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Sample records for pair coulomb interaction

  1. Coulomb interactions and fermion condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.; Cutkosky, R.E.; Joensen, M.A. ); Wang, K.C. )

    1990-08-15

    The influence of the Coulomb interaction in states containing massless and flavorless fermion-antifermion pairs is studied, using a continuum formulation within the finite volume {ital S}{sup 3}. Several different forms for the Coulomb interaction are examined, including confining potentials as well as nonconfining potentials. The calculations show that if the interaction is strong enough, the Coulomb interaction leads to condensation of pairs, and that this condensation has a chiral character. The condensation does not depend on whether the interaction is confining. It is found that simplified variational approximations are not accurate enough for an adequate description of the states.

  2. Coulomb Bound States of Strongly Interacting Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, M. J.; Bienias, P.; Choi, S.; Martin, I.; Firstenberg, O.; Lukin, M. D.; Büchler, H. P.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. This interaction gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasibound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb potential, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. Under certain conditions, the wave function resembles that of a diatomic molecule in which the two polaritons are separated by a finite "bond length." These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, allowing for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowly decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms.

  3. Existence and consequences of Coulomb pairing of electrons in a solid

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M.; Thyagaraja, A.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown from first principles that, in the periodic potential of a crystalline solid, short-range (i.e., screened) binary Coulomb interactions can lead to a two-electron bound state. It is further suggested that these composite bosonic states (charge -2e, and typically spin zero) could mediate an effectively attractive interaction between pairs of conduction electrons close to the Fermi level. This necessarily short range attractive interaction, which is crucially dependent on the band structure of the solid, and is complementary to the phonon-mediated one, may provide a source for the existence and properties of short correlation-length electron pairs (analogous to but distinct from Cooper pairs) needed to understand high temperature superconductivity. Several distinctive and observable characteristics of the proposed pairing scheme are discussed.

  4. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiokawa, T.; Takada, Y.; Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y.; Muraguchi, M.; Endoh, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  5. Ferroelectric instability under screened Coulomb interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohui; Burton, J D; Jaswal, Sitaram S; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y

    2012-12-14

    We explore the effect of charge carrier doping on ferroelectricity using density functional calculations and phenomenological modeling. By considering a prototypical ferroelectric material, BaTiO(3), we demonstrate that ferroelectric displacements are sustained up to the critical concentration of 0.11 electron per unit cell volume. This result is consistent with experimental observations and reveals that the ferroelectric phase and conductivity can coexist. Our investigations show that the ferroelectric instability requires only a short-range portion of the Coulomb force with an interaction range of the order of the lattice constant. These results provide a new insight into the origin of ferroelectricity in displacive ferroelectrics and open opportunities for using doped ferroelectrics in novel electronic devices. PMID:23368377

  6. Electron-pair excitations and the molecular Coulomb continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James

    2009-01-01

    Electron-pair excitations in the molecular hydrogen continuum are described by quantizing rotations of the momentum plane of the electron pair about by the pair's relative momentum. A helium-like description of the molecular pi.Joto double ionization is thus extended to higher angular momenta of the electron pair. A simple three-state superposition is found to account surprisingly well for recent observations of noncoplanar electron-pair, molecular-axis angular distributions.

  7. Dynamical interactions of galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    1990-01-01

    Here the author briefly reviews the dynamics of sinking satellites and the effect of companions on elliptical galaxies. The author then discusses recent work on interacting disk systems, and finally focuses on a favorite interacting pair, NGC 5194/5195.

  8. Exchange Coulomb interaction in nanotubes: Dispersion of Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, P. A. Ivanov, A. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The microscopic derivation of the Coulomb exchange interaction for electrons located on the nanotubes is presented. The derivation is based on the many-particle quantum hydrodynamic method. We demonstrate the effect of curvature of the nanocylinders on the force of exchange interaction. We calculate corresponding dispersion dependencies for electron oscillations on the nanotubes.

  9. Coulomb Interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiments with Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Kan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effect of Coulomb interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) type experiments with electrons. HBT experiments deal with intensity interference, which is related to the second-order correlation function of the particle field. This is an extension of the usual amplitude interference experiment, such as Young's…

  10. Interplay of Coulomb interaction and spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, Jörg; Linneweber, Thorben; Löw, Ute; Anders, Frithjof B.; Gebhard, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We employ the Gutzwiller variational approach to investigate the interplay of Coulomb interaction and spin-orbit coupling in a three-orbital Hubbard model. Already in the paramagnetic phase we find a substantial renormalization of the spin-orbit coupling that enters the effective single-particle Hamiltonian for the quasiparticles. Only close to half band-filling and for sizable Coulomb interaction do we observe clear signatures of Hund's atomic rules for spin, orbital, and total angular momentum. For a finite local Hund's rule exchange interaction we find a ferromagnetically ordered state. The spin-orbit coupling considerably reduces the size of the ordered moment, it generates a small ordered orbital moment, and it induces a magnetic anisotropy. To investigate the magnetic anisotropy energy, we use an external magnetic field that tilts the magnetic moment away from the easy axis (1 ,1 ,1 ) .

  11. Electron interactions in graphene through an effective Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Joao N. B.; Adam, Shaffique

    A recent numerical work [H.-K. Tang et al, PRL 115, 186602 (2015)] considering graphene's π-electrons interacting through an effective Coulomb potential that is finite at short-distances, stressed the importance of the sp2 -electrons in determining the semimetal to Mott insulator phase transition in graphene. Some years ago, I. F. Herbut [PRL 97, 146401 (2006)] studied such a transition by mapping graphene's π-electrons into a Gross-Neveu model. From a different perspective, D. T. Son [PRB 75, 235423 (2007)] put the emphasis on the long-range interactions by modelling graphene as Dirac fermions interacting through a bare Coulomb potential. Here we build on these works and explore the phase diagram of Dirac fermions interacting through an effective Coulomb-like potential screened at short-distances. The interaction potential used allows for analytic results that controllably switch between the two perspectives above. This work was supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01 and CA2DM medium-sized centre program) and by the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College (R-607-265-01312).

  12. Stationary entanglement between two nanomechanical oscillators induced by Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wu; Yin, Xiao; Zhi-Ming, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling two nanomechanical oscillators by Coulomb interaction in an optomechanical system. We find that the steady-state entanglement of two charged nanomechanical oscillators can be obtained when the coupling between them is stronger than a critical value which relies on the detuning. Remarkably, the degree of entanglement can be controlled by the Coulomb interaction and the frequencies of the two charged oscillators. Project supported by the Major Research Plan of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91121023), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61378012, 60978009, and 11574092), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20124407110009), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CBA00200 and 2013CB921804), and the Program for Changjiang Scholar and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT1243).

  13. Coulomb interactions in sharp tip pulsed photo field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ben; Kruit, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Photofield emitters show great potential for many single electron pulsed applications. However, for the brightest pulses > 10 11 A / ( m 2 sr V ) , our simulations show that Poisson statistics and stochastic Coulomb interactions limit the brightness and increase the energy spread even with an average of a single electron per pulse. For the systems, we study we find that the energy spread is probably the limiting factor for most applications.

  14. A nonlinear Bloch model for Coulomb interaction in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bidegaray-Fesquet, Brigitte Keita, Kole

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we first derive a Coulomb Hamiltonian for electron–electron interaction in quantum dots in the Heisenberg picture. Then we use this Hamiltonian to enhance a Bloch model, which happens to be nonlinear in the density matrix. The coupling with Maxwell equations in case of interaction with an electromagnetic field is also considered from the Cauchy problem point of view. The study is completed by numerical results and a discussion about the advisability of neglecting intra-band coherences, as is done in part of the literature.

  15. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands. PMID:24722427

  16. Coulomb-enhanced superconducting pair correlations and paired-electron liquid in the frustrated quarter-filled band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Niladri; De Silva, W. Wasanthi; Dutta, Tirthankar; Clay, R. Torsten; Mazumdar, S.

    2016-04-01

    A necessary condition for superconductivity (SC) driven by electron correlations is that electron-electron (e-e) interactions enhance superconducting pair-pair correlations, relative to the noninteracting limit. We report high-precision numerical calculations of the ground state on four different finite lattices of up to 100 sites within the frustrated two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard Hamiltonian for a wide range of carrier concentration ρ (0 <ρ <1 ). The average long-range pair-pair correlation for each cluster is enhanced by Hubbard U only for ρ ≈0.5 . At all other fillings e-e interactions mostly suppress pair correlations. Our work provides a key ingredient to the mechanism of SC in the 2D organic charge-transfer solids and many other unconventional superconductors with frustrated crystal lattices and ρ ≃0.5 .

  17. Quantum mechanics of Drude oscillators with full Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, M.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2016-09-01

    Drude oscillators provide a harmonic description of charge fluctuations and are widely studied as a model system and for ab initio calculations. In the dipole approximation the Hamiltonian describing the interaction of Drudes is quadratic, so it can be diagonalized exactly, but the energy diverges at short range. Here we consider the quantum mechanics of Drude oscillators interacting through the full Coulombic Hamiltonian for which the interaction energy does not have this defect. This protypical model for interactions between matter includes electrostatics, induction, and dispersion. Potential energy curves for rare-gas dimers are very closely matched by Drude correlation energies plus a single exponential function. The exact and accurate results presented here help to delineate between the basic properties of the physical model and the effects that arise from the dipole approximation.

  18. Mechanical model of the Lorentz force and Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyev, Valery

    2008-09-01

    The centripetal and Coriolis accelerations experienced by a cart traveling over a rotating turntable are usually calculated proceeding from the known kinematics of the problem. Respective forces can be regarded as due to the entrainment of the cart in the moving solid environs. We extend the approach to the general case of a particle entrained in the flow of the surrounding medium. The expression for the driving force on the particle obtained from the kinematics of the entrainment prescribed appears to be isomorphic to the Lorentz and Coulomb force on a positive electric charge. The inverse direction of the electromagnetic force on a negative charge implies that a growing applied flow induces the upstream motion of the particle. A possible microscopic mechanism for it may be the Magnus force dynamics of a kink in a vortex tangle. The loop on a straight vortex filament can be taken as a model of the electron, the loop with a cavitation models the positron. The Lorentz force is concerned with the Coriolis acceleration. The Coulomb interaction is due to the centripetal or centrifugal force that arises in the turbophoresis of the kink in the perturbation field generated in the medium by the center of pressure.

  19. The generalized Coulomb interactions for relativistic scalar bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrinkamar, S.; Panahi, H.; Rezaei, M.

    2016-07-01

    Approximate analytical solutions of Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) equation are obtained for the truncated Coulomb, generalized Cornell, Richardson and Song-Lin potentials via the quasi-exact analytical ansatz approach.

  20. Resonance tuning due to Coulomb interaction in strong near-field coupled metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-07-14

    Coulomb's law is one of the most fundamental laws of physics that describes the electrostatic interaction between two like or unlike point charges. Here, we experimentally observe a strong effect of Coulomb interaction in tightly coupled terahertz metamaterials where the split-ring resonator dimers in a unit cell are coupled through their near fields across the capacitive split gaps. Using a simple analytical model, we evaluated the Coulomb parameter that switched its sign from negative to positive values indicating the transition in the nature of Coulomb force from being repulsive to attractive depending upon the near field coupling between the split ring resonators. Apart from showing interesting effects in the strong coupling regime between meta-atoms, Coulomb interaction also allows an additional degree of freedom to achieve frequency tunable dynamic metamaterials.

  1. Interplay between Coulomb interaction and quantum interference in three-level resonant asymmetric double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Alsing, P. M.; Huang, D. H.; Cardimona, D. A.; Apostolova, T.

    2003-09-01

    A many-body density-matrix theory is derived by including quasiparticle renormalization of kinetic energy and dipole coupling to an external electromagnetic field, as well as the screening and quantum-interference effects. This theory is applied to a three-level resonant asymmetric double-quantum-well system in which the ground subband is coupled to the upper tunneling-split doublet by a strong external electromagnetic field. By using this theory, the quasiparticle energy-level separations and off-diagonal radiative-decay coupling rates, absorption coefficient, refractive-index function, and scaled subband electron density are calculated as functions of incident photon energy. The effects of quasiparticle renormalization on the quantum interference between a pair of optically induced polarizations are analyzed. The quantum interference is shown to be robust against the Coulomb-interaction effect in the mean-field approximation. The roles played by the dephasing rate and electron density are explained.

  2. Study of ultrasonic attenuation in f-electron systems in the paramagnetic limit of Coulomb interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shadangi, Asit Ku.; Rout, G. C.

    2015-05-15

    We report here a microscopic model study of ultrasonic attenuation in f-electron systems based on Periodic Anderson Model in which Coulomb interaction is considered within a mean-field approximation for a weak interaction. The Phonon is coupled to the conduction band and f-electrons. The phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique of the Green's function method. The temperature dependent ultrasonic attenuation co-efficient is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon self-energy in the dynamic and long wave length limit. The f-electron occupation number is calculated self-consistently in paramagnetic limit of Coulomb interaction. The effect of the Coulomb interaction on ultrasonic attenuation is studied by varying the phonon coupling parameters to the conduction and f-electrons, hybridization strength, the position of f-level and the Coulomb interaction Strength. Results are discussed on the basis of experimental results.

  3. Weak interaction rate Coulomb corrections in big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Christel J.; Fuller, George M.

    2010-03-15

    We have applied a fully relativistic Coulomb wave correction to the weak reactions in the full Kawano/Wagoner big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) code. We have also added the zero-temperature radiative correction. We find that using this higher accuracy Coulomb correction results in good agreement with previous work, giving only a modest {approx}0.04% increase in helium mass fraction over correction prescriptions applied previously in BBN calculations. We have calculated the effect of these corrections on other light element abundance yields in BBN, and we have studied these yields as functions of electron neutrino lepton number. This has allowed insights into the role of the weak neutron-proton interconversion processes in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We find that the lepton capture processes' contributions to this ratio are only second order in the Coulomb correction.

  4. Fermi Surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4}: Spin-Orbit and Anisotropic Coulomb Interaction Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoren; Gorelov, Evgeny; Sarvestani, Esmaeel; Pavarini, Eva

    2016-03-11

    The topology of the Fermi surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4} is well described by local-density approximation calculations with spin-orbit interaction, but the relative size of its different sheets is not. By accounting for many-body effects via dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the standard isotropic Coulomb interaction alone worsens or does not correct this discrepancy. In order to reproduce experiments, it is essential to account for the Coulomb anisotropy. The latter is small but has strong effects; it competes with the Coulomb-enhanced spin-orbit coupling and the isotropic Coulomb term in determining the Fermi surface shape. Its effects are likely sizable in other correlated multiorbital systems. In addition, we find that the low-energy self-energy matrix-responsible for the reshaping of the Fermi surface-sizably differs from the static Hartree-Fock limit. Finally, we find a strong spin-orbital entanglement; this supports the view that the conventional description of Cooper pairs via factorized spin and orbital part might not apply to Sr_{2}RuO_{4}. PMID:27015496

  5. Fermi Surface of Sr2 RuO4 : Spin-Orbit and Anisotropic Coulomb Interaction Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoren; Gorelov, Evgeny; Sarvestani, Esmaeel; Pavarini, Eva

    2016-03-01

    The topology of the Fermi surface of Sr2 RuO4 is well described by local-density approximation calculations with spin-orbit interaction, but the relative size of its different sheets is not. By accounting for many-body effects via dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the standard isotropic Coulomb interaction alone worsens or does not correct this discrepancy. In order to reproduce experiments, it is essential to account for the Coulomb anisotropy. The latter is small but has strong effects; it competes with the Coulomb-enhanced spin-orbit coupling and the isotropic Coulomb term in determining the Fermi surface shape. Its effects are likely sizable in other correlated multiorbital systems. In addition, we find that the low-energy self-energy matrix—responsible for the reshaping of the Fermi surface—sizably differs from the static Hartree-Fock limit. Finally, we find a strong spin-orbital entanglement; this supports the view that the conventional description of Cooper pairs via factorized spin and orbital part might not apply to Sr2 RuO4 .

  6. Collective modes in charge-density waves and long-range Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    1993-07-01

    We study theoretically the collective modes in charge-density waves in the presence of long-range Coulomb interaction. We find that earlier works by Takada and his collaborators are inadequate since they introduced inconsistent approximations in evaluating a variety of correlation functions. The amplitude mode is unaffected by the Coulomb interaction, while the phase mode splits into the phason with linear dispersion (i.e., acoustic mode) and the optical mode with an energy gap in the presence of the Coulomb interaction. In particular, we establish the temperature dependence of the phason velocity vφ. A comparison with recent neutron-scattering data on the phason velocity in the charge-density wave of a single crystal of blue bronze K0.3MoO3 indicates that mean-field theory which includes the long-range Coulomb interaction gives an excellent description of the observed phason velocity.

  7. Solution of two-body relativistic bound state equations with confining plus Coulomb interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maung, Khin Maung; Kahana, David E.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of meson spectroscopy have often employed a nonrelativistic Coulomb plus Linear Confining potential in position space. However, because the quarks in mesons move at an appreciable fraction of the speed of light, it is necessary to use a relativistic treatment of the bound state problem. Such a treatment is most easily carried out in momentum space. However, the position space Linear and Coulomb potentials lead to singular kernels in momentum space. Using a subtraction procedure we show how to remove these singularities exactly and thereby solve the Schroedinger equation in momentum space for all partial waves. Furthermore, we generalize the Linear and Coulomb potentials to relativistic kernels in four dimensional momentum space. Again we use a subtraction procedure to remove the relativistic singularities exactly for all partial waves. This enables us to solve three dimensional reductions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We solve six such equations for Coulomb plus Confining interactions for all partial waves.

  8. Probing the tides in interacting galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed spectroscopic and imaging observations of colliding elliptical galaxies revealed unmistakable diagnostic signatures of the tidal interactions. It is possible to compare both the distorted luminosity distributions and the disturbed internal rotation profiles with numerical simulations in order to model the strength of the tidal gravitational field acting within a given pair of galaxies. Using the best-fit numerical model, one can then measure directly the mass of a specific interacting binary system. This technique applies to individual pairs and therefore complements the classical methods of measuring the masses of galaxy pairs in well-defined statistical samples. The 'personalized' modeling of galaxy pairs also permits the derivation of each binary's orbit, spatial orientation, and interaction timescale. Similarly, one can probe the tides in less-detailed observations of disturbed galaxies in order to estimate some of the physical parameters for larger samples of interacting galaxy pairs. These parameters are useful inputs to the more universal problems of (1) the galaxy merger rate, (2) the strength and duration of the driving forces behind tidally stimulated phenomena (e.g., starbursts and maybe quasi steller objects), and (3) the identification of long-lived signatures of interaction/merger events.

  9. Strong-field S -matrix theory with final-state Coulomb interaction in all orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, F. H. M.

    2016-09-01

    During the last several decades the so-called Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss or strong-field approximation (SFA) has been highly useful for the analysis of atomic and molecular processes in intense laser fields. However, it is well known that SFA does not account for the final-state Coulomb interaction which is, however, unavoidable for the ubiquitous ionization process. In this Rapid Communication we solve this long-standing problem and give a complete strong-field S -matrix expansion that accounts for the final-state Coulomb interaction in all orders, explicitly.

  10. Nonlocal quantum state engineering with the Cooper pair splitter beyond the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, Ehud; Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Walter, Stefan; Schmidt, Thomas L.; Nigg, Simon E.

    2016-02-01

    A Cooper pair splitter consists of two quantum dots side-coupled to a conventional superconductor. Usually, the quantum dots are assumed to have a large charging energy compared to the superconducting gap, in order to suppress processes other than the coherent splitting of Cooper pairs. In this work, in contrast, we investigate the limit in which the charging energy is smaller than the superconducting gap. This allows us, in particular, to study the effect of a Zeeman field comparable to the charging energy. We find analytically that in this parameter regime the superconductor mediates an interdot tunneling term with a spin symmetry determined by the Zeeman field. Together with electrostatically tunable quantum dots, we show that this makes it possible to engineer a spin triplet state shared between the quantum dots. Compared to previous works, we thus extend the capabilities of the Cooper pair splitter to create entangled nonlocal electron pairs.

  11. Optimal Hubbard models for materials with nonlocal Coulomb interactions: graphene, silicene, and benzene.

    PubMed

    Schüler, M; Rösner, M; Wehling, T O; Lichtenstein, A I; Katsnelson, M I

    2013-07-19

    To understand how nonlocal Coulomb interactions affect the phase diagram of correlated electron materials, we report on a method to approximate a correlated lattice model with nonlocal interactions by an effective Hubbard model with on-site interactions U(*) only. The effective model is defined by the Peierls-Feynman-Bogoliubov variational principle. We find that the local part of the interaction U is reduced according to U(*)=U-V[over ¯], where V[over ¯] is a weighted average of nonlocal interactions. For graphene, silicene, and benzene we show that the nonlocal Coulomb interaction can decrease the effective local interaction by more than a factor of 2 in a wide doping range. PMID:23909346

  12. Assessing Paired Orals: Raters' Orientation to Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducasse, Ana Maria; Brown, Annie

    2009-01-01

    Speaking tasks involving peer-to-peer candidate interaction are increasingly being incorporated into language proficiency assessments, in both large-scale international testing contexts, and in smaller-scale, for example course-related, ones. This growth in the popularity and use of paired and group orals has stimulated research, particularly into…

  13. A critical phase induced by interplay of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook; Xu, Cenke; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon

    2013-03-01

    We study long range Coulomb interaction effect on the Luttinger Hamiltonian in three spatial dimensions, which describes strong spin orbit coupling intrinsically. The Hamiltonian has energy spectrum of inverted band gap semiconductors as in well-known HgTe; only one quadratic band touching point exists at the gamma point in Brillouin zone protected by the cubic and time reversal symmetries. Using controlled renormalization group techniques, we find that long-range Coulomb interaction converts the quadratic band touching state into a non-Fermi liquid (NFL) state, in some ways analogous to the Luttinger liquid state in one dimension. Consequently, all physical quantities become scale invariant and show deviations from non-interacting electrons' properties. Temperature and field dependence of various thermodynamic functions are obtained. Moreover, our ground state can be viewed as a parent state of topological insulators, magnetic metals, and Weyl semi-metals by breaking either cubic symmetry or time-reversal symmetry. The strong Coulomb interaction changes phase boundaries qualitatively and phase diagrams with the Coulomb interaction are provided. Applications to iridium-oxides materials are also discussed.

  14. Comment on ``Pairing interaction and Galilei invariance''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. M.; Gallardo, M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    1999-05-01

    A recent article by Dussel, Sofia, and Tonina studies the relation between Galilei invariance and dipole energy weighted sum rule (EWSR). The authors find that the pairing interaction, which is neither Galilei nor Lorentz invariant, produces big changes in the EWSR and in effective masses of the nucleons. They argue that these effects of the pairing force could be realistic. In this Comment we stress the validity of Galilei invariance to a very good approximation in this context of low-energy nuclear physics and show that the effective masses and the observed change in the EWSR for the electric dipole operator relative to its classical value are compatible with this symmetry.

  15. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Margine, E R; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-01-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8-8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. PMID:26892805

  16. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margine, E. R.; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-02-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8-8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets.

  17. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Margine, E. R.; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-01-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8–8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. PMID:26892805

  18. Testing refined shell-model interactions in the s d shell: Coulomb excitation of 26Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebeck, B.; Seidlitz, M.; Blazhev, A.; Reiter, P.; Altenkirch, R.; Bauer, C.; Butler, P. A.; de Witte, H.; Elseviers, J.; Gaffney, L. P.; Hess, H.; Huyse, M.; Kröll, T.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Pietralla, N.; Radeck, F.; Scheck, M.; Schneiders, D.; Sotty, C.; van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Miniball Collaboration; Rex-Isolde Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shell-model calculations crucially depend on the residual interaction used to approximate the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Recent improvements to the empirical universal s d interaction (USD) describing nuclei within the s d shell yielded two new interactions—USDA and USDB—causing changes in the theoretical description of these nuclei. Purpose: Transition matrix elements between excited states provide an excellent probe to examine the underlying shell structure. These observables provide a stringent test for the newly derived interactions. The nucleus 26Na with 7 valence neutrons and 3 valence protons outside the doubly-magic 16O core is used as a test case. Method: A radioactive beam experiment with 26Na (T1 /2=1 ,07 s ) was performed at the REX-ISOLDE facility (CERN) using Coulomb excitation at safe energies below the Coulomb barrier. Scattered particles were detected with an annular Si detector in coincidence with γ rays observed by the segmented MINIBALL array. Coulomb excitation cross sections of the beam have been obtained by normalization to the well known Coulomb excitation cross sections of the 104Pd target. Results: The observation of three γ -ray transitions in 26Na together with available spectroscopic data allows us to determine E 2 - and M 1 -transitional matrix elements. Results are compared to theoretical predictions. Conclusion: The improved theoretical description of 26Na could be validated. Remaining discrepancies between experimental data and theoretical predictions indicate the need for future experiments and possibly further theoretical improvements.

  19. Paired and interacting galaxies: Conference summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1990-01-01

    The author gives a summary of the conference proceedings. The conference began with the presentation of the basic data sets on pairs, groups, and interacting galaxies with the latter being further discussed with respect to both global properties and properties of the galactic nuclei. Then followed the theory, modelling and interpretation using analytic techniques, simulations and general modelling for spirals and ellipticals, starbursts and active galactic nuclei. Before the conference the author wrote down the three questions concerning pairs, groups and interacting galaxies that he hoped would be answered at the meeting: (1) How do they form, including the role of initial conditions, the importance of subclustering, the evolution of groups to compact groups, and the fate of compact groups; (2) How do they evolve, including issues such as relevant timescales, the role of halos and the problem of overmerging, the triggering and enhancement of star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei, and the relative importance of dwarf versus giant encounters; and (3) Are they important, including the frequency of pairs and interactions, whether merging and interactions are very important aspects of the life of a normal galaxy at formation, during its evolution, in forming bars, shells, rings, bulges, etc., and in the formation and evolution of active galaxies? Where possible he focuses on these three central issues in the summary.

  20. Current correlations in an interacting Cooper-pair beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J.; Chevallier, D.; Jonckheere, T.; Martin, T.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an approach allowing the computation of currents and their correlations in interacting multiterminal mesoscopic systems involving quantum dots coupled to normal and/or superconducting leads. The formalism relies on the expression of branching currents and noise crossed correlations in terms of one- and two-particle Green's functions for the dots electrons, which are then evaluated self-consistently within a conserving approximation. We then apply this to the Cooper-pair beam-splitter setup recently proposed [L. Hofstetter , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08432 461, 960 (2009); Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.136801 107, 136801 (2011); L. G. Herrmann , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.026801 104, 026801 (2010)], which we model as a double quantum dot with weak interactions, connected to a superconducting lead and two normal ones. Our method not only enables us to take into account a local repulsive interaction on the dots, but also to study its competition with the direct tunneling between dots. Our results suggest that even a weak Coulomb repulsion tends to favor positive current cross correlations in the antisymmetric regime (where the dots have opposite energies with respect to the superconducting chemical potential).

  1. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  2. Quasiparticle weight and renormalized Fermi velocity of graphene with long-range Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ho-Kin; Leaw, Jia Ning; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Sengupta, P.; Assaad, F. F.; Adam, S.

    In this work, we study the effects of realistic Coulomb interactions in graphene using a projective quantum Monte Carlo simulation of electrons at half-filing on a honeycomb lattice. We compute the quasiparticle residue, the renormalized Fermi velocity and the antiferromagnetic order parameter as a function of both the long-range and short-range components of the Coulomb potential. We find that the Mott insulator transition is determined mostly by the short-range interaction and is consistent with the Gross-Neveu-Yukawa critical theory. Far from the critical point and in the semi-metallic regime, we find that the Fermi-velocity and quasiparticle residue are influenced by the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential, and for very small interaction strength are consistent with predictions of first order perturbation theory. For experimentally relevant and stronger values of the long-range interaction, our numerical data contradicts prediction from both perturbation theory and the renormalization group approaches. This work was supported by Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01 and CA2DM mid-size Centre), Singapore Ministry of Education(Yale-NUS College R-607-265-01312 and MOE2014-T2-2-112), and DFG Grant No. AS120/9-1.

  3. Contact Pairing Interaction for the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J.

    2001-10-18

    Properties of density-dependent contact pairing interactions in nuclei are discussed. It is shown that the pairing interaction that is intermediate between surface and volume pairing forces gives the pairing gaps that are compatible with the experimental odd-even mass staggering. Results of the deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations for this ''mixed'' pairing interaction, and using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis, are presented.

  4. Correlated wave functions for three-particle systems with Coulomb interaction - The muonic helium atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K.-N.

    1977-01-01

    A computational procedure for calculating correlated wave functions is proposed for three-particle systems interacting through Coulomb forces. Calculations are carried out for the muonic helium atom. Variational wave functions which explicitly contain interparticle coordinates are presented for the ground and excited states. General Hylleraas-type trial functions are used as the basis for the correlated wave functions. Excited-state energies of the muonic helium atom computed from 1- and 35-term wave functions are listed for four states.

  5. Physical interrelation between Fokker-Planck and random walk models with application to Coulomb interactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    A model of the random walk is formulated to allow a simple computing procedure to replace the difficult problem of solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. The step sizes and probabilities of taking steps in the various directions are expressed in terms of Fokker-Planck coefficients. Application is made to many particle systems with Coulomb interactions. The relaxation of a highly peaked velocity distribution of particles to equilibrium conditions is illustrated.

  6. Probing molecular interaction in ionic liquids by low frequency spectroscopy: Coulomb energy, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Fumino, Koichi; Reimann, Sebastian; Ludwig, Ralf

    2014-10-28

    Ionic liquids are defined as salts composed solely of ions with melting points below 100 °C. These remarkable liquids have unique and fascinating properties and offer new opportunities for science and technology. New combinations of ions provide changing physical properties and thus novel potential applications for this class of liquid materials. To a large extent, the structure and properties of ionic liquids are determined by the intermolecular interaction between anions and cations. In this perspective we show that far infrared and terahertz spectroscopy are suitable methods for studying the cation-anion interaction in these Coulomb fluids. The interpretation of the measured low frequency spectra is supported by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. We present results for selected aprotic and protic ionic liquids and their mixtures with molecular solvents. In particular, we focus on the strength and type of intermolecular interaction and how both parameters are influenced by the character of the ions and their combinations. We show that the total interaction between cations and anions is a result of a subtle balance between Coulomb forces, hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces. For protic ionic liquids we could measure distinct vibrational modes in the low frequency spectra indicating clearly the cation-anion interaction characterized by linear and medium to strong hydrogen bonds. Using isotopic substitution we have been able to dissect frequency shifts related to pure interaction strength between cations and anions and to different reduced masses only. In this context we also show how these different types of interaction may influence the physical properties of ionic liquids such as the melting point, viscosity or enthalpy of vaporization. Furthermore we demonstrate that low frequency spectroscopy can also be used for studying ion speciation. Low vibrational features can be assigned to contact ion pairs and solvent separated

  7. Odd frequency pairing of interacting Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen; Woelfle, Peter; Balatsky, Alexandar

    Majorana fermions are rising as a promising key component in quantum computation. While the prevalent approach is to use a quadratic (i.e. non-interacting) Majorana Hamiltonian, when expressed in terms of Dirac fermions, generically the Hamiltonian involves interaction terms. Here we focus on the possible pair correlations in a simple model system. We study a model of Majorana fermions coupled to a boson mode and show that the anomalous correlator between different Majorana fermions, located at opposite ends of a topological wire, exhibits odd frequency behavior. It is stabilized when the coupling strength g is above a critical value gc. We use both, conventional diagrammatic theory and a functional integral approach, to derive the gap equation, the critical temperature, the gap function, the critical coupling, and a Ginzburg-Landau theory allowing to discuss a possible subleading admixture of even-frequency pairing. Work supported by USDOE DE-AC52-06NA25396 E304, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and ERC DM-321031.

  8. Self-Consistent Monte Carlo Study of the Coulomb Interaction under Nano-Scale Device Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Nobuyuki

    2011-03-01

    It has been pointed that the Coulomb interaction between the electrons is expected to be of crucial importance to predict reliable device characteristics. In particular, the device performance is greatly degraded due to the plasmon excitation represented by dynamical potential fluctuations in high-doped source and drain regions by the channel electrons. We employ the self-consistent 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, which could reproduce both the correct mobility under various electron concentrations and the collective plasma waves, to study the physical impact of dynamical potential fluctuations on device performance under the Double-gate MOSFETs. The average force experienced by an electron due to the Coulomb interaction inside the device is evaluated by performing the self-consistent MC simulations and the fixed-potential MC simulations without the Coulomb interaction. Also, the band-tailing associated with the local potential fluctuations in high-doped source region is quantitatively evaluated and it is found that the band-tailing becomes strongly dependent of position in real space even inside the uniform source region. This work was partially supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research B (No. 2160160) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  9. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  10. New calculations and measurements of the Coulomb cross-section for the production of direct electron pairs by high energy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Dake, S.; Dong, B. L.; Eby, P. B.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Iyono, A.; King, D. T.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, new calculations were made of the direct Coulomb pair cross section that rely less in arbitrary parameters. More accurate calculations of the cross section down to low pair energies were made. New measurements of the total direct electron pair yield, and the energy and angular distribution of the electron pairs in emulsion were made for O-16 at 60 and 200 GeV/amu at S-32 at 200 GeV/amu which give satisfactory agreement with the new calculations. These calculations and measurements are presented along with previous accelerator measurements made of this effect during the last 40 years. The microscope scanning criteria used to identify the direct electron pairs is described. Prospects for application of the pair method to cosmic ray energy measurements in the region 10 (exp 13) to 10 (exp 15) eV/amu are discussed.

  11. From Light Impurity Doping to Complete Cation Exchange in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: The Role of Coulomb Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Steven; Ott, Florian; Norris, David

    2014-03-01

    Cation exchange is a reversible chemical reaction used to create new materials by replacing one type of cation with another, usually from solution. We have developed an atomistic model describing cation exchange in semiconductor nanocrystals. The model uses a small set of results obtained from DFT calculations for Ag-doped CdSe. From these we constructed a kinetic Monte Carlo model to address finite temperatures and time scales beyond the reach of DFT. Our simulations span a wide range of Ag concentrations, from light doping to full cation exchange. Thus our model provides a single conceptual framework in which these two phenomena can be understood as limiting endpoints. The results of the simulations are consistent with several experimentally observed aspects of both phenomena. An unexpected finding of our simulations is that the Coulomb interaction plays a central, but changing, role as the Ag concentration varies from light doping to fully cation exchanged. For example, if the Coulomb interaction is strongly screened then cation exchange is suppressed or stopped. When only moderately screened, Coulomb effects play an unanticipated but important role for both doping and cation exchange.

  12. Transport coefficients of graphene: Interplay of impurity scattering, Coulomb interaction, and optical phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong-Yi; Foster, Matthew S.

    2016-05-01

    We study the electric and thermal transport of the Dirac carriers in monolayer graphene using the Boltzmann-equation approach. Motivated by recent thermopower measurements [F. Ghahari, H.-Y. Xie, T. Taniguchi, K. Watanabe, M. S. Foster, and P. Kim, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 136802 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.136802], we consider the effects of quenched disorder, Coulomb interactions, and electron-optical-phonon scattering. Via an unbiased numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation we calculate the electrical conductivity, thermopower, and electronic component of the thermal conductivity, and discuss the validity of Mott's formula and of the Wiedemann-Franz law. An analytical solution for the disorder-only case shows that screened Coulomb impurity scattering, although elastic, violates the Wiedemann-Franz law even at low temperature. For the combination of carrier-carrier Coulomb and short-ranged impurity scattering, we observe the crossover from the interaction-limited (hydrodynamic) regime to the disorder-limited (Fermi-liquid) regime. In the former, the thermopower and the thermal conductivity follow the results anticipated by the relativistic hydrodynamic theory. On the other hand, we find that optical phonons become non-negligible at relatively low temperatures and that the induced electron thermopower violates Mott's formula. Combining all of these scattering mechanisms, we obtain the thermopower that quantitatively coincides with the experimental data.

  13. Charge separation in organic solar cells: Effects of Coulomb interaction, recombination and hole propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati Aram, Tahereh; Asgari, Asghar; Mayou, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells are analysed within a simple efficient model that includes the important physical properties of such photovoltaic systems. In this model, in contrast with most of the previous studies, we take into account the motion of both the electron and the hole in the separation process at the donor-acceptor interface. We theoretically examine the exciton dissociation yield under the influences of charge Coulomb interaction and non-radiative recombination. We find that the electron-hole local Coulomb attraction and charge carriers' coupling parameters play an important role in the system performance and in the optimal energy conversion efficiency of the BHJ photocell. We show that the fixed-hole models tend to underestimate the yield.

  14. Interacting pairs in natural orbital functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piris, M.

    2014-07-01

    An interacting-pair model is considered to attain a new natural orbital functional (NOF). The new approach, which will be termed PNOF6, belongs to the JKL-only family of NOFs known in the literature as PNOFi. Accordingly, the approximated two-particle reduced density matrix (RDM) is reconstructed from the one-particle RDM, considering an explicit form of the two-particle cumulant in terms of the occupation numbers, and enforcing (2,2)-positivity conditions for the N-representability of the 2-RDM. PNOF6 is superior to its predecessor, PNOF5, which is an independent-pair approach. The functional is able to treat both dynamic and static correlations, thereby putting together the advantages of the other members of this series. The theory is applied to the dissociation of selected diatomic molecules. The equilibrium distances, dipole moments, harmonic frequencies, anharmonicity constants, and binding energies of the considered molecules are presented. Comparative potential energy curves for the deformation of benzene are given at the PNOF5 and PNOF6 levels of theory. In benzene, PNOF5 breaks the symmetry by about 1.5°, with an energy lowering of almost 3 kcal/mol, whereas PNOF6 provides the correct D6h symmetry.

  15. Coulomb enhancement of superconducting pair-pair correlations in a 3/4 -filled model for κ -(BEDT-TTF)2X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, W. Wasanthi; Gomes, N.; Mazumdar, S.; Clay, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of precise correlated-electron calculations on the monomer lattices of the organic charge-transfer solids κ -(BEDT-TTF) 2X for 32 and 64 molecular sites. Our calculations are for band parameters corresponding to X =Cu[N (CN) 2]Cl and Cu2(CN) 3, which are semiconducting antiferromagnetic and quantum spin liquid, respectively, at ambient pressure. We have performed our calculations for variable electron densities ρ per BEDT-TTF molecule, with ρ ranging from 1 to 2. We find that d -wave superconducting pair-pair correlations are enhanced by electron-electron interactions only for a narrow carrier concentration about ρ =1.5 , which is precisely the carrier concentration where superconductivity in the charge-transfer solids occurs. Our results indicate that the enhancement in pair-pair correlations is not related to antiferromagnetic order, but to a proximate hidden spin-singlet state that manifests itself as a charge-ordered state in other charge-transfer solids. Long-range superconducting order does not appear to be present in the purely electronic model, suggesting that electron-phonon interactions also must play a role in a complete theory of superconductivity.

  16. Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narozhny, B. N.; Levchenko, A.

    2016-04-01

    Coulomb drag is a transport phenomenon whereby long-range Coulomb interaction between charge carriers in two closely spaced but electrically isolated conductors induces a voltage (or, in a closed circuit, a current) in one of the conductors when an electrical current is passed through the other. The magnitude of the effect depends on the exact nature of the charge carriers and the microscopic, many-body structure of the electronic systems in the two conductors. Drag measurements have become part of the standard toolbox in condensed matter physics that can be used to study fundamental properties of diverse physical systems including semiconductor heterostructures, graphene, quantum wires, quantum dots, and optical cavities.

  17. Theory of intervalley Coulomb interactions in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dery, Hanan

    2016-08-01

    Exciton optical transitions in transition-metal dichalcogenides offer unique opportunities to study rich many-body physics. Recent experiments in monolayer WSe2 and WS2 have shown that, while the low-temperature photoluminescence from neutral excitons and three-body complexes is suppressed in the presence of elevated electron densities or strong photoexcitation, new dominant peaks emerge in the low-energy side of the spectrum. I present a theory that elucidates the nature of these optical transitions showing the role of the intervalley Coulomb interaction. After deriving a compact dynamical form for the Coulomb potential, I calculate the self-energy of electrons due to their interaction with this potential. For electrons in the upper valleys of the spin-split conduction band, the self-energy includes a moderate redshift due to exchange and, most importantly, a correlation-induced virtual state in the band gap. The latter sheds light on the origin of the luminescence in monolayer WSe2 and WS2 in the presence of pronounced many-body interactions.

  18. Interaction effects in superconductor/quantum spin Hall devices: Universal transport signatures and fractional Coulomb blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Lee, Shu-Ping; Karzig, Torsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Interfacing s -wave superconductors and quantum spin Hall edges produces time-reversal-invariant topological superconductivity of a type that can not arise in strictly one-dimensional systems. With the aim of establishing sharp fingerprints of this phase, we use renormalization-group methods to extract universal transport characteristics of superconductor/quantum spin Hall heterostructures where the native edge states serve as leads. We determine scaling forms for the conductance through a grounded superconductor and show that the results depend sensitively on the interaction strength in the leads, the size of the superconducting region, and the presence or absence of time-reversal-breaking perturbations. We also study transport across a floating superconducting island isolated by magnetic barriers. Here, we predict e -periodic Coulomb-blockade peaks, as recently observed in nanowire devices [S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162], with the added feature that the island can support fractional charge tunable via the relative orientation of the barrier magnetizations. As an interesting corollary, when the magnetic barriers arise from strong interactions at the edge that spontaneously break time-reversal symmetry, the Coulomb-blockade periodicity changes from e to e /2 . These findings suggest several future experiments that probe unique characteristics of topological superconductivity at the quantum spin Hall edge.

  19. Coulomb interaction parameters in bcc iron: an LDA+DMFT study.

    PubMed

    Belozerov, A S; Anisimov, V I

    2014-09-17

    We study the influence of Coulomb interaction parameters on electronic structure and magnetic properties of paramagnetic bcc Fe by means of the local density approximation plus dynamical mean-field theory approach. We consider the local Coulomb interaction in the density-density form as well as in the form with spin rotational invariance approximated by averaging over all directions of the quantization axis. Our results indicate that the magnetic properties of bcc Fe are mainly affected by the Hund's rule coupling J rather than by the Hubbard U. By employing the constrained density functional theory approach in the basis of Wannier functions of spd character, we obtain U = 4 eV and J = 0.9 eV. In spite of the widespread belief that U = 4 eV is too large for bcc Fe, our calculations with the obtained values of U and J result in a satisfactory agreement with the experiment. The correlation effects caused by U are found to be weak even for large U = 6 eV. The agreement between the calculated and experimental Curie temperatures is further improved if J is reduced to 0.8 eV. However, with the decrease of J, the effective local magnetic moment moves further away from the experimental value.

  20. Coulomb interaction parameters in bcc iron: an LDA+DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, A. S.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    We study the influence of Coulomb interaction parameters on electronic structure and magnetic properties of paramagnetic bcc Fe by means of the local density approximation plus dynamical mean-field theory approach. We consider the local Coulomb interaction in the density-density form as well as in the form with spin rotational invariance approximated by averaging over all directions of the quantization axis. Our results indicate that the magnetic properties of bcc Fe are mainly affected by the Hund's rule coupling J rather than by the Hubbard U. By employing the constrained density functional theory approach in the basis of Wannier functions of spd character, we obtain U = 4 eV and J = 0.9 eV. In spite of the widespread belief that U = 4 eV is too large for bcc Fe, our calculations with the obtained values of U and J result in a satisfactory agreement with the experiment. The correlation effects caused by U are found to be weak even for large U = 6 eV. The agreement between the calculated and experimental Curie temperatures is further improved if J is reduced to 0.8 eV. However, with the decrease of J, the effective local magnetic moment moves further away from the experimental value.

  1. Collective properties of two-dimensional Dirac electron system with a superconducting pairing interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inotani, Daisuke; Ohashi, Yoji; Okada, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the possibility of the superconductivity in graphene are attracting a lot of attention because of its novel properties associated with the pure two-dimensionality, as well as the Dirac fermion nature of the electrons. In this work, we investigate the collective properties of the superconducting graphene. Including the attractive s-wave pairing interaction, as well as the long range Coulomb interaction between the electrons in the tight-binding model for the honeycomb lattice, we calculate the generalized density-density correlation function within the random phase approximation in both normal and superconducting state at T=0. In normal state, we find that a stable collective excitation associated with the superconducting pairing fluctuations appears due to the linear dispersion relation of the electrons. On the other hand, in superconducting state, the phase mode remains stable even at T=0, although the dispersion relation of the phase mode is strongly modified by the Coulomb interaction in the long wave-length region. This result is in contrast to the conventional superconductors in which the phase mode disappears at T=0 by the so-called Anderson-Higgs mechanism. We show that this novel property of the phase mode arises from the pure two-dimensionality of the system.

  2. Isospin Dependent Pairing Interactions and BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Margueron, J.; Hagino, K.

    2008-11-11

    We propose new types of density dependent contact pairing interaction which reproduce the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matters obtained by a microscopic treatment based on the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The BCS-BEC crossover of neutrons pairs in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matters is studied by using these contact interactions. It is shown that the bare and screened pairing interactions lead to different features of the BCS-BEC crossover in symmetric nuclear matter. We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic Calcium, Nickel, Tin and Lead isotopes and N = 20, 28, 50 and 82 isotones using these density-dependent pairing interactions. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two neutrons separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. Especially the interaction IS+IV Bare without the medium polarization effect gives satisfactory results for all the isotopes.

  3. Final state interaction and Coulomb effect for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the quasielastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, M. K.

    2009-11-25

    We study the effect of final state interaction between outgoing nucleons and residual nuclei through total cross sections of neutrino-nucleus scattering within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model in the quasielastic region. To investigate the effect of the FSI, a relativistic phenomenological optical potential and a real potential for final nucleons are used. The real potential refers to no loss of flux while the optical potential indicates an absorption. We calculate both neutral-current reaction such as (v, v') and charged-current reactions like (v{sub e}, e{sup -}) and (v{sub {mu}}, {mu}{sup -}). In these calculations, {sup 12}C is used as a target nucleus and the incident neutrino (antineutrino) energies are exploited up to 2 GeV. We find that the effect of the FSI by the optical potential reduces cross sections about 50% and about 15% for the real potential. Furthermore, in the case of the charged-current reaction, we also calculate the Coulomb distortion of the outgoing leptons for {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 208}Pb. As a consequence, the effect of the Coulomb distortion is about a half by comparing with the case of electron scattering.

