency or low-frequency stimulation at immediate or late time points. Immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis of S-100 and NF-200 demonstrated that both immediate and late high frequency electrical stimulation showed a similar effect; however the effect was superior to that achieved with low frequency stimulation. Immediate high frequency electrical stimulation resulted in significant expression of TNF-α and synaptophysin in the dorsal root ganglion, somatosensory cortex, and hippocampus compared to late electrical stimulation, and this trend paralleled the observed effect on somatosensory evoked potential. The CatWalk gait analysis also showed that immediate electrical stimulation led to a significantly high regularity index. In primary dorsal root ganglion cells culture, high-frequency electrical stimulation also exerted a significant increase in expression of TNF-α, synaptophysin, and

  19. Targeted therapies using electrical and magnetic neural stimulation for the treatment of chronic pain in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Morse, Leslie R; Alam, Mahtab; Bikson, Marom; Zafonte, Ross; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-01-15

    Chronic neuropathic pain is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Over two-thirds of subjects with SCI suffer from chronic pain influencing quality of life, rehabilitation, and recovery. Given the refractoriness of chronic pain to most pharmacological treatments, the majority of individuals with SCI report worsening of this condition over time. Moreover, only 4-6% of patients in this cohort report improvement. Novel treatments targeting mechanisms associated with pain-maladaptive plasticity, such as electromagnetic neural stimulation, may be desirable to improve outcomes. To date, few, small clinical trials have assessed the effects of invasive and noninvasive nervous system stimulation on pain after SCI. We aimed to review initial efficacy, safety and potential predictors of response by assessing the effects of neural stimulation techniques to treat SCI pain. A literature search was performed using the PubMed database including studies using the following targeted stimulation strategies: transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), High Definition tDCS (HD-tDCS), repetitive Transcranial Magnetical Stimulation (rTMS), Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS), Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) and Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS), published prior to June of 2012. We included studies from 1998 to 2012. Eight clinical trials and one naturalistic observational study (nine studies in total) met the inclusion criteria. Among the clinical trials, three studies assessed the effects of tDCS, two of CES, two of rTMS and one of TENS. The naturalistic study investigated the analgesic effects of SCS. No clinical trials for epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) or HD-tDCS were found. Parameters of stimulation and also clinical characteristics varied significantly across studies. Three out of eight studies showed larger effects sizes (0.73, 0.88 and 1.86 respectively) for pain

  20. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain.

    PubMed

    Gozani, Shai N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9%) were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1) pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80.3% of responders reporting a reduction compared to 11.8% of non-responders. FS-TENS is a safe and effective

  1. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

    PubMed Central

    Gozani, Shai N

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Methods Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. Results One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9%) were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1) pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80.3% of responders reporting a reduction compared to 11.8% of non

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, A; Milne, S; Brosseau, L; Robinson, V; Saginur, M; Shea, B; Tugwell, P; Wells, G

    2005-07-20

    Chronic low-back pain (LBP) affects a significant proportion of the population. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was introduced more than 30 years ago as an adjunct to the pharmacological management of pain. However, despite its widespread use, the usefulness of TENS in chronic LBP is still controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of TENS in the management of chronic LBP. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 2, 2005), MEDLINE, EMBASE and PEDro up to April 1, 2005. Only randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of TENS on chronic LBP were included. Abstracts were excluded unless further data could be obtained from the authors. Two reviewers independently selected trials and extracted data using predetermined forms. Heterogeneity was tested with Cochrane's Q test. A fixed effect model was used throughout for calculating continuous variables, except where heterogeneity existed, in which case, a random effects model was used. Results are presented as weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), where the difference between the treated and control groups was weighted by the inverse of the variance. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated by dividing the difference between the treated and control by the baseline variance. SMD were used when different scales were used to measure the same concept. Dichotomous outcomes were analyzed with odds ratios. The only two RCTs (175 patients) meeting eligibility criteria differed in study design, methodological quality, inclusion and exclusion criteria, type and method of TENS application, treatment schedule, co-interventions and final outcomes. In one RCT, TENS produced significantly greater pain relief than the placebo control. However, in the other RCT, no statistically significant differences between treatment and control groups were shown for multiple outcome measures. Pre

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Amole; Milne, Sarah; Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George; Tugwell, Peter; Robinson, Vivian; Shea, Beverley; Saginur, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Systematic review. To determine the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the management of chronic LBP. Chronic low back pain (LBP) affects a significant proportion of the population. TENS was introduced more than 30 years ago as an adjunct to pharmacologic pain management. However, despite its widespread use, the usefulness of TENS in chronic LBP is still controversial. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 2, 2005), up to April 1, 2005. Only randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of TENS on chronic LBP were included. Two reviewers independently selected trials and extracted data using predetermined forms. Heterogeneity was tested with Cochrane's Q test. A fixed effect model was used throughout for calculating continuous variables, except where heterogeneity existed, in which case a random effects model was used. Results are presented as weighted mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), where the difference between the treated and control groups was weighted by the inverse of the variance. Standardized mean differences were calculated by dividing the difference between the treated and control by the baseline variance. Standardized mean differences were used when different scales were used to measure the same concept. Dichotomous outcomes were analyzed with odds ratios. Two RCTs (175 patients) were included. They differed with respect to study design, methodologic quality, inclusion and exclusion criteria, characteristics of TENS application, treatment schedule, cointerventions, and measured outcomes. In one RCT, TENS produced significantly greater pain relief than the placebo control. However, in the other RCT, no statistically significant differences between treatment and control groups were shown for multiple outcome measures. Preplanned subgroup analyses, intended to examine the impact of different stimulation parameters

  4. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces exercise-induced perceived pain and improves endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Astokorki, Ali H Y; Mauger, Alexis R

    2017-03-01

    Muscle pain is a natural consequence of intense and prolonged exercise and has been suggested to be a limiter of performance. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential current (IFC) have been shown to reduce both chronic and acute pain in a variety of conditions. This study sought to ascertain whether TENS and IFC could reduce exercise-induced pain (EIP) and whether this would affect exercise performance. It was hypothesised that TENS and IFC would reduce EIP and result in an improved exercise performance. In two parts, 18 (Part I) and 22 (Part II) healthy male and female participants completed an isometric contraction of the dominant bicep until exhaustion (Part I) and a 16.1 km cycling time trial as quickly as they could (Part II) whilst receiving TENS, IFC, and a SHAM placebo in a repeated measures, randomised cross-over, and placebo-controlled design. Perceived EIP was recorded in both tasks using a validated subjective scale. In Part I, TENS significantly reduced perceived EIP (mean reduction of 12%) during the isometric contraction (P = 0.006) and significantly improved participants' time to exhaustion by a mean of 38% (P = 0.02). In Part II, TENS significantly improved (P = 0.003) participants' time trial completion time (~2% improvement) through an increased mean power output. These findings demonstrate that TENS can attenuate perceived EIP in a healthy population and that doing so significantly improves endurance performance in both submaximal isometric single limb exercise and whole-body dynamic exercise.

  5. Electrical high-frequency stimulation of the human thoracolumbar fascia evokes long-term potentiation-like pain amplification.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Magerl, Walter; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-10-01

    Nociceptive long-term potentiation, a use dependent increase in synaptic efficacy in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain states. So far, no study has analyzed the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of afferents from deep tissues (muscle and fascia) on pain perception in the back in humans. In 16 healthy volunteers, the multifidus muscle and the overlying thoracolumbar fascia were stimulated with electrical high-frequency pulses (5 × 100 pulses at 100 Hz) through bipolar concentric needle electrodes placed at lumbar level (L3/L4). Electrical pain thresholds were lower (P < 0.001) and pain ratings were higher for fascia compared with muscle stimulation (P < 0.05). For both tissues, pain ratings increased significantly across the five 100 Hz trains (from 15 to 22 numerical rating scale for fascia, from 8 to 12 numerical rating scale for muscle; both P < 0.01). Fascia HFS increased fascia pain ratings 2.17 times compared with the unconditioned control site (P < 0.001), but had no significant effect on pain sensitivity of the muscle. The HFS in muscle had no significant effect on muscle pain, but decreased pain sensitivity of the overlying fascia by 20% (P < 0.05). In additional experiments using the same electrodes and followed over >60 minutes post-HFS, potentiation by fascia HFS was similar to that of skin HFS. These findings show that the spinal input from the fascia can induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity for at least 60 minutes making it a candidate potentially contributing to nonspecific low back pain.

  6. Alternating frequencies of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation: does it produce greater analgesic effects on mechanical and thermal pain thresholds?

    PubMed

    Tong, K C; Lo, Sing Kai; Cheing, Gladys L

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether alternating frequency transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) at 2 and 100Hz (2/100Hz) has a more potent hypoalgesic effect than a fixed frequency at 2 or 100Hz in healthy participants. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with a convenience sample. University physiotherapy department. Sixty-four healthy volunteers (32 men [mean age, 28.1+/-5.9y], 32 women [mean age, 27.7+/-5.6y]) were recruited and randomly divided into 4 groups. The 4 groups received TENS delivered at (1) 2Hz; (2) 100Hz; (3) 2/100Hz alternating frequency; and (4) no treatment (control group), respectively. Electric stimulation was applied over the anterior aspect of the dominant forearm for 30 minutes. Mechanical pain thresholds (MPTs) and heat pain thresholds (HPTs) were recorded before, during, and after TENS stimulation. The data were analyzed using linear mixed models, with group treated as a between-subject factor and time a within-subject factor. During and shortly after electric stimulation, HPT increased significantly in the alternating frequency stimulation group (P=.024). MPT increased significantly in both the 100Hz (P=.008) and the alternating frequency groups (P=.012), but the increase was substantially larger in the 100Hz group. Alternating frequency stimulation produced a greater elevation in the HPT, but a greater increase in the MPT was achieved using 100Hz stimulation.

  7. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) versus placebo for chronic low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Amole; Odebiyi, Daniel Oluwafemi; Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A

    2008-10-08

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was introduced more than 30 years ago as a therapeutic adjunct to the pharmacological management of pain. However, despite widespread use, its effectiveness in chronic low-back pain (LBP) is still controversial. To determine whether TENS is more effective than placebo for the management of chronic LBP. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro and CINAHL were searched up to July 19, 2007. Only randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing TENS to placebo in patients with chronic LBP were included. Two review authors independently selected the trials, assessed their methodological quality and extracted relevant data. If quantitative meta-analysis was not possible, a qualitative synthesis was performed, taking into consideration 5 levels of evidence as recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group. Four high-quality RCTs (585 patients) met the selection criteria. Clinical heterogeneity prevented the use of meta-analysis. Therefore, a qualitative synthesis was completed. There was conflicting evidence about whether TENS was beneficial in reducing back pain intensity and consistent evidence in two trials (410 patients) that it did not improve back-specific functional status. There was moderate evidence that work status and the use of medical services did not change with treatment. Conflicting results were obtained from two studies regarding generic health status, with one study showing no improvement on the modified Sickness Impact Profile and another study showing significant improvements on several, but not all subsections of the SF-36 questionnaire. Multiple physical outcome measures lacked statistically significant improvement relative to placebo. In general, patients treated with acupuncture-like TENS responded similarly to those treated with conventional TENS. However, in two of the trials, an inadequate stimulation intensity was used for acupuncture

  8. Can we "predict" long-term outcome for ambulatory transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Köke, Albère J; Smeets, Rob J E M; Perez, Roberto S; Kessels, Alphons; Winkens, Bjorn; van Kleef, Maarten; Patijn, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Evidence for effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is still inconclusive. As heterogeneity of chronic pain patients might be an important factor for this lack of efficacy, identifying factors for a successful long-term outcome is of great importance. A prospective study was performed to identify variables with potential predictive value for 2 outcome measures on long term (6 months); (1) continuation of TENS, and (2) a minimally clinical important pain reduction of ≥ 33%. At baseline, a set of risk factors including pain-related variables, psychological factors, and disability was measured. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, higher patient's expectations, neuropathic pain, no severe pain (< 80 mm visual analogue scale [VAS]) were independently related to long-term continuation of TENS. For the outcome "minimally clinical important pain reduction," the multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that no multisited pain (> 2 pain locations) and intermittent pain were positively and independently associated with a minimally clinical important pain reduction of ≥ 33%. The results showed that factors associated with a successful outcome in the long term are dependent on definition of successful outcome. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  9. Laser stimulation for pain research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stuart; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Jones, Anthony; Chen, Andrew; Derbyshire, Stuart; Townsend, D. W.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Mintun, M. A.; Nichols, T.

    1996-01-01

    Pain is a serious medical problem; it inflicts huge economic loss and personal suffering. Pain signals are conducted via small, non- and partially myelinated A-delta and C nerve fibers and lasers are particularly well suited to stimulating these fibers. Large myelinated fibers convey touch and vibration information and these fibers are also discharged when contact thermodes and other touch pain stimuli are used and this would give a more muddled signal for functional imaging experiments. The advantages of lasers over conventional methods of pain stimulation are good temporal resolution, no variable parameters are involved such as contact area and they give very reproducible results. Accurate inter-stimulus changes can be achieved by computer control of the laser pulse duration, pulse height and repetition rate and this flexibility enables complex stimulation paradigms to be realized. We present a flexible carbon dioxide laser system designed to generate these stimuli for the study of human cerebral pain responses. We discuss the advantages within research of this system over other methods of pain stimulation such as thermal, electrical and magnetic. The stimulator is used in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electrophysiological methods of imaging the brain's activity. This combination is a powerful tool for the study of pain-induced activity in different areas of the brain. An accurate understanding of the brain's response to pain will help in research into the areas of rheumatoid arthritis and chronic back pain.

  10. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prolonged Reduction in Shoulder Strength after Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Treatment of Exercise-Induced Acute Muscle Pain.

    PubMed

    Butera, Katie A; George, Steven Z; Borsa, Paul A; Dover, Geoffrey C

    2018-03-05

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is commonly used for reducing musculoskeletal pain to improve function. However, peripheral nerve stimulation using TENS can alter muscle motor output. Few studies examine motor outcomes following TENS in a human pain model. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of TENS sensory stimulation primarily on motor output (strength) and secondarily on pain and disability following exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Thirty-six participants were randomized to a TENS treatment, TENS placebo, or control group after completing a standardized DOMS protocol. Measures included shoulder strength, pain, mechanical pain sensitivity, and disability. TENS treatment and TENS placebo groups received 90 minutes of active or sham treatment 24, 48, and 72 hours post-DOMS. All participants were assessed daily. A repeated measures analysis of variance and post-hoc analysis indicated that, compared to the control group, strength remained reduced in the TENS treatment group (48 hours post-DOMS, P < 0.05) and TENS placebo group (48 hours post-DOMS, P < 0.05; 72 hours post-DOMS, P < 0.05). A mixed-linear modeling analysis was conducted to examine the strength (motor) change. Randomization group explained 5.6% of between-subject strength variance (P < 0.05). Independent of randomization group, pain explained 8.9% of within-subject strength variance and disability explained 3.3% of between-subject strength variance (both P < 0.05). While active and placebo TENS resulted in prolonged strength inhibition, the results were nonsignificant for pain. Results indicated that higher pain and higher disability were independently related to decreased strength. Regardless of the impact on pain, TENS, or even the perception of TENS, may act as a nocebo for motor output. © 2018 World Institute of Pain.

  12. The effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on postural control in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Rojhani-Shirazi, Z; Rezaeian, T

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on postural control in patients with low back pain which is not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of TENS on postural control in chronic low back pain. Methods: This study was an experimental research design. Twenty-eight patients with chronic LBP (25-45 Y/ O) participated and by using a random allocation, were divided to samples who participated in this study. The mean center of pressure (COP) velocity and displacement were measured before, immediately and 30 min after the intervention. The tests were done with eyes open and closed on a force platform. Sensory electrical stimulation was applied through the TENS device. The descriptive statistics, independent sample T-test and ANOVA with repeated measurement on time were used for data analysis. Results: The results of the present study demonstrated that the application of the sensory electrical stimulation in chronic LBP patients showed a statistically significant improvement in postural control in Medio-lateral direction with no corresponding effect on the anterior-posterior direction immediately following the TENS application and 30 minutes after it in closed eyes conditions as compared to baseline. The application of TENS decreased the displacement and velocity of COP (p≤0.05), 30 minutes after the application of sensory electrical stimulation. The results showed that the mean displacement and velocity of COP decreased in eyes open position (p≤0.05). Also, immediately and 30 minutes after the application of sensory electrical stimulation, COP displacement and velocity in ML direction with eyes closed significantly decreased in the intervention group in comparison with control group (p≤0.05). Conclusion: The application of TENS in patients with chronic low back pain could improve postural control in these patients.

  13. The effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on postural control in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Rojhani-Shirazi, Z; Rezaeian, T

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on postural control in patients with low back pain which is not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of TENS on postural control in chronic low back pain. Methods: This study was an experimental research design. Twenty-eight patients with chronic LBP (25-45 Y/ O) participated and by using a random allocation, were divided to samples who participated in this study. The mean center of pressure (COP) velocity and displacement were measured before, immediately and 30 min after the intervention. The tests were done with eyes open and closed on a force platform. Sensory electrical stimulation was applied through the TENS device. The descriptive statistics, independent sample T-test and ANOVA with repeated measurement on time were used for data analysis. Results: The results of the present study demonstrated that the application of the sensory electrical stimulation in chronic LBP patients showed a statistically significant improvement in postural control in Medio-lateral direction with no corresponding effect on the anterior-posterior direction immediately following the TENS application and 30 minutes after it in closed eyes conditions as compared to baseline. The application of TENS decreased the displacement and velocity of COP (p≤0.05), 30 minutes after the application of sensory electrical stimulation. The results showed that the mean displacement and velocity of COP decreased in eyes open position (p≤0.05). Also, immediately and 30 minutes after the application of sensory electrical stimulation, COP displacement and velocity in ML direction with eyes closed significantly decreased in the intervention group in comparison with control group (p≤0.05). Conclusion: The application of TENS in patients with chronic low back pain could improve postural control in these patients. PMID:28255392

  14. Efficacy of pulsed low-intensity electric neuromuscular stimulation in reducing pain and disability in patients with myofascial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iodice, P; Lessiani, G; Franzone, G; Pezzulo, G

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is characterized by chronic pain in multiple myofascial trigger points and fascial constrictions. In recent years, the scientific literature has recognized the need to include the patient with MPS in a multidimensional rehabilitation project. At the moment, the most widely recognized therapeutic methods for the treatment of myofascial syndrome include the stretch and spray pressure massage. Microcurrent electric neuromuscular stimulation was proposed in pain management for its effects on normalizing bioelectricity of cells and for its sub-sensory application. In this study, we tested the efficacy of low-intensity pulsed electric neuromuscular stimulus (PENS) on pain in patients with MPS of cervical spine muscles. We carried out a prospective-analytic longitudinal study at an outpatient clinic during two weeks. Forty subjects (mean age 42±13 years) were divided into two groups: treatment (TrGr, n=20) and control group (CtrlGr, n=20). Visual-analog scale (VAS) values, concerning the spontaneous and movement-related pain in the cervical-dorsal region at baseline (T0) and at the end of the study (T1), showed a reduction from 7 to 3.81 (p < 0.001) in TrGr. In the CtrlGr, VAS was reduced from 8.2 to 7.2 (n.s.). Moreover, the pressure pain threshold at T0 was 2.1 vs 4.2 at T1 (p < 0.001) in TrG. In the CtrlGR we observed no significant changes. Modulated low-intensity PENS is an innovative therapy permitting to act on the transmission of pain and on the restoration of tissue homeostasis. It seems to affect the transmission of pain through the stimulation of A-beta fibers. The above results show that low-intensity PENS can be considered as an effective treatment to reduce pain and disability in patients with MPS.

  15. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifeng; Song, Yuze

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficiency and safety of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain control after total knee arthroplasty. Methods: A systematic search was performed in Medline (1966 to June 2017), PubMed (1966 to June 2017), Embase (1980 to June 2017), ScienceDirect (1985 to June 2017), and the Cochrane Library. Only randomized controlled trial (RCT) was included. The fixed/random effect model was used according to the heterogeneity tested by I2 statistic. Meta-analysis was performed using Stata 11.0 software. Results: Five RCTs including 472 patients met the inclusion criteria. The present meta-analysis indicated that there were significant differences between groups in terms of visual analogue scale score at 12 hours (average: 3.58 vs 4.34, SMD = −0.260, 95% CI: −0.442 to −0.078, P = .005), 24 hours (average: 3.18 vs 3.52, SMD = −0.244, 95% CI: −0.426 to −0.063, P = .008), and 48 hours (average: 2.70 vs 2.96, SMD = −0.214, 95% CI: −0.395 to −0.033, P = .021) after total knee arthroplasty. Significant differences were found regarding opioid consumption at 12 hours (average: 14.44 vs 18.54, SMD = −0.503, 95% CI: −0.687 to −0.319, P = .000), 24 hours (average: 16.10 vs 18.40, SMD = −0.262, 95% CI: −0.443 to −0.080, P = .005), and 48 hours (average: 12.92 vs 15.12, SMD = −0.183, 95% CI: −0.364 to −0.002, P = .048). Conclusion: TENS could significantly reduce pain and opioid consumption after total knee arthroplasty. In addition, there were fewer adverse effects in the TENS groups. Higher quality RCTs are required for further research. PMID:28906393

  16. Electric Stimulation for Pain Relief in Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana Paula de Silva; Stein, Cinara; Marchese, Ritchele Redivo; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Mea; Pagnussat, Aline De Souza

    2017-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome whose primary symptoms include chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The treatment of patients with FM aims to provide symptomatic relief and improvement in physical capacities to perform daily tasks and quality of life. Invasive or non-invasive electric stimulation (ES) is used for pain relief in patients with FM. This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of treatment with ES, combined or not combined with other types of therapy, for pain relief in patients with FM. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Electronic search was conducted on databases (from the inception to April 2016): MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane CENTRAL), and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of studies based on the inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of ES combined or not with other types of treatment for pain relief in patients with FM (according to the American College of Rheumatology), regardless of the ES dosages. The primary outcome was pain, assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes extracted were quality of life, assessed by short form-36 health survey (SF- 36), and fatigue, assessed by VAS. Nine studies were included, with 301 patients. The meta-analysis for pain showed positive effect of ES treatment versus control [-1.24 (95% CI: -2.39 to -0.08; I²: 87%, P = 0.04) n = 8 RCTs]. The sensitivity analysis for pain showed significant results for invasive ES, combined or not with other types of therapy [-0.94 (95% CI, -1.50 to -0.38; I² 0%, P = 0.001) n = 3 RCTs]. No significant improvement was found regarding quality of life [-3.48 (95% CI: -12.58 to 5.62; I²: 0%, P = 0.45), n = 2 RCTs] or fatigue [-0.57 (95% CI, -1.25 to 0.11; I² 34%, P = 0.100; n = 4 RCTs]. This systematic review included a small number of studies and reduced number of participants in

  17. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for pain control after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongjun; Feng, Yuxing; Peng, Lihua

    2017-11-21

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a possible adjunctive therapy to pharmacological treatment for controlling pain after total knee arthroplasty. However, the results are controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on patients with total knee arthroplasty. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on patients with total knee arthroplasty were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. Primary outcome was visual analogue scale (VAS) score over a period of 24 h. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model. Six randomized controlled trials involving 529 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce VAS scores and total postoperative morphine dose over a period of 24 h, and to improve active range of knee motion (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.37; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.06-0.68; p = 0.02), but had no effect on VAS scores at 2 weeks (SMD = 0.20; 95% CI = -0.07 to 0.48; p = 0.15). Compared with control intervention, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce pain and morphine requirement over a period of 24 h and to promote functional recovery in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty.

  18. Analgesic efficacy of cerebral and peripheral electrical stimulation in chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomized, double-blind, factorial clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hazime, Fuad Ahmad; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Maretto, Rafaela Lasso; Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida de Almeida; Hasue, Renata Hydee; João, Silvia Maria Amado

    2015-01-31

    Chronic non-specific low back pain is a major socioeconomic public health issue worldwide and, despite the volume of research in the area, it is still a difficult-to-treat condition. The conservative analgesic therapy usually comprises a variety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies, such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. The neuromatrix pain model and the new findings on the process of chronicity of pain point to a higher effectiveness of treatments that address central rather than peripheral structures. The transcranial direct current stimulation is a noninvasive technique of neuromodulation that has made recent advances in the treatment of chronic pain. The simultaneous combination of these two electrostimulation techniques (cerebral and peripheral) can provide an analgesic effect superior to isolated interventions. However, all the evidence on the analgesic efficacy of these techniques, alone or combined, is still fragmented. This is a protocol for a randomized clinical trial to investigate whether cerebral electrical stimulation combined with peripheral electrical stimulation is more effective in relieving pain than the isolated application of electrical stimulations in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Ninety-two patients will be randomized into four groups to receive transcranial direct current stimulation (real/sham) + transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (real/sham) for 12 sessions over a period of four weeks. The primary clinical outcome (pain intensity) and the secondary ones (sensory and affective aspects of pain, physical functioning and global perceived effect) will be recorded before treatment, after four weeks, in Month 3 and in Month 6 after randomization. Confounding factors such as anxiety and depression, the patient's satisfaction with treatment and adverse effects will also be listed. Data will be collected by an examiner unaware of (blind to) the treatment allocation. The results of this

  19. High-frequency, high-intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as treatment of pain after surgical abortion.

    PubMed

    Platon, B; Andréll, P; Raner, C; Rudolph, M; Dvoretsky, A; Mannheimer, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the pain-relieving effect and the time spent in the recovery ward after treatment with high-frequency, high-intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or intravenous (IV) conventional pharmacological treatment after surgical abortion. Two-hundred women who underwent surgical abortion and postoperatively reported a visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score3 were included. The patients were randomised to TENS or conventional pharmacological treatment for their postoperative pain. The TENS treatment was given with a stimulus intensity between 20 and 60 mA during 1 min and repeated once if insufficient pain relief (VAS3). In the conventional pharmacological treatment group, a maximum dose of 100 microg fentanyl was given IV. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pain relief according to the VAS pain score (TENS=VAS 1.3 vs. IV opioids=VAS 1.6; p=0.09) upon discharge from the recovery ward. However, the patients in the TENS group spent shorter time (44 min) in the recovery ward than the conventional pharmacological treatment group (62 min; p<0.0001). The number of patients who needed additional analgesics in the recovery ward was comparable in both groups, as was the reported VAS pain score upon leaving the hospital (TENS=2.0 vs. conventional pharmacological treatment=1.8, NS). These results suggest that the pain-relieving effect of TENS seems to be comparable to conventional pharmacological treatment with IV opioids. Hence, TENS may be a suitable alternative to conventional pain management with IV opioids after surgical abortion. Copyright 2009 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A pilot study on using acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to treat chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Itoh, Satoko; Katsumi, Yasukazu; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    The present study tests whether a combined treatment of acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is more effective than acupuncture or TENS alone for treating chronic low back pain (LBP). Thirty-two patients with chronic LBP were randomly allocated to four groups. The acupuncture group (ACP) received only acupuncture treatment at selected acupoints for low back pain; the TENS group (TENS) received only TENS treatment at pain areas; the acupuncture and TENS group (A&T) received both acupuncture and TENS treatments; the control group (CT) received topical poultice (only when necessary). Each group received specific weekly treatment five times during the study. Outcome measures were pain intensity in terms of visual analogue scale (VAS) and QOL of low back in terms of Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ). The ACP, TENS and A&T groups all reported lower VAS and RDQ scores. Significant reduction in pain intensity (P<0.008) and significant improvement in QOL (P<0.008) were shown in the A&T group. Combined acupuncture and TENS treatment is effective in pain relief and QOL of low back improvement for the sampled patients suffering from chronic LBP.

  1. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of human brain in pain-related areas induced by electrical stimulation with different intensities.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wang; Ming, Zhang; Rana, Netra; Hai, Liu; Chen-wang, Jin; Shao-hui, Ma

    2010-01-01

    Pain-related studies have mainly been performed through traditional methods, which lack the rigorous analysis of anatomical locations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a noninvasive method detecting neural activity, and has the ability to precisely locate related activations in vivo. Moreover, few studies have used painful stimulation of changed intensity to investigate relevant functioning nuclei in the human brain. This study mainly focused on the pain-related activations induced by electrical stimulation with different intensities using fMRI. Furthermore, the electrophysiological characteristics of different pain-susceptible-neurons were analyzed to construct the pain modulatory network, which was corresponding to painful stimulus of changed intensity. Twelve volunteers underwent functional scanning receiving different electrical stimulation. The data were collected and analyzed to generate the corresponding functional activation maps and response time curves related to pain. The common activations were mainly located in several specific regions, including the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), insula, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), thalamus, and other cerebral regions. Moreover, innocuous electrical stimulation primarily activated the lateral portions of SII and thalamus, as well as the posterior insula, anterior ACC, whereas noxious electrical stimulation primarily activated the medial portions of SII and thalamus, as well as the anterior insula, the posterior ACC, with larger extensions and greater intensities. Several specified cerebral regions displayed different response patterns during electrical stimulation by means of fMRI, which implied that the corresponding pain-susceptible-neurons might process specific aspects of pain. Elucidation of functions on pain-related regions will help to understand the delicate pain modulation of human brain.

  2. Altered Cortical Responsiveness to Pain Stimuli after High Frequency Electrical Stimulation of the Skin in Patients with Persistent Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    van den Broeke, Emanuel N.; Koeslag, Lonneke; Arendsen, Laura J.; Nienhuijs, Simon W.; Rosman, Camiel; van Rijn, Clementina M.; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H. G.; van Goor, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background High Frequency electrical Stimulation (HFS) of the skin induces enhanced brain responsiveness expressed as enhanced Event-Related Potential (ERP) N1 amplitude to stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this enhanced ERP N1 amplitude could be a potential marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery. Materials and Methods Nineteen male patients; 9 with and 10 without persistent pain after inguinal hernia repair received HFS. Before, directly after and thirty minutes after HFS evoked potentials and the subjective pain intensity were measured in response to electric pain stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin. Results The results show that, thirty minutes after HFS, the ERP N1 amplitude observed at the conditioned arm was statistically significantly larger than the amplitude at the control arm across all patients. No statistically significant differences were observed regarding ERP N1 amplitude between patients with and without persistent pain. However, thirty minutes after HFS we did observe statistically significant differences of P2 amplitude at the conditioned arm between the two groups. The P2 amplitude decreased in comparison to baseline in the group of patients with pain. Conclusion The ERP N1 effect, induced after HFS, was not different between patients with vs. without persistent pain. The decreasing P2 amplitude was not observed in the patients without pain and also not in the previous healthy volunteer study and thus might be a marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery. PMID:24376568

  3. Electroacupuncture Reduces the Effects of Acute Noxious Stimulation on the Electrical Activity of Pain-Related Neurons in the Hippocampus of Control and Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Chen, Renbo; Feng, Xiu-Mei; Yan, Yaxia; Lippe, Irmgard Th.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of acupuncture analgesia on the hippocampus, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor on pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal area CA1 of sham or chronic constrictive injury (CCI) rats. The animals were randomly divided into a control, a CCI, and a U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) group. In all experiments, we briefly (10-second duration) stimulated the sciatic nerve electrically and recorded the firing rates of PENs and PINs. The results showed that in both sham and CCI rats brief sciatic nerve stimulation significantly increased the electrical activity of PENs and markedly decreased the electrical activity of PINs. These effects were significantly greater in CCI rats compared to sham rats. EA treatment reduced the effects of the noxious stimulus on PENs and PINs in both sham and CCI rats. The effects of EA treatment could be inhibited by U0126 in sham-operated rats. The results suggest that EA reduces effects of acute sciatic nerve stimulation on PENs and PINs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of both sham and CCI rats and that the ERK (extracellular regulated kinase) signaling pathway is involved in the modulation of EA analgesia. PMID:27833763

  4. High- and low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation does not reduce experimental pain in elderly individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Corriveau, Hélène; Martel, Marylie; Harvey, Marie-Philippe; Léonard, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite its widespread clinical use, the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) remains poorly documented in elderly individuals. In this randomized, double-blind crossover study, we compared the efficacy of high-frequency (HF), low-frequency (LF), and placebo (P) TENS in a group of 15 elderly adults (mean age: 67 ± 5 years). The effect of HF-, LF-, and P-TENS was also evaluated in a group of 15 young individuals (26 ± 5 years; same study design) to validate the effectiveness of the TENS protocols that were used in the elderly group. Each participant came to the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to receive, in random order, HF-, LF-, and P-TENS. Pain intensity and pain perception thresholds were assessed before, during, and after TENS, using an experimental heat pain paradigm. For the young group, there was a significant decrease in pain intensity during and after HF- and LF-TENS when compared with baseline, with both HF- and LF-TENS being superior to P-TENS. In the older group, HF- and LF-TENS did not reduce pain when compared with baseline and no difference was observed between the 2 active TENS sessions and P-TENS. High-frequency, LF-, and P-TENS all increased pain thresholds in young individuals, whereas in older individuals, only LF-TENS increased pain thresholds. Taken together, these results suggest that TENS is effective in young, but not in older, individuals. Future studies should be conducted to confirm these results in pain populations and to identify strategies that could enhance the effect of TENS in the elderly. PMID:26101836

  5. Comparison of effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Kinesio Taping added to exercises in patients with myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azatcam, Gokmen; Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Akkaya, Nuray; Sahin, Fusun; Aksoy, Sibel; Zincir, Ozge; Topuz, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Although there are several studies of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and exercise in myofascial pain syndrome, there are no studies comparing the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping (KT) and TENS in myofascial pain syndrome patients. To compare the early and late effects of TENS and KT on pain, disability and range of motion in myofascial pain syndrome patients. Sixty-nine patients were divided into three groups randomly as TENS+Exercise, KT+Exercise and exercise groups. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), pain threshold, Neck Disability Index and cervical contralateral lateral flexion were employed in the evaluation of the patients performed before treatment, after treatment and 3rd month after treatment. The VAS, pain threshold, Neck Disability Index and contralateral lateral flexion values were improved in all groups both in after treatment and 3rd month after treatment (p< 0.01). In the comparison of after treatment vs. before treatment evaluations, VAS score was decreased in KT group compared to the TENS and control group (p= 0.001), in the TENS group compared to control group (p= 0.011). In the comparison of 3rd month and before treatment evaluations, VAS score was decreased in the TENS group compared to control group (p= 0.001) and in the KT group compared to the control group (p= 0.001). There was no significant difference between TENS and KT groups. All other parameters did not differ between the groups. TENS and KT added exercises can decrease pain severity and increase pain threshold, function and cervical range of motion in myofascial pain syndrome patients. Addition of TENS or KT to the exercise therapy resulted in more significant improvement compared to exercise therapy alone with a more pronounced improvement in KT group compared to the TENS group in the early period. Because KT was found to be more effective in decreasing the pain and had the advantage of being used in every 3 days, it seems to be beneficial in acute painful periods in

  6. Pain relief by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation with bidirectional modulated sine waves in patients with chronic back pain: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Shimoji, Koki; Takahashi, Norio; Nishio, Yasuyuki; Koyanagi, Mika; Aida, Sumihisa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives.  Newly developed bidirectional modulated sine waves (BMW) might provide some derived benefit to patients with low back pain. Pain relief by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) with BMWs was tested. Materials and Methods.  Analgesic effects of BMWs and conventional bidirectional pulsed waves on chronic back pain in 28 patients were compared, and effects of repeated TENS using BMWs on chronic back pain were investigated in 21 patients by means of a randomized double-blind, sham-controlled, parallel-group method. Pain intensity was assessed using numerical rating scale (NRS). Results.  There was significant immediate reduction in NRS in patients receiving BMWs, and 60 min after treatment compared to sham TENS. Weekly repeated treatments using massage and TENS with BMWs for 5 weeks resulted in a decrease of NRS, but there were no significant differences between the TENS plus massage and sham TENS plus massage groups. Conclusions.  This study shows that TENS with BMWs significantly inhibits chronic back pain, and treatment effects are attained within a day. The results also suggest that there were no statistically significant long-term effects of TENS with BMW in the repeated treatment.

  7. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) reduces pain and postpones the need for pharmacological analgesia during labour: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Santana, Licia Santos; Gallo, Rubneide Barreto Silva; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Duarte, Geraldo; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In the active phase of the first stage of labour, does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) relieve pain or change its location? Does TENS delay the request for neuraxial analgesia during labour? Does TENS produce any harmful effects in the mother or the foetus? Are women in labour satisfied with the care provided? Randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding for some outcomes, and intention-to-treat analysis. Forty-six low-risk, primigravida parturients with a gestational age > 37 weeks, cervical dilation of 4cm, and without the use of any medications from hospital admission until randomisation. The principal investigator applied TENS to the experimental group for 30minutes starting at the beginning of the active phase of labour. A second investigator assessed the outcomes in both the control and experimental groups. Both groups received routine perinatal care. The primary outcome was pain severity after the intervention period, which was assessed using the 100-mm visual analogue scale. Secondary outcomes included: pain location, duration of the active phase of labour, time to pharmacological labour analgesia, mode of birth, neonatal outcomes, and the participant's satisfaction with the care provided. After the intervention, a significant mean difference in change in pain of 15mm was observed favouring the experimental group (95% CI 2 to 27). The application of TENS did not alter the location or distribution of the pain. The mean time to pharmacological analgesia after the intervention was 5.0hours (95% CI 4.1 to 5.9) longer in the experimental group. The intervention did not significantly impact the other maternal and neonatal outcomes. Participants in both groups were satisfied with the care provided during labour. TENS produces a significant decrease in pain during labour and postpones the need for pharmacological analgesia for pain relief. NCT01600495. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. High-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuates postsurgical pain and inhibits excess substance P in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Lin, Min-Fei; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a common therapeutic modality for pain management, but its effectiveness in skin/muscle incision and retraction (SMIR)-evoked pain is unknown. We aimed to examine the effects of TENS on postoperative pain and the levels of substance P (SP), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1), and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). High-frequency (100 Hz) TENS was administered daily beginning on postoperative day 1 (POD1) and continued until animal subjects were killed for tissues. Mechanical sensitivity to von Frey stimuli (6g and 15g) and the levels of NR1, SP, and IL-1β in DRG were assessed in the sham-operated, SMIR-operated, TENS after SMIR surgery, and placebo-TENS after SMIR surgery groups. Skin/muscle incision and retraction rats exhibited a significant hypersensitivity to von Frey stimuli on POD3. In contrast with SMIR rats, SMIR-operated rats receiving TENS therapy demonstrated a rapid recovery of mechanical hypersensitivity. The SMIR-operated rats showed an up-regulation of NR1, SP, and IL-1β in DRG on PODs 14 and 28, whereas the SMIR-operated rats after TENS administration reversed this up-regulation. By contrast, the placebo-TENS after SMIR operation did not alter postsurgical pain nor the levels of NR1, SP, and IL-1β. Our data demonstrated that TENS intervention reduced persistent postoperative pain caused by SMIR operation. Up-regulation of NR1, SP, and IL-1β in DRG, activated after SMIR surgery, is important in the development of prolonged postincisional pain. The TENS pain relief may be related to the suppression of NR1, SP, and IL-1β in DRG of SMIR rats.

  9. Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Pain, Pain Sensitivity, and Function in People With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Carol Grace T.; Rakel, Barbara A.; Blodgett, Nicole P.; DeSantana, Josimari Melo; Amendola, Annunziato; Zimmerman, Miriam Bridget; Walsh, Deirdre M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is commonly used for the management of pain; however, its effects on several pain and function measures are unclear. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-frequency TENS (HF-TENS) and low-frequency TENS (LF-TENS) on several outcome measures (pain at rest, movement-evoked pain, and pain sensitivity) in people with knee osteoarthritis. Design The study was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Setting The setting was a tertiary care center. Participants Seventy-five participants with knee osteoarthritis (29 men and 46 women; 31–94 years of age) were assessed. Intervention Participants were randomly assigned to receive HF-TENS (100 Hz) (n=25), LF-TENS (4 Hz) (n=25), or placebo TENS (n=25) (pulse duration=100 microseconds; intensity=10% below motor threshold). Measurements The following measures were assessed before and after a single TENS treatment: cutaneous mechanical pain threshold, pressure pain threshold (PPT), heat pain threshold, heat temporal summation, Timed “Up & Go” Test (TUG), and pain intensity at rest and during the TUG. A linear mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare differences before and after TENS and among groups (HF-TENS, LF-TENS, and placebo TENS). Results Compared with placebo TENS, HF-TENS and LF-TENS increased PPT at the knee; HF-TENS also increased PPT over the tibialis anterior muscle. There was no effect on the cutaneous mechanical pain threshold, heat pain threshold, or heat temporal summation. Pain at rest and during the TUG was significantly reduced by HF-TENS, LF-TENS, and placebo TENS. Limitations This study tested only a single TENS treatment. Conclusions Both HF-TENS and LF-TENS increased PPT in people with knee osteoarthritis; placebo TENS had no significant effect on PPT. Cutaneous pain measures were unaffected by TENS. Subjective pain ratings at rest and during movement were similarly reduced by active TENS and

  10. Efficacy of Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Therapeutic Exercise for Older Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Debra K.; Perera, Subashan; Rudy, Thomas E.; Glick, Ronald M.; Shenoy, Sonali; Delitto, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults may be disabling and therapeutically challenging, largely because of the inefficacy and/or morbidity associated with traditional pain treatment. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 200 men and women ≥ age 65 with CLBP to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) with and without general conditioning and aerobic exercise (GCAE), for reducing pain and improving physical function. Participants were randomized to receive 1) PENS, 2) control-PENS (brief electrical stimulation to control for treatment expectancy), 3) PENS + GCAE, or 4) control-PENS + GCAE, twice a week for 6 weeks. All four groups experienced significantly reduced pain (range −2.3 to −4.1 on the McGill Pain Questionnaire short form), improved self-reported disability (range −2.1 to −3.0 on Roland scale) and improved gait velocity (0.04–0.07 m/sec), sustained at 6 months. The GCAE groups experienced significantly fewer fear avoidance beliefs immediately post-intervention and at 6 months than non-GCAE groups. There were no significant side effects. Since brief electrical stimulation (i.e., control-PENS) facilitated comparably reduced pain and improved function at 6 months as compared with PENS, the exact dose of electrical stimulation required for analgesia cannot be determined. GCAE was more effective than PENS alone in reducing fear avoidance beliefs, but not in reducing pain or improving physical function. PMID:18930352

  11. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current demonstrate similar effects in relieving acute and chronic pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Cadena de; Silva, Vinicius Z Maldaner da; Júnior, Gerson Cipriano; Liebano, Richard Eloin; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2018-02-02

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current have been widely used in clinical practice. However, a systematic review comparing their effects on pain relief has not yet been performed. To investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current on acute and chronic pain. We use Pubmed, Embase, LILACS, PEDro and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as data sources. Two independent reviewers that selected studies according to inclusion criteria, extracted information of interest and verified the methodological quality of the studies made study selection. The studies were selected if transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current were used as treatment and they had pain as the main outcome, as evaluated by a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were the Western Ontario Macmaster and Rolland Morris Disability questionnaires, which were added after data extraction. Eight studies with a pooled sample of 825 patients were included. The methodological quality of the selected studies was moderate, with an average of six on a 0-10 scale (PEDro). In general, both transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current improved pain and functional outcomes without a statistical difference between them. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current have similar effects on pain outcome The low number of studies included in this meta-analysis indicates that new clinical trials are needed. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. The New Portable Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Device Was Efficacious in the Control of Primary Dysmenorrhea Cramp Pain.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Gabriela R; Oliveira, Raquel; Parada, Flavia; Mattos, Anita L

    2015-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an established method for pain relief in dysmenorrhea. A feasible advantage would be the study of a portable device. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a new portable TENS device (TANYX®) for menstruation cramps. Forty women were evaluated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized fashion, divided into sham and active groups. TENS was applied medially at the suprapubic region, for 30-min duration at eight-hour intervals, up to seven days. The placebo group (PG) received sham device. The TENS group (TG) applied an active 85 Hz frequency TENS. Efficacy measures were pain relief evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS) and diclofenac intake, and quality of life represented by: 1) capacity to get out of the bed, 2) food or drink intake, 3) missing routine daily activities such as work or school, and 4) quality of sleep. The active TENS device induced a prompt onset of pain relief in a strictly segmental manner nearby the dermatomes where the TENS was applied at the skin, and there was a drop in mean pain score from 8 to 2 cm (p < 0.001). Diclofenac consumption was also significantly reduced (p < 0.01), compared with the PG. Quality of life improved significantly in TG when compared with PG (p < 0.05). Three months after the beginning of the study, 14/20 of the women were still using the active device regularly. No adverse effects were observed. The portable, disposable, active TENS device induced a prompt onset of pain relief and improved the quality of life, without adverse effects, in patients with painful cramps associated with dysmenorrhea. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (P<0.05). In contrast, the application of TENS at 1 week (TENS-1w) or 2 weeks (TENS-2w) after injury was ineffective in reducing hyperalgesia (mechanical and thermal) or activation of microglia and astrocytes. Early TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (P<0.05), the expression levels of protein kinase C (PKC-γ), and phosphorylated anti-phospho-cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons (P<0.05), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased the expression levels of opioid receptors (P<0.05). The results suggested that the application of early TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief in labour: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Bedwell, Carol; Dowswell, Therese; Neilson, James P; Lavender, Tina

    2011-10-01

    to assess the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief in labour. studies were identified from a search of the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (November 2008). randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain relief in labour vs routine care or placebo devices. All types of TENS machines were included. two review authors assessed all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. 14 studies including 1256 women were included: 11 examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points and one to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in satisfaction with pain relief or in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.55). The majority of women using TENS would use it again in a future labour. There was no evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and infants. No adverse events were reported. there is only limited evidence that TENS reduces pain in labour and it does not seem to have any impact on other outcomes for mothers or infants. The use of TENS at home in early labour has not been evaluated. Although the guidelines of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommend that TENS should not be offered to women in labour, women appear to be choosing it and midwives are supporting them in their choice. Given the absence of adverse effects and the limited evidence base, it seems unreasonable to deny women that choice. More robust studies of effectiveness are needed. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation on Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beckwée, David; Bautmans, Ivan; Lefeber, Nina; Lievens, Pierre; Scheerlinck, Thierry; Vaes, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) has proven to be effective for postsurgical pain relief. However, there is a lack of well-constructed clinical trials investigating the effect of TENS after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In addition, previous investigations reported that low- and high-frequency TENSs produced analgesic tolerance after 4 or 5 days of treatment. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of burst TENS on pain during hospitalization after TKA and to investigate whether burst TENS produces analgesic tolerance after 4 or 5 days of treatment. This stratified, triple blind, randomized controlled trial was approved by the University Hospital Brussels. Sixty-eight subjects were screened for eligibility before surgery; 54 were found eligible and 53 were included in the analyses. Patients were allocated to either a burst TENS or sham burst TENS group. TENS was applied daily during continuous passive mobilization. Knee pain intensity, knee range of motion, and analgesic consumption were assessed daily. Patients received burst TENS ( N  = 25) or sham burst TENS ( N  = 28). No significant differences in knee pain intensity were found between the groups ( p  > 0.05). Within the TENS and the sham TENS groups, the difference in knee pain before and after treatment did not evolve over time ( p  > 0.05). This study found no effects of burst TENS compared with sham burst TENS on pain during hospitalization after TKA. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. [Use of stimulation techniques in pain treatment].

    PubMed

    Rosted, Palle; Andersen, Claus

    2006-05-15

    Stimulation techniques (SB) include manipulation, acupuncture, acupressure, physiotherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, reflexotherapy, laser treatment and epidural stimulation technique. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the scientific evidence for these techniques. The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched for all techniques from 2000 to date. Only randomised controlled studies written in English were included. Search words were used, such as; acupuncture and neck pain, shoulder pain, etc. In total 587 papers were identified for the following diseases; headache, neck pain, shoulder pain, elbow pain, low back pain and knee pain. 415 papers were excluded, and the remaining 172 papers, a total of 20,431 patients, are the basis for this study. The effect of acupuncture and epidural stimulation technique is scientifically well-supported. For the remaining techniques, the scientific evidence is dubious.