  4. Interacting preformed Cooper pairs in resonant Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, K. B.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2011-07-15

    We consider the normal phase of a strongly interacting Fermi gas, which can have either an equal or an unequal number of atoms in its two accessible spin states. Due to the unitarity-limited attractive interaction between particles with different spin, noncondensed Cooper pairs are formed. The starting point in treating preformed pairs is the Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink (NSR) theory, which approximates the pairs as being noninteracting. Here, we consider the effects of the interactions between the Cooper pairs in a Wilsonian renormalization-group scheme. Starting from the exact bosonic action for the pairs, we calculate the Cooper-pair self-energy by combining the NSR formalism with the Wilsonian approach. We compare our findings with the recent experiments by Harikoshi et al. [Science 327, 442 (2010)] and Nascimbene et al. [Nature (London) 463, 1057 (2010)], and find very good agreement. We also make predictions for the population-imbalanced case, which can be tested in experiments.

  5. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  6. Coulomb Interaction Effect in Weyl Fermions with Tilted Energy Dispersion in Two Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-03-18

    Weyl fermions with tilted linear dispersions characterized by several different velocities appear in some systems including the quasi-two-dimensional organic semiconductor α-(BEDT-TTF)_{2}I_{3} and three-dimensional WTe_{2}. The Coulomb interaction between electrons modifies the velocities in an essential way in the low-energy limit, where the logarithmic corrections dominate. Taking into account the coupling to both the transverse and longitudinal electromagnetic fields, we derive the renormalization group equations for the velocities of the tilted Weyl fermions in two dimensions, and found that they increase as the energy decreases and eventually hit the speed of light c to result in the Cherenkov radiation. Especially, the system restores the isotropic Weyl cone even when the bare Weyl cone is strongly tilted and the velocity of electrons becomes negative in certain directions. PMID:27035318

  7. Quasi-particle spectrum in trilayer graphene: Role of onsite coulomb interaction and interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Stacking dependent quasi-particle spectrum and density of states (DOS) in trilayer (ABC-, ABA- and AAA-stacked) graphene are analyzed using mean-field Green's function equations of motion method. Interlayer coupling (t1) is found to be responsible for the splitting of quasi-particle peaks in each stacking order. Coulomb interaction suppresses the trilayer splitting and generates a finite gap at Fermi level in ABC- while a tiny gap in ABA-stacked trilayer graphene. Influence of t⊥ is prominent for AAA-stacking as compared to ABC- and ABA-stacking orders. The theoretically obtained quasi-particle energies and DOS has been viewed in terms of recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopic (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) data available on these systems.

  8. Relativistic effects in the photoionization of hydrogen-like ions with screened Coulomb interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, L. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2014-06-15

    The relativistic effects in the photoionization of hydrogen-like ion with screened Coulomb interaction of Yukawa type are studied for a broad range of screening lengths and photoelectron energies. The bound and continuum wave functions have been determined by solving the Dirac equation. The study is focused on the relativistic effects manifested in the characteristic features of photoionization cross section for electric dipole nl→ε,l±1 transitions: shape resonances, Cooper minima and cross section enhancements due to near-zero-energy states. It is shown that the main source of relativistic effects in these cross section features is the fine-structure splitting of bound state energy levels. The relativistic effects are studied in the photoionization of Fe{sup 25+} ion, as an example.

  9. A multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for excited electronic states. II. Coulomb interaction effects in single conjugated polymer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, R. P.; Fisher, A. J.; Stella, L.; Horsfield, A. P.

    2011-06-01

    Conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention in the last few decades due to their potential for optoelectronic applications. A key step that needs optimisation is charge carrier separation following photoexcitation. To understand better the dynamics of the exciton prior to charge separation, we have performed simulations of the formation and dynamics of localised excitations in single conjugated polymer strands. We use a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics method which allows for the coupled evolution of the nuclear degrees of freedom and of multiconfigurational electronic wavefunctions. We show the relaxation of electron-hole pairs to form excitons and oppositely charged polaron pairs and discuss the modifications to the relaxation process predicted by the inclusion of the Coulomb interaction between the carriers. The issue of charge photogeneration in conjugated polymers in dilute solution is also addressed.

  10. Gas-liquid phase coexistence and crossover behavior of binary ionic fluids with screened Coulomb interactions.

    PubMed

    Patsahan, O

    2014-06-01

    We study the effects of an interaction range on the gas-liquid phase diagram and the crossover behavior of a simple model of ionic fluids: an equimolar binary mixture of equisized hard spheres interacting through screened Coulomb potentials which are repulsive between particles of the same species and attractive between particles of different species. Using the collective variables theory, we find explicit expressions for the relevant coefficients of the effective φ{4} Ginzburg-Landau Hamiltonian in a one-loop approximation. Within the framework of this approximation, we calculate the critical parameters and gas-liquid phase diagrams for varying inverse screening length z. Both the critical temperature scaled by the Yukawa potential contact value and the critical density rapidly decrease with an increase of the interaction range (a decrease of z) and then for z<0.05 they slowly approach the values found for a restricted primitive model (RPM). We find that gas-liquid coexistence region reduces with an increase of z and completely vanishes at z≃2.78. Our results clearly show that an increase in the interaction range leads to a decrease of the crossover temperature. For z≃0.01, the crossover temperature is the same as for the RPM.

  11. Measurements and calculations of the Coulomb cross section for the production of direct electron pairs by energetic heavy nuclei in nuclear track emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Eby, P. B.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T. A.; Dong, B. L.; Gregory, J. C.; Takahashi, Y.; King, D. T.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of the Coulomb cross section for the production of direct electron pairs by heavy ions in emulsion have been performed. Nuclear track emulsions were exposed to the 1.8 GeV/amu Fe-56 beam at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory bevalac and to the 60 and 200 GeV/amu O-16 and the 200 GeV/amu S-32 beam at the European Center for Nuclear Research Super Proton Synchrotron modified to accelerate heavy ions. The calculations combine the Weizsacker-Williams virtual quanta method applicable to the low-energy transfers and the Kelner-Kotov relativistic treatment for the high-energy transfers. Comparison of the measured total electron pair yield, the energy transfer distribution, and the emission angle distribution with theoretical predictions revealed a discrepancy in the frequency of occurrence of the low-energy pairs (less than or = 10 MeV). The microscope scanning criteria used to identify the direct electron pairs is described and efforts to improve the calculation of the cross section for pair production are also discussed.

  12. Coulomb stress changes over a 660-year period in central Italy: Implications for understanding fault interactions and earthquake occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedmore, L. N. J.; Faure Walker, J.; Roberts, G.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Sammonds, P. R.; Cowie, P. A.; Gregory, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    A record of 27 historical earthquakes in central Italy extending back to 1349 AD on faults with known geological slip-rates enables us to investigate the effect of Coulomb stress interactions between faults over long time scales. Modeling the effect of these interactions between active faults in low strain-rate regions is challenging due to a paucity of long earthquake records and poorly constrained long-term strain rates, yet this is key if we are to understand the effect of these interactions on earthquake occurrence. The central Apennines, Italy, with 27 well constrained historical earthquakes over 660 years and over 100 measurements of fault slip rate, provides a natural laboratory for testing models of fault interaction and determining how Coulomb stress interactions between faults affect the timing and location of future earthquakes. The central Apennines has parallel sets of NW-SE striking active normal faults. Since 1349, earthquakes have clustered along the northeast side of the fault system whereas Holocene averaged strain-rates are more evenly distributed across strike. We model the Coulomb stress changes caused by each of the 27 events and resolve stresses on all faults in the region. Our modeling includes interseismic loading over this period, with stress accumulating on shear zones beneath the seismogenic portion of each fault constrained by the measurements of fault slip-rate, and measurements of fault kinematics from frictional wear striae on bedrock fault scarps. We show that earthquakes occurred on faults where the net accumulation of stress was positive over the timescale modeled. Co-seismic Coulomb stress increases on the order of 0.01-0.1 MPa along strike appear to occasionally trigger large earthquakes yet are more often eclipsed by interseismic loading stresses on the order of 10-3 MPa/yr. Importantly, the effect of across strike co-seismic Coulomb stress decreases is more pervasive and can cause changes in earthquake recurrence of 102

  13. Exact solution of the Isovector-Isoscalar pairing interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, B.; Lerma, S.

    2010-04-26

    A Richardson-Gaudin exactly-solvable model is presented for an isovector-isoscalar pairing interaction. Exact results show the existence of quartet correlations at T = 0, that disappear at higher T where two condensates of identical particles coexist.

  14. FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfang; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Bo

    2009-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for the rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensions. The method utilizes an adaptive oct-tree structure, and is based on the new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related packages are also available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/. This paper is a brief review of the program and its performance. Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 385 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 222 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran77 and Fortran90 Computer: Any Operating system: Any RAM: Depends on the number of particles, their distribution, and the adaptive tree structure Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: An adaptive oct-tree is generated, and a new version of fast multipole method is applied in which the "multipole-to-local" translation operator is diagonalized. Restrictions: Only three and six significant digits accuracy options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are written in

  15. Non-local magnetoelectric effects via Coulomb interaction in TI-FMI heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rex, Stefan; Nogueira, Flavio S.; Sudbø, Asle

    Magnetic order on the surface of a 3 D topological insulator (TI) has been predicted to evoke a topological magnetoelectric effect (TME) by the breaking of time-reversal invariance. In the TME, an electric field leads to a magnetic polarization in the same direction as the field and vice versa. Here, we consider heterostructures of TI and ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) layers. We show that in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions the magnetization couples non-locally to the fluctuating electric field (non-local TME) by performing a field-theoretic calculation of the vacuum polarization. In addition, we obtain a Landau-Lifshitz equation for the magnetization dynamics, and find that charged magnetic textures lead to a net magnetization even at a large distance. Such textures can be induced by an external electric field with nonzero in-plane divergence. We apply this effect to a FMI-TI-FMI trilayer heterostructure with two parallel interfaces being well-separated by the bulk TI, where we propose to non-locally control the magnetic texture at one interface by proper gating of the other interface. A preprint can be found at arXiv:1510.04285 Supported by the Norwegian Research Council, Grants 205591/V20 and 216700/F20, and the Collaborative Research Center SFB 1143 ''Correlated Magnetism: From Frustration to Topology''.

  16. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  17. Electrohydrodynamic deformation and interaction of a pair of emulsion drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baygents, James C.

    1994-01-01

    The response of a pair of emulsion drops to the imposition of a uniform electric field is examined. The case studied is that of equal-sized drops whose line of centers is parallel to the axis of the applied field. A new boundary integral solution to the governing equations of the leaky dielectric model is developed; the formulation accounts for the electrostatic and hydrodynamic interactions between the drops, as well as their deformations. Numerical calculations show that, after an initial transient during which the drops primarily deform, the pair drift slowly together due to their electrostatic interactions.

  18. Isospin-dependent pairing interaction from nuclear matter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. S.; Cao, L. G.; Lombardo, U.; Zhao, E. G.; Zhou, S. G.

    2010-04-15

    The isospin dependence of the effective pairing interaction is discussed on the basis of the Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer theory of superfluid asymmetric nuclear matter. It is shown that the energy gap, calculated within the mean field approximation in the range from symmetric nuclear matter to pure neutron matter, is not linearly dependent on the symmetry parameter owing to the nonlinear structure of the gap equation. Moreover, the construction of a zero-range effective pairing interaction compatible with the neutron and proton gaps in homogeneous matter is investigated, along with some recent proposals of isospin dependence tested on the nuclear data table.

  19. Interatomic Coulomb interaction and electron nematic bond order in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kun; Hu, Jiangping; Ding, Hong; Wang, Ziqiang

    2016-03-01

    Despite having the simplest atomic structure, bulk FeSe has an observed electronic structure with the largest deviation from the band theory predictions among all Fe-based superconductors and exhibits a low-temperature nematic electronic state without intervening magnetic order. We show that the Fe-Fe interatomic Coulomb repulsion V offers a natural explanation for the puzzling electron correlation effects in FeSe superconductors. It produces a strongly renormalized low-energy band structure where the van Hove singularity sits remarkably close to Fermi level in the high-temperature electron liquid phase as observed experimentally. This proximity enables the quantum fluctuations in V to induce a rotational symmetry breaking electronic bond order in the d -wave channel. We argue that this emergent low-temperature d -wave bond nematic state, different from the commonly discussed ferro-orbital order and spin nematicity, has been observed recently by several angle-resolved photoemission experiments detecting the lifting of the band degeneracies at high-symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. We present a symmetry analysis of the space group and identify the hidden antiunitary T symmetry that protects the band degeneracy and the electronic order/interaction that can break the symmetry and lift the degeneracy. We show that the d -wave nematic bond order, together with the spin-orbit coupling, provide a unique explanation of the temperature dependence, momentum space anisotropy, and domain effects observed experimentally. We discuss the implications of our findings on the structural transition, the absence of magnetic order, and the intricate competition between nematicity and superconductivity in FeSe superconductors.

  20. Dynamical correlations in Coulomb drag effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, B.; Davoudi, B.; Hu, B. Y.-K.

    2003-05-01

    Motivated by recent Coulomb drag experiments in pairs of low-density two-dimensional (2D) electron gases, we investigate the influence of correlation effects on the interlayer drag rate as a function of temperature. We use the self-consistent field method to calculate the intra and interlayer local-field factors Gij( q, T) which embody the short-range correlation effects. We calculate the transresistivity using the screened effective interlayer interactions that result from incorporating these local-field factors within various approximation schemes. Our results suggest that dynamic (frequency dependent) correlations play an important role in enhancing the Coulomb drag rate.

  1. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous. PMID:21867316

  2. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  3. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Samuel D; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-21

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry. PMID:27448904

  4. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  5. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    FMM-YUKAWA is a mathematical software package primarily for rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensional space. Since its release, we have revised and re-organized the data structure, software architecture, and user interface, for the purpose of enabling more flexible, broader and easier use of the package. The package and its documentation are available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/, along with a few other closely related mathematical software packages. New version program summaryProgram title: FMM-Yukawa Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 854 265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 90, and C. Requires gcc and gfortran version 4.4.3 or later Computer: All Operating system: Any Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2331 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: The new version of fast multipole method (FMM) that diagonalizes the multipole-to-local translation operator is applied with the tree structure adaptive to sample particle locations. Reasons for new version: To handle much larger particle ensembles, to enable the iterative use of the subroutines in a solver, and to remove potential contention in assignments for parallelization. Summary of revisions: The software package FMM-Yukawa has been

  6. Alignment of H(2p) in collisions of protons and antiprotons with hydrogen atoms with screened Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimovski, Dragan; Janev, Ratko K.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of screened Coulomb interaction on the alignment of H(2p) state produced in collisions of hydrogen atoms with protons and antiprotons are investigated in the energy range 1-200 keV by using the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method. It is shown that the decrease of the binding energy of hydrogen nl-states and the reduction of the number of bound states with increasing the strength of the screening affect significantly the alignment degree and its energy dependence. In the case of antiproton-H collision the difference between the alignments with screened and unscreened Coulomb potential increases with increasing the strength of the screening in the entire energy range above 2 keV/u, while in the case of proton-H collision it does so only in the energy range 5-25 keV/u.

  7. Paired and Interacting Galaxies: International Astronomical Union Colloquium No. 124

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W. (Editor); Keel, William C. (Editor); Telesco, C. M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings of the International Astronomical Union Colloquium No. 124, held at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, on December 4 to 7, are given. The purpose of the conference was to describe the current state of theoretical and observational knowledge of interacting galaxies, with particular emphasis on galaxies in pairs.

  8. Molecular electrostatics for probing lone pairinteractions.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Neetha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H; Kumar, Anmol; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2013-11-14

    An electrostatics-based approach has been proposed for probing the weak interactions between lone pair containing molecules and π deficient molecular systems. For electron-rich molecules, the negative minima in molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography give the location of electron localization and the MESP value at the minimum (Vmin) quantifies the electron-rich character of that region. Interactive behavior of a lone pair bearing molecule with electron deficient π-systems, such as hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine and 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene explored within DFT brings out good correlation of the lone pairinteraction energy (E(int)) with the Vmin value of the electron-rich system. Such interaction is found to be portrayed well with the Electrostatic Potential for Intermolecular Complexation (EPIC) model. On the basis of the precise location of MESP minimum, a prediction for the orientation of a lone pair bearing molecule with an electron deficient π-system is possible in the majority of the cases studied.

  9. Interaction effects on the tunneling of electron-hole pairs in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Hector M.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2001-03-01

    The transit time of carriers is beginning to be an important parameter in the physical operation of semiconductor quantum dot `devices'. In the present work, we study the coherent propagation of electron-hole pairs in coupled self-assembled quantum dots in close proximity. These systems, achieved experimentally in a number of different geometries, have been recently implemented as a novel storage of optical information that may give rise to smart pixel technology in the near future [1]. Here, we apply an effective mass hamiltonian approach and solve numerically the time dependent Schroedinger equation of a system of photo-created electron-hole pairs in the dots. Our approach takes into account both Coulomb interactions and confinement effects. The time evolution is investigated in terms of the structural parameters for typical InAs-GaAs dots. Different initial conditions are considered, reflecting the basic processes that would take place in these experiments. We study the probabilities of finding the electron and hole in either the same or adjacent quantum dot, and study carefully the role of interactions in this behavior. [1] T. Lundstrom, W. Schoenfeld, H. Lee, and P. M. Petroff, Science 286, 2312 (1999).

  10. Interactional Competence across Proficiency Levels: How Do Learners Manage Interaction in Paired Speaking Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaczi, Evelina D.

    2014-01-01

    Paired speaking tasks are now commonly used in both pedagogic and assessment contexts, as they elicit a wide range of interactional skills. The current study aims to offer an investigation of the interaction co-constructed by learners at different proficiency levels who are engaged in a paired speaking test, and to provide insights into the…

  11. TSEMA: interactive prediction of protein pairings between interacting families.

    PubMed

    Izarzugaza, José M G; Juan, David; Pons, Carles; Ranea, Juan A G; Valencia, Alfonso; Pazos, Florencio

    2006-07-01

    An entire family of methodologies for predicting protein interactions is based on the observed fact that families of interacting proteins tend to have similar phylogenetic trees due to co-evolution. One application of this concept is the prediction of the mapping between the members of two interacting protein families (which protein within one family interacts with which protein within the other). The idea is that the real mapping would be the one maximizing the similarity between the trees. Since the exhaustive exploration of all possible mappings is not feasible for large families, current approaches use heuristic techniques which do not ensure the best solution to be found. This is why it is important to check the results proposed by heuristic techniques and to manually explore other solutions. Here we present TSEMA, the server for efficient mapping assessment. This system calculates an initial mapping between two families of proteins based on a Monte Carlo approach and allows the user to interactively modify it based on performance figures and/or specific biological knowledge. All the explored mappings are graphically shown over a representation of the phylogenetic trees. The system is freely available at http://pdg.cnb.uam.es/TSEMA. Standalone versions of the software behind the interface are available upon request from the authors.

  12. Photoassociative cooling and trapping of a pair of interacting atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subrata; Naskar, Somnath; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-08-01

    We show that it is possible to cool interacting pairs of atoms by a lin ⊥ lin Sisyphus-like laser cooling scheme using counterpropagating photoassociation (PA) lasers. It is shown that the center-of-mass (c.m.) motion of atom pairs can be trapped in molecular spin-dependent periodic potentials generated by the lasers. The proposed scheme is most effective for narrow-line PA transitions. We illustrate this with numerical calculations using fermionic 171Yb atoms as an example.

  13. The effect of Coulomb interactions on thermoelectric properties of quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2014-03-14

    Thermoelectric effects in a quantum dot coupled to the source and drain charge reservoirs are explored using a nonequilibrium Green's functions formalism beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. Thermal transport is analyzed within a linear response regime. A transition from Coulomb blockade regime to Kondo regime in thermoelectric transport through a single-level quantum dot is traced using unified approximations for the relevant Green's functions.

  14. The Interacting Galaxy Pair KPG 390: Hα Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we present scanning Fabry-Perot (FP) Hα observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/79 obtained with the PUMA FP interferometer. We derived velocity fields and rotation curves for both galaxies. For NGC 5278 we also obtained the residual velocity map to investigate the non-circular motions, and estimated its mass by fitting the rotation curve with disk+halo components. We test three different types of halos (pseudo-isothermal, Hernquist, and Navarro-Frenk-White) and obtain satisfactory fits to the rotation curve for all profiles. The amount of dark matter required by the pseudo-isothermal profile is about 10 times smaller than that for the other two halo distributions. Finally, our kinematical results together with the analysis of dust lane distribution and of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis allowed us to determine univocally that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  15. THE INTERACTING GALAXY PAIR KPG 390: H{alpha} KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we present scanning Fabry-Perot (FP) H{alpha} observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/79 obtained with the PUMA FP interferometer. We derived velocity fields and rotation curves for both galaxies. For NGC 5278 we also obtained the residual velocity map to investigate the non-circular motions, and estimated its mass by fitting the rotation curve with disk+halo components. We test three different types of halos (pseudo-isothermal, Hernquist, and Navarro-Frenk-White) and obtain satisfactory fits to the rotation curve for all profiles. The amount of dark matter required by the pseudo-isothermal profile is about 10 times smaller than that for the other two halo distributions. Finally, our kinematical results together with the analysis of dust lane distribution and of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis allowed us to determine univocally that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  16. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions.

    PubMed

    Thaicharoen, N; Gonçalves, L F; Raithel, G

    2016-05-27

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C_{3} coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems. PMID:27284655

  17. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaicharoen, N.; Gonçalves, L. F.; Raithel, G.

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C3 coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  18. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. II. Screening beyond the single-site and atomic-sphere approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, A. V.; Simak, S. I.; Korzhavyi, P. A.; Skriver, H. L.

    2002-06-01

    A quantitative description of the configurational part of the total energy of metallic alloys with substantial atomic size difference cannot be achieved in the atomic-sphere approximation: It needs to be corrected at least for the multipole-moment interactions in the Madelung part of the one-electron potential and energy. In the case of a random alloy such interactions can be accounted for only by lifting the atomic-sphere and single-site approximations, in order to include the polarization due to local environment effects. Nevertheless, a simple parametrization of the screened Coulomb interactions for the ordinary single-site methods, including the generalized perturbation method, is still possible. We obtained such a parametrization for bulk and surface NiPt alloys, which allows one to obtain quantitatively accurate effective interactions in this system.

  19. Bound states for a Coulomb-type potential induced by the interaction between a moving electric quadrupole moment and a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, K.

    2014-02-15

    We discuss the arising of bound states solutions of the Schrödinger equation due to the presence of a Coulomb-type potential induced by the interaction between a moving electric quadrupole moment and a magnetic field. Furthermore, we study the influence of the Coulomb-type potential on the harmonic oscillator by showing a quantum effect characterized by the dependence of the angular frequency on the quantum numbers of the system, whose meaning is that not all values of the angular frequency are allowed. -- Highlights: • Interaction between a moving electric quadrupole moment and a magnetic field. • Arising of bound states solutions due to the presence of a Coulomb-type potential. • Influence of the Coulomb-type potential on the harmonic oscillator. • Dependence of the angular frequency on the quantum numbers of the system.

  20. The effect of Coulomb interactions on nonlinear thermovoltage and thermocurrent in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2015-06-28

    In the present work, we theoretically study the nonlinear regime of charge transport through a quantum dot coupled to the source and drain reservoirs. The investigation is carried out using a nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. Employed approximations for the relevant Green’s functions allow to trace a transition from Coulomb blockade regime to Kondo regime in the thermoelectric transport. Effects arising when electrons move in response to thermal gradient applied across the system are discussed, including experimentally observed thermovoltage zeros.

  1. Examining the dynamic interactions on volatilities of paired stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Shean; Sek, Siok Kun

    2015-02-01

    We conduct empirical analyses to investigate the interaction between volatilities of paired stock markets. The main objective of this study is to reveal possibility of spillover effects among stock markets which can determine the performances of stock returns and trade volumes of stocks. In particular, we seek to investigate if there exist two-way causal relationships on the volatilities in two stock markets in two groups of countries, i.e. between emerging markets of ASEAN-5 and between emerging and advanced countries. Our study is focused in Malaysia stock market and the paired relationship with its neighbouring countries (ASEAN5) and advanced countries (Japan and U.S.) respectively. The multivariate GARCH(1,1) model is applied in studying the interactions on the volatilities of paired stock markets. The results are compared between neighbouring countries and with that of advanced countries. The results are expected to reveal linkages between volatilities of stock markets and the dynamic relationships across markets. The results provide useful information in studying the performances of stock markets and predicting the stock movements by incorporating the external impacts from foreign stock markets.

  2. Effect of Coulomb interaction on time of flight of cold antiprotons launched from an ion trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, J. B.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-of-flight spectra for Maxwell-Boltzman (MB) distributions of antiprotons initially held in an ion trap and detected after being launched through a 50-cm-long shielding drift tube have been calculated. The distributions used are of temperature 0.4-40 K, cubic length 0.003-3.0 cm, and number 10-100 particles. The mutual Coulomb repulsion of the particles causes a reduction in the number of late arrival particles expected from the MB velocity distribution. The Coulomb energy is not equally divided among the particles during the expansion. The energy is transferred preferentially to the outer particles so that the reduction in the number of slow particles is not necessarily large. The reduction factor is found to be greater than unity when the potential energy of the trapped ions is greater than about 5 percent of the ions' kinetic energy and is about 2 for the launch parameters of the Los Alamos antiproton gravity experiment.

  3. Odd-frequency pairing of interacting Majorana fermions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Zhoushen; Wolfle, P.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, Majorana fermions are rising as a promising key component in quantum computation. Although the prevalent approach is to use a quadratic (i.e., noninteracting) Majorana Hamiltonian, when expressed in terms of Dirac fermions, generically the Hamiltonian involves interaction terms. Here we focus on the possible pair correlations in a simple model system. We study a model of Majorana fermions coupled to a boson mode and show that the anomalous correlator between different Majorana fermions, located at opposite ends of a topological wire, exhibits odd-frequency behavior. It is stabilized when the coupling strength g is above a critical valuemore » gc. We use both, conventional diagrammatic theory and a functional integral approach, to derive the gap equation, the critical temperature, the gap function, the critical coupling, and a Ginzburg-Landau theory that allows discussing a possible subleading admixture of even-frequency pairing.« less

  4. Odd-frequency pairing of interacting Majorana fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhoushen; Wolfle, P.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, Majorana fermions are rising as a promising key component in quantum computation. Although the prevalent approach is to use a quadratic (i.e., noninteracting) Majorana Hamiltonian, when expressed in terms of Dirac fermions, generically the Hamiltonian involves interaction terms. Here we focus on the possible pair correlations in a simple model system. We study a model of Majorana fermions coupled to a boson mode and show that the anomalous correlator between different Majorana fermions, located at opposite ends of a topological wire, exhibits odd-frequency behavior. It is stabilized when the coupling strength g is above a critical value gc. We use both, conventional diagrammatic theory and a functional integral approach, to derive the gap equation, the critical temperature, the gap function, the critical coupling, and a Ginzburg-Landau theory that allows discussing a possible subleading admixture of even-frequency pairing.

  5. Interaction-induced pair hyperpolarizabilities by spherical irreducible tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancewicz, Tadeusz

    1999-10-01

    Starting from the electrostatic part of the intermolecular multipole interaction energy we derived irreducible spherical tensor formulas for the first-order long-range, interaction-induced first and second pair hyperpolarizabilities ΔβLM and ΔγLM for arbitrary shape monomers. For atoms a general relation is obtained for the dipolei-2k-pole hyperpolarizability tensor Z(i+k) of arbitrary order, between its irreducible spherical components Z00[((((11)a11)a2…)ai-21)kk] and the Cartesian counterpart Zzz…z(i+k). For isotropic systems the expressions for Δβzzz and Δγzzzz are in full agreement with the Cartesian tensor results of Buckingham, Concannon and Hands [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 10455 (1994)] and Li et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 10954 (1996)]. Our irreducible spherical tensor results for ΔβLM and ΔγLM are very desirable when dealing with molecular rotations, e.g., in spectral line shape calculations of interaction-induced hyper-Rayleigh and/or hyper-Raman light scattering. Finally we show how our spherical tensor formula for ΔβLM can be used for calculation of, one molecule forbidden, hyper-Rayleigh and hyper-Raman (A1 vibration) pair hyperpolarizability Δβzzz for molecules of octahedral symmetry Oh.

  6. Spatial Patterns in Rydberg Excitations from Logarithmic Pair Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Zoller, Peter

    2015-09-18

    The collective excitations in ensembles of dissipative, laser driven ultracold atoms exhibit crystal-like patterns, a many-body effect of the Rydberg blockade mechanism. These crystalline structures are revealed in an experiment from a postselection of configurations with fixed numbers of excitations. Here, we show that these subensembles can be well represented by ensembles of effective particles that interact via logarithmic pair potentials. This allows one to study the emergent patterns with a small number of effective particles to determine the phases of Rydberg crystals and to systematically study contributions from N-body terms. PMID:26430998

  7. Strong Interactions of Photon Pairs in Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H. J.

    2008-05-01

    The charge and spin degrees of freedom of massive particles have relatively large long-range interactions, which enable nonlinear coupling between pairs of atoms, ions, electrons, and diverse quasi-particles. By contrast, photons have vanishingly small cross-sections for direct coupling. Instead, photon interactions must be mediated by a material system. Even then,typical materials produce photon-photon couplings that are orders of magnitude too small for nontrivial dynamics with individual photon pairs. The leading exception to this state of affairs is cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED), where strong interactions between light and matter at the single-photon level have enabled a wide set of scientific advances [1]. My presentation will describe two experiments in the Caltech Quantum Optics Group where strong interactions of photon pairs have been observed. The work in Ref. [2] provided the initial realization of photon blockade for an atomic system by using a Fabry-Perot cavity containing one atom strongly coupled to the cavity field. The underlying blockade mechanism was the quantum anharmonicity of the ladder of energy levels for the composite atom-cavity system. Beyond this structural effect, a new % dynamical mechanism was identified in Ref. [3] for which photon transport is regulated by the conditional state of one intracavity atom, leading to an efficient mechanism that is insensitive to many experimental imperfections and which achieves high efficiency for single-photon transport. The experiment utilized the interaction of an atom with the fields of a microtoroidal resonator [4]. Regulation was achieved by way of an interference effect involving the directly transmitted optical field, the intracavity field in the absence of the atom, and the polarization field radiated by the atom, with the requisite nonlinearity provided by the quantum character of the emission from one atom.[1] R. Miller, T. E. Northup, K. M. Birnbaum, A. Boca, A. D. Boozer, and H. J

  8. Coulomb explosion as a probe to understand the mechanism of electron stripping from ions interacting with crystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Y Marero, David; Gordillo, Nuria; González-Arrabal, Raquel

    2009-04-01

    When an ion impinges on a solid, it rapidly undergoes a process in which its electrons are stripped away provided the velocity of the orbiting electrons is smaller than the projectile speed. Electron stripping determines any posterior behavior of the ions in the solid, and it is assumed that it takes place on the surface of the solid, but no information is available on the details of the process. Here we show, using the Coulomb explosion of C2+ ions moving in Si as a tool, that electron stripping takes place in an orderly manner and that the number of electrons stripped, before charge equilibration, depends on a characteristic length. We also propose a relation capable of quantifying this dependence. We foresee these results as a starting point to a more general understanding of ion-solid interaction, with important consequences on ion beam analysis and modification techniques, and special significance in silicon technology.

  9. Repulsive interactions in quantum Hall systems as a pairing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; Nussinov, Z.; Dukelsky, J.; Seidel, A.

    2013-10-01

    A subtle relation between quantum Hall physics and the phenomenon of pairing is unveiled. By use of second quantization, we establish a connection between (i) a broad class of rotationally symmetric two-body interactions within the lowest Landau level and (ii) integrable hyperbolic Richardson-Gaudin-type Hamiltonians that arise in (px+ipy) superconductivity. Specifically, we show that general Haldane pseudopotentials (and their sums) can be expressed as a sum of repulsive noncommuting (px+ipy)-type pairing Hamiltonians. The determination of the spectrum and individual null spaces of each of these noncommuting Richardson-Gaudin-type Hamiltonians is nontrivial yet is Bethe ansatz solvable. For the Laughlin sequence, it is observed that this problem is frustration free and zero-energy ground states lie in the common null space of all of these noncommuting Hamiltonians. This property allows for the use of a new truncated basis of pairing configurations in which to express Laughlin states at general filling factors. We prove separability of arbitrary Haldane pseudopotentials, providing explicit expressions for their second quantized forms, and further show by explicit construction how to exploit the topological equivalence between different geometries (disk, cylinder, and sphere) sharing the same topological genus number, in the second quantized formalism, through similarity transformations. As an application of the second quantized approach, we establish a “squeezing principle” that applies to the zero modes of a general class of Hamiltonians, which includes but is not limited to Haldane pseudopotentials. We also show how one may establish (bounds on) “incompressible filling factors” for those Hamiltonians. By invoking properties of symmetric polynomials, we provide explicit second quantized quasihole generators; the generators that we find directly relate to bosonic chiral edge modes and further make aspects of dimensional reduction in the quantum Hall systems

  10. Lone-pair interactions and photodissociation of compressed nitrogen trifluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzydłowski, D.; Wang, H. B.; Eremets, M. I.; Troyan, I. A.

    2014-08-14

    High-pressure behavior of nitrogen trifluoride (NF{sub 3}) was investigated by Raman and IR spectroscopy at pressures up to 55 GPa and room temperature, as well as by periodic calculations up to 100 GPa. Experimentally, we find three solid-solid phase transitions at 9, 18, and 39.5 GPa. Vibrational spectroscopy indicates that in all observed phases NF{sub 3} remains in the molecular form, in contrast to the behavior of compressed ammonia. This finding is confirmed by density functional theory calculations, which also indicate that the phase transitions of compressed NF{sub 3} are governed by the interplay between lone‑pair interactions and efficient molecule packing. Although nitrogen trifluoride is molecular in the whole pressure range studied, we show that it can be photodissociated by mid-IR laser radiation. This finding paves the way for the use of NF{sub 3} as an oxidizing and fluorinating agent in high-pressure reactions.

  11. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.S.; Chu, J.-H.; Toney, M.F.; Geballe, T.H.; Fisher, I.R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  12. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.S.

    2010-05-03

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  13. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Lavagnini, M.

    2010-02-24

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  14. The Coulombic Lattice Potential of Ionic Compounds: The Cubic Perovskites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents coulombic models representing the particles of a system by point charges interacting through Coulomb's law to explain coulombic lattice potential. Uses rubidium manganese trifluoride as an example of cubic perovskite structure. Discusses the effects on cluster properties. (CW)

  15. Relativistic Spin and Pseudospin Symmetries of Inversely Quadratic Yukawa-like plus Mobius Square Potentials Including a Coulomb-like Tensor Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikot, Akpan N.; Maghsoodi, Elham; Zarrinkamar, Saber; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2013-11-01

    The Dirac equation for the combined Mobius square and inversely quadratic Yukawa potentials including a Coulomb-like interaction term has been investigated in the presence of spin and pseudospin symmetries with arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number κ .We have obtained the explicit energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions by the framework of Nikiforov-Uvarov method.

  16. Coulomb Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Viscous damping is commonly discussed in beginning differential equations and physics texts but dry friction or Coulomb friction is not despite dry friction being encountered in many physical applications. One reason for avoiding this topic is that the equations involve a jump discontinuity in the damping term. In this article, we adopt an energy…

  17. Robustness of the universal optical transmittance in monolayer and multilayer graphene flakes under Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Premlata; Srivastava, Pawan Kumar; Ray, Nirat; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-09-01

    We present an experimental investigation on the universality of the optical transmittance of mono- and multilayer chemically exfoliated graphene flakes. By varying the exfoliating solvent, and thereby modulating the strength of electron-electron interactions, we find that the universality is not impacted over the visible region. The impact of modulating the interaction strength is clearly seen as shifts in the M-point exciton spectra. These shifts can then lead to a reduction in the wavelength regime over which universal wavelength independent optical transmittance is observed. At the level of first-order perturbation theory, our results are consistent with existing theoretical predictions for interaction corrections in optical properties of monolayer graphene.

  18. Coulomb interactions, Dirac sea polarization, and S U (4 ) symmetry breaking of the integer quantum Hall states of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Vinu; Shankar, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate effects of the filled Dirac sea on the S U (4 ) symmetry breaking for the integer quantum Hall states of graphene with long-ranged electrostatic Coulomb interactions. Our model also includes Hubbard and nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions with strengths U and V , respectively. We find the symmetry breaking of n =0 Landau level is accompanied by an S U (4 ) polarization of the filled Dirac sea. We compute the phase diagram for filling factor ν =0 ,±1 in the U -V space at magnetic fields relevant to experiments. The Dirac sea polarization significantly influences the phase diagram. It suppresses the Kekulé ordering at ν =0 and induces it at ν =±1 . We also calculate the excitation gaps at small tilted magnetic fields. This enables us to conclude that the ground state is a charge density wave at ν =0 and valley-spin polarized at ν =±1 . We delineate a region in the U -V space consistent with the experiments.

  19. Enhancement of pairing interaction and magnetic fluctuations toward a band insulator in an electron-doped Li(x)ZrNCl Superconductor.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yuichi; Kishiume, Tsukasa; Takano, Takumi; Kobayashi, Katsuki; Matsuoka, Eiichi; Onodera, Hideya; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2009-08-14

    The doping dependence of specific heat and magnetic susceptibility has been investigated for Li(x)ZrNCl superconductors derived from a band insulator. As the carrier concentration is decreased, the anisotropy of superconducting gap changes from highly anisotropic to almost isotropic. It was also found that, upon reducing carrier density, the superconducting coupling strength and the magnetic susceptibility are concomitantly enhanced in parallel with T(c), while the density of states at the Fermi level is kept almost constant. Theoretical calculations taking into account the on-site Coulomb interaction reproduced the experimental results, suggesting a possible pairing mediated by magnetic fluctuations, even in the doped band insulators. PMID:19792678

  20. Interacting in Pairs in a Test of Oral Proficiency: Co-Constructing a Better Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    This study, framed within sociocultural theory, examines the interaction of adult ESL test-takers in two tests of oral proficiency: one in which they interacted with an examiner (the individual format) and one in which they interacted with another student (the paired format). The data for the eight pairs in this study were drawn from a larger…

  1. Heterogeneous dynamics and stretched exponential decay of spatio-temporal correlations for Coulomb-interacting particles in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Amit; Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of Coulomb-interacting confined particles over a range of temperatures capturing the crossover from a Wigner molecule to a liquid-like phase. Dynamical signatures, derived from the Van-Hove correlations, develop pivotal understanding of the phases as well as the intervening crossover, which are inaccessible from the study of static correlations alone. The motion of the particles shows frustrations, produces heterogeneities depending on the observation time-scales and temperatures and results into a non-Gaussian behavior. The extent and nature of the departure of the behavior of spatio-temporal correlations from the conventional wisdom depends crucially on the symmetry of the confinements. In particular, we find that the decay of correlations follow a stretched-exponential form in traps that lack any symmetry. Our data offers a broad support to a theoretical model that integrates the non-Gaussian behavior arising from the convolution of Gaussian fluctuations weighted by appropriate diffusivities, consistent with local dynamics. The richness of information from the dynamic correlation will be shown to improve the understanding of melting in confined systems in a powerful manner.

  2. An entropic understanding of Coulomb force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hyosung

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting Verlinde's proposal on the entropic understanding of Newton's law, we show that Coulomb force could also be understood as an entropically emergent force (rather than as a fundamental force). We apply Kaluza-Klein idea to Verlinde's formalism to obtain Coulomb interaction in the lower dimensions. The kinematics concerning the Kaluza-Klein momenta separates the interaction due to the momentum flow from the gravitational interaction. The momentum-charge conversion relation results in the precise form of Coulomb interaction.

  3. Dirac Hamiltonian and Reissner-Nordström metric: Coulomb interaction in curved space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J. H.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the spin-1 /2 relativistic quantum dynamics in the curved space-time generated by a central massive charged object (black hole). This necessitates a study of the coupling of a Dirac particle to the Reissner-Nordström space-time geometry and the simultaneous covariant coupling to the central electrostatic field. The relativistic Dirac Hamiltonian for the Reissner-Nordström geometry is derived. A Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation reveals the presence of gravitational and electrogravitational spin-orbit coupling terms which generalize the Fokker precession terms found for the Dirac-Schwarzschild Hamiltonian, and other electrogravitational correction terms to the potential proportional to αnG , where α is the fine-structure constant and G is the gravitational coupling constant. The particle-antiparticle symmetry found for the Dirac-Schwarzschild geometry (and for other geometries which do not include electromagnetic interactions) is shown to be explicitly broken due to the electrostatic coupling. The resulting spectrum of radially symmetric, electrostatically bound systems (with gravitational corrections) is evaluated for example cases.

  4. Coulomb interaction of acceptors in Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te/CdTe quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Nithiananthi, P. Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, A. Merwyn Jasper D.

    2014-04-24

    The investigation on the effect of confining potential like isotropic harmonic oscillator type potential on the binding and the Coulomb interaction energy of the double acceptors in the presence of magnetic field in a Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te/CdTe Spherical Quantum Dot has been made for the Mn ion composition x=0.3 and compared with the results obtained from the square well type potential using variational procedure in the effective mass approximation.

  5. Coulomb effects in femtoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Radoslaw; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2009-09-15

    The correlation function of two identical particles - pions or kaons - interacting via Coulomb potential is computed. The particles are emitted from an anisotropic particle's source of finite lifetime. In the case of pions, the effect of halo is taken into account as an additional particle's source of large spatial extension. The relativistic effects are discussed in detail. The Bowler-Sinyukov procedure to remove the Coulomb interaction is carefully tested. In the absence of halo the procedure is shown to work very well even for an extremely anisotropic source. When the halo is taken into account the free correlation function, which is extracted by means of the Bowler-Sinyukov procedure, is distorted at small relative momenta but the source parameters are still correctly reproduced.

  6. a Monte Carlo Simulation of Coulomb Collisions and Wave-Particle Interactions in Space Plasma at High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghouthi, Imad Ahmad

    In study I, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to investigate the behavior of O^+ ions that are E x B-drifting through a background of neutral O, with the effect of O^+(Coulomb) self-collisions included. Wide ranges of the ion-to-neutral density ratio n_{i}/n _{n} and electrostatic field E were considered in order to investigate the change of ion behavior with respect to the solar cycle and altitude. For low altitudes and/or solar minimum (n_{i }/n_{n} <= 10 ^{-5}), the effect of self-collisions is negligible. For higher values of n_ {i}/n_{n}, the effect of self-collisions becomes significant and, hence, the non-Maxwellian features of the O^+ distributions are reduced. In study II, the steady-state flow of the polar wind protons through a background of O^+ ions was studied. The Fokker-Planck expression was used to represent H^+-O ^+ Coulomb collisions. The transition layer between the collision-dominated and the collisionless regions plays a pivotal role in the behavior of the H^+ flow. In the transition region, the shape of H ^+ distribution changes in a complicated manner from Maxwellian to "kidney bean". The flow also changes from subsonic to supersonic within the transition region. The heat fluxes of parallel and perpendicular energies change rapidly from their maximum (positive) to their minimum (negative) values within the same transition region. In study III, a Monte Carlo simulation was developed in order to study the effect of the wave-particle interactions (WPI) on O^+ and H^+ ions outflow in the polar wind. The simulation also considered the other mechanisms included in the classical polar wind studies such as gravity, polarization electrostatic field, and divergence of geomagnetic field lines. Also, an altitude dependent wave spectral density was adopted. The main conclusions are (1) the O^+ velocity distribution develops conic features at high altitudes; (2) the O^+ ions are preferentially energized; (3) the escape flux of O^+ increased by a factor of

  7. A Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions and wave-particle interactions in space plasma at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghouthi, Imad Ahmad

    In study 1, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to investigate the behavior of O(+) ions that are E x B-drifting through a background of neutral O, with the effect of O(+) (Coulomb) self-collisions included. Wide ranges of the ion-to-neutral density ratio n(sub i)/n(sub n) and electrostatic field E were considered in order to investigate the change of ion behavior with respect to the solar cycle and altitude. For low altitudes and/or solar minimum (n(sub i)/n(sub n) less than or equal to 10(exp -5)), the effect of self-collisions is negligible. For higher values of n(sub i)/n(sub n), the effect of self-collisions becomes significant and, hence, the non-Maxwellian features of the O(+) distributions are reduced. In study 2, the steady-state flow of the polar wind protons through a background of O(+) ions was studied. The Fokker-Planck expression was used to represent H(+)-0(+) Coulomb collisions. The transition layer between the collision-dominated and the collisionless regions plays a pivotal role in the behavior of the H(+) flow. In the transition region, the shape of H(+) distribution changes in a complicated manner from Maxwellian to 'kidney bean.' The flow also changes from subsonic to supersonic within the transition region. The heat fluxes of parallel and perpendicular energies change rapidly from their maximum (positive) to their minimum (negative) values within the same transition region. In study 3, a Monte Carlo simulation was developed in order to study the effect of the wave-particle interactions (WPI) on O(+) and H(+) ions outflow in the polar wind. The simulation also considered the other mechanisms included in the classical polar wind studies such as gravity, polarization electrostatic field, and divergence of geomagnetic field lines. Also, an altitude dependent wave spectral density was adopted. The main conclusions are (1) the O(+) velocity distribution develops conic features at high altitudes; (2) the O(+) ions are preferentially energized; (3) the

  8. Ionic Coulomb Blockade in Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Krems, Matt; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of ions in nanopores is essential for applications ranging from single-molecule detection to DNA sequencing. We show both analytically and by means of molecular dynamics simulations that under specific conditions ion-ion interactions in nanopores lead to the phenomenon of ionic Coulomb blockade, namely the build-up of ions inside a nanopore with specific capacitance impeding the flow of additional ions due to Coulomb repulsion. This is the counterpart of electronic Coulomb blockade observed in mesoscopic systems. We discuss the analogies and differences with the electronic case as well as experimental situations in which this phenomenon could be detected. PMID:23307655

  9. Van der Waals interactions: accuracy of pair potential approximations.

    PubMed

    Cole, Milton W; Kim, Hye-Young; Liebrecht, Michael

    2012-11-21

    Van der Waals interactions between single atoms and solids are discussed for the regime of large separation. A commonly employed approximation is to evaluate this interaction as a sum of two-body interactions between the adatom and the constituent atoms of the solid. The resulting potentials are here compared with known results in various geometries. Analogous comparisons are made for diatomic molecules near either single atoms or semi-infinite surfaces and for triatomic molecules' interactions with single atoms. PMID:23181315

  10. Coulomb stress interactions among M≥5.9 earthquakes in the Gorda deformation zone and on the Mendocino Fracture Zone, Cascadia megathrust, and northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rollins, John C.; Stein, Ross S.