  17. Efficacy of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Debra K; Rudy, Thomas E; Glick, Ronald M; Boston, J Robert; Lieber, Susan J; Morrow, Lisa A; Taylor, Stephen

    2003-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of a complementary analgesic modality, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS), for the treatment of chronic low back pain (CLBP) in community-dwelling older adults. Randomized, controlled clinical trial. University of Pittsburgh Pain Evaluation and Treatment Institute. Thirty-four English speaking, community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older with CLBP of at least moderate intensity experienced every day or almost every day. Subjects were randomized to receive twice-weekly PENS and physical therapy (PT) or sham PENS and physical therapy for 6 weeks. At baseline, immediately after the 6-week intervention period, and 3 months later, the primary outcome measures pain intensity and pain-related disability were assessed. The secondary outcome measures physical performance (timed chair rise, functional reach, gait speed, static and isoinertial lifting), psychosocial factors (mood, sleep, and life control), and cognitive function (measures of attention, concentration, and mental flexibility) were also collected. Subjects randomized to PENS plus PT displayed significant reductions in pain intensity measures from pre- to posttreatment (P <.001), but the sham PENS plus PT group did not (P =.94). These pain reduction effects were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Similarly, significant reductions in pain-related disability were observed at posttreatment (P =.002) for the PENS plus PT group and were maintained at follow-up, but the sham PENS plus PT group did not show reductions in pain-related disability (P =.81). Of the secondary outcome measures, psychosocial function, timed chair rise, and isoinertial lifting endurance also improved significantly at posttreatment for the PENS plus PT group, and their improvement was sustained at 3-month follow-up, but the sham PENS plus PT did not display significant changes on these measures after treatment. This preliminary study suggests that PENS may be a promising treatment modality for community

  18. Validation of two novel electronic devices to time-link transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and pain report in patients with chronic back pain.

    PubMed

    Pallett, Edward J; Rentowl, Patricia; Watson, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    The analgesic effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is uncertain. Negative findings, interpreted as ineffectiveness, might be due to poor methodological quality. Monitoring is necessary to differentiate between ineffectiveness and low implementation fidelity. Electronic data-logging devices, "TLOG" and "TSCORE," were developed to monitor and time-link TENS and pain report. TLOG records the time and duration of TENS use and output parameters; TSCORE records time-stamped pain scores. The purpose was to determine the accuracy, reliability, and acceptability of the devices. Forty-two outpatients with chronic back pain consented to use TENS daily for 2 weeks. Treatment times and durations were recorded in paper diaries and compared with TLOG data. Using TSCORE, patients reported pain before, during, and after TENS. Pain scores, reported using TSCORE or paper numerical rating scale at the beginning and end of 2 study visits, were compared using Bland-Altman methodology. The mean (SD) difference between paper and TSCORE pain scores was -0.05 (0.81). Limits of agreement (mean difference ± 1.96 SD) were -1.65 to 1.55. Test-retest reliabilities of paper and TSCORE were comparable: Paper mean (SD) difference was -0.33 (0.66), limits of agreement were -1.62 to 0.96; TSCORE mean (SD) difference was -0.10 (0.31), limits were -0.7 to 0.5. TLOG recorded TENS use accurately and worked reliably for 2 weeks in 84% of cases. An overall 79% of participants preferred TSCORE to paper numerical rating scale. TLOG and TSCORE are accurate, reliable, and acceptable devices for monitoring TENS implementation fidelity and pain outcome, with potential for improving TENS research methodology and clinical application.

  19. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Andrew W.; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low–voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, ηp2 = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, ηp2 = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, ηp2 = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m (ηp2 = 0.10) and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m (ηp2 = 0.16), 500-m (ηp2 = 0.15), and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to improve 5-km TT performance. PMID:28223939

  20. [Analysis of quality of life in patiens with low back pain after receiving transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)].

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Renata; Okurowska-Zawada, Bozena; Kułak, Wojciech; Domian, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common disorders affecting office employees working with a computer, which inevitably leads to lower quality of life. The aim of this study was to analyze the quality of life of patients with LBP after application of TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nervous Stimulation). The study group included 30 computer workers (26 females and 4 males) aged 30-60 years (45 +/- 12). The quality of life was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument-Abbreviated version (WHOQOL-Bref) before and after 10 applications of TENS. Outcomes were evaluated with a visual analog score (VAS) for pain and Schober's test to measure the ability of a patient to flex his or her lower back. The mean VAS value decreased significantly from 3.83 +/- 1.31 cm at baseline to 3.36 +/- 1.21 cm after treatment. Patients reported pain relief. The highest quality of life scores in terms of social relationships were found in the social category evaluating personal relationships, social support and sexual activity (15.91 +/- 2.07) and mental health (14.32 +/- 1.59). After treatment a significant increase in the flexion of lower back was observed in the majority of patients. No significant correlations between the quality of life and the intensity of pain and the flexion of lower back before and after treatment were found. TENS therapy is an effective technique for pain relief in patients with LBP. TENS can also be used with other methods of LBP treatment and may improve the patients' quality of life.

  1. Methodological quality in randomised controlled trials of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation for pain: low fidelity may explain negative findings.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael I; Hughes, Nicola; Johnson, Mark I

    2011-06-01

    The benefits of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief have not been reliably established, as most systematic reviews find poor methodological quality in many studies. The paradox within the evidence base for TENS is that despite identified sources of bias that may lead to an overestimation of treatment effects, no benefits for TENS can be clearly demonstrated. Conventional assessments of quality assume a single direction of bias, and little work has been undertaken examining other directions of bias. Our hypothesis was that low fidelity in studies (bias leading to an underestimation of treatment effects) may account for inconclusive findings. We included 38 studies from 3 recently published Cochrane systematic reviews that examined TENS for acute, chronic, and cancer pain. We extracted data relating to treatment allocation, application of TENS and to the assessment of outcomes. We quantified these data and judged this against standardised assessment criteria using a "traffic light" approach based on the number of studies reaching the standard. We identified significant sources of potential bias in both directions in relation to study design and implementation fidelity that have not been quantified previously. Suboptimal dosing of TENS and inappropriate outcome assessment were particularly prevalent weaknesses indicating low fidelity. We propose criteria for judging directions of bias in future studies of TENS that may be adapted to assess other trials in which implementation fidelity is important, such as other nonpharmacological interventions for pain. Poor implementation fidelity was identified as a significant source of bias in systematic reviews of TENS studies and might explain lack of consistent treatment effects of TENS in pain. Here, criteria for assessing methodology are proposed for use in designing future clinical trials of TENS. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  2. Different mechanisms for the short-term effects of real versus sham transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with chronic pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oosterhof, Jan; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H; Oostendorp, Rob A; Crul, Ben J

    2012-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has existed since the early 1970s. However, randomized placebo controlled studies show inconclusive results in the treatment of chronic pain. These results could be explained by assuming that TENS elicits a placebo response. However, in animal research TENS has been found to decrease hyperalgesia, which contradicts this assumption. The aim of this study is to use quantitative sensory testing to explore changes in pain processing during sham versus real TENS in patients with chronic pain. Patients with chronic pain (N = 20) were randomly allocated to real TENS or sham TENS application. Electrical pain thresholds (EPTs) were determined inside and outside the segment stimulated, before and after the first 20 minutes of the intervention, and after a period of 10 days of daily real/sham TENS application. Pain relief did not differ significantly for real versus sham TENS. However, by comparing time courses of EPTs, it was found that EPT values outside the segment of stimulation increased for sham TENS, whereas for real TENS these values decreased. There were, however, no differences for EPT measurements inside the segment stimulated. These results illustrate the importance of including mechanism-reflecting parameters in addition to symptoms when conducting pain research.

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for postoperative pain relief after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective double-blinded randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Mahure, Siddharth A; Rokito, Andrew S; Kwon, Young W

    2017-09-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) can be associated with significant postoperative pain. Concern for opioid abuse has led surgeons to identify alternative, efficacious methods of postoperative analgesia. To determine whether transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can have a similarly beneficial effect after shoulder procedures, we conducted a prospective double-blinded randomized trial in patients undergoing outpatient ARCR. All patients undergoing ARCR of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear by the senior authors were identified. Patients with a history of recent narcotic use or prior narcotic abuse and those under management of a pain control specialist were excluded. Patients were randomized into 2 groups, active or placebo TENS, and used the device for 4 sessions/day for 45 minutes/session for the first postoperative week. All patients received Percocet 5/325 mg (oxycodone/acetaminophen) for use as rescue pain pills. One-week narcotic consumption and visual analog scale pain scores were compared between groups. The final analysis included 37 patients (21 active,16 placebo). Baseline and procedural differences were not different between groups. At 1 week postoperatively, patients in the active group had significantly lower pain scores (3.6 ± 2.1 vs. 5.8 ± 1.2; P= .008). Postoperative Percocet consumption during the initial 48 hours (12.8 ± 4.7 vs. 17.2 ± 6.3; P = .020) and during the first week (25.2 ± 9.9 vs. 33.8 ± 14.3; P = .037) was also significantly lower in the active group. Results from this prospective double-blinded randomized trial demonstrate that compared with placebo TENS, active TENS can result in significantly less pain and reduced opioid use in the immediate postoperative period after ARCR, suggesting that TENS may be potentially useful in a multimodal approach to managing postoperative pain. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier

  4. Multimodal pain stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Understanding and characterization of pain and other sensory symptoms are among the most important issues in the diagnosis and assessment of patient with gastrointestinal disorders. Methods to evoke and assess experimental pain have recently developed into a new area with the possibility for multimodal stimulation (e.g., electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation) of different nerves and pain pathways in the human gut. Such methods mimic to a high degree the pain experienced in the clinic. Multimodal pain methods have increased our basic understanding of different peripheral receptors in the gut in health and disease. Together with advanced muscle analysis, the methods have increased our understanding of receptors sensitive to mechanical, chemical and temperature stimuli in diseases, such as systemic sclerosis and diabetes. The methods can also be used to unravel central pain mechanisms, such as those involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. Abnormalities in central pain mechanisms are often seen in patients with chronic gut pain and hence methods relying on multimodal pain stimulation may help to understand the symptoms in these patients. Sex differences have been observed in several diseases of the gut, and differences in central pain processing between males and females have been hypothesized using multimodal pain stimulations. Finally, multimodal methods have recently been used to gain more insight into the effect of drugs against pain in the GI tract. Hence, the multimodal methods undoubtedly represents a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut. PMID:16688791

  5. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has a long history of use in medicine dating back to 46 A.D. when the Roman physician Largus found the electrical discharge of torpedo fishes useful in the treatment of pain produced by headache and gout. A rival Greek physician, Dioscorides, discounted the value of the torpedo fish for headache relief but did recommend its use in the treatment of hemorrhoids. In 1745, the Leyden jar and various sized electrostatic generators were used to treat angina pectoris, epilepsy, hemiplegia, kidney stones, and sciatica. Benjamin Franklin used an electrical device to treat successfully a young woman suffering from convulsive fits. In the late 1800's battery powered hydroelectric baths were used to treat chronic inflammation of the uterus while electrified athletic supporters were advertised for the treatment of male problems. Fortunately, such an amusing early history of the simple beginnings of electrical stimulation did not prevent eventual development of a variety of useful therapeutic and rehabilitative applications of electrical stimulation. Over the centuries electrical stimulation has survived as a modality in the treatment of various medical disorders with its primary application being in the rehabilitation area. Recently, a surge of new interest in electrical stimulation has been kindled by the work of a Russian sport scientist who reported remarkable muscle strength and endurance improvements in elite athletes. Yakov Kots reported his research on electric stimulation and strength improvements in 1977 at a Canadian-Soviet Exchange Symposium held at Concordia University in Montreal. Since then an explosion of new studies has been seen in both sport science and in medicine. Based upon the reported works of Kots and the present surge of new investigations, one could be misled as to the origin of electrical stimulation as a technique to increase muscle strength. As a matter of fact, electric stimulation has been used as a technique to improve

  6. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Interferential Therapy on the Upper Trapezius in Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Dissanayaka, Thusharika Dilrukshi; Pallegama, Ranjith Wasantha; Suraweera, Hilari Justus; Johnson, Mark I; Kariyawasam, Anula Padma

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential therapy (IFT) both in combination with hot pack, myofascial release, active range of motion exercise, and a home exercise program on myofascial pain syndrome patients with upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. A total of 105 patients with an upper trapezius myofascial trigger point were recruited to this single-blind randomized controlled trial. Following random allocation of patients to three groups, three therapeutic regimens-control-standard care (hot pack, active range of motion exercises, myofascial release, and a home exercise program with postural advice), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation-standard care and IFT-standard care-were administered eight times during 4 wks at regular intervals. Pain intensity and cervical range of motions (cervical extension, lateral flexion to the contralateral side, and rotation to the ipsilateral side) were measured at baseline, immediately after the first treatment, before the eighth treatment, and 1 wk after the eighth treatment. Immediate and short-term improvements were marked in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group (n = 35) compared with the IFT group (n = 35) and the control group (n = 35) with respect to pain intensity and cervical range of motions (P < 0.05). The IFT group showed significant improvement on these outcome measurements than the control group did (P < 0.05). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with standard care facilitates recovery better than IFT does in the same combination.

  7. Electrical stimulation of the insular cortex as a novel target for the relief of refractory pain: An experimental approach in rodents.

    PubMed

    Dimov, Luiz Fabio; Toniolo, Elaine Flamia; Alonso-Matielo, Heloísa; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Ballester, Gerson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Dale, Camila Squarzoni

    2018-07-02

    Cortical electrical stimulation (CES) has shown to be an effective therapeutic alternative for neuropathic pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. The primary motor cortex(M1) was the main cortical target used in the vast majority of both invasive and non-invasive studies. Despite positive results M1-based approaches still fail to relieve pain in a significant proportion of individuals. It has been advocated that the direct stimulation of cortical areas directly implicated in the central integration of pain could increase the efficacy of analgesic brain stimulation. Here, we evaluated the behavioral effects of electrical stimulation of the insular cortex (ESI) on pain sensitivity in an experimental rat model of peripheral neuropathy, and have described the pathways involved. Animals underwent chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve in the right hind limb and had concentric electrodes implanted in the posterior dysranular insular cortex. Mechanical nociception responses were evaluated before and at the end of a 15-min session of ESI (60Hz, 210μs, 1V). ESI reversed mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw contralateral to the brain hemisphere stimulated, without inducing motor impairment in the open-field test. Pharmacological blockade of μ-opioid (MOR) or type 1-cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) abolished ESI-induced antinociceptive effects. Evaluation of CB1R and MOR spatial expression demonstrated differential modulation of CB1R and MOR in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) of ESI-treated rats in sub-areas involved in pain processing/modulation. These results indicate that ESI induces antinociception by functionally modulating opioid and cannabinoid systems in the PAG pain circuitry in rats with experimentally induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of stimulus frequency on the analgesic response to percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ghoname, E S; Craig, W F; White, P F; Ahmed, H E; Hamza, M A; Gajraj, N M; Vakharia, A S; Noe, C E

    1999-04-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common medical problems in our society. Increasingly, patients are turning to nonpharmacologic analgesic therapies such as percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS). We designed this sham-controlled study to compare the effect of three different frequencies of electrical stimulation on the analgesic response to PENS therapy. Sixty-eight consenting patients with LBP secondary to degenerative lumbar disc disease were treated with PENS therapy at 4 Hz, alternating 15 Hz and 30 Hz (15/30 Hz), and 100 Hz, as well as sham-PENS (0 Hz), according to a randomized, cross-over study design. Each treatment was administered for a period of 30 min three times per week for 2 wk. The pre- and posttreatment assessments included the health status survey short form and visual analog scales for pain, physical activity, and quality of sleep. After receiving all four treatments, patients completed a global assessment questionnaire. The sham-PENS treatments failed to produce changes in the degree of pain, physical activity, sleep quality, or daily intake of oral analgesic medications. In contrast, 4-Hz, 15/30-Hz, and 100-Hz stimulation all produced significant decreases in the severity of pain, increases in physical activity, improvements in the quality of sleep, and decreases in oral analgesic requirements (P < 0.01). Of the three frequencies, 15/30 Hz was the most effective in decreasing pain, increasing physical activity, and improving the quality of sleep (P < 0.05). In the global assessment, 40% of the patients reported that 15/30 Hz was the most desirable therapy, and it was also more effective in improving the patient's sense of well-being. We conclude that the frequency of electrical stimulation is an important determinant of the analgesic response to PENS therapy. Alternating stimulation at 15-Hz and 30-Hz frequencies was more effective than either 4 Hz or 100 Hz in improving outcome measures in patients with LBP. The frequency of

  9. Release of endogenous opioids following transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in an experimental model of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Sabino, George S; Santos, Cristiane M F; Francischi, Janetti N; de Resende, Marcos Antônio

    2008-02-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a noninvasive treatment used in physiotherapy practice to promote analgesia in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the action mechanism of TENS at high (HF: 130 Hz) and low (LF: 10 Hz) frequencies in an inflammation model produced by the injection of carrageenan in rat paws (Cg; 250 microg). After carrageenan administration (0 time), either HF or LF TENS was applied to the inflamed paw of rats for 20 minutes, and hyperalgesia was assessed hourly using the modified Randall-Selitto method (1957). HF and LF TENS inhibited the carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia by 100%. Pretreatment of animals with intraplantar naltrexone (Nx; 50 microg) reversed the analgesic effect of the LF TENS but did not alter the effect of HF TENS. The application of HF and LF TENS to the contralateral paw reversed the hyperalgesia of the inflamed paw similar to that observed when TENS was applied to the inflamed paw. However, LF TENS presented a longer-lasting analgesic effect than HF TENS. Our data demonstrate that HF and LF TENS induced antihyperalgesia. We also report that the antihyperalgesia provoked by LF TENS is partially due to the local release of endogenous opioids. This study offers important information about physiotherapy practices aimed at pain relieving. TENS is a noninvasive treatment that promotes analgesia in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. Scientists, patients, and the general population may benefit from this knowledge.

  10. Effect of Transcutaneous Acupoint Electrical Stimulation on Post-Hemorrhoidectomy-Associated Pain, Anxiety, and Heart Rate Variability: A Randomized-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Mei-Ling; Chung, Yu-Chu; Hsu, Lun-Chia; Hung, Shuo-Hui

    2018-05-01

    Hemorrhoidectomy is the current best treatment for severe hemorrhoids, but it causes significant postoperative pain and anxiety, which is associated with heart rate variability (HRV). Transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation (TAES) was assumed to alleviate pain and anxiety, and modify the autonomic nervous system. This study aimed to examine the effects of TAES intervention on postoperative pain, anxiety, and HRV in patients who received a hemorrhoidectomy. A randomized-controlled trial with five repeated measures was conducted. The TAES group ( n = 39) received four 20-min sessions of electrical stimulation at chengshan (BL57) and erbai (EX-UE2) after hemorrhoidectomy, whereas the control group ( n = 41) did not. Data were collected using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), State Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and HRV physiological signal monitor. TAES resulted in a significant group difference in pain scores, anxiety levels, and some HRV parameters. The findings indicate that TAES can help reduce pain and anxiety associated with hemorrhoidectomy. TAES is a noninvasive, simple, and convenient modality for post-hemorrhoidectomy-associated pain control and anxiety reduction.

  11. Dysregulation of the Descending Pain System in Temporomandibular Disorders Revealed by Low-Frequency Sensory Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: A Pupillometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Mesin, Luca; Ortu, Eleonora; Giannoni, Mario; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Using computerized pupillometry, our previous research established that the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysregulated in patients suffering from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), suggesting a potential role for ANS dysfunction in pain modulation and the etiology of TMD. However, pain modulation hypotheses for TMD are still lacking. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in the descending modulation of defensive behavior and pain through μ, κ, and δ opioid receptors. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been extensively used for pain relief, as low-frequency stimulation can activate µ receptors. Our aim was to use pupillometry to evaluate the effect of low-frequency TENS stimulation of μ receptors on opioid descending pathways in TMD patients. In accordance with the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, 18 females with myogenous TMD and 18 matched-controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent subsequent pupillometric evaluations under dark and light conditions before, soon after (end of stimulation) and long after (recovery period) sensorial TENS. The overall statistics derived from the darkness condition revealed no significant differences in pupil size between cases and controls; indeed, TENS stimulation significantly reduced pupil size in both groups. Controls, but not TMD patients, displayed significant differences in pupil size before compared with after TENS. Under light conditions, TMD patients presented a smaller pupil size compared with controls; the pupil size was reduced only in the controls. Pupil size differences were found before and during TENS and before and after TENS in the controls only. Pupillometry revealed that stimulating the descending opioid pathway with low-frequency sensory TENS of the fifth and seventh pairs of cranial nerves affects the peripheral target. The TMD patients exhibited a different pattern of response to TENS stimulation compared with the controls, suggesting that impaired modulation of the

  12. Efficacy of the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Lucie; Milne, Sarah; Robinson, Vivian; Marchand, Serge; Shea, Beverley; Wells, George; Tugwell, Peter

    2002-03-15

    Low back pain affects a large proportion of the population. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was introduced more than 30 years ago as an alternative therapy to pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain. However, despite its widespread use, the efficacy of TENS is still controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of TENS in the treatment of chronic low back pain. The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to June 1, 2000. Only randomized controlled clinical trials of TENS for the treatment of patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic low back pain were included. Abstracts were excluded unless further data could be obtained from the authors. Two reviewers independently selected trials and extracted data using predetermined forms. Heterogeneity was tested with Cochrane's Q test. A fixed effects model was used throughout for continuous variables, except where heterogeneity existed, in which case, a random effects model was used. Results are presented as weighted mean differences with 95% confidence intervals, where the difference between the treated and control groups was weighted by the inverse of the variance. Standardized mean differences were calculated by dividing the difference between the treated and control by the baseline variance. Standardized mean differences were used when different scales were integrated to measure the same concept. Dichotomous outcomes were analyzed with odds ratios. Five trials were included, with 170 subjects randomized to the placebo group receiving sham TENS and 251 subjects receiving active TENS (153 for conventional mode, 98 for acupuncture-like TENS). The schedule of treatments varied greatly between studies ranging from one treatment/day for 2 consecutive days, to three treatments/day for 4 weeks. There were no statistically significant differences between the active TENS group compared with the placebo TENS group for any outcome

  13. Treatment of neuropathic pain in a patient with diabetic neuropathy using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the skin of the lumbar region.

    PubMed

    Somers, D L; Somers, M F

    1999-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathy can produce severe pain. The purpose of this case report is to describe the alteration of pain in a patient with severe, painful diabetic neuropathy following application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to the low back. The patient was a 73-year-old woman with pain in the left lower extremity over the lateral aspect of the hip and the entire leg below the knee. The pain prevented sound sleep. The intensity of pain was assessed with a visual analog scale. The TENS (80 Hz) was delivered 1 to 2 hours a day and during the entire night through electrodes placed on the lumbar area of the back. Following 20 minutes of TENS on the first day of treatment, the patient reported a 38% reduction in intensity of pain. After 17 days, the patient reported no pain following 20 minutes of TENS and that she could sleep through the night. Application of TENS to the skin of the lumbar area may be an effective treatment for the pain of diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Effectiveness of fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in chronic pain: a large-scale, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xuan; Gozani, Shai N

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) in a real-world chronic pain sample. Background There is a need for nonpharmacological treatment options for chronic pain. FS-TENS improved multisite chronic pain in a previous interventional study. Large observational studies are needed to further characterize its effectiveness. Methods This retrospective observational cohort study examined changes in chronic pain measures following 60 days of FS-TENS use. The study data were obtained from FS-TENS users who uploaded their device utilization and clinical data to an online database. The primary outcome measures were changes in pain intensity and pain interference with sleep, activity, and mood on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Dose–response associations were evaluated by stratifying subjects into low (≤30 days), intermediate (31–56 days), and high (≥57 days) utilization subgroups. FS-TENS effectiveness was quantified by baseline to follow-up group differences and a responder analysis (≥30% improvement in pain intensity or ≥2-point improvement in pain interference domains). Results Utilization and clinical data were collected from 11,900 people using FS-TENS for chronic pain, with 713 device users meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study subjects were generally older, overweight adults. Subjects reported multisite pain with a mean of 4.8 (standard deviation [SD] 2.5) pain sites. A total of 97.2% of subjects identified low back and/or lower extremity pain, and 72.9% of subjects reported upper body pain. All pain measures exhibited statistically significant group differences from baseline to 60-day follow-up. The largest changes were pain interference with activity (−0.99±2.69 points) and mood (−1.02±2.78 points). A total of 48.7% of subjects exhibited a clinically meaningful reduction in pain interference with activity or mood. This

  15. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain intensity during application of carboxytherapy in patients with cellulite: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sadala, Adria Y; Machado, Aline F P; Liebano, Richard E

    2018-01-16

    Carboxytherapy may generate local pain that is considered the main limiting factor in clinical practice. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used in the control of acute pain; however, the effect of TENS on pain relief during carboxytherapy has not been studied to date. To assess the effect of TENS on pain intensity during carboxytherapy in patients with cellulite in the gluteal region. This randomized clinical trial was conducted with 84 patients, 18-44 years of age, who had moderate cellulite in the gluteal region, according to Cellulite Severity Scale, but never received carboxytherapy. Patients were randomized into 3 groups: active TENS, placebo TENS, and control group. For the intervention, skin depressions with cellulite were outlined, and the gluteal area to be treated was defined. The subcutaneous injection of CO 2 was performed using 0.30 × 13 mm-needles at a 45° angle, with a controlled flow rate of 100 mL/min maintained for 1 minute at each puncture site. The parameters for TENS were as follows: frequency of 100 Hz and pulse duration of 200 μs; TENS intensity was adjusted until the patient reported strong paresthesia. The visual numeric pain rating scale was used to assess pain intensity after each puncture. The active TENS group reported lower pain intensity compared to the placebo TENS (P < .0001) and control (P < .0001) groups. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) was effective in reducing pain intensity during carboxytherapy in patients with cellulite in the gluteal region. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) reduces pain, fatigue, and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol GT; Liebano, Richard E; Anand, Amrit S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Because TENS works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo controlled cross-over design to test effects of a single treatment of TENS in people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS, no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and movement, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), 6 minute walk test (6MWT), range of motion (ROM), five time sit to stand test (FTSTS), and single leg stance (SLS). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was completed at end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. PPTs increased at site of TENS (spine) and outside site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During Active TENS CPM was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to how TENS is used clinically, on pain, fatigue, function and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia. PMID:23900134

  18. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the control of pain during rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty: A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rakel, Barbara A; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Geasland, Katharine; Embree, Jennie; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Herr, Keela; Walsh, Deirdre; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in reducing pain and hyperalgesia and increasing function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized that participants using TENS during rehabilitation exercises would report significantly lower pain during range-of-motion (ROM) activity and fast walking but not at rest, would have less hyperalgesia, and would have better function than participants receiving placebo-TENS or standard care. We also hypothesized that change in ROM pain would differ based on psychological characteristics (trait anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and depression) and treatment group. This prospective, randomized study used intent-to-treat analyses in 317 participants after primary, unilateral TKA. Assessors, blinded to treatment allocation, measured pain, function (ROM and gait speed), and hyperalgesia (quantitative sensory tests) postoperatively and 6 weeks after surgery. Analgesic intake, anxiety, depression, and pain catastrophizing were also assessed. TENS participants used it 1 to 2 times per day at 42 mA (on average) and had less pain postoperatively during active knee extension (P=.019) and fast walking (P=.006) than standard care participants. TENS and placebo-TENS were not significantly different. TENS participants who scored low on anxiety and pain catastrophizing had a greater reduction in ROM pain at 6 weeks than those who scored high on these factors (P=.002 and P=.03). Both TENS and placebo-TENS participants had less postoperative mechanical hyperalgesia (P=.03-.01) than standard care participants. Supplementing pharmacologic analgesia with TENS during rehabilitation exercises reduces movement pain postoperatively, but a placebo influence exists and the effect is gone by 6 weeks. Patients with low anxiety and pain catastrophizing may benefit most from TENS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in a major cancer center for the treatment of severe cancer-related pain and associated disability.

    PubMed

    Loh, Jeffrey; Gulati, Amitabh

    2015-06-01

    Cancer pain is difficult to treat, often requiring a multimodal approach. While medication management remains the mainstay for the treatment of cancer pain, medications are often associated with undesired side effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) provides a potential adjunctive method for treating cancer pain with minimal side effects. Few studies have been performed evaluating the efficacy of TENS on cancer pain. We sought to examine the usefulness of TENS on all cancer patients and to specifically look at the use of TENS as a goal-directed therapy to improve functionality. Retrospective cohort study. Since 2008, patients with chronic cancer pain and on multimodal pain regimens were trialed with TENS. Those patients who showed an improvement in pain symptoms or severity were educated about and provided with a TENS unit for use at home. Pain symptoms and scores were monitored with the visual analog scale (VAS), the numerical rating pain (NRP) scale, and Short-Form McGill Questionnaire at the start of TENS treatment and at 2 months follow-up. TENS proved beneficial in 69.7% of patients over the course of 2 months. In TENS responsive patients, VAS scores decreased by 9.8 on a 0-100 mm scale (P < 0.001), and NRP scores decreased by 0.8 on a 1-10 scale (P < 0.001). Lack of placebo and lack of blinding of physician and patient. TENS provides a beneficial adjunct for the treatment of cancer pain, especially when utilized as a goal-directed therapy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the relief of post-partum uterine contraction pain during breast-feeding: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Ligia; Gomes-Sponholz, Flávia A; Nakano, Ana Márcia S

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) used to relieve uterine contraction pain during breast-feeding in multiparous women. A controlled and randomized clinical trial was performed with 32 post-partum multiparous women who were breast-feeding. The participants were randomized into an experimental (EG, n = 16) and a control group (CG, n = 16). Pain was assessed using the Numerical Rating Scale and the descriptors of the Present Pain Intensity (PPI - McGill) during two sequential feeds. In the first assessment, the post-partum women in the EG and CG were monitored while breast-feeding and questioned regarding the degree of uterine contraction pain. In the second assessment, which was performed at the next feed, the EG used TENS while the CG was monitored, with pain being reassessed following. In the EG, the TENS electrodes were placed between T10-L1 and S2-S4, with a frequency of 100 Hz, a pulse duration of 75 μs and amplitude adjusted to produce a strong and tolerable sensation for 40 min. A descriptive analysis of the data and comparative intra- and intergroup analyses were performed by means of a non-parametrical test, with a significance level P ≤ 0.05. The level of basal pain was 5.56 in the EG and 5.50 in the CG. In the intragroup analysis, the EG (P < 0.0001) and CG (P = 0.04) presented significant pain reduction. In the intergroup analysis, the EG had significant pain reduction (P < 0.01) in comparison to the CG. In the PPI analysis, a non-significant decrease in pain intensity was observed in the EG. TENS was found to be effective in reducing post-partum uterine contraction pain during breast-feeding. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) alleviate the pain experienced during bone marrow sampling in addition to standard techniques? A randomised, double-blinded, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tucker, David L; Rockett, Mark; Hasan, Mehedi; Poplar, Sarah; Rule, Simon A

    2015-06-01

    Bone marrow aspiration and trephine (BMAT) biopsies remain important tests in haematology. However, the procedures can be moderately to severely painful despite standard methods of pain relief. To test the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in alleviating the pain from BMAT in addition to standard analgesia using a numerical pain rating scale (NRS). 70 patients requiring BMAT were randomised (1:1) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. -35 patients received TENS impulses at a strong but comfortable amplitude (intervention group) and 35 patients received TENS impulses just above the sensory threshold (control group) (median pulse amplitude 20 and 7 mA, respectively). Patients and operators were blinded to group allocation. Pain assessments were made using a numerical pain scale completed after the procedure. No significant difference in NRS pain recalled after the procedure was detected (median pain score 5.7 (95% CI 4.8 to 6.6) in control vs 5.6 (95% CI 4.8 to 6.4) in the intervention group). However, 100% of patients who had previous experience of BMAT and >94% of participants overall felt they benefited from using TENS and would recommend it to others for this procedure. There were no side effects from the TENS device, and it was well tolerated. TENS is a safe, non-invasive adjunct to analgesia for reducing pain during bone marrow biopsy and provides a subjective benefit to most users; however, no objective difference in pain scores was detected when using TENS in this randomised controlled study. NCT02005354. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Electrical peripheral nerve stimulation relieves bone cancer pain by inducing Arc protein expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-fu; Feng, Wan-wen; Liu, Yue-peng; Dong, Yan-bin; Gao, Li; Yang, Hui-lin

    2018-01-01

    Objective The analgesic effect on chronic pain of peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been proven, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the analgesic effect of PNS on bone cancer pain in a rat model and to explore the underlying mechanism. Materials and methods PNS on sciatic nerves with bipolar electrode was performed in both naïve and bone cancer pain model rats. Then, the protein levels of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid–type glutamate receptor 1 (GluA1), and phosphate N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (pGluNR2B) in spinal cord were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Thermal paw withdraw latency and mechanical paw withdraw threshold were used to estimate the analgesic effect of PNS on bone cancer pain. Intrathecal administration of Arc shRNA was used to inhibit Arc expression in the spinal cord. Results PNS at 60 and 120 Hz for 20 min overtly induced Arc expression in the spinal cord, increased thermal pain thresholds in naïve rats, and relieved bone cancer pain; meanwhile, 10 Hz PNS did not achieve those results. In addition, PNS at 60 and 120 Hz also reduced the expression of GluA1, but not pGluNR2B, in the spinal cord. Finally, the anti-nociceptive effect and GluA1 downregulation induced by PNS were inhibited by intrathecal administration of Arc shRNA. Conclusion PNS (60 Hz, 0.3 mA) can relieve bone-cancer-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia by upregulating Arc protein expression and then by decreasing GluA1 transcription in the spinal cord dorsal horn. PMID:29606887

  3. American football and other sports injuries may cause migraine/persistent pain decades later and can be treated successfully with electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ETOIMS).

    PubMed

    Chu, J; McNally, S; Bruyninckx, F; Neuhauser, D

    2017-04-01

    Autonomous twitch elicitation at myofascial trigger points from spondylotic radiculopathies-induced denervation supersensitivity can provide favourable pain relief using electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ETOIMS). To provide objective evidence that ETOIMS is safe and efficacious in migraine and persistent pain management due to decades-old injuries to head and spine from paediatric American football. An 83-year-old mildly hypertensive patient with 25-year history of refractory migraine and persistent pain self-selected to regularly receive fee-for-service ETOIMS 2/week over 20 months. He had 180 sessions of ETOIMS. Pain levels, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate/pulse were recorded before and immediately after each treatment alongside highest level of clinically elicitable twitch forces/session, session duration and intervals between treatments. Twitch force grades recorded were from 1 to 5, grade 5 twitch force being strongest. Initially, there was hypersensitivity to electrical stimulation with low stimulus parameters (500 µs pulse-width, 30 mA stimulus intensity, frequency 1.3 Hz). This resolved with gradual stimulus increments as tolerated during successive treatments. By treatment 27, autonomous twitches were noted. Spearman's correlation coefficients showed that pain levels are negatively related to twitch force, number of treatments, treatment session duration and directly related to BP and heart rate/pulse. Treatment numbers and session durations directly influence twitch force. At end of study, headaches and quality of life improved, hypertension resolved and antihypertensive medication had been discontinued. Using statistical process control methodology in an individual patient, we showed long-term safety and effectiveness of ETOIMS in simultaneous diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of migraine and persistent pain in real time obviating necessity for randomised controlled studies.

  4. Effects of visual illusion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: A randomised controlled cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Özkul, Çağla; Kılınç, Muhammed; Yıldırım, Sibel Aksu; Topçuoğlu, Elif Yalçın; Akyüz, Müfit

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI). No therapeutic drugs or drug groups are proven to be superior for neuropathic pain and treatments only aim to convert pain from dull to tolerable levels and not to remove it. This study was planned to compare the effect of visual illusion (VI) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on pain intensity, pain quality and functional capacity in SCI patients with neuropathic pain. Twenty-four patients were included and randomly categorized into two groups. In the first group (n= 12), visual illusion was applied for first two weeks, 1 week wash out period and then TENS was applied for 2 weeks. In second group (n= 12), TENS was applied firstly, 1 week wash out and then %visual illusion VI were applied. Pain severity, pain quality, and functional capacity were assessed with the visual analog scale (VAS), the neuropathic pain scale (NPS), and the brief pain inventory (BPI), respectively. A pre-post-treatment and cross over design was used. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group analyses. Mann-Whitney U tests were used for analyses that compared different groups. It was observed that pain intensity decrease immediately after both applications (VI: p= 0.07, TENS: p= 0.08). After TENS application for 2 weeks, it was observed that significant decrease in most (p= 0.04) and less (p= 0.02) pain intensity; while there was no significant decrease in pain intensity after 2 weeks for VI (p> 0.05). When findings of NPS were analyzed, hot (p= 0.047), sharp (p= 0.02), unpleasant (p= 0.03) and deep items (p= 0.047) decreased after VI application. When the results of BPI were detected, they were observed that the negative effect of pain on moving ability (p= 0.04) after visual illusion application and the negative effect of pain on mood (p= 0.03), relationships with others (p= 0.04) and sleep (p= 0.04) after TENS application decreased significantly. TENS and VI therapies can be successfully

  5. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential current, electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, and thermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Poitras, Stéphane; Brosseau, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine practitioners and researchers, who were invited to summarize the best available evidence for a particular intervention and encouraged to make this information accessible to nonexperts. Each of the articles contains five sections (description, theory, evidence of efficacy, harms, and summary) with common subheadings to facilitate comparison across the 24 different interventions profiled in this special focus issue, blending narrative and systematic review methodology as deemed appropriate by the authors. It is hoped that articles in this special focus issue will be informative and aid in decision making for the many stakeholders evaluating nonsurgical interventions for CLBP.

  6. Electrical stimulation for chronic non-specific low back pain in a working-age population: a 12-week double blinded randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thiese, Matthew S; Hughes, Matthew; Biggs, Jeremy

    2013-03-28

    Non-invasive electrotherapy is commonly used for treatment of chronic low back pain. Evidence for efficacy of most electrotherapy modalities is weak or lacking. This study aims to execute a high-quality, double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial comparing 1) H-Wave(®) Device stimulation plus usual care with 2) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) plus usual care, and 3) Sham electrotherapy plus usual care to determine comparative efficacy for treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain patients. Chronic non-specific low back pain patients between ages of 18-65 years, with pain of at least 3 months duration and minimal current 5/10 VAS pain. Patients will have no significant signs or symptoms of lumbosacral nerve impingement, malignancy, spinal stenosis, or mood disorders. Double blind RCT with 3 arms and 38 subjects per arm. Randomization by permuted blocks of random length, stratified by Workers Compensation claim (yes vs. no), and use of opioids. The null hypothesis of this study is that there are no statistically significant differences in functional improvement between treatment types during and at the end of a 12-week week treatment period. Subjective data will be collected using Filemaker Pro™ database management collection tools. Objective data will be obtained through functional assessments. Data will be collected at enrollment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks for each participant by a blinded assessor. H-Wave(®) device stimulation (Intervention A) plus usual care, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (Intervention B) plus usual care, and sham electrotherapy plus usual care (control). Each treatment arm will have identical numbers of visits (4) and researcher contact time (approximately 15 hours). Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary measures include: Rowland Morris Instrument, VAS pain score, functional evaluation including strength when pushing and pulling, pain free range of motion in flexion and extension

  7. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain, walking function, respiratory muscle strength and vital capacity in kidney donors: a protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain is a negative factor in the recovery process of postoperative patients, causing pulmonary alterations and complications and affecting functional capacity. Thus, it is plausible to introduce transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief to subsequently reduce complications caused by this pain in the postoperative period. The objective of this paper is to assess the effects of TENS on pain, walking function, respiratory muscle strength and vital capacity in kidney donors. Methods/design Seventy-four patients will be randomly allocated into 2 groups: active TENS or placebo TENS. All patients will be assessed for pain intensity, walk function (Iowa Gait Test), respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure) and vital capacity before and after the TENS application. The data will be collected by an assessor who is blinded to the group allocation. Discussion This study is the first to examine the effects of TENS in this population. TENS during the postoperative period may result in pain relief and improvements in pulmonary tests and mobility, thus leading to an improved quality of life and further promoting organ donation. Trial registration Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clinicos (ReBEC), number RBR-8xtkjp. PMID:23311705

  8. Adjunct High Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Stimulation (TENS) for Postoperative Pain Management during Weaning from Epidural Analgesia Following Colon Surgery: Results from a Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bjerså, Kristofer; Jildenstaal, Pether; Jakobsson, Jan; Egardt, Madelene; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2015-12-01

    The potential benefit of nonpharmacological adjunctive therapy is not well-studied following major abdominal surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary nonpharmacological analgesia intervention during weaning from epidural analgesia (EDA) after open lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomized to TENS and sham TENS during weaning from EDA. The effects on pain at rest, following short walk, and after deep breath were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) grading. Number of patients assessed was lower than calculated because of change in clinical routine. Pain scores overall were low. A trend of lower pain scores was observed in the active TENS group of patients; a statistical significance between the groups was found for the pain lying prone in bed (p < .05). This controlled pilot study indicates benefits of TENS use in postoperative pain management during weaning from EDA after open colon surgery. Further studies are warranted in order to verify the potential beneficial effects from TENS during weaning from EDA after open, lower abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been remarkable progress in the understanding and practical use of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques. Nevertheless, to date, this experimental effort has not been accompanied by substantial reflections on the models and mechanisms that could explain the stimulation effects. Given these premises, the aim of this article is to provide an updated picture of what we know about the theoretical models of tES that have been proposed to date, contextualized in a more specific and unitary framework. We demonstrate that these models can explain the tES behavioral effects as distributed along a continuum from stimulation dependent to network activity dependent. In this framework, we also propose that stochastic resonance is a useful mechanism to explain the general online neuromodulation effects of tES. Moreover, we highlight the aspects that should be considered in future research. We emphasize that tES is not an “easy-to-use” technique; however, it may represent a very fruitful approach if applied within rigorous protocols, with deep knowledge of both the behavioral and cognitive aspects and the more recent advances in the application of stimulation. PMID:26873962

  10. The effects of electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation on shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain, and function in persons with stroke: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Somyung; Kim, Young; Jung, Kyoungsim; Chung, Yijung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation for shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain and upper extremity function in hemiparetic stroke patients. Twenty participants with subacute hemiparetic stroke were recruited for this study and were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (n = 10) and control group (n = 10). Subjects in the experimental group participated in task-oriented electromyography triggered stimulation for 30 minutes, five times a week for four weeks, whereas the control group received cyclic functional electrical stimulation for 30 minutes, five times a week for four weeks. Subjects in both groups received conventional physical therapy for four weeks (30 min/day, five times/week). Data collected included the degree of shoulder subluxation which had been confirmed by X-ray, muscle activation of the supraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles by electromyography, pain by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and hand function by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) before and after the four week exercise period. The results showed significant improvement in shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, and VAS results in the experimental group, compared with the control group(p < 0.05). FMA scores showed no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation improved shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain and upper extremity function. These results suggest that task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation is effective and beneficial for individuals with subacute stroke, and that further studies should be conducted on multivarious anatomical regions.

  11. A pilot investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon low back pain in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Smadi, J; Warke, K; Wilson, I; Cramp, A F L; Noble, G; Walsh, D M; Lowe-Strong, A S

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon low back pain (LBP) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). A randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical pilot study. Fifteen people with MS were recruited and randomly allocated to one of the following groups under double blind conditions (n = 5 per group): TENS 1 (4 Hz, 200 micros), TENS 2 (110 Hz, 200 micros), placebo TENS. Treatment was applied for 45 minutes three times a week for six weeks with a four-week follow-up. The following outcome measures were taken at weeks 1, 6, and 10: visual analogue scale (VAS) (for current LBP, right leg pain, left leg pain); Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire; Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire; Short Form-36 (SF-36) Version 1; and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). VAS for current LBP, right and left leg pain were also taken before and after treatment, and once a week during the follow-up period. Analysis showed no statistically significant effects for any of the data. However, both active treatment groups showed a trend of improvement in the majority of the outcome measures. Active TENS was more effective than placebo TENS in decreasing VAS scores following each treatment although results were not statistically significant. Further work in this area is warranted and should include a larger number of participants in the form of a randomized controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy of this modality.

  12. Evaluating efficacy and feasibility of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for postoperative pain after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: A randomized pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Engen, Deborah J; Carns, Paul E; Allen, Mark S; Bauer, Brent A; Loehrer, Laura L; Cha, Stephen S; Chartrand, Christine M; Eggler, Eric J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2016-05-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been applied for pain relief after surgical procedures. This study evaluated whether TENS after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), in addition to opioid administration, decreased postoperative pain and pain medication use. In a controlled trial, 56 patients scheduled to undergo VATS were randomly assigned to TENS plus opioids (Group 1) or opioids alone (Group 2) for 48 h. Forty patients completed the study. Pain scores and use of oral morphine equivalents (OMEs) were not significantly different between the groups during the first and second 24 h. A decreased use of OMEs between the first and second 24 h was significant for Group 1 (P = .005) but not for Group 2 (P = .11); a decreased use of OMEs between groups was not significant (P = .35). A larger, well-powered clinical trial is indicated to evaluate the effects of TENS for pain control after a VATS procedure. Clinical Trial No.: NCT01046695. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An experimental study comparing the effects of combined transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation and electromagnetic millimeter waves for spinal pain in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yip, Y B; Tse, Hing-Min Sonny; Wu, Ka Kalina

    2007-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of combined transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation (TAES) and electromagnetic millimeter wave (EMMW) therapy as an add-on treatment for pain relief and physical functional activity enhancement among adults with sub-acute non-specific spinal pain in either the low back or neck. A non-blinded study with data obtained before, immediate, one week and three months after intervention. The Telehealth Clinic and Community Centre, Hong Kong. Forty-seven subjects with either sub-acute neck or low back pain. Subjects were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (n=23) or a control group (n=24). These groups were then divided into subgroups according to the site of their spinal pain-neck or back. The intervention group had eight treatments over a three-week period of TAES and EMMW. Changes from baseline to the end of treatment were assessed at intervals of one week and three months on either neck or low back pain intensity [by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)]; stiffness level; stress level; neck or low back lateral flexion and forward flexion in cm, and interference with daily activities. The baseline VAS scores for the intervention and control groups were 5.34 and 5.18 out of 10, respectively (P value=0.77). At the one week and three month assessments, there were no significant differences between the groups-VAS (P value=0.09 and 0.27, respectively). A further subgroup of chronic pain sufferers (n=31) was identified and these had significantly reduced pain intensity at the one week assessment (P value=0.04) but this was not sustained at post three months after treatment (P value=0.15). Improvements in stiffness level, stress level, and functional disability level in the intervention group were not significant. Our study shows that there was a reduction in pain intensity, stress and stiffness level immediately after the eight sessions of treatment (TAES and EMMW), though the effect is not sustained after a week. No pain relief was found

  14. Direct and Indirect Benefits Reported by Users of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Qualitative Exploration Using Patient Interviews.

    PubMed

    Gladwell, Peter William; Badlan, Kathryn; Cramp, Fiona; Palmer, Shea

    2015-11-01

    There is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for management of chronic musculoskeletal pain or chronic low back pain. A recent review of previous trial methodology identified significant problems with low treatment fidelity. There is little information available to guide selection of patient-reported outcome measures appropriate for TENS evaluation. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients at a secondary care pain clinic who successfully used TENS to help manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. These key informants were selected because they had the potential to generate knowledge that could inform research design and clinical practice. A qualitative method using individual semistructured interviews with open questions was selected for its capacity to generate rich data. A mini focus group informed the development of a discussion guide for semistructured interviews with 9 patients (6 women, 3 men). Thematic analysis was used as the primary data analysis method, and this analysis was enhanced by a case-level analysis of the context and processes of TENS use of each individual. Data analysis indicated that distraction from pain and a reduction in the sensations associated with muscle tension or spasm should be considered as separate outcomes from pain relief. These direct benefits led to a wide range of indirect benefits dependent on patient decision making, including medication reduction, enhanced function, psychological benefits, and enhanced ability to rest. The findings indicate that evaluating TENS using a unidimensional pain scale is likely to overlook potential benefits. The complex pattern of TENS usage, as well as multiple direct and indirect outcomes, indicates that TENS could be considered as a complex intervention. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  15. Preemptive Analgesic Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on Postoperative Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eidy, Mohammad; Fazel, Mohammad Reza; Janzamini, Monir; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Moravveji, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological analgesic method used to control different types of pain. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative TENS on post inguinal hernia repair pain. Patients and Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 66 male patients with unilateral inguinal hernias who were admitted to the Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, from April to October 2014. Participants were selected using a convenience sampling method and were assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (n = 33) groups using permuted-block randomization. Patients in the intervention group were treated with TENS 1 hour before surgery, while the placebo was administered to patients in the control group. All of the patients underwent inguinal hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method, and pain intensity was evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after surgery using a visual analogue scale. Additionally, the amounts of analgesic administered by pump were calculated and compared between the two groups. Results The mean estimated postoperative pain intensity was 6.21 ± 1.63 in the intervention group and 5.45 ± 1.82 in the control group (P = 0.08). In the intervention group pain intensity at 2 and 4 hours after surgery were 3.54 ± 1.48 and 5.12 ± 1.41 (P < 0.001), respectively. In the control group these values were 4.0±1.5 and 4.76 ± 1.39 (P = 0.04), respectively. No significant differences were observed in mean pain intensities at 6 and 12 hours. Conclusions TENS can reduce postoperative pain in the early hours after inguinal hernia repair surgery. PMID:27275401

  16. Autonomic components of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) are favourably affected by Electrical Twitch-Obtaining Intramuscular Stimulation (ETOIMS): effects on blood pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jennifer; Bruyninckx, Frans; Neuhauser, Duncan V

    2017-07-01

    Favourable pain relief results on evoking autonomous twitches at myofascial trigger points with Electrical Twitch Obtaining Intramuscular Stimulation (ETOIMS). To document autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from blood pressure (BP) and pulse/heart rate changes with ETOIMS. A patient with persistent pain regularly received serial ETOIMS sessions of 60, 90, 120 or ≥150 min over 24 months. Outcome measures include BP: systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure and pulse/heart rate, pre-session/immediate-post-session summed differences (SDPPP index), and pain reduction. His results were compared with that of two other patients and one normal control. Each individual represented the following maximal elicitable twitch forces (TWF) graded 1-5: maximum TWF2: control subject; maximum TWF3: CRPS patient with suspected ANS dysfunction; and maximum TWF4 and TWF5: two patients with respective slow-fatigue and fast-fatigue twitches who during ETOIMS had autonomous twitching at local and remote myotomes simultaneously from denervation supersensitivity. ETOIMS results between TWFs were compared using one-way analysis of variance test. The patients showed immediate significant pain reduction, BP and pulse/heart rate changes/reduction(s) except for diastolic BP in the TWF5 patient. TWF2 control subject had diastolic BP reduction with ETOIMS but not with rest. Linear regression showed TWF grade to be the most significant variable in pain reduction, more so than the number of treatments, session duration and treatment interval. TWF grade was the most important variable in significantly reducing outcome measures, especially pulse/heart rate. Unlike others, the TWF3 patient had distinctive reductions in SDPPP index. Measuring BP and pulse/heart rate is clinically practical for alerting ANS dysfunction maintained CRPS. SDPPP index (≥26) and pulse/heart rate (≥8) reductions with almost every ETOIMS treatment, plus inability to evoke

  17. Preemptive Analgesic Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on Postoperative Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Eidy, Mohammad; Fazel, Mohammad Reza; Janzamini, Monir; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Moravveji, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological analgesic method used to control different types of pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative TENS on post inguinal hernia repair pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 66 male patients with unilateral inguinal hernias who were admitted to the Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, from April to October 2014. Participants were selected using a convenience sampling method and were assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (n = 33) groups using permuted-block randomization. Patients in the intervention group were treated with TENS 1 hour before surgery, while the placebo was administered to patients in the control group. All of the patients underwent inguinal hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method, and pain intensity was evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after surgery using a visual analogue scale. Additionally, the amounts of analgesic administered by pump were calculated and compared between the two groups. The mean estimated postoperative pain intensity was 6.21 ± 1.63 in the intervention group and 5.45 ± 1.82 in the control group (P = 0.08). In the intervention group pain intensity at 2 and 4 hours after surgery were 3.54 ± 1.48 and 5.12 ± 1.41 (P < 0.001), respectively. In the control group these values were 4.0±1.5 and 4.76 ± 1.39 (P = 0.04), respectively. No significant differences were observed in mean pain intensities at 6 and 12 hours. TENS can reduce postoperative pain in the early hours after inguinal hernia repair surgery.

  18. The effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the management of patients with complex regional pain syndrome: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Adem; Çakır, Tuncay; Doğan, Şebnem Koldaş; Erçalık, Tülay; Filiz, Meral Bilgilisoy; Toraman, Füsun

    2016-11-21

    To investigate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on clinical recovery in the management of patients with complex regional pain syndrome Type I (CRPS Type I). The study included 30 patients with stage 1 and 2 CRPS Type I in the upper extremities. The patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups, group 1 (n= 15) received conventional TENS therapy for 20 minutes, and group 2 (n= 15) received sham TENS therapy. The standard physical therapy program, which included contrast bath for 20 minutes; whirlpool bath for 15 minutes; assisted active and passive range of motion, and static stretching exercises up to the pain threshold, was also conducted in both groups. Therapy was scheduled for 15 sessions. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess spontaneous pain. The Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms (LANSS) scale and the Douleur Neuropathique en 4 Questions (DN-4) were used to assess neuropathic pain. In addition, range of motion (ROM) was measured using a goniometer and volumetric measurements were taken to assess edema. Functional capacity was assessed using a hand dynamometer and the Duruöz Hand Index (DHI). All measurements were performed at baseline and after therapy. Significant improvements were achieved in spontaneous and neuropathic pain scores, edema, ROM, and functional capacity in both groups (p< 0.05). However, improvement was found to be significantly greater in group 1 regarding pain intensity, neuropathic pain assessed using LANNS, edema, and in the 2nd-3rd finger ROM measurements (p< 0.05). No significant difference was detected between groups regarding improvements in 4th-5th finger and wrist ROM measurements, grip strength, and DN4 and DHI scores (p> 0.05). The addition of TENS to the physical therapy program was seen to make a significant contribution to clinical recovery in CRPS Type 1.

  19. Assessment: efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of pain in neurologic disorders (an evidence-based review): report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Richard M; Miyasaki, Janis

    2010-01-12

    To determine if transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is efficacious in the treatment of pain in neurologic disorders. We performed a systematic literature search of Medline and the Cochrane Library from inception to April 2009. There are conflicting reports of TENS compared to sham TENS in the treatment of chronic low back pain, with 2 Class II studies showing benefit, but 2 Class I studies and another Class II study not showing benefit. Because the Class I studies are stronger evidence, TENS is established as ineffective for the treatment of chronic low back pain (2 Class I studies). TENS is probably effective in treating painful diabetic neuropathy (2 Class II studies). Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is not recommended for the treatment of chronic low back pain (Level A). TENS should be considered in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy (Level B). Further research into the mechanism of action of TENS is needed, as well as more rigorous studies for determination of efficacy.

  20. Modulation of laser-evoked potentials and pain perception by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS): a placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vassal, François; Créac'h, C; Convers, Ph; Laurent, B; Garcia-Larrea, L; Peyron, R

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on brain nociceptive responses (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs) and pain perception. Twenty healthy subjects were included. Nociceptive CO(2)-laser pulses were sequentially delivered to the dorsum of both feet. The amplitude of LEPs and nociceptive thresholds were collected in three consecutive conditions: T1: "sham" TENS (2 Hz/low-intensity) positioned heterotopically, over the left thigh; T2: "active" TENS (120 Hz/low-intensity) applied homotopically, over the left common peroneal nerve; and T3: "sham" TENS (replication of condition T1). Compared with "sham" TENS, "active" TENS significantly decreased the LEPs amplitude. This effect was observed exclusively when "active" TENS was applied ipsilaterally to the painful stimulus. Nociceptive thresholds increased with sessions in both limbs, but the increase observed during the "active" condition of TENS (T2) exceeded significantly that observed during the condition T3 only on the foot ipsilateral to TENS. Compared with a credible placebo TENS, high-frequency TENS induced a significant attenuation of both the acute pain and LEPs induced by noxious stimuli applied on the same dermatome. This modulation of subjective and objective concomitants of pain processing reflects a real neurophysiological TENS-related effect on nociceptive transmission. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Florene Carnicelli

    Currently, research is being performed in the area of nonsurgical and nonchemical means for influencing the body's threshold for pain. Today, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is being widely used for this purpose. Application of this treatment can be confusing, however, because determining such things as selection of the proper…

  2. Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduce pain and improve quality of life in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia? A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tantawy, Sayed A; Kamel, Dalia M; Abdelbasset, Walid Kamal

    2018-01-01

    Background Chronic orchialgia is defined as testicular pain, which may be either unilateral or bilateral, lasting for more than 3 months. It disturbs a patient’s daily activities and quality of life (QoL), inciting the patient to search for treatments to alleviate the pain. It is estimated that 25% of chronic orchialgia cases are idiopathic. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate how effective transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is in pain reduction and how it consequently affects the QoL in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia (ICO). Patients and methods Seventy-one patients were randomly assigned to group A (study group), which included 36 patients who received TENS and analgesia, and group B (control group), which included 35 patients who received analgesia only. The outcome measures were the participants’ demographic data and results of the visual analog scale (VAS) and QoL questionnaire. These outcomes were measured before and after 4 weeks of treatment and at 2-month follow-up. Results The results showed that compared to pretreatment, there was a significant reduction in pain postintervention and at 2-month follow-up in group A (P<0.0001 and <0.001, respectively; F=7.1) as well as a significant improvement in QoL at these time points (P<0.0001 and <0.0001, respectively). There were no significant differences in the VAS score and QoL in group B at different time points of evaluation. Conclusion The findings indicate that TENS is effective in reducing pain and improving patients’ QoL in cases of ICO. TENS is an easy-to-use, effective, noninvasive, and simple method for ICO-associated pain control and QoL improvement. PMID:29343983

  3. Effects of functional electrical stimulation assisted rowing on aerobic fitness and shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wilbanks, Susan R; Rogers, Rebecca; Pool, Sean; Bickel, C Scott

    2016-11-01

    Test the effectiveness of a 6-week functional electrical stimulation (FES)-assisted rowing intervention to increase aerobic fitness and decrease shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) Methods: Ten adults with SCI (47 ± 12 years, 86 ± 19.7 kg, 175.5 ± 13.2 cm) 18 ± 14 years since injury, AIS classification A-C who had pain in one or both shoulders for >6 months took part in a pre-test, post-test experiment in our human performance laboratory. Participants took part in 30 minutes of FES-assisted rowing, 3 days/week × 6 weeks. Participants were evaluated for VO 2 peak (FES-row and arm bike), distance rowed, arm power output, Wheelchair User Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI), upper extremity isokinetic strength, scapular stabilization, participation (LIFE-H), quality of life (QOL-SCI), qualitative exit interview. Participants increased distance rowed by 257 ± 266 m and increased arm power output by 6.7 ± 7.9 W. An 8% increase in VO 2 peak and 10.5 ± 4.4 point decrease in shoulder pain were observed (all P < 0.05). There were no changes in upper extremity strength, scapular stabilization, or survey-based measures of participation or quality of life. Qualitative interviewing indicated overall enjoyment of the intervention and improvement in perceived quality of life. FES-assisted rowing is effective to increase aerobic fitness and decrease shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. Further research is necessary to determine if rowing without FES can provide similar benefits, and to determine mechanisms driving improvements in shoulder pain, as no changes in measures of upper extremity strength or scapular stabilization were observed.

  4. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral nerve...

  5. Gastric Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis was to assess the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) for the treatment of chronic, symptomatic refractory gastroparesis and morbid obesity. Background Gastroparesis - Epidemiology Gastroparesis (GP) broadly refers to impaired gastric emptying in the absence of obstruction. Clinically, this can range from the incidental detection of delayed gastric emptying in an asymptomatic person to patients with severe nausea, vomiting and malnutrition. Symptoms of GP are nonspecific and may mimic structural disorders such as ulcer disease, partial gastric or small bowel obstruction, gastric cancer, and pancreaticobiliary disorders. Gastroparesis may occur in association with diabetes, gastric surgery (consequence of peptic ulcer surgery and vagotomy) or for unknown reasons (idiopathic gastroparesis). Symptoms include early satiety, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and weight loss. The majority of patients with GP are women. The relationship between upper gastrointestinal symptoms and the rate of gastric emptying is considered to be weak. Some patients with markedly delayed gastric emptying are asymptomatic and sometimes, severe symptoms may remit spontaneously. Idiopathic GP may represent the most common form of GP. In one tertiary referral retrospective series, the etiologies in 146 GP patients were 36% idiopathic, 29% diabetic, 13% postgastric surgery, 7.5% Parkinson’s disease, 4.8% collagen vascular disorders, 4.1% intestinal pseudoobstruction and 6% miscellaneous causes. The true prevalence of digestive symptoms in patients with diabetes and the relationship of these symptoms to delayed gastric emptying are unknown. Delayed gastric emptying is present in 27% to 58% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 30% with type 2 diabetes. However, highly variable rates of gastric emptying have been reported in type 1 and 2 diabetes, suggesting that development of GP in

  6. Motor cortex stimulation and neuropathic pain: how does motor cortex stimulation affect pain-signaling pathways?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyung; Ryu, Sang Baek; Lee, Sung Eun; Shin, Jaewoo; Jung, Hyun Ho; Kim, Sung June; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Chang, Jin Woo

    2016-03-01

    Neuropathic pain is often severe. Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is used for alleviating neuropathic pain, but the mechanism of action is still unclear. This study aimed to understand the mechanism of action of MCS by investigating pain-signaling pathways, with the expectation that MCS would regulate both descending and ascending pathways. Neuropathic pain was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats. Surface electrodes for MCS were implanted in the rats. Tactile allodynia was measured by behavioral testing to determine the effect of MCS. For the pathway study, immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate changes in c-fos and serotonin expression; micro-positron emission tomography (mPET) scanning was performed to investigate changes of glucose uptake; and extracellular electrophysiological recordings were performed to demonstrate brain activity. MCS was found to modulate c-fos and serotonin expression. In the mPET study, altered brain activity was observed in the striatum, thalamic area, and cerebellum. In the electrophysiological study, neuronal activity was increased by mechanical stimulation and suppressed by MCS. After elimination of artifacts, neuronal activity was demonstrated in the ventral posterolateral nucleus (VPL) during electrical stimulation. This neuronal activity was effectively suppressed by MCS. This study demonstrated that MCS effectively attenuated neuropathic pain. MCS modulated ascending and descending pain pathways. It regulated neuropathic pain by affecting the striatum, periaqueductal gray, cerebellum, and thalamic area, which are thought to regulate the descending pathway. MCS also appeared to suppress activation of the VPL, which is part of the ascending pathway.

  7. Problems, Solutions, and Strategies Reported by Users of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Qualitative Exploration Using Patient Interviews.

    PubMed

    Gladwell, Peter William; Badlan, Kathryn; Cramp, Fiona; Palmer, Shea

    2016-07-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) could offer a non-drug form of pain relief, but there is no consensus regarding its effectiveness for chronic musculoskeletal pain or chronic low back pain. A recent review of previous trial methods identified significant problems with low treatment fidelity. There is little information available to inform the development of a pragmatic implementation design for a TENS evaluation. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of patients who were receiving secondary care in a pain clinic and who had expertise in using TENS to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. These key informants were selected because they had the potential to generate knowledge that could inform research design and clinical practice. A qualitative method using individual semistructured interviews with open questions was selected for its capacity to generate rich data. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 9 patients (6 women, 3 men). Thematic analysis was used as the primary data analysis method, and this analysis was enhanced by a case-level analysis of the context and processes of TENS use of each individual. Data analysis indicated that patients learned to address a range of problems in order to optimize TENS use. Patients may need to personalize the positioning of electrodes and the TENS settings and to readjust them over time. Patients learned to use TENS in a strategic manner, and the outcomes of each strategy varied. The findings indicated that a pragmatic TENS evaluation may need to incorporate a learning phase to allow patients to optimize this complex pattern of TENS usage, and evaluation may need to be sensitive to the outcomes of strategic use. These findings also have implications for clinical practice. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  8. Short-term transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and improves the masticatory muscle activity in temporomandibular disorder patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Paula de Lima; Costa, Dayse Regina Alves da; Oliveira, Ana Izabela Sobral de; Carvalho, Elyson Adam Nunes; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Costa, Yuri Martins; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the short-term effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) by examining pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and electromyography (EMG) activity in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Forty patients with myofascial TMD were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial and were divided into two groups: active (n=20) and placebo (n=20) TENS. Outcome variables assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after (T2) and 48 hours after treatment (T1) were: pain intensity with the aid of a visual analogue scale (VAS); PPT of masticatory and cervical structures; EMG activity during mandibular rest position (MR), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and habitual chewing (HC). Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was applied to the data and the significance level was set at 5%. There was a decrease in the VAS values at T1 and T2 when compared with T0 values in the active TENS group (p<0.050). The PPT between-group differences were significant at T1 assessment of the anterior temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and T2 for the masseter and the SCM (p<0.050). A significant EMG activity reduction of the masseter and anterior temporalis was presented in the active TENS during MR at T1 assessment when compared with T0 (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the anterior temporalis was significantly higher in the active TENS during MVC at T1 and T2 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscle was significantly higher in the active TENS during HC at T1 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). The short-term therapeutic effects of TENS are superior to those of the placebo, because of reported facial pain, deep pain sensitivity and masticatory muscle EMG activity improvement.

  9. THE USE OF TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING AND INTRAMUSCULAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION FOR A SUBJECT WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report. Background and Purpose: Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are widely accepted by clinicians and researchers as a primary source of regional neuromusculoskeletal pain. Trigger point dry needling (TrP‐DN) is an invasive procedure that involves stimulation of MTrPs using an monofilament needle. The purpose of this case report is to report the outcomes of TrP‐DN and intramuscular electrical stimulation (IES) as a primary treatment intervention in a subject with chronic low back pain. Case Description: The subject was a 30‐year‐old female, active duty military, who was referred to physical therapy for low back and right posterolateral hip pain. She noticed symptoms after suffering a lumbar flexion injury while picking up a barbell during weight training. Physical examination demonstrated findings that supported the diagnosis of lumbar segmental instability with a right hip stability dysfunction. Objective findings included a multi‐segmental flexion movement pattern dysfunction and MTrPs in the right gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles with deep palpation. The subject was treated with TrP‐DN and IES for a total of two visits. Bilateral L3 and L5 multifidus and right gluteus maximus and medius muscles were treated, along with implementing a home exercise program consisting of core stability exercises. Outcomes: The subject reported no existing pain and disability on the Numerical Pain Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire and a large perceived change in recovery on the Global Rating of Change at final follow‐up. Physical examination was normal, demonstrating no observed impairments or functional limitations, including normal multi‐segmental flexion and no MTrPs with deep palpation. Discussion: The subject was able to return to full military active duty without any physical limitations and resumed pre‐injury activity levels, including the ability to resume all activities without pain. There is much promise

  10. Mirror Therapy and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Management of Phantom Limb Pain in Amputees - A Single Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tilak, Merlyn; Isaac, Serin Anna; Fletcher, Jebaraj; Vasanthan, Lenny Thinagaran; Subbaiah, Rajalakshmi Sankaran; Babu, Andrew; Bhide, Rohit; Tharion, George

    2016-06-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) can be disabling for nearly two thirds of amputees. Hence, there is a need to find an effective and inexpensive treatment that can be self administered. Among the non-pharmacological treatment for PLP, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) applied to the contralateral extremity and mirror therapy are two promising options. However, there are no studies to compare the two treatments. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare mirror therapy and TENS in the management of PLP in subjects with amputation. The study was an assessor blinded randomized controlled trial conducted at Physiotherapy Gymnasium of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Christian Medical College, Vellore. Twenty-six subjects with PLP consented to participate. An initial assessment of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS) and universal pain score (UPS) was performed by a therapist blinded to the treatment given. Random allocation into Group I-mirror therapy and Group II-TENS was carried out. After 4 days of treatment, pain was re-assessed by the same therapist. The mean difference in Pre and Post values were compared among the groups. The change in pre-post score was analyzed using the paired t test. Participants of Group I had significant decrease in pain [VAS ( p = 0.003) and UPS ( p = 0.001)]. Group II also showed a significant reduction in pain [VAS ( p = 0.003) and UPS ( p = 0.002)]. However, no difference was observed between the two groups [VAS ( p = 0.223 and UPS ( p = 0.956)]. Both Mirror Therapy and TENS were found to be effective in pain reduction on a short-term basis. However, no difference between the two groups was found. Substantiation with long-term follow-up is essential to find its long-term effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Pain, Function, and Quality of Life in Fibromyalgia: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Dailey, Dana L.; Rakel, Barbara A.; Vance, Carol G.T.; Zimmerman, Miriam B.; Crofford, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition that has a significant impact on quality of life and often leads to disability. To date, there have been few well-controlled trials assessing the utility of nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the management of pain and improvement in function in individuals with fibromyalgia. Objectives The purpose of this study will be to complete a long-term, multicenter study to assess the effects of TENS in women with fibromyalgia. Design This will be a phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. Participants Three hundred forty-three participants with fibromyalgia will be recruited for this study. Intervention Participants will be randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: the intervention (TENS), placebo, or no treatment. After completing the randomized period, all participants will receive the intervention for 1 month. The participants will be asked to use TENS at the highest tolerable level for at least 2 hours daily during physical activity. Measurements The primary outcome will be pain with movement, with secondary outcomes assessing functional abilities, patient-reported outcomes, and quantitative sensory testing. Limitations Because having participants refrain from their typical medications is not practical, their usage and any change in medication use will be recorded. Conclusions The results of this study will provide some of the first evidence from a large-scale, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the effectiveness of TENS on pain control and quality-of-life changes in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:25212518

  12. An investigation into the effects of frequency-modulated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on experimentally-induced pressure pain in healthy human participants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Johnson, Mark I

    2009-10-01

    Frequency-modulated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers currents that fluctuate between preset boundaries over a fixed period of time. This study compared the effects of constant-frequency TENS and frequency-modulated TENS on blunt pressure pain in healthy human volunteers. Thirty-six participants received constant-frequency TENS (80 pps), frequency-modulated TENS (20 to 100 pps), and placebo (no current) TENS at a strong nonpainful intensity in a randomized cross-over manner. Pain threshold was taken from the forearm using pressure algometry. There were no statistical differences between constant-frequency TENS and frequency-modulated TENS after 20 minutes (OR = 1.54; CI, 0.29, 8.23, P = 1.0). Both constant-frequency TENS and frequency-modulated TENS were superior to placebo TENS (OR = 59.5, P < .001 and OR = 38.5, P < .001, respectively). Frequency-modulated TENS does not influence hypoalgesia to any greater extent than constant-frequency TENS when currents generate a strong nonpainful paraesthesia at the site of pain. The finding that frequency-modulated TENS and constant-frequency TENS were superior to placebo TENS provides further evidence that a strong yet nonpainful TENS intensity is a prerequisite for hypoalgesia. This study provides evidence that TENS, delivered at a strong nonpainful intensity, increases pain threshold to pressure algometry in healthy participants over and above that seen with placebo (no current) TENS. Frequency-modulated TENS does not increase hypoalgesia to any appreciable extent to that seen with constant-frequency TENS.

  13. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain, function, and quality of life in fibromyalgia: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Noehren, Brian; Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol G T; Zimmerman, Miriam B; Crofford, Leslie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition that has a significant impact on quality of life and often leads to disability. To date, there have been few well-controlled trials assessing the utility of nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the management of pain and improvement in function in individuals with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study will be to complete a long-term, multicenter study to assess the effects of TENS in women with fibromyalgia. This will be a phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. Three hundred forty-three participants with fibromyalgia will be recruited for this study. Participants will be randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: the intervention (TENS), placebo, or no treatment. After completing the randomized period, all participants will receive the intervention for 1 month. The participants will be asked to use TENS at the highest tolerable level for at least 2 hours daily during physical activity. The primary outcome will be pain with movement, with secondary outcomes assessing functional abilities, patient-reported outcomes, and quantitative sensory testing. Because having participants refrain from their typical medications is not practical, their usage and any change in medication use will be recorded. The results of this study will provide some of the first evidence from a large-scale, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the effectiveness of TENS on pain control and quality-of-life changes in patients with fibromyalgia. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  14. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Mailis-Gagnon, A; Furlan, A D; Sandoval, J A; Taylor, R

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a form of therapy used to treat certain types of chronic pain. It involves an electrical generator that delivers pulses to a targeted spinal cord area. The leads can be implanted by laminectomy or percutaneously and the source of power is supplied by an implanted battery or by an external radio-frequency transmitter. The exact mechanism of action of SCS is poorly understood. To assess the efficacy and effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation in relieving certain kinds of pain, as well as the complications and adverse effects of this procedure. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE to September 2003; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 3, 2003); textbooks and reference lists in retrieved articles. We also contacted experts in the field of pain and the main manufacturer of the stimulators. We included trials with a control group, either randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or non-randomized controlled clinical trials (CCTs), that assessed spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain. Two independent reviewers selected the studies, assessed study quality and extracted the data. One of the assessors of methodological quality was blinded to authors, dates and journals. The data were analysed using qualitative methods (best evidence synthesis). Two RCTs (81 patients in total) met our inclusion criteria. One was judged as being of high quality (score of 3 on Jadad scale) and the other of low quality (score of 1 on Jadad scale). One trial included patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (reflex sympathetic dystrophy) and the other patients with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome. The follow-up periods varied from 6 to 12 months. Both studies reported that SCS was effective, however, meta-analysis was not undertaken because of the small number of patients and the heterogeneity of the study population. Although there is limited evidence in favour of SCS for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome and Complex Regional Pain

  15. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor cortex stimulation in neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Mylius, V; Ayache, S S; Teepker, M; Kappus, C; Kolodziej, M; Rosenow, F; Nimsky, C; Oertel, W H; Lefaucheur, J P

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive and invasive cortical stimulation allows the modulation of therapy-refractory neuropathic pain. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the contralateral motor cortex yields therapeutic effects at short-term and predicts the benefits of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS). The present article summarizes the findings on application, mechanisms and therapeutic effects of cortical stimulation in neuropathic pain.

  16. Short-term transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and improves the masticatory muscle activity in temporomandibular disorder patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    FERREIRA, Ana Paula de Lima; da COSTA, Dayse Regina Alves; de OLIVEIRA, Ana Izabela Sobral; CARVALHO, Elyson Adam Nunes; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; COSTA, Yuri Martins; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Studies to assess the effects of therapies on pain and masticatory muscle function are scarce. Objective To investigate the short-term effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) by examining pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and electromyography (EMG) activity in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Material and Methods Forty patients with myofascial TMD were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial and were divided into two groups: active (n=20) and placebo (n=20) TENS. Outcome variables assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after (T2) and 48 hours after treatment (T1) were: pain intensity with the aid of a visual analogue scale (VAS); PPT of masticatory and cervical structures; EMG activity during mandibular rest position (MR), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and habitual chewing (HC). Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was applied to the data and the significance level was set at 5%. Results There was a decrease in the VAS values at T1 and T2 when compared with T0 values in the active TENS group (p<0.050). The PPT between-group differences were significant at T1 assessment of the anterior temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and T2 for the masseter and the SCM (p<0.050). A significant EMG activity reduction of the masseter and anterior temporalis was presented in the active TENS during MR at T1 assessment when compared with T0 (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the anterior temporalis was significantly higher in the active TENS during MVC at T1 and T2 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscle was significantly higher in the active TENS during HC at T1 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). Conclusions The short-term therapeutic effects of TENS are superior to those of the placebo, because of reported facial pain, deep pain sensitivity and masticatory muscle EMG activity improvement. PMID:28403351

  17. Effectiveness of complementary pain treatment for women with deep endometriosis through Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS): randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mira, Ticiana A A; Giraldo, Paulo C; Yela, Daniela A; Benetti-Pinto, Cristina L

    2015-11-01

    Evaluate TENS effectiveness as a complementary treatment of chronic pelvic pain and deep dyspareunia in women with deep endometriosis. This randomized controlled trial was performed in a tertiary health care center, including twenty-two women with deep endometriosis undergoing hormone therapy with persistent pelvic pain and/or deep dyspareunia. This study was registered in the Brazilian Record of Clinical Trials (ReBEC), under n RBR-3rndh6. TENS application for 8 weeks followed a randomized allocation into two groups: Group 1 - acupuncture-like TENS (Frequency: 8Hz, pulse duration: 250μs) - VIF (n=11) and Group 2 - self-applied TENS (Frequency: 85Hz, pulse duration: 75μs) (n=11). The intensity applied was "strong, but comfortable". We evaluated patients before and after treatment by the use of the Visual Analogue Scale, Deep Dyspareunia Scale and Endometriosis Quality of Life Questionnaire. We used the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests to compare before and after treatment conditions. Despite the use of hormone therapy for 1.65±2.08 years, the 22 women with deep endometriosis sustained pelvic pain complaints (VAS=5.95±2.13 and 2.45±2.42, p<.001) and/or deep dyspareunia (DDS=2.29±0.46 and 1.20±1.01, p=.001). We observed significant improvement for chronic pelvic pain, deep dyspareunia and quality of life by the use of TENS. Both application types of TENS were effective for improving the evaluated types of pain. Both resources (acupuncture-like TENS and self-applied TENS) demonstrated effectiveness as a complementary treatment of pelvic pain and deep dyspareunia, improving quality of life in women with deep endometriosis regardless of the device used for treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential currents (IFC) in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Facci, Ligia Maria; Nowotny, Jean Paulus; Tormem, Fabio; Trevisani, Virgínia Fernandes Moça

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential current are the most used electrotherapy methods, although there is little scientific evidence to support their use. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of TENS and interferential current among patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. Single-blind randomized controlled trial in the Department of Physiotherapy, Centro Universitário de Maringá. One hundred and fifty patients were randomly divided into three groups: TENS (group 1), interferential current (group 2) and controls (group 3). The patients designated for electrotherapy received ten 30-minute sessions, while the control group remained untreated. All patients and controls were evaluated before and after treatment using a visual analog scale and the McGill Pain and Roland Morris questionnaires, and regarding their use of additional medications. There was a mean reduction on the visual analog scale of 39.18 mm with TENS, 44.86 mm with interferential current and 8.53 mm among the controls. In the Roland Morris questionnaire, group 1 had a mean reduction of 6.59; group 2, 7.20; and group 3, 0.70 points. In group 1, 84% of the patients stopped using medications after the treatment; in group 2, 75%; and in group 3, 34%. There was no statistically significant difference between the TENS and interferential current groups (P > 0.05); a difference was only found between these groups and the controls (P < 0.0001). There was no difference between TENS and interferential current for chronic low back pain treatment. NCT01017913.

  19. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to relieve... on the patient's spinal cord and an external transmitter for transmitting the stimulating pulses...

  20. An Electrical Muscle Stimulation Suit for Increasing Blood Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    an exploratory way in about 100 trials. Maximal indi- vidual stimulation intensity was selected to give a solid, tetanic muscle contraction without...therapy and in muscle strength training in athletes. However, if the electrical stimulation is too intense, the result will be muscle contraction pain...Each subject was instructed to have the investigator lower the intensity or stop the stimulation if muscle contraction pain was experienced

  1. Efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (tens) for chronic low-back pain in a multiple sclerosis population: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Warke, Kim; Al-Smadi, Jamal; Baxter, David; Walsh, Deirdre M; Lowe-Strong, Andrea S

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hypoalgesic effects of self-applied transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on chronic low-back pain (LBP) in a multiple sclerosis (MS) population. Ninety participants with probable or definite MS (aged 21 to 78 y) presenting with chronic LBP were recruited and randomized into 3 groups (n=30 per group): (1) low-frequency TENS group (4 Hz, 200 micros); (2) high-frequency TENS group (110 Hz, 200 micros); and (3) placebo TENS. Participants self-applied TENS for 45 minutes, a minimum of twice daily, for 6 weeks. Outcome measures were recorded at weeks 1, 6, 10, and 32. Primary outcome measures included: Visual Analog Scale for average LBP and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included: Visual Analog Scale for worst and weekly LBP, back and leg spasm; Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire; Barthel Index; Rivermead Mobility Index; Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Instrument, and a daily logbook. Data were analyzed blind using parametric and nonparametric tests, as appropriate. Results indicated a statistically significant interactive effect between groups for average LBP (P=0.008); 1-way analysis of covariance did not show any significant effects at any time point once a Bonferonni correction was applied (P>0.05). However, clinically important differences were observed in some of the outcome measures in both active treatment groups during the treatment and follow-up periods. Although not statistically significant, the observed effects may have implications for the clinical prescription and the use of TENS within this population.

  2. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES) are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications. Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES) are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favor of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG) signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm. PMID:27471448

  3. The influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation parameters on the level of pain perceived by participants with painful diabetic neuropathy: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Upton, Gabrielle A; Tinley, Paul; Al-Aubaidy, Hayder; Crawford, Rachel

    This pilot study aimed to investigate and compare the perceived pain relief effectiveness of two different modes of TENS in people with painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). A cross-over study was conducted at Charles Sturt University, Orange. Five participants with PDN were assessed with a McGill Pain Questionnaire before and after each of the two TENS treatments. Participants were randomly allocated to Traditional TENS (80Hz, 200ms) or Acupuncture-like TENS (2Hz, 200ms) and the treatments were applied daily for 30min over ten days. Following a seven day washout period, the alternate mode of TENS was carried out using the same method. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests were used to statistically analyse the results. All five participants reported personally meaningful pain relief during one or both of the TENS treatments. The Wilcoxon signed rank testing showed no statistical significance, p=1, likely due to the small sample size. Acupuncture-like TENS had a large effect size (z=-1.625, r=0.514), whilst Traditional TENS produced a medium effect size (z=-1.214, r=0.384). No adverse effects were reported. Acupuncture-like TENS may be more effective for PDN than traditional TENS. A larger scale replication of this pilot study is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical stimulation of mechanoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echenique, A. M.; Graffigna, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Within the field of Rehabilitation Engineering, this work is aimed at identifying the optimal parameters of electric current stimulus which activate the nervous axons of mecanoreceptors found in the fingertip, allowing, this way, to resemble tactile senses. These sensorial feelings can be used by aiding technological means, namely, the sensorial substitution technology, in an attempt to render information to blind people through the tactile sense. The physical pressure on sensorial areas (fingertips) used for reading activities through the Braille System is the main effect that is imitated and studied in this research work. An experimental aiding prototype for Braille reading research has been developed and tested with blinds and reduced vision people, with highly satisfactory results.

  5. Decreased Opioid Utilization and Cost at One Year in Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Treated with Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS).

    PubMed

    Pivec, Robert; Minshall, Michael E; Mistry, Jaydev B; Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa K; Mont, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) may be treated without opioids through the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). However, no study has evaluated its clinical effect and economic impact as measured by opioid utilization and costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients who were given TENS for CLBP compared to a matched group without TENS at one-year follow-up, to determine differences between opioid consumption. Opioid utilization and costs in patients who did and did not receive TENS were extracted from a Medicare supplemental administrative claims database. Patients were selected if they had at least two ICD-9-CM coded claims for low back pain in a three-month period and were then propensity score matched at a 1:1 ratio between patients who received TENS and those who did not. There were 22,913 patients in each group who had a minimum follow-up of one year. There were no significant demographic or comorbidity differences with the exception that TENS patients had more episodes of back pain. Significantly fewer patients in the TENS group required opioids at final follow-up (57.7 vs. 60.3%). TENS patients also had significantly fewer annual per-patient opioid costs compared to non-TENS patients ($169 vs. $192). There were significantly lower event rates in TENS patients compared to non-TENS patients when measured by opioid utilization (characterized by frequency of prescription refills) (3.82 vs. 4.08, respectively) or pharmacy utilization (31.67 vs. 32.25). The TENS group also demonstrated a significantly lower cost of these utilization events ($44 vs. $49) and avoided more opioid events (20.4 events fewer per 100 patients annually). Treatment of CLBP with TENS demonstrated significantly fewer patients requiring opioids, fewer events where a patient required an opioid prescription, and lower per-patient costs. Since TENS is both non-invasive and a non-narcotic, it may potentially allow physicians to be more aggressive in treating CLBP

  6. Deep brain stimulation for phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Richard G; Otero, Sofia; Carter, Helen; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2005-05-01

    Phantom limb pain is an often severe and debilitating phenomenon that has been reported in up to 85% of amputees. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms are thought to play a role in pain modulation in affected individuals; however central mechanisms are also likely to be of importance. The neuromatrix theory postulates a genetically determined representation of body image, which is modified by sensory input to create a neurosignature. Persistence of the neurosignature may be responsible for painless phantom limb sensations, whereas phantom limb pain may be due to abnormal reorganisation within the neuromatrix. This study assessed the clinical outcome of deep brain stimulation of the periventricular grey matter and somatosensory thalamus for the relief of chronic neuropathic pain associated with phantom limb in three patients. These patients were assessed preoperatively and at 3 month intervals postoperatively. Self-rated visual analogue scale pain scores assessed pain intensity, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire assessed the quality of the pain. Quality of life was assessed using the EUROQOL EQ-5D scale. Periventricular gray stimulation alone was optimal in two patients, whilst a combination of periventricular gray and thalamic stimulation produced the greatest degree of relief in one patient. At follow-up (mean 13.3 months) the intensity of pain was reduced by 62% (range 55-70%). In all three patients, the burning component of the pain was completely alleviated. Opiate intake was reduced in the two patients requiring morphine sulphate pre-operatively. Quality of life measures indicated a statistically significant improvement. This data supports the role for deep brain stimulation in patients with phantom limb pain. The medical literature relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of this clinical entity is reviewed in detail.

  7. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-07-16

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes.

  8. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes. PMID:26193273

  9. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Barbara M.; Lam, Amy; Griffin, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Lack of neural innervation due to neurological damage renders muscle unable to produce force. Use of electrical stimulation is a medium in which investigators have tried to find a way to restore movement and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Different methods of applying electrical current to modify neuromuscular activity are electrical stimulation (ES), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and functional electrical stimulation (FES). This review covers the aspects of electrical stimulation used for rehabilitation and functional purposes. Discussed are the various parameters of electrical stimulation, including frequency, pulse width/duration, duty cycle, intensity/amplitude, ramp time, pulse pattern, program duration, program frequency, and muscle group activated, and how they affect fatigue in the stimulated muscle. PMID:22737049

  10. Treatment of Post-Herpetic Neuralgia by Prolonged Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P. W.; Wall, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    The results of treating patients with severe post-herpetic neuralgia with prolonged self-administered electric stimulation from a portable apparatus were good in 11 out of 30 patients. None of these patients had had as good relief of pain with other forms of treatment. In 10 patients some effects from stimulation continued after stimulation stopped. In eight there was an improvement in the course of the neuralgia, and in two there was a cure. Imagesp646-a PMID:4425789

  11. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation effect on postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Celal Bugra; Akboga, Suleyman Anil; Celik, Ali; Kalafat, Cem Emrah; Tastepe, Abdullah Irfan

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation has been used to control post-thoracotomy pain, with conflicting results. We aimed to assess its efficacy on post-thoracotomy pain and early complications. Methods Between January 2012 and December 2014, 87 patients underwent a standard posterolateral thoracotomy and were randomized in 2 groups: group T was 43 patients who had transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and group C was 44 patients who had placebo stimulation with an inoperative device. Pain score was measured using a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10. The frequency of the device was set at 100 Hz and pulse width at 100 ms. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the demographic characteristics of the 2 groups, and there was no difference in the duration of hospitalization (4.74 ± 1.6 vs. 5.23 ± 1.5 days; p = 0.06). Postoperative pain scores of the two groups showed that on postoperative day 0, 1, and 2, the mean pain scores of group T were significantly lower ( p = 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.003). There were no significant differences in early complications or surgical technique. Conclusion We concluded that electrical stimulation is a safe and effective adjunctive therapy for acute post-thoracotomy pain control. However, it does not affect the duration of hospitalization or early pulmonary complications.

  12. Stimulation of the peripheral nervous system for pain control.

    PubMed

    Long, D M

    1983-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation is a proven effective way to relieve pain. Its optimal use requires an accurate patient diagnosis. Treatment of pain as a symptom only is likely to fail. There must be a careful psychosocial evaluation, for the majority of patients who come to the doctor complaining of pain have major psychological, social, or behavioral factors that are most important in the genesis of the complaint. Drug abuse must be corrected. Related symptoms, such as anxiety and depression, must be treated. Then, a thorough trail of transcutaneous stimulation is mandatory. A desultory use will undoubtedly lead to failure. This trial must begin with patient education by experienced personnel. Then the electrodes must be properly applied, and there must be a regular follow-up of stimulation to be certain the patient is utilizing it correctly. The patient must be supported through an adequate trial which should extend over 2-4 weeks before purchase of the device is contemplated. Furthermore, all related nursing and physician personnel must be educated in the proper use of the technique. The uninformed professional who denigrates the therapy is a very effective deterrent to appropriate use. In this situation, transcutaneous electrical stimulation will be of great value in the treatment of acute musculoskeletal injury and acute postoperative pain. It will be effective in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury pain, chronic musculoskeletal abnormalities, chronic pain in the patient who has undergone multiple operations upon the low back and neck, visceral pain, some of the reflex sympathetic dystrophies, and postherpetic neuralgia. Stimulation will not help a complaint which is psychosomatic in origin. It will not influence drug addiction. It is not likely to be useful in any situation where secondary gain is important. The metabolic neuropathies, pain of spinal cord injury, and pain from cerebrovascular accident will not respond frequently enough to warrant more than

  13. A systematic review investigating the relationship between efficacy and stimulation parameters when using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Beckwée, David; Bautmans, Ivan; Swinnen, Eva; Vermet, Yorick; Lefeber, Nina; Lievens, Pierre; Vaes, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of postoperative knee arthroplasty pain and to relate these results to the stimulation parameters used. PubMed, Pedro and Web of Knowledge were systematically screened for studies investigating effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative knee arthroplasty pain. Studies were screened for their methodological and therapeutical quality. We appraised the influence of the stimulation settings used and indicated whether or not a neurophysiological and/or mechanistic rationale was given for these stimulation settings. A total of 5 articles met the inclusion criteria. In total, 347 patients were investigated. The number of patients who received some form of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation was 117, and 54 patients received sham transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. Pain was the primary outcome in all studies. The stimulation settings used in the studies (n = 2) that reported significant effects differed from the others as they implemented a submaximal stimulation intensity. Stimulation parameters were heterogeneous, and only one study provided a rationale for them. This review reveals that an effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation might have been missed due to low methodological and therapeutical quality. Justifying the choice of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation parameters may improve therapeutical quality.

  14. A systematic review investigating the relationship between efficacy and stimulation parameters when using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Beckwée, David; Bautmans, Ivan; Swinnen, Eva; Vermet, Yorick; Lefeber, Nina; Lievens, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of postoperative knee arthroplasty pain and to relate these results to the stimulation parameters used. Data Sources: PubMed, Pedro and Web of Knowledge were systematically screened for studies investigating effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative knee arthroplasty pain. Review Methods: Studies were screened for their methodological and therapeutical quality. We appraised the influence of the stimulation settings used and indicated whether or not a neurophysiological and/or mechanistic rationale was given for these stimulation settings. Results: A total of 5 articles met the inclusion criteria. In total, 347 patients were investigated. The number of patients who received some form of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation was 117, and 54 patients received sham transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. Pain was the primary outcome in all studies. The stimulation settings used in the studies (n = 2) that reported significant effects differed from the others as they implemented a submaximal stimulation intensity. Stimulation parameters were heterogeneous, and only one study provided a rationale for them. Conclusion: This review reveals that an effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation might have been missed due to low methodological and therapeutical quality. Justifying the choice of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation parameters may improve therapeutical quality. PMID:26770730

  15. Deep Brain Electrical Stimulation in Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luisa L.

    2008-11-01

    The deep brain electrical stimulation has been used for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, depression and epilepsy. Studies carried out in human brain indicate that the application of high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz in limbic structures of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy abolished clinical seizures and significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes at focus. The anticonvulsant effects of HFS seem to be more effective in patients with less severe epilepsy, an effect associated with a high GABA tissue content and a low rate of cell loss. In addition, experiments using models of epilepsy indicate that HFS (pulses of 60 μs width at 130 Hz at subthreshold current intensity) of specific brain areas avoids the acquisition of generalized seizures and enhances the postictal seizure suppression. HFS is also able to modify the status epilepticus. It is concluded that the effects of HFS may be a good strategy to reduce or avoid the epileptic activity.

  16. Braille line using electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puertas, A.; Purés, P.; Echenique, A. M.; Ensinck, J. P. Graffigna y. G.

    2007-11-01

    Conceived within the field of Rehabilitation Technologies for visually impaired persons, the present work aims at enabling the blind user to read written material by means of a tactile display. Once he is familiarized to operate this system, the user will be able to achieve greater performance in study, academic and job activities, thus achieving a rapid and easier social inclusion. The devise accepts any kind of text that is computer-loadable (documents, books, Internet information, and the like) which, through digital means, can be read as Braille text on the pad. This tactile display is composed of an electrodes platform that simulate, through stimulation the writing/reading Braille characters. In order to perceive said characters in similar way to the tactile feeling from paper material, the skin receptor of fingers are stimulated electrically so as to simulate the same pressure and depressions as those of the paper-based counterpart information. Once designed and developed, the display was tested with blind subjects, with relatively satisfactory results. As a continuing project, this prototype is currently being improved as regards.

  17. [Mechanisms and applications of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in analgesia].

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Hui-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Lei; Tang, Yi; Peng, Wei-Wei; Hu, Li

    2017-06-25

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), as a non-pharmacological and non-invasive analgesic therapy with low-cost, has been widely used to relieve pain in various clinical applications, by delivering current pulses to the skin area to activate the peripheral nerve fibers. Nevertheless, analgesia induced by TENS varied in the clinical practice, which could be caused by the fact that TENS with different stimulus parameters has different biological mechanisms in relieving pain. Therefore, to advance our understanding of TENS in various basic and clinical studies, we discussed (1) neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia; (2) relevant factors that may influence analgesic effects of TENS from the perspectives of stimulus parameters, including stimulated position, pulse parameters (current intensity, frequency, and pulse width), stimulus duration and used times in each day; and (3) applications of TENS in relieving clinical pain, including post-operative pain, chronic low back pain and labor pain. Finally, we propose that TENS may involve multiple and complex psychological neurophysiological mechanisms, and suggest that different analgesic effects of TENS with different stimulus parameters should be taken into consideration in clinical applications. In addition, to optimize analgesic effect, we recommend that individual-based TENS stimulation parameters should be designed by considering individual differences among patients, e.g., adaptively adjusting the stimulation parameters based on the dynamic ratings of patients' pain.