    2010-01-01

    The Gorda deformation zone, a 50,000 km2 area of diffuse shear and rotation offshore northernmost California, has been the site of 20 M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes on four different fault orientations since 1976, including four M ≥ 7 shocks. This is the highest rate of large earthquakes in the contiguous United States. We calculate that the source faults of six recent M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes had experienced ≥0.6 bar Coulomb stress increases imparted by earthquakes that struck less than 9 months beforehand. Control tests indicate that ≥0.6 bar Coulomb stress interactions between M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes separated by Mw = 7.3 Trinidad earthquake are consistent with the locations of M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes in the Gorda zone until at least 1995, as well as earthquakes on the Mendocino Fault Zone in 1994 and 2000. Coulomb stress changes imparted by the 1980 earthquake are also consistent with its distinct elbow-shaped aftershock pattern. From these observations, we derive generalized static stress interactions among right-lateral, left-lateral and thrust faults near triple junctions.

  11. Interactions between pairs of bacteriocins from lactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mulet-Powell, N; Lacoste-Armynot, A M; Viñas, M; Simeon de Buochberg, M

    1998-09-01

    Activity of pairs of crude extracts of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) containing different bacteriocins (nisin, pediocin AcH, lacticin 481, lactacin F, and lactacin B) was measured against 10 different indicator strains. Experiments were carried out both in liquid and on solid media. Both synergisms and antagonisms were observed. Lacticin 481 produced mainly antagonistic effects whereas pediocin AcH produced mainly synergistic effects. The use of more than one LAB bacteriocin as a combination biopreservative might be envisaged. PMID:9766080

  12. A number-projected model with generalized pairing interaction in application to rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Satula, W. |||; Wyss, R.

    1996-12-31

    A cranked mean-field model that takes into account both T=1 and T=0 pairing interactions is presented. The like-particle pairing interaction is described by means of a standard seniority force. The neutron-proton channel includes simultaneously correlations among particles moving in time reversed orbits (T=1) and identical orbits (T=0). The coupling between different pairing channels and nuclear rotation is taken into account selfconsistently. Approximate number-projection is included by means of the Lipkin-Nogami method. The transitions between different pairing phases are discussed as a function of neutron/proton excess, T{sub z}, and rotational frequency, {Dirac_h}{omega}.

  13. Calculation of the Coulomb Fission Cross Sections for Pb-Pb and Bi-Pb Interactions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poyser, William J.; Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The Weizsacker-Williams (WW) method of virtual quanta is used to make approximate cross section calculations for peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We calculated the Coulomb fission cross sections for projectile ions of Pb-208 and Bi-209 with energies of 158 A GeV interacting with a Pb-208 target. We also calculated the electromagnetic absorption cross section for Pb-208 ion interacting as described. For comparison we use both the full WW method and a standard approximate WW method. The approximate WW method in larger cross sections compared to the more accurate full WW method.

  14. Ab initio calculation of the effective on-site Coulomb interaction parameters for half-metallic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaşıoğlu, Ersoy; Galanakis, Iosif; Friedrich, Christoph; Blügel, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Correlation effects play an important role in the electronic structure of half-metallic (HM) magnets. In particular, they give rise to nonquasiparticle states above (or below) the Fermi energy at finite temperatures that reduce the spin polarization and, as a consequence, the efficiency of spintronics devices. Employing the constrained random-phase approximation (cRPA) within the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave (FLAPW) method using maximally localized Wannier functions, we calculate the strength of the effective on-site Coulomb interaction (Hubbard U and Hund exchange J) between localized electrons in different classes of HM magnets considering: (i) sp-electron ferromagnets in rock-salt structure, (ii) zinc-blende 3d binary ferromagnets, as well as (iii) ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic semi- and full-Heusler compounds. For HM sp-electron ferromagnets, the calculated Hubbard U parameters are between 2.7 and 3.9 eV, while for transition-metal-based HM compounds, they lie between 1.7 and 3.8 eV, being smallest for MnAs (Mn-3d orbitals) and largest for Cr2CoGa (Co-3d orbitals). For the HM full-Heusler compounds, the Hubbard U parameters are comparable to the ones in elementary 3d transition metals, while for semi-Heusler compounds, they are slightly smaller. We show that the increase of the Hubbard U with structural complexity, i.e., from MnAs to Cr2CoGa, stems from the screening of the p electrons of the nonmagnetic sp atoms. The p-electron screening turns out to be more efficient for MnAs than for Cr2CoGa. The calculated Hubbard U parameters for CrAs, NiMnSb, and Co2MnSi are about two times smaller than previous estimates based on the constrained local-density approximation (cLDA) method. Furthermore, the width of the correlated d or p bands of the studied compounds is usually smaller than the calculated Hubbard U parameters. Thus these HM magnets should be classified as weakly correlated materials.

  15. Beyond Gaussian pair fluctuation theory for strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkerin, Brendan C.; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Interacting Fermi systems in the strongly correlated regime play a fundamental role in many areas of physics and are of particular interest to the condensed matter community. Though weakly interacting fermions are understood, strongly correlated fermions are difficult to describe theoretically as there is no small interaction parameter to expand about. Existing strong-coupling theories rely heavily on the so-called many-body T -matrix approximation that sums ladder-type Feynman diagrams. Here, by acknowledging the fact that the effective interparticle interaction (i.e., the vertex function) becomes smaller above three dimensions, we propose an alternative way to reorganize Feynman diagrams and develop a theoretical framework for interacting Fermi gases beyond the ladder approximation. As an application, we solve the equation of state for three- and two-dimensional strongly interacting fermions and find excellent agreement with experimental [M. J. H. Ku et al., Science 335, 563 (2012), 10.1126/science.1214987] and other theoretical results above temperatures of 0.5 TF .

  16. Effect of Pair Interactions on Transition Probabilities between Inactive and Active States — Achieving Collective Behaviour via Pair Interactions in Social Insects —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Yuki, Mai; Kikuchi, Tomonori; Tsuji, Kazuki; Sugawara, Ken

    2015-10-01

    To understand the evolution of well-organized social behaviour, we must first understand the mechanism by which collective behaviour is established. In this study, the mechanisms of collective behaviour in a colony of social insects were studied in terms of the transition probability between active and inactive states, which is linked to mutual interactions. The active and inactive states of the social insects were statistically extracted from the velocity profiles. From the duration distributions of the two states, we found that (1) the durations of active and inactive states follow an exponential law, and (2) pair interactions increase the transition probability from inactive to active states. The regulation of the transition probability by pair interactions suggests that such interactions control the populations of active and inactive workers in the colony.

  17. Effect of spin-orbit and on-site Coulomb interactions on the electronic structure and lattice dynamics of uranium monocarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowik, U. D.; Piekarz, P.; Legut, D.; Jagło, G.

    2016-08-01

    Uranium monocarbide, a potential fuel material for the generation IV reactors, is investigated within density functional theory. Its electronic, magnetic, elastic, and phonon properties are analyzed and discussed in terms of spin-orbit interaction and localized versus itinerant behavior of the 5 f electrons. The localization of the 5 f states is tuned by varying the local Coulomb repulsion interaction parameter. We demonstrate that the theoretical electronic structure, elastic constants, phonon dispersions, and their densities of states can reproduce accurately the results of x-ray photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat measurements as well as inelastic neutron scattering experiments only when the 5 f states experience the spin-orbit interaction and simultaneously remain partially localized. The partial localization of the 5 f electrons could be represented by a moderate value of the on-site Coulomb interaction parameter of about 2 eV. The results of the present studies indicate that both strong electron correlations and spin-orbit effects are crucial for realistic theoretical description of the ground-state properties of uranium carbide.

  18. Quasi-stationary states and a classification of the range of pair interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, A.; Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2011-03-24

    Systems of long-range interacting particles present typically 'quasi-stationary' states (QSS). Investigating their lifetime for a generic pair interaction V(r{yields}{infinity}){approx}1/r{sup {gamma}} we give a classification of the range of the interactions according to the dynamical properties of the system.

  19. Pair Creation in QED-Strong Pulsed Laser Fields Interacting with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Naumova, Natalia M.; Nees, John A.; Mourou, Gerard A.

    2010-11-05

    QED effects are known to occur in a strong laser pulse interaction with a counterpropagating electron beam, among these effects being electron-positron pair creation. We discuss the range of laser pulse intensities of J{>=}5x10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} combined with electron beam energies of tens of GeV. In this regime multiple pairs may be generated from a single beam electron, some of the newborn particles being capable of further pair production. Radiation backreaction prevents avalanche development and limits pair creation. The system of integro-differential kinetic equations for electrons, positrons and {gamma} photons is derived and solved numerically.

  20. Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhentao

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

  1. A dynamical proximity analysis of interacting galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.

    1990-01-01

    Using the impulsive approximation to study the velocity changes of stars during disk-sphere collisions and a method due to Bottlinger to study the post collision orbits of stars, the formation of various types of interacting galaxies is studied as a function of the distance of closest approach between the two galaxies.

  2. An Application of the Direct Coulomb Electron Pair Production Process to the Energy Measurement of the "VH-Group" in the "Knee" Region of the "All-Particle" Energy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Wu, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    The "all-particle" cosmic ray energy spectrum appears to be exhibiting a significant change in the spectral index just above approximately 3000 TeV. This could indicate (1) a change in the propagation of the cosmic rays in the galactic medium, and/or (2) the upper limit of the supernova shock wave acceleration mechanism, and/or (3) a new source of high-energy cosmic rays. Air shower and JACEE data indicate the spectral change is associated with a composition change to a heavier element mixture whereas DICE does not indicate this. A detector concept will be presented that utilizes the energy dependence of the production of direct Coulomb electron-positron pairs by energetic heavy ions. Monte Carlo simulations of a direct electron pair detector consisting of Pb target foils interleaved with planes of 1-mm square scintillating optical fibers will be discussed. The goal is to design a large area, non-saturating instrument to measure the energy spectrum of the individual cosmic ray elements in the "VH-group" for energies greater than 10 TeV/nucleon.

  3. Extremely strong bipolar optical interactions in paired graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wanli; Chen, Huajin; Liu, Shiyang; Zi, Jian; Lin, Zhifang

    2016-03-28

    Graphene is an excellent multi-functional platform for electrons, photons, and phonons due to exceptional electronic, photonic, and thermal properties. When combining its extraordinary mechanical characteristics with optical properties, graphene-based nanostructures can serve as an appealing platform for optomechanical applications at the nanoscale. Here, we demonstrate, using full-wave simulations, the emergence of extremely strong bipolar optical forces, or, optical binding and anti-binding, between a pair of coupled graphene nanoribbons, due to the remarkable confinement and enhancement of optical fields arising from the large effective mode indices. In particular, the binding and anti-binding forces, which are about two orders of magnitude stronger than that in metamaterials and high-Q resonators, can be tailored by selective excitation of either the even or the odd optical modes, achievable by tuning the relative phase of the lightwaves propagating along the two ribbons. Based on the coupled mode theory, we derive analytical formulae for the bipolar optical forces, which agree well with the numerical results. The attractive optical binding force F(y)(b) and the repulsive anti-binding force F(y)(a) exhibit a remarkably different dependence on the gap distance g between the nanoribbons and the Fermi energy E(F), in the forms of F(y)(b) ∝ 1/√(g³E(F)) and F(y)(a) ∝ 1/E(F)(2). With E(F) dynamically tunable by bias voltage, the bipolar forces may provide a flexible handle for active control of the nanoscale optomechanical effects, and also, might be significant for optoelectronic and optothermal applications as well. PMID:26948095

  4. Effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite nuclear matter in the Brueckner approach: Model {delta}-shaped NN interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Lombardo, U.; Saperstein, E.E.; Zverev, M.V.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of pairing in semi-infinite nuclear matter is considered in the Brueckner approach. Equations for effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite matter are derived for the case of the separable representation of realistic NN interaction. The propagator of two noninteracting particles in a semi-infinite potential well is calculated numerically. The equation for effective interaction is solved for a model 8-shaped NN interaction, which correctly reproduces NN scattering in the low-energy limit. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Complex-Scaling Treatment for Doubly Excited Inter-Shell Resonances in H- Interacting with Screened Coulomb (Yukawa) Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Kar, S.

    2012-10-01

    The doubly-excited inter-shell resonance states of the hydrogen negative ion with screened Coulomb potentials are investigated in the framework of complex-scaling method. Highly correlated wave functions with terms up to 1078 in Hylleraas coordinates are used. The resonance parameters for the 2 s3 s 1 S e associated with the H ( N = 2) threshold and the 3 s4 s 1 S e state associated with the H ( N = 3) threshold for various screening strengths are reported. Comparisons are made with other available data in the literature.

  6. Isolated Galaxies versus Interacting Pairs with MaNGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, María; Yuan, Fangting; Shen, Shiyin; Yin, Jun; Chang, Ruixiang; Feng, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    We present preliminary results of the spectral analysis on the radial distributions of the star formation history in both, a galaxy merger and a spiral isolated galaxy observed with MaNGA. We find that the central part of the isolated galaxy is composed by older stellar population ($\\sim$2 Gyr) than in the outskirts ($\\sim$7 Gyr). Also, the time-scale is gradually larger from 1 Gyr in the inner part to 3 Gyr in the outer regions of the galaxy. In the case of the merger, the stellar population in the central region is older than in the tails, presenting a longer time-scale in comparison to central part in the isolated galaxy. Our results are in agreement with a scenario where spiral galaxies are built from inside-out. In the case of the merger, we find evidence that interactions enhance star formation in the central part of the galaxy.

  7. Co-Constructed Interaction in a Paired Speaking Test: The Rater's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Lyn

    2009-01-01

    The definition and operationalization of interactional competence in speaking tests that entail co-construction of discourse is an area of language testing requiring further research. This article explores the reactions of four trained raters to paired candidates who oriented to asymmetric patterns of interaction in a discussion task. Through an…

  8. The role of close pair interactions in triggering stellar bars and rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Preethi; Ellison, Sara; Patton, David

    2015-03-01

    Recent works which have looked at bars in clusters versus the field have found no significant difference in bar fraction. However, other works (Nair & Abraham 2010, Lee et al. 2012) have found that bar fractions depend sensitively on the mass, morphology and color of the galaxy. In addition, simulations suggest that bar formation may depend on the merger ratio of close pair interactions as well as on the separation between the pairs. In this work, we analyze the bar fractions in a complete sample of ~23,000 close pairs derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We will present results illustrating the dependence of bar and ring fractions as a function of merger mass ratio, pair separation, galaxy morphology, and stellar mass. I will further compare the role of bars and close pairs in triggering central star formation and AGN.

  9. Interactions in 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetracyanoborate ion pair: Spectroscopic and density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, James X; Lee, Anita S; Kitchin, John R; Nulwala, Hunaid B; Luebke, David R; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-24

    Density Functional Theory is used to investigate a weakly coordinating room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetracyanoborate ([Emim]{sup +}[TCB]{sup -}). Four locally stable conformers of the ion pair were located. Atoms-in-molecules (AIM) and electron density analysis indicated the existence of several hydrogen bonds. Further investigation through the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Energy Decomposition Analysis (NEDA) calculations provided insight into the origin of interactions in the [Emim]{sup +}[TCB]{sup -} ion pair. Strength of molecular interactions in the ionic liquid was correlated with frequency shifts of the characteristic vibrations of the ion pair. Harmonic vibrations of the ion pair were also compared with the experimental Raman and Infrared spectra. Vibrational frequencies were assigned by visualizing displacements of atoms around their equilibrium positions and through Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis.

  10. The Role of CH···O Coulombic Interactions in Determining Rotameric Conformations of Phenyl Substituted 1,3-Dioxanes and Tetrahydropyrans.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Kenneth B; Lambert, Kyle M; Bailey, William F

    2015-08-21

    The rotameric conformations of the phenyl ring in both the axial and the equatorial conformers of phenyl substituted 1,3-dioxanes and tetrahydropyrans are compared with those of the corresponding phenylcyclohexanes at the MP2/6-311+G* level. The compounds with an axial phenyl commonly adopt a conformation in which the plane of the aromatic ring is perpendicular to the benzylic C-H bond. However, axial 5-phenyl-1,3-dioxane adopts a "parallel" conformation that allows an ortho hydrogen to be proximate to the two ring oxygens, leading to attractive CH···O interactions. Stabilizing Coulombic interactions of this sort are found with many of the oxygen-containing six-membered rings that were investigated. PMID:26182246

  11. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized.

  12. Local unitary transformation method for large-scale two-component relativistic calculations. II. Extension to two-electron Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2012-10-01

    The local unitary transformation (LUT) scheme at the spin-free infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (IODKH) level [J. Seino and H. Nakai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 244102 (2012), 10.1063/1.4729463], which is based on the locality of relativistic effects, has been extended to a four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. In the previous study, the LUT scheme was applied only to a one-particle IODKH Hamiltonian with non-relativistic two-electron Coulomb interaction, termed IODKH/C. The current study extends the LUT scheme to a two-particle IODKH Hamiltonian as well as one-particle one, termed IODKH/IODKH, which has been a real bottleneck in numerical calculation. The LUT scheme with the IODKH/IODKH Hamiltonian was numerically assessed in the diatomic molecules HX and X2 and hydrogen halide molecules, (HX)n (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). The total Hartree-Fock energies calculated by the LUT method agree well with conventional IODKH/IODKH results. The computational cost of the LUT method is reduced drastically compared with that of the conventional method. In addition, the LUT method achieves linear-scaling with respect to the system size and a small prefactor.

  13. Theoretical Studies on the Intermolecular Interactions of Potentially Primordial Base-Pair Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sponer, Judit; Sponer, Jiri; Sumpter, Bobby G; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental studies on the Watson Crick type base pairing of triazine and aminopyrimidine derivatives suggest that acid/base properties of the constituent bases might be related to the duplex stabilities measured in solution. Herein we use high-level quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the base pairing and stacking interactions of seven selected base pairs, which are common in that they are stabilized by two NH O hydrogen bonds separated by one NH N hydrogen bond. We show that neither the base pairing nor the base stacking interaction energies correlate with the reported pKa data of the bases and the melting points of the duplexes. This suggests that the experimentally observed correlation between the melting point data of the duplexes and the pKa values of the constituent bases is not rooted in the intrinsic base pairing and stacking properties. The physical chemistry origin of the observed experimental correlation thus remains unexplained and requires further investigations. In addition, since our calculations are carried out with extrapolation to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals and with inclusion of higher electron correlation effects, they provide reference data for stacking and base pairing energies of non-natural bases.

  14. Coulomb attraction in optical spectra of quantum discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, B.; Glutsch, S.; Bechstedt, F.

    1994-06-01

    We present a theory which describes the influence of the Coulomb interaction on the optical spectra of quantum discs within the envelope function formalism. Starting from a non-local Elliott formula luminescence is traced back to two-particle wave functions and energies. They are solutions of the corresponding Schrödinger equation for an electron-hole pair under the influence of the Coulomb attraction and confinement potentials determined by the spatial variation of the band edges of the considered microstructure. We present a complete numerical solution of the two-particle problem for flat quantum dots, i.e. discs for which the size quantization in growth direction is much stronger than that in the xy-plane. We discuss two different situations, single discs with infinite and finite confinement potentials. Resulting theoretical lineshapes are compared with luminescence spectra obtained recently for quantum discs fabricated by laser-induced thermal cation interdiffusion in quantum-well structures.

  15. Nucleon-pair states of even-even Sn isotopes based on realistic effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. Y.; Qi, C.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study yrast states of 128,126,124Sn and 104,106,108Sn by using the monopole-optimized realistic interactions in terms of both the shell model (SM) and the nucleon-pair approximation (NPA). For yrast states of 128,126Sn and 104,106Sn, we calculate the overlaps between the wave functions obtained in the full SM space and those obtained in the truncated NPA space, and find that most of these overlaps are very close to 1. Very interestingly, for most of these states with positive parity and even spin or with negative parity and odd spin, the SM wave function is found to be well represented by one nucleon-pair basis state, viz., a simple picture of "nucleon-pair states" (nucleon-pair configuration without mixings) emerges. In 128,126Sn, the positive-parity (or negative-parity) yrast states with spin J >10 (or J >7 ) are found to be well described by breaking one or two S pairs in the 101+ (or 71-) state, i.e., the yrast state of seniority-two, spin-maximum, and positive-parity (or negative-parity), into non-S pair(s). Similar regularity is also pointed out for 104,106Sn. The evolution of E 2 transition rates between low-lying states in 128,126,124Sn is discussed in terms of the seniority scheme.

  16. Generation of periodic ultrashort electron bunches and strongly asymmetric ion Coulomb explosion in nanometer foils interacting with ultra-intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Youwei; Yu Wei; Xu Han; Lei Anle; Shen Baifei; Wang Xin; Lu Peixiang; Senecha, Vinod

    2008-05-15

    The interaction of a linearly polarized intense laser pulse with an ultrathin nanometer plasma layer is investigated to understand the physics of the ion acceleration. It is shown by the computer simulation that the plasma response to the laser pulse comprises two steps. First, due to the vxB effect, electrons in the plasma layer are extracted and periodic ultrashort relativistic electron bunches are generated every half of a laser period. Second, strongly asymmetric Coulomb explosion of ions in the foil occurs due to the strong electrostatic charge separation, once the foil is burnt through. Followed by the laser accelerated electron bunch, the ion expansion in the forward direction occurs along the laser beam that is much stronger as compared to the backward direction.

  17. A Structural NIR Analysis of the Interacting Pair of Galaxies KPG 404 (NGC 5394/95)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gutiérrez, M.; Puerari, I.; Hernández-López, I.

    2004-06-01

    We present near infrared observations in J, H and K' passbands of the interacting pair of galaxies KPG 404 (NGC 5394/95). We calculate total magnitudes, surface brightnesses and colour profiles. We present the growth curve to compare our photometry against earlier works in which circular aperture estimations were published. We also perform a structural (disk + bulge) analysis to get insight on the morphology of the pair. The disk+bulge fit shows that NGC 5394 (KPG 404A) is more compact than normal galaxies, while NGC 5395 (KPG 404B) is less concentrated. This suggests an interacting scenario in which NGC 5394 passes through the disk of NGC 5395 (a Cartwheel-type collision), rather than a passage as M51-type pairs.

  18. Study of atomic dipole-dipole interactions via measurement of atom-pair kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Gonçalves, Luís Felipe; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We observe atom-pair kinetics due to binary dipolar forces by direct imaging of the center-of-mass positions of the individual Rydberg atoms and pair-correlation analysis. To prepare a highly dipolar quantum state, Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly- into a strongly-interacting regime via adiabatic state transformation. The transformed atoms exhibit a large permanent electric dipole moment that is locked to the direction of an applied electric field. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces reveal dumbbell-shaped pair correlation images that demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipole-dipole interaction coefficient C3, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the known permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The observations also show the dynamics reminiscent of disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  19. Verbal play as a discourse resource in the social interactions of older and younger communication pairs.

    PubMed

    Shune, Samantha; Duff, Melissa Collins

    2014-01-01

    Verbal play, or the playful manipulation of elements of language, is a pervasive component of social interaction, serving important interpersonal functions. We analyzed verbal play in the interactional discourse of ten healthy younger pairs and ten healthy older pairs as they completed a collaborative referencing task. A total of 1,893 verbal play episodes were coded. While there were no group differences in verbal play frequency, age-related differences in the quality and function of these episodes emerged. While older participants engaged in more complex, extended, and reciprocal episodes that supported the social nature of communicative interactions (e.g., teasing), younger participants were more likely to engage in verbal play episodes for the purpose of successful task completion. Despite these age-related variations in the deployment of verbal play, verbal play is a robust interactional discourse resource in healthy aging, highlighting an element of human cognition that does not appear to decline with age.

  20. Verbal play as a discourse resource in the social interactions of older and younger communication pairs

    PubMed Central

    Shune, Samantha; Duff, Melissa Collins

    2014-01-01

    Verbal play, or the playful manipulation of elements of language, is a pervasive component of social interaction, serving important interpersonal functions. We analyzed verbal play in the interactional discourse of ten healthy younger pairs and ten healthy older pairs as they completed a collaborative referencing task. A total of 1,893 verbal play episodes were coded. While there were no group differences in verbal play frequency, age-related differences in the quality and function of these episodes emerged. While older participants engaged in more complex, extended, and reciprocal episodes that supported the social nature of communicative interactions (e.g., teasing), younger participants were more likely to engage in verbal play episodes for the purpose of successful task completion. Despite these age-related variations in the deployment of verbal play, verbal play is a robust interactional discourse resource in healthy aging, highlighting an element of human cognition that does not appear to decline with age. PMID:25485072

  1. The Quantity and Quality of Language Practice in Typical Interactive Pair/Group Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Laura; White, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study examining the language practice opportunities that occurred during a range of paired and small group interactive tasks in an intensive English as a Second Language (ESL) class of francophone Grade 6 students. The analysis focussed on the opportunities the tasks provided for the use of two complex and challenging…

  2. Dopamine and opioid systems interact within the nucleus accumbens to maintain monogamous pair bonds.

    PubMed

    Resendez, Shanna L; Keyes, Piper C; Day, Jeremy J; Hambro, Caely; Austin, Curtis J; Maina, Francis K; Eidson, Lori; Porter-Stransky, Kirsten A; Nevárez, Natalie; McLean, J William; Kuhnmuench, Morgan A; Murphy, Anne Z; Mathews, Tiffany A; Aragona, Brandon J

    2016-01-01

    Prairie vole breeder pairs form monogamous pair bonds, which are maintained through the expression of selective aggression toward novel conspecifics. Here, we utilize behavioral and anatomical techniques to extend the current understanding of neural mechanisms that mediate pair bond maintenance. For both sexes, we show that pair bonding up-regulates mRNA expression for genes encoding D1-like dopamine (DA) receptors and dynorphin as well as enhances stimulated DA release within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We next show that D1-like receptor regulation of selective aggression is mediated through downstream activation of kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and that activation of these receptors mediates social avoidance. Finally, we also identified sex-specific alterations in KOR binding density within the NAc shell of paired males and demonstrate that this alteration contributes to the neuroprotective effect of pair bonding against drug reward. Together, these findings suggest motivational and valence processing systems interact to mediate the maintenance of social bonds. PMID:27371827

  3. Dopamine and opioid systems interact within the nucleus accumbens to maintain monogamous pair bonds

    PubMed Central

    Resendez, Shanna L; Keyes, Piper C; Day, Jeremy J; Hambro, Caely; Austin, Curtis J; Maina, Francis K; Eidson, Lori N; Porter-Stransky, Kirsten A; Nevárez, Natalie; McLean, J William; Kuhnmuench, Morgan A; Murphy, Anne Z; Mathews, Tiffany A; Aragona, Brandon J

    2016-01-01

    Prairie vole breeder pairs form monogamous pair bonds, which are maintained through the expression of selective aggression toward novel conspecifics. Here, we utilize behavioral and anatomical techniques to extend the current understanding of neural mechanisms that mediate pair bond maintenance. For both sexes, we show that pair bonding up-regulates mRNA expression for genes encoding D1-like dopamine (DA) receptors and dynorphin as well as enhances stimulated DA release within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We next show that D1-like receptor regulation of selective aggression is mediated through downstream activation of kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and that activation of these receptors mediates social avoidance. Finally, we also identified sex-specific alterations in KOR binding density within the NAc shell of paired males and demonstrate that this alteration contributes to the neuroprotective effect of pair bonding against drug reward. Together, these findings suggest motivational and valence processing systems interact to mediate the maintenance of social bonds. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15325.001 PMID:27371827

  4. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Keller, A J; Lim, J S; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S; Katine, J A; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  5. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  6. Influence of Constitution and Charge on Radical Pairing Interactions in Tris-radical Tricationic Complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuyang; Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wang, Yuping; McGonigal, Paul R; Frasconi, Marco; Barnes, Jonathan C; Fahrenbach, Albert C; Wasielewski, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-07-01

    The results of a systematic investigation of trisradical tricationic complexes formed between cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) bisradical dicationic (CBPQT(2(•+))) rings and a series of 18 dumbbells, containing centrally located 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cationic (BIPY(•+)) units within oligomethylene chains terminated for the most part by charged 3,5-dimethylpyridinium (PY(+)) and/or neutral 3,5-dimethylphenyl (PH) groups, are reported. The complexes were obtained by treating equimolar amounts of the CBPQT(4+) ring and the dumbbells containing BIPY(2+) units with zinc dust in acetonitrile solutions. Whereas UV-Vis-NIR spectra revealed absorption bands centered on ca. 1100 nm with quite different intensities for the 1:1 complexes depending on the constitutions and charges on the dumbbells, titration experiments showed that the association constants (Ka) for complex formation vary over a wide range, from 800 M(-1) for the weakest to 180 000 M(-1) for the strongest. While Coulombic repulsions emanating from PY(+) groups located at the ends of some of the dumbbells undoubtedly contribute to the destabilization of the trisradical tricationic complexes, solid-state superstructures support the contention that those dumbbells with neutral PH groups at the ends of flexible and appropriately constituted links to the BIPY(•+) units stand to gain some additional stabilization from C-H···π interactions between the CBPQT(2(•+)) rings and the PH termini on the dumbbells. The findings reported in this Article demonstrate how structural changes implemented remotely from the BIPY(•+) units influence their non-covalent bonding interactions with CBPQT(2(•+)) rings. Different secondary effects (Coulombic repulsions versus C-H···π interactions) are uncovered, and their contributions to both binding strengths associated with trisradical interactions and the kinetics of associations and dissociations are discussed at some length, supported by extensive DFT

  7. Nuclear pairing from bare interaction: Two and three-body chiral forces

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Paolo

    2012-10-20

    In a recent paper the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei has been investigated starting from the chiral nucleon-nucleon potential at the N{sup 3}LO order in the two-body sector and the N{sup 2}LO order in the three-body sector. To include realistic nuclear forces in RHB (Relativistic Hartree Bolgoliubov) calculations we relied on a separable representation of the pairing interaction. In this paper we would like to show recent results concerning isotonic chains with N= 28,50,82.

  8. Non-invasive determination of external forces in vortex-pair-cylinder interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.; Schröder, W.; Shashikanth, B. N.

    2012-06-01

    Expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta of a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system are derived. Based on the knowledge of the flow velocity field, these expressions allow the determination of the external forces exerted on a body moving in the fluid such as, e.g., swimming fish. The verification of the derived conserved quantities is done numerically. The interaction of a vortex pair with a circular cylinder in various configurations of motions representing a generic test case for a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system is investigated in a weakly compressible Navier-Stokes setting using a Cartesian cut-cell method, i.e., the moving circular cylinder is represented by cut cells on a moving mesh. The objectives of this study are twofold. The first objective is to show the robustness of the derived expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta with respect to bounded and discrete data sets. The second objective is to study the coupled dynamics of the vortex pair and a neutrally buoyant cylinder free to move in response to the fluid stresses exerted on its surface. A comparison of the vortex-body interaction with the case of a fixed circular cylinder evidences significant differences in the vortex dynamics. When the cylinder is fixed strong secondary vorticity is generated resulting in a repeating process between the primary vortex pair and the cylinder. In the neutrally buoyant cylinder case, a stable structure consisting of the primary vortex pair and secondary vorticity shear layers stays attached to the moving cylinder. In addition to these fundamental cases, the vortex-pair-cylinder interaction is studied for locomotion at constant speed and locomotion at constant thrust. It is shown that a similar vortex structure like in the neutrally buoyant cylinder case is obtained when the cylinder moves away from the approaching vortex pair at a constant speed smaller than the vortex pair translational velocity. Finally, the idealized

  9. Effects of the plasma profiles on photon and pair production in ultrahigh intensity laser solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Y. X.; Jin, X. L. Yan, W. Z.; Li, J. Q.; Li, B.; Yu, J. Q.

    2015-12-15

    The model of photon and pair production in strong field quantum electrodynamics is implemented into our 1D3V particle-in-cell code with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using this code, the evolution of the particles in ultrahigh intensity laser (∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction with aluminum foil target is observed. Four different initial plasma profiles are considered in the simulations. The effects of initial plasma profiles on photon and pair production, energy spectra, and energy evolution are analyzed. The results imply that one can set an optimal initial plasma profile to obtain the desired photon distributions.

  10. ChIA-PET tool for comprehensive chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Fullwood, Melissa J; Xu, Han; Mulawadi, Fabianus Hendriyan; Velkov, Stoyan; Vega, Vinsensius; Ariyaratne, Pramila Nuwantha; Mohamed, Yusoff Bin; Ooi, Hong-Sain; Tennakoon, Chandana; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Sung, Wing-Kin

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) is a new technology to study genome-wide long-range chromatin interactions bound by protein factors. Here we present ChIA-PET Tool, a software package for automatic processing of ChIA-PET sequence data, including linker filtering, mapping tags to reference genomes, identifying protein binding sites and chromatin interactions, and displaying the results on a graphical genome browser. ChIA-PET Tool is fast, accurate, comprehensive, user-friendly, and open source (available at http://chiapet.gis.a-star.edu.sg). PMID:20181287

  11. Development of the Physical Activity Interactive Recall (PAIR) for Aboriginal children.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Lucie; Cargo, Margaret; Salsberg, Jon

    2004-03-29

    BACKGROUND: Aboriginal children in Canada are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Given that physical inactivity is an important modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes, prevention efforts targeting Aboriginal children include interventions to enhance physical activity involvement. These types of interventions require adequate assessment of physical activity patterns to identify determinants, detect trends, and evaluate progress towards intervention goals. The purpose of this study was to develop a culturally appropriate interactive computer program to self-report physical activity for Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) children that could be administered in a group setting. This was an ancillary study of the ongoing Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP). METHODS: During Phase I, focus groups were conducted to understand how children describe and graphically depict type, intensity and duration of physical activity. Sixty-six students (40 girls, 26 boys, mean age = 8.8 years, SD = 1.8) from four elementary schools in three eastern Canadian Kanien'kehá:ka communities participated in 15 focus groups. Children were asked to discuss and draw about physical activity. Content analysis of focus groups informed the development of a school-day and non-school-day version of the physical activity interactive recall (PAIR). In Phase II, pilot-tests were conducted in two waves with 17 and 28 children respectively to assess the content validity of PAIR. Observation, videotaping, and interviews were conducted to obtain children's feedback on PAIR content and format. RESULTS: Children's representations of activity type and activity intensity were used to compile a total of 30 different physical activity and 14 non-physical activity response choices with accompanying intensity options. Findings from the pilot tests revealed that Kanien'kehá:ka children between nine and 13 years old could answer PAIR without assistance. Content validity of PAIR was judged to be adequate

  12. Study on the impact of pair production interaction on D-T controllable neutron density logging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Zhang, Li; Hou, Boran

    2016-05-01

    This paper considers the effect of pair production on the precision of D-T controllable neutron source density logging. Firstly, the principle of the traditional density logging and pulsed neutron density logging are analyzed and then gamma ray cross sections as a function of energy for various minerals are compared. In addition, the advantageous areas of Compton scattering and pair production interactions on high-energy gamma ray pulse height spectrum and the errors of a controllable source density measurement are studied using a Monte Carlo simulation method. The results indicate that density logging mainly utilizes the Compton scattering of gamma rays, while the attenuation of neutron induced gamma rays and the precision of neutron gamma density measurements are affected by pair production interactions, particularly in the gamma rays with energy higher than 2MeV. By selecting 0.2-2MeV energy range and performing proper lithology correction, the effect of pair production can be eliminated effectively and the density measurement error can be rendered close to the precision of chemical source density logging. PMID:26945102

  13. Study on the impact of pair production interaction on D-T controllable neutron density logging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Zhang, Li; Hou, Boran

    2016-05-01

    This paper considers the effect of pair production on the precision of D-T controllable neutron source density logging. Firstly, the principle of the traditional density logging and pulsed neutron density logging are analyzed and then gamma ray cross sections as a function of energy for various minerals are compared. In addition, the advantageous areas of Compton scattering and pair production interactions on high-energy gamma ray pulse height spectrum and the errors of a controllable source density measurement are studied using a Monte Carlo simulation method. The results indicate that density logging mainly utilizes the Compton scattering of gamma rays, while the attenuation of neutron induced gamma rays and the precision of neutron gamma density measurements are affected by pair production interactions, particularly in the gamma rays with energy higher than 2MeV. By selecting 0.2-2MeV energy range and performing proper lithology correction, the effect of pair production can be eliminated effectively and the density measurement error can be rendered close to the precision of chemical source density logging.

  14. Coulomb gap at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvestani, Masoud; Schreiber, Michael; Vojta, Thomas

    1995-08-01

    The Coulomb glass, a model of interacting localized electrons in a random potential, exhibits a soft gap, the Coulomb gap, in the single-particle density of states (DOS) g(ɛ,T) close to the chemical potential μ. In this paper we investigate the Coulomb gap at finite temperatures T by means of a Monte Carlo method. We find that the Coulomb gap fills with increasing temperature. In contrast to previous results the temperature dependence is, however, much stronger than g(μ,T)~TD-1 as predicted analytically. It can be described by power laws with the exponents 1.75+/-0.1 for the two-dimensional model and 2.7+/-0.1 for the three-dimensional model. Nevertheless, the relation g(μ,T)~g(ɛ,T=0) with ||ɛ-μ||=kBT seems to be valid, since energy dependence of the DOS at low temperatures has also been found to follow power laws with these exponents.

  15. Entropic Corrections to Coulomb's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Sheykhi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Two well-known quantum corrections to the area law have been introduced in the literatures, namely, logarithmic and power-law corrections. Logarithmic corrections, arises from loop quantum gravity due to thermal equilibrium fluctuations and quantum fluctuations, while, power-law correction appears in dealing with the entanglement of quantum fields in and out the horizon. Inspired by Verlinde's argument on the entropic force, and assuming the quantum corrected relation for the entropy, we propose the entropic origin for the Coulomb's law in this note. Also we investigate the Uehling potential as a radiative correction to Coulomb potential in 1-loop order and show that for some value of distance the entropic corrections of the Coulomb's law is compatible with the vacuum-polarization correction in QED. So, we derive modified Coulomb's law as well as the entropy corrected Poisson's equation which governing the evolution of the scalar potential ϕ. Our study further supports the unification of gravity and electromagnetic interactions based on the holographic principle.

  16. Interactions in ion pairs of protic ionic liquids: comparison with aprotic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Shinoda, Wataru; Miran, Md Shah; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2013-11-01

    The stabilization energies for the formation (E(form)) of 11 ion pairs of protic and aprotic ionic liquids were studied by MP2/6-311G** level ab initio calculations to elucidate the difference between the interactions of ions in protic ionic liquids and those in aprotic ionic liquids. The interactions in the ion pairs of protic ionic liquids (diethylmethylammonium [dema] and dimethylpropylammonium [dmpa] based ionic liquids) are stronger than those of aprotic ionic liquids (ethyltrimethylammonium [etma] based ionic liquids). The E(form) for the [dema][CF3SO3] and [dmpa][CF3SO3] complexes (-95.6 and -96.4 kcal/mol, respectively) are significantly larger (more negative) than that for the [etma][CF3SO3] complex (-81.0 kcal/mol). The same trend was observed for the calculations of ion pairs of the three cations with the Cl(-), BF4(-), TFSA(-) anions. The anion has contact with the N-H bond of the dema(+) or dmpa(+) cations in the most stable geometries of the dema(+) and dmpa(+) complexes. The optimized geometries, in which the anions locate on the counter side of the cations, are 11.0-18.0 kcal/mol less stable, which shows that the interactions in the ions pairs of protic ionic liquids have strong directionality. The E(form) for the less stable geometries for the dema(+) and dmpa(+) complexes are close to those for the most stable etma(+) complexes. The electrostatic interaction, which is the major source of the attraction in the ion pairs, is responsible for the directionality of the interactions and determining the magnitude of the interaction energy. Molecular dynamic simulations of the [dema][TFSA] and [dmpa][TFSA] ionic liquids show that the N-H bonds of the cations have contact with the negatively charged (oxygen and nitrogen) atoms of TFSA(-) anion, while the strong directionality of the interactions was not suggested from the simulation of the [etma][CF3SO3] ionic liquid.

  17. Interactions in ion pairs of protic ionic liquids: Comparison with aprotic ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Shinoda, Wataru; Miran, Md. Shah; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2013-11-07

    The stabilization energies for the formation (E{sub form}) of 11 ion pairs of protic and aprotic ionic liquids were studied by MP2/6-311G{sup **} level ab initio calculations to elucidate the difference between the interactions of ions in protic ionic liquids and those in aprotic ionic liquids. The interactions in the ion pairs of protic ionic liquids (diethylmethylammonium [dema] and dimethylpropylammonium [dmpa] based ionic liquids) are stronger than those of aprotic ionic liquids (ethyltrimethylammonium [etma] based ionic liquids). The E{sub form} for the [dema][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] and [dmpa][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] complexes (−95.6 and −96.4 kcal/mol, respectively) are significantly larger (more negative) than that for the [etma][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] complex (−81.0 kcal/mol). The same trend was observed for the calculations of ion pairs of the three cations with the Cl{sup −}, BF{sub 4}{sup −}, TFSA{sup −} anions. The anion has contact with the N–H bond of the dema{sup +} or dmpa{sup +} cations in the most stable geometries of the dema{sup +} and dmpa{sup +} complexes. The optimized geometries, in which the anions locate on the counter side of the cations, are 11.0–18.0 kcal/mol less stable, which shows that the interactions in the ions pairs of protic ionic liquids have strong directionality. The E{sub form} for the less stable geometries for the dema{sup +} and dmpa{sup +} complexes are close to those for the most stable etma{sup +} complexes. The electrostatic interaction, which is the major source of the attraction in the ion pairs, is responsible for the directionality of the interactions and determining the magnitude of the interaction energy. Molecular dynamic simulations of the [dema][TFSA] and [dmpa][TFSA] ionic liquids show that the N–H bonds of the cations have contact with the negatively charged (oxygen and nitrogen) atoms of TFSA{sup −} anion, while the strong directionality of the interactions was not suggested from the simulation

  18. Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their “avatars” along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment. PMID:24419102

  19. Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: a minimalist virtual reality experiment.

    PubMed

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-14

    Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their "avatars" along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment.

  20. Molecular Interactions in 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Acetate Ion Pair: A Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhumal, Nilesh R.; Kim, Hyung J.; Kiefer, Johannes

    2009-08-01

    The density functional method is used to obtain the molecular structure, electron density topography, and vibrational frequencies of the ion pair 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Different conformers are simulated on the basis of molecular interactions between the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and acetate anion. The lowest energy conformers exhibit strong C-H···O interionic interactions compared with other conformers. Characteristic vibrational frequencies of the ion pair and their shifts with respect to free ions are analyzed via the natural bond orbitals and difference electron density maps coupled with molecular electron density topology. Theoretically scaled vibrational frequencies are also compared with the spontaneous Raman scattering and attenuated total reflection infrared absorption measurements.

  1. On the classical description of the recombination of dark matter particles with a Coulomb-like interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, K. M.; Esipova, E. A.; Kirillov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Cold dark matter (DM) scenario may be cured of several problems by involving self-interaction of dark matter. Viability of the models of long-range interacting DM crucially depends on the effectiveness of recombination of the DM particles, making thereby their interaction short-range. Usually in numeric calculations, recombination is described by cross section obtained on a feasible quantum level. However in a wide range of parameter values, a classical treatment, where the particles are bound due to dipole radiation, is applicable. The cross sections, obtained in both approaches, are very different and lead to diverse consequences. Classical cross section has a steeper dependence on relative velocity, what leads to the fact that, after decoupling of DM particles from thermal background of "dark photons" (carriers of DM long-range interaction), recombination process does not "freeze out", diminishing gradually density of unbound DM particles. Our simplified estimates show, that at the taken parameter values (the mass of DM particle is 100 GeV, interaction constant is 100-1, and quite natural assumptions on initial conditions, from which the result is very weakly dependent) the difference in residual density reaches about 5 orders of magnitude on pre-galactic stage. This estimate takes into account thermal effects induced by dipole radiation and recombination, which resulted in the increase of both temperature and density of DM particles by a half order of magnitude.

  2. Formation of chain structures in systems of charged grains interacting via isotropic pair potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I.; Koss, K. G.

    2013-05-15

    Conditions for the formation of chain structures of charged grains confined in the gravitational field by external electric fields are studied analytically and numerically. The relationships between the parameters of the pair interaction potential, the number of grains, and the electric field gradient in the trap are found. A criterion for the violation of stable equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional chain of grains and the formation of a new configuration in the system is proposed.

  3. Excessive production of electron pairs by soft photons in low multiplicity ion interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Three multiply charged primary cosmic ray interactions with carbon nuclei are reported, in which the number of materialized electron pairs within a distance of about 0.3 conversion length is larger than predicted from isospin considerations. These are the most energetic (sigma E gamma 4 TeV) of the low multiplicity ( 15 tracks) events observed in the Japanese-American Cooperative Experiment (JACEE-2) emulsion chamber.

  4. Investigating Coulomb's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Ellis; Koehlinger, Mervin; Kowalski, Ludwik; Swackhamer, Gregg

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of a computer-linked camera to demonstrate Coulomb's law. Suggests a way of reducing the difficulties in presenting Coulomb's law by teaching the inverse square law of gravity and the inverse square law of electricity in the same unit. (AIM)

  5. Observation of interband pairing interaction in a two-band superconductor: MgB2.

    PubMed

    Geerk, J; Schneider, R; Linker, G; Zaitsev, A G; Heid, R; Bohnen, K-P; v Löhneysen, H

    2005-06-10

    The recently discovered anisotropic superconductor MgB2 is the first of its kind showing the intriguing properties of two-band superconductivity. By tunneling experiments using thin film tunnel junctions, electron-coupled phonon spectra were determined showing that superconductivity in MgB2 is phonon mediated. In a further analysis, which involves first principles calculations, the strongest feature in these spectra could be traced back to the key quantity of two-band superconductivity, the interband pairing interaction. For the phonons, this interaction turns out quite selective. It involves mainly low-energy optical phonon modes, where the boron atoms move perpendicular to the boron planes.

  6. A Survey of Aspartate Phenylalanine and Glutamate Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek M; Harris, Jason B; Adams, Rachel M; Nguyen, Don; Spires, Jeremy; Howell, Elizabeth E.; Hinde, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242 8249]. To study the role of anion interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe Asp or Glu pairs separated by less than 7 in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (2 to 7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation interactions as well as potential stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  7. An interaction scenario of the galaxy pair NGC 3893/96 (KPG 302): A single passage?

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbasov, R. F.; Rosado, M.; Klapp, J.

    2014-05-20

    Using the data obtained previously from Fabry-Perot interferometry, we study the orbital characteristics of the interacting pair of galaxies KPG 302 with the aim to estimate a possible interaction history, the conditions necessary for the spiral arm formation, and initial satellite mass. We found by performing N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the interaction that a single passage can produce a grand design spiral pattern in less than 1 Gyr. Although we reproduce most of the features with the single passage, the required satellite to host mass ratio should be ∼1:5, which is not confirmed by the dynamical mass estimate made from the measured rotation curve. We conclude that a more realistic interaction scenario would require several passages in order to explain the mass ratio discrepancy.