  18. Vomiting Center reanalyzed: An electrical stimulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brainstem of 15 decerebrate cats produced stimulus-bound vomiting in only 4 animals. Vomiting was reproducible in only one cat. Effective stimulating sites were located in the solitary tract and reticular formation. Restricted localization of a vomiting center, stimulation of which evoked readily reproducible results, could not be obtained.

  19. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    PubMed

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  20. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS. PMID:25674327

  1. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation in functional pain.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R R; Arbit, J; Siqueira, E B; Zagar, R

    1981-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) has recently emerged as a distinct therapeutic modality in the alleviation of acute and chronic pain. We applied this modality to 15 nonsurgical low-back pain patients having diagnoses of functional pain, with 40% initially having significant pain relief (50% of greater). However, this pain-alleviating effect of TENS did not last longer than two months. After initiation of neurostimulation, increased pain and/or bizarre and inappropriate sensations and behavior frequently developed. We also applied this modality in the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of 24 patients having diagnoses of postsurgical chronic intractable low-back pain of psychosomatic origin and achieved similar results. In both groups, we utilized a simplified poststimulation "normal-saline-sterile-water intramuscular injection test" to confirm the findings from transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation and to verify the functional basis of the present low-back pain.

  3. Does Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Peripheral Electrical Stimulation Have an Additive Effect in the Control of Hip Joint Osteonecrosis Pain Associated with Sickle Cell Disease? A Protocol for a One-Session Double Blind, Block-Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Tiago da Silva; Silva, Wellington Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Sânzia B; Figueiredo, Camila A; Campbell, Fernanda Q; Daltro, Gildasio de Cerqueira; Valenzuela, Antônio; Montoya, Pedro; Lucena, Rita de C S; Baptista, Abrahão F

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is probably related to maladaptive plasticity of brain areas involved in nociceptive processing. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) and Peripheral Electrical Stimulation (PES) can modulate cortical excitability and help to control chronic pain. Studies have shown that combined use of tDCS and PES has additive effects. However, to date, no study investigated additive effects of these neuromodulatory techniques on chronic pain in patients with SCD. This protocol describes a study aiming to assess whether combined use of tDCS and PES more effectively alleviate pain in patients with SCD compared to single use of each technique. The study consists of a one-session double blind, block-randomized clinical trial (NCT02813629) in which 128 participants with SCD and femoral osteonecrosis will be enrolled. Stepwise procedures will occur on two independent days. On day 1, participants will be screened for eligibility criteria. On day 2, data collection will occur in four stages: sample characterization, baseline assessment, intervention, and post-intervention assessment. These procedures will last ~5 h. Participants will be divided into two groups according to homozygous for S allele (HbSS) ( n = 64) and heterozygous for S and C alleles (HbSC) ( n = 64) genotypes. Participants in each group will be randomly assigned, equally, to one of the following interventions: (1) active tDCS + active PES; (2) active tDCS + sham PES; (3) sham tDCS + active PES; and (4) sham tDCS + sham PES. Active tDCS intervention will consist of 20 min 2 mA anodic stimulation over the primary motor cortex contralateral to the most painful hip. Active PES intervention will consist of 30 min sensory electrical stimulation at 100 Hz over the most painful hip. The main study outcome will be pain intensity, measured by a Visual Analogue Scale. In addition, electroencephalographic power density, cortical maps of the gluteus maximus muscle elicited by

  4. Electrical Cerebral Stimulation Modifies Inhibitory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuéllar-Herrera, M.; Rocha, L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nervous tissue has been proposed as a method to treat some neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Epileptic seizures result from excessive, synchronous, abnormal firing patterns of neurons that are located predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Many people with epilepsy continue presenting seizures even though they are under regimens of antiepileptic medications. An alternative therapy for treatment resistant epilepsy is cerebral electrical stimulation. The present study is focused to review the effects of different types of electrical stimulation and specifically changes in amino acids.

  5. [Electrical acupoint stimulation increases athletes' rapid strength].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua-yuan; Liu, Tang-yi; Kuai, Le; Gao, Ming

    2006-05-01

    To search for a stimulation method for increasing athletes' performance. One hundred and fifty athletes were randomly divided into a trial group and a control group, 75 athletes in each group. Acupoints were stimulated with audio frequency pulse modulated wave and multi-blind method were used to investigate effects of the electric stimulation of acupoints on 30-meter running, standing long jumping and Cybex isokinetic testing index. The acupoint electric stimulation method could significantly increase athlete's performance (P < 0.05), and the biomechanical indexes, maximal peak moment of force (P < 0.05), force moment accelerating energy (P < 0.05) and average power (P < 0.05). Electrical acupoint stimulation can enhance athlete's rapid strength.

  6. [Functional electric stimulation (FES) in cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M H; Lourenção, M I; Ribeiro Sobrinho, J B; Battistella, L R

    1992-01-01

    Our study concerns a patient with cerebral palsy, submitted to conventional occupational therapy and functional electrical stimulation. The results as to manual ability, spasticity, sensibility and synkinesis were satisfactory.

  7. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for the Control of Pain during Rehabilitation Following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): A Randomized, Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rakel, Barbara; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Geasland, Katharine; Embree, Jennie; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Herr, Keela; Walsh, Deirdre; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of TENS in reducing pain and hyperalgesia and increasing function following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized participants using TENS during rehabilitation exercises would: 1) report significantly lower pain during range-of-motion (ROM) and fast walking but not at rest; 2) have less hyperalgesia; and, 3) have better function than participants receiving Placebo-TENS or Standard Care. We also hypothesized that change in ROM pain would differ based on psychological characteristics (trait anxiety, pain catastrophizing and depression) and treatment group. This prospective, randomized study used intent-to-treat analyses on 317 subjects after primary, unilateral TKA. Assessors, blinded to treatment allocation, measured pain, function (ROM and gait speed), and hyperalgesia (quantitative sensory tests) postoperatively and 6 weeks after surgery. Analgesic intake, anxiety, depression, and pain catastrophizing were also assessed. TENS participants used it 1–2 times/day at 42 mA (on average) and had less pain postoperatively during active knee extension (p=0.019) and fast walking (p=0.006) than Standard Care participants. TENS and Placebo-TENS were not significantly different. TENS participants who scored low on anxiety and pain catastrophizing had a greater reduction in ROM pain at 6 weeks than those scoring high on these factors (p=0.002 and 0.03). Both TENS and Placebo-TENS participants had less postoperative mechanical hyperalgesia (p=0.03 – 0.01) than Standard Care participants. Supplementing pharmacologic analgesia with TENS during rehabilitation exercises reduces movement pain postoperatively but a placebo influence exists and the effect is gone by 6 weeks. Patients with low anxiety and pain catastrophizing may benefit most from TENS. PMID:25270585

  8. Psychophysics, flare, and neurosecretory function in human pain models: capsaicin versus electrically evoked pain.

    PubMed

    Geber, Christian; Fondel, Ricarda; Krämer, Heidrun H; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolfe-Detlef; Sommer, Claudia; Birklein, Frank

    2007-06-01

    Intradermal capsaicin injection (CAP) and electrical current stimulation (ES) are analyzed in respect to patterns and test-retest reliability of pain as well as sensory and neurosecretory changes. In 10 healthy subjects, 2x CAP (50 microg) and 2x ES (5 to 30 mA) were applied to the volar forearm. The time period between 2 identical stimulations was about 4 months. Pain ratings, areas of mechanical hyperalgesia, and allodynia were assessed. The intensity of sensory changes was quantified by using quantitative sensory testing. Neurogenic flare was assessed by using laser Doppler imaging. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release was quantified by dermal microdialysis in combination with an enzyme immunoassay. Time course and peak pain ratings were different between CAP and ES. Test-retest correlation was high (r > or = 0.73). Both models induced primary heat hyperalgesia and primary plus secondary pin-prick hyperalgesia. Allodynia occurred in about half of the subjects. Maximum flare sizes did not differ between CAP and ES, but flare intensities were higher for ES. Test-retest correlation was higher for flare sizes than for flare intensity. A significant CGRP release could only be measured after CAP. The different time courses of pain stimulation (CAP: rapidly decaying pain versus ES: pain plateau) led to different peripheral neurosecretory effects but induced similar central plasticity and hyperalgesia. The present study gives a detailed overview of psychophysical and neurosecretory characteristics induced by noxious stimulation with capsaicin and electrical current. We describe differences, similarities, and reproducibility of these human pain models. These data might help to interpret past and future results of human pain studies using experimental pain.

  9. Elevation of pain threshold by vaginal stimulation in women.

    PubMed

    Whipple, B; Komisaruk, B R

    1985-04-01

    In 2 studies with 10 women each, vaginal self-stimulation significantly increased the threshold to detect and tolerate painful finger compression, but did not significantly affect the threshold to detect innocuous tactile stimulation. The vaginal self-stimulation was applied with a specially designed pressure transducer assembly to produce a report of pressure or pleasure. In the first study, 6 of the women perceived the vaginal stimulation as producing pleasure. During that condition, the pain tolerance threshold increased significantly by 36.8% and the pain detection threshold increased significantly by 53%. A second study utilized other types of stimuli. Vaginal self-stimulation perceived as pressure significantly increased the pain tolerance threshold by 40.3% and the pain detection threshold by 47.4%. In the second study, when the vaginal stimulation was self-applied in a manner that produced orgasm, the pain tolerance threshold and pain detection threshold increased significantly by 74.6% and 106.7% respectively, while the tactile threshold remained unaffected. A variety of control conditions, including various types of distraction, did not significantly elevate pain or tactile thresholds. We conclude that in women, vaginal self-stimulation decreases pain sensitivity, but does not affect tactile sensitivity. This effect is apparently not due to painful or non-painful distraction.

  10. Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Pain: Mode of Action.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Bradley, Kerry; Kapural, Leonardo

    2017-07-15

    Literature review. A review of the literature that presents a perspective on mechanisms of actions behind spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy for chronic pain. SCS is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of intractable chronic pain. Its application has been mostly based on the gate control theory of pain. Computational models have been fundamental on the understanding of clinical observations and the design of therapies that provide optimal neuromodulation. Research has provided insight into the involvement of specific neurotransmitters that support segmental and supraspinal mechanisms of action. A literature review was performed with emphasis on mechanisms of action for SCS including the effects of electrical fields on spinal cord structures based on computational models and preclinical and clinical explorations. This review provides background on the development of SCS, which has been driven around a paresthesia-based paradigm as a result of the gate control theory. A review of computational models emphasizes their importance on our current understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical optimization of therapy. Electrophysiology and molecular biology have provided a closer, yet narrow, view of the effect of SCS on neurotransmitters and their receptors, which have led to the formulation of segmental and supraspinal mechanisms. Literature supporting the involvement of glial cells in chronic pain and their characteristic response to electrical fields should motivate further investigation of mechanisms involving neuroglia. Finally, a review of recent results paresthesia-free strategies should encourage research on mechanisms of action. The mechanisms of SCS have been extensively studied and several consistent phenomena have emerged. The activation of A-beta fibers to induce paresthesia also involve neurotransmitter release via segmental and supraspinal pathways. Despite advancements, much remains to be understood, particularly as new

  11. Neuromuscular electric stimulation in patellofemoral dysfunction: literature review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ricardo Lucas; Souza, Márcia Leal São Pedro; dos Santos, Fernanda Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Patellofemoral dysfunction is a fairly common deficiency among young individuals that primarily affects females and may be characterized by pain, swelling and retropatellar crepitation. The purpose of this review of literature from the period between 2005 and 2011 was to systematize knowledge in relation to the increase in quadriceps muscle strength and pain relief in patients with patellofemoral dysfunction, using neuromuscular electrical stimulation and resistance exercises. The inclusion criteria were intervention articles from the past six years, in English, Spanish and Portuguese, which used muscle strengthening and neuromuscular electrical stimulation for rehabilitation obtained through searches in the electronic databases Medline and Lilacs and in the Bireme library. The bibliographic search yielded 28 references, of which nine were excluded in accordance with the aims and inclusion criteria while 16 articles were selected for reading of the abstracts and subsequent analysis. Mediumfrequency Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) can be used in association with resistance exercises as an adjuvant in the treatment of patellofemoral dysfunction (PFD), both to achieve muscle rebalance and for pain relief. PMID:24453645

  12. Distributed stimulation increases force elicited with functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmire, Alie J.; Lockwood, Danielle R.; Doane, Cynthia J.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. The maximum muscle forces that can be evoked using functional electrical stimulation (FES) are relatively modest. The reason for this weakness is not fully understood but could be partly related to the widespread distribution of motor nerve branches within muscle. As such, a single stimulating electrode (as is conventionally used) may be incapable of activating the entire array of motor axons supplying a muscle. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether stimulating a muscle with more than one source of current could boost force above that achievable with a single source. Approach. We compared the maximum isometric forces that could be evoked in the anterior deltoid of anesthetized monkeys using one or two intramuscular electrodes. We also evaluated whether temporally interleaved stimulation between two electrodes might reduce fatigue during prolonged activity compared to synchronized stimulation through two electrodes. Main results. We found that dual electrode stimulation consistently produced greater force (~50% greater on average) than maximal stimulation with single electrodes. No differences, however, were found in the fatigue responses using interleaved versus synchronized stimulation. Significance. It seems reasonable to consider using multi-electrode stimulation to augment the force-generating capacity of muscles and thereby increase the utility of FES systems.

  13. Evaluation of the Combined Application of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Volitional Contractions on Thigh Muscle Strength, Knee Pain and Physical Performance in Women at Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Kaitlin G; Matsuse, Hiroo; Jackson, Anthony; Segal, Neil A

    2018-05-28

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability that is associated with quadriceps weakness. However, strengthening in people with or with risk factors for knee OA can be poorly tolerated. To assess the efficacy of a twelve-week low-load exercise program, using a hybrid training system (HTS) that utilizes the combination of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and volitional contractions, for improving thigh muscle strength, knee pain and physical performance in women with or with risk factors for knee OA. Randomized, single-blind, controlled trial SETTING: Exercise training laboratory PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two women, age 44-85 years, with risk factors for knee OA INTERVENTIONS: Participants randomized to 12 weeks of biweekly low-load resistance training either with HTS or on an isokinetic dynamometer (control). Maximum isokinetic knee extensor torque. Secondary measures included: maximum isokinetic knee flexor torque, knee pain (KOOS), and timed 20-meter walk and chair-stand tests. HTS and control both resulted in muscle strengthening, reduced knee pain and improved physical performance. HTS group quadriceps and hamstring strength increased by 0.06±0.04 Nm/kg (p>.05) and 0.05±0.02 Nm/kg (p=.02), respectively. Control group quadriceps and hamstring strength increased by 0.03±0.04 Nm/kg (p>.05) and 0.06±0.02 Nm/kg (p=.009), respectively. Knee pain improved by 11.9±11.5 points (p<.001) for the HTS group and 14.1±15.4 points (p=.001) for the control group. 20-meter walk time decreased by 1.60±2.04 seconds (p=.005) and 0.95±1.2 seconds (p=.004), and chair stand time decreased by 4.8±10.0 seconds (p>.05) and 1.9±4.7 seconds (p>.05) in the HTS and control groups, respectively. These results did not differ statistically between HTS and control groups. These results suggest HTS is effective for improving pain and physical performance in women with risk factors for knee OA. However, HTS does not appear to be superior to low-load resistance training for

  14. Ipsilateral masking between acoustic and electric stimulations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Payton; Turner, Christopher W; Gantz, Bruce J; Djalilian, Hamid R; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    Residual acoustic hearing can be preserved in the same ear following cochlear implantation with minimally traumatic surgical techniques and short-electrode arrays. The combined electric-acoustic stimulation significantly improves cochlear implant performance, particularly speech recognition in noise. The present study measures simultaneous masking by electric pulses on acoustic pure tones, or vice versa, to investigate electric-acoustic interactions and their underlying psychophysical mechanisms. Six subjects, with acoustic hearing preserved at low frequencies in their implanted ear, participated in the study. One subject had a fully inserted 24 mm Nucleus Freedom array and five subjects had Iowa/Nucleus hybrid implants that were only 10 mm in length. Electric masking data of the long-electrode subject showed that stimulation from the most apical electrodes produced threshold elevations over 10 dB for 500, 625, and 750 Hz probe tones, but no elevation for 125 and 250 Hz tones. On the contrary, electric stimulation did not produce any electric masking in the short-electrode subjects. In the acoustic masking experiment, 125-750 Hz pure tones were used to acoustically mask electric stimulation. The acoustic masking results showed that, independent of pure tone frequency, both long- and short-electrode subjects showed threshold elevations at apical and basal electrodes. The present results can be interpreted in terms of underlying physiological mechanisms related to either place-dependent peripheral masking or place-independent central masking.

  15. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Neil E; Marston, Louise; Spencer, Sally; DeSouza, Lorraine H; Wand, Benedict M

    2018-03-16

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in 2010, Issue 9, and last updated in 2014, Issue 4. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques aim to induce an electrical stimulation of the brain in an attempt to reduce chronic pain by directly altering brain activity. They include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) and reduced impedance non-invasive cortical electrostimulation (RINCE). To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive cortical stimulation techniques in the treatment of chronic pain. For this update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS and clinical trials registers from July 2013 to October 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of rTMS, CES, tDCS, RINCE and tRNS if they employed a sham stimulation control group, recruited patients over the age of 18 years with pain of three months' duration or more, and measured pain as an outcome. Outcomes of interest were pain intensity measured using visual analogue scales or numerical rating scales, disability, quality of life and adverse events. Two review authors independently extracted and verified data. Where possible we entered data into meta-analyses, excluding studies judged as high risk of bias. We used the GRADE system to assess the quality of evidence for core comparisons, and created three 'Summary of findings' tables. We included an additional 38 trials (involving 1225 randomised participants) in this update, making a total of 94 trials in the review (involving 2983 randomised participants). This update included a total of 42 rTMS studies, 11 CES, 36 tDCS, two RINCE and two tRNS. One study evaluated both rTMS and tDCS. We judged only four studies as low risk of bias across all key criteria. Using the GRADE criteria we judged the quality of evidence for each outcome, and for all comparisons as low or very

  16. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Neil E; Marston, Louise; Spencer, Sally; DeSouza, Lorraine H; Wand, Benedict M

    2018-04-13

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in 2010, Issue 9, and last updated in 2014, Issue 4. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques aim to induce an electrical stimulation of the brain in an attempt to reduce chronic pain by directly altering brain activity. They include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) and reduced impedance non-invasive cortical electrostimulation (RINCE). To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive cortical stimulation techniques in the treatment of chronic pain. For this update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS and clinical trials registers from July 2013 to October 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of rTMS, CES, tDCS, RINCE and tRNS if they employed a sham stimulation control group, recruited patients over the age of 18 years with pain of three months' duration or more, and measured pain as an outcome. Outcomes of interest were pain intensity measured using visual analogue scales or numerical rating scales, disability, quality of life and adverse events. Two review authors independently extracted and verified data. Where possible we entered data into meta-analyses, excluding studies judged as high risk of bias. We used the GRADE system to assess the quality of evidence for core comparisons, and created three 'Summary of findings' tables. We included an additional 38 trials (involving 1225 randomised participants) in this update, making a total of 94 trials in the review (involving 2983 randomised participants). This update included a total of 42 rTMS studies, 11 CES, 36 tDCS, two RINCE and two tRNS. One study evaluated both rTMS and tDCS. We judged only four studies as low risk of bias across all key criteria. Using the GRADE criteria we judged the quality of evidence for each outcome, and for all comparisons as low or very

  17. Spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of chronic back pain patients: 500-Hz vs. 1000-Hz burst stimulation.

    PubMed

    Van Havenbergh, Tony; Vancamp, Tim; Van Looy, Pieter; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is a commonly used, safe, and effective procedure applied for medically intractable failed back surgery syndrome, as well as other neuropathic pain syndromes. Recently, a novel stimulation paradigm called burst stimulation has been developed that is paresthesia-free and has a more pronounced suppressive effect on neuropathic pain. Fifteen patients who were being treated with burst spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome participated in an open-label trial to verify whether their pain suppression could be further ameliorated by changing the burst pattern. Burst stimulation with packets of five electrical pulses delivered at 500 Hz with 1000-μsec pulse width 40 times per second was changed to burst mode delivering five spikes at 1000 Hz with 500-μsec pulse width 40 times a second. As the amplitudes did not differ between the two groups, the total delivery of current to the spinal cord was not different between the two modes of burst stimulation. Scores on visual analog scales for pain and paresthesia, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire, and the Short Form 36 quality of life measurement were compared between the two modes of burst stimulation. [Correction added on 06 Feb 2015, after first online publication: this paragraph has been revised to signify the comparison of amplitudes between two groups] No statistically significant differences were found between the two modes of stimulation. The results suggest that increasing the frequency from 500 to 1000 Hz while keeping the pulse width constant does not add any extra benefit in suppressing pain. Further studies should verify whether increasing the frequency above 1000 Hz has a similar lack of effect. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. Effect of Unmodulated 5-kHz Alternating Currents Versus Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Mechanical and Thermal Pain, Tactile Threshold, and Peripheral Nerve Conduction: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Coy, Juan; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Goicoechea-García, Carlos; Basco-López, Julian Angel; Taylor, Julian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of unmodulated 5-kHz alternating current on mechanical pain threshold (MPT), heat pain threshold (HPT), tactile threshold (TT), and peripheral nerve conduction (PNC) compared with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and sham stimulation. National referral center. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Healthy volunteers (N=38). No dropouts or adverse events were reported. TENS, unmodulated 5-kHz currents, and sham stimulation were applied on the radial nerve for 20 minutes with a 24-hour washout period between them and concealed intervention allocation. Four measures were taken: before, during, and 2 after the interventions. Algometry was used to assess MPT, a Peltier thermode for HPT using the method of limits, Von Frey filaments for TT, and radial nerve compound action potential. No differences were observed on MPT, HPT, and PNC when 5-kHz current and TENS were compared. However, TT increased 56.2mN (95% confidence interval [CI], 28.8-83.6) in the TENS group compared with the 5-kHz current group during intervention. Compared with sham stimulation during intervention, MPT increased 4.7N (95% CI, 0.3-9.2) using 5-kHz current and 10.4N (95% CI, 3.5-17.3) with TENS. TT increased 17.2mN (95% CI, 4.7-29.7) with 5-kHz current and 73.4mN (95% CI, 47.5-99.2) with TENS. However, HPT increased 1.0°C (95% CI, 0.2-2.0) only with TENS. For the PNC, no differences were found among the 3 groups. Unmodulated 5-kHz current produced an increase in somatosensory thresholds that was greater than placebo but not when compared with TENS; however, participants perceived 5-kHz currents to be more comfortable and showed more habituation to them. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of NSAID patch given as monotherapy and NSAID patch in combination with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, a heating pad, or topical capsaicin in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyeong; Yoon, Kyung Bong; Park, SangHa; Jin, Tae Eun; An, Yoo Jin; Schepis, Eric A; Yoon, Duck Mi

    2014-12-01

    This study compared the therapeutic effect of monotherapy with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch vs an NSAID patch combined with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), a heating pad, or topical capsaicin in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) of the upper trapezius. A randomized, single-blind, controlled study of combination therapy for patients with MPS was performed. Ninety-nine patients were randomly assigned to one of four different self-management methods for treatment: NSAID patch (N = 25), NSAID patch + TENS (N = 24), NSAID patch + heating pad (N = 25), and NSAID patch + topical capsaicin (N = 25). The NSAID patch used in this study was a ketoprofen patch. All treatment groups were observed for 2 weeks, and the numeric rating scale (NRS) pain score, cervical active range of motion, pressure pain threshold, and Neck Disability Index were assessed. There was no significant difference between the NSAID patch alone group and the three combination therapy groups with respect to decrease in NRS score from baseline (day 0) to each period of observation. In covariate analysis, although there was no difference among the groups in most of the periods, the data at day 14 indicated a trend (P = 0.057). There were no significant differences in the other variables. We did not observe a statistical difference in improvements to the clinical variables among the four different methods. However, further studies regarding the effectiveness of a mixture of topical capsaicin and ketoprofen in patients with MPS should be considered. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An experimental study of pain upon stimulation of the nasal and sinus cavities.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Dean M

    2014-01-01

    To map different areas of pain sensitivity and to determine the existence and/or pattern of referred pain from upon stimulating the sinonasal cavity. Experimental human study. Mechanical and electrical stimulations to various anatomical structures and areas of the nasal and sinus cavities were conducted on nine volunteers. Intensity, location and character of pain were recorded in all subjects. The postero-superior (cephalic) aspect of the nasal cavity, primarily the anterior face of the sphenoid sinus and the superior turbinate, were the most sensitive sites, and the antero-inferior (caudal) region was the least sensitive. Referred pain to the head and face was reported by several subjects. Topographical differences in pain sensitivity exist in the sinonasal cavity. The phenomenon of referred pain from the nasal cavity was demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Variation in the Burst Mode and Carrier Frequency of High Intensity Electrical Stimulation on Muscle Fatigue and Pain Perception of Healthy Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-22

    Soderlund, K. (1986). Biochemistry of muscle fatigue. Biomedica Brochimica Acta, 45, 97-106. Huskisson, E. C. (1983). Visual analogue scales. In R. Melzack...stimulation. IT 7-t -Hs53, Ui#4£sizy o3 Ktucy, Lexington, Kentucky. Luttgens, K. and Wells, K. F. (1933). Kinesiology (7th ed.). Philadelonia: Dryden Press

  2. A wireless wearable surface functional electrical stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Peng; Guo, Ai-Wen; Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Xia, Yang; Huang, Jia; Xu, Chong-Yao; Huang, Zong-Hao; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a wireless wearable functional electrical stimulator controlled by Android phone with real-time-varying stimulation parameters for multichannel surface functional electrical stimulation application has been developed. It can help post-stroke patients using more conveniently. This study focuses on the prototype design, including the specific wristband concept, circuits and stimulation pulse-generation algorithm. A novel stimulator circuit with a driving stage using a complementary current source technique is proposed to achieve a high-voltage compliance, a large output impedance and an accurate linear voltage-to-current conversion. The size of the prototype has been significantly decreased to 17 × 7.5 × 1 cm3. The performance of the prototype has been tested with a loaded resistor and wrist extension/flexion movement of three hemiplegic patients. According to the experiments, the stimulator can generate four-channel charge-balanced biphasic stimulation with a voltage amplitude up to 60 V, and the pulse frequency and width can be adjusted in real time with a range of 100-600 μs and 20-80 Hz, respectively.

  3. Feasibility of controlled micturition through electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R A; Tanagho, E A

    1979-01-01

    Historically, man has been aware of bioelectric phenomena for some 4,000 years. Yet it has only been during the last 20 years that technology has advanced to the stage where controlled bladder emptying has become feasible. A great deal of interest followed the introduction of transistor and bladder stimulation via the principle of radio frequency induction. Spinal cord, sacral, and pelvic nerve and direct bladder stimulation have all been attempted. Only direct bladder stimulation in lower motor neuron situations has shown any promise. The many difficulties associated with bladder stimulation include simultaneous sphincter contraction, pain, electrode and insulation difficulties, and fibroplasia due to movement of electrodes placed in pliable tissues. In addition, the role of the prostate, increased urethral length, and erection responses in the male have received little investigation. These problems are outlined and experimental observations of attempts to achieve controlled micturition in canines areresented. These studies were carried out over a 3-year period, and emphasize responses to stimulation of the spinal cord and sacral roots. It was concluded that the most efficient manner by which to effect simulated micturition is via stimulation of the ventral sacral root dominant for bladder responsiveness, and combine this with selective division of somatic fibers of only the root being stimulated.

  4. Binaural hearing with electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming a standard of care in many clinics. While much benefit has been shown through bilateral implantation, patients who have bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) still do not perform as well as normal hearing listeners in sound localization and understanding speech in noisy environments. This difference in performance can arise from a number of different factors, including the areas of hardware and engineering, surgical precision and pathology of the auditory system in deaf persons. While surgical precision and individual pathology are factors that are beyond careful control, improvements can be made in the areas of clinical practice and the engineering of binaural speech processors. These improvements should be grounded in a good understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to the acoustic binaural cues that are important to normal hearing listeners for sound localization and speech in noise understanding. To this end, we review the current state-of-the-art in the understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to binaural cues in electric hearing, and highlight the important issues and challenges as they relate to clinical practice and the development of new binaural processing strategies. PMID:25193553

  5. Binaural hearing with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming a standard of care in many clinics. While much benefit has been shown through bilateral implantation, patients who have bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) still do not perform as well as normal hearing listeners in sound localization and understanding speech in noisy environments. This difference in performance can arise from a number of different factors, including the areas of hardware and engineering, surgical precision and pathology of the auditory system in deaf persons. While surgical precision and individual pathology are factors that are beyond careful control, improvements can be made in the areas of clinical practice and the engineering of binaural speech processors. These improvements should be grounded in a good understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to the acoustic binaural cues that are important to normal hearing listeners for sound localization and speech in noise understanding. To this end, we review the current state-of-the-art in the understanding of the sensitivities of bilateral CI patients to binaural cues in electric hearing, and highlight the important issues and challenges as they relate to clinical practice and the development of new binaural processing strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring the...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring the...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring the...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring the...

  10. Back pain: a real target for spinal cord stimulation?

    PubMed

    Rigoard, Philippe; Delmotte, Alexandre; D'Houtaud, Samuel; Misbert, Lorraine; Diallo, Bakari; Roy-Moreau, Aline; Durand, Sylvain; Royoux, Solène; Giot, Jean-Philippe; Bataille, Benoit

    2012-03-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome represents one of the most frequent etiologies of chronic back pain and is a major public health issue. Neurostimulation has currently not been validated in the treatment of back pain because of technological limitations in implantable spinal cord stimulation (SCS) systems. New-generation leads using several columns of stimulation can generate longitudinal and/or transverse stimulation fields into the spinal cord. To investigate, through extensive stimulation testing, the capacity of multicolumn tripolar leads to achieve back territory paresthesia coverage in refractory failed back surgery syndrome patients. Eleven patients implanted with a 16-contact spinal cord stimulation lead (Specify 5-6-5, Medtronic Inc) were assessed with a systematic exploration of 43 selected stimulation configurations to generate bilateral back paresthesia in addition to leg territory coverage. The tripolar lead successfully generated paresthesia in both bilateral back and leg territories in 9 patients (81.8%). Success rates of multicolumn stimulation patterns were significantly higher than for longitudinal configurations for lombodorsal paresthesia coverage. Six months after implantation, significant pain relief was obtained compared with preoperative evaluation for global pain (Visual Analog Scale, 2.25 vs 8.2 preoperatively; P < .05), leg pain (Visual Analog Scale, 0.5 vs 7.6 preoperatively; P < .05), and back pain (Visual Analog Scale, 1.5 vs 7.8 preoperatively; P < .05). These results suggest that multicolumn leads can reliably generate back pain coverage and favor pain relief outcomes. This may lead physicians to reconsider new indications for spinal cord stimulation. Expanding neurostimulation perspectives to intractable back pain syndromes could become realistic in the near future.

  11. Metallic taste from electrical and chemical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Harry T; Stevens, David A; Chapman, Kathryn W; Kurtz, Anne

    2005-03-01

    A series of three experiments investigated the nature of metallic taste reports after stimulation with solutions of metal salts and after stimulation with metals and electric currents. To stimulate with electricity, a device was fabricated consisting of a small battery affixed to a plastic handle with the anode side exposed for placement on the tongue or oral tissues. Intensity of taste from metals and batteries was dependent upon the voltage and was more robust in areas dense in fungiform papillae. Metallic taste was reported from stimulation with ferrous sulfate solutions, from metals and from electric stimuli. However, reports of metallic taste were more frequent when the word 'metallic' was presented embedded in a list of choices, as opposed to simple free-choice labeling. Intensity decreased for ferrous sulfate when the nose was occluded, consistent with a decrease in retronasal smell, as previously reported. Intensity of taste evoked by copper metal, bimetallic stimuli (zinc/copper) or small batteries (1.5-3 V) was not affected by nasal occlusion. This difference suggests two distinct mechanisms for evocation of metallic taste reports, one dependent upon retronasal smell and a second mediated by oral chemoreceptors.

  12. Peripheral nerve field stimulation in chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paicius, Richard M; Bernstein, Clifford A; Lempert-Cohen, Cheryl

    2006-07-01

    Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) has become an accepted therapeutic modality for the treatment of intractable pain syndromes, primarily used today in the settings of failed back surgery syndrome, neuropathic back and limb pain. The use of spinal cord stimulators for peripheral nerve field electrostimulation is becoming increasingly recognized as a safe, effective alternative for chronic pain conditions that are refractory to medical management and do not respond to traditional dorsal column stimulation. Advances in technology have allowed for minimally invasive percutaneous placement of multipolar leads with complex programmable systems to provide patient- controlled relief of pain in precisely targeted regions. With these improvements in hardware, the use of Peripheral Nerve Field Stimulation (PNFS) appears to have an untapped potential for providing patients with pain relief for a wider range of underlying conditions than was previously believed possible. We present three cases, each with a different etiology of chronic abdominal pain: one with inguinal neuralgia, one with chronic pancreatitis, and one with pain following liver transplant. Each patient was refractory to conventional medical approaches. For all three patients, PNFS provided significant relief from pain, enabling patients to decrease or discontinue their opioid medications and to enjoy significant improvement in their quality of life. We conclude that PNFS is a safe, effective and minimally invasive treatment that may be used successfully for a wide variety of indications including chronic abdominal pain.

  13. Hypoalgesia in response to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) depends on stimulation intensity.

    PubMed

    Moran, Fidelma; Leonard, Tracey; Hawthorne, Stephanie; Hughes, Ciara M; McCrum-Gardner, Evie; Johnson, Mark I; Rakel, Barbara A; Sluka, Kathleen A; Walsh, Deirdre M

    2011-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrophysical modality used for pain management. This study investigated the dose response of different TENS intensities on experimentally induced pressure pain. One hundred and thirty TENS naïve healthy individuals (18-64 years old; 65 males, 65 females) were randomly allocated to 5 groups (n = 26 per group): Strong Non Painful TENS; Sensory Threshold TENS; Below Sensory Threshold TENS; No Current Placebo TENS; and Transient Placebo TENS. Active TENS (80 Hz) was applied to the forearm for 30 minutes. Transient Placebo TENS was applied for 42 seconds after which the current amplitude automatically reset to 0 mA. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded from 2 points on the hand and forearm before and after TENS to measure hypoalgesia. There were significant differences between groups at both the hand and forearm (ANOVA; P = .005 and .002). At 30 minutes, there was a significant hypoalgesic effect in the Strong Non Painful TENS group compared to: Below Sensory Threshold TENS, No Current Placebo TENS and Transient Placebo TENS groups (P < .0001) at the forearm; Transient Placebo TENS and No Current Placebo TENS groups at the hand (P = .001). There was no significant difference between Strong Non Painful TENS and Sensory Threshold TENS groups. The area under the curve for the changes in PPT significantly correlated with the current amplitude (r(2) = .33, P = .003). These data therefore show that there is a dose-response effect of TENS with the largest effect occurring with the highest current amplitudes. This study shows a dose response for the intensity of TENS for pain relief with the strongest intensities showing the greatest effect; thus, we suggest that TENS intensity should be titrated to achieve the strongest possible intensity to achieve maximum pain relief. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shirvalkar, Prasad; Veuthey, Tess L.; Dawes, Heather E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2018-01-01

    Pain is a subjective experience that alerts an individual to actual or potential tissue damage. Through mechanisms that are still unclear, normal physiological pain can lose its adaptive value and evolve into pathological chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic pain is a multifaceted experience that can be understood in terms of somatosensory, affective, and cognitive dimensions, each with associated symptoms and neural signals. While there have been many attempts to treat chronic pain, in this article we will argue that feedback-controlled ‘closed-loop’ deep brain stimulation (DBS) offers an urgent and promising route for treatment. Contemporary DBS trials for chronic pain use “open-loop” approaches in which tonic stimulation is delivered with fixed parameters to a single brain region. The impact of key variables such as the target brain region and the stimulation waveform is unclear, and long-term efficacy has mixed results. We hypothesize that chronic pain is due to abnormal synchronization between brain networks encoding the somatosensory, affective and cognitive dimensions of pain, and that multisite, closed-loop DBS provides an intuitive mechanism for disrupting that synchrony. By (1) identifying biomarkers of the subjective pain experience and (2) integrating these signals into a state-space representation of pain, we can create a predictive model of each patient's pain experience. Then, by establishing how stimulation in different brain regions influences individual neural signals, we can design real-time, closed-loop therapies tailored to each patient. While chronic pain is a complex disorder that has eluded modern therapies, rich historical data and state-of-the-art technology can now be used to develop a promising treatment. PMID:29632482

  15. Spinal cord stimulation: Current applications for treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is thought to relieve chronic intractable pain by stimulating nerve fibers in the spinal cord. The resulting impulses in the fibers may inhibit the conduction of pain signals to the brain, according to the pain gate theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 and the sensation of pain is thus blocked. Although SCS may reduce pain, it will not eliminate it. After a period of concern about safety and efficacy, SCS is now regaining popularity among pain specialists for the treatment of chronic pain. The sympatholytic effect of SCS is one of its most interesting therapeutic properties. This effect is considered responsible for the effectiveness of SCS in peripheral ischemia, and at least some cases of complex regional pain syndrome. The sympatholytic effect has also been considered part of the management of other chronic pain states such as failed back surgery syndrome, phantom pain, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. In general, SCS is part of an overall treatment strategy and is used only after the more conservative treatments have failed. The concept of SCS has evolved rapidly following the technological advances that have produced leads with multiple contact electrodes and battery systems. The current prevalence of patients with chronic pain requiring treatment other than conventional medical management has significantly increased and so has been the need for SCS. With the cost benefit analysis showing significant support for SCS, it may be appropriate to offer this as an effective alternative treatment for these patients.

  16. Triangular stimulation method utilizing combination spinal cord stimulation with peripheral subcutaneous field stimulation for chronic pain patients: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rosa M; Vercimak, Danika C

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective data collection study aims to evaluate the responses of patients who have been implanted with a neuromodulation system using a combination of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and peripheral subcutaneous field stimulation (PSFS) leads for chronic intractable pain. Forty patients with chronic, intractable pain implanted with both SCS and PSFS leads were enrolled in a retrospective data collection study. Pre-implant data (demographics, pain levels, pain location, and medication use) and post-implant data (pain levels, medication use, and device programming reports) were compared to measure short- and long-term improvements in pain for a period of approximately six months. Device system use and parameter data were collected. The majority of patients experienced immediate and short-term pain relief and reduction in oral pain medications as a result of combination SCS/PSFS therapy. The improvements were maintained for some, but not all patients by six months. Patients cycled through multiple programs over follow-up; the use of triangular stimulation was consistent over time, and by six months, patients preferred this program over others. Limitations of the retrospective chart review included missing data and variable follow-up times, and may have made determinations of long-term efficacy difficult. This study demonstrates that combination SCS and PSFS therapy is potentially a beneficial treatment option for reducing pain levels and oral pain medication compared with baseline in previously resistive chronic pain patients. There is a need for further study of this therapy in a greater number of subjects and in a prospective, controlled setting. In the author's general experience, triangular stimulation is very effective for treating isolated low back pain, because it covers larger topographic areas of the lower back than flow or field stimulation. An investigational device exemption study will be necessary for subcutaneous field stimulation indicated for

  17. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  18. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  19. A microprocessor-based multichannel subsensory stochastic resonance electrical stimulator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gwo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic resonance electrical stimulation is a novel intervention which provides potential benefits for improving postural control ability in the elderly, those with diabetic neuropathy, and stroke patients. In this paper, a microprocessor-based subsensory white noise electrical stimulator for the applications of stochastic resonance stimulation is developed. The proposed stimulator provides four independent programmable stimulation channels with constant-current output, possesses linear voltage-to-current relationship, and has two types of stimulation modes, pulse amplitude and width modulation.

  20. [Pain as a stimulator of protective and curative processes (the theory of pain)].

    PubMed

    Uglov, F G; Kopylov, V A

    1985-06-01

    The work deals with the theoretical approach to problem of pain. The mechanism of the appearance of pain is considered as lack of correspondence between functional capacity of the nervous system and the presented load. The function of pain as reparator and stimulator of defensive forces of the organism in pathological processes is disclosed. The possible employment of pain as a curative factor in practical medicine is discussed.

  1. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about functional electrical stimulation in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is defined as the electrical stimulation of muscles that have impaired motor control, in order to produce a contraction to obtain functionally useful movement. It was first proposed in…

  2. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  3. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  4. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  5. Sandwich technique, peripheral nerve stimulation, peripheral field stimulation and hybrid stimulation for inguinal region and genital pain.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrew; Sharma, Mayur; Zibly, Zion; Ikeda, Daniel; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2016-12-01

    Ilioinguinal neuralgia (IG) and genitofemoral (GF) neuralgia following inguinal hernia repair is a chronic and debilitating neuropathic condition. Recently, peripheral nerve stimulation has become an effective and minimally invasive option for the treatment of refractory pain. Here we present a retrospective case series of six patients who underwent placement of peripheral nerve stimulation electrodes using various techniques for treatment of refractory post-intervention inguinal region pain. Six patients with post-intervention inguinal, femoral or GF neuropathic pain were evaluated for surgery. Either octopolar percutaneous electrodes or combination of paddle and percutaneous electrodes were implanted in the area of their pain. Pain visual analog scores (VAS), surgical complication rate, preoperative symptom duration, degree of pain relief, preoperative and postoperative work status, postoperative changes in medication usage, and overall degree of satisfaction with this therapy was assessed. All six patients had an average improvement of 62% in the immediate post-operative follow-up. Four patients underwent stimulation for IG, one for femoral neuralgia, and another for GF neuralgia. Peripheral nerve stimulation provided at least 50% pain relief in all the six patients with post-intervention inguinal region pain. 85% of patients indicated they were completely satisfied with the therapy overall. There was one treatment failure with an acceptable complication rate. Peripheral nerve or field stimulation for post-intervention inguinal region pain is a safe and effective treatment for this refractory and complex problem for patients who have exhausted other management options.

  6. Electrical stimulation superimposed onto voluntary muscular contraction.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Thierry; Noé, Frédéric; Passelergue, Philippe; Dupui, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) reverses the order of recruitment of motor units (MU) observed with voluntary muscular contraction (VOL) since under ES, large MU are recruited before small MU. The superimposition of ES onto VOL (superimposed technique: application of an electrical stimulus during a voluntary muscle action) can theoretically activate more motor units than VOL performed alone, which can engender an increase of the contraction force. Two superimposed techniques can be used: (i) the twitch interpolation technique (ITT), which consists of interjecting an electrical stimulus onto the muscle nerve; and (ii) the percutaneous superimposed electrical stimulation technique (PST), where the stimulation is applied to the muscle belly. These two superimposed techniques can be used to evaluate the ability to fully activate a muscle. They can thus be employed to distinguish the central or peripheral nature of fatigue after exhausting exercise. In general, whatever the technique employed, the superimposition of ES onto volitional exercise does not recruit more MU than VOL, except with eccentric actions. Nevertheless, the neuromuscular response associated with the use of the superimposed technique (ITT and PST) depends on the parameter of the superimposed current. The sex and the training level of the subjects can also modify the physiological impact of the superimposed technique. Although the motor control differs drastically between training with ES and VOL, the integration of the superimposed technique in training programmes with healthy subjects does not reveal significant benefits compared with programmes performed only with voluntary exercises. Nevertheless, in a therapeutic context, training programmes using ES superimposition compensate volume and muscle strength deficit with more efficiency than programmes using VOL or ES separately.

  7. A Comparison of Two Electric Taste Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Scott T.; Lawless, Harry T.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the tongue, commonly used in clinical evaluations of taste dysfunction, can produce a variety of sensations including reports of metallic taste. Two studies compared responses to a fabricated electrical stimulator (a 1.6 V battery, anode side exposed) and a clinical electrogustometer (Rion TR-06). Batteries placed on the anterior dorsal tongue surface produced sensations similar in intensity and quality to those produced by the clinical electrogustometer, with equal intensity on the tongue tip for the 1.6 V battery in the range of 33 – 56 µA from the electrogustometer. A second study examined responses on three areas of the tongue on each side. Responses declined for areas lower in fungiform papillae for both devices, but at different rates. Higher current levels were required to match the battery in lower density areas, indicating spatial summation for the larger battery surface area. A consistent pattern of lateral differences was seen in only one subject. Quality descriptions were similar in frequency whether or not a word list was provided, with metallic, sour, pain and bitter being the most frequently mentioned words for both electric stimuli. Similarities in response to the battery device and electrogustometer were evident in intensity, qualities evoked, lack of a laterality effect and decreasing response in areas with lower fungiform papillae density. The battery device may provide an inexpensive portable alternative to an electrogustometer for use in clinical testing of taste. PMID:17573078

  8. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of "painful" stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called "pain matrix" regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation.

  9. The value of electrical stimulation as an exercise training modality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currier, Dean P.; Ray, J. Michael; Nyland, John; Noteboom, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary exercise is the traditional way of improving performance of the human body in both the healthy and unhealthy states. Physiological responses to voluntary exercise are well documented. It benefits the functions of bone, joints, connective tissue, and muscle. In recent years, research has shown that neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) simulates voluntary exercise in many ways. Generically, NMES can perform three major functions: suppression of pain, improve healing of soft tissues, and produce muscle contractions. Low frequency NMES may gate or disrupt the sensory input to the central nervous system which results in masking or control of pain. At the same time NMES may contribute to the activation of endorphins, serotonin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptides, and ACTH which control pain and may even cause improved athletic performances. Soft tissue conditions such as wounds and inflammations have responded very favorably to NMES. NMES of various amplitudes can induce muscle contractions ranging from weak to intense levels. NMES seems to have made its greatest gains in rehabilitation where directed muscle contractions may improve joint ranges of motion correct joint contractures that result from shortening muscles; control abnormal movements through facilitating recruitment or excitation into the alpha motoneuron in orthopedically, neurologically, or healthy subjects with intense sensory, kinesthetic, and proprioceptive information; provide a conservative approach to management of spasticity in neurological patients; by stimulation of the antagonist muscle to a spastic muscle stimulation of the agonist muscle, and sensory habituation; serve as an orthotic substitute to conventional bracing used with stroke patients in lieu of dorsiflexor muscles in preventing step page gait and for shoulder muscles to maintain glenohumeral alignment to prevent subluxation; and of course NMES is used in maintaining or improving the performance or torque producing

  10. [Hemispheric transcranial electrical stimulation: clinical results].

    PubMed

    Pastor Gómez, Jesús; Perla-Perla, Patricia; Pulido-Rivas, Paloma; Sola, Rafael G

    2010-07-16

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) is a technique widely used in intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. However, there are theoretical limitations to their use in supratentorial surgery. To test the usefulness of hemispheric TES (C3/C4-Cz) in supratentorial surgery. Hemispheric TES was conducted in a group of 15 patients operated on supratentorial region with possible compromise of the inner capsule. In all cases orbicularis oris, extensor digitorum, abductor of V finger, anterior tibialis and abductor hallucis brevis contralateral to stimulation were recorded. We used trains of 4-6 pulses of 50 micro-seconds at 500 Hz. The intensity of the movements induced by hemispheric TES did not interfere with the microsurgical dissection. We have used 78.5 +/- 11.2 trains per patient, with the voltage of 235 +/- 21 V and the equivalent current 370 +/- 37 mA. Stimulation resulted in response in facial region in 80% of cases, 100% in arm/hand and 66.7% in leg/foot. In eight patients, there was no change in latency and/or amplitude during resection. In six patients we observed retardation, decreased amplitude or both in any of the region studied. In these patients no neurologic injury was observed. In one patient a sharp decrease and complete absence of motor response was observed. In this case there was a post-surgical neurologic injury. The hemispheric TES have high sensitivity and specificity monitoring the inner capsule in supratentorial neurosurgery.