  8. The Interacting Galaxy Pair NGC 5394/95: Near-Infrared Photometry, Structure, and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerari, Ivânio; Valdez-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Hernández-López, Izbeth

    2005-10-01

    We present near-infrared observations in the J, H, and K' passbands of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5394/95 (KPG 404). The total magnitudes, colors, surface brightnesses, and color profiles are calculated. In addition, aperture magnitudes are compared against previous determinations. We also perform a structural (disk + bulge) analysis, as well as a two-dimensional Fourier analysis, to gain insight into the morphology of the pair. The disk + bulge fit shows that NGC 5394 (KPG 404A) is more compact than normal galaxies, while NGC 5395 (KPG 404B) is less concentrated. The two-dimensional Fourier analysis shows that NGC 5394 is an H2β galaxy in the dust-penetrated (DP) classification by Block & Puerari. NGC 5395, in contrast, displays a very complex structure that needs a number of Fourier coefficients to be explained. A tightly wound m=1 coefficient (DP class H1α) is the main structure, but other m=1 and m=2 coefficients (suggesting modulation) are also present in the Fourier spectra. The m=1 coefficients represent a pseudo-ring-type structure, indicative of a collision rather than a passage. Based on our results we are able to assert that the scenario of the interaction between the galaxy members of KPG 404 should take into account a crossing of NGC 5394 through the disk of NGC 5395 in a Cartwheel-like encounter rather than a passage as in M51-type pairs. Numerical simulations could help to unravel the structural and morphological evolution of this interacting pair.

  9. Metal-insulator transition and novel magnetism driven by Coulomb interactions, spin-orbit coupling and disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meetei, Oinam Nganba

    Strong interactions in transition metal oxides can lead to spectacular phenomena like high Tc superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance which have dominated materials research in the past decades. The goal of this thesis is to examine the interplay of strong correlations with additional degrees of freedom, like spin orbit coupling (SOC), multiple transition metal ions and disorder. We start with a discussion of Mott insulators, with the transition metal in the d4 configuration, where the competition between superexchange interaction and SOC leads to a novel ferromagnetic insulator. In recent years SOC has been at the center stage of condensed matter research because it can produce band insulators in uncorrelated materials with non-trivial topological properties. Here, we focus on the dual role of SOC and strong interactions, naturally realized in 4d/5dd transition metal oxides. We show that in d4 Mott insulators, the local moment can be altered by varying the relative strength of SOC and superexchange, both of which are small parameters compared to the interaction energy scale. In fact, a phase transition from a non-magnetic insulator with J=0 singlets at every site to an orbitally entangled ferromagnetic insulator occurs with decreasing SOC. Our results challenge the commonly held notion that local moments are robust in a Mott insulator. We identify candidate materials and present predictions for Resonant X-ray Scattering (RXS) signatures of the unusual magnetism in d4 Mott insulators. Next we focus on the double perovskite material Sr2 CrOsO6 which is an insulator and has the highest ferromagnetic Tc among all perovskites with a net moment. It presents several puzzles which we address systematically. Its insulating behavior cannot be explained from a band theory point of view or from a naive consideration of Mott physics. Additionally, the net moment at low temperature, M(0)=0.75 μΒ ,is unusual for half-filled bands where anti-ferromagnetism is expected

  10. Coupling strength in Coulomb and Yukawa one-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, T.; Bonitz, M.; Stanton, L. G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2014-11-15

    In a non-ideal classical Coulomb one-component plasma (OCP), all thermodynamic properties are known to depend only on a single parameter—the coupling parameter Γ. In contrast, if the pair interaction is screened by background charges (Yukawa OCP) the thermodynamic state depends, in addition, on the range of the interaction via the screening parameter κ. How to determine in this case an effective coupling parameter has been a matter of intensive debate. Here we propose a consistent approach for defining and measuring the coupling strength in Coulomb and Yukawa OCPs based on a fundamental structural quantity, the radial pair distribution function (RPDF). The RPDF is often accessible in experiments by direct observation or indirectly through the static structure factor. Alternatively, it is directly computed in theoretical models or simulations. Our approach is based on the observation that the build-up of correlation from a weakly coupled system proceeds in two steps: First, a monotonically increasing volume around each particle becomes devoid of other particles (correlation hole), and second (upon further increase of the coupling), a shell structure emerges around each particle giving rise to growing peaks of the RPDF. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we present a systematic study for the dependence of these features of the RPDF on Γ and κ and derive a simple expression for the effective coupling parameter.

  11. Pairing interaction near a nematic quantum critical point of a three-band CuO2 model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maier, Thomas A.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, we calculate the pairing interaction and the k dependence of the gap function associated with the nematic charge fluctuations of a CuO2 model.We find that the nematic pairing interaction is attractive for small momentum transfer and that it gives rise to d-wave pairing. Finally, as the doping p approaches a quantum critical point, the strength of this pairing increases and higher d-wave harmonics contribute to the k dependence of the superconducting gap function, reflecting the longer range nature of the nematic fluctuations.

  12. Pairing interaction near a nematic quantum critical point of a three-band CuO2 model

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Thomas A.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, we calculate the pairing interaction and the k dependence of the gap function associated with the nematic charge fluctuations of a CuO2 model.We find that the nematic pairing interaction is attractive for small momentum transfer and that it gives rise to d-wave pairing. Finally, as the doping p approaches a quantum critical point, the strength of this pairing increases and higher d-wave harmonics contribute to the k dependence of the superconducting gap function, reflecting the longer range nature of the nematic fluctuations.

  13. Dynamical DMRG study of non-linear optical response in one-dimensional dimerized Hubbard model with nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction and alternating on-site potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, Shigetoshi; Tohyama, Takami; Brazovskii, Serguei

    2012-02-01

    The optical response of organic compounds has been attracting much attention. The one of the reasons is the huge non-linear and ultrafast optical response [K. Yamamoto et. al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 77, 074709(2008)]. In order to investigate such optical properties, we carry out dynamical DMRG calculations to obtain optical responses in the 1/4-filled one-dimensional Hubbard model including the nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction and the alternating electron hopping. The charge gap [S. Nishimoto, M. Takahashi, and Y. Ohta, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 69, 1594(2000)] and the bound state [H. Benthien and E. Jeckelmann, Eur. Phys. J. B 44, 287(2005)] in this model have been discussed based on DMRG calculations. In the present study, we introduce an alternating on-site potential giving the polarization in the system into the dimerized Hubbard model, which breaks the reflection symmetry of the system. In this talk, we discuss the obtained linear and the 2nd order non-linear optical susceptibility in order to make a prediction for non-linear optical experiments in the future.

  14. Vertex renormalization of weak interactions and Cooper-pair breaking in cooling compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakian, Armen; Muether, Herbert; Schuck, Peter

    2007-11-15

    Below the critical temperature of superfluid phase transition baryonic matter emits neutrinos by breaking and recombination of Cooper pairs formed in the condensate. The weak vector and axial-vector vertices and the neutrino loss rates via pair breaking are modified by strong interactions in nuclear medium. We study these modifications nonperturbatively by summing infinite series of particle-hole loops in S-wave superfluid neutron matter. The interactions in the particle-hole channel are described within the Landau Fermi-liquid framework with the Landau parameters derived from the microscopic theory. The S-wave superfluid is described within the BCS theory. We derive the renormalized three-point vector and axial-vector vertices and the complete polarization tensor of matter and its low momentum transfer expansion. The leading-order term in this expansion and the associated neutrino losses arise at O(q{sup 2}), consistent with the f-sum rule. The neutrino emission rate due to the pair breaking is parametrically suppressed compared to its one-loop counterpart by the ratio of the neutron recoil energy to the temperature, which is of order 5x10{sup -3}. The approximations to the normal and anomalous self-energies that guarantee the conformity of the theory with the generalized Ward identities are established.

  15. Assessment of the photosensitization properties of cationic porphyrins in interaction with DNA nucleotide pairs.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Jirón, Gloria I; Cortez, Luis

    2013-07-01

    We present a theoretical assessment of the photosensitization properties of meso-mono(N-methylpyridyl) triphenylporphyrin (1, MmPyP(+)), which interacts with DNA nucleotide pairs [adenine (A)-thymine (T); guanine (G)-cytosine (C)] via an external binding mode. The photosensitization properties of the arrangements 1A, 1T, 1G and 1C were investigated. A set of density functionals (B3LYP, PBE0, CAM-B3LYP, M06-2X, B97D) with the 6-31G(d) basis set was used to calculate the electronic absorption spectra in solution (water) following TD-DFT methodology. In all the arrangements, with the exception of 1C, the functional PBE0 produced the lowest deviation of the Soret band (0.1-0.2 eV). Using this functional, we show that the porphyrin-nucleotide interaction is stabilized, as reflected by a larger HOMO-LUMO gap than free porphyrin. A more important effect of the interaction corresponds to the red-shift of the Soret band of MmPyP(+), which is in agreement with experimental results. This behavior could be explained by the higher symmetry found in arrangements with a lower dipole moment, and by the more symmetrical distribution of electronic density along the molecular orbitals, which provokes electronic transitions of lower energy. The structural model allowed us to show that MmPyP(+) improves the characteristics as a photosensitizer when it interacts with nucleotide pairs due to the longer wavelength required for the Soret band. Results obtained for porphyrins with larger monocationic substituents (2, MmAP+; 3, MONPP+) do not lead to the same behavior. Although the structural model is insufficient to describe porphyrin photosensitization, it suggests that improvements in this property are produced by the inclusion of a cationic charge in the pyridyl ring and a smaller size of the substituent leading to a better communication in the porphyrin-nucleotide pair.

  16. End of Frustration: Catalytic Precision Polymerization with Highly Interacting Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Maximilian G M; Giuman, Marco M; Pöthig, Alexander; Rieger, Bernhard

    2016-06-22

    Herein we report on the catalytic polymerization of diverse Michael-type monomers with high precision by using simple but highly active combinations of phosphorus-containing Lewis bases and organoaluminum compounds. The interacting Lewis pair catalysts enable the control of molecular weight and microstructure of the produced polymers. The reactions show a linear Mn vs consumption plot thus proving a living type polymerization. The initiation has been investigated by end-group analysis with ESI mass spectrometric analysis. With these main-group element Lewis acid base pairs, it is not only possible to polymerize sterically demanding, functionalized as well as heteroatom containing monomers but also, for the first time, to catalytically polymerize extended Michael systems, like 4-vinylpyridine. PMID:27254134

  17. Suitability of the Binaural Interaction Component for Interaural Electrode Pairing of Bilateral Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongmei; Kollmeier, Birger; Dietz, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Although bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) have succeeded in improving the spatial hearing performance of bilateral CI users, the overall performance is still not comparable with normal hearing listeners. Limited success can be partially caused by an interaural mismatch of the place-of-stimulation in each cochlea. Pairing matched interaural CI electrodes and stimulating them with the same frequency band is expected to facilitate binaural functions such as binaural fusion, localization, or spatial release from masking. It has been shown in animal experiments that the magnitude of the binaural interaction component (BIC) derived from the wave-eV decreases for increasing interaural place of stimulation mismatch. This motivated the investigation of the suitability of an electroencephalography-based objective electrode-frequency fitting procedure based on the BIC for BiCI users. A 61 channel monaural and binaural electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (eABR) recording was performed in 7 MED-EL BiCI subjects so far. These BiCI subjects were directly stimulated at 60% dynamic range with 19.9 pulses per second via a research platform provided by the University of Innsbruck (RIB II). The BIC was derived for several interaural electrode pairs by subtracting the response from binaural stimulation from their summed monaural responses. The BIC based pairing results are compared with two psychoacoustic pairing methods: interaural pulse time difference sensitivity and interaural pitch matching. The results for all three methods analyzed as a function of probe electrode allow for determining a matched pair in more than half of the subjects, with a typical accuracy of ± 1 electrode. This includes evidence for statistically significant tuning of the BIC as a function of probe electrode in human subjects. However, results across the three conditions were sometimes not consistent. These discrepancies will be discussed in the light of pitch plasticity versus less plastic

  18. Suitability of the Binaural Interaction Component for Interaural Electrode Pairing of Bilateral Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongmei; Kollmeier, Birger; Dietz, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Although bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) have succeeded in improving the spatial hearing performance of bilateral CI users, the overall performance is still not comparable with normal hearing listeners. Limited success can be partially caused by an interaural mismatch of the place-of-stimulation in each cochlea. Pairing matched interaural CI electrodes and stimulating them with the same frequency band is expected to facilitate binaural functions such as binaural fusion, localization, or spatial release from masking. It has been shown in animal experiments that the magnitude of the binaural interaction component (BIC) derived from the wave-eV decreases for increasing interaural place of stimulation mismatch. This motivated the investigation of the suitability of an electroencephalography-based objective electrode-frequency fitting procedure based on the BIC for BiCI users. A 61 channel monaural and binaural electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (eABR) recording was performed in 7 MED-EL BiCI subjects so far. These BiCI subjects were directly stimulated at 60% dynamic range with 19.9 pulses per second via a research platform provided by the University of Innsbruck (RIB II). The BIC was derived for several interaural electrode pairs by subtracting the response from binaural stimulation from their summed monaural responses. The BIC based pairing results are compared with two psychoacoustic pairing methods: interaural pulse time difference sensitivity and interaural pitch matching. The results for all three methods analyzed as a function of probe electrode allow for determining a matched pair in more than half of the subjects, with a typical accuracy of ± 1 electrode. This includes evidence for statistically significant tuning of the BIC as a function of probe electrode in human subjects. However, results across the three conditions were sometimes not consistent. These discrepancies will be discussed in the light of pitch plasticity versus less plastic

  19. Coulomb drag in quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Alex; Kamenev, Alex

    2008-11-21

    We study the drag effect in a system of two electrically isolated quantum point contacts, coupled by Coulomb interactions. Drag current exhibits maxima as a function of quantum point contacts gate voltages when the latter are tuned to the transitions between quantized conductance plateaus. In the linear regime this behavior is due to enhanced electron-hole asymmetry near an opening of a new conductance channel. In the nonlinear regime the drag current is proportional to the shot noise of the driving circuit, suggesting that the Coulomb drag experiments may be a convenient way to measure the quantum shot noise. Remarkably, the transition to the nonlinear regime may occur at driving voltages substantially smaller than the temperature.

  20. Lone-pairinteractions: analysis of the physical origin and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Jan; Bazzi, Sophia; Marek, Radek; Kozelka, Jiří

    2016-07-28

    Lone-pair-π (lp-π) interactions have been suggested to stabilize DNA and protein structures, and to participate in the formation of DNA-protein complexes. To elucidate their physical origin, we have carried out a theoretical multi-approach analysis of two biologically relevant model systems, water-indole and water-uracil complexes, which we compared with the structurally similar chloride-tetracyanobenzene (TCB) complex previously shown to contain a strong charge-transfer (CT) binding component. We demonstrate that the CT component in lp-π interactions between water and indole/uracil is significantly smaller than that stabilizing the Cl(-)-TCB reference system. The strong lp(Cl(-))-π(TCB) orbital interaction is characterized by a small energy gap and an efficient lp-π* overlap. In contrast, in lp-π interactions between water and indole or uracil, the corresponding energy gap is larger and the overlap less efficient. As a result, water-uracil and water-indole interactions are weak forces composed by smaller contributions from all energy components: electrostatics, polarization, dispersion, and charge transfer. In addition, indole exhibits a negative electrostatic potential at its π-face, making lp-π interactions less favorable than O-Hπ hydrogen bonding. Consequently, some of the water-tryptophan contacts observed in X-ray structures of proteins and previously interpreted as lp-π interactions [Luisi, et al., Proteins, 2004, 57, 1-8], might in fact arise from O-Hπ hydrogen bonding.

  1. Lone-pairinteractions: analysis of the physical origin and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Jan; Bazzi, Sophia; Marek, Radek; Kozelka, Jiří

    2016-07-28

    Lone-pair-π (lp-π) interactions have been suggested to stabilize DNA and protein structures, and to participate in the formation of DNA-protein complexes. To elucidate their physical origin, we have carried out a theoretical multi-approach analysis of two biologically relevant model systems, water-indole and water-uracil complexes, which we compared with the structurally similar chloride-tetracyanobenzene (TCB) complex previously shown to contain a strong charge-transfer (CT) binding component. We demonstrate that the CT component in lp-π interactions between water and indole/uracil is significantly smaller than that stabilizing the Cl(-)-TCB reference system. The strong lp(Cl(-))-π(TCB) orbital interaction is characterized by a small energy gap and an efficient lp-π* overlap. In contrast, in lp-π interactions between water and indole or uracil, the corresponding energy gap is larger and the overlap less efficient. As a result, water-uracil and water-indole interactions are weak forces composed by smaller contributions from all energy components: electrostatics, polarization, dispersion, and charge transfer. In addition, indole exhibits a negative electrostatic potential at its π-face, making lp-π interactions less favorable than O-Hπ hydrogen bonding. Consequently, some of the water-tryptophan contacts observed in X-ray structures of proteins and previously interpreted as lp-π interactions [Luisi, et al., Proteins, 2004, 57, 1-8], might in fact arise from O-Hπ hydrogen bonding. PMID:27411074

  2. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  3. The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2014-04-01

    Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ω-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of π-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

  4. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun -Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-26

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. Lastly, this study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  5. Photoassociation of a cold-atom-molecule pair: Long-range quadrupole-quadrupole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lepers, M.; Dulieu, O.; Kokoouline, V.

    2010-10-15

    The general formalism of the multipolar expansion of electrostatic interactions is applied to the calculation of the potential energy between an excited atom (without fine structure) and a ground-state diatomic molecule at large mutual separations. Both partners exhibit a permanent quadrupole moment so that their mutual long-range interaction is dominated by a quadrupole-quadrupole term, which is attractive enough to bind trimers. Numerical results are given for an excited Cs(6{sup 2}P) atom and a ground-state Cs{sub 2} molecule. The prospects for achieving photoassociation of a cold-atom-dimer pair are thus discussed and found promising. The formalism can be generalized to the long-range interaction between molecules to investigate the formation of cold tetramers.

  6. Intriguing radical-radical interactions among double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Laibin; Su, Xiyu; Su, Hanlei; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pair as well as its deprotonated Watson-Crick derivatives. Double-electron oxidation can destabilize the AT unit, leading to a barrier-hindered metastable A+T+ state with a dissociation channel featuring negative dissociation energy. This unusual energetic phenomenon originates from the competition of electrostatic repulsion and attractively hydrogen-bonding interaction co-existing between Arad + and Trad +. The associated double-proton-transfer process is also explored, suggesting a possible two-step mechanism. Magnetic coupling interactions of various diradical structures are controlled by both intra- and inter-molecular interactions.

  7. Probing the role of interlayer coupling and coulomb interactions on electronic structure in few-layer MoSe₂ nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Aaron J; Ugeda, Miguel M; da Jornada, Felipe H; Qiu, Diana Y; Ruan, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Riss, Alexander; Lu, Jiong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Louie, Steven G; Crommie, Michael F

    2015-04-01

    Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution of the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron-electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices.

  8. GGIP: Structure and sequence-based GPCR-GPCR interaction pair predictor.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Wataru; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Saito, Akira; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are important pharmaceutical targets. More than 30% of currently marketed pharmaceutical medicines target GPCRs. Numerous studies have reported that GPCRs function not only as monomers but also as homo- or hetero-dimers or higher-order molecular complexes. Many GPCRs exert a wide variety of molecular functions by forming specific combinations of GPCR subtypes. In addition, some GPCRs are reportedly associated with diseases. GPCR oligomerization is now recognized as an important event in various biological phenomena, and many researchers are investigating this subject. We have developed a support vector machine (SVM)-based method to predict interacting pairs for GPCR oligomerization, by integrating the structure and sequence information of GPCRs. The performance of our method was evaluated by the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. The corresponding area under the curve was 0.938. As far as we know, this is the only prediction method for interacting pairs among GPCRs. Our method could accelerate the analyses of these interactions, and contribute to the elucidation of the global structures of the GPCR networks in membranes. Proteins 2016; 84:1224-1233. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27191053

  9. Space-dependent formation of central pair microtubules and their interactions with radial spokes.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yuki; Ariyoshi, Tetsuro; Noga, Akira; Kamiya, Ritsu; Hirono, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella contain nine outer doublet microtubules and a pair of central microtubules. The central pair of microtubules (CP) is important for cilia/flagella beating, as clearly shown by primary ciliary dyskinesia resulting from the loss of the CP. The CP is thought to regulate axonemal dyneins through interaction with radial spokes (RSs). However, the nature of the CP-RS interaction is poorly understood. Here we examine the appearance of CPs in the axonemes of a Chlamydomonas mutant, bld12, which produces axonemes with 8 to 11 outer-doublets. Most of its 8-doublet axonemes lack CPs. However, in the double mutant of bld12 and pf14, a mutant lacking the RS, most 8-doublet axonemes contain the CP. Thus formation of the CP apparently depends on the internal space limited by the outer doublets and RSs. In 10- or 11-doublet axonemes, only 3-5 RSs are attached to the CP and the doublet arrangement is distorted most likely because the RSs attached to the CP pull the outer doublets toward the axonemal center. The CP orientation in the axonemes varies in double mutants formed between bld12 and mutants lacking particular CP projections. The mutant bld12 thus provides the first direct and visual information about the CP-RS interaction, as well as about the mechanism of CP formation.

  10. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order.

  11. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  12. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M.; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near Tc, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below Tc, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high Tc: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  13. Coulomb Stress Interactions Among Earthquakes in the Gorda Deformation Zone, the San Andreas, Mendocino Fracture Zone, and Cascadia Megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, C.; Stein, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    During the last 30 years the most prolific source of large earthquakes in the western U.S. has been the Gorda deformation zone, a region of diffuse shear off the coast of northernmost California and southern Oregon. Fifteen M≥6 earthquakes have occurred there since 1980, including M≥7 shocks. The abundance of large earthquakes on different fault systems provides fertile ground for the study of earthquake interaction. We find five strong examples of triggering attributable to static stress transfer. A left- lateral Mw=7.3 earthquake in 1980 promoted slip on the right-lateral Mendocino Fracture Zone (MFZ) in an area where aftershocks were abundant, and inhibited slip on a section of the MFZ where aftershocks were absent. The 1980 earthquake appears to have inhibited slip on the Gorda zone faults except within an off- fault stress trigger lobe where three M≥6 shocks subsequently struck. The Mw=6.9 earthquake at Cape Mendocino in 1992 promoted failure on the rupture planes of Mw=6.5 and Mw=6.6 aftershocks. M≥7 earthquakes in 1994 and 2005 are found to have promoted the rupture of subsequent Mw=6.6 earthquakes. We also calculate that the 1906 San Andreas earthquake promoted slip on the MFZ and left-lateral slip on Gorda deformation zone faults, consistent with the M~5.8 shock offshore Cape Mendocino in 1909 and earthquakes in 1922, 1941 and 1954. However, the 1991 Mw=7.0 earthquake should have inhibited the rupture of the 2005 Mw=7.2 earthquake. There are also examples of earthquakes closely spaced in time that occurred more than two source dimensions apart, the approximate limit of static stress transfer for earthquakes with 30-bar stress-drops. A 16 Aug 1991 Mw=6.3 shock was followed 21 hr later by the 17 Aug event 200 km away; the 17 Aug 1991 Mw=6.1 shock was followed 3 hr later by a Mw=7.0 shock 200 km away; and a 25 Nov 1954 M=6.1 shock was followed 26 days later by a M=6.5 shock 120 km away. Together these counter-examples suggest that dynamic triggering

  14. Coulomb Glass: a Mean Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandra, Salvatore; Palassini, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    We study the Coulomb glass model of disordered localized electrons with long-range Coulomb interaction, which describes systems such as disordered insulators, granular metals, amorphous semiconductors, or doped crystalline semiconductors. Long ago Efros and Shklovskii showed that the long-range repulsion induces a soft Coulomb gap in the single particle density of states at low temperatures. Recent works suggested that this gap is associated to a transition to a glass phase, similar to the Almeida-Thouless transition in spin glasses. In this work, we use a mean field approach to characterize several physical properties of the Coulomb glass. In particular, following a seminal work of Bray and Moore, we show that the Edward-Anderson parameter qEA and the spin glass susceptibility χSG are directly related to spectrum distribution of the Hessian matrix around free energy minima. Using this result, we show that no glass transition is associated to the gap formation.

  15. Accurate energies of hydrogen bonded nucleic acid base pairs and triplets in tRNA tertiary interactions

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Tertiary interactions are crucial in maintaining the tRNA structure and functionality. We used a combined sequence analysis and quantum mechanics approach to calculate accurate energies of the most frequent tRNA tertiary base pairing interactions. Our analysis indicates that six out of the nine classical tertiary interactions are held in place mainly by H-bonds between the bases. In the remaining three cases other effects have to be considered. Tertiary base pairing interaction energies range from −8 to −38 kcal/mol in yeast tRNAPhe and are estimated to contribute roughly 25% of the overall tRNA base pairing interaction energy. Six analyzed posttranslational chemical modifications were shown to have minor effect on the geometry of the tertiary interactions. Modifications that introduce a positive charge strongly stabilize the corresponding tertiary interactions. Non-additive effects contribute to the stability of base triplets. PMID:16461956

  16. Resonantly enhanced electron-positron pair production in ultra-intense laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeai, Francois; Lorin, Emmanuel; Bandrauk, Andre

    2013-05-01

    A new mechanism for pair production from the interaction of a laser with two nuclei is presented. The latter takes advantage of the Stark effect in diatomic molecules and the presence of molecular resonances in the negative and positive energy continua. Both move in the complex energy plane as the interatomic distance and the electric field strength are varied. We demonstrate that there is an enhancement of pair production at the crossing of these resonances. This mechanism is studied in a very simple one-dimensional model where the nuclei are modelled by delta function potential wells and the laser by a constant electric field. The position of resonances is evaluated by using the Weyl-Titchmarch-Kodaira theory, which allows to treat singular boundary value problems and to compute the spectral density. The rate of producing pairs is also computed. It is shown that this process yields a positron production rate which is approximately an order of magnitude higher than in the single nucleus case and a few orders of magnitudes higher than Schwinger's tunnelling result in a static field.

  17. Mapping IR Enhancements in Closely Interacting Spiral-Spiral Pairs: I. ISO CAM and ISO SWS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.; Gao, Y.; Mazzarella, J.; Lu, N.; Sulentic, J.; Domingue, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging and spectroscopic observations are presented for a well defined sample of eight closely interacting (CLO) pairs of spiral galaxies that have overlapping disks and show enhanced far-infrared (FIR) emission.

  18. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  19. Fluctuation-driven anisotropy in effective pair interactions between nanoparticles: Thiolated gold nanoparticles in ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Jabes, B. Shadrack; Yadav, Hari O. S.; Chakravarty, Charusita; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-10-21

    Fluctuations within the ligand shell of a nanoparticle give rise to a significant degree of anisotropy in effective pair interactions for low grafting densities [B. Bozorgui, D. Meng, S. K. Kumar, C. Chakravarty, and A. Cacciuto, Nano Lett. 13, 2732 (2013)]. Here, we examine the corresponding fluctuation-driven anisotropy for gold nanocrystals densely passivated with short ligands. In particular, we consider gold nanocrystals capped by alkylthiols, both in vacuum and in ethane solvent at high density. As in the preceding study, we show that the anisotropy in the nanoparticle pair potential can be quantified by an angle-dependent correction term to the isotropic potential of mean force (PMF). We find that the anisotropy of the ligand shells is distance dependent, and strongly influenced by ligand interdigitation effects as well as expulsion of ligand chains from the interparticle region at short distances. Such fluctuation-driven anisotropy can be significant for alkylthiol-coated gold nanoparticles, specially for longer chain lengths, under good solvent conditions. The consequences of such anisotropy for self-assembly, specially as a function of grafting density, solvent quality and at interfaces, should provide some interesting insights in future work. Our results clearly show that an isotropic two-body PMF cannot adequately describe the thermodynamics and assembly behavior of nanoparticles in this dense grafting regime and inclusion of anisotropic effects, as well as possibly many-body interactions, is necessary. Extensions of this approach to other passivated nanoparticle systems and implications for self-assembly are considered.

  20. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-07-18

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb⁻¹. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp̄→jjjj) as a function of the masses of the hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.

  1. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-07-18

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb⁻¹. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp̄→jjjj) as a function of the masses of themore » hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.« less

  2. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-07-01

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6fb-1. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp¯→jjjj) as a function of the masses of the hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.

  3. Search for pair production of strongly interacting particles decaying to pairs of jets in pp collisions at √s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Albin, E; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-07-19

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √[s]=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb(-1). We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp[over ¯]→jjjj) as a function of the masses of the hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.

  4. Effect of three-body Coulomb interactions on the breakup of light nuclei in the field of a heavy ion: An asymptotic estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Alt, E.O.; Irgaziev, B.F.; Muminov, A.T.

    1995-11-01

    The quasielastic breakup of light nuclei into two charged fragments in the Coulomb field of a heavy multiply charged ion are studied. For fragments diverging with extremely low energies an asymptotic estimate is obtained for the ratio of the differential cross section in which three-body Coulomb effects are taken into account to that in which these effects are disregarded. It is shown that effects due to the acceleration of breakup fragments in the field of the heavy ion are significant. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Like-Charge Guanidinium Pairing between Ligand and Receptor: An Unusual Interaction for Drug Discovery and Design?

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Xu, Zhijian; Zhang, Zhengyan; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Wang, Jinan; Cai, Tingting; Li, Shujin; Chen, Kaixian; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-09-10

    A database survey in this study revealed for the first time that there are 227 counterintuitive like-charge guanidinium pairings (Gdm(+)-Arg pairings) between ligands and receptors in the Protein Data Bank, implying the potential guanidinium-arginine binding between guanidine-containing drugs and their target proteins. Furthermore, there are 145 guanidine-containing molecules in the DrugBank, showing the prevalence of guanidinium groups in drugs. It has also been reported that the introduction of a guanidinium group forming Gdm(+)-Arg pairing improved the potency of the drug by more than 8-fold in a typical case. On the basis of the survey, six ligand-protein complexes with typical Gdm(+)-Arg pairings were chosen for QM/MM calculations. The calculations at the B97-D/6-311++g(d,p) level revealed that the interaction could be as strong as -1.0 to -2.5 kcal/mol in DMSO and water, comparable to common intermolecular interactions. The calculations also unveiled that the Gdm(+)-Arg pairing interactions change from repulsive to attractive with the increase of dielectric constant, suggesting that the dielectric constant has a general stabilization effect on the Gdm(+)-Arg pairing. This study suggested that the like-charge guanidinium pairing interaction could be used not only for tuning the physical and chemical properties of drug leads but also for improving ligand binding affinity.

  6. Liquid and glass polymorphism in a monatomic system with isotropic, smooth pair interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Joel Y; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Systems of particles with interactions given by the Jagla core-softened pair potential are known to exhibit water-like thermodynamic anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition. The drawback of the Jagla potential is that it is characterized by discontinuous forces acting between particles and thus is not suitable for standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we introduce a smooth version of the Jagla potential based on two Fermi distributions and study the properties of a system of particles interacting via this new "Fermi-Jagla" pair potential by using standard MD simulations. We find that the liquid based on the Fermi-Jagla potential retains most of the properties of the liquid based on the original Jagla potential. Namely, it exhibits the following water-like anomalies: (i) decrease of density, (ii) increase of compressibility, κ(T)(T,P), and (iii) increase of isobaric specific heat, C(P)(T,P), upon isobaric cooling, and (iv) increase of diffusivity upon isothermal compression. The Fermi-Jagla potential also exhibits (i') density minima, (ii') compressibility minima, (iii') isobaric specific heat minima upon isobaric cooling, and (iv') diffusivity minima upon isothermal compression. As in the Jagla model case, we find a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and a liquid-liquid critical point in the equilibrium liquid. Contrary to the case of the original Jagla model liquid, the LLPT line for the Fermi-Jagla potential has a negative slope in the P-T plane that extends well above the crystallization temperature. This feature makes the Fermi-Jagla potential a better candidate to reproduce the behavior of tetrahedral liquids including water, for which the LLPT line observed in simulations has also negative slope. In the glass state, the Fermi-Jagla pair potential results in reversible polyamorphism between low- and high-density amorphous solids (LDA and HDA, respectively). We also find that HDA results from pressure-induced amorphization of the model

  7. Electrohydrodynamic interactions in Quincke rotation: from pair dynamics to collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debasish; Saintillan, David

    2013-11-01

    Weakly conducting dielectric particles suspended in a dielectric liquid can undergo spontaneous sustained rotation when placed in a sufficiently strong dc electric field. This phenomenon of Quincke rotation has interesting implications for the rheology of these suspensions whose effective viscosity can be reduced by application of an external field. While previous models based on the rotation of isolated particles have provided accurate estimates for this viscosity reduction in dilute suspensions discrepancies have been reported in more concentrated systems where particle-particle interactions are likely significant. Motivated by this observation we extend the classic description of Quincke rotation based on the Taylor-Melcher leaky dielectric model to account for pair electrohydrodynamic interactions between identical spheres using method of reflections. We also consider the case of spherical particles undergoing Quincke rotation next to a planar electrode, where hydrodynamic interactions with the no-slip boundary lead to a self-propelled velocity. The interactions between such Quincke rollers are analyzed, and a transition to collective motion is predicted in sufficiently dense collections of many rollers, in agreement with recent experiments.

  8. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  9. Superconducting Pairing Mechanism of Rare-Earth Effects of Electron-Electron and Electron-Phonon Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Jain, Rajendra K.

    Upon considering the three interactions namely, the electron-acoustic phonon, the electron-optical phonon and the Coulomb, the analytical solutions for the energy gap equation allows one to determine the electronic structure parameters to discuss the behavior of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) and isotope effect coefficient (α) for layered structure YNi2 B2C. Tc of 17 K is estimated for YNi2B2C with electron-acoustic phonon (λac) = 0.31, electron-optical phonon (λop) = 0.1 and Coulomb screening parameter (μ*) = 0.126 indicating that the YNi2B2C superconductor is in the intermediate coupling regime. To correlate the Tc with various coupling strengths as λac, λop and μ*, we present curves of Tc with them. The present approach also explains the conditions for the Boron and Carbon isotope effect. The negative pressure coefficient of Tc in this layered material is attributed to the contraction along c-axis under hydrostatic pressure. We suggest from these results that both the acoustic and optical phonons within the framework of a three-square well scheme consistently explains the effective electron-electron interaction leading to superconductivity in layered structure YNi2B2C.

  10. Comparative study of the bound states of static screened Coulomb and cut-off Coulomb potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David; Varshni, Y. P.

    1984-05-01

    Accurate eigenvalues (eight to six significant figures) and critical screening parameters are calculated for a two-particle system interacting through (a) a static screened Coulomb potential (SSCP), and (b) a cut-off Coulomb potential (COCP). A comparison of the results shows that as far as bound states are concerned it is not possible to simulate a SSCP by a COCP by a suitable scaling of the screening length.

  11. Complete Switchgrass Genetic Maps Reveal Subgenome Collinearity, Preferential Pairing and Multilocus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Miki; Lanzatella, Christina; Saha, Malay C.; Bouton, Joe; Wu, Rongling; Tobias, Christian M.

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidy is an important aspect of the evolution of flowering plants. The potential of gene copies to diverge and evolve new functions is influenced by meiotic behavior of chromosomes leading to segregation as a single locus or duplicated loci. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) linkage maps were constructed using a full-sib population of 238 plants and SSR and STS markers to access the degree of preferential pairing and the structure of the tetraploid genome and as a step toward identification of loci underlying biomass feedstock quality and yield. The male and female framework map lengths were 1645 and 1376 cM with 97% of the genome estimated to be within 10 cM of a mapped marker in both maps. Each map coalesced into 18 linkage groups arranged into nine homeologous pairs. Comparative analysis of each homology group to the diploid sorghum genome identified clear syntenic relationships and collinear tracts. The number of markers with PCR amplicons that mapped across subgenomes was significantly fewer than expected, suggesting substantial subgenome divergence, while both the ratio of coupling to repulsion phase linkages and pattern of marker segregation indicated complete or near complete disomic inheritance. The proportion of transmission ratio distorted markers was relatively low, but the male map was more extensively affected by distorted transmission ratios and multilocus interactions, associated with spurious linkages. PMID:20407132

  12. Combinatorial transcriptional interaction within the Cardiac Neural Crest: a pair of HANDs in heart formation

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Anthony B.; Conway, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The cardiac neural crest migrate from rostral dorsal neural folds and populate the branchial arches, which directly contribute to cardiac-outflow structures. Although neural crest cell specification is associated with a number of morphogenic factors, little is understood about the mechanisms by which transcription factors actually implement the transcriptional programs that dictate cell migration and later the differentiation into the proper cell types within the heart. It is clear from genetic evidence that members of the paired box family and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors from the twist family of proteins are expressed in and play an important function in cardiac neural crest specification and differentiation. Interestingly, both paired box and bHLH factors can function as dimers and in the case of twist family bHLH factors partner choice can clearly dictate a change in transcriptional program. The focus of this review is to consider the role that the protein-protein interactions of these transcription factors may play determining cardiac neural crest specification and differentiation and how genetic alteration of transcription factor stoichiometry within the cell may reflect more than a simple null event. PMID:15269889

  13. Effect of dipolar nanoparticle interaction on transverse magnetic susceptibility: particle pair model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Elizabeth; Hovorka, Ondrej; Friedman, Gennady

    2014-03-01

    Determining nanoparticle dipolar interactions from experimental measurement of magnetic moments is a classical inverse problem in magnetism. It is important in a variety of applications including magnetic information storage and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI). Historically, magnetic moment relaxation has been used to characterize system parameters including dipolar interactions. However, the results are sensitive to particle size distribution. We demonstrate that dipolar coupling strength in a nanoparticle-pair can be determined from transverse magnetic susceptibility, a readily measured parameter. Moreover, we demonstrate that this method is insensitive to particle size, rendering it more robust for real-world experiments. We present both analytical and numerical models for transient and steady-state transverse magnetic susceptibility and resulting interaction strength of our two-particle system. In the analytical model master equation is employed. The particles are assumed to be immobile and the set of possible states is discrete. In the numerical models both master equation and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics are employed. In these models random particle anisotropy directions are taken into account. The results of each model are compared. National Science Foundation GRFP.

  14. Modeling intermolecular interactions of physisorbed organic molecules using pair potential calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, Ingo; Stadtmueller, Benjamin; Wagner, Christian; Weiss, Christian; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2011-12-21

    The understanding and control of epitaxial growth of organic thin films is of crucial importance in order to optimize the performance of future electronic devices. In particular, the start of the submonolayer growth plays an important role since it often determines the structure of the first layer and subsequently of the entire molecular film. We have investigated the structure formation of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride and copper-phthalocyanine molecules on Au(111) using pair-potential calculations based on van der Waals and electrostatic intermolecular interactions. The results are compared with the fundamental lateral structures known from experiment and an excellent agreement was found for these weakly interacting systems. Furthermore, the calculations are even suitable for chemisorptive adsorption as demonstrated for copper-phthalocyanine/Cu(111), if the influence of charge transfer between substrate and molecules is known and the corresponding charge redistribution in the molecules can be estimated. The calculations are of general applicability for molecular adsorbate systems which are dominated by electrostatic and van der Waals interaction.

  15. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun -Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-26

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics somore » that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. Lastly, this study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.« less

  16. Density functional theory studies of interactions of ruthenium-arene complexes with base pair steps.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Shaun T; Platts, James A

    2011-10-20

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to determine the strength and geometry of intermolecular interactions of "piano-stool" ruthenium arene complexes, which show potential as anticancer treatments. Model complexes with methane and benzene indicate that the coordinated arene has C-H···π acceptor ability similar to that of free benzene, whereas this arene acts as a much stronger C-H donor or partner in π-stacking than free benzene. The source of these enhanced interactions is identified as a combination of electrostatic and dispersion effects. Complexes of Ru-arene complexes with base-pair step fragments of DNA, in which the arene has the potential to act as an intercalator, have also been investigated. Binding energies are found to be sensitive to the size and nature of the arene, with larger and more flexible arenes having stronger binding. π-stacking and C-H···π interactions between arene and DNA bases and hydrogen bonds from coordinated N-H to DNA oxygen atoms, as well as covalent Ru-N bonding, contribute to the overall binding. The effect of complexation on DNA structure is also examined, with larger rise and more negative slide values than canonical B-DNA observed in all cases.

  17. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Herein, we demonstrate physical/mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515. SLAC-PUB-16300 2 lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high performance Li-ion batteries.

  18. Phase Transitions of Boron Carbide: Pair Interaction Model of High Carbon Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Sanxi; Widom, Michael; Huhn, William; Gao, Qin

    2015-03-01

    Boron carbide is a structure that exhibits a broad composition range, implying a degree of intrinsic substitutional disorder. While the observed symmetry is rhombohedral, the enthalpy minimizing structure has lower, monoclinic, symmetry. With high melting temperature, it is difficult to experimentally study its phase transition at low temperature and there is discrepancy among different research groups. Moreover, the widely-accepted phase diagram suggests substitutional disorder at low temperature, implying a non vanishing entropy. Here we use computational method to study its phase transition. We implement a pair interaction model and fit to a database of structural energies. Utilizing histogram methods to analyze Monte Carlo simulations of this model, we investigate the symmetry-restoring phase transition that explains the observed rhombohedral symmetry at high temperatures.

  19. Quantum simulation of pairing Hamiltonians with nearest-neighbor-interacting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixin; Gu, Xiu; Wu, Lian-Ao; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-06-01

    Although a universal quantum computer is still far from reach, the tremendous advances in controllable quantum devices, in particular with solid-state systems, make it possible to physically implement "quantum simulators." Quantum simulators are physical setups able to simulate other quantum systems efficiently that are intractable on classical computers. Based on solid-state qubit systems with various types of nearest-neighbor interactions, we propose a complete set of algorithms for simulating pairing Hamiltonians. The fidelity of the target states corresponding to each algorithm is numerically studied. We also compare algorithms designed for different types of experimentally available Hamiltonians and analyze their complexity. Furthermore, we design a measurement scheme to extract energy spectra from the simulators. Our simulation algorithms might be feasible with state-of-the-art technology in solid-state quantum devices.

  20. The influence of intramolecular sulfur-lone pair interactions on small-molecule drug design and receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Hudson, B M; Nguyen, E; Tantillo, D J

    2016-04-28

    Sulfur-lone pair interactions are important conformational control elements in sulfur-containing heterocycles that abound in pharmaceuticals, natural products, agrochemicals, polymers and other important classes of organic molecules. Nonetheless, the role of intramolecular sulfur-lone pair interactions in the binding of small molecules to receptors is often overlooked. Here we analyze the magnitudes and origins of these interactions for a variety of biologically relevant small molecules using quantum chemical and automated docking calculations. In most cases examined in this study, the lowest energy conformation of the small molecule displays a sulfur-lone pair close contact. However, docking studies, both published and new, often predict that conformations without sulfur-lone pair contacts have the best binding affinity for their respective receptors. This is a serious problem. Since many of these predicted bound conformations are not actually energetically accessible, pursuing design (e.g., drug design) around these binding modes necessarily will lead, serendipity aside, to dead end designs. Our results constitute a caution that one best not neglect these interactions when predicting the binding affinities of potential ligands (drugs or not) for hosts (enzymes, receptors, DNA, RNA, synthetic hosts). Moreover, a better understanding and awareness of sulfur-lone pair interactions should facilitate the rational modulation of host-guest interactions involving sulfur-containing molecules. PMID:27049933

  1. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    SciTech Connect

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  2. Pair-correlation properties and momentum distribution of finite number of interacting trapped bosons in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Anindya; Das, Tapan Kumar; Chakrabarti, Barnali

    2010-09-14

    We study the ground state pair-correlation properties of a weakly interacting trapped Bose gas in three dimensions by using a correlated many-body method. The use of the van der Waals interaction potential and an external trapping potential shows realistic features. We also test the validity of shape-independent approximation in the calculation of correlation properties.

  3. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Keller, A J; Lim, J S; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S; Katine, J A; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior. PMID:27541473

  4. New approach to folding with the Coulomb wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Blokhintsev, L. D.; Savin, D. A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2015-05-15

    Due to the long-range character of the Coulomb interaction theoretical description of low-energy nuclear reactions with charged particles still remains a formidable task. One way of dealing with the problem in an integral-equation approach is to employ a screened Coulomb potential. A general approach without screening requires folding of kernels of the integral equations with the Coulomb wave. A new method of folding a function with the Coulomb partial waves is presented. The partial-wave Coulomb function both in the configuration and momentum representations is written in the form of separable series. Each term of the series is represented as a product of a factor depending only on the Coulomb parameter and a function depending on the spatial variable in the configuration space and the momentum variable if the momentum representation is used. Using a trial function, the method is demonstrated to be efficient and reliable.

  5. Coulomb Breakup Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2008-12-05

    We formulate scattering theory in the framework of a surface-integral approach utilizing analytically known asymptotic forms of the three-body wave functions. This formulation is valid for both short-range and Coulombic potentials. The post and prior forms of the breakup amplitude are derived without any reference to renormalization procedures.

  6. Analyses of interactions among pair-rule genes and the gap gene Krüppel in Bombyx segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    In the short-germ insect Tribolium, a pair-rule gene circuit consisting of the Tribolium homologs of even-skipped, runt, and odd-skipped (Tc-eve, Tc-run and Tc-odd, respectively) has been implicated in segment formation. To examine the application of the model to other taxa, I studied the expression and function of pair-rule genes in Bombyx mori, together with a Bombyx homolog of Krüppel (Bm-Kr), a known gap gene. Knockdown embryos of Bombyx homologs of eve, run and odd (Bm-eve, Bm-run and Bm-odd) exhibited asegmental phenotypes similar to those of Tribolium knockdowns. However, pair-rule gene interactions were similar to those of both Tribolium and Drosophila, which, different from Tribolium, shows a hierarchical segmentation mode. Additionally, the Bm-odd expression pattern shares characteristics with those of Drosophila pair-rule genes that receive upstream regulatory input. On the other hand, Bm-Kr knockdowns exhibited a large posterior segment deletion as observed in short-germ insects. However, a detailed analysis of these embryos indicated that Bm-Kr modulates expression of pair-rule genes like in Drosophila, although the mechanisms appear to be different. This suggested hierarchical interactions between Bm-Kr and pair-rule genes. Based on these results, I concluded that the pair-rule gene circuit model that describes Tribolium development is not applicable to Bombyx. PMID:26102481

  7. Analyses of interactions among pair-rule genes and the gap gene Krüppel in Bombyx segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    In the short-germ insect Tribolium, a pair-rule gene circuit consisting of the Tribolium homologs of even-skipped, runt, and odd-skipped (Tc-eve, Tc-run and Tc-odd, respectively) has been implicated in segment formation. To examine the application of the model to other taxa, I studied the expression and function of pair-rule genes in Bombyx mori, together with a Bombyx homolog of Krüppel (Bm-Kr), a known gap gene. Knockdown embryos of Bombyx homologs of eve, run and odd (Bm-eve, Bm-run and Bm-odd) exhibited asegmental phenotypes similar to those of Tribolium knockdowns. However, pair-rule gene interactions were similar to those of both Tribolium and Drosophila, which, different from Tribolium, shows a hierarchical segmentation mode. Additionally, the Bm-odd expression pattern shares characteristics with those of Drosophila pair-rule genes that receive upstream regulatory input. On the other hand, Bm-Kr knockdowns exhibited a large posterior segment deletion as observed in short-germ insects. However, a detailed analysis of these embryos indicated that Bm-Kr modulates expression of pair-rule genes like in Drosophila, although the mechanisms appear to be different. This suggested hierarchical interactions between Bm-Kr and pair-rule genes. Based on these results, I concluded that the pair-rule gene circuit model that describes Tribolium development is not applicable to Bombyx.

  8. Simulation of the formation of two-dimensional Coulomb liquids and solids in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.H.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    Dust particle transport in low-temperature plasmas has recently received considerable attention due to the desire to minimize contamination of wafers during plasma processing of microelectronics devices. Laser light scattering observations of dust particles near wafers in reactive-ion-etching (RIE) radio frequency (rf) discharges have revealed clouds which display collective behavior. These observations have motivated experimental studies of the Coulomb liquid and solid properties of these systems. In this paper, we present results from a two-dimensional model for dust particle transport in RIE rf discharges in which we include particle-particle Coulomb interactions. We predict the formation of Coulomb liquids and solids. These predictions are based both on values of {Gamma}{gt}2 (liquid) and {Gamma}{gt}170 (solid), where {Gamma} is the ratio of electrostatic potential energy to thermal energy, and on crystal-like structure in the pair correlation function. We find that Coulomb liquids and solids composed of trapped dust particles in RIE discharges are preferentially formed with increasing gas pressure, decreasing particle size, and decreasing rf power. We also observe the ejection of particles from dust crystals which completely fill trapping sites, as well as lattice disordering followed by annealing and refreezing. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Interaction effects on galaxy pairs with Gemini/GMOS - II: oxygen abundance gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, D. A.; Dors, O. L.; Krabbe, A. C.; Hägele, G. F.; Cardaci, M. V.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Rodrigues, I.; Winge, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we derive oxygen abundance gradients from H II regions located in 11 galaxies in eight systems of close pairs. Long-slit spectra in the range 4400-7300 Å were obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at Gemini South (GMOS-S). Spatial profiles of oxygen abundance in the gaseous phase along galaxy discs were obtained using calibrations based on strong emission lines (N2 and O3N2). We found oxygen gradients to be significantly flatter for all the studied galaxies than those in typical isolated spiral galaxies. Four objects in our sample, AM 1219A, AM 1256B, AM 2030A and AM 2030B, show a clear break in the oxygen abundance at galactocentric radius R/R25 between 0.2 and 0.5. For AM 1219A and AM 1256B, we found negative slopes for the inner gradients, and for AM 2030B, we found a positive slope. All three cases show a flatter behaviour to the outskirts of the galaxies. For AM 2030A, we found a positive slope for the outer gradient, while the inner gradient is almost compatible with a flat behaviour. We found a decrease of star formation efficiency in the zone that corresponds to the oxygen abundance gradient break for AM 1219A and AM 2030B. For the former, a minimum in the estimated metallicities was found very close to the break zone, which could be associated with a corotation radius. However, AM 1256B and AM 2030A, present a star formation rate maximum but not an extreme oxygen abundance value. All four interacting systems that show oxygen gradient breaks have extreme SFR values located very close to break zones.The H II regions located in close pairs of galaxies follow the same relation between the ionization parameter and the oxygen abundance as those regions in isolated galaxies.

  10. New mechanism for the generation of electron-positron pairs in Laser-Matter Interaction: Resonantly Enhanced Pair Production in a molecular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Lorin, Emmanuel; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-02-01

    A new mechanism for pair production from the interaction of a laser with two nuclei is presented. The latter takes advantage of the Stark effect in diatomic molecules and the presence of molecular resonances in the negative and positive energy continua. Both move in the complex energy plane as the interatomic distance and the electric field strength are varied. We demonstrate that there is an enhancement of pair production at the crossing of these resonances. This mechanism is studied in a very simple one-dimensional model where the nuclei are modeled by delta function potential wells and the laser by a constant electric field. The position of resonances is evaluated by using the Weyl-Titchmarch-Kodaira theory, which allows to treat singular boundary value problems and to compute the spectral density. The rate of producing pairs is also computed. It is shown that this process yields a positron production rate which is approximately an order of magnitude higher than in the single nucleus case and a few orders of magnitudes higher than Schwinger's tunneling result in a static field.

  11. Pair correlation function decay in models of simple fluids that contain dispersion interactions.

    PubMed

    Evans, R; Henderson, J R

    2009-11-25

    We investigate the intermediate-and longest-range decay of the total pair correlation function h(r) in model fluids where the inter-particle potential decays as -r(-6), as is appropriate to real fluids in which dispersion forces govern the attraction between particles. It is well-known that such interactions give rise to a term in q(3) in the expansion of [Formula: see text], the Fourier transform of the direct correlation function. Here we show that the presence of the r(-6) tail changes significantly the analytic structure of [Formula: see text] from that found in models where the inter-particle potential is short ranged. In particular the pure imaginary pole at q = iα(0), which generates monotonic-exponential decay of rh(r) in the short-ranged case, is replaced by a complex (pseudo-exponential) pole at q = iα(0)+α(1) whose real part α(1) is negative and generally very small in magnitude. Near the critical point α(1)∼-α(0)(2) and we show how classical Ornstein-Zernike behaviour of the pair correlation function is recovered on approaching the mean-field critical point. Explicit calculations, based on the random phase approximation, enable us to demonstrate the accuracy of asymptotic formulae for h(r) in all regions of the phase diagram and to determine a pseudo-Fisher-Widom (pFW) line. On the high density side of this line, intermediate-range decay of rh(r) is exponentially damped-oscillatory and the ultimate long-range decay is power-law, proportional to r(-6), whereas on the low density side this damped-oscillatory decay is sub-dominant to both monotonic-exponential and power-law decay. Earlier analyses did not identify the pseudo-exponential pole and therefore the existence of the pFW line. Our results enable us to write down the generic wetting potential for a 'real' fluid exhibiting both short-ranged and dispersion interactions. The monotonic-exponential decay of correlations associated with the pseudo-exponential pole introduces additional terms into

  12. Redistribution of the density of states due to Coulomb interactions in La{sub 2-2x}Sr{sub 1+2x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, D.; Gray, K. E.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Ozyuzer, L.; Beloborodov, I. S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Materials Science Division; IIT; Izmir Inst. Tech.; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-01-01

    Tunneling data on La{sub 1.28}Sr{sub 1.72}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystals confirm Coulomb interaction effects through the {radical}{bar E} dependence of the density of states. Importantly, the data and analysis at high energy E show a pileup of states: most of the states removed from near the Fermi level are found between {approx}40 and 130 meV, from which we infer the possibility of universal behavior. The agreement of our tunneling data with recent photoemission results further confirms our analysis.

  13. Ultranarrow resonance in Coulomb drag between quantum wires at coinciding densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. P.; Gornyi, I. V.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of the chemical potential mismatch Δ (different electron densities) on Coulomb drag between two parallel ballistic quantum wires. For pair collisions, the drag resistivity ρD(Δ ) shows a peculiar anomaly at Δ =0 with ρD being finite at Δ =0 and vanishing at any nonzero Δ . The "bodyless" resonance in ρD(Δ ) at zero Δ is only broadened by processes of multiparticle scattering. We analyze Coulomb drag for finite Δ in the presence of both two- and three-particle scattering within the kinetic equation framework, focusing on a Fokker-Planck picture of the interaction-induced diffusion in momentum space of the double-wire system. We describe the dependence of ρD on Δ for both weak and strong intrawire equilibration due to three-particle scattering.

  14. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levallois, J.; Tran, M. K.; Pouliot, D.; Presura, C. N.; Greene, L. H.; Eckstein, J. N.; Uccelli, J.; Giannini, E.; Gu, G. D.; Leggett, A. J.; van der Marel, D.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 -x single crystals: underdoped with Tc=60 , 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with Tc=91 K ; overdoped with Tc=84 , 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi2 Sr2 Ca2 Cu3 O10 +x with Tc=110 K . Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through Tc, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—Tc depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π ,π ).

  15. Coulomb attraction in the optical spectra of quantum disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, B.; Glutsch, S.; Bechstedt, F.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper we present a theory that describes the influence of the Coulomb interaction between electrons and holes on the optical spectra of flat quantum dots within the envelope-function formalism. Starting from a nonlocal Elliott-like formula, absorption and luminescence characteristics are traced back to properties of two-particle wave functions and energies, which are solutions of the corresponding Schrödinger equation for an electron-hole pair under the influence of the Coulomb attraction and confinement potentials, determined by the spatial variation of the band edges of the considered microstructure. We present a complete numerical solution of the two-particle problem for flat quantum dots, i.e., disks for which the size quantization in the growth direction is much stronger than that in the perpendicular plane. The resulting theoretical line shapes are compared with luminescence spectra obtained recently for quantum dots fabricated by laser-induced thermal cation interdiffusion in quantum-well structures.

  16. Phase transitions of boron carbide: Pair interaction model of high carbon limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Sanxi; Huhn, W. P.; Widom, M.

    2015-09-01

    Boron Carbide exhibits a broad composition range, implying a degree of intrinsic substitutional disorder. While the observed phase has rhombohedral symmetry (space group R 3 bar m), the enthalpy minimizing structure has lower, monoclinic, symmetry (space group Cm). The crystallographic primitive cell consists of a 12-atom icosahedron placed at the vertex of a rhombohedral lattice, together with a 3-atom chain along the 3-fold axis. In the limit of high carbon content, approaching 20% carbon, the icosahedra are usually of type B11 Cp, where the p indicates the carbon resides on a polar site, while the chains are of type C-B-C. We establish an atomic interaction model for this composition limit, fit to density functional theory total energies, that allows us to investigate the substitutional disorder using Monte Carlo simulations augmented by multiple histogram analysis. We find that the low temperature monoclinic Cm structure disorders through a pair of phase transitions, first via a 3-state Potts-like transition to space group R3m, then via an Ising-like transition to the experimentally observed R 3 bar m symmetry. The R3m and Cm phases are electrically polarized, while the high temperature R 3 bar m phase is nonpolar.

  17. Observations of energetic particles between a pair of corotating interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Tang, C. L.; Li, G.; Zhao, L. L.; Ebert, R. W.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Lavraud, B.; Sauvaud, J.; Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Liu, Y. C.-M.; Guo, F.

    2014-01-20

    We report observations of the acceleration and trapping of energetic ions and electrons between a pair of corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The event occurred in Carrington Rotation 2060. Observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft, the two CIRs were separated by less than 5 days. In contrast to other CIR events, the fluxes of the energetic ions and electrons in this event reached their maxima between the trailing edge of the first CIR and the leading edge of the second CIR. The radial magnetic field (B{sub r} ) reversed its sense and the anisotropy of the flux also changed from Sunward to anti-Sunward between the two CIRs. Furthermore, there was an extended period of counterstreaming suprathermal electrons between the two CIRs. Similar observations for this event were also obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer and STEREO-A. We conjecture that these observations were due to a U-shaped, large-scale magnetic field topology connecting the reverse shock of the first CIR and the forward shock of the second CIR. Such a disconnected U-shaped magnetic field topology may have formed due to magnetic reconnection in the upper corona.

  18. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas

  19. Role of electronic correlation in high-low temperature phase transition of hexagonal nickel sulfide: a comparative density functional theory study with and without correction for on-site Coulomb interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Bing; Li, Jie; Tang, Bi-Yu

    2013-06-28

    The structural, electronic, magnetic, and elastic properties of hexagonal nickel sulfide (NiS) have been investigated comparatively by Density Functional theory (DFT) and DFT plus correction for on-site Coulomb interaction (DFT+U), in which two different exchange correlation functionals local density approximations (LDA) and general gradient approximations (GGA) in the form of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) are used. Our results indicate LDA and PBE methods predict hexagonal NiS to be a paramagnetic metal whereas LDA(PBE)+U calculations with reasonable on-site Coulomb interaction energy give the antiferromagnetic insulating state of low temperature hexagonal NiS successfully. Meanwhile, compared with LDA(PBE) results, LDA(PBE)+U methods give larger lattice parameters, crystal volume, and shear constant c44, consistent with the experimental picture during high-low temperature phase transition of hexagonal NiS, in which an increase of the shear constant c44 and lattice parameters were found in the low-temperature antiferromagnetic phase. The present DFT and DFT+U calculations provide a reasonable description for the properties of high temperature and low temperature hexagonal NiS respectively, which indicates that electronic correlation is responsible for this high-low temperature phase transition.

  20. Deciphering Noncoding RNA and Chromatin Interactions: Multiplex Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (mChIA-PET).

    PubMed

    Choy, Jocelyn; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is dynamically associated with protein factors and folded to form chromatin fibers. The 3-dimensional (3D) configuration of the chromatin will enable the distal genetic elements to come into close proximity, allowing transcriptional regulation. Noncoding RNA can mediate the 3D structure of chromatin. Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (ChIA-PET) is a valuable and powerful technique in molecular biology which allows the study of unbiased, genome-wide de novo chromatin interactions with paired-end tags. Here, we describe the standard version of ChIA-PET and a Multiplex ChIA-PET version. PMID:27662871

  1. Dependence of the Rate of LiF Ion-Pairing on the Description of Molecular Interaction.

    PubMed

    Pluhařová, Eva; Baer, Marcel D; Schenter, Gregory K; Jungwirth, Pavel; Mundy, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    We present an analysis of the dynamics of ion-pairing of lithium fluoride (LiF) in aqueous solvent using both detailed molecular simulation as well as reduced models within a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) framework. We explored the sensitivity of the ion-pairing phenomena to the details of descriptions of molecular interaction, comparing two empirical potentials to explicit quantum based density functional theory. We find quantitative differences in the potentials of mean force for ion-pairing as well as time dependent frictions that lead to variations in the rate constant and reactive flux correlation functions. These details reflect differences in solvent response to ion-pairing between different representations of molecular interaction and influence anharmonicity of the dynamic response. We find that the short-time anharmonic response is recovered with a GLE parametrization. Recovery of the details of long time response may require extensions to the reduced model. We show that the utility of using a reduced model leads to a straightforward application of variational transition state theory concepts to the condensed phase system. The significance of this is reflected in the analysis of committor distributions and the variation of planar hypersurfaces, leading to an improved understanding of factors that determine the rate of LiF ion-pairing.

  2. Proton-Neutron Pairing Interaction in Neutron Rich A = 132 Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Laouet, N.; Benrachi, F.; Khiter, M.; Benmicia, N.; Saifi, H.

    2010-10-31

    In infinite nuclear systems, such as neutron stars, pairing phenomena have a particular interest in the study of nuclear structure properties. Thus, pairing lies at the heart of quantum many body problems, and nuclear process connecting to nucleosynthesis. In this work, we are interested on the contribution of this aspect, for neutron rich nuclei far from stability in the vicinity of doubly magic {sup 132}Sn. The study of A = 134 isobar, which presents a proton-neutron mixing in valence space, based on the proton-neutron correlation properties. Our results, using the P{sub d} pairing gap calculations, are in a good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Semiclassical Coulomb field

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.

    2008-06-15

    The contribution of different modes of the Coulomb field to decoherence and to the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance is calculated in the one-loop approximation for nonrelativistic electron gas. The dominant contribution was found to come from the usual collective modes in the plasma, namely, the zero-sound and the plasmon oscillations. The length scale of the quantum-classical transition is found to be close to the Thomas-Fermi screening length. It is argued that the extension of these modes to the whole Fock space yields optimal pointer states.

  4. Exact solution of CKP equation and formation and interaction of two solitons in pair-ion-electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batool, Nazia; Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Jahangir, R.

    2016-08-01

    In the present investigation, cylindrical Kadomstev-Petviashvili (CKP) equation is derived in pair-ion-electron plasmas to study the propagation and interaction of two solitons. Using a novel gauge transformation, two soliton solutions of CKP equation are found analytically by using Hirota's method and to the best of our knowledge have been used in plasma physics for the first time. Interestingly, it is observed that unlike the planar Kadomstev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, the CKP equation admits horseshoe-like solitary structures. Another non-trivial feature of CKP solitary solution is that the interaction parameter gets modified by the plasma parameters contrary to the one obtained for Korteweg-de Vries equation. The importance of the present investigation to understand the formation and interaction of solitons in laboratory produced pair plasmas is also highlighted.

  5. Hydrodynamic interactions between pairs of capsules and drops in a simple shear: Effects of viscosity ratio and heterogeneous collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Sarkar, Kausik

    2015-12-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between a pair of capsules in simple shear are numerically investigated using a front-tracking finite difference method. The membrane of the capsule is modeled using different hyperelastic constitutive relations. We also compare the pair interactions between drops to those between capsules. An increased viscosity ratio leads to a reduced net cross-stream separation between capsules as well as drops after collision. At low viscosity ratios, for the same capillary number drop-pairs show higher cross-stream separation than those for capsule-pairs, while substantially large viscosity ratios result in almost the same value for both cases. We investigate pair-collisions between two heterogeneous capsules C1 and C2 with two different capillary numbers. The maximum deformation of C1 was seen to increase with increasing stiffness (decreasing capillary number) of C2, even though the stiffness of C1 was kept fixed. The findings are similar for a drop-pair, however, with a smaller maximum deformation for the same combinations of capillary numbers. The final cross-stream drift of the trajectory of C1 decreases with the increasing stiffness of C2, but the relative trajectory between the capsules remains unchanged. The maximum deformation and the cross-stream drift of the trajectory of C1 are shown to approximately vary with power-law functions of the ratio of the capillary numbers of C1 and C2. An analytical explanation of the dependence on the two capillary numbers is offered. Different membrane constitutive laws result in similar deformation and drift in trajectory.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  7. Efficient surface reconstruction using generalized coulomb potentials.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel, geometrically adaptive method for surface reconstruction from noisy and sparse point clouds, without orientation information. The method employs a fast convection algorithm to attract the evolving surface towards the data points. The force field in which the surface is convected is based on generalized Coulomb potentials evaluated on an adaptive grid (i.e., an octree) using a fast, hierarchical algorithm. Formulating reconstruction as a convection problem in a velocity field generated by Coulomb potentials offers a number of advantages. Unlike methods which compute the distance from the data set to the implicit surface, which are sensitive to noise due to the very reliance on the distance transform, our method is highly resilient to shot noise since global, generalized Coulomb potentials can be used to disregard the presence of outliers due to noise. Coulomb potentials represent long-range interactions that consider all data points at once, and thus they convey global information which is crucial in the fitting process. Both the spatial and temporal complexities of our spatially-adaptive method are proportional to the size of the reconstructed object, which makes our method compare favorably with respect to previous approaches in terms of speed and flexibility. Experiments with sparse as well as noisy data sets show that the method is capable of delivering crisp and detailed yet smooth surfaces.

  8. General impossibility to 'prescribe' diffusion for a geminate pair in a central force field and peculiarities of geminate in ionic liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.

    2011-05-12

    Given the difficulty of obtaining analytical solutions for the diffusion of interacting geminate pairs of (ion) radicals in liquids, it is common, following the original treatment of Mozumder, to 'prescribe' this diffusion. A demonstration is given that such a prescription is impossible for any interaction potential other than the Coulomb potential. This demonstration suggests the inadequacy of this common approach to modeling geminate pair and spur dynamics in the largest emerging class of organic solvents: room-temperature ionic liquids.

  9. Ship and satellite observations of chlorophyll stocks in interacting cyclone-anticyclone eddy pairs in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggs, Douglas, C.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    When anticyclonic eddies shed by the Loop Current of the Gulf of Mexico reach the western margin of the gulf, they influence the surface circulation over the continental slope and rise. Of particular interest is the generation of cyclone (cold-core)-anticyclone (warm-core) pairs when aging Loop Current eddies interact with the continental margin. In this paper we describe the physical and biological characteristics of these cyclone-anticyclone pairs. Our objective was to determine how eddy pairs affect the distribution of phytoplankton in the region and how satellite ocean color measurements are applicable to tracing of the eddies. We present shipboard data collected between 1980 and 1982 on the hydrography, chlorophyll stocks, and nutrient concentrations of eddy pairs in the western Gulf of Mexico and compare these data with coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) images collected during the time frame of the cruises. Surface pigment concentrations followed a seasonal cycle, with low concentrations (0.05-0.1 mg m(exp -3)) found within cyclones and anticyclones from April through early November and higher concentrations (greater than 0.1 mg(exp -3)) found in the winter. CZCS pigment concentrations were locally high in the flow confluence of cyclone-anticyclone pairs. The CZCS imagery shows that some cyclone-anticyclone geometries transport high-chlorophyll shelf water seaward at least 100-200 km off-shelf.

  10. σ-Hole···π and lone pair···π interactions in benzylic halides.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Teresa; Tardajos, Gloria; Guerrero, Andrés; Torres, María del Rosario; Salgado, Cástor; Fernández, Israel; Osío Barcina, José

    2015-06-14

    Intermolecular and intramolecular halogen···π interactions in benzylic halides (Ph-CR2-X; X = F, Cl, Br and I) derived from 7-phenylnorbornane were investigated. The imposed geometry of the 7-arylnorbornane moiety prevents the participation of intramolecular attractive interactions between the σ-hole region of the halogen atom and the π electrons of the aromatic ring. Crystallographic data show intermolecular halogen bonds in iodide 1 and bromide 2 in the solid state. On the other hand, both UV-Vis and D-NMR data suggest the occurrence of intramolecular interactions between the halogen atoms and the phenyl rings in these compounds in solution. To provide more insight into the nature of the observed stabilizing interactions, density functional calculations were also carried out. These computations confirm the presence of genuine lone pairπ intramolecular interactions which strongly affect the stability and the electronic structure of these species. PMID:25960103

  11. Influence of electron-electron interactions on pair tunneling through a mesoscopic N-S tunnel junction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, A. K.; Hekking, F. W. J.

    1997-03-01

    At low temperatures and voltages, smaller than the superconducting gap, transport through a normal metal - superconductor (N-S) tunnel barrier is due to tunneling of electrons in pairs. For a mesoscopic N-S tunnel junction, this process is very sensitive to quantum interference effects: pair tunneling is determined by particle-particle diffusion (Cooperon propagation) near the junction (F.W.J. Hekking, Yu.V. Nazarov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1625 (1993)). On the other hand it is well-known that electron-electron interactions in a disordered metal lead to significant corrections to particle-particle diffusion (Yu.N. Ovchinnikov, Sov. Phys. JETP 37, 366 (1973)). We explore the effect of the interplay between disorder and interactions on the subgap conductivity of a mesoscopic N-S tunnel junction.

  12. Coulomb clusters in RETRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, B. R.; Church, D. A.; Gruber, L.; Holder, J. P.; Schneider, D.; Steiger, J.

    1998-10-22

    Storage rings and Penning traps are being used to study ions in their highest charge states. Both devices must have the capability for ion cooling in order to perform high precision measurements such as mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. This is accomplished in storage rings in a merged beam arrangement where a cold electron beam moves at the speed of the ions. In RETRAP, a Penning trap located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a sympathetic laser/ion cooling scheme has been implemented. In a first step, singly charged beryllium ions are cooled electronically by a tuned circuit and optically by a laser. Then hot, highly charged ions are merged into the cold Be plasma. By collisions, their kinetic energy is reduced to the temperature of the Be plasma. First experiments indicate that the highly charged ions form a strongly coupled plasma with a Coulomb coupling parameter.

  13. Application of the short and long consecutive pairs model to the triplet-doublet interaction in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, T.; Monge, J. L.; Bouchriha, H.

    2010-10-01

    We have adapted the model of two consecutive pairs to the study of the triplet-doublet (T-D) interaction in molecular crystals. We have applied this model to the modulation of the photoconductivity in crystalline anthracene by a static magnetic field (MFE) and a microwave field (PDMR). We were able to reproduce, for the first time, quite perfectly two types of experiments with the same set of kinetic constants.

  14. Controlling the transmitted information of a multi-photon interacting with a single-Cooper pair box

    SciTech Connect

    Kadry, Heba Abdel-Aty, Abdel-Haleem Zakaria, Nordin; Cheong, Lee Yen

    2014-10-24

    We study a model of a multi-photon interaction of a single Cooper pair box with a cavity field. The exchange of the information using this system is studied. We quantify the fidelity of the transmitted information. The effect of the system parameters (detuning parameter, field photons, state density and mean photon number) in the fidelity of the transmitted information is investigated. We found that the fidelity of the transmitted information can be controlled using the system parameters.

  15. Energies of Screened Coulomb Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    This article shows that, by applying the Hellman-Feynman theorem alone to screened Coulomb potentials, the first four coefficients in the energy series in powers of the perturbation parameter can be obtained from the unperturbed Coulomb system. (Author/HM)

  16. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  17. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

    2006-04-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within

  18. Attention to Form in Collaborative Writing Tasks: Comparing Pair and Small Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobao, Ana Fernández

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the opportunities that a collaborative writing task completed in pairs and in small groups offers for attention to form. Previous research suggests that collaborative writing activities encourage learners to focus their attention on language and to collaborate in the resolution of their language-related problems in ways that…

  19. Pairing Mechanism of Unconventional Superconductivity in Doped Kane–Mele Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Yuri; Yada, Keiji; Hattori, Ayami; Tanaka, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    We study the pairing symmetry of a doped Kane-Mele model on a honeycomb lattice with on-site Coulomb interaction. The pairing instability of Cooper pair is calculated based on the linearized Eliashberg equation within the random phase approximation (RPA). When the magnitude of the spin-orbit coupling is weak, even-frequency spin-singlet even-parity (ESE) pairing is dominant. On the other hand, with the increase of the spin-orbit coupling, we show that the even-frequency spin-triplet odd-parity (ETO) f-wave pairing exceeds ESE one. ETO f-wave pairing is supported by the longitudinal spin fluctuation. Since the transverse spin fluctuation is strongly suppressed by spin-orbit coupling, ETO f-wave pairing becomes dominant for large magnitude of spin-orbit coupling.

  20. Bacterial beta-lactamase fragmentation complementation strategy can be used as a method for identifying interacting protein pairs.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Back, Jung Ho; Hahm, Soo Hyun; Shim, Hye-Young; Park, Min Ju; Ko, Sung Il; Han, Ye Sun

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the applicability of the TEM-1 beta- lactamase fragment complementation (BFC) system to develop a strategy for the screening of protein-protein interactions in bacteria. A BFC system containing a human Fas-associated death domain (hFADD) and human Fas death domain (hFasDD) was generated. The hFADD-hFasDD interaction was verified by cell survivability in ampicillin-containing medium and the colorimetric change of nitrocefin. It was also confirmed by His pull-down assay using cell lysates obtained in selection steps. A coiled-coil helix coiled-coil domain-containing protein 5 (CHCH5) was identified as an interacting protein of human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG) from the bacterial BFC cDNA library strategy. The interaction between hUNG and CHCH5 was further confirmed with immunoprecipitation using a mammalian expression system. CHCH5 enhanced the DNA glycosylase activity of hUNG to remove uracil from DNA duplexes containing a U/G mismatch pair. These results suggest that the bacterial BFC cDNA library strategy can be effectively used to identify interacting protein pairs.

  1. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} and La{sub 3}Te{sub 4} computed with density functional theory with on-site Coulomb interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Trinh; Allmen, Paul von; Huang, Chen-Kuo; Ma, James; Bux, Sabah; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-07

    The electronic properties and Seebeck coefficients of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} and La{sub 3}Te{sub 4} are computed using Density Functional Theory with on-site Coulomb interaction correction. We found that the Seebeck coefficients of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} and La{sub 3}Te{sub 4} are almost equal at temperatures larger than the Curie temperature of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4}, and in good agreement with the measurements reported by May et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 035135 (2012)]. At temperatures below the Curie temperature, the Seebeck coefficient of Ce{sub 3}Te{sub 4} increases due to the ferromagnetic ordering, which leads the f-electron of Ce to contribute to the Seebeck coefficient in the relevant range of electron concentration.

  2. A Survey of Aspartate-Phenylalanine and Glutamate-Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion-pi Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek M; Harris, Jason B; Adams, Rachel M; Nguyen, Don; Spiers, Jeremy D; Baudry, Jerome Y; Howell, Elizabeth E; Hinde, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion-{pi} pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion-quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242-8249]. To study the role of anion-{pi} interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe-Asp or -Glu pairs separated by less than 7 {angstrom} in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura-Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene-formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (-2 to -7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion-{pi} pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as {beta} strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation-{pi} interactions as well as potential {pi}-{pi} stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion-{pi} pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion-{pi} pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  3. Geometrically-frustrated pseudogap phase of Coulomb liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudya, Y.; Terletska, H.; Pankov, S.; Manousakis, E.; Dobrosavljević, V.

    2012-06-01

    We study a class of models with long-range repulsive interactions of the generalized Coulomb form V(r)∼1/rα. We show that decreasing the interaction exponent in the regime αinteractions. A nearly frozen Coulomb liquid then survives in a broad pseudogap phase found at T>Tc, which is characterized by an unusual temperature dependence of all quantities. In contrast, the leading critical behavior very close to the charge-ordering temperature remains identical as in models with short-range interactions.

  4. NaFe0.56Cu0.44As : A Pnictide Insulating Phase Induced by On-Site Coulomb Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Lv, Baiqing; Ma, Junzhang; Bisti, F.; Park, J.; Shang, T.; Cao, Chongde; Song, Yu; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Dai, Pengcheng; Patthey, L.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Mesot, J.; Shi, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the studies of iron pnictides, a key question is whether their bad-metal state from which the superconductivity emerges lies in close proximity with a magnetically ordered insulating phase. Recently, it was found that at low temperatures, the heavily Cu-doped NaFe1 -xCuxAs (x >0.3 ) iron pnictide is an insulator with long-range antiferromagnetic order, similar to the parent compound of cuprates but distinct from all other iron pnictides. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we determined the momentum-resolved electronic structure of NaFe1 -xCuxAs (x =0.44 ) and identified that its ground state is a narrow-gap insulator. Combining the experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) and DFT +U calculations, our analysis reveals that the on-site Coulombic (Hubbard) and Hund's coupling energies play crucial roles in the formation of the band gap about the chemical potential. We propose that at finite temperatures, charge carriers are thermally excited from the Cu-As-like valence band into the conduction band, which is of Fe 3 d -like character. With increasing temperature, the number of electrons in the conduction band becomes larger and the hopping energy between Fe sites increases, and finally the long-range antiferromagnetic order is destroyed at T >TN . Our study provides a basis for investigating the evolution of the electronic structure of a Mott insulator transforming into a bad metallic phase and eventually forming a superconducting state in iron pnictides.

  5. NaFe_{0.56}Cu_{0.44}As: A Pnictide Insulating Phase Induced by On-Site Coulomb Interaction.

    PubMed

    Matt, C E; Xu, N; Lv, Baiqing; Ma, Junzhang; Bisti, F; Park, J; Shang, T; Cao, Chongde; Song, Yu; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Dai, Pengcheng; Patthey, L; Plumb, N C; Radovic, M; Mesot, J; Shi, M

    2016-08-26

    In the studies of iron pnictides, a key question is whether their bad-metal state from which the superconductivity emerges lies in close proximity with a magnetically ordered insulating phase. Recently, it was found that at low temperatures, the heavily Cu-doped NaFe_{1-x}Cu_{x}As (x>0.3) iron pnictide is an insulator with long-range antiferromagnetic order, similar to the parent compound of cuprates but distinct from all other iron pnictides. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we determined the momentum-resolved electronic structure of NaFe_{1-x}Cu_{x}As (x=0.44) and identified that its ground state is a narrow-gap insulator. Combining the experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) and DFT+U calculations, our analysis reveals that the on-site Coulombic (Hubbard) and Hund's coupling energies play crucial roles in the formation of the band gap about the chemical potential. We propose that at finite temperatures, charge carriers are thermally excited from the Cu-As-like valence band into the conduction band, which is of Fe 3d-like character. With increasing temperature, the number of electrons in the conduction band becomes larger and the hopping energy between Fe sites increases, and finally the long-range antiferromagnetic order is destroyed at T>T_{N}. Our study provides a basis for investigating the evolution of the electronic structure of a Mott insulator transforming into a bad metallic phase and eventually forming a superconducting state in iron pnictides. PMID:27610876

  6. Coulomb excitation of 107In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cederkall, J.; Fahlander, C.; Ekström, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Albers, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I.; Davinson, T.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Iwanicki, J.; Lutter, R.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Siem, S.; Taprogge, J.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive isotope 107In was studied using sub-barrier Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. Two γ rays were observed during the experiment, corresponding to the low-lying 11/2+ and 3/2- states. The reduced transition probability of the 11/2+ state was determined with the semiclassical Coulomb excitation code gosia2. The result is discussed in comparison to large-scale shell-model calculations, previous unified-model calculations, and earlier Coulomb excitation measurements in the odd-mass In isotopes.

  7. Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgers, C.P.; Kirk, J.G.; Duclous, R.; Blackburn, T.G.; Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D.; Bell, A.R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

  8. Enthalpy pair coefficients of interaction for DL-valine in aqueous solutions of polyatomic alcohols at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    Integral enthalpies of dissolution Δsol H m of DL-valine are measured via calorimetry of dissolution in aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethylene glycol, and 1,2-propylene glycol. Standard values of the enthalpies of dissolution (Δsol H ○) and transfer (Δtr H ○) of amino acid from water to mixed solvent are calculated from the resulting experimental data. The enthalpy coefficients for pair interactions hxy of amino acid with polyatomic alcohol molecules are calculated using the McMillan-Meyer theory and have positive values. The obtained results are discussed in light of the theory of the predomination of various types of interactions in mixed solutions and the effect of structural features of interacting biomolecules on the thermochemical parameters of the dissolution of amino acids.

  9. RETIRED A STARS AND THEIR COMPANIONS. VI. A PAIR OF INTERACTING EXOPLANET PAIRS AROUND THE SUBGIANTS 24 SEXTANIS AND HD 200964

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, John Asher; Payne, Matthew; Ford, Eric B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Henry, Gregory W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Brewer, John M.; Schwab, Christian; Reffert, Sabine; Lowe, Thomas B.

    2011-01-15

    We report radial velocity (RV) measurements of the G-type subgiants 24 Sextanis (= HD 90043) and HD 200964. Both are massive, evolved stars that exhibit periodic variations due to the presence of a pair of Jovian planets. Photometric monitoring with the T12 0.80 m APT at Fairborn Observatory demonstrates both stars to be constant in brightness to {<=}0.002 mag, thus strengthening the planetary interpretation of the RV variations. Based on our dynamical analysis of the RV time series, 24 Sex b, c have orbital periods of 452.8 days and 883.0 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.333 AU and 2.08 AU, and minimum masses 1.99 M{sub Jup} and 0.86 M{sub Jup}, assuming a stellar mass M{sub *}= 1.54 M{sub sun}. HD 200964 b, c have orbital periods of 613.8 days and 825.0 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.601 AU and 1.95 AU, and minimum masses 1.99 M{sub Jup} and 0.90 M{sub Jup}, assuming M{sub *}= 1.44 M{sub sun}. We also carry out dynamical simulations to properly account for gravitational interactions between the planets. Most, if not all, of the dynamically stable solutions include crossing orbits, suggesting that each system is locked in a mean-motion resonance that prevents close encounters and provides long-term stability. The planets in the 24 Sex system likely have a period ratio near 2:1, while the HD 200964 system is even more tightly packed with a period ratio close to 4:3. However, we caution that further RV observations and more detailed dynamical modeling will be required to provide definitive and unique orbital solutions for both cases, and to determine whether the two systems are truly resonant.

  10. Coulomb repulsion in short polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Norouzy, Amir; Assaf, Khaleel I; Zhang, Shuai; Jacob, Maik H; Nau, Werner M

    2015-01-01

    Coulomb repulsion between like-charged side chains is presently viewed as a major force that impacts the biological activity of intrinsically disordered polypeptides (IDPs) by determining their spatial dimensions. We investigated short synthetic models of IDPs, purely composed of ionizable amino acid residues and therefore expected to display an extreme structural and dynamic response to pH variation. Two synergistic, custom-made, time-resolved fluorescence methods were applied in tandem to study the structure and dynamics of the acidic and basic hexapeptides Asp6, Glu6, Arg6, Lys6, and His6 between pH 1 and 12. (i) End-to-end distances were obtained from the short-distance Förster resonance energy transfer (sdFRET) from N-terminal 5-fluoro-l-tryptophan (FTrp) to C-terminal Dbo. (ii) End-to-end collision rates were obtained for the same peptides from the collision-induced fluorescence quenching (CIFQ) of Dbo by FTrp. Unexpectedly, the very high increase of charge density at elevated pH had no dynamical or conformational consequence in the anionic chains, neither in the absence nor in the presence of salt, in conflict with the common view and in partial conflict with accompanying molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast, the cationic peptides responded to ionization but with surprising patterns that mirrored the rich individual characteristics of each side chain type. The contrasting results had to be interpreted, by considering salt screening experiments, N-terminal acetylation, and simulations, in terms of an interplay of local dielectric constant and peptide-length dependent side chain charge-charge repulsion, side chain functional group solvation, N-terminal and side chain charge-charge repulsion, and side chain-side chain as well as side chain-backbone interactions. The common picture that emerged is that Coulomb repulsion between water-solvated side chains is efficiently quenched in short peptides as long as side chains are not in direct contact with each

  11. Development of a Model Protein Interaction Pair as a Benchmarking Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of 2-Site Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Newitt, John A; Doyle, Michael L; Arisaka, Fumio; Giannetti, Anthony M; Hensley, Preston; Myszka, David G; Schwarz, Fred P; Thomson, James A; Eisenstein, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the molecular interaction field is to accurately determine the stoichiometry and stepwise binding affinity constants for macromolecules having >1 binding site. The mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) is to show how biophysical technologies are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core technologies [such as biosensor, microcalorimetry, or analytic ultracentrifugation (AUC)]. In the present work, the MIRG has developed a robust model protein interaction pair consisting of a bivalent variant of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens extracellular RNase barnase and a variant of its natural monovalent intracellular inhibitor protein barstar. It is demonstrated that this system can serve as a benchmarking tool for the quantitative analysis of 2-site protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction pair enables determination of precise binding constants for the barstar protein binding to 2 distinct sites on the bivalent barnase binding partner (termed binase), where the 2 binding sites were engineered to possess affinities that differed by 2 orders of magnitude. Multiple MIRG laboratories characterized the interaction using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), AUC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods to evaluate the feasibility of the system as a benchmarking model. Although general agreement was seen for the binding constants measured using solution-based ITC and AUC approaches, weaker affinity was seen for surface-based method SPR, with protein immobilization likely affecting affinity. An analysis of the results from multiple MIRG laboratories suggests that the bivalent barnase-barstar system is a suitable model for benchmarking new approaches for the quantitative characterization of complex biomolecular interactions. PMID:26543437

  12. Development of a Model Protein Interaction Pair as a Benchmarking Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of 2-Site Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Newitt, John A.; Doyle, Michael L.; Arisaka, Fumio; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Hensley, Preston; Myszka, David G.; Schwarz, Fred P.; Thomson, James A.; Eisenstein, Edward

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in the molecular interaction field is to accurately determine the stoichiometry and stepwise binding affinity constants for macromolecules having >1 binding site. The mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) is to show how biophysical technologies are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core technologies [such as biosensor, microcalorimetry, or analytic ultracentrifugation (AUC)]. In the present work, the MIRG has developed a robust model protein interaction pair consisting of a bivalent variant of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens extracellular RNase barnase and a variant of its natural monovalent intracellular inhibitor protein barstar. It is demonstrated that this system can serve as a benchmarking tool for the quantitative analysis of 2-site protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction pair enables determination of precise binding constants for the barstar protein binding to 2 distinct sites on the bivalent barnase binding partner (termed binase), where the 2 binding sites were engineered to possess affinities that differed by 2 orders of magnitude. Multiple MIRG laboratories characterized the interaction using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), AUC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods to evaluate the feasibility of the system as a benchmarking model. Although general agreement was seen for the binding constants measured using solution-based ITC and AUC approaches, weaker affinity was seen for surface-based method SPR, with protein immobilization likely affecting affinity. An analysis of the results from multiple MIRG laboratories suggests that the bivalent barnase-barstar system is a suitable model for benchmarking new approaches for the quantitative characterization of complex biomolecular interactions. PMID:26543437

  13. N lone-pair···π interaction: a rotational study of chlorotrifluoroethylene···ammonia.

    PubMed

    Gou, Qian; Spada, Lorenzo; Geboes, Yannick; Herrebout, Wouter A; Melandri, Sonia; Caminati, Walther

    2015-03-28

    The rotational spectra of four isotopologues of the adduct C2F3Cl-NH3 show that NH3 is bound to the partner molecule through a (N)lone-pair···π interaction. Ammonia is located in proximity to the C2 atom (the one linked to two fluorine atoms), with the C2···N distance = 2.987(2) Å. The nuclear hyperfine structure due to the quadrupole coupling effects of (35)Cl/(37)Cl and (14)N nuclei has been fully resolved. The (14)N quadrupole coupling constants allow estimating the effective orientation of NH3 in the complex.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of crystalline UF6 using the pair interaction potentials of the uranium and fluorine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekunov, G. S.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2016-09-01

    A model of uranium hexafluoride is suggested that is based on the empirical pair potentials of U-U, F-F, U-F used for both intra- and intermolecular interactions. The potentials for this model are obtained from the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient of UF6 crystal using the molecular dynamics simulation under the periodic boundary conditions with constant volume and temperature. Within the framework of the model, the thermal expansion and sublimation of crystalline UF6 are investigated. A set of potential parameters is identified that provides satisfactory simulation of both UF6 crystal and the dependence of the UF6 saturated vapor pressure on temperature.

  15. Pair interactions in polyelectrolyte-nanoparticle systems: Influence of dielectric inhomogeneities and the partial dissociation of polymers and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pryamitsyn, Victor; Ganesan, Venkat

    2015-10-28

    We study the effective pair interactions between two charged spherical particles in polyelectrolyte solutions using polymer self-consistent field theory. In a recent study [V. Pryamitsyn and V. Ganesan, Macromolecules 47, 6095 (2015)], we considered a model in which the particles possess fixed charge density, the polymers contain a prespecified amount of dissociated charges and, the dielectric constant of the solution was assumed to be homogeneous in space and independent of the polymer concentration. In this article, we present results extending our earlier model to study situations in which either or both the particle and the polymers possess partially dissociable groups. Additionally, we also consider the case when the dielectric constant of the solution depends on the local concentration of the polymers and when the particle’s dielectric constant is lower than that of the solvent. For each case, we quantify the polymer-mediated interactions between the particles as a function of the polymer concentrations and the degree of dissociation of the polymer and particles. Consistent with the results of our previous study, we observe that the polymer-mediated interparticle interactions consist of a short-range attraction and a long-range repulsion. The partial dissociablity of the polymer and particles was seen to have a strong influence on the strength of the repulsive portion of the interactions. Rendering the dielectric permittivity to be inhomogeneous has an even stronger effect on the repulsive interactions and results in changes to the qualitative nature of interactions in some parametric ranges.

  16. LDGIdb: a database of gene interactions inferred from long-range strong linkage disequilibrium between pairs of SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complex human diseases may be associated with many gene interactions. Gene interactions take several different forms and it is difficult to identify all of the interactions that are potentially associated with human diseases. One approach that may fill this knowledge gap is to infer previously unknown gene interactions via identification of non-physical linkages between different mutations (or single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) to avoid hitchhiking effect or lack of recombination. Strong non-physical SNP linkages are considered to be an indication of biological (gene) interactions. These interactions can be physical protein interactions, regulatory interactions, functional compensation/antagonization or many other forms of interactions. Previous studies have shown that mutations in different genes can be linked to the same disorders. Therefore, non-physical SNP linkages, coupled with knowledge of SNP-disease associations may shed more light on the role of gene interactions in human disorders. A user-friendly web resource that integrates information about non-physical SNP linkages, gene annotations, SNP information, and SNP-disease associations may thus be a good reference for biomedical research. Findings Here we extracted the SNPs located within the promoter or exonic regions of protein-coding genes from the HapMap database to construct a database named the Linkage-Disequilibrium-based Gene Interaction database (LDGIdb). The database stores 646,203 potential human gene interactions, which are potential interactions inferred from SNP pairs that are subject to long-range strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), or non-physical linkages. To minimize the possibility of hitchhiking, SNP pairs inferred to be non-physically linked were required to be located in different chromosomes or in different LD blocks of the same chromosomes. According to the genomic locations of the involved SNPs (i.e., promoter, untranslated region (UTR) and coding region (CDS)), the

  17. The pluripotency factor Oct4 interacts with Ctcf and also controls X-chromosome pairing and counting.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Mary E; Silva, Susana S; Pinter, Stefan F; Xu, Na; Lee, Jeannie T

    2009-07-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells is controlled by defined transcription factors. During differentiation, mouse ES cells undergo global epigenetic reprogramming, as exemplified by X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in which one female X chromosome is silenced to achieve gene dosage parity between the sexes. Somatic XCI is regulated by homologous X-chromosome pairing and counting, and by the random choice of future active and inactive X chromosomes. XCI and cell differentiation are tightly coupled, as blocking one process compromises the other and dedifferentiation of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells is accompanied by X chromosome reactivation. Recent evidence suggests coupling of Xist expression to pluripotency factors occurs, but how the two are interconnected remains unknown. Here we show that Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) lies at the top of the XCI hierarchy, and regulates XCI by triggering X-chromosome pairing and counting. Oct4 directly binds Tsix and Xite, two regulatory noncoding RNA genes of the X-inactivation centre, and also complexes with XCI trans-factors, Ctcf and Yy1 (ref. 17), through protein-protein interactions. Depletion of Oct4 blocks homologous X-chromosome pairing and results in the inactivation of both X chromosomes in female cells. Thus, we have identified the first trans-factor that regulates counting, and ascribed new functions to Oct4 during X-chromosome reprogramming.