  11. A Systematic Review of Electric-Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant systems that combine electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear are now commercially available and the number of patients using these devices is steadily increasing. In particular, electric-acoustic stimulation is an option for patients with severe, high frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. There have been a range of approaches to combining electric stimulation and acoustic hearing in the same ear. To develop a better understanding of fitting practices for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation, we conducted a systematic review addressing three clinical questions: what is the range of acoustic hearing in the implanted ear that can be effectively preserved for an electric-acoustic fitting?; what benefits are provided by combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation?; and what clinical fitting practices have been developed for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation? A search of the literature was conducted and 27 articles that met the strict evaluation criteria adopted for the review were identified for detailed analysis. The range of auditory thresholds in the implanted ear that can be successfully used for an electric-acoustic application is quite broad. The effectiveness of combined electric and acoustic stimulation as compared with electric stimulation alone was consistently demonstrated, highlighting the potential value of preservation and utilization of low frequency hearing in the implanted ear. However, clinical procedures for best fitting of electric-acoustic devices were varied. This clearly identified a need for further investigation of fitting procedures aimed at maximizing outcomes for recipients of electric-acoustic devices. PMID:23539259

  12. Efficacy of Selected Electrical Therapies on Chronic Low Back Pain: A Comparative Clinical Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Rajfur, Katarzyna; Walewicz, Karolina; Fras, Beata; Bolach, Bartosz; Dymarek, Robert; Rosinczuk, Joanna; Halski, Tomasz; Taradaj, Jakub

    2017-01-07

    BACKGROUND In the currently available research publications on electrical therapy of low back pain, generally no control groups or detailed randomization were used, and such studies were often conducted with relatively small groups of patients, based solely on subjective questionnaires and pain assessment scales (lacking measurement methods to objectify the therapeutic progress). The available literature also lacks a comprehensive and large-scale clinical study. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of treating low back pain using selected electrotherapy methods. The study assesses the influence of individual electrotherapeutic treatments on reduction of pain, improvement of the range of movement in lower section of the spine, and improvement of motor functions and mobility. MATERIAL AND METHODS The 127 patients qualified for the therapy (ultimately, 123 patients completed the study) and assigned to 6 comparison groups: A - conventional TENS, B - acupuncture-like TENS, C - high-voltage electrical stimulation, D - interferential current stimulation, E - diadynamic current, and F - control group. RESULTS The research showed that using electrical stimulation with interferential current penetrating deeper into the tissues results in a significant and more efficient elimination of pain, and an improvement of functional ability of patients suffering from low back pain on the basis of an analysis of both subjective and objective parameters. The TENS currents and high voltage were helpful, but not as effective. The use of diadynamic currents appears to be useless. CONCLUSIONS Selected electrical therapies (interferential current, TENS, and high voltage) appear to be effective in treating chronic low back pain.

  13. Neural Activation during Anticipation of Near Pain-Threshold Stimulation among the Pain-Fearful

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhou; Jackson, Todd; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of pain (FOP) can increase risk for chronic pain and disability but little is known about corresponding neural responses in anticipation of potential pain. In this study, more (10 women, 6 men) and less (7 women, 6 men) pain-fearful groups underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during anticipation of near pain-threshold stimulation. Groups did not differ in the proportion of stimuli judged to be painful but pain-fearful participants reported significantly more state fear prior to stimulus exposure. Within the entire sample, stronger activation was found in several pain perception regions (e.g., bilateral insula, midcingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus, superior frontal gyrus) and visual areas linked to decoding stimulus valences (inferior orbital cortex) during anticipation of “painful” stimuli. Between groups and correlation analyses indicated pain-fearful participants experienced comparatively more activity in regions implicated in evaluating potential threats and processing negative emotions during anticipation (i.e., MCC, mid occipital cortex, superior temporal pole), though group differences were not apparent in most so-called “pain matrix” regions. In sum, trait- and task-based FOP is associated with enhanced responsiveness in regions involved in threat processing and negative affect during anticipation of potentially painful stimulation. PMID:27489536

  14. Combined electric and pressure cuff pain stimuli for assessing conditioning pain modulation (CPM).

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, M; Petersen, K K; Mørch, C D; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2017-12-29

    Aims Traditionally, conditioning pain modulation (CPM) can be assessed by applying a test stimulus (TS) before and after application of a conditioning stimulus (CS), which is normally applied extra-segmental. Currently, no studies have attempted to apply the TS and CS to the same site using different stimuli modalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate electrical TS and cuff pressure CS applied to the same experimental site for studying CPM. Methods 20 male volunteers participated in this study, which consisted of stimulations applied by a cuff-algometer (NociTech and Aalborg University, Denmark) and current stimulator (Digitimer DS5, UK), through two Ag/AgCl electrodes (Ambu® Neuroline 700, Denmark). The cuff was wrapped around the lower leg and stimulation electrodes were placed under the cuff and to the same location on the contralateral leg. Electrical TS were applied to the non-dominant leg with or without cuff pressure CS on the dominant (CS1) or the same (non-dominant) leg (CS2, electrode under cuff). The subjects were instructed to rate the electrical evoked pain intensity on a 10-cm continuous visual analog scale (VAS, "0" represented "no pain", and "10" represented "maximal pain"). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as "1" on the VAS scale. Results There was no significant deference in PDT for neither CS1 nor CS2. A median split subanalysis on CPM-responders versus CPM-nonresponders to the TS + CS1 combination. Using this grouping, there was significant increase in PDT when comparing TS to TS + CS1 or TS + CS2 (4.0 mA vs 5.6 mA; P < 0.05, 4.0 mA vs 5.1 mA; P < 0.05). Conclusions The study indicates that CPM can be evoked in a subgroup of subjects by applying the electrical test stimulus and cuff pressure conditioning stimuli to the same experimental site.

  15. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of ‘Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm’

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. Ethics and dissemination This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. Trial

  16. Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) in chronic low back pain: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kloimstein, Herwig; Likar, Rudolf; Kern, Michael; Neuhold, Josef; Cada, Miroslav; Loinig, Nadja; Ilias, Wilfried; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Wolf, Andreas; Dorn, Christian; Mozes-Balla, Eva Maria; Stein, Rolf; Lappe, Ivo; Sator-Katzenschlager, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for chronic low back pain (cLBP). In this prospective, multicenter observational study, 118 patients were admitted to 11 centers throughout Austria and Switzerland. After a screening visit, all patients underwent a trial stimulation period of at least seven days before implantation of the permanent system. Leads were placed in the subcutaneous tissues of the lower back directly in the region of greatest pain. One hundred five patients were implanted with a permanent stimulating system. Patients' evaluation of pain and functional levels were completed before implantation and one, three, and six months after implantation. Adverse events, medication usage, and coverage of the painful area and predictive value of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) were monitored. All pain and quality-of-life measures showed statistically significant improvement during the treatment period. These included the average pain visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, the Becks Depression Inventory, and the Short Form-12 item Health survey. Additionally, medication usage with opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anti-convulsants showed a highly significant reduction. Complications requiring surgical intervention were reported in 9.6% of the patients. The degree of coverage of painful areas seems to be an important criterion for efficacy of PNFS, whereas TENS is presumably no predictor. This prospective, multicenter study confirms that PNFS is an effective therapy for the management of cLBP. Significant improvements in many aspects of the pain condition were measured, and complications were minimal. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  17. Effects of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on affect, pain and attention in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Palm, Ulrich; Chalah, Moussa A; Padberg, Frank; Al-Ani, Tarik; Abdellaoui, Mohamed; Sorel, Marc; Dimitri, Dalia; Créange, Alain; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Ayache, Samar S

    2016-01-01

    Pain and cognitive impairment are frequent symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Neglecting experimental pain and paying attention to demanding tasks is reported to decrease the pain intensity. Little is known about the interaction between chronic neuropathic pain and attention disorders in MS. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was used to modulate various cognitive and motor symptoms in MS. We aimed to study the effects of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a form of transcranial electric stimulation, over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on attention and neuropathic pain in MS patients. 16 MS patients were included in a randomized, sham-controlled, cross-over study. Each patient randomly received two tRNS blocks, separated by three weeks of washout interval. Each block consisted of three consecutive daily sessions of either active or sham tRNS. The patients were evaluated for pain, attention and mood and further underwent an electrophysiological evaluation. Compared to sham, tRNS showed a trend to decrease the N2-P2 amplitudes of pain related evoked potentials and improve pain ratings. Attention performance and mood scales did not change after stimulations. This study suggests the role of tRNS in pain modulation, which could have been more evident with longer stimulation protocols.

  18. The Effect of Electrical Stimulation in Improving Muscle Tone (Clinical)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azman, M. F.; Azman, A. W.

    2017-11-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) and also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) involves the use of electrical current to stimulate the nerves or nerve endings that innervate muscle beneath the skin. Electrical stimulation may be applied superficially on the skin (transcutaneously) or directly into a muscle or muscles (intramuscularly) for the primary purpose of enhancing muscle function. The basic theoretical premise is that if the peripheral nerve can be stimulated, the resulting excitation impulse will be transmitted along the nerve to the motor endplates in the muscle, producing a muscle contraction. In this work, the effect of mere electrical stimulation to the muscle bulk and strength are tested. This paper explains how electrical stimulation can affect the muscle bulk, muscle size, muscle tone, muscle atrophy and muscle strength. The experiment and data collection are performed on 5 subjects and the results obtained are analyzed. This research aims to understand the full potential of electrical stimulation and identifying its possible benefits or disadvantages to the muscle properties. The results indicated that electrical stimulation alone able to improve muscle properties but with certain limits and precautions which might be useful in rehabilitation programme.

  19. Immediate effect of laryngeal surface electrical stimulation on swallowing performance.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keizo; Hori, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Fujiu-Kurachi, Masako; Ono, Takahiro; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Inoue, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Surface electrical stimulation of the laryngeal region is used to improve swallowing in dysphagic patients. However, little is known about how electrical stimulation affects tongue movements and related functions. We investigated the effect of electrical stimulation on tongue pressure and hyoid movement, as well as suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscle activity, in 18 healthy young participants. Electrical stimulation (0.2-ms duration, 80 Hz, 80% of each participant's maximal tolerance) of the laryngeal region was applied. Each subject swallowed 5 ml of barium sulfate liquid 36 times at 10-s intervals. During the middle 2 min, electrical stimulation was delivered. Tongue pressure, electromyographic activity of the suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles, and videofluorographic images were simultaneously recorded. Tongue pressure during stimulation was significantly lower than before or after stimulation and was significantly greater after stimulation than at baseline. Suprahyoid activity after stimulation was larger than at baseline, while infrahyoid muscle activity did not change. During stimulation, the position of the hyoid at rest was descended, the highest hyoid position was significantly inferior, and the vertical movement was greater than before or after stimulation. After stimulation, the positions of the hyoid at rest and at the maximum elevation were more superior than before stimulation. The deviation of the highest positions of the hyoid before and after stimulation corresponded to the differences in tongue pressures at those times. These results suggest that surface electrical stimulation applied to the laryngeal region during swallowing may facilitate subsequent hyoid movement and tongue pressure generation after stimulation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Surface electrical stimulation applied to the laryngeal region during swallowing may facilitate subsequent hyoid movement and tongue pressure generation after stimulation. Tongue muscles may contribute to overshot recovery

  20. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  1. Injectable microstimulator for functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loeb, G E; Zamin, C J; Schulman, J H; Troyk, P R

    1991-11-01

    A family of digitally controlled devices is constructed for functional electrical stimulation in which each module is an hermetically sealed glass capsule that is small enough to be injected through the lumen of a hypodermic needle. The overall design and component characteristics of microstimulators that receive power and command signals by inductive coupling from a single, externally worn coil are described. Each device stores power between stimulus pulses by charging an electrolytic capacitor formed by its two electrodes, made of sintered, anodised tantalum and electrochemically activated iridium, respectively. Externally, a highly efficient class E amplifier provides power and digitally encoded command signals to control the amplitude, duration and timing of pulses from up to 256 such microstimulators.

  2. Utility of Vibratory Stimulation for Reducing Intraoral Injection Pain.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Ozgur; Sinsawat, Anatachai; Pawa, Sudeep; Rintanalert, Duangtawan; Vuddhakanok, Suchada

    2018-01-01

    Intraoral local anesthesia injection is often perceived as a painful and anxiety-causing dental procedure. Vibration stimulus is one of the nonpharmacologic methods used to reduce unwanted sensations of local anesthesia injection. This clinical study evaluated the effectiveness of a recently introduced vibratory stimulation device in intraoral local anesthesia administration. Thirty-two subjects underwent 2 maxillary local anesthesia injections in 2 different sessions: 1 with conventional techniques and 1 with the aid of a vibratory stimulation device (DentalVibe). The pain levels were evaluated with a visual analog scale and the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale. The subjects were asked to choose the preferred method for future injections. The data were evaluated statistically. There were no significant differences between the 2 injection methods with regard to either pain evaluation method. The preference of the subjects regarding future injection technique was evenly distributed between the groups. The vibratory stimulation device used in this study did not provide any reduction in pain level associated with maxillary infiltration local anesthesia administration.

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for spasticity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tenorio, E; Serrano-Muñoz, D; Avendaño-Coy, J; Gómez-Soriano, J

    2016-07-26

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has traditionally been used to treat pain, some studies have observed decreased spasticity after use of this technique. However, its use in clinical practice is still limited. Our purpose was twofold: to determine whether TENS is effective for treating spasticity or associated symptoms in patients with neurological involvement, and to determine which stimulation parameters exert the greatest effect on variables associated with spasticity. Two independent reviewers used PubMed, PEDro, and Cochrane databases to search for randomised clinical trials addressing TENS and spasticity published before 12 May 2015, and selected the articles that met the inclusion criteria. Of the initial 96 articles, 86 were excluded. The remaining 10 articles present results from 207 patients with a cerebrovascular accident, 84 with multiple sclerosis, and 39 with spinal cord lesions. In light of our results, we recommend TENS as a treatment for spasticity due to its low cost, ease of use, and absence of adverse reactions. However, the great variability in the types of stimulation used in the studies, and the differences in parameters and variables, make it difficult to assess and compare any results that might objectively determine the effectiveness of this technique and show how to optimise parameters. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include Pain Relievers and other medicines Acupuncture Electrical stimulation Surgery Physical therapy Psychotherapy Relaxation and meditation therapy Biofeedback NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  5. New controller for functional electrical stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Fisekovic, N; Popovic, D B

    2001-07-01

    A novel, self-contained controller for functional electrical stimulation systems has been designed. The development was motivated by the need to have a general purpose, easy to use controller capable of stimulating many muscle groups, thus restoring complex motor functions (e.g. standing, walking, reaching, and grasping). The designed controller can regulate the frequency, pulse duration, and charge balance on up to 16 channels, and execute pre-programmed and sensory-driven control operations. The controller supports up to eight analog and six digital sensors, and comprises a memory block for including history of the sensory data (time series). Five independent timers provide the basis for the multi-modal and multi-level control of movement. The PC compatible interface is realised via an IR serial communication channel. The PC based software is user friendly and fully menu driven. This paper also presents a case study where the controller was implemented to restore walking in a paraplegic subject. The assistive system comprised the novel controller, the power and output stages of an eight-channel FES system (IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng, TRE-2 (1994) 234), ankle-foot orthoses, and a rolling walker. Stimulation was applied with surface electrodes positioned over the motoneurons that innervate muscles responsible for the hip and knee flexion and extension. The sensory system included goniometers at knee and hip joints, force-sensing resistors built in the shoe insoles, and digital accelerometers at the hips. A rule-based control algorithm was generated following a two-step procedure: (1) simulation and (2) machine learning as described in earlier studies (IEEE Trans Rehab Eng, TRE-7 (1999) 69). The paraplegic subject walked faster, and with less physiological effort, when automatic control was applied as compared to hand-control. This case study, as well as a previous one for assisting grasping (The design and testing of a new programmable electronic stimulator. N

  6. Assessment of deep tissue hyperalgesia in the groin - a method comparison of electrical vs. pressure stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, E K; Werner, M U; Kehlet, H

    2014-09-01

    Deep pain complaints are more frequent than cutaneous in post-surgical patients, and a prevalent finding in quantitative sensory testing studies. However, the preferred assessment method - pressure algometry - is indirect and tissue unspecific, hindering advances in treatment and preventive strategies. Thus, there is a need for development of methods with direct stimulation of suspected hyperalgesic tissues to identify the peripheral origin of nociceptive input. We compared the reliability of an ultrasound-guided needle stimulation protocol of electrical detection and pain thresholds to pressure algometry, by performing identical test-retest sequences 10 days apart, in deep tissues in the groin region. Electrical stimulation was performed by five up-and-down staircase series of single impulses of 0.04 ms duration, starting from 0 mA in increments of 0.2 mA until a threshold was reached and descending until sensation was lost. Method reliability was assessed by Bland-Altman plots, descriptive statistics, coefficients of variance and intraclass correlation coefficients. The electrical stimulation method was comparable to pressure algometry regarding 10 days test-retest repeatability, but with superior same-day reliability for electrical stimulation (P < 0.05). Between-subject variance rather than within-subject variance was the main source for test variation. There were no systematic differences in electrical thresholds across tissues and locations (P > 0.05). The presented tissue-specific direct deep tissue electrical stimulation technique has equal or superior reliability compared with the indirect tissue-unspecific stimulation by pressure algometry. This method may facilitate advances in mechanism based preventive and treatment strategies in acute and chronic post-surgical pain states. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Efficacy of transverse tripolar spinal cord stimulator for the relief of chronic low back pain from failed back surgery.

    PubMed

    Buvanendran, Asokumar; Lubenow, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is a common clinical entity for which spinal cord stimulation has been found to be an effective mode of analgesia, but with variable success rates. To determine if focal stimulation of the dorsal columns with a transverse tripolar lead might achieve deeper penetration of the electrical stimulus into the spinal cord and therefore provide greater analgesia to the back. Case report. We describe a 42-year-old female with failed back surgery syndrome that had greater back pain than leg pain. The tripolar lead configuration was achieved by placing percutaneously an octapolar lead in the spinal midline followed by 2 adjacent quadripolar leads, advanced to the T7-T10 vertebral bodies. Tripolar stimulation pattern resulted in more than 70% pain relief in this patient during the screening trial, while stimulation of one or 2 electrodes only provided 20% pain relief. After implantation of a permanent tripolar electrode system with a single rechargeable battery, the pain relief was maintained for one year. This is case report describing a case of a patient with chronic low back pain with a diagnosis of failed back surgery syndrome in which transverse tripolar stimulation using an octapolar and 2 quadripolar leads appeared to be beneficial. The transverse tripolar system consists of a central cathode surrounded by anodes, using 3 leads. This arrangement may contribute to maximum dorsal column stimulation with minimal dorsal root stimulation and provide analgesia to the lower back.

  8. Multimodal pain stimulations in patients with grade B oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, A M; Reddy, H; Pedersen, J; Funch‐Jensen, P; Gregersen, H; Arendt‐Nielsen, L

    2006-01-01

    Aim To obtain a better understanding of nociceptive processing in patients with oesophagitis. Patients and methods Eleven patients with grade B oesophagitis were compared with an age and sex matched group of 16 healthy subjects. A probe was positioned in the lower part of the oesophagus. After preconditioning of the tissue, painful mechanical stimuli were applied as distensions with a bag using an impedance planimetric method. Distensions were done before and after pharmacological impairment of distension induced smooth muscle contractions. Thermal stimulation was performed by recirculating water at 1 and 60°C in the bag. The area under the temperature curve (AUC) represented caloric load. The referred pain area (being a proxy for the central pain mechanisms) to the mechanical stimuli was drawn at maximum pain intensities. Results Patients were hyposensitive to mechanical stimuli, as assessed by the distending volume (F = 8.1, p = 0.005). After relaxation of smooth muscle with butylscopolamine, the difference between the two groups was more evident (F = 27.4, p<0.001). AUC for cold stimulation was 1048.6 (242.7) °C×s in controls and 889.8 (202.6) °C×s in patients (p = 0.5). For heat stimuli, AUC values were 323.3 (104.1) and 81.3 (32.3) °C×s in controls and patients, respectively (p = 0.04). The referred pain area to the mechanical stimulations was larger and more widespread in patients (49.3 (6.2) cm2 compared with controls 23.9 (7) cm2; p = 0.02). Conclusions The data indicate that peripheral sensitisation of heat sensitive receptors and pathways combined with facilitation of central pain mechanisms may explain the symptoms in patients with oesophagitis. PMID:16091554

  9. Non-invasive brain stimulation approaches to fibromyalgia pain

    PubMed Central

    Short, Baron; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; George, Mark; Beam, Will; Reeves, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a poorly understood disorder that likely involves central nervous system sensory hypersensitivity. There are a host of genetic, neuroendocrine and environmental abnormalities associated with the disease, and recent research findings suggest enhanced sensory processing, and abnormalities in central monoamines and cytokines expression in patients with fibromyalgia. The morbidity and financial costs associated with fibromyalgia are quite high despite conventional treatments with antidepressants, anticonvulsants, low-impact aerobic exercise and psychotherapy. Noninvasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and electroconvulsive therapy are beginning to be studied as possible treatments for fibromyalgia pain. Early studies appear promising but more work is needed. Future directions in clinical care may include innovative combinations of noninvasive brain stimulation, pharmacological augmentation, and behavior therapies. PMID:21841959

  10. Pain and the defense response: structural equation modeling reveals a coordinated psychophysiological response to increasing painful stimulation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Gary W; Chapman, C Richard; Nakamura, Yoshi; Bradshaw, David H; Jacobson, Robert C; Chapman, Christopher N

    2003-03-01

    The defense response theory implies that individuals should respond to increasing levels of painful stimulation with correlated increases in affectively mediated psychophysiological responses. This paper employs structural equation modeling to infer the latent processes responsible for correlated growth in the pain report, evoked potential amplitudes, pupil dilation, and skin conductance of 92 normal volunteers who experienced 144 trials of three levels of increasingly painful electrical stimulation. The analysis assumed a two-level model of latent growth as a function of stimulus level. The first level of analysis formulated a nonlinear growth model for each response measure, and allowed intercorrelations among the parameters of these models across individuals. The second level of analysis posited latent process factors to account for these intercorrelations. The best-fitting parsimonious model suggests that two latent processes account for the correlations. One of these latent factors, the activation threshold, determines the initial threshold response, while the other, the response gradient, indicates the magnitude of the coherent increase in response with stimulus level. Collectively, these two second-order factors define the defense response, a broad construct comprising both subjective pain evaluation and physiological mechanisms.

  11. Reproduction of overall spontaneous pain pattern by manual stimulation of active myofascial trigger points in fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has previously been reported that local and referred pain from active myofascial trigger points (MTPs) in the neck and shoulder region contribute to fibromyalgia (FM) pain and that the pain pattern induced from active MTPs can reproduce parts of the spontaneous clinical FM pain pattern. The current study investigated whether the overall spontaneous FM pain pattern can be reproduced by local and referred pain from active MTPs located in different muscles. Methods A spontaneous pain pattern in FM was recorded in 30 FM patients and 30 healthy subjects served as controls. Local and referred pain patterns induced from active (patients) and latent (controls) MTPs were recorded following manual stimulation. The existence of MTPs was confirmed by intramuscular electromyographical registration of spontaneous electrical activity. Results Local and referred pain areas induced from key active MTPs in FM were larger than pain areas from latent MTPs in healthy controls (P < 0.001), but were similar to the overall spontaneous FM pain area in FM (P > 0.05). The induced pain area was positively associated with current spontaneous pain intensity in FM (P < 0.01). The locations of key active MTPs in FM patients were found to have latent MTPs in healthy subjects. The muscles containing key active MTPs in FM are often observed in the muscles of extensor digitorum, trapezius, infraspinatus in the upper part of the body and of quadratus lumborum, gluteus medius in the lower part of the body. Conclusions The overall spontaneous FM pain pattern can be reproduced by mechanical stimulation of active MTPs located in different muscles, suggesting that fibromyalgia pain is largely composed of pain arising from muscle pain and spasm. Targeting active MTPs and related perpetuating factors may be an important strategy in FM pain control. Trial registration ISRCTN ISRCTN43167547. PMID:21426569

  12. Contralaterally Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation for Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Harley, Mary Y.; Hisel, Terri Z.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.; Fu, Michael J.; Chae, John

    2012-01-01

    Contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation (CCFES) is an innovative method of delivering neuromuscular electrical stimulation for rehabilitation of paretic limbs after stroke. It is being studied to evaluate its efficacy in improving recovery of arm and hand function and ankle dorsiflexion in chronic and subacute stroke patients. The initial studies provide preliminary evidence supporting the efficacy of CCFES. PMID:23365893

  13. Cell-stimulation therapy of lateral epicondylitis with frequency-modulated low-intensity electric current.

    PubMed

    Aliyev, R M; Geiger, G

    2012-03-01

    In addition to the routine therapy, the patients with lateral epicondylitis included into experimental group were subjected to a 12-week cell-stimulation therapy with low-intensity frequency-modulated electric current. The control group received the same routine therapy and sham stimulation (the therapeutic apparatus was not energized). The efficiency of this microcurrent therapy was estimated by comparing medical indices before therapy and at the end of a 12-week therapeutic course using a 10-point pain severity numeric rating scale (NRS) and Roles-Maudsley pain score. The study revealed high therapeutic efficiency of cell-stimulation with low-intensity electric current resulting probably from up-regulation of intracellular transmitters, interleukins, and prostaglandins playing the key role in the regulation of inflammation.

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Max M.; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B.; Ayache, Samar S.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after

  15. Epidural electrical stimulation to improve chronic poststroke aphasia: a 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Balossier, Anne; Etard, Olivier; Descat, Chloé; Vivien, Denis; Emery, Evelyne

    2012-07-01

    Aphasia is an incapacitating deficit experienced by almost 25% of patients after a left hemispheric ischemic stroke. Spontaneous recovery is considered to be limited to a period of 3 to 6 months. Although speech therapy performed during the first weeks may speed up this process and enhance its outcome, beyond this period it fails to change the global prognosis. We report a case of an unusual recovery of nonfluent chronic poststroke aphasia subsequent to extradural cortical stimulation. A right-handed woman experienced aphasia and drug-resistant central poststroke facial pain after a left superficial Sylvian ischemic stroke at the age of 58 years old. Four years after the stroke, the patient was included in a clinical trial to establish the efficiency of epidural electric stimulation on neuropathic pain. As an improvement in her language performance was noted, a speech evaluation was added to the initial protocol to quantify the benefit. Twelve months after the surgical implantation, pain and language performance were assessed in a double-blind manner during two consecutive 1-month periods when the stimulator was randomly enabled or disabled. The same evaluation was performed after 5 years of stimulation. Eventually, epidural electric stimulation significantly and sustainably improved her lexical access and speech fluency. Cortical stimulation may offer a new approach for the treatment of late chronic poststroke aphasia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of analgesic nerve block electrical stimulation in a patient with adhesive capsulitis.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Dawn T; Borger, Amy; McNamee, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of adhesive capsulitis is poorly understood, the primary goal of therapeutic intervention is to restore pain-free, functional range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder. Pain and muscle guarding, particularly of the subscapularis muscle, are common impairments that occur with adhesive capsulitis. The purpose of this case report is to describe a novel approach to help the pain-muscle guarding-pain cycle associated with pain and limited shoulder motion in a patient with a medical diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. The patient was a 64-year-old female with adhesive capsulitis. Outcome variables were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) ROM, and rotational lack. Twelve treatments of moist heat, analgesic nerve block electrical stimulation, contract/relax exercises for shoulder IR/ER, and Pendulum/Codman exercises were administered. After both 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, the patient demonstrated marked improvements in all areas. Overall, there was a 78-106% increase in ROM (IR and ER) and a 50-83% improvement in functional mobility (rotational lack & SPADI). It appears that analgesic electrical stimulation may have helped decrease the pain-muscle guarding cycle associated with adhesive capsulitis to enhance functional outcomes in a timely manner.

  17. Frequency dependence of behavioral modulation by hippocampal electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    La Corte, Giorgio; Wei, Yina; Chernyy, Nick; Gluckman, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation offers the potential to develop novel strategies for the treatment of refractory medial temporal lobe epilepsy. In particular, direct electrical stimulation of the hippocampus presents the opportunity to modulate pathological dynamics at the ictal focus, although the neuroanatomical substrate of this region renders it susceptible to altering cognition and affective processing as a side effect. We investigated the effects of three electrical stimulation paradigms on separate groups of freely moving rats (sham, 8-Hz and 40-Hz sine-wave stimulation of the ventral/intermediate hippocampus, where 8- and 40-Hz stimulation were chosen to mimic naturally occurring hippocampal oscillations). Animals exhibited attenuated locomotor and exploratory activity upon stimulation at 40 Hz, but not at sham or 8-Hz stimulation. Such behavioral modifications were characterized by a significant reduction in rearing frequency, together with increased freezing behavior. Logistic regression analysis linked the observed changes in animal locomotion to 40-Hz electrical stimulation independently of time-related variables occurring during testing. Spectral analysis, conducted to monitor the electrophysiological profile in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus, showed a significant reduction in peak theta frequency, together with reduced theta power in the 40-Hz vs. the sham stimulation animal group, independent of locomotion speed (theta range: 4–12 Hz). These findings contribute to the development of novel and safe medical protocols by indicating a strategy to constrain or optimize parameters in direct hippocampal electrical stimulation. PMID:24198322

  18. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve...

  19. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve...

  20. Toward rational design of electrical stimulation strategies for epilepsy control

    PubMed Central

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Gluckman, Bruce; Reato, Davide; Bikson, Marom

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is emerging as a viable alternative for epilepsy patients whose seizures are not alleviated by drugs or surgery. Its attractions are temporal and spatial specificity of action, flexibility of waveform parameters and timing, and the perception that its effects are reversible unlike resective surgery. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mechanisms of neural electrical stimulation, clinical electrotherapy for seizures relies heavily on empirical tuning of parameters and protocols. We highlight concurrent treatment goals with potentially conflicting design constraints that must be resolved when formulating rational strategies for epilepsy electrotherapy: namely seizure reduction versus cognitive impairment, stimulation efficacy versus tissue safety, and mechanistic insight versus clinical pragmatism. First, treatment markers, objectives, and metrics relevant to electrical stimulation for epilepsy are discussed from a clinical perspective. Then the experimental perspective is presented, with the biophysical mechanisms and modalities of open-loop electrical stimulation, and the potential benefits of closed-loop control for epilepsy. PMID:19926525

  1. Adjusting Pulse Amplitude During Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Does Not Provide Greater Hypoalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Filion, Camille; Couture, Chantal; Vallée, Élisabeth; Laroche, Sarah; Léonard, Guillaume

    2018-03-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrotherapeutic modality commonly used in rehabilitation to relieve pain. Adjusting pulse amplitude (intensity) during TENS treatment has been suggested to overcome nerve habituation. However, it is still unclear if this procedure leads to greater hypoalgesia. The aim of this study was to determine if the hypoalgesic effect of TENS is greater when pulse amplitude is adjusted throughout the TENS treatment session in chronic low-back pain patients. Randomized double-blind crossover study. Recruitment and assessment were conducted at the Clinique universitaire de réadaptation de l'Estrie (CURE) of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the Université de Sherbrooke. Twenty-one volunteers with chronic low-back pain were enrolled and completed this investigation. Each patient received two high-frequency TENS treatments on two separate sessions: (1) with adjustment of pulse amplitude and (2) without pulse amplitude adjustment. Pain intensity and unpleasantness were assessed before, during, and after TENS application with a 10 cm visual analog scale. Both TENS conditions (with and without adjustment of intensity) decreased pain intensity and unpleasantness when compared with baseline. No difference was observed between the two stimulation conditions for both pain intensity and unpleasantness. The current results suggest that adjustment of pulse amplitude during TENS application does not provide greater hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic low-back pain. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings in other pain populations.

  2. Helplessness and perceived pain intensity: relations to cortisol concentrations after electrocutaneous stimulation in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Uncontrollable aversive events are associated with feelings of helplessness and cortisol elevation and are suitable as a model of depression. The high comorbidity of depression and pain symptoms and the importance of controllability in both conditions are clinically well-known but empirical studies are scarce. The study investigated the relationship of pain experience, helplessness, and cortisol secretion after controllable vs. uncontrollable electric skin stimulation in healthy male individuals. Methods Sixty-four male volunteers were randomly assigned to receive 30 controllable (self-administered) or uncontrollable (experimenter-administered) painful electric skin stimuli. Perceived pain intensity (PPI), subjective helplessness ratings, and salivary cortisol concentrations were assessed. PPI was assessed after stress exposure. For salivary cortisol concentrations and subjective helplessness ratings, areas under the response curve (AUC) were calculated. Results After uncontrollable vs. controllable stress exposure significantly higher PPI ratings (P = 0.023), higher subjective helplessness AUC (P < 0.0005) and higher salivary cortisol AUC (P = 0.004, t-tests) were found. Correlation analyses revealed a significant correlation between subjective helplessness AUC and PPI (r = 0.500, P < 0.0005), subjective helplessness AUC and salivary cortisol AUC (r = 0.304, P = 0.015) and between PPI and salivary cortisol AUC (r = 0.298, P = 0.017). Conclusions The results confirm the impact of uncontrollability on stress responses in humans; the relationship of PPI with subjective helplessness and salivary cortisol suggests a cognitive-affective sensitization of pain perception, particularly under uncontrollable conditions. PMID:21718526

  3. The differential effect of trigeminal vs. peripheral pain stimulation on visual processing and memory encoding is influenced by pain-related fear.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K; Forkmann, K; Sinke, C; Gratz, M; Bitz, A; Bingel, U

    2016-07-01

    Compared to peripheral pain, trigeminal pain elicits higher levels of fear, which is assumed to enhance the interruptive effects of pain on concomitant cognitive processes. In this fMRI study we examined the behavioral and neural effects of trigeminal (forehead) and peripheral (hand) pain on visual processing and memory encoding. Cerebral activity was measured in 23 healthy subjects performing a visual categorization task that was immediately followed by a surprise recognition task. During the categorization task subjects received concomitant noxious electrical stimulation on the forehead or hand. Our data show that fear ratings were significantly higher for trigeminal pain. Categorization and recognition performance did not differ between pictures that were presented with trigeminal and peripheral pain. However, object categorization in the presence of trigeminal pain was associated with stronger activity in task-relevant visual areas (lateral occipital complex, LOC), memory encoding areas (hippocampus and parahippocampus) and areas implicated in emotional processing (amygdala) compared to peripheral pain. Further, individual differences in neural activation between the trigeminal and the peripheral condition were positively related to differences in fear ratings between both conditions. Functional connectivity between amygdala and LOC was increased during trigeminal compared to peripheral painful stimulation. Fear-driven compensatory resource activation seems to be enhanced for trigeminal stimuli, presumably due to their exceptional biological relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain excites the auditory cortex asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Quass, Gunnar Lennart; Kurt, Simone; Hildebrandt, Jannis; Kral, Andrej

    2018-05-17

    Auditory midbrain implant users cannot achieve open speech perception and have limited frequency resolution. It remains unclear whether the spread of excitation contributes to this issue and how much it can be compensated by current-focusing, which is an effective approach in cochlear implants. The present study examined the spread of excitation in the cortex elicited by electric midbrain stimulation. We further tested whether current-focusing via bipolar and tripolar stimulation is effective with electric midbrain stimulation and whether these modes hold any advantage over monopolar stimulation also in conditions when the stimulation electrodes are in direct contact with the target tissue. Using penetrating multielectrode arrays, we recorded cortical population responses to single pulse electric midbrain stimulation in 10 ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice. We compared monopolar, bipolar, and tripolar stimulation configurations with regard to the spread of excitation and the characteristic frequency difference between the stimulation/recording electrodes. The cortical responses were distributed asymmetrically around the characteristic frequency of the stimulated midbrain region with a strong activation in regions tuned up to one octave higher. We found no significant differences between monopolar, bipolar, and tripolar stimulation in threshold, evoked firing rate, or dynamic range. The cortical responses to electric midbrain stimulation are biased towards higher tonotopic frequencies. Current-focusing is not effective in direct contact electrical stimulation. Electrode maps should account for the asymmetrical spread of excitation when fitting auditory midbrain implants by shifting the frequency-bands downward and stimulating as dorsally as possible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Design of Electrical Stimulation Bioreactors for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, N.; Marsano, A.; Cannizzaro, C.; Voldman, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:19163486

  6. Design of electrical stimulation bioreactors for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, N; Marsano, A; Cannizzaro, C; Voldman, J; Vunjak-Novakovic, G

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

  7. Gender effect on discrimination of location and frequency in surface electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Bo; Paramanathan, Senthoopiya A; Pedersen, Karina F; Lauridsen, Mette V; Gade, Julie; Lontis, Romulus; Jensen, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the gender effect on discrimination of surface electrical stimulation applied on the human forearm. Three experiments were conducted to examine the abilty of discriminating stimulation frequency, location, or both parameters in 14 healthy subjects. The results indicated a statistically significant impact of gender on the discrimination performance in all the three experiments (p <; 0.01, p <; 0.01, and p <; 0.001, respectively). The female group performed noticeably better than the male group (i.e., mean difference 15.4%, 11.9%, and 16.7% in repective experiment). The findings may provide evidence of gender difference in perceiving and interpreting electrical stimulation. Considering the gender difference may improve the efficacy of electrically evoked sensory feedback in applications such as prosthetic use and pain relief.

  8. Electrical Stimulation for Pressure Injuries: A Health Technology Assessment.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Pressure injuries (bedsores) are common and reduce quality of life. They are also costly and difficult to treat. This health technology assessment evaluates the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and lived experience of adding electrical stimulation to standard wound care for pressure injuries. We conducted a systematic search for studies published to December 7, 2016, limited to randomized and non-randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of electrical stimulation plus standard wound care versus standard wound care alone for patients with pressure injuries. We assessed the quality of evidence through Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). In addition, we conducted an economic literature review and a budget impact analysis to assess the cost-effectiveness and affordability of electrical stimulation for treatment of pressure ulcers in Ontario. Given uncertainties in clinical evidence and resource use, we did not conduct a primary economic evaluation. Finally, we conducted qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers about their experiences with pressure injuries, currently available treatments, and (if applicable) electrical stimulation. Nine randomized controlled trials and two non-randomized controlled trials were found from the systematic search. There was no significant difference in complete pressure injury healing between adjunct electrical stimulation and standard wound care. There was a significant difference in wound surface area reduction favouring electrical stimulation compared with standard wound care.The only study on cost-effectiveness of electrical stimulation was partially applicable to the patient population of interest. Therefore, the cost-effectiveness of electrical stimulation cannot be determined. We estimate that the cost of publicly funding electrical stimulation for pressure injuries would be $0.77 to $3.85 million yearly for the next 5 years.Patients and caregivers

  9. Electrical Stimulation for Pressure Injuries: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lambrinos, Anna; Falk, Lindsey; Ali, Arshia; Holubowich, Corinne; Walter, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Pressure injuries (bedsores) are common and reduce quality of life. They are also costly and difficult to treat. This health technology assessment evaluates the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and lived experience of adding electrical stimulation to standard wound care for pressure injuries. Methods We conducted a systematic search for studies published to December 7, 2016, limited to randomized and non–randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of electrical stimulation plus standard wound care versus standard wound care alone for patients with pressure injuries. We assessed the quality of evidence through Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). In addition, we conducted an economic literature review and a budget impact analysis to assess the cost-effectiveness and affordability of electrical stimulation for treatment of pressure ulcers in Ontario. Given uncertainties in clinical evidence and resource use, we did not conduct a primary economic evaluation. Finally, we conducted qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers about their experiences with pressure injuries, currently available treatments, and (if applicable) electrical stimulation. Results Nine randomized controlled trials and two non–randomized controlled trials were found from the systematic search. There was no significant difference in complete pressure injury healing between adjunct electrical stimulation and standard wound care. There was a significant difference in wound surface area reduction favouring electrical stimulation compared with standard wound care. The only study on cost-effectiveness of electrical stimulation was partially applicable to the patient population of interest. Therefore, the cost-effectiveness of electrical stimulation cannot be determined. We estimate that the cost of publicly funding electrical stimulation for pressure injuries would be $0.77 to $3.85 million yearly for the next 5

  10. Evoked pain analgesia in chronic pelvic pain patients using respiratory-gated auricular vagal afferent nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Napadow, Vitaly; Edwards, Robert R; Cahalan, Christine M; Mensing, George; Greenbaum, Seth; Valovska, Assia; Li, Ang; Kim, Jieun; Maeda, Yumi; Park, Kyungmo; Wasan, Ajay D

    2012-06-01

    Previous vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) studies have demonstrated antinociceptive effects, and recent noninvasive approaches, termed transcutaneous-vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS), have utilized stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve in the ear. The dorsal medullary vagal system operates in tune with respiration, and we propose that supplying vagal afferent stimulation gated to the exhalation phase of respiration can optimize t-VNS. Counterbalanced, crossover study. Patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) due to endometriosis in a specialty pain clinic. INTERVENTIONS/OUTCOMES: We evaluated evoked pain analgesia for respiratory-gated auricular vagal afferent nerve stimulation (RAVANS) compared with nonvagal auricular stimulation (NVAS). RAVANS and NVAS were evaluated in separate sessions spaced at least 1 week apart. Outcome measures included deep-tissue pain intensity, temporal summation of pain, and anxiety ratings, which were assessed at baseline, during active stimulation, immediately following stimulation, and 15 minutes after stimulus cessation. RAVANS demonstrated a trend for reduced evoked pain intensity and temporal summation of mechanical pain, and significantly reduced anxiety in N = 15 CPP patients, compared with NVAS, with moderate to large effect sizes (η(2) > 0.2). Chronic pain disorders such as CPP are in great need of effective, nonpharmacological options for treatment. RAVANS produced promising antinociceptive effects for quantitative sensory testing (QST) outcomes reflective of the noted hyperalgesia and central sensitization in this patient population. Future studies should evaluate longer-term application of RAVANS to examine its effects on both QST outcomes and clinical pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Electrical Stimulation Modulates High γ Activity and Human Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Brent M.; Miller, Laura R.; Khadjevand, Fatemeh; Ezzyat, Youssef; Wanda, Paul; Sperling, Michael R.; Lega, Bradley; Stead, S. Matt

    2018-01-01

    Direct electrical stimulation of the brain has emerged as a powerful treatment for multiple neurological diseases, and as a potential technique to enhance human cognition. Despite its application in a range of brain disorders, it remains unclear how stimulation of discrete brain areas affects memory performance and the underlying electrophysiological activities. Here, we investigated the effect of direct electrical stimulation in four brain regions known to support declarative memory: hippocampus (HP), parahippocampal region (PH) neocortex, prefrontal cortex (PF), and lateral temporal cortex (TC). Intracranial EEG recordings with stimulation were collected from 22 patients during performance of verbal memory tasks. We found that high γ (62–118 Hz) activity induced by word presentation was modulated by electrical stimulation. This modulatory effect was greatest for trials with “poor” memory encoding. The high γ modulation correlated with the behavioral effect of stimulation in a given brain region: it was negative, i.e., the induced high γ activity was decreased, in the regions where stimulation decreased memory performance, and positive in the lateral TC where memory enhancement was observed. Our results suggest that the effect of electrical stimulation on high γ activity induced by word presentation may be a useful biomarker for mapping memory networks and guiding therapeutic brain stimulation. PMID:29404403

  12. Experimental Sleep Restriction Facilitates Pain and Electrically Induced Cortical Responses.

    PubMed

    Matre, Dagfinn; Hu, Li; Viken, Leif A; Hjelle, Ingri B; Wigemyr, Monica; Knardahl, Stein; Sand, Trond; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Sleep restriction (SR) has been hypothesized to sensitize the pain system. The current study determined whether experimental sleep restriction had an effect on experimentally induced pain and pain-elicited electroencephalographic (EEG) responses. A paired crossover study. Pain testing was performed after 2 nights of 50% SR and after 2 nights with habitual sleep (HS). Laboratory experiment at research center. Self-reported healthy volunteers (n = 21, age range: 18-31 y). Brief high-density electrical stimuli to the forearm skin produced pinprick-like pain. Subjective pain ratings increased after SR, but only in response to the highest stimulus intensity (P = 0.018). SR increased the magnitude of the pain-elicited EEG response analyzed in the time-frequency domain (P = 0.021). Habituation across blocks did not differ between HS and SR. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was reduced after SR (P = 0.039). Pressure pain threshold of the trapezius muscle region also decreased after SR (P = 0.017). Sleep restriction (SR) increased the sensitivity to pressure pain and to electrically induced pain of moderate, but not low, intensity. The increased electrical pain could not be explained by a difference in habituation. Increased response magnitude is possibly related to reduced processing within the somatosensory cortex after partial SR. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Efficacy of Selected Electrical Therapies on Chronic Low Back Pain: A Comparative Clinical Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Rajfur, Katarzyna; Walewicz, Karolina; Fras, Beata; Bolach, Bartosz; Dymarek, Robert; Rosinczuk, Joanna; Halski, Tomasz; Taradaj, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Background In the currently available research publications on electrical therapy of low back pain, generally no control groups or detailed randomization were used, and such studies were often conducted with relatively small groups of patients, based solely on subjective questionnaires and pain assessment scales (lacking measurement methods to objectify the therapeutic progress). The available literature also lacks a comprehensive and large-scale clinical study. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of treating low back pain using selected electrotherapy methods. The study assesses the influence of individual electrotherapeutic treatments on reduction of pain, improvement of the range of movement in lower section of the spine, and improvement of motor functions and mobility. Material/Methods The 127 patients qualified for the therapy (ultimately, 123 patients completed the study) and assigned to 6 comparison groups: A – conventional TENS, B – acupuncture-like TENS, C – high-voltage electrical stimulation, D – interferential current stimulation, E – diadynamic current, and F – control group. Results The research showed that using electrical stimulation with interferential current penetrating deeper into the tissues results in a significant and more efficient elimination of pain, and an improvement of functional ability of patients suffering from low back pain on the basis of an analysis of both subjective and objective parameters. The TENS currents and high voltage were helpful, but not as effective. The use of diadynamic currents appears to be useless. Conclusions Selected electrical therapies (interferential current, TENS, and high voltage) appear to be effective in treating chronic low back pain. PMID:28062862

  14. Optimization of Electrical Stimulation Parameters for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile cardiac tissue constrcuts. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation, to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, and were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Cardiac tissues stimulated at 3V/cm amplitude and 3Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43, and the best developed contractile behavior. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21604379

  15. Transient finite element modeling of functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad D; Peulic, Aleksandar S; Zdravkovic, Nebojsa D; Grbovic-Markovic, Vesna M; Jurisic-Skevin, Aleksandra J

    2011-03-01

    Transcutaneous functional electrical stimulation is commonly used for strengthening muscle. However, transient effects during stimulation are not yet well explored. The effect of an amplitude change of the stimulation can be described by static model, but there is no differency for different pulse duration. The aim of this study is to present the finite element (FE) model of a transient electrical stimulation on the forearm. Discrete FE equations were derived by using a standard Galerkin procedure. Different tissue conductive and dielectric properties are fitted using least square method and trial and error analysis from experimental measurement. This study showed that FE modeling of electrical stimulation can give the spatial-temporal distribution of applied current in the forearm. Three different cases were modeled with the same geometry but with different input of the current pulse, in order to fit the tissue properties by using transient FE analysis. All three cases were compared with experimental measurements of intramuscular voltage on one volunteer.

  16. Study of driving fatigue alleviation by transcutaneous acupoints electrical stimulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuwang; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Driving fatigue is more likely to bring serious safety trouble to traffic. Therefore, accurately and rapidly detecting driving fatigue state and alleviating fatigue are particularly important. In the present work, the electrical stimulation method stimulating the Láogóng point (PC8) of human body is proposed, which is used to alleviate the mental fatigue of drivers. The wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) is used to extract θ, α, and β subbands of drivers' electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Performances of the two algorithms (θ + α)/(α + β) and θ/β are also assessed as possible indicators for fatigue detection. Finally, the differences between the drivers with electrical stimulation and normal driving are discussed. It is shown that stimulating the Láogóng point (PC8) using electrical stimulation method can alleviate driver fatigue effectively during longtime driving.

  17. Study of Driving Fatigue Alleviation by Transcutaneous Acupoints Electrical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuwang; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Driving fatigue is more likely to bring serious safety trouble to traffic. Therefore, accurately and rapidly detecting driving fatigue state and alleviating fatigue are particularly important. In the present work, the electrical stimulation method stimulating the Láogóng point (劳宫PC8) of human body is proposed, which is used to alleviate the mental fatigue of drivers. The wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) is used to extract θ, α, and β subbands of drivers' electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Performances of the two algorithms (θ + α)/(α + β) and θ/β are also assessed as possible indicators for fatigue detection. Finally, the differences between the drivers with electrical stimulation and normal driving are discussed. It is shown that stimulating the Láogóng point (劳宫PC8) using electrical stimulation method can alleviate driver fatigue effectively during longtime driving. PMID:25254242

  18. A CONTINUED INVESTIGATION OF ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED FABRIC FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes three experiments performed by Southern Research Institute under a cooperative agreement with EPA. First was a demonstration of electrostatically stimulated fabric filtration (ESFF) used to collect particulate matter (PM) from fossil fuel electrical power pl...

  19. Pulsed laser versus electrical energy for peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter; Kao, Chris; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Transient optical neural stimulation has previously been shown to elicit highly controlled, artifact-free potentials within the nervous system in a non-contact fashion without resulting in damage to tissue. This paper presents the physiologic validity of elicited nerve and muscle potentials from pulsed laser induced stimulation of the peripheral nerve in a comparative study with the standard method of electrically evoked potentials. Herein, the fundamental physical properties underlying the two techniques are contrasted. Key laser parameters for efficient optical stimulation of the peripheral nerve are detailed. Strength response curves are shown to be linear for each stimulation modality, although fewer axons can be recruited with optically evoked potentials. Results compare the relative transient energy requirements for stimulation using each technique and demonstrate that optical methods can selectively excite functional nerve stimulation. Adjacent stimulation and recording of compound nerve potentials in their entirety from optical and electrical stimulation are presented, with optical responses shown to be free of any stimulation artifact. Thus, use of a pulsed laser exhibits some advantages when compared to standard electrical means for excitation of muscle potentials in the peripheral nerve in the research domain and possibly for clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:17537515

  20. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. 882.5880 Section 882.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator...

  1. Short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gregorini, Cristie; Cipriano Junior, Gerson; Aquino, Leticia Moraes de; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Bernardelli, Graziella França

    2010-03-01

    Respiratory muscle strength has been related to the postoperative outcome of cardiac surgeries. The main documented therapeutic purpose of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the reduction of pain, which could bring secondary benefits to the respiratory muscles and, consequently, to lung capacities and volumes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the reduction of pain and its possible influence on respiratory muscle strength and lung capacity and volumes of patients in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery. Twenty five patients with mean age of 59.9 +/- 10.3 years, of whom 72% were men, and homogeneous as regards weight and height, were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received therapeutic TENS (n = 13) and the other, placebo TENS (n = 12), for four hours on the third postoperative day of cardiac surgery. Pain was analyzed by means of a visual analogue scale, and of respiratory muscle strength as measured by maximum respiratory pressures and lung capacity and volumes before and after application of TENS. Short-duration TENS significantly reduced pain of patients in the postoperative period (p < 0.001). Respiratory muscle strength (p < 0.001), tidal volume (p < 0.001) and vital capacity (p < 0.05) significantly improved after therapeutic TENS, unlike in the placebo group. Short-duration TENS proved effective for the reduction of pain and improvement of respiratory muscle strength, as well as of lung volumes and capacity.

  2. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    PubMed

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients.

  3. Emotions induced by intracerebral electrical stimulation of the temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Meletti, Stefano; Tassi, Laura; Mai, Roberto; Fini, Nicola; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Russo, Giorgio Lo

    2006-01-01

    To assess the quality and frequency of emotions induced by intracerebral electrical stimulation of the temporal lobe. Behavioral responses were obtained by electrical stimulation in 74 patients undergoing presurgical video-stereo-EEG monitoring for drug-resistant epilepsy. Intracerebral electrical stimulation was performed by delivering trains of electrical stimuli of alternating polarity; the intensity could vary from 0.2 to 3 mA. Stimulation frequency was 1 Hz or 50 Hz. Nine hundred thirty-eight stimulation procedures were performed. Seventy-nine emotional responses (ERs) were obtained (8.4%). Of these, 67 were "fear responses." Sad feelings were evoked 3 times, happy-pleasant feelings 9 times. Anger and disgust were never observed. The following variables affected the incidence of ER: (a) Anatomical site of stimulation. ERs (always fear) were maximal at the amygdala (12%) and minimal for lateral neocortical stimulation (3%, p < 0.01). (b) Pathology. Stimulation of a temporal lobe with hippocampal sclerosis was associated with a lower frequency of ERs compared with stimulation of a temporal lobe with no evidence of atrophy in the medial temporal structures. (c) Stimulation frequency. ERs were 12% at 50 Hz versus 6.0% at 1 Hz (p < 0.01). (d) Gender. In women fear responses were 16% compared with 3% in men (p < 0.01). There were no gender differences when analyzing nonemotional responses. These data confirm the role of the medial temporal lobe region in the expression of emotions, especially fear-related behaviors. Fear was observed more frequently in the absence of medial temporal sclerosis, supporting the hypothesis that emotional behaviors induced by stimulation are positive phenomena, strictly related to the physiological function of these regions. Further investigations should address why women express fear behaviors more frequently than men.

  4. High-Frequency Transcutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Induces a Higher Increase of Heat Pain Threshold in the Cutaneous Area of the Stimulated Nerve When Confronted to the Neighbouring Areas

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, M.; Camuzzini, N.; Cecini, M.; Dalla Toffola, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) is probably the most diffused physical therapy used for antalgic purposes. Although it continues to be used by trial and error, correct targeting of paresthesias evoked by the electrical stimulation on the painful area is diffusely considered very important for pain relief. Aim. To investigate if TENS antalgic effect is higher in the cutaneous area of the stimulated nerve when confronted to neighbouring areas. Methods. 10 volunteers (4 males, 6 females) underwent three different sessions: in two, heat pain thresholds (HPTs) were measured on the dorsal hand skin before, during and after electrical stimulation (100 Hz, 0.1 msec) of superficial radial nerve; in the third session HPTs, were measured without any stimulation. Results. Radial nerve stimulation induced an increase of HPT significantly higher in its cutaneous territory when confronted to the neighbouring ulnar nerve territory, and antalgic effect persisted beyond the stimulation time. Conclusions. The location of TENS electrodes is crucial for obtaining the strongest pain relief, and peripheral nerve trunk stimulation is advised whenever possible. Moreover, the present study indicates that continuous stimulation could be unnecessary, suggesting a strategy for avoiding the well-known tolerance-like effect of prolonged TENS application. PMID:24027756

  5. Experimental Sleep Restriction Facilitates Pain and Electrically Induced Cortical Responses

    PubMed Central

    Matre, Dagfinn; Hu, Li; Viken, Leif A.; Hjelle, Ingri B.; Wigemyr, Monica; Knardahl, Stein; Sand, Trond; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep restriction (SR) has been hypothesized to sensitize the pain system. The current study determined whether experimental sleep restriction had an effect on experimentally induced pain and pain-elicited electroencephalographic (EEG) responses. Design: A paired crossover study. Intervention: Pain testing was performed after 2 nights of 50% SR and after 2 nights with habitual sleep (HS). Setting: Laboratory experiment at research center. Participants: Self-reported healthy volunteers (n = 21, age range: 18–31 y). Measurements and Results: Brief high-density electrical stimuli to the forearm skin produced pinprick-like pain. Subjective pain ratings increased after SR, but only in response to the highest stimulus intensity (P = 0.018). SR increased the magnitude of the pain-elicited EEG response analyzed in the time-frequency domain (P = 0.021). Habituation across blocks did not differ between HS and SR. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was reduced after SR (P = 0.039). Pressure pain threshold of the trapezius muscle region also decreased after SR (P = 0.017). Conclusion: Sleep restriction (SR) increased the sensitivity to pressure pain and to electrically induced pain of moderate, but not low, intensity. The increased electrical pain could not be explained by a difference in habituation. Increased response magnitude is possibly related to reduced processing within the somatosensory cortex after partial SR. Citation: Matre D, Hu L, Viken LA, Hjelle IB, Wigemyr M, Knardahl S, Sand T, Nilsen KB. Experimental sleep restriction facilitates pain and electrically induced cortical responses. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1607–1617. PMID:26194577

  6. Spinal cord stimulation: Subjective pain intensity and presurgical correlates in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Lekeisha A; Lofland, Kenneth

    2014-09-01

    This study determined the changes in pain intensity prior to and after permanent placement of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), as measured by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and, examined associations of presurgical characteristics to both pre- and post-SCS VAS scores. Demographic, disease, and psychological data were extracted from the medical charts of chronic pain patients (N = 58) being treated at a Hospital in IL, USA. Most patients were diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome (51.9%) and low back pain (33.3%). The majority were White (72.5%), male (60%), married (72%), and temporary disabled or receiving worker's compensation (40%). Study objectives were tested with correlational and univariate analysis. A significant reduction between pre (M = 6.87; SD = 1.38) and Post-(M = 4.11; SD = 1.54) SCS pain intensity scores was observed (p < .000). Pre-SCS pain intensity scores were associated with medical diagnosis (p < .01), marital status (p < .05), and catastrophizing (p < .05). Post-SCS pain intensity scores were associated with body mass index (p < .05), medical diagnosis (p < .05), employment status (p < .05), bodily concern (p < .05), marital status (p < .05), and race (p < .05). Results strengthen support for the short-term effectiveness of SCS and demonstrate the differential associations of presurgical factors on pain intensity. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Flat-top beam for laser-stimulated pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Ryan; Nadeau, Valerie; Dickinson, Mark

    2005-04-01

    One of the main problems during laser stimulation in human pain research is the risk of tissue damage caused by excessive heating of the skin. This risk has been reduced by using a laser beam with a flattop (or superGaussian) intensity profile, instead of the conventional Gaussian beam. A finite difference approximation to the heat conduction equation has been applied to model the temperature distribution in skin as a result of irradiation by flattop and Gaussian profile CO2 laser beams. The model predicts that a 15 mm diameter, 15 W, 100 ms CO2 laser pulse with an order 6 superGaussian profile produces a maximum temperature 6 oC less than a Gaussian beam with the same energy density. A superGaussian profile was created by passing a Gaussian beam through a pair of zinc selenide aspheric lenses which refract the more intense central region of the beam towards the less intense periphery. The profiles of the lenses were determined by geometrical optics. In human pain trials the superGaussian beam required more power than the Gaussian beam to reach sensory and pain thresholds.

  8. [Methods of brain stimulation based on weak electric current--future tool for the clinician?].

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, Tuukka; Lehto, Soili M

    2016-01-01

    Methods of brain stimulation based on a weak electric current are non-invasive neuromodulation techniques. They include transcranial direct current, alternating current and random noise stimulation. These methods modify the membrane potential of neurons without triggering the action potential, and have been successfully utilized to influence cognition and regulation of emotions in healthy experimental subjects. In clinical studies, indications of the efficacy of these techniques have been obtained in the treatment of depression, schizophrenia, memory disorders and pain as well as in stroke rehabilitation. It is hoped that these techniques will become established as part of the care and rehabilitation of psychiatric and neurologic patients in the future.

  9. Economic substitutability of electrical brain stimulation, food, and water.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L; Rachlin, H

    1991-01-01

    Concurrent variable-ratio schedules of electrical brain stimulation, food, and water were paired in various combinations as reinforcement of rats' lever presses. Relative prices of the concurrent reinforcers were varied by changing the ratio of the response requirements on the two levers. Economic substitutability, measured by the sensitivity of response ratio to changes in relative price, was highest with brain stimulation reinforcement of presses on both levers and lowest with food reinforcement of presses on one lever and water reinforcement of presses on the other. Substitutability with brain stimulation reinforcement of presses on one lever and either food or water reinforcement for presses on the other was about as high as with brain stimulation for presses on both levers. Electrical brain stimulation for rats may thus serve as an economic substitute for two reinforcers, neither of which is substitutable for the other. PMID:2037823

  10. Intramuscular Electrical Stimulation for Muscle Activation of the Tibialis Anterior After Surgical Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Sharon; McClure, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Background Loss of voluntary activation of musculature can result in muscle weakness. External neuromuscular stimulation can be utilized to improve voluntary activation but is often poorly tolerated because of pain associated with required stimulus level. Intramuscular electrical stimulation requires much lower voltage and may be better tolerated, and therefore more effective at restoring voluntary muscle activation. Case Description A 71-year-old man sustained a rupture of the distal attachment of the tibialis anterior tendon. Thirty-two weeks after surgical repair, there was no palpable or visible tension development in the muscle belly or tendon. Dorsiflexion was dependent on toe extensors. Electrical stimulation applied via a dry needling placement in the muscle belly was utilized to induce an isometric contraction. Outcomes Five sessions of intramuscular electrical stimulation were delivered. By day 4 (second visit), the patient was able to dorsiflex without prominent use of the extensor hallucis longus. By day 6 (third visit), active-range-of-motion dorsiflexion with toes flexed increased 20° (-10° to 10°). Eighteen days after the initial treatment, the patient walked without his previous high-step gait pattern, and the tibialis anterior muscle test improved to withstanding moderate resistance (manual muscle test score, 4/5). Discussion The rapid change in muscle function observed suggests that intramuscular electrical stimulation may facilitate voluntary muscle activation. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 5. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):965-969. Epub 15 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7368.

  11. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hekstra, Doeke R.; White, K. Ian; Socolich, Michael A.; Henning, Robert W.; Šrajer, Vukica; Ranganathan, Rama

    2017-01-01

    The internal mechanics of proteins—the coordinated motions of amino acids and the pattern of forces constraining these motions—connects protein structure to function. Here we describe a new method combining the application of strong electric field pulses to protein crystals with time-resolved X-ray crystallography to observe conformational changes in spatial and temporal detail. Using a human PDZ domain (LNX2PDZ2) as a model system, we show that protein crystals tolerate electric field pulses strong enough to drive concerted motions on the sub-microsecond timescale. The induced motions are subtle, involve diverse physical mechanisms, and occur throughout the protein structure. The global pattern of electric-field-induced motions is consistent with both local and allosteric conformational changes naturally induced by ligand binding, including at conserved functional sites in the PDZ domain family. This work lays the foundation for comprehensive experimental study of the mechanical basis of protein function. PMID:27926732

  12. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    currently investigating the effects of CG stimulation in subjects with debilitating pain due to cervical or thoracic SCI. This study stemmed from...had a low thoracic injury and pain in lumbar dermatomes, whereas Subject 1 had mainly mid- cervical pain that responded minimally to DBS and matched...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0559 TITLE: Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation PRINCIPAL

  13. Electrical stimulation of a small brain area reversibly disrupts consciousness.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Picard, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms that underlie consciousness are not fully understood. We describe a region in the human brain where electrical stimulation reproducibly disrupted consciousness. A 54-year-old woman with intractable epilepsy underwent depth electrode implantation and electrical stimulation mapping. The electrode whose stimulation disrupted consciousness was between the left claustrum and anterior-dorsal insula. Stimulation of electrodes within 5mm did not affect consciousness. We studied the interdependencies among depth recording signals as a function of time by nonlinear regression analysis (h(2) coefficient) during stimulations that altered consciousness and stimulations of the same electrode at lower current intensities that were asymptomatic. Stimulation of the claustral electrode reproducibly resulted in a complete arrest of volitional behavior, unresponsiveness, and amnesia without negative motor symptoms or mere aphasia. The disruption of consciousness did not outlast the stimulation and occurred without any epileptiform discharges. We found a significant increase in correlation for interactions affecting medial parietal and posterior frontal channels during stimulations that disrupted consciousness compared with those that did not. Our findings suggest that the left claustrum/anterior insula is an important part of a network that subserves consciousness and that disruption of consciousness is related to increased EEG signal synchrony within frontal-parietal networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Improves Walking Performance in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Seenan, Chris; McSwiggan, Steve; Roche, Patricia A; Tan, Chee-Wee; Mercer, Tom; Belch, Jill J F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 types of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on walking distance and measures of pain in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC). In a phase 2a study, 40 participants with PAD and IC completed a graded treadmill test on 2 separate testing occasions. Active TENS was applied to the lower limb on the first occasion; and placebo TENS, on the second. The participants were divided into 2 experimental groups. One group received high-frequency TENS; and the other, low-frequency TENS. Measures taken were initial claudication distance, functional claudication distance, and absolute claudication distance. The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) vocabulary was completed at the end of the intervention, and the MPQ-Pain Rating Index score was calculated. Four participants were excluded from the final analysis because of noncompletion of the experimental procedure. Median walking distance increased with high-frequency TENS for all measures (P < .05, Wilcoxon signed rank test, all measures). Only absolute claudication distance increased significantly with low-frequency TENS compared with placebo (median, 179-228; Ws = 39; z = 2.025; P = .043; r = 0.48). No difference was observed between reported median MPQ-Pain Rating Index scores: 21.5 with placebo TENS and 21.5 with active TENS (P = .41). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the lower limb of the patients with PAD and IC was associated with increased walking distance on a treadmill but not with any reduction in pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be a useful adjunctive intervention to help increase walking performance in patients with IC.

  15. Transcutaneous Nerve Stimulation for Pain Relief During Office Hysteroscopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lisón, Juan F; Amer-Cuenca, Juan J; Piquer-Martí, Silvia; Benavent-Caballer, Vicente; Biviá-Roig, Gemma; Marín-Buck, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the pain-relieving effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) during office-based hysteroscopy without sedation. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned to the active TENS, placebo TENS, or control group. The active TENS intervention consisted of a varying high-frequency (80-100 Hz), 400-microseconds, individually adjusted, high-intensity TENS application with two self-adhesive electrodes placed parallel to the spinal cord at the T10-L1 and S2-S4 levels. In the placebo group, participants were connected to the TENS unit but delivering no electrical stimulation. The primary outcome was self-reported pain intensity (0-100 mm) measured on a visual analog scale at several stages (entry, contact, biopsy, and residual). The minimum clinically relevant difference for the visual analog scale has been previously reported as 10 mm. Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 10-mm difference (α=0.0125) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included duration of the procedure, vital parameters, vasovagal symptoms, and participant satisfaction index (0-10 rating scale). A total of 138 women (46 per group) participated in the study between January 2016 and April 2016. No differences were found between groups regarding age, weight, body mass index, parity status, menopausal status, or previous hysteroscopy status. Visual analog scale scores highlighted a decrease in pain in the active TENS group compared with the placebo group (entry: -11 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] -17 to -5; contact: -21.9 mm, 95% CI -30 to -13.9; biopsy: -30.5 mm, 95% CI -47.1 to -13.8, P<.001). Moreover, the reduction in pain reached the minimum clinically relevant difference. Regarding satisfaction, results also revealed differences between active TENS and placebo groups (1.3, 95% CI 0.5-2.2, P=.001). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and increases patient satisfaction

  16. Spinal cord stimulation for cancer-related pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lihua; Min, Su; Zejun, Zhou; Wei, Ke; Bennett, Michael I

    2015-06-29

    This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 3, 2013. Cancer-related pain places a heavy burden on public health with related high expenditure. Severe pain is associated with a decreased quality of life in patients with cancer. A significant proportion of patients with cancer-related pain are under-treated. There is a need for more effective control of cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may have a role in pain management. The effectiveness and safety of SCS for patients with cancer-related pain is currently unknown. This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of SCS for cancer-related pain compared with standard care using conventional analgesic medication. We also appraised risk and potential adverse events associated with the use of SCS. This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 3, 2013. The search strategy for the update was the same as in the original review. We searched the following bibliographic databases in order to identify relevant studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; and CBM (Chinese Biomedical Database) in October 2014. We also handsearched relevant journals. There were no language restrictions. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that directly compared SCS with other interventions with regards to the effectiveness of pain management. We also planned to include cross-over trials that compared SCS with another treatment. We planned to identify non-randomised controlled trials but these would only be included if no RCTs could be found. The literature search for the update of this review found 121 potentially eligible articles. The initial search strategy yielded 430 articles. By scrutinising titles and abstracts, we found 412 articles irrelevant to the analytical purpose of this systematic review due to different scopes of diseases or different methods of intervention

  17. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Warrell, G. R.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the impact of strong (˜104 V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  18. Electroencephalographic evoked pain response is suppressed by spinal cord stimulation in complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hylands-White, Nicholas; Duarte, Rui V; Beeson, Paul; Mayhew, Stephen D; Raphael, Jon H

    2016-12-01

    Pain is a subjective response that limits assessment. The purpose of this case report was to explore how the objectivity of the electroencephalographic response to thermal stimuli would be affected by concurrent spinal cord stimulation. A patient had been implanted with a spinal cord stimulator for the management of complex regional pain syndrome of both hands for 8 years. Following ethical approval and written informed consent we induced thermal stimuli using the Medoc PATHWAY Pain & Sensory Evaluation System on the right hand of the patient with the spinal cord stimulator switched off and with the spinal cord stimulator switched on. The patient reported a clinically significant reduction in thermal induced pain using the numerical rating scale (71.4 % reduction) with spinal cord stimulator switched on. Analysis of electroencephalogram recordings indicated the occurrence of contact heat evoked potentials (N2-P2) with spinal cord stimulator off, but not with spinal cord stimulator on. This case report suggests that thermal pain can be reduced in complex regional pain syndrome patients with the use of spinal cord stimulation and offers objective validation of the reported outcomes with this treatment.

  19. Mimosa pudica: Electrical and mechanical stimulation of plant movements.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Foster, Justin C; Ashby, Talitha A; Walker, Ronald K; Johnson, Jon A; Markin, Vladislav S

    2010-02-01

    Thigmonastic movements in the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica L., associated with fast responses to environmental stimuli, appear to be regulated through electrical and chemical signal transductions. The thigmonastic responses of M. pudica can be considered in three stages: stimulus perception, electrical signal transmission and induction of mechanical, hydrodynamical and biochemical responses. We investigated the mechanical movements of the pinnae and petioles in M. pudica induced by the electrical stimulation of a pulvinus, petiole, secondary pulvinus or pinna by a low electrical voltage and charge. The threshold value was 1.3-1.5 V of applied voltage and 2 to 10 microC of charge for the closing of the pinnules. Both voltage and electrical charge are responsible for the electro-stimulated closing of a leaf. The mechanism behind closing the leaf in M. pudica is discussed. The hydroelastic curvature mechanism closely describes the kinetics of M. pudica leaf movements.

  20. Burst spinal cord stimulation evaluated in patients with failed back surgery syndrome and painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Cecile C; Bom, Marjanne J; Vanneste, Sven; Lenders, Mathieu W P M; de Ridder, Dirk

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is used for treating intractable neuropathic pain. Generally, it induces paresthesia in the area covered by SCS. Burst SCS was introduced as a new stimulation paradigm with good pain relief without causing paresthesia. Good results have been obtained in patients who were naive to SCS. In this study we assess the effectiveness of burst stimulation in three groups of chronic pain patients who are already familiar with SCS and the accompanying paresthesia. Forty-eight patients with at least six months of conventional, tonic stimulation tested burst stimulation for a period of two weeks. They were classified in three different groups: a cross-section of our population with painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), a cross-section of our population with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), and FBSS patients who over time had become poor responders (PR) to SCS. Visual analog scale scores for pain were assessed prior to implantation, with tonic stimulation, and after two weeks of burst stimulation. Burst stimulation reduced pain significantly for almost all patients. When compared with tonic stimulation, burst stimulation led to a significant additional pain reduction of on average 44% in patients with PDN (p < 0.001) and 28% in patients with FBSS (p < 0.01). Patients from the PR group benefitted less from burst stimulation on average. In addition, burst stimulation caused little or no paresthesia whereas tonic stimulation did induce paresthesia. Most patients preferred burst stimulation, but several preferred tonic stimulation because the paresthesia assured them that the SCS was working. About 60% of the patients with tonic SCS experienced further pain reduction upon application of burst stimulation. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. Electrical stimulation of dorsal root entry zone attenuates wide-dynamic range neuronal activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Zhang, Chen; Xu, Qian; Tiwari, Vinod; He, Shao-Qiu; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P.; Wacnik, Paul W.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Guan, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent clinical studies suggest that neurostimulation at the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) may alleviate neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms of action for this therapeutic effect are unclear. Here, we examined whether DREZ stimulation inhibits spinal wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neuronal activity in nerve-injured rats. Materials and Methods We conducted in vivo extracellular single-unit recordings of WDR neurons in rats after an L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) or sham surgery. We set bipolar electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 5 min) of the DREZ at the intensity that activated only Aα/β-fibers by measuring the lowest current at which DREZ stimulation evoked a peak antidromic sciatic Aα/β-compound action potential without inducing an Aδ/C-compound action potential (i.e., Ab1). Results The elevated spontaneous activity rate of WDR neurons in SNL rats [n=25; data combined from day 14–16 (n = 15) and day 45–75 post-SNL groups (n=10)] was significantly decreased from the pre-stimulation level (p<0.01) at 0–15 min and 30–45 min post-stimulation. In both sham-operated (n=8) and nerve-injured rats, DREZ stimulation attenuated the C-component, but not A-component, of the WDR neuronal response to graded intracutaneous electrical stimuli (0.1–10 mA, 2 ms) applied to the skin receptive field. Further, DREZ stimulation blocked windup (a short form of neuronal sensitization) to repetitive noxious stimuli (0.5 Hz) at 0–15 min in all groups (p<0.05). Conclusions Attenuation of WDR neuronal activity may contribute to DREZ stimulation-induced analgesia. This finding supports the notion that DREZ may be a useful target for neuromodulatory control of pain. PMID:25308522

  2. Why intra-epidermal electrical stimulation achieves stimulation of small fibres selectively: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Jun; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Inui, Koji; Tamura, Manabu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    The in situ electric field in the peripheral nerve of the skin is investigated to discuss the selective stimulation of nerve fibres. Coaxial planar electrodes with and without intra-epidermal needle tip were considered as electrodes of a stimulator. From electromagnetic analysis, the tip depth of the intra-epidermal electrode should be larger than the thickness of the stratum corneum, the electrical conductivity of which is much lower than the remaining tissue. The effect of different radii of the outer ring electrode on the in situ electric field is marginal. The minimum threshold in situ electric field (rheobase) for free nerve endings is estimated to be 6.3 kV m-1. The possible volume for electrostimulation, which can be obtained from the in situ electric field distribution, becomes deeper and narrower with increasing needle depth, suggesting that possible stimulation sites may be controlled by changing the needle depth. The injection current amplitude should be adjusted when changing the needle depth because the peak field strength also changes. This study shows that intra-epidermal electrical stimulation can achieve stimulation of small fibres selectively, because Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-fibre terminals are located at different depths in the skin.

  3. Different activation of opercular and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I) compared with healthy controls during perception of electrically induced pain: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Freund, Wolfgang; Wunderlich, Arthur P; Stuber, Gregor; Mayer, Florian; Steffen, Peter; Mentzel, Martin; Weber, Frank; Schmitz, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Although the etiology of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) is still debated, many arguments favor central maladaptive changes in pain processing as an important causative factor. To look for the suspected alterations, 10 patients with CRPS affecting the left hand were explored with functional magnetic resonance imaging during graded electrical painful stimulation of both hands subsequently and compared with healthy participants. Activation of the anterior insula, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and caudate nucleus was seen in patients during painful stimulation. Compared with controls, CRPS patients had stronger activation of the PCC during painful stimulation of the symptomatic hand. The comparison of insular/opercular activation between controls and patients with CRPS I during painful stimulation showed stronger (posterior) opercular activation in controls than in patients. Stronger PCC activation during painful stimulation may be interpreted as a correlate of motor inhibition during painful stimuli different from controls. Also, the decreased opercular activation in CRPS patients shows less sensory-discriminative processing of painful stimuli.These results show that changed cerebral pain processing in CRPS patients is less sensory-discriminative but more motor inhibition during painful stimuli. These changes are not limited to the diseased side but show generalized alterations of cerebral pain processing in chronic pain patients.

  4. Patient-conducted anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex alleviates pain in trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex has been shown to modulate pain and trigeminal nociceptive processing. Methods Ten patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) were stimulated daily for 20 minutes over two weeks using anodal (1 mA) or sham tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1) in a randomized double-blind cross-over design. Primary outcome variable was pain intensity on a verbal rating scale (VRS 0–10). VRS and attack frequency were assessed for one month before, during and after tDCS. The impact on trigeminal pain processing was assessed with pain-related evoked potentials (PREP) and the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) following electrical stimulation on both sides of the forehead before and after tDCS. Results Anodal tDCS reduced pain intensity significantly after two weeks of treatment. The attack frequency reduction was not significant. PREP showed an increased N2 latency and decreased peak-to-peak amplitude after anodal tDCS. No severe adverse events were reported. Conclusion Anodal tDCS over two weeks ameliorates intensity of pain in TN. It may become a valuable treatment option for patients unresponsive to conventional treatment. PMID:25424567

  5. Correlations Between Electrically Quantified Pain Degree, Subjectively Assessed Visual Analogue Scale, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junho; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kong, Sang Won; Kim, Taikon; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si-Bog

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical utility of the electrically calculated quantitative pain degree (QPD) and to correlate it with subjective assessments of pain degree including a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). Methods We recruited 25 patients with low back pain. Of them, 21 patients suffered from low back pain for more than 3 months. The QPD was calculated using the PainVision (PV, PS-2100; Nipro Co., Osaka, Japan). We applied electrodes to the medial forearm of the subjects and the electrical stimulus was amplified sequentially. Minimum perceived current (MPC) and pain equivalent current (PEC) were defined as minimum electrical stimulation that could be sensed by the subject and electrical stimulation that could trigger actual pain itself. To eliminate individual differences, we defined QPD as the following: QPD=PEC-MPC/MPC. We scored pre-treatment QPD three times at admission and post-treatment QPD once at discharge. The VAS, MPQ, and QPD were evaluated and correlations between the scales were analyzed. Results Result showed significant test-retest reliability (ICC=0.967, p<0.001) and the correlation between QDP and MPQ was significant (at admission SRCC=0.619 and p=0.001; at discharge SRCC=0.628, p=0.001). However, the correlation between QPD and VAS was not significant (at admission SRCC=0.240, p=0.248; at discharge SRCC=0.289, p=0.161). Conclusion Numerical values measured with PV showed consistent results with repeated calculations. Electrically measured QPD showed an excellent correlation with MPQ but not with VAS. These results demonstrate that PV is a significantly reliable device for quantifying the intensity of low back pain. PMID:25379496

  6. Correlations Between Electrically Quantified Pain Degree, Subjectively Assessed Visual Analogue Scale, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junho; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kong, Sang Won; Kim, Taikon; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si-Bog; Lee, Kyu Hoon

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of the electrically calculated quantitative pain degree (QPD) and to correlate it with subjective assessments of pain degree including a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). We recruited 25 patients with low back pain. Of them, 21 patients suffered from low back pain for more than 3 months. The QPD was calculated using the PainVision (PV, PS-2100; Nipro Co., Osaka, Japan). We applied electrodes to the medial forearm of the subjects and the electrical stimulus was amplified sequentially. Minimum perceived current (MPC) and pain equivalent current (PEC) were defined as minimum electrical stimulation that could be sensed by the subject and electrical stimulation that could trigger actual pain itself. To eliminate individual differences, we defined QPD as the following: QPD=PEC-MPC/MPC. We scored pre-treatment QPD three times at admission and post-treatment QPD once at discharge. The VAS, MPQ, and QPD were evaluated and correlations between the scales were analyzed. Result showed significant test-retest reliability (ICC=0.967, p<0.001) and the correlation between QDP and MPQ was significant (at admission SRCC=0.619 and p=0.001; at discharge SRCC=0.628, p=0.001). However, the correlation between QPD and VAS was not significant (at admission SRCC=0.240, p=0.248; at discharge SRCC=0.289, p=0.161). Numerical values measured with PV showed consistent results with repeated calculations. Electrically measured QPD showed an excellent correlation with MPQ but not with VAS. These results demonstrate that PV is a significantly reliable device for quantifying the intensity of low back pain.

  7. Mapping of electrical muscle stimulation using MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Harris, Robert T.; Woodard, Daniel; Dudley, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of muscle contractile activity elicited by electromyostimulation (EMS) was mapped and compared to the contractile-activity pattern produced by voluntary effort. This was done by examining the patterns and the extent of contrast shift, as indicated by T2 values, im magnetic resonance (MR) images after isometric activity of the left m. quadriceps of human subjects was elicited by EMS (1-sec train of 500-microsec sine wave pulses at 50 Hz) or voluntary effort. The results suggest that, whereas EMS stimulates the same fibers repeatedly, thereby increasing the metabolic demand and T2 values, the voluntary efforts are performed by more diffuse asynchronous activation of skeletal muscle even at forces up to 75 percent of maximal to maintain performance.

  8. Soft Encapsulation of Flexible Electrical Stimulation Implant: Challenges and Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Debelle, Adrien; Hermans, Laura; Bosquet, Maxime; Dehaeck, Sam; Lonys, Laurent; Scheid, Benoit; Nonclercq, Antoine; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In this document we discuss the main challenges encountered when producing flexible electrical stimulation implants, and present our approach to solving them for prototype production. We include a study of the optimization of the flexible PCB design, the selection of additive manufacturing materials for the mold, and the chemical compatibility of the different materials. Our approach was tested on a flexible gastro-stimulator as part of the ENDOGES research program. PMID:28078073

  9. Subcutaneous stimulation as an additional therapy to spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of lower limb pain and/or back pain: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Hamm-Faber, Tanja E; Aukes, Hans A; de Loos, Frank; Gültuna, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of subcutaneous stimulation (SubQ) as an additional therapy in patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) with chronic refractory pain, for whom spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was unsuccessful in treating low back pain. Case series. FBSS patients with chronic limb and/or low back pain whose conventional therapies had failed received a combination of SCS (8-contact Octad lead) and/or SubQ (4-contact Quad Plus lead(s)). Initially leads were placed in the epidural space for SCS for a trial stimulation to assess response to suppression of limb and low back pain. Where SCS alone was insufficient in treating lower back pain, leads were placed superficially in the subcutaneous tissue of the lower back, directly in the middle of the pain area. A pulse generator was implanted if patients reported more than 50% pain relief during the trial period. Pain intensity for limb and lower back pain was scored separately, using visual analog scale (VAS). Pain and Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (QBPDS) after 12-month treatment were compared with pain and QBPDS at baseline. Eleven FBSS patients, five male and six female (age: 51 ± 8 years; mean ± SD), in whom SCS alone was insufficient in treating lower back pain, were included. In nine cases, SubQ was used in combination with SCS to treat chronic lower back and lower extremity pain. In two cases only SubQ was used to treat lower back pain. SCS significantly reduced limb pain after 12 months (VAS(bl) : 62 ± 14 vs. VAS(12m) : 20 ± 11; p= 0.001, N= 8). SubQ stimulation significantly reduced low back pain after 12 months (VAS(bl) : 62 ± 13.0 vs. VAS(12m) : 32 ± 16; p= 0.0002, N= 10). Overall pain medication was reduced by more than 70%. QBPDS improved from 61 ± 15 to 49 ± 12 (p= 0.046, N= 10). Furthermore, we observed that two patients returned to work. SubQ may be an effective additional treatment for chronic low back pain in patients with FBSS for whom SCS

  10. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  11. Electrically stimulated contractions of Vorticella convallaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantha, Deependra; van Winkle, David

    2009-03-01

    The contraction of Vorticella convallaria was triggered by applying a voltage pulse in its host culturing medium. The 50V, 1ms wide pulse was applied across platinum wires separated by 0.7 cm on a microscope slide. The contractions were recorded as cines (image sequences) by a Phantom V5 camera (Vision Research) on a bright field microscope with 20X objective, with the image size of 256 pixels x 128 pixels at 7352 pictures per second. The starting time of the cines was synchronized with the starting of the electrical pulse. We recorded five contractions of each of 12 organisms. The cines were analyzed to obtain the initiation time, defined as the difference in time between the leading edge of the electrical pulse and the first frame showing zooid movement. From multiple contractions of same organism, we found the initiation time is reproducible. In comparing different organisms, we found the average initiation time of 1.73 ms with a standard deviation of 0.63 ms. This research is supported by the state of Florida (MARTECH) and Research Corporation.

  12. Challenges associated with nerve conduction block using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Yogi A.; Butera, Robert J.

    2018-06-01

    Neuromodulation therapies, which electrically stimulate parts of the nervous system, have traditionally attempted to activate neurons or axons to restore function or alleviate disease symptoms. In stark contrast to this approach is inhibiting neural activity to relieve disease symptoms and/or restore homeostasis. One potential approach is kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) of peripheral nerves—which enables a rapid, reversible, and localized block of conduction. This review highlights the existing scientific and clinical utility of KES and discusses the technical and physiological challenges that must be addressed for successful translation of KES nerve conduction block therapies.

  13. Influence of transcutaneous electrical stimulation on heterotopic ossification: an experimental study in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues, resulting in joint mobility deficit and pain. Different treatment modalities have been tried to prevent HO development, but there is no consensus on a therapeutic approach. Since electrical stimulation is a widely used resource in physiotherapy practice to stimulate joint mobility, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, its usefulness for HO treatment was investigated. We aimed to identify the influence of electrical stimulation on induced HO in Wistar rats. Thirty-six male rats (350-390 g) were used, and all animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction, to quantify the serum alkaline phosphatase. HO induction was performed by bone marrow implantation in both quadriceps of the animals, which were then divided into 3 groups: control (CG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (TG), and functional electrical stimulation (FES) group (FG) with 12 rats each. All animals were anesthetized and electrically stimulated twice per week, for 35 days from induction day. After this period, another blood sample was collected and quadriceps muscles were bilaterally removed for histological and calcium analysis and the rats were killed. Calcium levels in muscles showed significantly lower results when comparing TG and FG (P<0.001) and between TG and CG (P<0.001). Qualitative histological analyses confirmed 100% HO in FG and CG, while in TG the HO was detected in 54.5% of the animals. The effects of the muscle contractions caused by FES increased HO, while anti-inflammatory effects of TENS reduced HO. PMID:26292223

  14. Effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current in primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Tugay, Nazan; Akbayrak, Türkan; Demirtürk, Funda; Karakaya, Ilkim Citak; Kocaacar, Ozge; Tugay, Umut; Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Demirtürk, Fazli

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current in primary dysmenorrhea. A prospective, randomized, and controlled study. Hacettepe University School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation. Thirty-four volunteer subjects with primary dysmenorrhea (mean age: 21.35 +/- 1.70 years) were included. Statistical analyses were performed in 32 subjects who completed all measures. Fifteen subjects received interferential current application for 20 minutes and 17 subjects received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for 20 minutes when they were experiencing dysmenorrhea. Physical characteristics, years since menarche, length of menstrual cycle (days), and duration of menstruation (days) were recorded. Visual analog scale ( VAS) intensities of menstrual pain, referred lower limb pain, and low back pain were recorded before treatment, and immediately, 8 hours, and 24 hours after treatment. Intensities of the evaluated parameters decreased beginning from just after the applications in both groups (P<0.05). Intensity of referring low back pain in first three measurement times was different between the groups (P<0.05), but this difference is thought to be due to the baseline values of the groups. So, it can be said that no superiority existed between the methods (P>0.05). Both transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current appear to be effective in primary dysmenorrhea. As they are free from the potentially adverse effects of analgesics, and no adverse effects are reported in the literature nor observed in this study, a clinical trial of their effectiveness in comparison with untreated and placebo-treated control groups is warranted.

  15. Tactile discrimination, but not tactile stimulation alone, reduces chronic limb pain.

    PubMed

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Zalucki, Nadia M; Wiech, Katja

    2008-07-31

    Chronic pain is often associated with reduced tactile acuity. A relationship exists between pain intensity, tactile acuity and cortical reorganisation. When pain resolves, tactile function improves and cortical organisation normalises. Tactile acuity can be improved in healthy controls when tactile stimulation is associated with a behavioural objective. We hypothesised that, in patients with chronic limb pain and decreased tactile acuity, discriminating between tactile stimuli would decrease pain and increase tactile acuity, but tactile stimulation alone would not. Thirteen patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) of one limb underwent a waiting period and then approximately 2 weeks of tactile stimulation under two conditions: stimulation alone or discrimination between stimuli according to their diameter and location. There was no change in pain (100 mm VAS) or two-point discrimination (TPD) during a no-treatment waiting period, nor during the stimulation phase (p > 0.32 for both). Pain and TPD were lower after the discrimination phase [mean (95% CI) effect size for pain VAS = 27 mm (14-40 mm) and for TPD = 5.7 mm (2.9-8. ), p < 0.015 for both]. These gains were maintained at three-month follow-up. We conclude that tactile stimulation can decrease pain and increase tactile acuity when patients are required to discriminate between the type and location of tactile stimuli.

  16. Evoked Pain Analgesia in Chronic Pelvic Pain Patients using Respiratory-gated Auricular Vagal Afferent Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, Vitaly; Edwards, Robert R; Cahalan, Christine M; Mensing, George; Greenbaum, Seth; Valovska, Assia; Li, Ang; Kim, Jieun; Maeda, Yumi; Park, Kyungmo; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects, and recent non-invasive approaches; termed transcutaneous-VNS, or t-VNS, have utilized stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve in the ear. The dorsal medullary vagal system operates in tune with respiration, and we propose that supplying vagal afferent stimulation gated to the exhalation phase of respiration can optimize t-VNS. Design counterbalanced, crossover study. Patients patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) due to endometriosis in a specialty pain clinic. Interventions/Outcomes We evaluated evoked pain analgesia for Respiratory-gated Auricular Vagal Afferent Nerve Stimulation (RAVANS) compared with Non-Vagal Auricular Stimulation (NVAS). RAVANS and NVAS were evaluated in separate sessions spaced at least one week apart. Outcome measures included deep tissue pain intensity, temporal summation of pain, and anxiety ratings, which were assessed at baseline, during active stimulation, immediately following stimulation, and 15 minutes after stimulus cessation. Results RAVANS demonstrated a trend for reduced evoked pain intensity and temporal summation of mechanical pain, and significantly reduced anxiety in N=15 CPP patients, compared to NVAS, with moderate to large effect sizes (eta2>0.2). Conclusion Chronic pain disorders such as CPP are in great need of effective, non-pharmacological options for treatment. RAVANS produced promising anti-nociceptive effects for QST outcomes reflective of the noted hyperalgesia and central sensitization in this patient population. Future studies should evaluate longer-term application of RAVANS to examine its effects on both QST outcomes and clinical pain. PMID:22568773

  17. Electrical stimulation of transplanted motoneurons improves motor unit formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Motoneurons die following spinal cord trauma and with neurological disease. Intact axons reinnervate nearby muscle fibers to compensate for the death of motoneurons, but when an entire motoneuron pool dies, there is complete denervation. To reduce denervation atrophy, we have reinnervated muscles in Fisher rats from local transplants of embryonic motoneurons in peripheral nerve. Since growth of axons from embryonic neurons is activity dependent, our aim was to test whether brief electrical stimulation of the neurons immediately after transplantation altered motor unit numbers and muscle properties 10 wk later. All surgical procedures and recordings were done in anesthetized animals. The muscle consequences of motoneuron death were mimicked by unilateral sciatic nerve section. One week later, 200,000 embryonic day 14 and 15 ventral spinal cord cells, purified for motoneurons, were injected into the tibial nerve 10–15 mm from the gastrocnemii muscles as the only neuron source for muscle reinnervation. The cells were stimulated immediately after transplantation for up to 1 h using protocols designed to examine differential effects due to pulse number, stimulation frequency, pattern, and duration. Electrical stimulation that included short rests and lasted for 1 h resulted in higher motor unit counts. Muscles with higher motor unit counts had more reinnervated fibers and were stronger. Denervated muscles had to be stimulated directly to evoke contractions. These results show that brief electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons, in vivo, has long-term effects on motor unit formation and muscle force. This muscle reinnervation provides the opportunity to use patterned electrical stimulation to produce functional movements. PMID:24848463

  18. Short-term anomia training and electrical brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Flöel, Agnes; Meinzer, Marcus; Kirstein, Robert; Nijhof, Sarah; Deppe, Michael; Knecht, Stefan; Breitenstein, Caterina

    2011-07-01

    Language training success in chronic aphasia remains only moderate. Electric brain stimulation may be a viable way to enhance treatment efficacy. In a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled crossover trial, we assessed if anodal transcranial direct current stimulation compared to cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation and sham stimulation over the right temporo-parietal cortex would improve the success of short-term high-frequency anomia training. Twelve chronic poststroke aphasia patients were studied. Naming outcome was assessed after training and 2 weeks later. All training conditions led to a significant increase in naming ability, which was retained for at least 2 weeks after the end of the training. Application of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation significantly enhanced the overall training effect compared to sham stimulation. Baseline naming ability significantly predicted anodal transcranial direct current stimulation effects. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation applied over the nonlanguage dominant hemisphere can enhance language training outcome in chronic aphasia. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT00822068.

  19. Acetylation mediates Cx43 reduction caused by electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Azzimato, Valerio; Colussi, Claudia; Florio, Maria Cristina; Binda, Anna; Panariti, Alice; Qanud, Khaled; Suffredini, Silvia; Gennaccaro, Laura; Miragoli, Michele; Barbuti, Andrea; Lampe, Paul D.; Gaetano, Carlo; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Pompilio, Giulio; Rivolta, Ilaria; Rossini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Communication between cardiomyocytes depends upon Gap Junctions (GJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that electrical stimulation induces GJ remodeling and modifies histone acetylases (HAT) and deacetylases (HDAC) activities, although these two results have not been linked. The aim of this work was to establish whether electrical stimulation modulates GJ-mediated cardiac cell-cell communication by acetylation-dependent mechanisms. Field stimulation of HL-1 cardiomyocytes at 0.5 Hz for 24 hours significantly reduced Connexin43 (Cx43) expression and cell-cell communication. HDAC activity was down-regulated whereas HAT activity was not modified resulting in increased acetylation of Cx43. Consistent with a post-translational mechanism, we did not observe a reduction in Cx43 mRNA in electrically stimulated cells, while the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 maintained Cx43 expression. Further, the treatment of paced cells with the HAT inhibitor Anacardic Acid maintained both the levels of Cx43 and cell-cell communication. Finally, we observed increased acetylation of Cx43 in the left ventricles of dogs subjected to chronic tachypacing as a model of abnormal ventricular activation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that altered electrical activity can regulate cardiomyocyte communication by influencing the acetylation status of Cx43. PMID:26264759

  20. Electrical and mechanical stimulation of cardiac cells and tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2016-01-15

    The field of cardiac tissue engineering has made significant strides over the last few decades, highlighted by the development of human cell derived constructs that have shown increasing functional maturity over time, particularly using bioreactor systems to stimulate the constructs. However, the functionality of these tissues is still unable to match that of native cardiac tissue and many of the stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes display an immature, fetal like phenotype. In this review, we seek to elucidate the biological underpinnings of both mechanical and electrical signaling, as identified via studies related to cardiac development and those related to an evaluation of cardiac disease progression. Next, we review the different types of bioreactors developed to individually deliver electrical and mechanical stimulation to cardiomyocytes in vitro in both two and three-dimensional tissue platforms. Reactors and culture conditions that promote functional cardiomyogenesis in vitro are also highlighted. We then cover the more recent work in the development of bioreactors that combine electrical and mechanical stimulation in order to mimic the complex signaling environment present in vivo. We conclude by offering our impressions on the important next steps for physiologically relevant mechanical and electrical stimulation of cardiac cells and engineered tissue in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Topical hyperbaric oxygen and electrical stimulation: exploring potential synergy.