  18. Reduced atomic pair-interaction design (RAPID) model for simulations of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ni, Boris; Baumketner, Andrij

    2013-02-14

    Increasingly, theoretical studies of proteins focus on large systems. This trend demands the development of computational models that are fast, to overcome the growing complexity, and accurate, to capture the physically relevant features. To address this demand, we introduce a protein model that uses all-atom architecture to ensure the highest level of chemical detail while employing effective pair potentials to represent the effect of solvent to achieve the maximum speed. The effective potentials are derived for amino acid residues based on the condition that the solvent-free model matches the relevant pair-distribution functions observed in explicit solvent simulations. As a test, the model is applied to alanine polypeptides. For the chain with 10 amino acid residues, the model is found to reproduce properly the native state and its population. Small discrepancies are observed for other folding properties and can be attributed to the approximations inherent in the model. The transferability of the generated effective potentials is investigated in simulations of a longer peptide with 25 residues. A minimal set of potentials is identified that leads to qualitatively correct results in comparison with the explicit solvent simulations. Further tests, conducted for multiple peptide chains, show that the transferable model correctly reproduces the experimentally observed tendency of polyalanines to aggregate into β-sheets more strongly with the growing length of the peptide chain. Taken together, the reported results suggest that the proposed model could be used to succesfully simulate folding and aggregation of small peptides in atomic detail. Further tests are needed to assess the strengths and limitations of the model more thoroughly.

  19. Reduced atomic pair-interaction design (RAPID) model for simulations of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Boris; Baumketner, Andrij

    2013-02-01

    Increasingly, theoretical studies of proteins focus on large systems. This trend demands the development of computational models that are fast, to overcome the growing complexity, and accurate, to capture the physically relevant features. To address this demand, we introduce a protein model that uses all-atom architecture to ensure the highest level of chemical detail while employing effective pair potentials to represent the effect of solvent to achieve the maximum speed. The effective potentials are derived for amino acid residues based on the condition that the solvent-free model matches the relevant pair-distribution functions observed in explicit solvent simulations. As a test, the model is applied to alanine polypeptides. For the chain with 10 amino acid residues, the model is found to reproduce properly the native state and its population. Small discrepancies are observed for other folding properties and can be attributed to the approximations inherent in the model. The transferability of the generated effective potentials is investigated in simulations of a longer peptide with 25 residues. A minimal set of potentials is identified that leads to qualitatively correct results in comparison with the explicit solvent simulations. Further tests, conducted for multiple peptide chains, show that the transferable model correctly reproduces the experimentally observed tendency of polyalanines to aggregate into β-sheets more strongly with the growing length of the peptide chain. Taken together, the reported results suggest that the proposed model could be used to succesfully simulate folding and aggregation of small peptides in atomic detail. Further tests are needed to assess the strengths and limitations of the model more thoroughly.

  20. Electron attraction mediated by Coulomb repulsion.

    PubMed

    Hamo, A; Benyamini, A; Shapir, I; Khivrich, I; Waissman, J; Kaasbjerg, K; Oreg, Y; von Oppen, F; Ilani, S

    2016-07-21

    One of the defining properties of electrons is their mutual Coulomb repulsion. However, in solids this basic property may change; for example, in superconductors, the coupling of electrons to lattice vibrations makes the electrons attract one another, leading to the formation of bound pairs. Fifty years ago it was proposed that electrons can be made attractive even when all of the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic, by exploiting their repulsion from other electrons. This attraction mechanism, termed 'excitonic', promised to achieve stronger and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite an extensive search, experimental evidence for excitonic attraction has yet to be found. Here we demonstrate this attraction by constructing, from the bottom up, the fundamental building block of the excitonic mechanism. Our experiments are based on quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with cryogenic precision manipulation. Using this platform, we demonstrate that two electrons can be made to attract each other using an independent electronic system as the 'glue' that mediates attraction. Owing to its tunability, our system offers insights into the underlying physics, such as the dependence of the emergent attraction on the underlying repulsion, and the origin of the pairing energy. We also demonstrate transport signatures of excitonic pairing. This experimental demonstration of excitonic pairing paves the way for the design of exotic states of matter. PMID:27443742

  1. Electron attraction mediated by Coulomb repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamo, A.; Benyamini, A.; Shapir, I.; Khivrich, I.; Waissman, J.; Kaasbjerg, K.; Oreg, Y.; von Oppen, F.; Ilani, S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the defining properties of electrons is their mutual Coulomb repulsion. However, in solids this basic property may change; for example, in superconductors, the coupling of electrons to lattice vibrations makes the electrons attract one another, leading to the formation of bound pairs. Fifty years ago it was proposed that electrons can be made attractive even when all of the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic, by exploiting their repulsion from other electrons. This attraction mechanism, termed ‘excitonic’, promised to achieve stronger and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite an extensive search, experimental evidence for excitonic attraction has yet to be found. Here we demonstrate this attraction by constructing, from the bottom up, the fundamental building block of the excitonic mechanism. Our experiments are based on quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with cryogenic precision manipulation. Using this platform, we demonstrate that two electrons can be made to attract each other using an independent electronic system as the ‘glue’ that mediates attraction. Owing to its tunability, our system offers insights into the underlying physics, such as the dependence of the emergent attraction on the underlying repulsion, and the origin of the pairing energy. We also demonstrate transport signatures of excitonic pairing. This experimental demonstration of excitonic pairing paves the way for the design of exotic states of matter.

  2. Derivation of Pitzer Interaction Parameters for an Aqueous Species Pair of FeCitrate- and Mg2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J.; Olivas, T.; Nemer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The WIPP is located within the bedded salts of the Permian Salado Formation, which consists of interbedded halite and anhydrite layers overlaying the Castile Formation. The waste includes, but is not limited to, the salts of citric acid and iron. To calculate the solution chemistry for brines of WIPP-relevance, WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) employs the Pitzer formulation to determine the activity coefficients of aqueous species in brine. The current WIPP thermodynamic database, however, does not include iron species and their Pitzer parameters, in spite of the fact that there will be a large amount of iron in the WIPP. Iron would be emplaced as part of the waste, as well as the containers for the waste. The objective of this analysis is to derive the Pitzer binary interaction parameters for the pair of Mg2+ and FeCitrate-. Briefly, an aqueous model for dissolution of Fe(OH)2(s) in MgNa2Citrate solution was fitted to the experimentally measured solubility data. The aqueous model consists of several chemical reactions and related Pitzer interaction parameters. Specifically, Pitzer binary interaction parameters for the Mg2+ and FeCitrate- pair (β(0), β(1), and Cφ) were fitted to the experimental data. Anoxic gloveboxes were used to keep the oxygen level low (less than 6 ppm) throughout the experiments. Aging time was more than 800 days to ensure equilibrium. EQ3NR packaged in EQ3/6 v.8.0a calculates the aqueous speciation and saturation index using an aqueous model addressed in EQ3/6's database. The saturation index indicates how far the system is from equilibrium with respect to the solid of interest. Thus, the smaller the sum of squared saturation indices that the aqueous model calculates for the given number of experiments, the more closely the model attributes equilibrium to each

  3. Pairing and unpairing electron densities in organic systems: Two-electron three center through space and through bonds interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lobayan, Rosana M.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.

    2014-05-07

    Two-electron three-center bonding interactions in organic ions like methonium (CH{sub 5}{sup +}), ethonium (C{sub 2}H{sub 7}{sup +}), and protonated alkanes n−C{sub 4}H{sub 11}{sup +} isomers (butonium cations) are described and characterized within the theoretical framework of the topological analysis of the electron density decomposition into its effectively paired and unpaired contributions. These interactions manifest in some of this type of systems as a concentration of unpaired electron cloud around the bond paths, in contrast to the well known paradigmatic boron hydrids in which it is not only concentrated close to the atomic nucleus and the bond paths but out of them and over the region defined by the involved atoms as a whole. This result permits to propose an attempt of classification for these interactions based in such manifestations. In the first type, it is called as interactions through bonds and in the second type as interactions through space type.

  4. OncoBinder facilitates interpretation of proteomic interaction data by capturing coactivation pairs in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Wang, Huanbin; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Xu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput methods such as co-immunoprecipitationmass spectrometry (coIP-MS) and yeast 2 hybridization (Y2H) have suggested a broad range of unannotated protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and interpretation of these PPIs remains a challenging task. The advancements in cancer genomic researches allow for the inference of “coactivation pairs” in cancer, which may facilitate the identification of PPIs involved in cancer. Here we present OncoBinder as a tool for the assessment of proteomic interaction data based on the functional synergy of oncoproteins in cancer. This decision tree-based method combines gene mutation, copy number and mRNA expression information to infer the functional status of protein-coding genes. We applied OncoBinder to evaluate the potential binders of EGFR and ERK2 proteins based on the gastric cancer dataset of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). As a result, OncoBinder identified high confidence interactions (annotated by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) or validated by low-throughput assays) more efficiently than co-expression based method. Taken together, our results suggest that evaluation of gene functional synergy in cancer may facilitate the interpretation of proteomic interaction data. The OncoBinder toolbox for Matlab is freely accessible online. PMID:26872056

  5. A Matched-Pairs Study of Interactive Computer Laboratory Activities in a Liberal Arts Math Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frederick; Butler, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    This paper details the culmination of a large, multi-year study on the effects of an interactive computer laboratory component in a large liberal arts math course at a state university. After several semesters of piloting these laboratory activities in the course, one of two sections, taught by the same senior instructor, was randomly selected to…

  6. The Influence of Context-Specific and Dispositional Achievement Goals on Children's Paired Collaborative Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Amanda; Yuill, Nicola; Luckin, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated that working collaboratively can have positive effects on children's learning. While key factors have been identified which influence the quality of these interactions, little research has addressed the influence of children's achievement goals on collaborative behaviour. Aims: This paper investigates the…

  7. Young Foreign Language Learners' Interactions during Task-Based Paired Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Yuko Goto; Zeng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in foreign language (FL) education at elementary school, it remains unclear how young learners' FL abilities can best be evaluated with tasks. The present study seeks to understand developmental differences in interactions among elementary-school students during task-based language…

  8. Using full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo in a seniority zero space to investigate the correlation energy equivalence of pair coupled cluster doubles and doubly occupied configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has shown promise for the description of strong correlation. This promise is related to its apparent ability to match results from doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), even though the latter method has exponential computational cost. Here, by modifying the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to sample only the seniority zero sector of Hilbert space, we show that the DOCI and pCCD energies are in agreement for a variety of 2D Hubbard models, including for systems well out of reach for conventional configuration interaction algorithms. Our calculations are aided by the sign problem being much reduced in the seniority zero space compared with the full space. We present evidence for this and then discuss the sign problem in terms of the wave function of the system which appears to have a simplified sign structure.

  9. Mitigation of adverse interactions in pairs of clinical practice guidelines using constraint logic programming.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Michalowski, Martin; Farion, Ken; Hing, Marisela Mainegra; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new method to mitigate (identify and address) adverse interactions (drug-drug or drug-disease) that occur when a patient with comorbid diseases is managed according to two concurrently applied clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). A lack of methods to facilitate the concurrent application of CPGs severely limits their use in clinical practice and the development of such methods is one of the grand challenges for clinical decision support. The proposed method responds to this challenge. We introduce and formally define logical models of CPGs and other related concepts, and develop the mitigation algorithm that operates on these concepts. In the algorithm we combine domain knowledge encoded as interaction and revision operators using the constraint logic programming (CLP) paradigm. The operators characterize adverse interactions and describe revisions to logical models required to address these interactions, while CLP allows us to efficiently solve the logical models - a solution represents a feasible therapy that may be safely applied to a patient. The mitigation algorithm accepts two CPGs and available (likely incomplete) patient information. It reports whether mitigation has been successful or not, and on success it gives a feasible therapy and points at identified interactions (if any) together with the revisions that address them. Thus, we consider the mitigation algorithm as an alerting tool to support a physician in the concurrent application of CPGs that can be implemented as a component of a clinical decision support system. We illustrate our method in the context of two clinical scenarios involving a patient with duodenal ulcer who experiences an episode of transient ischemic attack.

  10. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan Ahluwalia, P. K.; Chand, Shyam

    2015-06-24

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ε + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  11. Application of charge density methods to a protein model compound: Calculation of Coulombic intermolecular interaction energies from the experimental charge density

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wu, Guang; Abramov, Yuriy A.; Volkov, Anatoliy V.; Coppens, Philip

    2002-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical charge density study of the pentapeptide Boc-Gln-d-Iva-Hyp-Ala-Phol (Boc, butoxycarbonyl; Gln, glutamine; Iva, isovaline; Hyp, hydroxyproline; Ala, ethylalanine; Phol, phenylalaninol) is described. The experimental analysis, based on synchrotron x-ray data collected at 20 K, is combined with ab initio theoretical calculations. The topologies of the experimental and theoretical densities are analyzed in terms of the atoms in molecules quantum theory. Topological parameters, including atomic charges and higher moments integrated over the atomic basins, have been evaluated with the program topxd and are used to calculate the electrostatic interactions between the molecules in the crystal. The interaction energies obtained after adding dispersive and repulsive van der Waals contributions agree quite well with those based on M-B3LYP/6–31G** dimer calculations for two of the three dimers in the crystal, whereas for the third a larger stabilization is obtained than predicted by the calculation. The agreement with theory is significantly better than that obtained with multipole moments derived directly from the aspherical atom refinement. The convergence of the interaction as a function of addition of successively higher moments up to and including hexadecapoles (l = 4) is found to be within 2–3 kJ/mol. Although shortcomings of both the theoretical and experimental procedures are pointed out, the agreement obtained supports the potential of the experimental method for the evaluation of interactions in larger biologically relevant molecules. PMID:12221293

  12. Application of charge density methods to a protein model compound: calculation of Coulombic intermolecular interaction energies from the experimental charge density.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Wu, Guang; Abramov, Yuriy A; Volkov, Anatoliy V; Coppens, Philip

    2002-09-17

    A combined experimental and theoretical charge density study of the pentapeptide Boc-Gln-d-Iva-Hyp-Ala-Phol (Boc, butoxycarbonyl; Gln, glutamine; Iva, isovaline; Hyp, hydroxyproline; Ala, ethylalanine; Phol, phenylalaninol) is described. The experimental analysis, based on synchrotron x-ray data collected at 20 K, is combined with ab initio theoretical calculations. The topologies of the experimental and theoretical densities are analyzed in terms of the atoms in molecules quantum theory. Topological parameters, including atomic charges and higher moments integrated over the atomic basins, have been evaluated with the program topxd and are used to calculate the electrostatic interactions between the molecules in the crystal. The interaction energies obtained after adding dispersive and repulsive van der Waals contributions agree quite well with those based on M-B3LYP/6-31G** dimer calculations for two of the three dimers in the crystal, whereas for the third a larger stabilization is obtained than predicted by the calculation. The agreement with theory is significantly better than that obtained with multipole moments derived directly from the aspherical atom refinement. The convergence of the interaction as a function of addition of successively higher moments up to and including hexadecapoles (l = 4) is found to be within 2-3 kJ/mol. Although shortcomings of both the theoretical and experimental procedures are pointed out, the agreement obtained supports the potential of the experimental method for the evaluation of interactions in larger biologically relevant molecules. PMID:12221293

  13. Suspensions of polymer-grafted nanoparticles with added polymers-Structure and effective pair-interactions.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sivasurender; Saw, Shibu; Kandar, A K; Dasgupta, C; Sprung, M; Basu, J K

    2015-08-28

    We present the results of combined experimental and theoretical (molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory) studies of the structure and effective interactions of suspensions of polymer grafted nanoparticles (PGNPs) in the presence of linear polymers. Due to the absence of systematic experimental and theoretical studies of PGNPs, it is widely believed that the structure and effective interactions in such binary mixtures would be very similar to those of an analogous soft colloidal material-star polymers. In our study, polystyrene-grafted gold nanoparticles with functionality f = 70 were mixed with linear polystyrene (PS) of two different molecular weights for obtaining two PGNP:PS size ratios, ξ = 0.14 and 2.76 (where, ξ = Mg/Mm, Mg and Mm being the molecular weights of grafting and matrix polymers, respectively). The experimental structure factor of PGNPs could be modeled with an effective potential (Model-X), which has been found to be widely applicable for star polymers. Similarly, the structure factor of the blends with ξ = 0.14 could be modeled reasonably well, while the structure of blends with ξ = 2.76 could not be captured, especially for high density of added polymers. A model (Model-Y) for effective interactions between PGNPs in a melt of matrix polymers also failed to provide good agreement with the experimental data for samples with ξ = 2.76 and high density of added polymers. We tentatively attribute this anomaly in modeling the structure factor of blends with ξ = 2.76 to the questionable assumption of Model-X in describing the added polymers as star polymers with functionality 2, which gets manifested in both polymer-polymer and polymer-PGNP interactions especially at higher fractions of added polymers. The failure of Model-Y may be due to the neglect of possible many-body interactions among PGNPs mediated by matrix polymers when the fraction of added polymers is high. These observations point to the need for a new framework to

  14. Open-shell pair interaction energy decomposition analysis (PIEDA): formulation and application to the hydrogen abstraction in tripeptides.

    PubMed

    Green, Mandy C; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Francisco, Joseph S; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2013-02-21

    An open-shell extension of the pair interaction energy decomposition analysis (PIEDA) within the framework of the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method is developed. The open-shell PIEDA method allows the analysis of inter- and intramolecular interactions in terms of electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, charge-transfer, dispersion, and optional polarization energies for molecular systems with a radical or high-spin fragment. Taking into account the low computational cost and scalability of the FMO and PIEDA methods, the new scheme provides a means to characterize the stabilization of radical and open-shell sites in biologically relevant species. The open-shell PIEDA is applied to the characterization of intramolecular interactions in capped trialanine upon hydrogen abstraction (HA) at various sites on the peptide. Hydrogen abstraction reaction is the first step in the oxidative pathway initiated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, associated with oxidative stress. It is found that HA results in significant geometrical reorganization of the trialanine peptide. Depending on the HA site, terminal interactions in the radical fold conformers may become weaker or stronger compared to the parent molecule, and often change the character of the non-covalent bonding from amide stacking to hydrogen bonding.

  15. Monitoring Flower Visitation Networks and Interactions between Pairs of Bumble Bees in a Large Outdoor Flight Cage.

    PubMed

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Chittka, Lars; Raine, Nigel E

    2016-01-01

    Pollinators, such as bees, often develop multi-location routes (traplines) to exploit subsets of flower patches within larger plant populations. How individuals establish such foraging areas in the presence of other foragers is poorly explored. Here we investigated the foraging patterns of pairs of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) released sequentially into an 880m2 outdoor flight cage containing 10 feeding stations (artificial flowers). Using motion-sensitive video cameras mounted on flowers, we mapped the flower visitation networks of both foragers, quantified their interactions and compared their foraging success over an entire day. Overall, bees that were released first (residents) travelled 37% faster and collected 77% more nectar, thereby reaching a net energy intake rate 64% higher than bees released second (newcomers). However, this prior-experience advantage decreased as newcomers became familiar with the spatial configuration of the flower array. When both bees visited the same flower simultaneously, the most frequent outcome was for the resident to evict the newcomer. On the rare occasions when newcomers evicted residents, the two bees increased their frequency of return visits to that flower. These competitive interactions led to a significant (if only partial) spatial overlap between the foraging patterns of pairs of bees. While newcomers may initially use social cues (such as olfactory footprints) to exploit flowers used by residents, either because such cues indicate higher rewards and/or safety from predation, residents may attempt to preserve their monopoly over familiar resources through exploitation and interference. We discuss how these interactions may favour spatial partitioning, thereby maximising the foraging efficiency of individuals and colonies. PMID:26982030

  16. Monitoring Flower Visitation Networks and Interactions between Pairs of Bumble Bees in a Large Outdoor Flight Cage

    PubMed Central

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Chittka, Lars; Raine, Nigel E.

    2016-01-01

    Pollinators, such as bees, often develop multi-location routes (traplines) to exploit subsets of flower patches within larger plant populations. How individuals establish such foraging areas in the presence of other foragers is poorly explored. Here we investigated the foraging patterns of pairs of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) released sequentially into an 880m2 outdoor flight cage containing 10 feeding stations (artificial flowers). Using motion-sensitive video cameras mounted on flowers, we mapped the flower visitation networks of both foragers, quantified their interactions and compared their foraging success over an entire day. Overall, bees that were released first (residents) travelled 37% faster and collected 77% more nectar, thereby reaching a net energy intake rate 64% higher than bees released second (newcomers). However, this prior-experience advantage decreased as newcomers became familiar with the spatial configuration of the flower array. When both bees visited the same flower simultaneously, the most frequent outcome was for the resident to evict the newcomer. On the rare occasions when newcomers evicted residents, the two bees increased their frequency of return visits to that flower. These competitive interactions led to a significant (if only partial) spatial overlap between the foraging patterns of pairs of bees. While newcomers may initially use social cues (such as olfactory footprints) to exploit flowers used by residents, either because such cues indicate higher rewards and/or safety from predation, residents may attempt to preserve their monopoly over familiar resources through exploitation and interference. We discuss how these interactions may favour spatial partitioning, thereby maximising the foraging efficiency of individuals and colonies. PMID:26982030

  17. Monitoring Flower Visitation Networks and Interactions between Pairs of Bumble Bees in a Large Outdoor Flight Cage.

    PubMed

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Chittka, Lars; Raine, Nigel E

    2016-01-01

    Pollinators, such as bees, often develop multi-location routes (traplines) to exploit subsets of flower patches within larger plant populations. How individuals establish such foraging areas in the presence of other foragers is poorly explored. Here we investigated the foraging patterns of pairs of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) released sequentially into an 880m2 outdoor flight cage containing 10 feeding stations (artificial flowers). Using motion-sensitive video cameras mounted on flowers, we mapped the flower visitation networks of both foragers, quantified their interactions and compared their foraging success over an entire day. Overall, bees that were released first (residents) travelled 37% faster and collected 77% more nectar, thereby reaching a net energy intake rate 64% higher than bees released second (newcomers). However, this prior-experience advantage decreased as newcomers became familiar with the spatial configuration of the flower array. When both bees visited the same flower simultaneously, the most frequent outcome was for the resident to evict the newcomer. On the rare occasions when newcomers evicted residents, the two bees increased their frequency of return visits to that flower. These competitive interactions led to a significant (if only partial) spatial overlap between the foraging patterns of pairs of bees. While newcomers may initially use social cues (such as olfactory footprints) to exploit flowers used by residents, either because such cues indicate higher rewards and/or safety from predation, residents may attempt to preserve their monopoly over familiar resources through exploitation and interference. We discuss how these interactions may favour spatial partitioning, thereby maximising the foraging efficiency of individuals and colonies.

  18. A model study on a pair of trapped particles interacting with an arbitrary effective range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of the effective range of interaction on the eigenvalues and eigenstates of two particles confined in a three-dimensional (3D) isotropic as well as one- or quasi-one dimensional harmonic (1D) traps. For this we employ model potentials which mimic finite-range s-wave interactions over a wide range of s-wave scattering length a s including the unitarity limits {a}s\\to +/- ∞ . Our results show that when the range is larger than the 3D or 1D harmonic oscillator length scale, the eigenvalues and eigenstates are nearly similar to those of noninteracting two particles in the 3D or 1D trap, respectively. In case of 3D, we find that when the range goes to zero, the results of contact potential as derived by Busch et al (1998 Foundations of Physics 28 549) are reproduced. However, in the case of 1D, such reproducibility does not occur as the range goes to zero. We have calculated the eigenvalues and eigenstates in a 1D harmonic trap taking one dimensional finite-range model potential. We have also calculated the bound state properties of two particles confined in a highly anisotropic quasi-1D trap taking three-dimensional finite-range model potential, and examined whether these quasi-1D results approach towards 1D ones as the aspect ratio η of the radial to axial frequency of the trap increases. We find that if the range is very small compared to the axial size of the trap, then one can reach 1D regime for η ≥slant 10000. However, for a large range, one can almost get 1D results for smaller values of η. This study will be important for the exploration of two-body or many body physics of trapped ultracold atoms interacting with narrow Feshbach resonance for which the effective range can be large.

  19. Spatio-temporal correlations in Coulomb clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical responses of Coulomb-interacting particles in two-dimensional nanoclusters are analyzed at different temperatures characterizing their solid- and liquid-like behavior. Depending on the trap symmetry, spatial correlations undergo slow, stretched exponential relaxations at long times, arising from spatially correlated motion in string-like paths. Such results stem from the combined effects of confinement and long-range repulsion, making the systems inherently heterogeneous. While particles in a “solid” flow produce dynamic heterogeneities, motion in “liquid” yields an unusually long tail in the distribution of particle displacements. A phenomenological model captures much of the subtleties of our numerical simulations.

  20. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhter, R. I.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Jonson, M.; Aharony, A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals.

  1. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, R I; Entin-Wohlman, O; Jonson, M; Aharony, A

    2016-05-27

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals. PMID:27284669

  2. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Gargi; Sharma, Dipendra; Dwivedi, K. K.; Dwivedi, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  3. Evolutionarily conserved paired immunoglobulin-like receptor α (PILRα) domain mediates its interaction with diverse sialylated ligands.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonglian; Senger, Kate; Baginski, Tomasz K; Mazloom, Anita; Chinn, Yvonne; Pantua, Homer; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ramani, Sree Ranjani; Luis, Elizabeth; Tom, Irene; Sebrell, Andrew; Quinones, Gabriel; Ma, Yan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Sai, Tao; Ding, Jiabing; Haley, Benjamin; Shadnia, Hooman; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Gonzalez, Lino C; Hass, Philip E; Zarrin, Ali A

    2012-05-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PILR) α is an inhibitory receptor that recognizes several ligands, including mouse CD99, PILR-associating neural protein, and Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein B. The physiological function(s) of interactions between PILRα and its cellular ligands are not well understood, as are the molecular determinants of PILRα/ligand interactions. To address these uncertainties, we sought to identify additional PILRα ligands and further define the molecular basis for PILRα/ligand interactions. Here, we identify two novel PILRα binding partners, neuronal differentiation and proliferation factor-1 (NPDC1), and collectin-12 (COLEC12). We find that sialylated O-glycans on these novel PILRα ligands, and on known PILRα ligands, are compulsory for PILRα binding. Sialylation-dependent ligand recognition is also a property of SIGLEC1, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins. SIGLEC1 Ig domain shares ∼22% sequence identity with PILRα, an identity that includes a conserved arginine localized to position 97 in mouse and human SIGLEC1, position 133 in mouse PILRα and position 126 in human PILRα. We observe that PILRα/ligand interactions require conserved PILRα Arg-133 (mouse) and Arg-126 (human), in correspondence with a previously reported requirement for SIGLEC1 Arg-197 in SIGLEC1/ligand interactions. Homology modeling identifies striking similarities between PILRα and SIGLEC1 ligand binding pockets as well as at least one set of distinctive interactions in the galactoxyl-binding site. Binding studies suggest that PILRα recognizes a complex ligand domain involving both sialic acid and protein motif(s). Thus, PILRα is evolved to engage multiple ligands with common molecular determinants to modulate myeloid cell functions in anatomical settings where PILRα ligands are expressed. PMID:22396535

  4. Evolutionarily Conserved Paired Immunoglobulin-like Receptor α (PILRα) Domain Mediates Its Interaction with Diverse Sialylated Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yonglian; Senger, Kate; Baginski, Tomasz K.; Mazloom, Anita; Chinn, Yvonne; Pantua, Homer; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ramani, Sree Ranjani; Luis, Elizabeth; Tom, Irene; Sebrell, Andrew; Quinones, Gabriel; Ma, Yan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Sai, Tao; Ding, Jiabing; Haley, Benjamin; Shadnia, Hooman; Kapadia, Sharookh B.; Gonzalez, Lino C.; Hass, Philip E.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2012-01-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PILR) α is an inhibitory receptor that recognizes several ligands, including mouse CD99, PILR-associating neural protein, and Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein B. The physiological function(s) of interactions between PILRα and its cellular ligands are not well understood, as are the molecular determinants of PILRα/ligand interactions. To address these uncertainties, we sought to identify additional PILRα ligands and further define the molecular basis for PILRα/ligand interactions. Here, we identify two novel PILRα binding partners, neuronal differentiation and proliferation factor-1 (NPDC1), and collectin-12 (COLEC12). We find that sialylated O-glycans on these novel PILRα ligands, and on known PILRα ligands, are compulsory for PILRα binding. Sialylation-dependent ligand recognition is also a property of SIGLEC1, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins. SIGLEC1 Ig domain shares ∼22% sequence identity with PILRα, an identity that includes a conserved arginine localized to position 97 in mouse and human SIGLEC1, position 133 in mouse PILRα and position 126 in human PILRα. We observe that PILRα/ligand interactions require conserved PILRα Arg-133 (mouse) and Arg-126 (human), in correspondence with a previously reported requirement for SIGLEC1 Arg-197 in SIGLEC1/ligand interactions. Homology modeling identifies striking similarities between PILRα and SIGLEC1 ligand binding pockets as well as at least one set of distinctive interactions in the galactoxyl-binding site. Binding studies suggest that PILRα recognizes a complex ligand domain involving both sialic acid and protein motif(s). Thus, PILRα is evolved to engage multiple ligands with common molecular determinants to modulate myeloid cell functions in anatomical settings where PILRα ligands are expressed. PMID:22396535

  5. Coulomb explosion of "hot spot"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Oreshkin, E. V.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    The study presented in this paper has shown that the generation of hard x rays and high-energy ions, which are detected in pinch implosion experiments, may be associated with the Coulomb explosion of the hot spot that is formed due to the outflow of the material from the pinch cross point. During the process of material outflow, the temperature of the hot spot plasma increases, and conditions arise for the plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated. The runaway of electrons from the hot spot region results in the buildup of positive space charge in this region followed by a Coulomb explosion. The conditions for the hot spot plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated have been revealed, and the estimates have been obtained for the kinetic energy of the ions generated by the Coulomb explosion.

  6. Interaction between magnetic vortex cores in a pair of nonidentical nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnecker, J. P.; Vigo-Cotrina, H.; Garcia, F.; Novais, E. R. P.; Guimarães, A. P.

    2014-05-28

    The coupling of two nonidentical magnetic nanodisks, i.e., with different vortex gyrotropic frequencies, is studied. From the analytical approach, the interactions between the nanodisks along x and y directions (the coupling integrals) were obtained as a function of distance. From the numerical solution of Thiele's equation, we derived the eigenfrequencies of the vortex cores as a function of distance. The motion of the two vortex cores and, consequently, the time dependence of the total magnetization M(t) were derived both using Thiele's equation and by micromagnetic simulation. From M(t), a recently developed method, the magnetic vortex echoes, analogous to the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spin echoes, was used to compute the distance dependence of the magnetic coupling strength. The results of the two approaches differ by approximately 10%; using one single term, a dependence with distance found is broadly in agreement with studies employing other techniques.

  7. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andrasi, A.; Taylor, John C.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > The Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge of QCD contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term. > We investigate the UV divergences from higher order graphs. > We find that they cannot be absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. - Abstract: In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  8. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J W; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs-CG, GC and GG-could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  9. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-05-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs—CG, GC and GG—could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  10. Charge-pairing interactions control the conformational setpoint and motions of the FMN domain in neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Bayachou, Mekki; Fadlalla, Mohammed A; Durra, Deborah; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2013-03-15

    The NOS (nitric oxide synthase; EC 1.14.13.39) enzymes contain a C-terminal flavoprotein domain [NOSred (reductase domain of NOS)] that binds FAD and FMN, and an N-terminal oxygenase domain that binds haem. Evidence suggests that the FMN-binding domain undergoes large conformational motions to shuttle electrons between the NADPH/FAD-binding domain [FNR (ferredoxin NADP-reductase)] and the oxygenase domain. Previously we have shown that three residues on the FMN domain (Glu762, Glu816 and Glu819) that make charge-pairing interactions with the FNR help to slow electron flux through nNOSred (neuronal NOSred). In the present study, we show that charge neutralization or reversal at each of these residues alters the setpoint [Keq(A)] of the NOSred conformational equilibrium to favour the open (FMN-deshielded) conformational state. Moreover, computer simulations of the kinetic traces of cytochrome c reduction by the mutants suggest that they have higher conformational transition rates (1.5-4-fold) and rates of interflavin electron transfer (1.5-2-fold) relative to wild-type nNOSred. We conclude that the three charge-pairing residues on the FMN domain govern electron flux through nNOSred by stabilizing its closed (FMN-shielded) conformational state and by retarding the rate of conformational switching between its open and closed conformations. PMID:23289611

  11. Charge Pairing Interactions Control the Conformational Setpoint and Motions of the FMN Domain in Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Bayachou, Mekki; Fadlalla, Mohammed A.; Durra, Deborah; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The Nitric Oxide Synthases (NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) contain a C-terminal flavoprotein domain (NOSred) that binds FAD and FMN and an N-terminal oxygenase domain that binds heme. Evidence suggests that the FMN-binding domain undergoes large conformational motions to shuttle electrons between the NADPH/FAD-binding domain (FNR) and the oxygenase domain. previously we showed that three residues on the FMN domain (Glu762, Glu816 and Glu819) that make charge-pairing interactions with the FNR help to slow electron flux through nNOSred. In this study, we show that charge neutralization or reversal at each of these residues alters the setpoint (KeqA) of the NOSred conformational equilibrium to favor of the open (FMN-deshielded) conformational state. Moreover, computer simulations of the kinetic traces of cytochrome c reduction by the mutants suggest that they have relatively larger effects on the conformational transition rates (from 1.5 to 4x faster) and the rate of interflavin electron transfer (from 1.5 to 2x faster) relative to wild type nNOSred. We conclude that the three charge-pairing residues on the FMN domain govern electron flux through nNOSred by stabilizing its closed (FMN-shielded) conformational state and by retarding the rate of conformational switching between its open and closed conformations. PMID:23289611

  12. Systematic study of real photon and Drell-Yan pair production in p+A (d+A) interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelina, M.; Basso, E.; Goncalves, V. P.; Nemchik, J.; Pasechnik, R.

    2016-07-01

    We study nuclear effects in production of Drell-Yan pairs and direct photons in proton-nucleus collisions. For the first time, these effects are studied within the color dipole approach using the Green function formalism which naturally incorporates the color transparency and quantum coherence effects. The corresponding numerical results for the nuclear modification factor are compared with available data. Besides, we present a variety of predictions for the nuclear suppression as a function of transverse momentum pT, Feynman variable xF and invariant mass M of the lepton pair which can be verified by experiments at RHIC and LHC. We found that the nuclear suppression is caused predominantly by effects of quantum coherence (shadowing corrections) and by the effective energy loss induced by multiple initial state interactions. Whereas the former dominate at small Bjorken x2 in the target, the latter turns out to be significant at large x1 in the projectile beam and is universal at different energies and transverse momenta.

  13. Nonlinear interaction of instability waves and vortex-pairing noise in axisymmetric subsonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-Hua; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Xing-Chen; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-10-01

    A direct simulation with selected inflow forcing is performed for an accurate description of the jet flow field and far-field noise. The effects of the Mach number and heating on the acoustic field are studied in detail. The beam patterns and acoustic intensities are both varied as the change of the Mach number and temperature. The decomposition of the source terms of the Lilley-Goldstein (L-G) equation shows that the momentum and thermodynamic components lead to distinctly different beam patterns. Significant cancellation is found between the momentum and thermodynamic components at low polar angles for the isothermal jet and large polar angles for the hot jet. The cancellation leads to the minimum values of the far-field sound. Based on linear parabolized stability equation solutions, the nonlinear interaction model for sound prediction is built in combination with the L-G equation. The dominant beam patterns and their original locations predicted by the nonlinear model are in good agreement with the direct simulation results, and the predictions of sound pressure level (SPL) by the nonlinear model are relatively reasonable.

  14. Probing long-range carrier-pair spin–spin interactions in a conjugated polymer by detuning of electrically detected spin beating

    PubMed Central

    van Schooten, Kipp J.; Baird, Douglas L.; Limes, Mark E.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Weakly coupled electron spin pairs that experience weak spin–orbit interaction can control electronic transitions in molecular and solid-state systems. Known to determine radical pair reactions, they have been invoked to explain phenomena ranging from avian magnetoreception to spin-dependent charge-carrier recombination and transport. Spin pairs exhibit persistent spin coherence, allowing minute magnetic fields to perturb spin precession and thus recombination rates and photoreaction yields, giving rise to a range of magneto-optoelectronic effects in devices. Little is known, however, about interparticle magnetic interactions within such pairs. Here we present pulsed electrically detected electron spin resonance experiments on poly(styrene-sulfonate)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:PSS) devices, which show how interparticle spin–spin interactions (magnetic-dipolar and spin-exchange) between charge-carrier spin pairs can be probed through the detuning of spin-Rabi oscillations. The deviation from uncoupled precession frequencies quantifies both the exchange (<30 neV) and dipolar (23.5±1.5 neV) interaction energies responsible for the pair's zero-field splitting, implying quantum mechanical entanglement of charge-carrier spins over distances of 2.1±0.1 nm. PMID:25868686

  15. Etude de la Production de Paires de Leptons dans les Interactions Proton-Beryllium a 450 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Pierre Rene Roger

    L'experience HELIOS a fait une etude precise de la production des paires e^+e^-, mu^+mu^-, mu ^+mu^-+nu, et mu^+/- e^+/- dans les interactions p-Be a 450 GeV. Le detecteur comporte un spectrometre a electrons, un spectrometre a muons, et un ensemble de calorimetres qui peuvent mesurer les photons et l'energie manquante emportee par les neutrinos. Les paires de leptons sont observees dans la region cinematique ^1: eqalign {2/m_mu 6 GeV cr E_{e}&>2.8 GeV cr.25&paires d'electrons et environ 6000 paires de muons ont ete etudiees. Toutes ces paires ont une masse inferieure ou egale a celle de la resonance psi. L'experience est capable de detecter et de mesurer les desintegrations radiatives de mesons eta; etato l^+l^-gamma , cela permettant de faire une mesure directe d'une source encore mal connue de dileptons. La region de masse 0 < m_ll < m_phi est reproduite par la simulation Monte-Carlo des sources connues: desintegrations hadroniques de mesons, charme, bremsstrahlung. L'experience n'a pas observe de production anormale de dielectrons et de dimuons de basses masses dans la region de rapidite centrale. Le spectre en energie manquante permet d'identifier clairement les desintegrations semileptoniques de particules charmees. Une mesure de la section efficace de production de particules charmees dans les interactions p-Be a 450 GeV a ete faite:sigma_{c|c}= 24+/-8 (statistique) +/-16 (systématique) mu barn/nucléon. L'etude de la distribution en energie manquante des dimuons de masse intermediaire (1.2 GeV

  16. Visualization of cofilin-actin and Ras-Raf interactions by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays using a new pair of split Venus fragments.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazumasa; Kiuchi, Tai; Shoji, Kazuyasu; Sampei, Kaori; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2012-01-01

    The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is a method for visualizing protein-protein interactions in living cells. To visualize the cofilin-actin interaction in living cells, a series of combinations of the N- and C-terminal fragments of Venus fused upstream or downstream of cofilin and actin were screened systematically. A new pair of split Venus fragments, Venus (1-210) fused upstream of cofilin and Venus (210-238) fused downstream of actin, was the most effective combination for visualizing the specific interaction between cofilin and actin in living cells. This pair of Venus fragments was also effective for detecting the active Ras-dependent interaction between H-Ras and Raf1 and the Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between calmodulin and its target M13 peptide. In vitro BiFC assays using the pair of purified BiFC probes provided the means to detect the specific interactions between cofilin and actin and between H-Ras and Raf1. In vivo and in vitro BiFC assays using the newly identified pair of Venus fragments will serve as a useful tool for measuring protein-protein interactions with high specificity and low background fluorescence and could be applied to the screening of inhibitors that block protein-protein interactions.

  17. Probing the Role of Interlayer Coupling and Coulomb Interactions on Electronic Structure in Few-Layer MoSe2Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Aaron J.; M. Ugeda, Miguel; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Qiu, Diana Y.; Ruan, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Riss, Alexander; Lu, Jiong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution of the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron-electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures, and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices.

  18. Probing the Role of Interlayer Coupling and Coulomb Interactions on Electronic Structure in Few-Layer MoSe 2 Nanostructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bradley, Aaron J.; M. Ugeda, Miguel; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Qiu, Diana Y.; Ruan, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Riss, Alexander; Lu, Jiong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; et al

    2015-03-16

    Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution ofmore » the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron-electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices.« less

  19. Probing the Role of Interlayer Coupling and Coulomb Interactions on Electronic Structure in Few-Layer MoSe 2 Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Aaron J.; M. Ugeda, Miguel; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Qiu, Diana Y.; Ruan, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Riss, Alexander; Lu, Jiong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2015-03-16

    Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution of the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron-electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices.

  20. Probing the Role of Interlayer Coupling and Coulomb Interactions on Electronic Structure in Few-Layer MoSe2 Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution of the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron–electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices. PMID:25775022

  1. First-principles calculations of shear moduli for Monte Carlo-simulated Coulomb solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a first-principles study of the shear modulus tensor for perfect and imperfect Coulomb solids. Allowance is made for the effects of thermal fluctuations for temperatures up to the melting conditions. The present theory treats the cases of the long-range Coulomb interaction, where volume fluctuations should be avoided in the Ewald sums.

  2. Pairing Strengths for a Two Orbital Model of the Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Raghu, S.; Liu, Chao-Xing; Scalapino, D.J.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Using an RPA approximation, we have calculated the strengths of the singlet and triplet pairing interactions which arise from the exchange of spin and orbital fluctuations for a 2-orbital model of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. When the system is doped with F, the electron pockets become dominant and we find that the strongest pairing occurs in the singlet d-wave pairing and the triplet p-wave pairing channels, which compete closely. The pairing structure in the singlet d-wave channel corresponds to a superposition of near neighbor intra-orbital singlets with a minus sign phase difference between the d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} pairs. The leading pairing configuration in the triplet channel also involves a nearest neighbor intra-orbital pairing. We find that the strengths of both the singlet and triplet pairing grow, with the singlet pairing growing faster, as the onsite Coulomb interaction approaches the value where the S = 1 particle-hole susceptibility diverges.

  3. Nonlinear interaction between a pair of oblique modes in a supersonic mixing layer: Long-wave limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Gartside, James

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction between a pair of symmetric, oblique, and spatial instability modes is studied in the long-wave limit using asymptotic methods. The base flow is taken to be a supersonic mixing layer whose Mach number is such that the corresponding vortex sheet is marginally stable according to Miles' criterion. It is shown that the amplitude of the mode obeys a nonlinear integro-differential equation. Numerical solutions of this equation show that, when the obliqueness angle is less than pi/4, the effect of the nonlinearity is to enhance the growth rate of the instability. The solution terminates in a singularity at a finite streamwise location. This result is reminiscent of that obtained in the vicinity of the neutral point by other authors in several different types of flows. On the other hand, when the obliqueness angle is more than pi/4, the streamwise development of the amplitude is characterized by a series of modulations. This arises from the fact that the nonlinear term in the amplitude equation may be either stabilizing or destabilizing, depending on the value of the streamwise coordinate. However, even in this case the amplitude of the disturbance increases, though not as rapidly as in the case for which the angle is less than pi/4. Quite generally then, the nonlinear interaction between two oblique modes in a supersonic mixing layer enhances the growth of the disturbance.

  4. Fast HPLC method using ion-pair and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography for determination of phenylephrine in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Dousa, Michal; Gibala, Petr

    2010-01-01

    A rapid procedure based on a direct extraction and HPLC determination with fluorescence detection of phenylephrine in pharmaceutical sachets that include a large excess of paracetamol (65 + 1, w/w), ascorbic acid (5 + 1, w/w), and other excipients (aspartame and sucrose) was developed and validated. The final optimized chromatographic method for ion-pair chromatography used an XTerra RP18 column, 3 microm particle size, 50 x 3.0 mm id. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and buffer (10 mM sodium octane-1-sulfonate, adjusted with H3PO4 to pH 2.2; 200 + 800, v/v), with a constant flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The separation was carried out at 30 degrees C, and the injection volume was 3 microL. Fluorescence detection was performed at excitation and emission wavelengths of 275 and 310 nm, respectively. The mobile phase parameters, such as the organic solvent fraction (acetonitrile) in mobile phase as an organic modifier, the concentration of sodium octane-1-sulfonate as a counter-ion, temperature, and pH of mobile phase, were studied. As an alternative to ion-pair chromatography, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was investigated using a Luna HILIC column, 3 microm, 100 x 4.6 mm id. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and buffer (5 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate, adjusted with H3PO4 to pH 2.5; 750 + 250, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The separation was carried out at 25 degrees C, and the injection volume was 5 microL. The proposed method has an advantage of a very simple sample pretreatment, and is much faster than the currently utilized HPLC methods using gradient elution and UV detection. Commercial samples of sachets were successfully analyzed by the proposed HPLC method.

  5. Coulomb gauge approach for charmonium meson and hybrid radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Peng; Yepez-Martínez, Tochtli; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-01-22

    We consider the lowest order interaction of the Foldy-Wouthuysen QED and QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge approach, to describe radiative transitions between conventional and hybrids charmonium mesons. The results are compared to potential quark models and lattices calculations.

  6. Multiple Coulomb ordered strings of ions in a storage ring.

    PubMed

    Hasse, R W

    2001-04-01

    We explain that the anomalous frequency shifts of very close masses obtained in the high precision mass measurement experiments in the ESR storage ring result from the locking of Coulomb interacting strings of ions. Here two concentric strings which run horizontally close to each other are captured into a single string if their thermal clouds overlap and give up their identity.

  7. Magnetic control of Coulomb scattering and terahertz transitions among excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, J.; Zybell, S.; Eßer, F.; Helm, M.; Schneider, H.; Schneebeli, L.; Böttge, C. N.; Breddermann, B.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.; Andrews, A. M.; Strasser, G.

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved terahertz quenching studies of the magnetoexcitonic photoluminescence from GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells are performed. A microscopic theory is developed to analyze the experiments. Detailed experiment-theory comparisons reveal a remarkable magnetic-field controllability of the Coulomb and terahertz interactions in the excitonic system.

  8. Hydrodynamic Coulomb drag of strongly correlated electron liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolov, S. S.; Levchenko, A.; Andreev, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    We develop a theory of Coulomb drag in ultraclean double layers with strongly correlated carriers. In the regime where the equilibration length of the electron liquid is shorter than the interlayer spacing the main contribution to the Coulomb drag arises from hydrodynamic density fluctuations. The latter consist of plasmons driven by fluctuating longitudinal stresses, and diffusive modes caused by temperature fluctuations and thermal expansion of the electron liquid. We express the drag resistivity in terms of the kinetic coefficients of the electron fluid. Our results are nonperturbative in interaction strength and do not assume Fermi-liquid behavior of the electron liquid.

  9. Interstrand side chain--side chain interactions in a designed beta-hairpin: significance of both lateral and diagonal pairings.