    PubMed

    Edsberg, Laura E; Brogan, Michael S; Jaynes, C David; Fries, Kristin

    2002-11-01

    Treatment of chronic wounds involves interventions ranging from dressings to surgery. Modalities gaining popularity in clinical settings include topical hyperbaric oxygen and electrical stimulation. A prospective, uncontrolled study was conducted to obtain preliminary observations and data about the effects of topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy and topical hyperbaric oxygen used with electrical stimulation on the healing of chronic wounds. All subjects were geriatric residents of long-term care facilities with Stage III or Stage IV pressure ulcers. Topical hyperbaric oxygen was applied daily to the wounds of eight subjects; three also received electrical stimulation. Initial wound size ranged from 87.75 cm2 to 7.04 cm2 with an average size of 30.1 +/- 28.5 (mean +/- sd) cm2. Healing times ranged from 8 to 49 weeks. After 4 weeks of treatment with topical hyperbaric oxygen, wound size decreased an average of 34.4% +/- 22.9%. Incidentally, the wounds of five of the eight subjects decreased more than 20%, for an average of 51.8% +/- 17.9%. No significant differences in healing were observed between patients receiving topical hyperbaric oxygen alone and those receiving topical hyperbaric oxygen/electrical stimulation. Preliminary data indicate that topical hyperbaric oxygen facilitates wound healing and full closure for pressure ulcers in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. A multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study is currently under way.

  2. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Motor Restoration in Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Fu, Michael J.; Sheffler, Lynne R.; Chae, John

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews the most common therapeutic and neuroprosthetic applications of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for upper and lower extremity stroke rehabilitation. Fundamental NMES principles and purposes in stroke rehabilitation are explained. NMES modalities used for upper and lower limb rehabilitation are described and efficacy studies are summarized. The evidence for peripheral and central mechanisms of action is also summarized. PMID:26522909

  3. Motor unit recruitment during neuromuscular electrical stimulation: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Bickel, C Scott; Gregory, Chris M; Dean, Jesse C

    2011-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in clinical settings to activate skeletal muscle in an effort to mimic voluntary contractions and enhance the rehabilitation of human skeletal muscles. It is also used as a tool in research to assess muscle performance and/or neuromuscular activation levels. However, there are fundamental differences between voluntary- and artificial-activation of motor units that need to be appreciated before NMES protocol design can be most effective. The unique effects of NMES have been attributed to several mechanisms, most notably, a reversal of the voluntary recruitment pattern that is known to occur during voluntary muscle contractions. This review outlines the assertion that electrical stimulation recruits motor units in a nonselective, spatially fixed, and temporally synchronous pattern. Additionally, it synthesizes the evidence that supports the contention that this recruitment pattern contributes to increased muscle fatigue when compared with voluntary actions and provides some commentary on the parameters of electrical stimulation as well as emerging technologies being developed to facilitate NMES implementation. A greater understanding of how electrical stimulation recruits motor units, as well as the benefits and limitations of its use, is highly relevant when using this tool for testing and training in rehabilitation, exercise, and/or research.

  4. Matching native electrical stimulation by graded chemical stimulation in isolated mouse adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Fulop, Tiberiu; Smith, Corey

    2007-11-30

    Adrenal chromaffin cells release multiple transmitters in response to sympathetic stimulation. Modest cell firing, matching sympathetic tone, releases small freely soluble catecholamines. Elevated electrical firing rates matching input under sympathetic stress results in release of catecholamines as well as semi-soluble vaso- and neuro-active peptides packaged within the dense core of the secretory granule. This activity-dependent differential transmitter release has been shown to rely on a mechanistic shift in the mode of exocytosis through the regulated dilation of the secretory fusion pore between granule and cell surface membranes. However, biochemical description of the mechanism regulating fusion pore dilation remains elusive. In the experimental setting, electrical stimulation designed to mimic sympathetic input, is achieved through single-cell voltage-clamp. While precise, this approach is incompatible with biochemical and proteomic analysis, both of which require large sample sizes. We address this limitation in the current study. We describe a bulk chemical stimulation paradigm calibrated to match defined electrical activity. We utilize calcium and single-cell amperometric measurements to match extracellular potassium concentrations to physiological electrical stimulation under sympathetic tone as well as acute stress conditions. This approach provides larger samples of uniformly stimulated cells for determining molecular players in activity-dependent differential transmitter release from adrenal chromaffin cells.

  5. Hyperexcitability to electrical stimulation and accelerated muscle fatiguability of taut bands in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Hui; Yin, Ming-Jing; Fan, Zhen-Zhen; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ge, Hong-You; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Myofascial trigger points contribute significantly to musculoskeletal pain and motor dysfunction and may be associated with accelerated muscle fatiguability. The aim of this study was to investigate the electrically induced force and fatigue characteristics of muscle taut bands in rats. Muscle taut bands were dissected out and subjected to trains of electrical stimulation. The electrical threshold intensity for muscle contraction and maximum contraction force (MCF), electrical intensity dependent fatigue and electrical frequency dependent fatigue characteristics were assessed in three different sessions (n=10 each) and compared with non-taut bands in the biceps femoris muscle. The threshold intensity for muscle contraction and MCF at the 10th, 15th and 20th intensity dependent fatigue stimuli of taut bands were significantly lower than those of non-taut bands (all p<0.05). The MCF at the 15th and 20th intensity dependent fatigue stimuli of taut bands were significantly lower than those at the 1st and 5th stimuli (all p<0.01). The MCF in the frequency dependent fatigue test was significantly higher and the stimulus frequency that induced MCF was significantly lower for taut bands than for non-taut bands (both p<0.01). The present study demonstrates that the muscle taut band itself was more excitable to electrical stimulation and significantly less fatigue resistant than normal muscle fibres.

  6. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Pain Distress Tolerance: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Timothy Y; van't Wout, Mascha; Jacobson, Benjamin L; Garnaat, Sarah L; Kirschner, Jason L; Rasmussen, Steven A; Greenberg, Benjamin D

    2015-08-01

    Pain remains a critical medical challenge. Current treatments target nociception without addressing affective symptoms. Medically intractable pain is sometimes treated with cingulotomy or deep brain stimulation to increase tolerance of pain-related distress. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may noninvasively modulate cortical areas related to sensation and pain representations. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that cathodal ("inhibitory") stimulation targeting left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) would increase tolerance to distress from acute painful stimuli vs anodal stimulation. Forty healthy volunteers received both anodal and cathodal stimulation. During stimulation, we measured pain distress tolerance with three tasks: pressure algometer, cold pressor, and breath holding. We measured pain intensity with a visual-analog scale before and after each task. Mixed ANOVA revealed that mean cold pressor tolerance tended to be higher with cathodal vs anodal stimulation (P = 0.055) for participants self-completing the task. Pressure algometer (P = 0.81) and breath holding tolerance (P = 0.19) did not significantly differ. The pressure algometer exhibited a statistically significant order effect irrespective of stimulation polarity (all P < 0.008). Pain intensity ratings increased acutely after cold pressor and pressure algometer tasks (both P < 0.01), but not after breath holding (P = 0.099). Cold pressor pain ratings tended to rise less after cathodal vs anodal tDCS (P = 0.072). Although our primary results were nonsignificant, there is a preliminary suggestion that cathodal tDCS targeting left dACC may increase pain distress tolerance to cold pressor. Pressure algometer results are consistent with task-related sensitization. Future studies are needed to refine this novel approach for pain neuromodulation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Higher-order power harmonics of pulsed electrical stimulation modulates corticospinal contribution of peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiun-Fan; Bikson, Marom; Chou, Li-Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Khadka, Niranjan; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-03-03

    It is well established that electrical-stimulation frequency is crucial to determining the scale of induced neuromodulation, particularly when attempting to modulate corticospinal excitability. However, the modulatory effects of stimulation frequency are not only determined by its absolute value but also by other parameters such as power at harmonics. The stimulus pulse shape further influences parameters such as excitation threshold and fiber selectivity. The explicit role of the power in these harmonics in determining the outcome of stimulation has not previously been analyzed. In this study, we adopted an animal model of peripheral electrical stimulation that includes an amplitude-adapted pulse train which induces force enhancements with a corticospinal contribution. We report that the electrical-stimulation-induced force enhancements were correlated with the amplitude of stimulation power harmonics during the amplitude-adapted pulse train. In an exploratory analysis, different levels of correlation were observed between force enhancement and power harmonics of 20-80 Hz (r = 0.4247, p = 0.0243), 100-180 Hz (r = 0.5894, p = 0.0001), 200-280 Hz (r = 0.7002, p < 0.0001), 300-380 Hz (r = 0.7449, p < 0.0001), 400-480 Hz (r = 0.7906, p < 0.0001), 500-600 Hz (r = 0.7717, p < 0.0001), indicating a trend of increasing correlation, specifically at higher order frequency power harmonics. This is a pilot, but important first demonstration that power at high order harmonics in the frequency spectrum of electrical stimulation pulses may contribute to neuromodulation, thus warrant explicit attention in therapy design and analysis.

  8. Electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex improves memory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chua, Elizabeth F; Ahmed, Rifat

    2016-05-01

    The ability to accurately monitor one's own memory is an important feature of normal memory function. Converging evidence from neuroimaging and lesion studies have implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in memory monitoring. Here we used high definition transcranial direct stimulation (HD-tDCS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, to test whether the DLPFC has a causal role in memory monitoring, and the nature of that role. We used a metamemory monitoring task, in which participants first attempted to recall the answer to a general knowledge question, then gave a feeling-of-knowing (FOK) judgment, followed by a forced choice recognition task. When participants received DLPFC stimulation, their feeling-of-knowing judgments were better predictors of memory performance, i.e., they had better memory monitoring accuracy, compared to stimulation of a control site, the anterior temporal lobe (ATL). Effects of DLPFC stimulation were specific to monitoring accuracy, as there was no significant increase in memory performance, and if anything, there was poorer memory performance with DLPFC stimulation. Thus we have demonstrated a causal role for the DLPFC in memory monitoring, and showed that electrically stimulating the left DLPFC led people to more accurately monitor and judge their own memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots.

  10. Volume conductor model of transcutaneous electrical stimulation with kilohertz signals

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Leonel E.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Incorporating high-frequency components in transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) waveforms may make it possible to stimulate deeper nerve fibers since the impedance of tissue declines with increasing frequency. However, the mechanisms of high-frequency TES remain largely unexplored. We investigated the properties of TES with frequencies beyond those typically used in neural stimulation. Approach We implemented a multilayer volume conductor model including dispersion and capacitive effects, coupled to a cable model of a nerve fiber. We simulated voltage- and current-controlled transcutaneous stimulation, and quantified the effects of frequency on the distribution of potentials and fiber excitation. We also quantified the effects of a novel transdermal amplitude modulated signal (TAMS) consisting of a non-zero offset sinusoidal carrier modulated by a square-pulse train. Main results The model revealed that high-frequency signals generated larger potentials at depth than did low frequencies, but this did not translate into lower stimulation thresholds. Both TAMS and conventional rectangular pulses activated more superficial fibers in addition to the deeper, target fibers, and at no frequency did we observe an inversion of the strength-distance relationship. Current regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by fiber depth, whereas voltage regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by skin thickness. Finally, our model reproduced the threshold-frequency relationship of experimentally measured motor thresholds. Significance The model may be used for prediction of motor thresholds in TES, and contributes to the understanding of high-frequency TES. PMID:25380254

  11. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots. PMID:27050093

  12. Volume conductor model of transcutaneous electrical stimulation with kilohertz signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Leonel E.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Incorporating high-frequency components in transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) waveforms may make it possible to stimulate deeper nerve fibers since the impedance of tissue declines with increasing frequency. However, the mechanisms of high-frequency TES remain largely unexplored. We investigated the properties of TES with frequencies beyond those typically used in neural stimulation. Approach. We implemented a multilayer volume conductor model including dispersion and capacitive effects, coupled to a cable model of a nerve fiber. We simulated voltage- and current-controlled transcutaneous stimulation, and quantified the effects of frequency on the distribution of potentials and fiber excitation. We also quantified the effects of a novel transdermal amplitude modulated signal (TAMS) consisting of a non-zero offset sinusoidal carrier modulated by a square-pulse train. Main results. The model revealed that high-frequency signals generated larger potentials at depth than did low frequencies, but this did not translate into lower stimulation thresholds. Both TAMS and conventional rectangular pulses activated more superficial fibers in addition to the deeper, target fibers, and at no frequency did we observe an inversion of the strength-distance relationship. Current regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by fiber depth, whereas voltage regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by skin thickness. Finally, our model reproduced the threshold-frequency relationship of experimentally measured motor thresholds. Significance. The model may be used for prediction of motor thresholds in TES, and contributes to the understanding of high-frequency TES.

  13. Effects of electrical muscle stimulation on oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Tina L; Coombes, Jeff S; Knez, Wade L; Brancato, Tania L

    2005-02-01

    Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) devices are being marketed as weight/ fat loss devices throughout the world. Commercially available stimulators have the ability to evoke muscle contractions that may affect caloric expenditure while the device is being used. The aim of this study was to test the effects of two different EMS devices (Abtronic and Feminique) on oxygen consumption at rest. Subjects arrived for testing after an overnight fast, had the devices fitted, and then positioned supine with expired air measured to determine oxygen consumption. After a 10-minute acclimation period, oxygen consumption was measured for 20 minutes with the device switched off (resting) then 20 minutes with the device switched on (stimulated). There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in oxygen consumption between the resting and stimulated periods with either the Abtronic (mean +/- SD; resting, 3.40 +/- 0.44; stimulated, 3.45 +/- 0.53 ml of O(2).kg(-1).min(-1)) or the Feminique (resting, 3.73 +/- 0.45; stimulated, 3.75 +/- 0.46 ml of O(2).kg(-1).min(-1)). In summary, the EMS devices tested had no effect on oxygen consumption during muscle stimulation.

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  15. Emerging modalities in dysphagia rehabilitation: neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; Doeltgen, Sebastian

    2007-10-12

    The aim of this review article is to advise the New Zealand medical community about the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as a treatment for pharyngeal swallowing impairment (dysphagia). NMES in this field of rehabilitation medicine has quickly emerged as a widely used method overseas but has been accompanied by significant controversy. Basic information is provided about the physiologic background of electrical stimulation. The literature reviewed in this manuscript was derived through a computer-assisted search using the biomedical database Medline to identify all relevant articles published until from the initiation of the databases up to January 2007. The reviewers used the following search strategy: [(deglutition disorders OR dysphagia) AND (neuromuscular electrical stimulation OR NMES)]. In addition, the technique of reference tracing was used and very recently published studies known to the authors but not yet included in the database systems were included. This review elucidates not only the substantive potential benefit of this treatment, but also potential key concerns for patient safety and long term outcome. The discussion within the clinical and research communities, especially around the commercially available VitalStim stimulator, is objectively explained.

  16. Neural Responses to Electrical Stimulation on Patterned Silk Films

    PubMed Central

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie; Raja, Waseem Khan; Tang-Schomer, Min; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a critical issue for trauma patients. Following injury, incomplete axon regeneration or misguided axon innervation into tissue will result in loss of sensory and motor functions. The objective of this study was to examine axon outgrowth and axon alignment in response to surface patterning and electrical stimulation. To accomplish our objective, metal electrodes with dimensions of 1.5 mm × 4 cm, were sputter coated onto micropatterned silk protein films, with surface grooves 3.5 μm wide × 500 nm deep. P19 neurons were seeded on the patterned electronic silk films and stimulated at 120 mV, 1 kHz, for 45 minutes each day for 7 days. Responses were compared to neurons on flat electronic silk films, patterned silk films without stimulation, and flat silk films without stimulation. Significant alignment was found on the patterned film groups compared to the flat film groups. Axon outgrowth was greater (p < 0.05) on electronic films on day 5 and day 7 compared to the unstimulated groups. In conclusion, electrical stimulation, at 120 mV, 1 kHz, for 45 minutes daily, in addition to surface patterning, of 3.5 μm wide × 500 nm deep grooves, offered control of nerve axon outgrowth and alignment. PMID:23401351

  17. Effect of Electrical Current Stimulation on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alneami, Auns Q.; Khalil, Eman G.; Mohsien, Rana A.; Albeldawi, Ali F.

    2018-05-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of electrical current with different frequencies stimulation to kill pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) bacteria in vitro using human safe level of electricity controlled by function generator. A wide range of frequencies has been used from 0.5 Hz-1.2 MHz to stimulate the bacteria at a voltage of 20 p-p volt for different periods of time (5 to 30) minutes. The culture of bacteria used Nickel, Nichrome, or Titanium electrode using agarose in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and mixed with bacterial stock activated by trypticase soy broth (TSB). The results of frequencies between 0.5-1 KHz show the inhibition zone diameter of 20 mm in average at 30 minutes of stimulation. At frequencies between 3-60 KHz the inhibition zone diameter was only 10mm for 30 minutes of stimulation. While the average of inhibition zone diameter increased to more than 30mm for 30 minutes of stimulation at frequencies between 80-120 KHz. From this study we conclude that at specific frequency (resonance frequency) (frequencies between 0.5-1 KHz) there was relatively large inhibition zone because the inductive reactance effect is equal to the value of capacitive reactance effect (XC = XL). At frequencies over than 60 KHz, maximum inhibition zone noticed because the capacitance impedance becomes negligible (only the small resistivity of the bacterial internal organs).

  18. Toward an implantable functional electrical stimulation device to correct strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Federico G.; Isobe, Jun; Zealear, David; Judy, Jack W.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Patnode, Stephanie; Lee, Hyowon; Hahn, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the feasibility of electrically stimulating the lateral rectus muscle to recover its physiologic abduction ability in cases of complete sixth cranial (abducens) nerve palsy. METHODS In the feline lateral rectus muscle model, the effects of a charge-balanced, biphasic, current-controlled stimulus on the movement of the eye were investigated while stimulation frequency, amplitude, and pulse duration was varied. Eye deflection was measured with a force transducer. Denervated conditions were simulated by injection of botulinum toxin A. RESULTS Three chemically denervated and 4 control lateral rectus muscles were analyzed. In control lateral rectus muscles, the minimum fusion frequency was approximately 170 Hz, and the maximum evoked abduction was 27°. The minimum fusion frequency was unchanged after 4 weeks of chemical denervation. Stimulation of chemically denervated lateral rectus muscle resulted in 17° of abduction. For both innervated and chemically denervated lateral rectus muscle, frequencies greater than 175 Hz yielded very little increase in abduction. Modulating amplitude produced noticeable movement throughout the tested range (0.2 to 9 mA). CONCLUSIONS Results from the feline lateral rectus muscle showed that electrical stimulation is a feasible approach to evoke a contraction from a denervated lateral rectus muscle. The degree of denervation of the feline lateral rectus muscle was indeterminate. Varying the stimulation amplitude allowed greater eye movement. It is very likely that both frequency and amplitude must be modulated for finer control of static eye position. PMID:19375369

  19. Ownership of an artificial limb induced by electrical brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kelly L.; Cronin, Jeneva; Olson, Jared D.; Ehrsson, H. Henrik; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Replacing the function of a missing or paralyzed limb with a prosthetic device that acts and feels like one’s own limb is a major goal in applied neuroscience. Recent studies in nonhuman primates have shown that motor control and sensory feedback can be achieved by connecting sensors in a robotic arm to electrodes implanted in the brain. However, it remains unknown whether electrical brain stimulation can be used to create a sense of ownership of an artificial limb. In this study on two human subjects, we show that ownership of an artificial hand can be induced via the electrical stimulation of the hand section of the somatosensory (SI) cortex in synchrony with touches applied to a rubber hand. Importantly, the illusion was not elicited when the electrical stimulation was delivered asynchronously or to a portion of the SI cortex representing a body part other than the hand, suggesting that multisensory integration according to basic spatial and temporal congruence rules is the underlying mechanism of the illusion. These findings show that the brain is capable of integrating “natural” visual input and direct cortical-somatosensory stimulation to create the multisensory perception that an artificial limb belongs to one’s own body. Thus, they serve as a proof of concept that electrical brain stimulation can be used to “bypass” the peripheral nervous system to induce multisensory illusions and ownership of artificial body parts, which has important implications for patients who lack peripheral sensory input due to spinal cord or nerve lesions. PMID:27994147

  20. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Compared to Usual Care for Pain Relief of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard D.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Bennett, Maria E.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to establish the efficacy of single-lead, 3-week peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapy for pain reduction in stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegic shoulder pain. Design Single-site, pilot, randomized controlled trial for adults with chronic shoulder pain after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive a 3-week treatment of single-lead PNS or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was the worst pain in the last week (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 3) measured at baseline, and weeks 1,4, 12, and 16. Secondary outcomes included pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 9), pain measured by the ShoulderQ Visual Graphic Rating Scales; and health-related quality of life (SF-36v2). Results Twenty-five participants were recruited, 13 to PNS and 12 to UC. There was a significantly greater reduction in pain for the PNS group compared to controls, with significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Both PNS and UC were associated with significant improvements in pain interference and physical health related quality of life. Conclusions Short-term PNS is a safe and efficacious treatment for shoulder pain. Pain reduction is greater than compared to UC and is maintained for at least 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24355994

  1. Determinants of the electric field during transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Paulus, Walter; Will, Susanne; Antunes, Andre; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a complex spatial distribution of the electric current flow in the head which hampers the accurate localization of the stimulated brain areas. In this study we show how various anatomical features systematically shape the electric field distribution in the brain during tDCS. We constructed anatomically realistic finite element (FEM) models of two individual heads including conductivity anisotropy and different skull layers. We simulated a widely employed electrode montage to induce motor cortex plasticity and moved the stimulating electrode over the motor cortex in small steps to examine the resulting changes of the electric field distribution in the underlying cortex. We examined the effect of skull thickness and composition on the passing currents showing that thinner skull regions lead to higher electric field strengths. This effect is counteracted by a larger proportion of higher conducting spongy bone in thicker regions leading to a more homogenous current over the skull. Using a multiple regression model we could identify key factors that determine the field distribution to a significant extent, namely the thicknesses of the cerebrospinal fluid and the skull, the gyral depth and the distance to the anode and cathode. These factors account for up to 50% of the spatial variation of the electric field strength. Further, we demonstrate that individual anatomical factors can lead to stimulation "hotspots" which are partly resistant to electrode positioning. Our results give valuable novel insights in the biophysical foundation of tDCS and highlight the importance to account for individual anatomical factors when choosing an electrode montage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion on neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Kumru, Hatice; Pelayo, Raul; Vidal, Joan; Tormos, Josep Maria; Fregni, Felipe; Navarro, Xavier; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex and techniques of visual illusion, applied isolated or combined, in patients with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. In a sham controlled, double-blind, parallel group design, 39 patients were randomized into four groups receiving transcranial direct current stimulation with walking visual illusion or with control illusion and sham stimulation with visual illusion or with control illusion. For transcranial direct current stimulation, the anode was placed over the primary motor cortex. Each patient received ten treatment sessions during two consecutive weeks. Clinical assessment was performed before, after the last day of treatment, after 2 and 4 weeks follow-up and after 12 weeks. Clinical assessment included overall pain intensity perception, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory. The combination of transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion reduced the intensity of neuropathic pain significantly more than any of the single interventions. Patients receiving transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion experienced a significant improvement in all pain subtypes, while patients in the transcranial direct current stimulation group showed improvement in continuous and paroxysmal pain, and those in the visual illusion group improved only in continuous pain and dysaesthesias. At 12 weeks after treatment, the combined treatment group still presented significant improvement on the overall pain intensity perception, whereas no improvements were reported in the other three groups. Our results demonstrate that transcranial direct current stimulation and visual illusion can be effective in the management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury, with minimal side effects and with good tolerability. PMID:20685806

  3. Exploring the tolerability of spatiotemporally complex electrical stimulation paradigms.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Timothy S; Suhr, Courtney L; Lai, Alan; Halliday, Amy J; Freestone, Dean R; McLean, Karen J; Burkitt, Anthony N; Cook, Mark J

    2011-10-01

    A modified cortical stimulation model was used to investigate the effects of varying the synchronicity and periodicity of electrical stimuli delivered to multiple pairs of electrodes on seizure initiation. In this model, electrical stimulation of the motor cortex of rats, along four pairs of a microwire electrode array, results in an observable seizure with quantifiable electrographic duration and behavioural severity. Periodic stimuli had a constant inter-stimulus intervals across the two-second stimulus duration, whilst synchronous stimuli consisted of singular biphasic, bipolar pulses delivered to the four pairs of electrodes at precisely the same time for the entire two second stimulation period. In this way four combinations of stimulation were possible; periodic/synchronous (P/S), periodic/asynchronous (P/As), aperiodic/synchronous (Ap/S) and aperiodic/asynchronous (Ap/As). All stimulation types were designed with equal pulse width, current intensity and mean frequency of stimulation (60 Hz), standardizing net charge transfer. It was expected that the periodicity of the stimulus would be the primary determinant of seizure initiation and therefore severity and electrographic duration. However, the results showed that significant differences in both severity and duration only occurred when the synchronicity was altered. For periodic stimuli, synchronous delivery increased median seizure duration from 5 s to 13 s and increased median Racine severity from 1 to 3. In the aperiodic case, synchronous stimulus delivery increased median duration from 5.5 s to 11s and resulted in seizures of median severity 3 vs. 0 in the asynchronous case. These findings may have implications for the design of future neurostimulation waveform designs as higher numbers of electrodes and stimulator output channels become available in next generation implants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Liu, Anli A; Lafon, Belen; Friedman, Daniel; Dayan, Michael; Wang, Xiuyuan; Bikson, Marom; Doyle, Werner K; Devinsky, Orrin; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation aims to stimulate the brain by applying weak electrical currents at the scalp. However, the magnitude and spatial distribution of electric fields in the human brain are unknown. We measured electric potentials intracranially in ten epilepsy patients and estimated electric fields across the entire brain by leveraging calibrated current-flow models. When stimulating at 2 mA, cortical electric fields reach 0.8 V/m, the lower limit of effectiveness in animal studies. When individual whole-head anatomy is considered, the predicted electric field magnitudes correlate with the recorded values in cortical (r = 0.86) and depth (r = 0.88) electrodes. Accurate models require adjustment of tissue conductivity values reported in the literature, but accuracy is not improved when incorporating white matter anisotropy or different skull compartments. This is the first study to validate and calibrate current-flow models with in vivo intracranial recordings in humans, providing a solid foundation to target stimulation and interpret clinical trials. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18834.001 PMID:28169833

  5. Focused intracochlear electric stimulation with phased array channels.

    PubMed

    van den Honert, Chris; Kelsall, David C

    2007-06-01

    A method is described for producing focused intracochlear electric stimulation using an array of N electrodes. For each electrode site, N weights are computed that define the ratios of positive and negative electrode currents required to produce cancellation of the voltage within scala tympani at all of the N-1 other sites. Multiple sites can be stimulated simultaneously by superposition of their respective current vectors. The method allows N independent stimulus waveforms to be delivered to each of the N electrode sites without spatial overlap. Channel interaction from current spread associated with monopolar stimulation is substantially eliminated. The method operates by inverting the spread functions of individual monopoles as measured with the other electrodes. The method was implemented and validated with data from three human subjects implanted with 22-electrode perimodiolar arrays. Results indicate that (1) focusing is realizable with realistic precision; (2) focusing comes at the cost of increased total stimulation current; (3) uncanceled voltages that arise beyond the ends of the array are weak except when stimulating the two end channels; and (4) close perimodiolar positioning of the electrodes may be important for minimizing stimulation current and sensitivity to measurement errors.

  6. Electrically responsive microstructured polypyrrole-polyurethane composites for stimulated osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Acasandrei, Adriana Maria; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Dinescu, Maria; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Popescu, Andrei; Chioibasu, Diana; Cristian, Dan; Paun, Irina Alexandra

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the efficiency of substrate-mediated electrical stimulation of micropatterned polypyrrole/polyurethane (PPy/PU) composites for enhancing the osteogenesis in osteoblast-like cells. The PPy/PU substrates were obtained by dispersing electrically conductive PPy nanograins within a mechanically resistant PU matrix. Spin-coated PPy/PU layers were micropatterned with predefined 3D geometries by ultrashort laser ablation. Then they were conformally coated by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation, in order to restore their chemical and electrical integrity. The chemical structure of the laser-processed PPy/PU substrates was investigated by 2D and 3D mapping of the laser-processed areas, via Raman microspectroscopy. In vitro studies revealed that the micropatterned PPy/PU substrates facilitated the topological and electrical communication of the seeded osteoblasts. Specifically, we demonstrated the cells attachment on the predefined 3D micropatterns. More importantly, we found evidence about the cells mineralization inside the 3D micropatterns by investigating the calcium deposits by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and Alizarin Red staining. We found that the substrate-mediated electrical stimulation of the PPy/PU substrates induced a twofold increase of the Ca deposits in the cultured cells.

  7. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within “MOBIL” we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in “compliance data storage” as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  8. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Winfried

    2015-08-24

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in "compliance data storage" as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  9. Treating a pressure ulcer with bio-electric stimulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie; Collins, Fiona

    Mr Jones lived independently until he developed necrotic pressure ulcers over his heels and could no longer mobilize to care for himself. He was transferred to a nursing home where he lived for 18 months and where the nurses could care for his wounds. The wound had been on his right heel without changing over the 18 months and, although attempts to hydrate the eschar had been somewhat successful, the necrotic tissue proved stubborn creating large quantity of fibrous slough. Mr Jones was initially assessed by the tissue viability consultant on 14 March 2005 and agreed to the application of bio-electric stimulation therapy (POSiFEC). The wound change was immediate and was fully healed by 16 June 2005, 12 weeks after his initial assessment. This article outlines his care and the background to bio-electrical stimulation in wounds.

  10. Electrical engram: how deep brain stimulation affects memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hweeling; Fell, Jürgen; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2013-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure involving implantation of a pacemaker that sends electric impulses to specific brain regions. DBS has been applied in patients with Parkinson's disease, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (among others), and more recently in patients with Alzheimer's disease to improve memory functions. Current DBS approaches are based on the concept that high-frequency stimulation inhibits or excites specific brain regions. However, because DBS entails the application of repetitive electrical stimuli, it primarily exerts an effect on extracellular field-potential oscillations similar to those recorded with electroencephalography. Here, we suggest a new perspective on how DBS may ameliorate memory dysfunction: it may enhance normal electrophysiological patterns underlying long-term memory processes within the medial temporal lobe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation on quadriceps activation in individuals with knee joint injury.

    PubMed

    Glaviano, Neal R; Langston, William T; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation is a common intervention to address muscle weakness, however presents with many limitations such as fatigue, muscle damage, and patient discomfort that may influence its effectiveness. One novel form of electrical stimulation purported to improve neuromuscular re-education is Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation (PENS), which is proposed to mimic muscle-firing patterns of healthy individuals. PENS provides patterned stimulating to the agonist muscle, antagonist muscle and then agonist muscle again in an effort to replicate firing patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a single PENS treatment on knee extension torque and quadriceps activation in individuals with quadriceps inhibition. 18 subjects (10 males and 8 females: 24.2±3.4 years, 175.3±11.8cm, 81.8±12.4kg) with a history of knee injury/pain participated in this double-blinded randomized controlled laboratory trial. Participants demonstrated quadriceps inhibition with a central activation ratio of ≤90%. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps and central activation ratio were measured before and after treatment. The treatment intervention was a 15-minute patterned electrical stimulation applied to the quadriceps and hamstring muscles with a strong motor contraction or a sham group, who received an identical set up as the PENS group, but received a 1mA subsensory stimulation. A 2×2 (group × time) ANCOVA was used to determine differences in maximal voluntary isometric contraction and central activation ratio between groups. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction was selected as a covariate due to baseline differences. There were no differences in change scores between pre- and post-intervention for maximal voluntary isometric contraction: (PENS: 0.09±0.32Nm/kg and Sham 0.15±0.18Nm/kg, p=0.713), or central activation ratio:(PENS: -1.22±6.06 and Sham: 1.48±3.7, p=0.270). A single Patterned Electrical

  12. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy for the treatment of primary dysmenorrheal.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hai-Yan; Bai, Hong-Yan; Yang, Zhi-Qin

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect and safety of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy for relieving pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea (PD). In this study, 134 participants with PD were randomly divided into the intervention group and the sham group, with 67 participants in each group. Participants in the intervention group received TENS, whereas those in the sham group received sham TENS. The primary outcome was measured by the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes were measured by the duration of relief from dysmenorrheal pain, number of ibuprofen tablets taken, and the World Health Organization quality of life (WHOQOL)-BREF score, as well as the adverse events. A total of 122 participants completed the study. Compared to sham TENS, TENS showed a greater effect in pain relief with regard to the NRS (P < .01), duration of relief from dysmenorrheal pain (P < .01), and number of ibuprofen tablets taken (P < .01). However, no significant differences in the quality of life, measured by the WHOQOL-BREF score, were found between 2 groups. The adverse event profiles were also similar between 2 groups. TENS was efficacious and safe in relieving pain in participants with PD.

  13. Electric fields in hippocampus due to transcranial focal electrical stimulation via concentric ring electrodes.

    PubMed

    Besio, Walter G; Hadidi, Ruba; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rocha, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    As epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population, electrical stimulation of brain has recently shown potential as an additive seizure control therapy. In this study we applied focal transcranial electrical stimulation (TFS) on the surface of the skull of rats via concentric ring electrodes. We recorded electric potentials with a bipolar electrode consisting of two stainless steel wires implanted into the left ventral hippocampus. TFS current was gradually increased by 20% starting at 103 μA allowing us to assess the relationship between TFS current and both potentials recorded from the bipolar electrode and the resulting electric field. Generally, increases in TFS current resulted in increases in the electric field. This allows us to estimate what extra-cranial TFS current would be sufficient to cause the activation of neurons in the hippocampus.

  14. Multi-Scale Computational Models for Electrical Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Jun, Sung C.

    2017-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an appealing method to treat neurological disorders. To achieve optimal stimulation effects and a better understanding of the underlying brain mechanisms, neuroscientists have proposed computational modeling studies for a decade. Recently, multi-scale models that combine a volume conductor head model and multi-compartmental models of cortical neurons have been developed to predict stimulation effects on the macroscopic and microscopic levels more precisely. As the need for better computational models continues to increase, we overview here recent multi-scale modeling studies; we focused on approaches that coupled a simplified or high-resolution volume conductor head model and multi-compartmental models of cortical neurons, and constructed realistic fiber models using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Further implications for achieving better precision in estimating cellular responses are discussed. PMID:29123476

  15. Pain Relief in CRPS-II after Spinal Cord and Motor Cortex Simultaneous Dual Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, William Oc; Barbosa, Danilo C; Teixera, Manoel J; Paiz, Martin; Moura, Leonardo; Monaco, Bernardo A; Fonoff, Erich T

    2016-05-01

    We describe a case of a 30-year-old woman who suffered a traumatic injury of the right brachial plexus, developing severe complex regional pain syndrome type II (CRPS-II). After clinical treatment failure, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was indicated with initial positive pain control. However, after 2 years her pain progressively returned to almost baseline intensity before SCS. Additional motor cortex electrode implant was then proposed as a rescue therapy and connected to the same pulse generator. This method allowed simultaneous stimulation of the motor cortex and SCS in cycling mode with independent stimulation parameters in each site. At 2 years follow-up, the patient reported sustained improvement in pain with dual stimulation, reduction of painful crises, and improvement in quality of life. The encouraging results in this case suggests that this can be an option as add-on therapy over SCS as a possible rescue therapy in the management of CRPS-II. However, comparative studies must be performed in order to determine the effectiveness of this therapy. Chronic neuropathic pain, Complex regional pain syndrome Type II, brachial plexus injury, motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation.

  16. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Motor Restoration in Hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Jayme S; Fu, Michael J; Sheffler, Lynne R; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the most common therapeutic and neuroprosthetic applications of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for upper and lower extremity stroke rehabilitation. Fundamental NMES principles and purposes in stroke rehabilitation are explained. NMES modalities used for upper and lower limb rehabilitation are described, and efficacy studies are summarized. The evidence for peripheral and central mechanisms of action is also summarized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effect of biological electric stimulation on free muscle transfer].

    PubMed

    Yuang, F; Guan, W; Cao, Y

    1997-01-01

    The rectus femoris muscles of rabbits were used as muscle model. The electrical stimulation which resembled the normal motor-unit activity was used to observe its effects on free transferred muscle. After three months, the moist muscle weight (MW), its maximum cross-section area, its contractility and its histochemical characteristics were examined. The results showed that the function and morphology of the muscles were well preserved. These findings might encourage its clinical application.

  18. The Effect of Surface Electrical Stimulation on Vocal Fold Position

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Ianessa A.; Poletto, Christopher J.; Saxon, Keith G.; Kearney, Pamela R.; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Closure of the true and false vocal folds is a normal part of airway protection during swallowing. Individuals with reduced or delayed true vocal fold closure can be at risk for aspiration and benefit from intervention to ameliorate the problem. Surface electrical stimulation is currently used during therapy for dysphagia, despite limited knowledge of its physiological effects. Design Prospective single effects study. Methods The immediate physiological effect of surface stimulation on true vocal fold angle was examined at rest in 27 healthy adults using ten different electrode placements on the submental and neck regions. Fiberoptic nasolaryngoscopic recordings during passive inspiration were used to measure change in true vocal fold angle with stimulation. Results Vocal fold angles changed only to a small extent during two electrode placements (p ≤ 0.05). When two sets of electrodes were placed vertically on the neck the mean true vocal fold abduction was 2.4 degrees; while horizontal placements of electrodes in the submental region produced a mean adduction of 2.8 degrees (p=0.03). Conclusions Surface electrical stimulation to the submental and neck regions does not produce immediate true vocal fold adduction adequate for airway protection during swallowing and one position may produce a slight increase in true vocal fold opening. PMID:18043496

  19. Effects of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation on Synchronized Oscillatory Activity in Parkinsonian Basal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ratnadurai-Giridharan, Shivakeshavan; Cheung, Chung C; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2017-11-01

    Conventional deep brain stimulation of basal ganglia uses high-frequency regular electrical pulses to treat Parkinsonian motor symptoms but has a series of limitations. Relatively new and not yet clinically tested, optogenetic stimulation is an effective experimental stimulation technique to affect pathological network dynamics. We compared the effects of electrical and optogenetic stimulation of the basal gangliaon the pathologicalParkinsonian rhythmic neural activity. We studied the network response to electrical stimulation and excitatory and inhibitory optogenetic stimulations. Different stimulations exhibit different interactions with pathological activity in the network. We studied these interactions for different network and stimulation parameter values. Optogenetic stimulation was found to be more efficient than electrical stimulation in suppressing pathological rhythmicity. Our findings indicate that optogenetic control of neural synchrony may be more efficacious than electrical control because of the different ways of how stimulations interact with network dynamics.

  20. How Does Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Pain Neuromatrix Affect Brain Excitability and Pain Perception? A Randomised, Double-Blind, Sham-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaseghi, Bita; Zoghi, Maryam; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2015-01-01

    Background Integration of information between multiple cortical regions of the pain neuromatrix is thought to underpin pain modulation. Although altered processing in the primary motor (M1) and sensory (S1) cortices is implicated in separate studies, the simultaneous changes in and the relationship between these regions are unknown yet. The primary aim was to assess the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) over superficial regions of the pain neuromatrix on M1 and S1 excitability. The secondary aim was to investigate how M1 and S1 excitability changes affect sensory (STh) and pain thresholds (PTh). Methods Twelve healthy participants received 20 min a-tDCS under five different conditions including a-tDCS of M1, a-tDCS of S1, a-tDCS of DLPFC, sham a-tDCS, and no-tDCS. Excitability of dominant M1 and S1 were measured before, immediately, and 30 minutes after intervention respectively. Moreover, STh and PTh to peripheral electrical and mechanical stimulation were evaluated. All outcome measures were assessed at three time-points of measurement by a blind rater. Results A-tDCS of M1 and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) significantly increased brain excitability in M1 (p < 0.05) for at least 30 min. Following application of a-tDCS over the S1, the amplitude of the N20-P25 component of SEPs increased immediately after the stimulation (p < 0.05), whilst M1 stimulation decreased it. Compared to baseline values, significant STh and PTh increase was observed after a-tDCS of all three stimulated areas. Except in M1 stimulation, there was significant PTh difference between a-tDCS and sham tDCS. Conclusion a-tDCS of M1 is the best spots to enhance brain excitability than a-tDCS of S1 and DLPFC. Surprisingly, a-tDCS of M1 and S1 has diverse effects on S1 and M1 excitability. A-tDCS of M1, S1, and DLPFC increased STh and PTh levels. Given the placebo effects of a-tDCS of M1 in pain perception, our results should be interpreted with caution

  1. Chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus by carbachol attenuated the formalin-induced pain behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Ezzatpanah, Somayeh; Babapour, Vahab; Sadeghi, Bahman; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-02-01

    Electrical and chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) produces analgesia. Previous studies emphasized the importance of LH in the modulation of nociceptive behaviors in the acute pain models. In the current study, for the first time, we examined the effect of direct chemical stimulation of the LH with cholinergic receptor agonist, carbachol, on pain-related behaviors in the formalin test as a model of persistent inflammatory pain. Forty-eight adult male Wistar rats were implanted unilaterally with cannula into the LH. Four doses of carbachol (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 nM/0.5 μl saline) were microinjected into the LH just 5 min before the formalin test. Vehicle group received 0.5 μl saline into the LH. Pain-related behaviors were quantified and monitored in 5-min blocks for 60 min test period. Average nociceptive scores and area under the curve (AUC) as raw pain scores × time by the linear trapezoidal method were used for the statistical analyses. One important finding of our study was that carbachol blocks the nociceptive responses in both phases of formalin-induced nociception in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, the percentage decrease of AUC values calculated for treatment groups, compared to the control group, was more significant in the late phase than the early phase. These findings suggest that LH modulates formalin-induced nociception through spinal and/or supraspinal sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an external...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an external...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an external...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an external...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an external...

  7. Can a single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation targeted to the motor cortex interrupt pain processing?

    PubMed Central

    Kisler, Lee-Bareket; Gurion, Ilan; Granovsky, Yelena; Sinai, Alon; Sprecher, Elliot; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone

    2018-01-01

    The modulatory role of the primary motor cortex (M1), reflected by an inhibitory effect of M1-stimulation on clinical pain, motivated us to deepen our understanding of M1’s role in pain modulation. We used Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)-induced virtual lesion (VL) to interrupt with M1 activity during noxious heat pain. We hypothesized that TMS-VL will effect experimental pain ratings. Three VL protocols were applied consisting of single-pulse TMS to transiently interfere with right M1 activity: (1) VLM1- TMS applied to 11 subjects, 20 msec before the individual’s first pain-related M1 peak activation, as determined by source analysis (sLORETA), (2) VL-50 (N = 16; TMS applied 50 ms prior to noxious stimulus onset), and (3) VL+150 (N = 16; TMS applied 150 ms after noxious stimulus onset). Each protocol included 3 conditions ('pain-alone', ' TMS-VL', and ‘SHAM-VL’), each consisted of 30 noxious heat stimuli. Pain ratings were compared, in each protocol, for TMS-VL vs. SHAM-VL and vs. pain-alone conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance, corrected for multiple comparisons revealed no significant differences in the pain ratings between the different conditions within each protocol. Therefore, our results from this exploratory study suggest that a single pulse TMS-induced VL that is targeted to M1 failed to interrupt experimental pain processing in the specific three stimulation timing examined here. PMID:29630681

  8. Can a single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation targeted to the motor cortex interrupt pain processing?

    PubMed

    Kisler, Lee-Bareket; Gurion, Ilan; Granovsky, Yelena; Sinai, Alon; Sprecher, Elliot; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2018-01-01

    The modulatory role of the primary motor cortex (M1), reflected by an inhibitory effect of M1-stimulation on clinical pain, motivated us to deepen our understanding of M1's role in pain modulation. We used Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)-induced virtual lesion (VL) to interrupt with M1 activity during noxious heat pain. We hypothesized that TMS-VL will effect experimental pain ratings. Three VL protocols were applied consisting of single-pulse TMS to transiently interfere with right M1 activity: (1) VLM1- TMS applied to 11 subjects, 20 msec before the individual's first pain-related M1 peak activation, as determined by source analysis (sLORETA), (2) VL-50 (N = 16; TMS applied 50 ms prior to noxious stimulus onset), and (3) VL+150 (N = 16; TMS applied 150 ms after noxious stimulus onset). Each protocol included 3 conditions ('pain-alone', ' TMS-VL', and 'SHAM-VL'), each consisted of 30 noxious heat stimuli. Pain ratings were compared, in each protocol, for TMS-VL vs. SHAM-VL and vs. pain-alone conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance, corrected for multiple comparisons revealed no significant differences in the pain ratings between the different conditions within each protocol. Therefore, our results from this exploratory study suggest that a single pulse TMS-induced VL that is targeted to M1 failed to interrupt experimental pain processing in the specific three stimulation timing examined here.

  9. Repetitive electric brain stimulation reduces food intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Kistenmacher, Alina; Herzog, Nina; Schwarz, Marianka; Schweiger, Ulrich; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2014-10-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays an important role in appetite and food intake regulation. Because previous data revealed that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the DLPFC reduces food cravings, we hypothesized that repetitive electric stimulation of the right DLPFC would lower food intake behavior in humans. In a single-blind, code-based, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced, randomized crossover experiment, 14 healthy young men with body mass index (in kg/m(2)) from 20 to 25 were examined during 8 d of daily tDCS or a sham stimulation. After tDCS or sham stimulation on the first and the last day of both experimental conditions, participants consumed food ad libitum from a standardized test buffet. One week of daily anodal tDCS reduced overall caloric intake by 14% in comparison with sham stimulation. Moreover, repetitive tDCS diminished self-reported appetite scores. Our study implies that the application of anodal direct currents to the right DLPFC represents a promising option for reducing both caloric intake and appetite in humans. This trial was registered at the German Clinical Trials Register (www.germanctr.de) as DRKS00005811. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. The short- and long-term benefit in chronic low back pain through adjuvant electrical versus manual auricular acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Sator-Katzenschlager, Sabine M; Scharbert, Gisela; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Szeles, Jozef C; Finster, Gabriele; Schiesser, Andreas W; Heinze, Georg; Kress, Hans Georg

    2004-05-01

    Acupuncture is an established adjuvant analgesic modality for the treatment of chronic pain. Electrical stimulation of acupuncture points is considered to increase acupuncture analgesia. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study we tested the hypothesis that auricular electroacupuncture (EA) relieves pain more effectively than conventional manual auricular acupuncture (CO) in chronic low back pain patients with insufficient pain relief (visual analogue scale [VAS] > or = 5) treated with standardized analgesic therapy. Disposable acupuncture needles were inserted in the auricular acupuncture points 29, 40, and 55 of the dominant side and connected to a newly developed battery-powered miniaturized stimulator worn behind the ear. Patients were randomized into group EA (n = 31) with continuous low-frequency auricular EA (1 Hz biphasic constant current of 2 mA) and group CO (n = 30) without electrical stimulation (sham-electroacupuncture). Treatment was performed once weekly for 6 wk, and in each group needles were withdrawn 48 h after insertion. During the study period and a 3-mo follow-up, patients were asked to complete the McGill questionnaire. Psychological well being, activity level, quality of sleep, and pain intensity were assessed by means of VAS; moreover, analgesic drug consumption was documented. Pain relief was significantly better in group EA during the study and the follow-up period as compared with group CO. Similarly, psychological well-being, activity, and sleep were significantly improved in group EA versus group CO, the consumption of analgesic rescue medication was less, and more patients returned to full-time employment. Neuropathic pain in particular improved in patients treated with EA. There were no adverse side effects. These results are the first to demonstrate that continuous EA stimulation of auricular acupuncture points improves the treatment of chronic low back pain in an outpatient population. Continuous electrical

  11. Implantation of a 16-channel functional electrical stimulation walking system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Marsolais, E B; Polando, G; Triolo, R J; Davis, J A; Bhadra, N; Uhlir, J P

    1998-02-01

    A 16-channel electrical stimulation system was implanted in a 39-year-old patient with T10 paraplegia to restore sit to stand, walking, and exercise functions. System implantation required two surgical sessions. In the first session, the posterior muscle set consisting of bilateral semimembranosus, adductor magnus, and gluteus maximus muscles were exposed and epimysial electrodes sutured at the point of greatest muscle contraction. Closed double helix intramuscular electrodes were implanted in the erector spinae. Two weeks later, epimysial electrodes were attached to the eight anterior muscles consisting of the tibialis anterior, sartorius, tensor fasciae latae, and vastus lateralis with all 16 electrode leads passed to the anterior abdominal wall. The electrodes were connected to two eight-channel stimulators placed in the iliac fossae, and the system was checked by activating the individual muscles. The implanted stimulators received stimulation instructions and power via a radio frequency link to an external control. Stimulation patterns for standing, walking, sitting, and exercise functions were chosen from a preprogrammed menu via a finger key pad. After 3 weeks of restricted patient activity, all electrodes stimulated either the target muscle or had an acceptable spillover pattern. The patient is undergoing a 16-week rehabilitation course of stimulated exercises gradually increasing in intensity. At the conclusion, the goal is to discharge the patient with the system for spontaneous use. Although long term followup is required to determine system reliability, preliminary clinical results indicate that targeted, repeatable, functional muscle contractions in the lower extremity can be achieved with a system consisting of epimysial electrodes.