    PubMed

    Syud, F A; Stanger, H E; Gellman, S H

    2001-09-12

    The contributions of interstrand side chain-side chain contacts to beta-sheet stability have been examined with an autonomously folding beta-hairpin model system. RYVEV(D)PGOKILQ-NH2 ((D)P = D-proline, O = ornithine) has previously been shown to adopt a beta-hairpin conformation in aqueous solution, with a two-residue loop at D-Pro-Gly. In the present study, side chains that display interstrand NOEs (Tyr-2, Lys-9, and Leu-11) are mutated to alanine or serine, and the conformational impact of the mutations is assessed. In the beta-hairpin conformation Tyr-2 and Leu-11 are directly across from one another (non-hydrogen bonded pair). This "lateral" juxtaposition of two hydrophobic side chains appears to contribute to beta-hairpin conformational stability, which is consistent with results from other beta-sheet model studies and with statistical analyses of interstrand residue contacts in protein crystal structures. Interaction between the side chains of Tyr-2 and Lys-9 also stabilizes the beta-hairpin conformation. Tyr-2/Lys-9 is a "diagonal" interstrand juxtaposition because these residues are not directly across from one another in terms of the hydrogen bonding registry between the strands. This diagonal interaction arises from the right-handed twist that is commonly observed among beta-sheets. Evidence of diagonal side chain-side chain contacts has been observed in other autonomously folding beta-sheet model systems, but we are not aware of other efforts to determine whether a diagonal interaction contributes to beta-sheet stability.

  10. Isovector spin-singlet (T = 1, S = 0) and isoscalar spin-triplet (T = 0, S = 1) pairing interactions and spin-isospin response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Bai, C. L.; Colò, G.

    2016-08-01

    We review several experimental and theoretical advances that emphasize common aspects of the study of spin-singlet, T = 1, and spin-triplet, T = 0, pairing correlations in nuclei. We first discuss various empirical evidence of the special role played by the T = 1 pairing interaction. In particular, we show the peculiar features of the nuclear pairing interaction in the low-density regime, and possible outcomes such as the BCS–BEC crossover in nuclear matter and, in an analogous way, in loosely bound nuclei. We then move to the competition between T = 1 and T = 0 pairing correlations. The effect of such competition on the low-lying spectra is studied in N = Z odd-odd nuclei by using a three-body model; in this case, it is shown that the inversion of the {J}π ={0}+ and {J}π ={1}+ states near the ground state, and the strong magnetic dipole transitions between them, can be considered as a clear manifestation of strong T = 0 pairing correlations in these nuclei. The effect of T = 0 pairing correlations is also quite evident if one studies charge-changing transitions. The Gamow–Teller (GT) states in N=Z+2 nuclei are studied here by using self-consistent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations in which the T = 0 pairing interaction is taken into account. Strong GT states are found, near the ground state of daughter nuclei; these are compared with available experimental data from charge-exchange reactions, and such comparison can pinpoint the value of the strength of the T = 0 interaction. Pair transfer reactions are eventually discussed. While two-neutron transfer has long been proposed as a tool to measure the T = 1 superfluidity in the nuclear ground states, the study of deuteron transfer is still in its infancy, despite its potential interest for revealing effects coming from both T = 1 and T = 0 interactions. We also point out that the reaction mechanism may mask the strong pair transfer amplitudes predicted

  11. Isovector spin-singlet (T = 1, S = 0) and isoscalar spin-triplet (T = 0, S = 1) pairing interactions and spin-isospin response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Bai, C. L.; Colò, G.

    2016-08-01

    We review several experimental and theoretical advances that emphasize common aspects of the study of spin-singlet, T = 1, and spin-triplet, T = 0, pairing correlations in nuclei. We first discuss various empirical evidence of the special role played by the T = 1 pairing interaction. In particular, we show the peculiar features of the nuclear pairing interaction in the low-density regime, and possible outcomes such as the BCS-BEC crossover in nuclear matter and, in an analogous way, in loosely bound nuclei. We then move to the competition between T = 1 and T = 0 pairing correlations. The effect of such competition on the low-lying spectra is studied in N = Z odd-odd nuclei by using a three-body model; in this case, it is shown that the inversion of the {J}π ={0}+ and {J}π ={1}+ states near the ground state, and the strong magnetic dipole transitions between them, can be considered as a clear manifestation of strong T = 0 pairing correlations in these nuclei. The effect of T = 0 pairing correlations is also quite evident if one studies charge-changing transitions. The Gamow-Teller (GT) states in N=Z+2 nuclei are studied here by using self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations in which the T = 0 pairing interaction is taken into account. Strong GT states are found, near the ground state of daughter nuclei; these are compared with available experimental data from charge-exchange reactions, and such comparison can pinpoint the value of the strength of the T = 0 interaction. Pair transfer reactions are eventually discussed. While two-neutron transfer has long been proposed as a tool to measure the T = 1 superfluidity in the nuclear ground states, the study of deuteron transfer is still in its infancy, despite its potential interest for revealing effects coming from both T = 1 and T = 0 interactions. We also point out that the reaction mechanism may mask the strong pair transfer amplitudes predicted by the

  12. Nucleon-nucleon correlations in heavy ion transfer reactions: Recent investigations at energies far below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-15

    Excitation functions of one- and two-neutron transfer channels have been measured for the {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 116}Sn+{sup 60}Ni systems at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ∼25% below. Target-like recoils have been identified in A, Z and velocity with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental transfer probabilities have been compared, in absolute values and in slope, with semiclassical microscopic calculations which incorporate nucleon-nucleon pairing correlations. For the first time in a heavy ion collision, one was able to provide a consistent description of one and two neutron transfer reactions by incorporating, in the reaction mechanism, all known structure information of entrance and exit channels nuclei. In particular, there is no need to introduce any enhancement factor for the description of two neutron transfer, of course very important are the correlations induced by the pairing interaction.

  13. Derivation of Pitzer Interaction Parameters for an Aqueous Species Pair of Sodium and Iron(II)-Citrate Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. H.; Nemer, M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The WIPP is located in the Permian Delaware Basin near Carlsbad, New Mexico, U.S.A. The TRU waste includes, but is not limited to, iron-based alloys and the complexing agent, citric acid. Iron is also present from the steel used in the waste containers. The objective of this analysis is to derive the Pitzer activity coefficients for the pair of Na+ and FeCit- complex to expand current WIPP thermodynamic database. An aqueous model for the dissolution of Fe(OH)2(s) in a Na3Cit solution was fitted to the experimentally measured solubility data. The aqueous model consists of several chemical reactions and related Pitzer interaction parameters. Specifically, Pitzer interaction parameters for the Na+ and FeCit- pair (β(0), β(1), and Cφ) plus the stability constant for species of FeCit- were fitted to the experimental data. Anoxic gloveboxes were used to keep the oxygen level low (<1 ppm) throughout the experiments due to redox sensitivity. EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations, packaged in EQ3/6 v.8.0a, calculates the aqueous speciation and saturation index using an aqueous model addressed in EQ3/6's database. The saturation index indicates how far the system is from equilibrium with respect to the solid of interest. Thus, the smaller the sum of squared saturation indices that the aqueous model calculates for the given number of experiments, the more closely the model attributes equilibrium to each individual experiment with respect to the solid of interest. The calculation of aqueous speciation and saturation indices was repeated by adjusting stability constant of FeCit-, β(0), β(1), and Cφ in the database until the values are found that make the sum of squared saturation indices the smallest for the given number of experiments. Results will be presented at the time of

  14. Distorted Coulomb field of the scattered electron

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, H. D.; Esberg, J.; Andersen, K. K.; Lund, M. D.; Knudsen, H.; Uggerhoej, U. I.; Sona, P.; Mangiarotti, A.; Ketel, T. J.; Dizdar, A.; Ballestrero, S.; Connell, S. H.

    2010-03-01

    Experimental results for the radiation emission from ultrarelativistic electrons in targets of 0.03%-5% radiation length is presented. For the thinnest targets, the radiation emission is in accordance with the Bethe-Heitler formulation of bremsstrahlung, the target acting as a single scatterer. In this regime, the radiation intensity is proportional to the thickness. As the thickness increases, the distorted Coulomb field of the electron that is the result of the first scattering events, leads to a suppressed radiation emission per interaction, upon subsequent scattering events. In that case, the radiation intensity becomes proportional to a logarithmic function of the thickness, due to the suppression. Eventually, once the target becomes sufficiently thick, the entire radiation process becomes influenced by multiple scattering and the radiation intensity is again proportional to the thickness, but with a different constant of proportionality. The observed logarithmic thickness dependence of radiation intensity at intermediate values of the thickness can be directly interpreted as a manifestation of the distortion of the electron Coulomb field resulting from a scattering event. The Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect is explored with high primary energy using materials with low nuclear charge (Z). Also, targets that should give rise to the claimed interference effect in high-energy radiation emission from a structured target of thin foils are investigated.

  15. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  16. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles. PMID:27394119

  17. Phase diagram of the Kane-Mele-Coulomb model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenadler, M.; Parisen Toldin, F.; Herbut, I. F.; Assaad, F. F.

    2014-08-01

    We determine the phase diagram of the Kane-Mele model with a long-range Coulomb interaction using an exact quantum Monte Carlo method. Long-range interactions are expected to play a role in honeycomb materials because the vanishing density of states in the semimetallic weak-coupling phase suppresses screening. According to our results, the Kane-Mele-Coulomb model supports the same phases as the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model. The nonlocal part of the interaction promotes short-range sublattice charge fluctuations, which compete with antiferromagnetic order driven by the onsite repulsion. Consequently, the critical interaction for the magnetic transition is significantly larger than for the purely local Hubbard repulsion. Our numerical data are consistent with SU (2) Gross-Neveu universality for the semimetal to antiferromagnet transition, and with 3D XY universality for the quantum spin Hall to antiferromagnet transition.

  18. Close contacts between carbonyl oxygen atoms and aromatic centers in protein structures: pi...pi or lone-pair...pi interactions?

    PubMed

    Jain, Alok; Purohit, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Sandeep; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2007-08-01

    Lone-pair...pi and, more recently, pi...pi interactions have been studied in small molecule crystal structures, and they are the focus of attention in some biomolecules. In this study, we have systematically analyzed 500 high-resolution protein structures (resolution < or =1.8 A) and identified 286 examples in which carbonyl oxygen atoms approach the aromatic centers within a distance of 3.5 A. Contacts involving backbone carbonyl oxygens are frequently observed in helices and, to some extent, in strands. Geometrical characterization indicates that these contacts have geometry in between that of an ideal pi...pi and a lone-pair...pi interaction. Quantum mechanical calculations using 6-311++G** basis sets reveal that these contacts give rise to energetically favorable interactions and, along with MD simulations, indicate that such interactions could stabilize secondary structures.

  19. Young Learners' Interactional Development in Task-Based Paired-Assessment in Their First and Foreign Languages: A Case of English Learners in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Yuko Goto; Zeng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in evaluating young learners' foreign language (FL) performance, this study aims to deepen our understanding of young learners' developmental differences in interaction during task-based paired-language assessments. To examine age effects separately from the effect of general language proficiency, we analysed…

  20. Implementation of Pair Work and Group Work for Creation of Interaction Opportunities for Learners in Large Classes: The Viability of the Two Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otienoh, Ruth O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on an action research carried out in two Kenyan Primary schools in Nairobi. The purpose was to implement group work and pair work to improve teaching and learning in large classes by creating interaction opportunities for learners. This was a mixed method study of dominant/less dominant design where interviews and structured…

  1. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  2. Computer simulation of acetonitrile and methanol with ab initio-based pair potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hloucha, M.; Sum, A. K.; Sandler, S. I.

    2000-10-01

    This study address the adequacy of ab initio pair interaction energy potentials for the prediction of macroscopic properties. Recently, Bukowski et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 103, 7322 (1999)] performed a comprehensive study of the potential energy surfaces for several pairs of molecules using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. These ab initio energies were then fit to an appropriate site-site potential form. In an attempt to bridge the gap between ab initio interaction energy information and macroscopic properties prediction, we performed Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations using their developed pair potentials for acetonitrile and methanol. The simulations results show that the phase behavior of acetonitrile is well described by just the pair interaction potential. For methanol, on the other hand, pair interactions are insufficient to properly predict its vapor-liquid phase behavior, and its saturated liquid density. We also explored simplified forms for representing the ab initio interaction energies by refitting a selected range of the data to a site-site Lennard-Jones and to a modified Buckingham (exponential-6) potentials plus Coulombic interactions. These were also used in GEMC simulations in order to evaluate the quality and computational efficiency of these different potential forms. It was found that the phase behavior prediction for acetonitrile and methanol are highly dependent on the details of the interaction potentials developed.

  3. The one-dimensional Coulomb lattice fluid capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, Vincent; Dean, David S.; Hammant, Thomas C.; Horgan, Ronald R.; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-08-01

    The one-dimensional Coulomb lattice fluid in a capacitor configuration is studied. The model is formally exactly soluble via a transfer operator method within a field theoretic representation of the model. The only interactions present in the model are the one-dimensional Coulomb interaction between cations and anions and the steric interaction imposed by restricting the maximal occupancy at any lattice site to one particle. Despite the simplicity of the model, a wide range of intriguing physical phenomena arise, some of which are strongly reminiscent of those seen in experiments and numerical simulations of three-dimensional ionic liquid based capacitors. Notably, we find regimes where over-screening and density oscillations are seen near the capacitor plates. The capacitance is also shown to exhibit strong oscillations as a function of applied voltage. It is also shown that the corresponding mean-field theory misses most of these effects. The analytical results are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations.

  4. Effects of adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics interactions on the pair potential and thermophysical properties of helium.

    PubMed

    Cencek, Wojciech; Przybytek, Michał; Komasa, Jacek; Mehl, James B; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-14

    The adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) contributions to the pair potential of helium were computed, fitted separately, and applied, together with the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential, in calculations of thermophysical properties of helium and of the properties of the helium dimer. An analysis of the convergence patterns of the calculations with increasing basis set sizes allowed us to estimate the uncertainties of the total interaction energy to be below 50 ppm for interatomic separations R smaller than 4 bohrs and for the distance R = 5.6 bohrs. For other separations, the relative uncertainties are up to an order of magnitude larger (and obviously still larger near R = 4.8 bohrs where the potential crosses zero) and are dominated by the uncertainties of the nonrelativistic BO component. These estimates also include the contributions from the neglected relativistic and QED terms proportional to the fourth and higher powers of the fine-structure constant α. To obtain such high accuracy, it was necessary to employ explicitly correlated Gaussian expansions containing up to 2400 terms for smaller R (all R in the case of a QED component) and optimized orbital bases up to the cardinal number X = 7 for larger R. Near-exact asymptotic constants were used to describe the large-R behavior of all components. The fitted potential, exhibiting the minimum of -10.996 ± 0.004 K at R = 5.608 0 ± 0.000 1 bohr, was used to determine properties of the very weakly bound (4)He(2) dimer and thermophysical properties of gaseous helium. It is shown that the Casimir-Polder retardation effect, increasing the dimer size by about 2 Å relative to the nonrelativistic BO value, is almost completely accounted for by the inclusion of the Breit-interaction and the Araki-Sucher contributions to the potential, of the order α(2) and α(3), respectively. The remaining retardation effect, of the order of α(4) and higher, is practically negligible for the bound

  5. Interatomic Coulombic decay in nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisourat, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Interatomic (molecular) Coulombic decay (ICD) is an ultrafast non-radiative electronic decay process for excited atoms or molecules embedded in a chemical environment. Via ICD, the excited system can get rid of the excess energy, which is transferred to one of the neighbors and ionize it. ICD produces two charged particles next to each other and thus leads to Coulomb explosion. Kinetic energy distribution of the ionic fragments gives information on the dynamics of the decay process. From the theoretical point of view general quantum mechanical equations for describing the decay processes and the subsequent fragmentations are known but are only applicable for rather small systems. During the presentation, a semiclassical approach for modeling ICD and the subsequent fragmentations will be presented. This approach involves a classical treatment for the nuclear motion while retaining a quantum description for the electron dynamics. Such approach has low computational costs and can be used to study much larger systems. Comparison of the results from semiclassical and from quantum mechanical calculations will be shown for simple systems, demonstrating the good performance of the semiclassical method. Results on ICD in nanodroplets will finally be reported.

  6. A novel pair of split venus fragments to detect protein-protein interactions by in vitro and in vivo bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical components of almost every cellular process. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method has been used to detect protein-protein interactions in both living cells and cell-free systems. The BiFC method is based on the principle that a fluorescent protein is reassembled from its two complementary non-fluorescent fragments when an interaction occurs between two proteins, each one fused to each fragment. In vivo and in vitro BiFC assays, which use a new pair of split Venus fragments composed of VN210 (amino acids 1-210) and VC210 (amino acids 210-238), are useful tools to detect and quantify various protein-protein interactions (including the cofilin-actin and Ras-Raf interactions) with high specificity and low background fluorescence. Moreover, these assays can be applied to screen small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  7. Coulomb Collision Algorithms for Particle Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce

    2006-04-01

    This paper surveys some of the particle code algorithms used to model Coulomb collisions in fully ionized plasmas, e.g., pair-wise operators such as the Takizuka-Abe^1 scheme and extensions^2, Langevin equation collision operators^3,4, and partially linearized gyrokinetic collisions operators for strongly magnetized plasmas.^5,6,7 Some recent experience is reported.^8 Issues such as physics completeness, accuracy, and comparative algorithm performance are highlighted. 1. T. Takizuka and H. Abe, J. Comput. Phys. 25, 205 (1977). 2. K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55, 4642 (1997). 3. M.E. Jones, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 123, 169 (1996). 4. W.M. Manheimer, M. Lampe, and G. Joyce, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 138, 565 (1997). 5. X.Q. Xu and M.N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Fluids B 3, 627 (1991). 6. A.M. Dimits and B.I. Cohen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 709 (1994). 7. Z. Lin, W. M. Tang, and W. W. Lee, Phys.Plasmas 2, 2975 (August 1995). 8. B.I. Cohen, et al., ``Effects of ion-ion collisions and inhomogeneity in two-dimensional kinetic ion simulations of stimulated Brillouin backscattering,'' accepted for publication in Phys. Plasmas (2006).

  8. Energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates from a time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lu; Liang, WanZhen; Zhao, Yi; Zhong, Xinxin

    2014-06-07

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusive method [X. Zhong and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014111 (2013)] is extended to investigate the energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates with incorporation of Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling. The pair initial condition generated by laser pulse is represented by a Gaussian wavepacket with a central momentum. The results reveal that the hot electron energy relaxation is very well described by two rate processes with the fast rate much larger than the slow one, consistent with experimental observations, and an efficient electron-hole separation is accomplished accompanying the fast energy relaxation. Furthermore, although the extra energy indeed helps the separation by overcoming the Coulomb interaction, the width of initial wavepacket is much sensitive to the separation efficiency and the narrower wavepacket generates the more separated charges. This behavior may be useful to understand the experimental controversy of the hot carrier effect on charge separation.

  9. Pair- and many-atom interactions in the cohesion of surface clusters: Pd{sub x} and Ir{sub x} on W(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.

    1999-08-01

    In order to explore cohesion in surface clusters, interactions between Pd atoms adsorbed on W(110) have been characterized in observations of individual adatoms using a helium-cooled field ion microscope. The free energies of pair interactions F({bold R}) have been derived from detailed measurements of the probability of finding two atoms on an otherwise empty plane at a vector separation {bold R} from each other. For Pd, pair free energies are similar to previous results for Ir atoms: interactions extend over distances larger than 13 {Angstrom}, and show a strong directional anisotropy. Along the close-packed [1{bar 1}1] direction, interactions between two Pd atoms are very close to those for Ir adatoms, even though the binding energy of Ir atoms to the substrate is more than twice that of Pd. With quantitative pair free energies available, the contributions from many-atom effects to the cohesion of clusters have been evaluated by examining the transformation from chain structures to two-dimensional islands, which takes place with both Pd and Ir on W(110). Many-atom effects are parametrized in terms of the trio interactions F{sub 3lin} in linear and F{sub 3tri} in triangular configurations. It is found that many-atom effects, rather than amounting to small perturbations of the pair contributions, are the {ital major} contributors to the cohesion of two-dimensional clusters for both Pd and Ir on W(110). {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Heavy quarks, gluons and the confinement potential in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, Carina; Watson, Peter; Reinhardt, Hugo

    2011-05-23

    We consider the heavy quark limit of Coulomb gauge QCD, with the truncation of the Yang-Mills sector to include only (dressed) two-point functions. We find that the rainbow-ladder approximation to the gap and Bethe-Salpeter equations is nonperturbatively exact and moreover, we provide a direct connection between the temporal gluon propagator and the quark confinement potential. Further, we show that only bound states of color singlet quark-antiquark (meson) and quark-quark (SU(2) baryon) pairs are physically allowed.

  11. Heavy quarks, gluons and the confinement potential in Coulomb gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovici, Carina; Watson, Peter; Reinhardt, Hugo

    2011-05-01

    We consider the heavy quark limit of Coulomb gauge QCD, with the truncation of the Yang-Mills sector to include only (dressed) two-point functions. We find that the rainbow-ladder approximation to the gap and Bethe-Salpeter equations is nonperturbatively exact and moreover, we provide a direct connection between the temporal gluon propagator and the quark confinement potential. Further, we show that only bound states of color singlet quark-antiquark (meson) and quark-quark (SU(2) baryon) pairs are physically allowed.

  12. Lone pair⋯π interactions involving carbonyl π-systems: Experimental and theoretical study of the complexes of COF2 and COFCl with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geboes, Yannick; De Proft, Frank; Herrebout, Wouter A.

    2016-09-01

    In this theoretical and experimental study, the ability of carbonyl fluoride (COF2) and carbonyl chloride fluoride (COFCl) to form noncovalent interactions with the Lewis base dimethyl ether (DME) is assessed. From ab initio calculations, two stable complexes are found for COF2·DME, both formed through a lone pair⋯π interaction. FTIR measurements on liquefied noble gas solutions, supported by ab initio calculations, statistical thermodynamical calculations and Monte Carle Free Energy Perturbation calculations, show that a 1:1 lone pair⋯π bonded complex is found in solution, with an experimental complexation enthalpy of -14.5(3) kJ mol-1. For COFCl·DME three lone pair⋯π complexes, as well as a Cl⋯O halogen bonded complex, are found from ab initio calculations. Experimentally, clear complex bands for 1:1 lone pair⋯π complexes are observed, with an experimental complexation enthalpy of -11.4(2) kJ mol-1. Furthermore, indications of the presence of a small amount of the halogen bonded complex are also observed.

  13. Electronic cooling via interlayer Coulomb coupling in multilayer epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mihnev, Momchil T.; Tolsma, John R.; Divin, Charles J.; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-01-01

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron–phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport, even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier dynamics as temperature and the number of layers is varied. PMID:26399955

  14. Instabilities of Coulomb phases and quark confinement in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Asorey, Manuel; Santagata, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    The Gribov picture to quark confinement is based on the Coulomb phase instability due to the very large values that the effective α{sub s} coupling constant can reach in the infrared regime. The Gribov instability is driven by a vacuum decay into light quarks beyond a critical value of the coupling constant α{sub s}3π(1-√(2/3))/4 (for SU(3) gauge group). From first principles it has been shown the existence of an instability of the Coulomb phase in pure gauge theories for α≥√(2), much beyond the Gribov critical value. In this paper we analyze the effect of dynamical quarks in the instability of the Coulomb phase. We find a critical value of the coupling α=√(3) where a quark-antiquark pair creation mechanism leads to vacuum instability. However, the new critical value turns out to be larger than the pure gauge critical value α=√(2), unlike it is expected in the standard Gribov scenario. The result is analytically derived from first principles and provides further consistency to the picture where quark confinement is mainly driven by gluonic fluctuation instabilities.

  15. Coulomb excitation of 31Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlitz, M.; Mücher, D.; Reiter, P.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Cederkäll, J.; Clement, E.; Davinson, T.; Van Duppen, P.; Ekström, A.; Finke, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Holler, A.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Jolie, J.; Kalkühler, M.; Kotthaus, T.; Krücken, R.; Lutter, R.; Piselli, E.; Scheit, H.; Stefanescu, I.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.

    2011-06-01

    The ground state properties of 31Mg indicate a change of nuclear shape at N = 19 with a deformed Jπ = 1 /2+ intruder state as a ground state, implying that 31Mg is part of the "island of inversion". The collective properties of excited states were the subject of a Coulomb excitation experiment at REX-ISOLDE, CERN, employing a radioactive 31Mg beam. De-excitation γ-rays were detected by the MINIBALL γ-spectrometer in coincidence with scattered particles in a segmented Si-detector. The level scheme of 31Mg was extended. Spin and parity assignment of the 945 keV state yielded 5 /2+ and its de-excitation is dominated by a strong collective M1 transition. Comparison of the transition probabilities of 30,31,32Mg establishes that for the N = 19 magnesium isotope not only the ground state but also excited states are largely dominated by a deformed pf intruder configuration.

  16. Coulomb excitation of 107Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cederkall, J.; Fahlander, C.; Ekström, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Albers, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I.; Davinson, T.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Lutter, R.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Siem, S.; Taprogge, J.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2012-07-01

    The radioactive isotope 107Sn was studied using Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. This is the lightest odd-Sn nucleus examined using this technique. The reduced transition probability of the lowest-lying 3/2+ state was measured and is compared to shell-model predictions based on several sets of single-neutron energies relative to 100Sn . Similar to the transition probabilities for the 2+ states in the neutron-deficient even-even Sn nuclei, the measured value is underestimated by shell-model calculations. Part of the strength may be recovered by considering the ordering of the d_{5/2} and g_{7/2} single-neutron states.

  17. An interactive two-state model for cell membrane potassium and sodium ion channels in electric fields using the pair approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Rıza; Ekiz, Cesur

    2005-06-01

    An interactive two-state model for cell membrane potassium and sodium ion channels in the presence of electric fields is proposed and studied using the pair approximation. In the model, ion channels which can either be in an open or closed states are regarded as residing on a two-dimensional surface with a regular array of sites and the interactions between the neighbouring channels and the external electric field are incorporated. The minimization of the free energy is performed with respect to the pair or bond variables and maximum fractions of open potassium and sodium channels are obtained. Using known parameters for the squid giant axon the model gives qualitative agreement with the mean-field results and experimental measurements for potassium and sodium trans-membrane conductance.

  18. Coulombic contribution and fat center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2007-02-27

    The fat (thick) center vortex model is one of the phenomenological models which is fairly successful to interpret the linear potential between static sources. However, the Coulombic part of the potential has not been investigated by the model yet. In an attempt to get the Coulombic contribution and to remove the concavity of the potentials, we are studying different vortex profiles and vortex sizes.

  19. Coulomb field scattering in Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Daniel

    2011-02-15

    In the context of Born-Infeld electrodynamics, the electromagnetic fields interact with each other via their nonlinear couplings. A calculation will be performed where an incoming electromagnetic plane wave scatters off a Coulomb field in the geometrical optics approximation. In addition to finding the first-order angle of deflection, exact solutions for the trajectory will also be found. The possibility of electromagnetic bound states will be discussed.

  20. Anisotropic plasmon-coupling dimerization of a pair of spherical electron gases.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Balassis, Antonios; Huang, Danhong

    2014-04-01

    We have discovered a novel feature in the plasmon excitations for a pair of Coulomb-coupled non-concentric spherical two-dimensional electron gases (S2DEGs). Our results show that the plasmon excitations for such pairs depend on the orientation with respect to the external electromagnetic probe field. The origin of this anisotropy of the inter-sphere Coulomb interaction is due to the directional asymmetry of the electrostatic coupling of electrons in excited states which depend on both the angular momentum quantum number L and its projection M on the axis of quantization taken as the probe E-field direction. We demonstrate the anisotropic inter-sphere Coulomb coupling in space and present semi-analytic results in the random-phase approximation both perpendicular and parallel to the axis of quantization. For the incidence of light with a finite orbital or spin angular momentum, the magnetic field generated from an induced oscillating electric dipole on one sphere can couple to an induced magnetic dipole on another sphere in a way that is dependent on whether the direction is parallel or perpendicular to the probe E field. Such an effect from the plasmon spatial correlation is expected to be experimentally observable by employing circularly polarized light or a helical light beam for incidence. The S2DEG serves as a simple model for fullerenes as well as metallic dimers, when the energy bands are far apart. PMID:24625751

  1. New Theoretical Insight into the Interactions and Properties of Formic Acid: Development of a Quantum-Based Pair Potential for Formic Acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, S; Gee, R; Balasubramanian, K; Fried, L

    2005-08-08

    We performed ab initio quantum chemical studies for the development of intra and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter-molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  2. New theoretical insight into the interactions and properties of formic acid: development of a quantum-based pair potential for formic acid.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Szczepan; Gee, Richard H; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2005-10-01

    We performed ab initio quantum-chemical studies for the development of intra- and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular-dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen-bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular-dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment. PMID:16238411

  3. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Nonideal Cooper Pairs in the Hartree-Fock-Popov Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ze

    2016-08-01

    The Hartree-Fock-Popov theory of interacting Bose particles is generalized to the Cooper-pair system with a screened Coulomb repulsive interaction in high-temperature superconductors. At zero temperature, it is found that the condensate density n_c(0) of Cooper pairs is of the order n_c(0)˜eq 10^{18} cm^{-3}, consistently with the fact that a small fraction of the total p holes participate in pairing. We find that the phonon velocity c(0) at zero temperature is of the order c(0)˜eq 10 km s^{-1}. The computation shows that the transition temperature T_c is a dome-shaped function of the p hole concentration δ , which is consistent with experiments. At finite temperature, we find that the condensate fraction n_c(T)/n decreases continuously from n_c(0)/n to zero as the temperature increases from zero to the transition temperature T_c. For higher temperatures, we find that the repulsive interaction between Cooper pairs drives more Cooper pairs into the condensate. The computation reveals that the phonon velocity c( T) decreases continuously from c(0) to zero as the temperature increases from zero to the transition temperature T_c. The Cooper-pair system undergoes a first-order phase transition from the normal state to the BEC state.

  4. Coulomb and even-odd effects in cold and super-asymmetric fragmentation for thermal neutron induced fission of 235U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.

    2016-07-01

    Even-odd effects of the maximal total kinetic energy (Kmax) as a function of charge (Z) and mass (A) of fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of actinides are questioned by other authors. In this work, visiting old results on thermal neutron induced fission of 235U, those even-odd effects are reconfirmed. The cases seeming to contradict even-odd effects are interpreted with the Coulomb effect hypothesis. According to Coulomb effect hypothesis, Kmax is equal to the Coulomb interaction energy of the most compact scission configuration. As a consequence, between two isobaric charge splits with similar Q-values, the more asymmetrical one will get the more compact scission configuration and then it will reach the higher Kmax-value. In some cases, the more asymmetrical charge split corresponds, by coincidence, to an odd charge split; consequently its higher Kmax-value may be misinterpreted as anti-even-odd effect. Another experimental result reported in the literature is the increasing of even-odd effects on charge distribution on the more asymmetrical fragmentations region. In this region, the difference between Kmax and Q-values increases with asymmetry, which means that the corresponding scission configuration needs higher total deformation energy to occur. Higher deformation energy of the fragments implies lower free energy to break nucleon pairs. Consequently, in the asymmetric fragmentation region, the even-odd effects of the distribution of proton number and neutron number must increase with asymmetry.

  5. Energy spectrum of the low-lying gluon excitations in the Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Krupinski, Pawel

    2006-06-01

    We compute the energy spectrum of low-lying gluonic excitations in the presence of static quark-antiquark sources using Coulomb gauge and the quasiparticle representation. Within the valence sector of the Fock space we reproduce both, the overall normalization and the ordering of the spin-parity multiplets. We discus how the interactions induced by the nonabelian Coulomb kernel are central in to fine structure of the spectrum.

  6. Matched-Pairs Analysis of Co-Worker Interactions in Relation to Opportunity, Type of Job, and Placement Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusch, Frank R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study, involving 85 workers with and without disabilities, found few differences in coworker relations and interactions. Of nine interaction categories, coworkers without disabilities interacted more among themselves in only one--befriending off the job. Individual workers with disabilities in light industry occupations experienced less…

  7. Communication: Oscillating charge migration between lone pairs persists without significant interaction with nuclear motion in the glycine and Gly-Gly-NH-CH{sub 3} radical cations

    SciTech Connect

    Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2014-05-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics has been studied, using the Ehrenfest method, for four conformations of the glycine molecule and a single conformation of Gly-Gly-NH-CH{sub 3}. The initial electronic wavepacket was a superposition of eigenstates corresponding to ionization from the σ lone pairs associated with the carbonyl oxygens and the amine nitrogen. For glycine, oscillating charge migration (when the nuclei were frozen) was observed for the 4 conformers studied with periods ranging from 2 to 5 fs, depending on the energy gap between the lone pair cationic states. When coupled nuclear motion was allowed (which was mainly NH{sub 2} partial inversion), the oscillations hardly changed. For Gly-Gly-NH-CH{sub 3}, charge migration between the carbonyl oxygens and the NH{sub 2} lone pair can be observed with a period similar to glycine itself, also without interaction with nuclear motion. These simulations suggest that charge migration between lone pairs can occur independently of the nuclear motion.

  8. Exploring Interatomic Coulombic Decay by Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Demekhin, Philipp V.; Stoychev, Spas D.; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2011-12-30

    To exploit the high intensity of laser radiation, we propose to select frequencies at which single-photon absorption is of too low energy and two or more photons are needed to produce states of an atom that can undergo interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) with its neighbors. For Ne{sub 2} it is explicitly demonstrated that the proposed multiphoton absorption scheme is much more efficient than schemes used until now, which rely on single-photon absorption. Extensive calculations on Ne{sub 2} show how the low-energy ICD electrons and Ne{sup +} pairs are produced for different laser intensities and pulse durations. At higher intensities the production of Ne{sup +} pairs by successive ionization of the two atoms becomes competitive and the respective emitted electrons interfere with the ICD electrons. It is also shown that a measurement after a time delay can be used to determine the contribution of ICD even at high laser intensity.

  9. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin. PMID:27105312

  10. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin.

  11. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  12. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  13. Numerical approach to Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Bowman, Patrick O.

    2008-07-01

    We calculate the ghost two-point function in Coulomb gauge QCD with a simple model vacuum gluon wave function using Monte Carlo integration. This approach extends the previous analytic studies of the ghost propagator with this ansatz, where a ladder-rainbow expansion was unavoidable for calculating the path integral over gluon field configurations. The new approach allows us to study the possible critical behavior of the coupling constant, as well as the Coulomb potential derived from the ghost dressing function. We demonstrate that IR enhancement of the ghost correlator or Coulomb form factor fails to quantitatively reproduce confinement using Gaussian vacuum wave functional.

  14. Coulomb excitation of Ga73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diriken, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Balabanski, D.; Blasi, N.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Cederkäll, J.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Eberth, J.; Ekström, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Georgiev, G.; Gladnishki, K.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Köster, U.; Lagoyannis, A.; Lo Bianco, G.; Maierbeck, P.; Marsh, B. A.; Napiorkowski, P.; Patronis, N.; Pauwels, D.; Reiter, P.; Seliverstov, M.; Sletten, G.; van de Walle, J.; van Duppen, P.; Voulot, D.; Walters, W. B.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wrzosek, K.

    2010-12-01

    The B(E2;Ii→If) values for transitions in 3171Ga40 and 3173Ga42 were deduced from a Coulomb excitation experiment at the safe energy of 2.95 MeV/nucleon using post-accelerated beams of Ga71,73 at the REX-ISOLDE on-line isotope mass separator facility. The emitted γ rays were detected by the MINIBALL γ-detector array, and B(E2;Ii→If) values were obtained from the yields normalized to the known strength of the 2+→0+ transition in the Sn120 target. The comparison of these new results with the data of less neutron-rich gallium isotopes shows a shift of the E2 collectivity toward lower excitation energy when adding neutrons beyond N=40. This supports conclusions from previous studies of the gallium isotopes, which indicated a structural change in this isotopic chain between N=40 and 42. Combined with recent measurements from collinear laser spectroscopy showing a 1/2- spin and parity for the ground state, the extracted results revealed evidence for a 1/2-,3/2- doublet near the ground state in 3173Ga42 differing by at most 0.8 keV in energy.

  15. Energy decomposition analysis of cation-π, metal ion-lone pair, hydrogen bonded, charge-assisted hydrogen bonded, and π-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Gayatri, Gaddamanugu; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2015-03-30

    This study probes the nature of noncovalent interactions, such as cation-π, metal ion-lone pair (M-LP), hydrogen bonding (HB), charge-assisted hydrogen bonding (CAHB), and π-π interactions, using energy decomposition schemes-density functional theory (DFT)-symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and reduced variational space. Among cation-π complexes, the polarization and electrostatic components are the major contributors to the interaction energy (IE) for metal ion-π complexes, while for onium ion-π complexes (NH4+, PH4+, OH3+, and SH3+) the dispersion component is prominent. For M-LP complexes, the electrostatic component contributes more to the IE except the dicationic metal ion complexes with H2 S and PH3 where the polarization component dominates. Although electrostatic component dominates for the HB and CAHB complexes, dispersion is predominant in π-π complexes.

  16. σ-Hole Opposite to a Lone Pair: Unconventional Pnicogen Bonding Interactions between ZF3 (Z=N, P, As, and Sb) Compounds and Several Donors.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The ability of several pnicogen sp(3) derivatives ZF3 (Z=N, P, As, Sb) to interact with electron-rich entities by means of the opposite face to the lone pair (lp) is investigated at the RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. The strength of the interaction ranges from -1 to -87 kJ mol(-1) , proving its favorable nature, especially when the lp is coordinated to a metal center, whereby the strength of the interaction is significantly enhanced. NBO analysis showed that orbital effects are modest contributors to the global stabilization of the pnicogen σ-hole bonded complexes studied. Finally, a selection of Cambridge Structural Database examples are shown that demonstrate the impact of this counterintuitive binding mode in the solid state.

  17. Spatio-temporal correlations in Coulomb clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Amit; Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb

    Dynamical response of Coulomb-particles in nanoclusters are investigated at different temperatures characterizing their solid-like (Wigner molecule) and liquid-like behavior. The density correlations probe spatio-temporal relaxation, uncovering distinct behavior at multiple time scales in these systems. They show a stretched-Gaussian or stretched-exponential spatial decay at long times in circular and irregular traps. Interplay of confinement and long-range nature of interactions yields spatially correlated motion of the particles in string-like paths, leaving the system heterogeneous even at long times. While particles in a `solid' flow producing dynamic heterogeneities, their random motion in `liquid' defies central limit theorem. Distinguishing the two confinements, temperature dependent motional signatures serve as a criterion for the crossover between `solid' and `liquid'. The irregular Wigner molecule turns into a nearly homogeneous liquid over a much wider temperature window compared to the circular case. The temperature dependence of different relaxation time scales builds crucial insights. A phenomenological model, relating the unusual dynamics to the heterogeneous nature of the diffusivities in the system, captures much of the subtleties of our numerical simulations.

  18. Crystallization in two-component Coulomb systems.

    PubMed

    Bonitz, M; Filinov, V S; Fortov, V E; Levashov, P R; Fehske, H

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of Coulomb crystallization is extended from one-component to two-component plasmas. Critical parameters for the existence of Coulomb crystals are derived for both classical and quantum crystals. In the latter case, a critical mass ratio of the two charged components is found, which is of the order of 80. Thus, holes in semiconductors with sufficiently flat valence bands are predicted to spontaneously order into a regular lattice. Such hole crystals are intimately related to ion Coulomb crystals in white dwarf and neutron stars as well as to ion crystals produced in the laboratory. A unified phase diagram of two-component Coulomb crystals is presented and is verified by first-principles computer simulations. PMID:16384315

  19. Quarks in Coulomb gauge perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, C.; Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2009-02-15

    Coulomb gauge quantum chromodynamics within the first order functional formalism is considered. The quark contributions to the Dyson-Schwinger equations are derived and one-loop perturbative results for the two-point functions are presented.

  20. Crystallization in two-component Coulomb systems.

    PubMed

    Bonitz, M; Filinov, V S; Fortov, V E; Levashov, P R; Fehske, H

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of Coulomb crystallization is extended from one-component to two-component plasmas. Critical parameters for the existence of Coulomb crystals are derived for both classical and quantum crystals. In the latter case, a critical mass ratio of the two charged components is found, which is of the order of 80. Thus, holes in semiconductors with sufficiently flat valence bands are predicted to spontaneously order into a regular lattice. Such hole crystals are intimately related to ion Coulomb crystals in white dwarf and neutron stars as well as to ion crystals produced in the laboratory. A unified phase diagram of two-component Coulomb crystals is presented and is verified by first-principles computer simulations.

  1. Application of hydrophilic interaction chromatography retention coefficients for predicting peptide elution with TFA and methanesulfonic acid ion-pairing reagents.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Chad E; Tweed, Joseph; Kadar, Eugene P

    2010-03-01

    Hydrophilic retention coefficients for 17 peptides were calculated based on retention coefficients previously published for TSKgel silica-60 and were compared with the experimental elution profile on a Waters Atlantis HILIC silica column using TFA and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as ion-pairing reagents. Relative peptide retention could be accurately determined with both counter-ions. Peptide retention and chromatographic behavior were influenced by the percent acid modifier used with increases in both retention and peak symmetry observed at increasing modifier concentrations. The enhancement of net peptide polarity through MSA pairing shifted retention out by nearly five-fold for the earliest eluting peptide, compared with TFA. Despite improvements in retention and efficiency (N(eff)) for MSA over TFA, a consistent reduction in calculated selectivity (alpha) was observed. This result is believed to be attributed to the stronger polar contribution of MSA masking and diminishing the underlying influence of the amino acid residues of each associated peptide. Finally, post-column infusion of propionic acid and acetic acid was evaluated for their potential to recover signal intensity for TFA and MSA counter-ions for LC-ESI-MS applications. Acetic acid generally yielded more substantial signal improvements over propionic acid on the TFA system while minimal benefits and some further reductions were noted with MSA.

  2. A bioinspired redox relay that mimics radical interactions of the Tyr-His pairs of photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megiatto, Jackson D., Jr.; Méndez-Hernández, Dalvin D.; Tejeda-Ferrari, Marely E.; Teillout, Anne-Lucie; Llansola-Portolés, Manuel J.; Kodis, Gerdenis; Poluektov, Oleg G.; Rajh, Tijana; Mujica, Vladimiro; Groy, Thomas L.; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.

    2014-05-01

    In water-oxidizing photosynthetic organisms, light absorption generates a powerfully oxidizing chlorophyll complex (P680•+) in the photosystem II reaction centre. This is reduced via an electron transfer pathway from the manganese-containing water-oxidizing catalyst, which includes an electron transfer relay comprising a tyrosine (Tyr)-histidine (His) pair that features a hydrogen bond between a phenol group and an imidazole group. By rapidly reducing P680•+, the relay is thought to mitigate recombination reactions, thereby ensuring a high quantum yield of water oxidation. Here, we show that an artificial reaction centre that features a benzimidazole-phenol model of the Tyr-His pair mimics both the short-internal hydrogen bond in photosystem II and, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, the thermal relaxation that accompanies proton-coupled electron transfer. Although this artificial system is much less complex than the natural one, theory suggests that it captures the essential features that are important in the function of the relay.

  3. Coulomb Distortion in the Inelastic Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Solvignon, Dave Gaskell, John Arrington

    2009-09-01

    The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio $R(x,Q^2)$.

  4. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  5. Optimized Unlike-Pair Interactions for Water-Carbon Dioxide Mixtures described by the SPC/E and EPM2 Models

    SciTech Connect

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cole, David; Cole, David R

    2011-01-01

    The unlike- pair interaction parameters for the SPC/E- EPM2 models have been optimized to reproduce the mutual solubility of water and carbon dioxide at the conditions of liquid- supercritical fluid phase equilibria. An efficient global optimization of the parameters is achieved through an implementation of the coupling parameter approach, adapted to phase equilibria calculations in the Gibbs ensemble, that explicitly corrects for the over- polarization of the SPC/E water molecule in the non- polar CO2 environments. The resulting H2O- CO2 force field reproduces accurately the available experimental solubilities at the two fluid phases in equilibria as well as the corresponding species tracer diffusion coefficients.

  6. The analysis of historical earthquakes of the North Anatolian Fault in the Marmara Region, Turkey for the last 15 centuries based on intensity and continuous Coulomb scenarios: Implications for the fault geometry and the interaction of individual earthqua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Şahin, Murat

    2016-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the historical earthquakes of the Marmara Region totally in three-stages. In first stage, historical earthquakes were compiled from the available catalogues and classified according to their spatial distribution, whereas only the ones, related with the active northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) were selected. Then, the next phase of classification was made to relate historical data to the ancient and historical settlements, for which a kind of shake map was produced for each event. In the second stage, three different fault models, suggested for the geometry of the NAF in the Marmara Region, were integrated into a GIS database. Mw magnitudes were calculated for each fault segment by using lengths, seismogenic depths, and slip-rates of fault segments. In the third stage, the revised digital geological map of the Marmara Region were compiled based on 1:500k conventional maps and were used to estimate the Vs30 distribution within a grid of 750x750 m. Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) maps were produced for each earthquake scenario, depending on the geometry of different fault models, calculated model magnitudes and intensity distributions. Moreover, we tested the surface ruptures of each earthquake scenarios by using the Coulomb stress change model for historical data covering a time era between AD 478 and 2016 in assumption with a constant horizontal slip rate of 19 mma-1 for all fault segments. As conclusion, the horsetail-fault geometry (Yaltırak, 2002) among all 3 fault models yielded the best fit to the distribution of intensities and coulomb models.

  7. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion.

  8. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  9. Coulomb crystallization of sympathetically cooled highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, José R.

    2015-05-01

    Wave functions of inner-shell electrons significantly overlap with the nucleus, whereby enormously magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic (QED) and nuclear size effects emerge. In highly charged ions (HCI), the relative reduction of electronic correlations contributions improves the visibility of these effects. This well known facts have driven research efforts with HCI, yet the typically high temperatures at which these can be prepared in the laboratory constitutes a serious hindrance for application of laser spectroscopic methods. The solution for this, cooling HCI down to crystallization has remained an elusive target for more than two decades. By applying laser cooling to an ensemble of Be+ ions, we build Coulomb crystals that we use for stopping the motion of HCI and for cooling them. HCI, in this case Ar13+ ions are extracted from an electron beam ion trap with an energy spread of a few 100's of eV, due to the ion temperature within the trap. Carefully timed electric pulses in a potential-gradient decelerate and bunch the HCI. We achieve Coulomb crystallization of these HCI by re-trapping them in a cryogenic linear radiofrequency trap where they are sympathetically cooled through Coulomb interaction with the directly laser-cooled ensemble. Furthermore, we also demonstrate cooling of a single Ar13+ ion by a single Be+ ion, prerequisite for quantum logic spectroscopy with potentially 10-19 relative accuracy. The strongly suppressed thermal motion of the embedded HCI offers novel possibilities for investigation of questions related to the time variation of fundamental constants, parity non-conservation effects, Lorentz invariance and quantum electrodynamics. Achieving a seven orders-of-magnitude decrease in HCI temperature, from the starting point at MK values in the ion source down to the mK range within the Coulomb crystal eliminates the major obstacle for HCI investigation with high precision laser spectroscopy and quantum computation schemes.