  12. Giovanni Aldini: from animal electricity to human brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Parent, André

    2004-11-01

    Two hundred years ago, Giovanni Aldini published a highly influential book that reported experiments in which the principles of Luigi Galvani (animal electricity) and Alessandro Volta (bimetallic electricity) were used together for the first time. Aldini was born in Bologna in 1762 and graduated in physics at the University of his native town in 1782. As nephew and assistant of Galvani, he actively participated in a series of crucial experiments with frog's muscles that led to the idea that electricity was the long-sought vital force coursing from brain to muscles. Aldini became professor of experimental physics at the University of Bologna in 1798. He traveled extensively throughout Europe, spending much time defending the concept of his discreet uncle against the incessant attacks of Volta, who did not believe in animal electricity. Aldini used Volta's bimetallic pile to apply electric current to dismembered bodies of animals and humans; these spectacular galvanic reanimation experiments made a strong and enduring impression on his contemporaries. Aldini also treated patients with personality disorders and reported complete rehabilitation following transcranial administration of electric current. Aldini's work laid the ground for the development of various forms of electrotherapy that were heavily used later in the 19th century. Even today, deep brain stimulation, a procedure currently employed to relieve patients with motor or behavioral disorders, owes much to Aldini and galvanism. In recognition of his merits, Aldini was made a knight of the Iron Crown and a councillor of state at Milan, where he died in 1834.

  13. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment. (a) General. Electrical stimulating (EST) equipment is... of facilitating blood removal. These provisions do not apply to electrical equipment used to stun and... generate pulsed DC or AC voltage for stimulation and is separate from the equipment used to apply the...

  14. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment. (a) General. Electrical stimulating (EST) equipment is... of facilitating blood removal. These provisions do not apply to electrical equipment used to stun and... generate pulsed DC or AC voltage for stimulation and is separate from the equipment used to apply the...

  15. Effects of music engagement on responses to painful stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, David H; Chapman, C Richard; Jacobson, Robert C; Donaldson, Gary W

    2012-06-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for the behavioral modulation of pain based on constructivism, positing that task engagement, such as listening for errors in a musical passage, can establish a construction of reality that effectively replaces pain as a competing construction. Graded engagement produces graded reductions in pain as indicated by reduced psychophysiological arousal and subjective pain report. Fifty-three healthy volunteers having normal hearing participated in 4 music listening conditions consisting of passive listening (no task) or performing an error detection task varying in signal complexity and task difficulty. During all conditions, participants received normally painful fingertip shocks varying in intensity while stimulus-evoked potentials (SEP), pupil dilation responses (PDR), and retrospective pain reports were obtained. SEP and PDR increased with increasing stimulus intensity. Task performance decreased with increasing task difficulty. Mixed model analyses, adjusted for habituation/sensitization and repeated measures within person, revealed significant quadratic trends for SEP and pain report (Pchange<0.001) with large reductions from no task to easy task and smaller graded reductions corresponding to increasing task difficulty/complexity. PDR decreased linearly (Pchange<0.001) with graded task condition. We infer that these graded reductions in indicators of central and peripheral arousal and in reported pain correspond to graded increases in engagement in the music listening task. Engaging activities may prevent pain by creating competing constructions of reality that draw on the same processing resources as pain. Better understanding of these processes will advance the development of more effective pain modulation through improved manipulation of engagement strategies.

  16. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Sánchez, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10(-4)) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10(-4)). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  17. EFFECTS OF FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IN REHABILITATION WITH HEMIPARESIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Tanović, Edina

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident is a focal neurological deficiency occurring suddenly and lasting for more than 24 hours. The purpose of our work is to determine the role of the functional electrical simulation (FES) in the rehabilitation of patients with hemiparesis, which occurred as a consequence of a cerebrovascular accident. This study includes the analysis of two groups of 40 patients with hemiparesis (20 patients with deep hemiparesis and 20 patients with light hemi- paresis), a control group which was only treated with kinesiotherapy and a tested group which was treated with kinesiotherapy and functional electrical stimulation. Both groups of patients were analyzed in respect to their sex and age. Additional analysis of the walking function was completed in accordance with the BI and RAP index. The analysis of the basic demographical data demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the control and tested group. The patients of both groups are equal in respect of age and sex. After 4 weeks of rehabilitation of patients with deep and light hemiparesis there were no statistically significant differences between the groups after evaluation by the BI index. However, a statistically significant difference was noted between the groups by the RAP index among patients with deep hemiparesis. After 8 weeks of rehabilitation the group of patients who were treated with kinesiotherapy and functional electrical stimulation showed better statistically significant results of rehabilitation in respect to the control group with both the BI index and the RAP index (p<0,001). In conclusion, we can state that the patients in rehabilitation after a cerebrovascular accident require rehabilitation longer than 4 weeks. Walking rehabilitation after stroke is faster and more successful if we used functional electrical stimulation, in combination with kinesiotherapy, in patients with disabled extremities. PMID:19284395

  18. The Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation on the Orthodontic Movement of Teeth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is an alternating electrical current applied k., ’ to the skin or gingiva with surface electrodes. Many...AD-AI68 889 THE EFFECTS OF TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON 1/i THE ORTHODONTIC MOVEMENT OF TEETH(U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON...SPECIAL FIELD OF THE THESIS: of Transcutaneous Electrical Stimiu- Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation lation on the Orthodontic Movement

  19. Effects of noxious stimulation and pain expectations on neuromuscular control of the spine in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Henchoz, Yves; Tétreau, Charles; Abboud, Jacques; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Alterations of the neuromuscular control of the lumbar spine have been reported in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). During trunk flexion and extension tasks, the reduced myoelectric activity of the low back extensor musculature observed during full trunk flexion is typically absent in patients with chronic LBP. To determine whether pain expectations could modulate neuromuscular responses to experimental LBP to a higher extent in patients with chronic LBP compared with controls. A cross-sectional, case-control study. Twenty-two patients with nonspecific chronic LBP and 22 age- and sex-matched control participants. Trunk flexion-extension tasks were performed under three experimental conditions: innocuous heat, noxious stimulation with low pain expectation, and noxious stimulation with high pain expectation. Noxious stimulations were delivered using a contact heat thermode applied on the skin of the lumbar region (L4-L5), whereas low or high pain expectations were induced by verbal and visual instructions. Surface electromyography of erector spinae at L2-L3 and L4-L5, as well as lumbopelvic kinematic variables were collected during the tasks. Pain was evaluated using a numerical rating scale. Pain catastrophizing, disability, anxiety, and fear-avoidance beliefs were measured using validated questionnaires. Two-way mixed analysis of variance revealed that pain was significantly different among the three experimental conditions (F2,84=317.5; p<.001). Increased myoelectric activity of the low back extensor musculature during full trunk flexion was observed in the high compared with low pain expectations condition at the L2-L3 level (F2,84=9.5; p<.001) and at the L4-L5 level (F2,84=3.7; p=.030). At the L4-L5 level, this effect was significantly more pronounced for the control participants compared with patients with chronic LBP (F2,84=3.4; p=.045). Pearson correlation analysis revealed that increased lumbar muscle activity in full flexion induced by

  20. Comparing conventional physical therapy rehabilitation with neuromuscular electrical stimulation after TKA.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; McElroy, Karen; Stakich, Valerie; Cicco, Jodie

    2013-03-01

    Rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a costly, cumbersome, and often painful process. Physical therapy contributes to the successful outcome of TKA but can be expensive. Alternative methods of obtaining good functional results that help minimize costs are desirable. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a potential option. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation has been shown to increase quadriceps muscle strength and activation following TKA. Functional scores also improve following TKA when NMES is added to conventional therapy protocols vs therapy alone. The authors hypothesized that rehabilitation managed by a physical therapist would not result in a functional advantage for patients undergoing TKA when compared with NMES and an unsupervised at-home range of motion exercise program and that patient satisfaction would not differ between the 2 groups. Seventy patients were randomized into a postoperative protocol of conventional physical therapy with a licensed therapist, including range of motion exercises and strengthening exercises, or into a program of NMES and range of motion exercises performed at home without therapist supervision. Noninferiority of the NMES program was obtained 6 weeks postoperatively (Knee Society pain/function scores, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, flexion). Noninferiority was shown 6 months postoperatively for all parameters. The results suggest that rehabilitation managed by a physical therapist results in no functional advantage or difference in patient satisfaction when compared with NMES and an unsupervised at-home range of motion program. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and unsupervised at-home range of motion exercises may provide an option for reducing the cost of the postoperative TKA recovery process without compromising quadriceps strength or patient satisfaction. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. 'Virtual lesion' in pain research; a study on magnetic stimulation of the primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Granovsky, Y; Liem, K S; Weissman-Fogel, I; Yarnitsky, D; Chistyakov, A; Sinai, A

    2016-02-01

    'Virtual lesion' ('VL') is a transient disruption of cortical activity during task performance. It can be induced by single pulses or short trains of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) directed to functionally relevant brain areas. We applied 'VL' methodology of a short train of TMS given on top of experimental tonic pain, expecting to see changes in pain scores. Thirty young healthy subjects (15 women) were assessed with active ('VL') or 'sham' TMS in different sessions, randomly. In each session, 30 sec-long contact heat (47.5 °C, right forearm) was applied stand-alone ('baseline') and with 5 sec-long 10 Hz-TMS over left primary motor cortex (M1) starting at 17 sec of the heat stimulation. Pain scores decreased after 'VL' or 'sham' (p < 0.001). Independently of the type of TMS, pain reduction was stronger in women (p = 0.012). A triple Sex x Stimulation type ('VL' or 'sham') x Condition ('baseline' heat pain vs. heat pain with TMS) interaction (p = 0.027) indicated stronger pain reduction by 'VL' in women (p = 0.008) and not in men (p = 0.78) as compared to 'baseline'. Pain catastrophizing and perceived stress ratings affected the model (p = 0.010 and p < 0.001, respectively), but without sex differences. This study indicates that interactions between cortical excitability of the motor cortex and nociceptive processing may be gender-related. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  2. Use of electroacupuncture and transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation in reproductive medicine: a group consensus.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fan; Li, Rong; Sun, Wei; Lin, Ge; Zhang, Rong; Yang, Jing; Tian, Li; Xing, Guo-Gang; Jiang, Hui; Gong, Fei; Liang, Xiao-Yan; Meng, Yan; Liu, Jia-Yin; Zhou, Li-Ying; Wang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Yan; He, Yi-Jing; Ye, Jia-Yu; Han, Song-Ping; Han, Ji-Sheng

    With the rapid development of assisted reproductive technology, various reproductive disorders have been effectively addressed. Acupuncture-like therapies, including electroacupuncture (EA) and transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS), become more popular world-wide. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that EA and TEAS are effective in treating gynecological disorders, especially infertility. This present paper describes how to select acupoints for the treatment of infertility from the view of theories of traditional Chinese medicine and how to determine critical parameters of electric pulses of EA/TEAS based on results from animal and clinical studies. It summarizes the principles of clinical application of EA/TEAS in treating various kinds of reproductive disorders, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pain induced by oocyte retrieval, diminished ovarian reserve, embryo transfer, and oligospermia/ asthenospermia. The possible underlying mechanisms mediating the therapeutic effects of EA/TEAS in reproductive medicine are also examined.

  3. Transcranial Electric Stimulation for Precision Medicine: A Spatiomechanistic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Fatemeh; Nitsche, Michael A.; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    During recent years, non-invasive brain stimulation, including transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) in general, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in particular, have created new hopes for treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Despite promising primary results in some brain disorders, a more widespread application of tES is hindered by the unsolved question of determining optimum stimulation protocols to receive meaningful therapeutic effects. tES has a large parameter space including various montages and stimulation parameters. Moreover, inter- and intra-individual differences in responding to stimulation protocols have to be taken into account. These factors contribute to the complexity of selecting potentially effective protocols for each disorder, different clusters of each disorder, and even each single patient. Expanding knowledge in different dimensions of basic and clinical neuroscience could help researchers and clinicians to select potentially effective protocols based on tES modulatory mechanisms for future clinical studies. In this article, we propose a heuristic spatiomechanistic framework which contains nine levels to address tES effects on brain functions. Three levels refer to the spatial resolution (local, small-scale networks and large-scale networks) and three levels of tES modulatory effects based on its mechanisms of action (neurochemical, neuroelectrical and oscillatory modulations). At the group level, this framework could be helpful to enable an informed and systematic exploration of various possible protocols for targeting a brain disorder or its neuroscience-based clusters. Considering recent advances in exploration of neurodiversity at the individual level with different brain mapping technologies, the proposed framework might also be used in combination with personal data to design individualized protocols for tES in the context of precision medicine in the future. PMID:28450832

  4. Generation of Electrical Power from Stimulated Muscle Contractions Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Kilgore, Kevin; Ercegovic, David B.

    2004-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort between NASA Glenn Research Center's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Project, part of the NASA Aerospace Propulsion and Power Program of the Aerospace Technology Enterprise, and Case Western Reserve University's Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Center. The RAC Project foresees implantable power requirements for future applications such as organically based sensor platforms and robotics that can interface with the human senses. One of the goals of the FES Center is to develop a totally implantable neural prosthesis. This goal is based on feedback from patients who would prefer a system with an internal power source over the currently used system with an external power source. The conversion system under investigation would transform the energy produced from a stimulated muscle contraction into electrical energy. We hypothesize that the output power of the system will be greater than the input power necessary to initiate, sustain, and control the electrical conversion system because of the stored potential energy of the muscle. If the system can be made biocompatible, durable, and with the potential for sustained use, then the biological power source will be a viable solution.

  5. Assessment of the Therapeutic Effectiveness of Deep Electromagnetic Stimulation in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Przedborska, Agnieszka; Misztal, Małgorzata; Raczkowski, Jan W

    2015-10-01

    The study presents the results of the application of deep electromagnetic stimulation (DEMS) therapy in the treatment of low back pain. The study aimed to evaluate and compare pain severity before and after deep electromagnetic stimulation sessions and to assess persistence of the analgesic effect and identify factors which influenced it significantly. The study enrolled a series of 105 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain who underwent a series of 10 sessions of deep electromagnetic stimulation. The effectiveness of the therapy was assessed according to VAS and Laitinen scores. Risk factors significantly affecting the stability of analgesic effect after DEMS therapy were identified using the Cox regression model. Statistically significant pain relief was observed after deep electromagnetic therapy. Both the Laitinen and VAS scales demonstrated the reduction in pain intensity by half (Me (IQR): 6 (5-9) before the therapy vs. 3 (24) afterwards, p<0.0001 for Laitinen scale and 7 (6-8) before vs. 3 (2-5) after the therapy, p<0.0001 for VAS). During 12-month follow up, pain recurred in 84 (80%) patients. Pain recurrence within a year after the therapy was stimulated in a statistically significant manner by pain duration (HR=1.032, 95% CI: 0.988-1.078; p=0.032) and the co-occurrence of degenerative joint disease (HR=5.521, 95%CI: 2.905-10.493; p=0.001). 1. Deep electromagnetic stimulation is an effective treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. 2. The degree of effectiveness of this modality in the longer term depends on the cause and duration of pain.

  6. Transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation: technique and paradigms.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Walter; Peterchev, Angel V; Ridding, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial electrical and magnetic stimulation techniques encompass a broad physical variety of stimuli, ranging from static magnetic fields or direct current stimulation to pulsed magnetic or alternating current stimulation with an almost infinite number of possible stimulus parameters. These techniques are continuously refined by new device developments, including coil or electrode design and flexible control of the stimulus waveforms. They allow us to influence brain function acutely and/or by inducing transient plastic after-effects in a range from minutes to days. Manipulation of stimulus parameters such as pulse shape, intensity, duration, and frequency, and location, size, and orientation of the electrodes or coils enables control of the immediate effects and after-effects. Physiological aspects such as stimulation at rest or during attention or activation may alter effects dramatically, as does neuropharmacological drug co-application. Non-linear relationships between stimulus parameters and physiological effects have to be taken into account. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel bifunctional cap for simultaneous electroencephalography and transcranial electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Sophia; Hunold, Alexander; Fiedler, Patrique; Schlegelmilch, Falk; Schellhorn, Klaus; Haueisen, Jens

    2018-05-08

    Neuromodulation induced by transcranial electric stimulation (TES) exhibited promising potential for clinical practice. However, the underlying mechanisms remain subject of research. The combination of TES and electroencephalography (EEG) offers great potential for investigating these mechanisms and brain function in general, especially when performed simultaneously. In conventional applications, the combination of EEG and TES suffers from limitations on the electrode level (gel for electrode-skin interface) and the usability level (preparation time, reproducibility of positioning). To overcome these limitations, we designed a bifunctional cap for simultaneous TES-EEG applications. We used novel electrode materials, namely textile stimulation electrodes and dry EEG electrodes integrated in a flexible textile cap. We verified the functionality of this cap by analysing the effect of TES on visual evoked potentials (VEPs). In accordance with previous reports using standard TES, the amplitude of the N75 component was significantly decreased post-stimulation, indicating the feasibility of using this novel flexible cap for simultaneous TES and EEG. Further, we found a significant reduction of the P100 component only during TES, indicating a different brain modulation effect during and after TES. In conclusion, the novel bifunctional cap offers a novel tool for simultaneous TES-EEG applications in clinical research, therapy monitoring and closed-loop stimulation.

  8. Modulating Human Auditory Processing by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Heimrath, Kai; Fiene, Marina; Rufener, Katharina S.; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation, and transcranial random noise stimulation has emerged. While the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders. PMID:27013969

  9. Assessing the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in post-thoracotomy analgesia.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fabiana Cristina; Issy, Adriana Machado; Sakata, Rioko Kimiko

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is commonly used to treat musculoskeletal pain, but it may also be indicated for postoperative analgesia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of TENS on post-thoracotomy. Thirty patients between 18 and 60 years of age undergoing thoracotomy for lung cancer resection on the second postoperative day were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups (G1 and G2). G1 patients were treated with TENS; and in G2 (without TENS) electrodes were placed but the equipment was not turned on. TENS was maintained for one hour. The visual analogue scale was used to evaluate the analgesic effects on three moments: before TENS (M0), immediately after TENS (M1), and one hour later (M2), with the patient at rest, elevation of the upper limbs, change in decubitus, and coughing. The intensity of pain at rest was higher in G2 immediately after TENS, but not one hour after the procedure. There was no difference between both groups with elevation of the upper limbs, decubitus change, and coughing. With the use of TENS for one hour on the second post-thoracotomy day in patients who received fentanyl (50 μg) associated with bupivacaine (5 mL), a reduction in pain intensity was observed at rest immediately after TENS; with elevation of the upper limbs, change in decubitus, and coughing, a reduction in pain severity was not observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Hypnosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-02

    Limbs Arthrosis; Non Arthrosic Limbs Arthralgia; Chronic Lomboradiculalgia; Chronic Back Pain; Cervical Radiculopathy; Post-herpetic Neuralgia; Post-surgical Peripheral Neuropathic Pain; Post Trauma Neuropathic Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I or II; Tendinopathy

  11. Designing electrical stimulated bioreactors for nerve tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagita, Ignasius Dwi; Whulanza, Yudan; Dhelika, Radon; Nurhadi, Ibrahim

    2018-02-01

    Bioreactor provides a biomimetic ecosystem that is able to culture cells in a physically controlled system. In general, the controlled-parameters are temperature, pH, fluid flow, nutrition flow, etc. In this study, we develop a bioreactor that specifically targeted to culture neural stem cells. This bioreactor could overcome some limitations of conventional culture technology, such as petri dish, by providing specific range of observation area and a uniform treatment. Moreover, the microfluidic bioreactor, which is a small-controlled environment, is able to observe as small number of cells as possible. A perfusion flow is applied to mimic the physiological environment in human body. Additionally, this bioreactor also provides an electrical stimulation which is needed by neural stem cells. In conclusion, we found the correlation between the induced shear stress with geometric parameters of the bioreactor. Ultimately, this system shall be used to observe the interaction between stimulation and cell growth.

  12. Bio-robots automatic navigation with electrical reward stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Zhang, Xinlu; Zheng, Nenggan; Chen, Weidong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    Bio-robots that controlled by outer stimulation through brain computer interface (BCI) suffer from the dependence on realtime guidance of human operators. Current automatic navigation methods for bio-robots focus on the controlling rules to force animals to obey man-made commands, with animals' intelligence ignored. This paper proposes a new method to realize the automatic navigation for bio-robots with electrical micro-stimulation as real-time rewards. Due to the reward-seeking instinct and trial-and-error capability, bio-robot can be steered to keep walking along the right route with rewards and correct its direction spontaneously when rewards are deprived. In navigation experiments, rat-robots learn the controlling methods in short time. The results show that our method simplifies the controlling logic and realizes the automatic navigation for rat-robots successfully. Our work might have significant implication for the further development of bio-robots with hybrid intelligence.

  13. Nonparametric Model of Smooth Muscle Force Production During Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cole, Marc; Eikenberry, Steffen; Kato, Takahide; Sandler, Roman A; Yamashiro, Stanley M; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2017-03-01

    A nonparametric model of smooth muscle tension response to electrical stimulation was estimated using the Laguerre expansion technique of nonlinear system kernel estimation. The experimental data consisted of force responses of smooth muscle to energy-matched alternating single pulse and burst current stimuli. The burst stimuli led to at least a 10-fold increase in peak force in smooth muscle from Mytilus edulis, despite the constant energy constraint. A linear model did not fit the data. However, a second-order model fit the data accurately, so the higher-order models were not required to fit the data. Results showed that smooth muscle force response is not linearly related to the stimulation power.

  14. Technical Rebuilding of Movement Function Using Functional Electrical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gföhler, Margit

    To rebuild lost movement functions, neuroprostheses based on functional electrical stimulation (FES) artificially activate skeletal muscles in corresponding sequences, using both residual body functions and artificial signals for control. Besides the functional gain, FES training also brings physiological and psychological benefits for spinal cord-injured subjects. In this chapter, current stimulation technology and the main components of FES-based neuroprostheses including enhanced control systems are presented. Technology and application of FES cycling and rowing, both approaches that enable spinal cord-injured subjects to participate in mainstream activities and improve their health and fitness by exercising like able-bodied subjects, are discussed in detail, and an overview of neuroprostheses that aim at restoring movement functions for daily life as walking or grasping is given.

  15. Electromyographic control of functional electrical stimulation in selected patients.

    PubMed

    Graupe, D; Kohn, K H; Basseas, S; Naccarato, E

    1984-07-01

    The paper describes initial results of above-lesion electromyographic (EMG) controlled functional electrical stimulation (FES) of paraplegics. Such controlled stimulation is to provide upper-motor-neuron paraplegics (T5 to T12) with self-controlled standing and some walking without braces and with only the help of walkers or crutches. The above-lesion EMG signal employed serves to map the posture of the patient's upper trunk via a computerized mapping of the temporal patterns of that EMG. Such control also has an inherent safety feature in that it prevents the patient from performing a lower-limb movement via FES unless his trunk posture is adequate. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Chronic Neuropathic and Non-Cancerous Pain

    PubMed Central

    Plow, EB; Pascual-Leone, A; Machado, A

    2012-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is one of the most prevalent and debilitating disorders. Conventional medical management, however, remains frustrating for both patients and clinicians owing to poor specificity of pharmacotherapy, delayed-onset of analgesia and extensive side-effects. Neuromodulation presents as a promising alternative, or at least an adjunct, as it is more specific in inducing analgesia without associated risks of pharmacotherapy. Here, we discuss common clinical and investigational methods of neuromodulation. Compared to clinical spinal cord stimulation (SCS), investigational techniques of cerebral neuromodulation, both invasive [deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortical stimulation (MCS)] and noninvasive [repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)], may be more advantageous. By adaptively targeting the multi-dimensional experience of pain, subtended by integrative pain circuitry in the brain, including somatosensory and thalamocortical, limbic and cognitive, cerebral methods may modulate the sensory-discriminative, affective-emotional and evaluative-cognitive spheres of the pain neuromatrix. Despite promise, the current state of results alludes to the possibility that cerebral neuromodulation has thus far not been effective in producing analgesia as intended in patients with chronic pain disorders. These techniques, thus, remain investigational and off-label. We discuss issues implicated in inadequate efficacy, variability of responsiveness and poor retention of benefit, while recommending design and conceptual refinements for future trials of cerebral neuromodulation in management of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:22484179

  17. Spinal cord stimulation to abort painful spasms of atypical stiff limb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ughratdar, I; Sivakumar, G; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Stiff limb syndrome (SLS) is a rare chronic condition which can result in significant debility. We report the case of a 44-year-old man suffering from severe painful spasms in his right leg with a diagnosis of SLS. He had been initially treated for his pain with a spinal cord stimulator but presented with exacerbation of pain secondary to a lead fracture for which he underwent revision of the stimulator. Postoperative programming unexpectedly resulted in not only control of his pain but also an ability to abort his spasmodic episodes related to SLS. To our knowledge, spinal cord stimulation has not been previously used for SLS and our report opens up another avenue for this rare condition. We provide a brief overview of SLS and propose an underlying mechanism for the observed phenomenon.

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves pain in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellaprat, Jean; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Canivet, Cindy; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Radji, Fatai; Arbus, Christophe; Gerdelat, Angélique; Chaynes, Patrick; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic pain is a common symptom which markedly affects the quality of life. Some physiological arguments proposed that Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN-DBS) could improve pain in PD. We investigated in 58 PD patients the effect of STN-DBS on pain using the short McGill Pain Questionnaire and other pain parameters such as the Bodily discomfort subscore of the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire 39 and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale section II (UPDRS II) item 17. All pain scores were significantly improved 12 months after STN-DBS. This improvement was not correlated with motor improvement, depression scores or L-Dopa reduction. STN-DBS induced a substantial beneficial effect on pain in PD, independently of its motor effects and mood status of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Muscle Impairment: Critical Review and Recommendations for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Pamela; Anthony, Joseph; Rennie, Sandy; Shay, Barbara L.; Hoens, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In response to requests from physiotherapists for guidance on optimal stimulation of muscle using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), a review, synthesis, and extraction of key data from the literature was undertaken by six Canadian physical therapy (PT) educators, clinicians, and researchers in the field of electrophysical agents. The objective was to identify commonly treated conditions for which there was a substantial body of literature from which to draw conclusions regarding the effectiveness of NMES. Included studies had to apply NMES with visible and tetanic muscle contractions. Method: Four electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, PUBMED, and SCOPUS) were searched for relevant literature published between database inceptions until May 2015. Additional articles were identified from bibliographies of the systematic reviews and from personal collections. Results: The extracted data were synthesized using a consensus process among the authors to provide recommendations for optimal stimulation parameters and application techniques to address muscle impairments associated with the following conditions: stroke (upper or lower extremity; both acute and chronic), anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, patellofemoral pain syndrome, knee osteoarthritis, and total knee arthroplasty as well as critical illness and advanced disease states. Summaries of key details from each study incorporated into the review were also developed. The final sections of the article outline the recommended terminology for describing practice using electrical currents and provide tips for safe and effective clinical practice using NMES. Conclusion: This article provides physiotherapists with a resource to enable evidence-informed, effective use of NMES for PT practice. PMID:29162949

  20. Response of Combined Electrical Stimulation and Biodegradable Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    C 5044 /1/2 N ANC A~DF’N 1111111.01=L6 MICROCOP REOUIO" ET HR NAIOA BREUOFSTN 193 A’’ Report Number 7 RESPOSE OF COMBINED ELECTRICAL STIMULATION AND...past ten years. U In most all reports, the TCP has demonstrated good biocompatibility, which has resulted in these types of compounds being introduced...the same for all soecimens and the compound was not osteooenic. Some concerns have develooed about residues of TCP within bone lesion sites when large

  1. Neuronal excitability level transition induced by electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florence, G.; Kurths, J.; Machado, B. S.; Fonoff, E. T.; Cerdeira, H. A.; Teixeira, M. J.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    In experimental studies, electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied to induce neuronal activity or to disrupt pathological patterns. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of these activity pattern transitions are not clear. To study these phenomena, we simulated a model of the hippocampal region CA1. The computational simulations using different amplitude levels and duration of ES revealed three states of neuronal excitability: burst-firing mode, depolarization block and spreading depression wave. We used the bifurcation theory to analyse the interference of ES in the cellular excitability and the neuronal dynamics. Understanding this process would help to improve the ES techniques to control some neurological disorders.

  2. Visualizing Simulated Electrical Fields from Electroencephalography and Transcranial Electric Brain Stimulation: A Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Dannhauer, Moritz; Hlawitschka, Mario; Brooks, Dana; Knösche, Thomas R.; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2014-01-01

    Electrical activity of neuronal populations is a crucial aspect of brain activity. This activity is not measured directly but recorded as electrical potential changes using head surface electrodes (electroencephalogram - EEG). Head surface electrodes can also be deployed to inject electrical currents in order to modulate brain activity (transcranial electric stimulation techniques) for therapeutic and neuroscientific purposes. In electroencephalography and noninvasive electric brain stimulation, electrical fields mediate between electrical signal sources and regions of interest (ROI). These fields can be very complicated in structure, and are influenced in a complex way by the conductivity profile of the human head. Visualization techniques play a central role to grasp the nature of those fields because such techniques allow for an effective conveyance of complex data and enable quick qualitative and quantitative assessments. The examination of volume conduction effects of particular head model parameterizations (e.g., skull thickness and layering), of brain anomalies (e.g., holes in the skull, tumors), location and extent of active brain areas (e.g., high concentrations of current densities) and around current injecting electrodes can be investigated using visualization. Here, we evaluate a number of widely used visualization techniques, based on either the potential distribution or on the current-flow. In particular, we focus on the extractability of quantitative and qualitative information from the obtained images, their effective integration of anatomical context information, and their interaction. We present illustrative examples from clinically and neuroscientifically relevant cases and discuss the pros and cons of the various visualization techniques. PMID:24821532

  3. Central noradrenergic mechanisms and the acute stress response during painful stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C Richard; Bradshaw, David H; Donaldson, Gary W; Jacobson, Robert C; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Events that threaten tissue integrity including noxious stimulation activate central noradrenergic circuits, particularly locus coeruleus and its projections. Recent advances in theory hold that an adaptive, defensive shift in brain activity takes place in response to threat. In principle, this shift may accentuate the autonomic and central biomarkers of the perception of painful events and the experience of pain itself. We have examined the effects of an alpha-2 agonist on pupil dilation responses, skin conductance responses, near field somatosensory evoked potentials and pain reports in normal volunteers undergoing repeated trials of painful fingertip stimulation delivered at low, medium and high intensities. In a double-blinded study, 114 healthy male and female volunteers underwent repeated noxious stimulation under baseline, placebo and active drug conditions where the active drug was the alpha-2 agonist tizanidine 4 mg. In contrast to baseline and placebo conditions, tizanidine 4 mg significantly reduced the magnitudes of the mean pupil dilation response, the mean skin conductance response, the mean near field somatosensory evoked potential peak-to-peak amplitude and the mean pain intensity rating. Stimulus intensity significantly altered all three biomarkers and the pain report in a graded fashion. There were no sex differences. These findings support the hypotheses that painful events activate central noradrenergic circuits, and that these circuits play a role in the autonomic and central arousal associated with pain. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Occipital Nerve Field Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Normalizes Imbalance Between Pain Detecting and Pain Inhibitory Pathways in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Occipital nerve field (OCF) stimulation with subcutaneously implanted electrodes is used to treat headaches, more generalized pain, and even failed back surgery syndrome via unknown mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can predict the efficacy of implanted electrodes. The purpose of this study is to unravel the neural mechanisms involved in global pain suppression, mediated by occipital nerve field stimulation, within the realm of fibromyalgia. Nineteen patients with fibromyalgia underwent a placebo-controlled OCF tDCS. Electroencephalograms were recorded at baseline after active and sham stimulation. In comparison with healthy controls, patients with fibromyalgia demonstrate increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, increased premotor/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity, and an imbalance between pain-detecting dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pain-suppressing pregenual anterior cingulate cortex activity, which is normalized after active tDCS but not sham stimulation associated with increased pregenual anterior cingulate cortex activation. The imbalance improvement between the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is related to clinical changes. An imbalance assumes these areas communicate and, indeed, abnormal functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex is noted to be caused by a dysfunctional effective connectivity from the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, which improves and normalizes after real tDCS but not sham tDCS. In conclusion, OCF tDCS exerts its effect via activation of the descending pain inhibitory pathway and de-activation of the salience network, both of which are abnormal in fibromyalgia.

  5. Postural stability is altered by the stimulation of pain but not warm receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Corbeil, Philippe; Teasdale, Normand

    2003-10-17

    It is now recognized that large diameter myelinated afferents provide the primary source of lower limb proprioceptive information for maintaining an upright standing position. Small diameter afferents transmitting noxious stimuli, however, can also influence motor behaviors. Despite the possible influence of pain on motor behaviors, the effects of pain on the postural control system have not been well documented. Two cutaneous heat stimulations (experiment 1: non-noxious 40 degrees C; experiment 2: noxious 45 degrees C) were applied bilaterally on the calves of the subject with two thermal grills to stimulate A delta and C warm receptors and nociceptors in order to examine their effects on postural stability. The non-noxious stimulation induced a gentle sensation of warmth and the noxious stimulation induced a perception of heat pain (visual analogue scores of 0 and 46 mm, respectively). For both experiments, ten healthy young adults were tested with and without heat stimulations of the lower limbs while standing upright on a force platform with eyes open, eyes closed and eyes closed with tendon co-vibration of tibialis anterior and triceps surae muscles. The center of pressure displacements were analyzed to examine how both stimulations affected the regulation of quiet standing and if the effects were exacerbated when vision was removed or ankle proprioception perturbed. The stimulation of the warm receptors (40 degrees C) did not induce any postural deterioration. With pain (45 degrees C), subjects showed a significant increase in standard deviation, range and mean velocity of postural oscillations as well as standard deviation of the center of pressure velocity. The effects of heat pain were exacerbated when subjects had both their eyes closed and ankle tendons vibrated (increased standard deviation of the center of pressure velocity and mean velocity of the center of pressure). A non-noxious stimulation (40 degrees C) of the small diameter afferents is not a

  6. Relationships between the intensity and duration of Peltier heat stimulation and pain magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Vierck, Charles J.; Mauderli, Andre P.; Riley, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Ramp-and-hold heat stimulation with a Peltier thermode is a standard procedure for quantitative sensory testing of human pain sensitivity. Because myelinated and unmyelinated nociceptive afferents respond preferentially to changing and steady temperatures, respectively, ramp-and-hold heat stimulation could assess processing of input from A-delta nociceptors early and C nociceptors late during prolonged thermal stimulation. In order to evaluate the progression from dynamic change to a steady temperature during prolonged Peltier stimulation, recordings of temperatures at the probe-skin interface were obtained. First, recordings of temperature during contact-and-hold stimulation (solenoid powered delivery of a preheated thermode to the skin) provided an evaluation of heat dissipation from the beginning of stimulation, uncontaminated by ramping. The heat sink effect lasted up to 8 sec. and accounted in part for substantial increases in pain intensity as a combined function of durations from 1–16 sec. and stimulus intensities from 43°C to 59°. Recordings during longer periods of stimulation showed that Peltier stimulation generated feedback oscillations in temperature for up to 75 sec that were tracked by subjects’ continuous ratings of pain. During 120 sec. trials, sensitization of pain was observed over 45 seconds after the oscillations subsided. In contrast, sensitization was not observed during 130.5 sec. of stimulation with alternately increasing and decreasing temperatures that maintained a target eVAS rating of 35. Thus, long duration stimulation can be utilized to evaluate sensitization, presumably of C nociception, when not disrupted by oscillations inherent to feedback control of Peltier stimulation. PMID:23423165

  7. Relationships between the intensity and duration of Peltier heat stimulation and pain magnitude.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Mauderli, Andre P; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-03-01

    Ramp-and-hold heat stimulation with a Peltier thermode is a standard procedure for quantitative sensory testing of human pain sensitivity. Because myelinated and unmyelinated nociceptive afferents respond preferentially to changing and steady temperatures, respectively, ramp-and-hold heat stimulation could assess processing of input from A-delta nociceptors early and C nociceptors late during prolonged thermal stimulation. In order to evaluate the progression from dynamic change to a steady temperature during prolonged Peltier stimulation, recordings of temperatures at the probe-skin interface were obtained. First, recordings of temperature during contact-and-hold stimulation (solenoid powered delivery of a preheated thermode to the skin) provided an evaluation of heat dissipation from the beginning of stimulation, uncontaminated by ramping. The heat-sink effect lasted up to 8 s and accounted in part for a slow increase in pain intensity for stimulus durations of 1-16 s and stimulus intensities of 43-59 °C. Recordings during longer periods of stimulation showed that feedback-controlled Peltier stimulation generated oscillations in temperature that were tracked for up to 75 s by subjects' continuous ratings of pain. During 120-s trials, sensitization of pain was observed over 45 s after the oscillations subsided. Thus, long-duration stimulation can be utilized to evaluate sensitization, presumably of C nociception, when not disrupted by oscillations in thermode temperature (e.g., those inherent to feedback control of Peltier stimulation). In contrast, sensitization was not observed during 130.5 s of stimulation with alternately increasing and decreasing temperatures that repeatedly activated A-delta nociceptors.

  8. Dynamic Pain Phenotypes are Associated with Spinal Cord Stimulation-Induced Reduction in Pain: A Repeated Measures Observational Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Buenaver, Luis F; Raja, Srinivasa N; Kiley, Kasey B; Swedberg, Lauren J; Wacnik, Paul W; Cohen, Steven P; Erdek, Michael A; Williams, Kayode A; Christo, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has become a widely used treatment option for a variety of pain conditions. Substantial variability exists in the degree of benefit obtained from SCS and patient selection is a topic of expanding interest and importance. However, few studies have examined the potential benefits of dynamic quantitative sensory testing (QST) to develop objective measures of SCS outcomes or as a predictive tool to help patient selection. Psychological characteristics have been shown to play an important role in shaping individual differences in the pain experience and may aid in predicting responses to SCS. Static laboratory pain-induction measures have also been examined in their capacity for predicting SCS outcomes. The current study evaluated clinical, psychological and laboratory pain measures at baseline, during trial SCS lead placement, as well as 1 month and 3 months following permanent SCS implantation in chronic pain patients who received SCS treatment. Several QST measures were conducted, with specific focus on examination of dynamic models (central sensitization and conditioned pain modulation [CPM]) and their association with pain outcomes 3 months post SCS implantation. Results suggest few changes in QST over time. However, central sensitization and CPM at baseline were significantly associated with clinical pain at 3 months following SCS implantation, controlling for psycho/behavioral factors and pain at baseline. Specifically, enhanced central sensitization and reduced CPM were associated with less self-reported pain 3 months following SCS implantation. These findings suggest a potentially important role for dynamic pain assessment in individuals undergoing SCS, and hint at potential mechanisms through which SCS may impart its benefit. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Differential effects of bifrontal and occipital nerve stimulation on pain and fatigue using transcranial direct current stimulation in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    To, Wing Ting; James, Evan; Ost, Jan; Hart, John; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain frequently accompanied by other symptoms such as fatigue. Moderate improvement from pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments have proposed non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the occipital nerve (more specifically the C2 area) or to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as potential treatments. We aimed to explore the effectiveness of repeated sessions of tDCS (eight sessions) targeting the C2 area and DLPFC in reducing fibromyalgia symptoms, more specifically pain and fatigue. Forty-two fibromyalgia patients received either C2 tDCS, DLPFC tDCS or sham procedure (15 C2 tDCS-11 DLPFC tDCS-16 sham). All groups were treated with eight sessions (two times a week for 4 weeks). Our results show that repeated sessions of C2 tDCS significantly improved pain, but not fatigue, in fibromyalgia patients, whereas repeated sessions of DLPFC tDCS significantly improved pain as well as fatigue. This study shows that eight sessions of tDCS targeting the DLPFC have a more general relief in fibromyalgia patients than when targeting the C2 area, suggesting that stimulating different targets with eight sessions of tDCS can lead to benefits on different symptom dimensions of fibromyalgia.

  10. Improved Walking Claudication Distance with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: An Old Treatment with a New Indication in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Labrunée, Marc; Boned, Anne; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Jordan, Christian; Richard, Lisa; Garrigues, Damien; Gremeaux, Vincent; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Pathak, Atul; Guiraud, Thibaut

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether 45 mins of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation before exercise could delay pain onset and increase walking distance in peripheral artery disease patients. After a baseline assessment of the walking velocity that led to pain after 300 m, 15 peripheral artery disease patients underwent four exercise sessions in a random order. The patients had a 45-min transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation session with different experimental conditions: 80 Hz, 10 Hz, sham (presence of electrodes without stimulation), or control with no electrodes, immediately followed by five walking bouts on a treadmill until pain occurred. The patients were allowed to rest for 10 mins between each bout and had no feedback concerning the walking distance achieved. Total walking distance was significantly different between T10, T80, sham, and control (P < 0.0003). No difference was observed between T10 and T80, but T10 was different from sham and control. Sham, T10, and T80 were all different from control (P < 0.001). There was no difference between each condition for heart rate and blood pressure. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation immediately before walking can delay pain onset and increase walking distance in patients with class II peripheral artery disease, with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation of 10 Hz being the most effective.

  11. Models of the electrically stimulated binaural system: A review.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In an increasing number of countries, the standard treatment for deaf individuals is moving toward the implantation of two cochlear implants. Today's device technology and fitting procedure, however, appears as if the two implants would serve two independent ears and brains. Many experimental studies have demonstrated that after careful matching and balancing of left and right stimulation in controlled laboratory studies most patients have almost normal sensitivity to interaural level differences and some sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs). Mechanisms underlying the limited ITD sensitivity are still poorly understood and many different aspects may contribute. Recent pioneering computational approaches identified some of the functional implications the electric input imposes on the neural brainstem circuits. Simultaneously these studies have raised new questions and certainly demonstrated that further refinement of the model stages is necessary. They join the experimental study's conclusions that binaural device technology, binaural fitting, specific speech coding strategies, and binaural signal processing algorithms are obviously missing components to maximize the benefit of bilateral implantation. Within this review, the existing models of the electrically stimulated binaural system are explained, compared, and discussed from a viewpoint of a "CI device with auditory system" and from that of neurophysiological research.

  12. Muscular urinary sphincter: electrically stimulated myoplasty for functional sphincter reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palacio, M M; Van Aalst, V C; Perez Abadia, G A; Stremel, R W; Werker, P M; Ren, X; Petty, G D; Heilman, S J; Van Savage, J G; Garcia Fernandez, A; Kon, M; Tobin, G R; Barker, J H

    1998-11-01

    To reconstruct an electrically stimulated muscular urinary sphincter (MUS) using a tailored gracilis muscle free flap with intact nerve. Unilateral surgically tailored gracilis muscle free flaps were transferred into the pelvis in eight dogs, leaving the obturator nerve intact. The muscle's pedicle vessels were anastomosed to the inferior epigastric artery and vein in the pelvis and the muscle was wrapped around the bladder neck. Electrodes were inserted into the MUS and connected to a programmable pulse generator. After 8 weeks of training the MUS, the pulse generator was programmed to be "on" for 4 hours and "off' for 15 minutes in a continuous cycle. Urodynamic studies were performed periodically, and at the end of the experiment the MUS and proximal urethra were harvested for histology. Three control dogs had sham operations. All MUS's functioned well following the procedure. Histology of the MUS/urethra complex showed no evidence of stricture. Except for one dog, all urethras were easily catheterized. This electrically stimulated innervated free-flap MUS technique effectively increases bladder outlet resistance without producing urethral obstruction.

  13. Contralaterally Controlled Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Recovery of Ankle Dorsiflexion

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Hansen, Kristine; Nagy, Jennifer; Bailey, Stephanie N.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Sheffler, Lynne R.; Chae, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective Compare the effects of contralaterally controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CCNMES) versus cyclic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on lower extremity impairment, functional ambulation, and gait characteristics. Design Twenty-six stroke survivors with chronic (≥6mo) footdrop during ambulation were randomly assigned to six weeks of CCNMES or cyclic NMES. Both groups had ten sessions per week of self-administered home application of either CCNMES or cyclic NMES plus two sessions per week of gait training with a physical therapist. Primary outcomes included lower extremity Fugl-Meyer score, modified Emory Functional Ambulation Profile, and gait velocity. Assessments were made at pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Results There were no significant differences between groups in the outcome trajectories for any of the measures. With data from both groups pooled, there were significant but modest and sustained improvements in the Fugl-Meyer score and the modified Emory Functional Ambulation Profile, but not in gait velocity. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that gait training combined with either CCNMES or cyclic NMES reduces lower extremity impairment and functional ambulation, but do not support the hypothesis that CCNMES is more effective than cyclic NMES in chronic patients. PMID:23867888

  14. Microcurrent Point Stimulation Applied to Lower Back Acupuncture Points for the Treatment of Nonspecific Neck Pain.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kelly; Gokal, Raman; Chevalier, Antoine; Todorsky, William; Lim, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Although acupuncture and microcurrent are widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to their therapeutic value for neck pain. We aimed to determine the effect size of microcurrent applied to lower back acupuncture points to assess the impact on the neck pain. This was a cohort analysis of treatment outcomes pre- and postmicrocurrent stimulation, involving 34 patients with a history of nonspecific chronic neck pain. Consenting patients were enrolled from a group of therapists attending educational seminars and were asked to report pain levels pre-post and 48 hours after a single MPS application. Direct current microcurrent point stimulation (MPS) applied to standardized lower back acupuncture protocol points was used. Evaluations entailed a baseline visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale assessment, using a VAS, which was repeated twice after therapy, once immediately postelectrotherapy and again after a 48-h follow-up period. All 34 patients received a single MPS session. Results were analyzed using paired t tests. Results and Outcomes: Pain intensity showed an initial statistically significant reduction of 68% [3.9050 points; 95% CI (2.9480, 3.9050); p = 0.0001], in mean neck pain levels after standard protocol treatment, when compared to initial pain levels. There was a further statistically significant reduction of 35% in mean neck pain levels at 48 h when compared to pain levels immediately after standard protocol treatment [0.5588 points; 95% CI (0.2001, 0.9176); p = 0.03], for a total average pain relief of 80%. The positive results in this study could have applications for those patients impacted by chronic neck pain.

  15. Brain Stimulation Therapy