  10. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  11. Reexamination of an anomaly in near-threshold pair production

    SciTech Connect

    De Braeckeleer, L.; Adelberger, E.G.; Garcia, A. )

    1992-11-01

    We investigated a reported anomaly in near-threshold pair production, using radioactive sources to measure the {gamma}+Ge{r arrow}{ital e}{sup +}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}+Ge cross-section at {ital E}{sub {gamma}}=1063, 1086, 1112, 1173, 1213, 1299, 1332, and 1408 keV. Although the data agree with the theory (numerical calculations based on an exact partial-wave formulation for a screened central potential) at the higher energies, the data lie above the theory at 1063, 1082, and 1112 keV. The discrepancy is reduced by including the final-state Coulomb interaction between the {ital e}{sup +} and {ital e}{sup {minus}}.

  12. Analytic solution of the Schroedinger equation for the Coulomb-plus-linear potential. I. The wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Plante, Guillaume; Antippa, Adel F.

    2005-06-01

    We solve the Schroedinger equation for a quark-antiquark system interacting via a Coulomb-plus-linear potential, and obtain the wave functions as power series, with their coefficients given in terms of the combinatorics functions.

  13. Interactions of /sup 14/N:/sup 15/N stearic acid spin-label pairs: effects of host lipid alkyl chain length and unsaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, J.B.; Yin, J.J.; Hyde, J.S.

    1987-06-30

    Electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) and saturation recovery electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy have been employed to examine the interactions of /sup 14/N:/sup 15/N stearic acid spin-label pairs in fluid-phase model membrane bilayers composed of a variety of phospholipids. The (/sup 14/N)-16-doxylstearate:(/sup 15/N)-16-doxylstearate (16:16) pair was utilized to measure lateral diffusion of the spin-labels, while the (/sup 14/N)-16-doxylstearate:(/sup 15/N)-5-doxylstearate (16:5) pair provided information on vertical fluctuations of the 16-doxylstearate nitroxide moiety toward the membrane surface. Three saturated host lipids of varying alkyl chain length (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC)), an ..cap alpha..-saturated, ..beta..-unsaturated lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)), and phosphatidylcholine from a natural source (egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (egg PC)) were utilized as host lipids. Lateral diffusion of the stearic acid spin-labels was only slightly affected by alkyl chain length at a given reduced temperature (T/sub r/) in the saturated host lipids but was significantly decreased in POPC at the same T/sub r/. Lateral diffusion in DMPC, POPC, and egg PC was quite similar at 37/sup 0/C. A strong correlation was noted between lateral diffusion constants and rotational mobility of (/sup 14/N)-16-doxylstearate. Vertical fluctuations were likewise only slightly influenced by alklyl chain length but were strongly diminished in POPC and egg PC relative to the saturated systems. This diminution of the 16:5 interaction was observed even under conditions where no differences were discernible by conventional EPR.

  14. Rotationally adiabatic pair interactions of para- and ortho-hydrogen with the halogen molecules F2, Cl2, and Br2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Matthias; Accardi, Antonio; Paulus, Beate; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work is concerned with the weak interactions between hydrogen and halogen molecules, i.e., the interactions of pairs H2-X2 with X = F, Cl, Br, which are dominated by dispersion and quadrupole-quadrupole forces. The global minimum of the four-dimensional (4D) coupled cluster with singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) pair potentials is always a T shaped structure where H2 acts as the hat of the T, with well depths (De) of 1.3, 2.4, and 3.1 kJ/mol for F2, Cl2, and Br2, respectively. MP2/AVQZ results, in reasonable agreement with CCSD(T) results extrapolated to the basis set limit, are used for detailed scans of the potentials. Due to the large difference in the rotational constants of the monomers, in the adiabatic approximation, one can solve the rotational Schrödinger equation for H2 in the potential of the X2 molecule. This yields effective two-dimensional rotationally adiabatic potential energy surfaces where pH2 and oH2 are point-like particles. These potentials for the H2-X2 complexes have global and local minima for effective linear and T-shaped complexes, respectively, which are separated by 0.4-1.0 kJ/mol, where oH2 binds stronger than pH2 to X2, due to higher alignment to minima structures of the 4D-pair potential. Further, we provide fits of an analytical function to the rotationally adiabatic potentials.

  15. Examining the Role of Communication on Sibling Relationship Quality and Interaction for Sibling Pairs with and without a Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ashlyn L.; Romski, MaryAnn; Sevcik, Rose A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined communication interaction patterns when one sibling had a developmental disability as well as the role of communication skills in sibling relationship quality. Thirty sibling dyads were categorized into one of three communication status groups: emerging, context-dependent, and independent communicators. Independent…

  16. The Nature of Negotiations in Face-to-Face versus Computer-Mediated Communication in Pair Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouhshad, Amir; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Approach argues that negotiation for meaning and form is conducive to second language development. To date, most of the research on negotiations has been either in face-to-face (FTF) or text-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) modes. Very few studies have compared the nature of negotiations across the modes.…

  17. A comparison of Coulomb and pseudo-Coulomb friction implementations: Application to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M I; Hiley, M J; Yeadon, M R

    2011-10-13

    In the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting both dynamic and static friction act. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of simulating Coulomb friction that incorporated both dynamic and static phases and to compare the results with those obtained using a pseudo-Coulomb implementation of friction when applied to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting. Kinematic data were obtained from an elite level gymnast performing handspring straight somersault vaults using a Vicon optoelectronic motion capture system. An angle-driven computer model of vaulting that simulated the interaction between a seven segment gymnast and a single segment vaulting table during the table contact phase of the vault was developed. Both dynamic and static friction were incorporated within the model by switching between two implementations of the tangential frictional force. Two vaulting trials were used to determine the model parameters using a genetic algorithm to match simulations to recorded performances. A third independent trial was used to evaluate the model and close agreement was found between the simulation and the recorded performance with an overall difference of 13.5%. The two-state simulation model was found to be capable of replicating performance at take-off and also of replicating key contact phase features such as the normal and tangential motion of the hands. The results of the two-state model were compared to those using a pseudo-Coulomb friction implementation within the simulation model. The two-state model achieved similar overall results to those of the pseudo-Coulomb model but obtained solutions more rapidly. PMID:21889150

  18. Novel base-pairing interactions at the tRNA wobble position crucial for accurate reading of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Khusainov, Iskander; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications at the wobble position of transfer RNAs play a substantial role in deciphering the degenerate genetic code on the ribosome. The number and variety of modifications suggest different mechanisms of action during messenger RNA decoding, of which only a few were described so far. Here, on the basis of several 70S ribosome complex X-ray structures, we demonstrate how Escherichia coli tRNA(Lys)(UUU) with hypermodified 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm(5)s(2)U) at the wobble position discriminates between cognate codons AAA and AAG, and near-cognate stop codon UAA or isoleucine codon AUA, with which it forms pyrimidine-pyrimidine mismatches. We show that mnm(5)s(2)U forms an unusual pair with guanosine at the wobble position that expands general knowledge on the degeneracy of the genetic code and specifies a powerful role of tRNA modifications in translation. Our models consolidate the translational fidelity mechanism proposed previously where the steric complementarity and shape acceptance dominate the decoding mechanism. PMID:26791911

  19. Novel base-pairing interactions at the tRNA wobble position crucial for accurate reading of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Khusainov, Iskander; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications at the wobble position of transfer RNAs play a substantial role in deciphering the degenerate genetic code on the ribosome. The number and variety of modifications suggest different mechanisms of action during messenger RNA decoding, of which only a few were described so far. Here, on the basis of several 70S ribosome complex X-ray structures, we demonstrate how Escherichia coli tRNALysUUU with hypermodified 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) at the wobble position discriminates between cognate codons AAA and AAG, and near-cognate stop codon UAA or isoleucine codon AUA, with which it forms pyrimidine–pyrimidine mismatches. We show that mnm5s2U forms an unusual pair with guanosine at the wobble position that expands general knowledge on the degeneracy of the genetic code and specifies a powerful role of tRNA modifications in translation. Our models consolidate the translational fidelity mechanism proposed previously where the steric complementarity and shape acceptance dominate the decoding mechanism. PMID:26791911

  20. Simple pair-wise interactions for hybrid Monte Carlo-molecular dynamics simulations of titania/yttria-doped iron.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Karl D; Voigt, Hyon-Jee Lee; Marus, Lauren A; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D

    2013-02-01

    We present pair-wise, charge-neutral model potentials for an iron-titanium-yttrium-oxygen system. These simple models are designed to provide a tractable method of simulating nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) using off-lattice Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques without deviating significantly from the formalism employed in existing Monte Carlo simulations. The model is fitted to diamagnetic density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the various species over a range of densities and concentrations. The resulting model potentials provide reasonable and in some cases even excellent mechanical and thermodynamic properties for the pure metals. The model replicates the qualitative trends in formation energy predicted by DFT, though the energies of formation do not agree as well for dilute systems as they do for more concentrated systems. We find that on-lattice models will consistently favor tetrahedral oxygen interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites, while relaxed systems typically favor octahedral sites. This emphasizes the need for the off-lattice simulations for which this potential was designed. PMID:23288578

  1. Novel base-pairing interactions at the tRNA wobble position crucial for accurate reading of the genetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Khusainov, Iskander; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications at the wobble position of transfer RNAs play a substantial role in deciphering the degenerate genetic code on the ribosome. The number and variety of modifications suggest different mechanisms of action during messenger RNA decoding, of which only a few were described so far. Here, on the basis of several 70S ribosome complex X-ray structures, we demonstrate how Escherichia coli tRNALysUUU with hypermodified 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) at the wobble position discriminates between cognate codons AAA and AAG, and near-cognate stop codon UAA or isoleucine codon AUA, with which it forms pyrimidine-pyrimidine mismatches. We show that mnm5s2U forms an unusual pair with guanosine at the wobble position that expands general knowledge on the degeneracy of the genetic code and specifies a powerful role of tRNA modifications in translation. Our models consolidate the translational fidelity mechanism proposed previously where the steric complementarity and shape acceptance dominate the decoding mechanism.

  2. Interaction of the CCAAT displacement protein with shared regulatory elements required for transcription of paired histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hodiri, H M; Perry, M

    1995-01-01

    The H2A and H2B genes of the Xenopus xlh3 histone gene cluster are transcribed in opposite directions from initiation points located approximately 235 bp apart. The close proximity of these genes to one another suggests that their expression may be controlled by either a single bidirectional promoter or by separate promoters. Our analysis of the transcription of histone gene pairs containing deletions and site-specific mutations of intergenic DNA revealed that both promoters are distinct but that they overlap physically and share multiple regulatory elements, providing a possible basis for the coordinate regulation of their in vivo activities. Using the intergenic DNA fragment as a probe and extracts from mammalian and amphibian cells, we observed the formation of a specific complex containing the CCAAT displacement protein (CDP). The formation of the CDP-containing complex was not strictly dependent on any single element in the intergenic region but instead required the presence of at least two of the three CCAAT motifs. Interestingly, similar CDP-containing complexes were formed on the promoters from the three other histone genes. The binding of CDP to histone gene promoters may contribute to the coordination of their activities during the cell cycle and early development. PMID:7791766

  3. A geometric approach to the synchronization of a pair of two-state switching rowers interacting hydrodynamically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, M.

    2012-10-01

    Two-state switching rowers, or simply rowers, are model self-sustained oscillators in a fluid at a low Reynolds number, introduced in Cosentino Lagomarsino et al (2003 Phys. Rev. E 68 021908) and realized experimentally in Kotar et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 7669-73). Here we present a new approach for investigating the hydrodynamic synchronization of a pair of rowers with the same and different frequencies. Our analysis is geometrical, in the spirit of the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. By taking advantage of the separation of timescales in the model, the dynamics can be decomposed into a sequence of fast changes followed by slow relaxations. In this framework we discuss how synchronization is determined by the dominant mode of the relaxation dynamics. For rowers with the same frequencies, our analysis recovers naturally the anti-phase synchronized motion, its stability and the basin of attraction (Cosentino Lagomarsino et al 2003 Phys. Rev. E 68 021908; Kotar et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 7669-73) in the case of rowers with different frequencies we are able to provide upper bounds for the phase-locked solution and to determine a critical value of the frequency mismatch after which the coordination is lost. Our estimates are in good agreement with numerical simulations. In this way we provide a simple and robust explanation for the transition from the phase-locked state to the loss of synchrony.

  4. Multiterminal Coulomb-Majorana junction.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Egger, Reinhold

    2013-05-10

    We study multiple helical nanowires in proximity to a common mesoscopic superconducting island, where Majorana fermion bound states are formed. We show that a weak finite charging energy of the center island may dramatically affect the low-energy behavior of the system. While for strong charging interactions, the junction decouples the connecting wires, interactions lower than a nonuniversal threshold may trigger the flow towards an exotic Kondo fixed point. In either case, the ideally Andreev reflecting fixed point characteristic for infinite capacitance (grounded) devices gets destabilized by interactions.

  5. Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2007-04-01

    The authors propose a new linear-scaling method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals with Gaussian basis functions called the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method. In this method, the Coulomb potential is expanded in a basis of mixed Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions that express the core and smooth Coulomb potentials, respectively. Coulomb integrals can be evaluated by three-center one-electron overlap integrals among two Gaussian basis functions and one mixed auxiliary function. Thus, the computational cost and scaling for large molecules are drastically reduced. Several applications to molecular systems show that the GFC method is more efficient than the analytical integration approach that requires four-center two-electron repulsion integrals. The GFC method realizes a near linear scaling for both one-dimensional alanine α-helix chains and three-dimensional diamond pieces.

  6. Interaction energy in pairs of phthalazinium dibenzoylmethylid (PDBM)-protic solvent molecules estimated in the limits of the cell ternary solution model, by spectral means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoleta, Melniciuc-Puica; Mihaela, Avadanei; Maria, Caprosu; Dana Ortansa, Dorohoi

    2012-10-01

    The dipolar compound Phthalazinium-dibenzoylmethylid (PDBM) was used as spectrally active molecule in order to analyze the molecular interactions in ternary solutions containing at least one protic solvent. In PDBM + protic solvent (1) + aprotic solvent (2) ternary solutions, PDBM can be involved both in universal and specific interactions reflected in solvatochromic effects. The protic solvent (or the solvent with the higher electric permittivity) was considered as being active from the interactions point of view. The content of the first solvation sphere of the studied ylid has been established on the basis of the statistical cell model of ternary solutions. The active solvent molecules are dominant in the first solvation sphere of the PDBM molecules. The difference between the interaction energies in the PDBM-active solvent (1) and PDBM-inactive solvent (2) molecular pairs has been determined for three binary solvents water + ethanol (W + E), propionic acid + chloroform (PA + C) and octanol + 1,2 dichloroethane (O + DCE). The hydrogen bond formation energy of the PDBM-protic solvent complex has been estimated in the binary solvents PA + C and O + DCE containing one protic (PA and O, respectively) and one aprotic solvent with close electro-optical parameters refractive index and electric permittivity of the components.

  7. Interaction energy in pairs of phthalazinium dibenzoylmethylid (PDBM)-protic solvent molecules estimated in the limits of the cell ternary solution model, by spectral means.

    PubMed

    Nicoleta, Melniciuc-Puica; Mihaela, Avadanei; Maria, Caprosu; Dana Ortansa, Dorohoi

    2012-10-01

    The dipolar compound Phthalazinium-dibenzoylmethylid (PDBM) was used as spectrally active molecule in order to analyze the molecular interactions in ternary solutions containing at least one protic solvent. In PDBM+protic solvent (1)+aprotic solvent (2) ternary solutions, PDBM can be involved both in universal and specific interactions reflected in solvatochromic effects. The protic solvent (or the solvent with the higher electric permittivity) was considered as being active from the interactions point of view. The content of the first solvation sphere of the studied ylid has been established on the basis of the statistical cell model of ternary solutions. The active solvent molecules are dominant in the first solvation sphere of the PDBM molecules. The difference between the interaction energies in the PDBM-active solvent (1) and PDBM-inactive solvent (2) molecular pairs has been determined for three binary solvents water+ethanol (W+E), propionic acid+chloroform (PA+C) and octanol+1,2 dichloroethane (O+DCE). The hydrogen bond formation energy of the PDBM-protic solvent complex has been estimated in the binary solvents PA+C and O+DCE containing one protic (PA and O, respectively) and one aprotic solvent with close electro-optical parameters refractive index and electric permittivity of the components.

  8. A proposal for Coulomb assisted laser cooling of piezoelectric semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nia, Iman Hassani; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-07-28

    Anti-Stokes laser cooling of semiconductors as a compact and vibration-free method is very attractive. While it has achieved significant milestones, increasing its efficiency is highly desirable. The main limitation is the lack of the pristine material quality with high luminescence efficiency. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the Coulomb interaction among electrons and holes in piezoelectric heterostructures could lead to coherent damping of acoustic phonons; rendering a significantly higher efficiency that leads to the possibility of cooling a broad range of semiconductors.

  9. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of burial of an artificial ion pair in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Aaron C; Castañeda, Carlos A; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, E Bertrand

    2014-08-12

    An artificial charge pair buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease was engineered by making the V23E and L36K substitutions. Buried individually, Glu-23 and Lys-36 both titrate with pKa values near 7. When buried together their pKa values appear to be normal. The ionizable moieties of the buried Glu-Lys pair are 2.6 Å apart. The interaction between them at pH 7 is worth 5 kcal/mol. Despite this strong interaction, the buried Glu-Lys pair destabilizes the protein significantly because the apparent Coulomb interaction is sufficient to offset the dehydration of only one of the two buried charges. Save for minor reorganization of dipoles and water penetration consistent with the relatively high dielectric constant reported by the buried ion pair, there is no evidence that the presence of two charges in the hydrophobic interior of the protein induces any significant structural reorganization. The successful engineering of an artificial ion pair in a highly hydrophobic environment suggests that buried Glu-Lys pairs in dehydrated environments can be charged and that it is possible to engineer charge clusters that loosely resemble catalytic sites in a scaffold protein with high thermodynamic stability, without the need for specialized structural adaptations.

  10. Interacting binary galaxies. V - NGC 4782/4783 (3C 278): Unbound colliders, not a supermassive pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.; Balcells, Marc; Hoessel, John G.

    1988-01-01

    CCD imaging data of the elliptical galaxies NGC 4782 and NGC 4783 have been analyzed along with published spectroscopic measurements in order to develop a viable interaction model for this system. The best-fit model suggests that the binary orbit was hyperbolic before the encounter, but that the energy loss during the collision has led to a loosely bound system. The total system mass in the region occupied by the luminous matter is shown to be 1.4 x 10 to the 12th solar masses. The results support the previous theory that the internal velocity dispersions of colliding galaxies tend to increase just past closest approach.

  11. "Safe" Coulomb excitation of 30Mg.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, O; Scheit, H; Bildstein, V; Boie, H; Fitting, J; von Hahn, R; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Pal, U K; Podlech, H; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Alvarez, C; Ames, F; Bollen, G; Emhofer, S; Habs, D; Kester, O; Lutter, R; Rudolph, K; Pasini, M; Thirolf, P G; Wolf, B H; Eberth, J; Gersch, G; Hess, H; Reiter, P; Thelen, O; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Aksouh, F; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Mayet, P; Van de Walle, J; Aystö, J; Butler, P A; Cederkäll, J; Delahaye, P; Fynbo, H O U; Fraile, L M; Forstner, O; Franchoo, S; Köster, U; Nilsson, T; Oinonen, M; Sieber, T; Wenander, F; Pantea, M; Richter, A; Schrieder, G; Simon, H; Behrens, T; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Münch, M; Davinson, T; Gerl, J; Huber, G; Hurst, A; Iwanicki, J; Jonson, B; Lieb, P; Liljeby, L; Schempp, A; Scherillo, A; Schmidt, P; Walter, G

    2005-05-01

    We report on the first radioactive beam experiment performed at the recently commissioned REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN in conjunction with the highly efficient gamma spectrometer MINIBALL. Using 30Mg ions accelerated to an energy of 2.25 MeV/u together with a thin (nat)Ni target, Coulomb excitation of the first excited 2+ states of the projectile and target nuclei well below the Coulomb barrier was observed. From the measured relative deexcitation gamma-ray yields the B(E2;0(+)gs-->2(+)1) value of 30Mg was determined to be 241(31)e2 fm4. Our result is lower than values obtained at projectile fragmentation facilities using the intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation method, and confirms the theoretical conjecture that the neutron-rich magnesium isotope 30Mg resides outside the "island of inversion."

  12. Coulomb gauge confinement in the heavy quark limit

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, C.; Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2010-05-15

    The relationship between the nonperturbative Green's functions of Yang-Mills theory and the confinement potential is investigated. By rewriting the generating functional of quantum chromodynamics in terms of a heavy quark mass expansion in Coulomb gauge, restricting to leading order in this expansion and considering only the two-point functions of the Yang-Mills sector, the rainbow-ladder approximation to the gap and Bethe-Salpeter equations is shown to be exact in this case and an analytic, nonperturbative solution is presented. It is found that there is a direct connection between the string tension and the temporal gluon propagator. Further, it is shown that for the 4-point quark correlation functions, only confined bound states of color-singlet quark-antiquark (meson) and quark-quark (baryon) pairs exist.

  13. Collisions on the Fly: pairing numerical modelling with high speed imagery to explore pyroclast-pyroclast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtland, L. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Weinhart, T.; Thornton, A.

    2013-12-01

    The propensity for in-flight collisions of erupted bombs and blocks to alter their trajectory is often overlooked both in hazard analysis and when determining the energetics of bomb emplacement based on the resultant deposit, due to both paucity of observations and a lack of numerical tools capable of accounting for this effect. At several volcanoes, we used high-speed imaging to document clear evidence of mid-air collisions between erupted pyroclasts, which induce significant deviations from purely ballistic trajectories. MercuryDPM, a code for discrete element simulations, is here used to investigate the prevalence and effects of particle collisions numerically. Once particle parameters (e.g. size, density), exit conditions (e.g. ejection angle, ejection speed), external body forces (e.g. gravity, air drag), and particle-particle interactions (elastic, plastic, viscous, frictional) are defined, Mercury computes the translational and rotational evolution of particles by solving Newton's second law. Thus it is an ideal tool for exploring the relationships between the exit conditions of particles, including the concentrations of particles within eruptive bursts and the time periods between bursts, and how these factors affect both the prevalence of particle collisions and the resultant translations of the particles involved. By exploring the range of scenarios documented by high-speed imaging, we are able to quantify the anticipated effects of pyroclast-pyroclast interactions during unsteady explosive volcanic activity.

  14. Electron and nuclear dynamics of molecular clusters in ultraintense laser fields. IV. Coulomb explosion of molecular heteroclusters.

    PubMed

    Last, Isidore; Jortner, Joshua

    2004-11-01

    =E(j,M). These results for uniform Coulomb explosion serve as benchmark reference data for the assessment of the effects of nonuniform explosion, where the CVI scaling law for the energetics still holds, with deviations of the a coefficient, which increase with increasing eta. Kinematic effects (for eta>1) result in an isotope effect, predicting the enhancement (by 9%-11%) of E(H,av) for Coulomb explosion of (C(4+)H(4) (+))(eta) (eta=3) relative to E(D,av) for Coulomb explosion of (C(4+)D(4) (+))(eta) (eta=1.5), with the isotope effect being determined by the ratio of the kinematic parameters for the pair of Coulomb exploding clusters. Kinematic effects for nonuniform explosion also result in a narrow isotope dependent energy distribution (of width DeltaE) of the light ions (with DeltaE/E(H,av) approximately 0.3 and DeltaE/E(D,av) approximately 0.4), with the distribution peaking at the high energy edge, in marked contrast with the uniform explosion case. Features of laser-heterocluster interactions were inferred from the analyses of the intensity dependent boundary radii (R(0))(I) and the corresponding average D+ ion energies (E(D,av))(I), which provide a measure for optimization of the cluster size at intensity I for the neutron yield from dd nuclear fusion driven by Coulomb explosion (NFDCE) of these heteroclusters. We infer on the advantage of deuterium containing heteronuclear clusters, e.g., (CD4)(n) in comparison to homonuclear clusters, e.g., (D2)(n/2), for dd NFDCE, where the highly charged heavy ions (e.g., C4+ or C6+) serve as energetic and kinematic triggers driving the D+ ions to a high (10-200 keV) energy domain.

  15. Electron and nuclear dynamics of molecular clusters in ultraintense laser fields. IV. Coulomb explosion of molecular heteroclusters.

    PubMed

    Last, Isidore; Jortner, Joshua

    2004-11-01

    =E(j,M). These results for uniform Coulomb explosion serve as benchmark reference data for the assessment of the effects of nonuniform explosion, where the CVI scaling law for the energetics still holds, with deviations of the a coefficient, which increase with increasing eta. Kinematic effects (for eta>1) result in an isotope effect, predicting the enhancement (by 9%-11%) of E(H,av) for Coulomb explosion of (C(4+)H(4) (+))(eta) (eta=3) relative to E(D,av) for Coulomb explosion of (C(4+)D(4) (+))(eta) (eta=1.5), with the isotope effect being determined by the ratio of the kinematic parameters for the pair of Coulomb exploding clusters. Kinematic effects for nonuniform explosion also result in a narrow isotope dependent energy distribution (of width DeltaE) of the light ions (with DeltaE/E(H,av) approximately 0.3 and DeltaE/E(D,av) approximately 0.4), with the distribution peaking at the high energy edge, in marked contrast with the uniform explosion case. Features of laser-heterocluster interactions were inferred from the analyses of the intensity dependent boundary radii (R(0))(I) and the corresponding average D+ ion energies (E(D,av))(I), which provide a measure for optimization of the cluster size at intensity I for the neutron yield from dd nuclear fusion driven by Coulomb explosion (NFDCE) of these heteroclusters. We infer on the advantage of deuterium containing heteronuclear clusters, e.g., (CD4)(n) in comparison to homonuclear clusters, e.g., (D2)(n/2), for dd NFDCE, where the highly charged heavy ions (e.g., C4+ or C6+) serve as energetic and kinematic triggers driving the D+ ions to a high (10-200 keV) energy domain. PMID:15511153

  16. Computational studies of ion pairing. 8. Ion pairing of tetraalkylammonium ions to nitrosobenzene and benzaldehyde redox species. A general binding motif for the interaction of tetraalkylammonium ions with benzenoid species.

    PubMed

    Fry, Albert J

    2013-06-01

    Very little data is available on the detailed structures of ion pairs in solution, since few general experimental methods are available for obtaining such information. For this reason, computational methods have emerged as the method of choice for determining the structures of organic ion pairs in solution. The present study examines the ion pairs between a series of tetraalkylammonium ions and several redox forms of nitrosobenzene and a series of substituted benzaldehydes. The structures, though previously unexpected, are chemically reasonable and fit into a previous pattern of ion pairing described in previous publications in this series. To date in these studies, a total of 73 ion pairs and related species have in fact been identified having exactly the same unusual orientation of the tetraalkylammonium component with respect to the donor species. The results are pertinent to topics of general current interest, including self-assembly, molecular recognition, and supramolecular assembly.

  17. Nonlocal formulation of spin Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, I.; Ullrich, C. A.

    2013-10-01

    The spin Coulomb drag (SCD) effect occurs in materials and devices where charged carriers with different spins exchange momentum via Coulomb scattering. This causes frictional forces between spin-dependent currents that lead to intrinsic dissipation, which may limit spintronics applications. A nonlocal formulation of SCD is developed which is valid for strongly inhomogeneous systems such as nanoscale spintronics devices. This nonlocal formulation of SCD is successfully applied to linewidths of intersubband spin plasmons in semiconductor quantum wells, where experiments have shown that the local approximation fails.

  18. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  19. Coulomb sum rule in the quasielastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Yu, B. G.; Cheoun, M. K.

    2006-12-15

    Within a relativistic single particle model, we calculate the Coulomb sum rule of inclusive electron scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb in the quasielastic region. Theoretical longitudinal and transverse structure functions are extracted for three-momentum transfers from 300 to 500 MeV/c and compared with the experimental data measured at Bates and Saclay. We find that there is no drastic suppression of the longitudinal structure function and that the Coulomb sum rule depends on the nucleus in our theoretical model.

  20. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  1. WR 120bb and WR 120bc: a pair of WN9h stars with possibly interacting circumstellar shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeister, S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Todt, H.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2013-03-01

    Two optically obscured Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars have been recently discovered by means of their infrared (IR) circumstellar shells, which show signatures of interaction with each other. Following the systematics of the WR star catalogues, these stars obtain the names WR 120bb and WR 120bc. In this paper, we present and analyse new near-IR, J-, H- and K-band spectra using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. For that purpose, the atomic data base of the code has been extended in order to include all significant lines in the near-IR bands. The spectra of both stars are classified as WN9h. As their spectra are very similar the parameters that we obtained by the spectral analyses hardly differ. Despite their late spectral subtype, we found relatively high stellar temperatures of 63 kK. The wind composition is dominated by helium, while hydrogen is depleted to 25 per cent by mass. Because of their location in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm, WR 120bb and WR 120bc appear highly reddened, A_{K_s} ≈ 2 mag. We adopt a common distance of 5.8 kpc to both stars, which complies with the typical absolute K-band magnitude for the WN9h subtype of -6.5 mag, is consistent with their observed extinction based on comparison with other massive stars in the region, and allows for the possibility that their shells are interacting with each other. This leads to luminosities of log ({textit {L}/L}_{odot }) = 5.66 and 5.54 for WR 120bb and WR 120bc, with large uncertainties due to the adopted distance. The values of the luminosities of WR 120bb and WR 120bc imply that the immediate precursors of both stars were red supergiants (RSG). This implies in turn that the circumstellar shells associated with WR 120bb and WR 120bc were formed by interaction between the WR wind and the dense material shed during the preceding RSG phase.

  2. Polarization of the electron and positron produced in combined Coulomb and strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Mueller, C.; Milstein, A. I.

    2010-12-15

    The process of e{sup +}e{sup -} production in the superposition of a Coulomb and a strong laser field is considered. The pair production rate integrated over the momentum and summed over the spin projections of one of the particles is derived exactly in the parameters of the laser field and in the Born approximation with respect to the Coulomb field. The case of a monochromatic circularly polarized laser field is considered in detail. A very compact analytical expression of the pair production rate and its dependence on the polarization of one of the created particles is obtained in the quasiclassical approximation for the experimentally relevant case of an undercritical laser field. As a result, the polarization of the created electron (positron) is derived.

  3. Low-temperature emission spectra of 9-alkylanthracene esters: Dimer photodecomposition and monomer pair interactions in polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, K.; Scott, G.W. )

    1994-10-06

    Effects due to variation in the alkyl chain length of photodimers of 9-alkylanthracene esters on their photodecomposition efficiencies at 12 K and, by implication, the photoproduct migration as a function of temperature within polymer hosts are investigated. It is shown that dimers with longer alkyl chains have a lower photodecomposition efficiency. The extent of photoproduct migration within the polymer following photodecomposition was also studied as a function of alkyl chain length. This migration and its modulation of the interaction between the separating monomers is shown to affect the emission spectrum. Thus, monomer migration was studied in temperature cycling experiments. It was also found, for the polymer hosts investigated - poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl chloride), and polystyrene - that these properties are host dependent. This result is probably due to the void space differences that exist among these polymers. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  4. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The term "Coulombic viscosity" is introduced here to define an empirically observed phenomenon from experiments conducted in both microgravity, and in ground-based 1-g conditions. In the latter case, a sand attrition device was employed to test the longevity of aeolian materials by creating two intersecting grain-circulation paths or cells that would lead to most of the grain energy being expended on grain-to-grain collisions (simulating dune systems). In the areas in the device where gravitationally-driven grain-slurries recycled the sand, the slurries moved with a boundary-layer impeded motion down the chamber walls. Excessive electrostatic charging of the grains during these experiments was prevented by the use of an a.c. corona (created by a Tesla coil) through which the grains passed on every cycle. This created both positive and negative ions which neutralized the triboelectrically-generated grain charges. When the corona was switched on, the velocity of the wall-attached slurries increased by a factor of two as approximately determined by direct observation. What appeared to be a freely-flowing slurry of grains impeded only by intergranular mechanical friction, had obviously been significantly retarded in its motion by electrostatic forces between the grains; with the charging reduced, the grains were able to move past one another without a flow "viscosity" imposed by the Coulombic intergranular forces. A similar phenomenon was observed during microgravity experiments aboard Space Shuttle in USML-1 & USML-2 spacelabs where freely-suspended clouds of sand were being investigated for their potential to for-m aggregates. In this environment, the grains were also charged electrostatically (by natural processes prior to flight), but were free from the intervention of gravity in their interactions. The grains were dispersed into dense clouds by bursts of air turbulence and allowed to form aggregates as the ballistic and turbulent motions damped out. During this

  5. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-09-01

    The term "Coulombic viscosity" is introduced here to define an empirically observed phenomenon from experiments conducted in both microgravity, and in ground-based 1-g conditions. In the latter case, a sand attrition device was employed to test the longevity of aeolian materials by creating two intersecting grain-circulation paths or cells that would lead to most of the grain energy being expended on grain-to-grain collisions (simulating dune systems). In the areas in the device where gravitationally-driven grain-slurries recycled the sand, the slurries moved with a boundary-layer impeded motion down the chamber walls. Excessive electrostatic charging of the grains during these experiments was prevented by the use of an a.c. corona (created by a Tesla coil) through which the grains passed on every cycle. This created both positive and negative ions which neutralized the triboelectrically-generated grain charges. When the corona was switched on, the velocity of the wall-attached slurries increased by a factor of two as approximately determined by direct observation. What appeared to be a freely-flowing slurry of grains impeded only by intergranular mechanical friction, had obviously been significantly retarded in its motion by electrostatic forces between the grains; with the charging reduced, the grains were able to move past one another without a flow "viscosity" imposed by the Coulombic intergranular forces. A similar phenomenon was observed during microgravity experiments aboard Space Shuttle in USML-1 & USML-2 spacelabs where freely-suspended clouds of sand were being investigated for their potential to for-m aggregates. In this environment, the grains were also charged electrostatically (by natural processes prior to flight), but were free from the intervention of gravity in their interactions. The grains were dispersed into dense clouds by bursts of air turbulence and allowed to form aggregates as the ballistic and turbulent motions damped out. During this

  6. Efficient evaluation of the Coulomb force in the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Sato, Takeshi; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2010-06-01

    We propose an efficient method for evaluating the Coulomb force in the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method, which is a linear-scaling approach for evaluating the Coulomb matrix and energy in large molecular systems. The efficient evaluation of the analytical gradient in the GFC is not straightforward as well as the evaluation of the energy because the SCF procedure with the Coulomb matrix does not give a variational solution for the Coulomb energy. Thus, an efficient approximate method is alternatively proposed, in which the Coulomb potential is expanded in the Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions as done in the GFC. To minimize the error in the gradient not just in the energy, the derived functions of the original auxiliary functions of the GFC are used additionally for the evaluation of the Coulomb gradient. In fact, the use of the derived functions significantly improves the accuracy of this approach. Although these additional auxiliary functions enlarge the size of the discretized Poisson equation and thereby increase the computational cost, it maintains the near linear scaling as the GFC and does not affects the overall efficiency of the GFC approach.

  7. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  8. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  10. Coulomb corrections to the extrinsic spin-Hall effect of a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankiewicz, E. M.; Vignale, G.

    2006-03-01

    We develop the microscopic theory of the extrinsic spin-Hall conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas, including skew-scattering, side-jump, and Coulomb interaction effects. We find that while the spin-Hall conductivity connected with the side jump is independent of the strength of electron-electron interactions, the skew-scattering term is reduced by the spin-Coulomb drag, so the total spin current and the total spin-Hall conductivity are reduced for typical experimental mobilities. Further, we predict that in paramagnetic systems the spin-Coulomb drag reduces the spin accumulations in two different ways: (i) directly through the reduction of the skew-scattering contribution, and (ii) indirectly through the reduction of the spin diffusion length. Explicit expressions for the various contributions to the spin-Hall conductivity are obtained using an exactly solvable model of the skew scattering.

  11. Constructive influence of the induced electron pairing on the Kondo state

    PubMed Central

    Domański, T.; Weymann, I.; Barańska, M.; Górski, G.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting order and magnetic impurities are usually detrimental to each other. We show, however, that in nanoscopic objects the induced electron pairing can have constructive influence on the Kondo effect originating from the effective screening interactions. Such situation is possible at low temperatures in the quantum dots placed between the conducting and superconducting reservoirs, where the proximity induced electron pairing cooperates with the correlations amplifying the spin-exchange potential. The emerging Abrikosov-Suhl resonance, which is observable in the Andreev conductance, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the coupling to superconducting lead. We explain this intriguing tendency within the Anderson impurity model using: the generalized Schrieffer-Wolff canonical transformation, the second order perturbative treatment of the Coulomb repulsion, and the nonperturbative numerical renormalization group calculations. We also provide hints for experimental observability of this phenomenon. PMID:27009681

  12. Comment on "Calculations for the one-dimensional soft Coulomb problem and the hard Coulomb limit"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Bernal, M. A.; Núñez-Yépez, H. N.; Salas-Brito, A. L.; Solis, Didier A.

    2015-02-01

    In the referred paper, the authors use a numerical method for solving ordinary differential equations and a softened Coulomb potential -1 /√{x2+β2 } to study the one-dimensional Coulomb problem by approaching the parameter β to zero. We note that even though their numerical findings in the soft potential scenario are correct, their conclusions do not extend to the one-dimensional Coulomb problem (β =0 ). Their claims regarding the possible existence of an even ground state with energy -∞ with a Dirac-δ eigenfunction and of well-defined parity eigenfunctions in the one-dimensional hydrogen atom are questioned.

  13. Determination of nucleosides and nucleotides in baby foods by hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in the presence of hydrophilic ion-pairing reagents.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Vivas, María; Rodríguez-Gonzalo, Encarnación; Domínguez-Álvarez, Javier; García-Gómez, Diego; Carabias-Martínez, Rita

    2016-11-15

    In this work we propose a rapid and efficient method for the joint determination of nucleosides and nucleotides in dairy and non-dairy baby foods based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in the presence of diethylammonium (DEA) as a hydrophilic ion-pairing reagent (IP-HILIC-MS/MS). Sample treatment of the baby food included dilution with water and centrifugal ultrafiltration (CUF) with an additional washing step that notably improved the global performance of the process. Later dilution of the extract with acetonitrile allowed adequate separation in the HILIC system. With the proposed treatment, we obtained extraction recoveries higher than 80% and, additionally, no matrix effects were observed. The CUF-IP-HILIC-MS/MS method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC decision and was used for the quantification of nucleotides and nucleosides in sixteen samples of commercial baby foods. PMID:27283702

  14. Three-Body Coulomb Functions in the Hyperspherical Adiabatic Expansion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Kievsky, A.; Viviani, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we describe a numerical method devised to compute continuum three-body wave functions. The method is implemented using the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion for the three-body wave function imposing a box boundary condition. The continuum energy spectrum results discretized and, for specific quantum number values, all the possible incoming and outgoing channels are simultaneously computed. For a given energy, the hyperradial continuum functions form a matrix whose ij-term refers to specific incoming and outgoing channels. When applied to three-body systems interacting only through the Coulomb potential, this method provides the adiabatic representation of the regular three-body Coulomb wave function. The computation of the irregular Coulomb wave function representation is also discussed. These regular and irregular Coulomb functions can be used to extract the {S} -matrix for those reactions where, together with some short-range potential, the Coulomb interaction is also present. The method is illustrated in the case of the 3→ 3 process of three alpha particles.

  15. Morphological Evolution of Coexisting Amphipod Species Pairs from Sulfidic Caves Suggests Competitive Interactions and Character Displacement, but No Environmental Filtering and Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Fišer, Cene; Luštrik, Roman; Sarbu, Serban; Flot, Jean-François; Trontelj, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypically similar species coexisting in extreme environments like sulfidic water are subject to two opposing eco-evolutionary processes: those favoring similarity of environment-specific traits, and those promoting differences of traits related to resource use. The former group of processes includes ecological filtering and convergent or parallel evolution, the latter competitive exclusion, character displacement and divergent evolution. We used a unique eco-evolutionary study system composed of two independent pairs of coexisting amphipod species (genus Niphargus) from the sulfidic caves Movile in Romania and Frasassi in Italy to study the relative contribution and interaction of both processes. We looked at the shape of the multifunctional ventral channel as a trait ostensibly related to oxygenation and sulfide detoxification, and at body size as a resource-related trait. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the sulfidic caves were colonized separately by ancestors of each species. Species within pairs were more dissimilar in their morphology than expected according to a null model based on regional species pool. This might indicate competitive interactions shaping the morphology of these amphipod species. Moreover, our results suggest that the shape of the ventral channel is not subject to long-term convergent selection or to the process of environmental filtering, and as such probably does not play a role in sulfide tolerance. Nevertheless, the ancestral conditions reconstructed using the comparative method tended to be more similar than null-model expectations. This shift in patterns may reflect a temporal hierarchy of eco-evolutionary processes, in which initial environmental filtering became later on superseded by character displacement or other competition-driven divergent evolutionary processes. PMID:25905793

  16. Morphological evolution of coexisting amphipod species pairs from sulfidic caves suggests competitive interactions and character displacement, but no environmental filtering and convergence.

    PubMed

    Fišer, Cene; Luštrik, Roman; Sarbu, Serban; Flot, Jean-François; Trontelj, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypically similar species coexisting in extreme environments like sulfidic water are subject to two opposing eco-evolutionary processes: those favoring similarity of environment-specific traits, and those promoting differences of traits related to resource use. The former group of processes includes ecological filtering and convergent or parallel evolution, the latter competitive exclusion, character displacement and divergent evolution. We used a unique eco-evolutionary study system composed of two independent pairs of coexisting amphipod species (genus Niphargus) from the sulfidic caves Movile in Romania and Frasassi in Italy to study the relative contribution and interaction of both processes. We looked at the shape of the multifunctional ventral channel as a trait ostensibly related to oxygenation and sulfide detoxification, and at body size as a resource-related trait. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the sulfidic caves were colonized separately by ancestors of each species. Species within pairs were more dissimilar in their morphology than expected according to a null model based on regional species pool. This might indicate competitive interactions shaping the morphology of these amphipod species. Moreover, our results suggest that the shape of the ventral channel is not subject to long-term convergent selection or to the process of environmental filtering, and as such probably does not play a role in sulfide tolerance. Nevertheless, the ancestral conditions reconstructed using the comparative method tended to be more similar than null-model expectations. This shift in patterns may reflect a temporal hierarchy of eco-evolutionary processes, in which initial environmental filtering became later on superseded by character displacement or other competition-driven divergent evolutionary processes.

  17. Boltzmann-Langevin theory of Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Andreev, A. V.; Levchenko, A.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a Boltzmann-Langevin description of the Coulomb drag effect in clean double-layer systems with large interlayer separation d as compared to the average interelectron distance λF. Coulomb drag arises from density fluctuations with spatial scales of order d . At low temperatures, their characteristic frequencies exceed the intralayer equilibration rate of the electron liquid, and Coulomb drag may be treated in the collisionless approximation. As temperature is raised, the electron mean free path becomes short due to electron-electron scattering. This leads to local equilibration of electron liquid, and consequently drag is determined by hydrodynamic density modes. Our theory applies to both the collisionless and the hydrodynamic regimes, and it enables us to describe the crossover between them. We find that drag resistivity exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence with multiple crossovers at distinct energy scales. At the lowest temperatures, Coulomb drag is dominated by the particle-hole continuum, whereas at higher temperatures of the collision-dominated regime it is governed by the plasmon modes. We observe that fast intralayer equilibration mediated by electron-electron collisions ultimately renders a stronger drag effect.

  18. Effective Coulomb logarithm for one component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.

    2013-05-15

    An expression for the effective Coulomb logarithm in one-component-plasma is proposed, which allows to extend the applicability of the classical formula for the self-diffusion coefficient to the strongly coupled regime. The proposed analytical approximation demonstrates reasonable agreement with previous numerical simulation results. Relevance to weakly screened Yukawa systems (and, in particular, complex plasmas) is discussed.

  19. The Pioneer Anomaly as a Coulomb Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft can be explained as a Coulomb attraction between the positively-charged Solar System (due to cosmic rays) and the negatively-charged spacecraft (due to alpha-particle emission from the radioisotope thermoelectric generators).

  20. Nonequilibrium dephasing in Coulomb blockaded quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Egger, Reinhold

    2009-01-16

    We present a theory of zero-bias anomalies and dephasing rates for a Coulomb-blockaded quantum dot, driven out of equilibrium by coupling to voltage biased source and drain leads. We interpret our results in terms of the statistics of voltage fluctuations in the system.

  1. Coulomb's Electrical Measurements. Experiment No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devons, Samuel

    Presented is information related to the life and work of Charles Coulomb as well as detailed notes of his measurements of the distribution of electricity on conductors. The two methods that he used (the large torsion balance, and the timing of "force" oscillations) are described. (SA)

  2. Solution of Coulomb system in momentum space

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.

    2008-02-15

    The solution of D-dimensional Coulomb system is solved in momentum space by path integral. From which the topological effect of a magnetic flux in the system is given. It is revealed that the flux effect represented by the two-dimensional field of Aharonov-Bohm covers any space-dimensions.

  3. Distance distributions of photogenerated charge pairs in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Barker, Alex J; Chen, Kai; Hodgkiss, Justin M

    2014-08-27

    Strong Coulomb interactions in organic photovoltaic cells dictate that charges must separate over relatively long distances in order to circumvent geminate recombination and produce photocurrent. In this article, we measure the distance distributions of thermalized charge pairs by accessing a regime at low temperature where charge pairs are frozen out following the primary charge separation step and recombine monomolecularly via tunneling. The exponential attenuation of tunneling rate with distance provides a sensitive probe of the distance distribution of primary charge pairs, reminiscent of electron transfer studies in proteins. By fitting recombination dynamics to distributions of recombination rates, we identified populations of charge-transfer states and well-separated charge pairs. For the wide range of materials we studied, the yield of separated charges in the tunneling regime is strongly correlated with the yield of free charges measured via their intensity-dependent bimolecular recombination dynamics at room temperature. We therefore conclude that populations of free charges are established via long-range charge separation within the thermalization time scale, thus invoking early branching between free and bound charges across an energetic barrier. Subject to assumed values of the electron tunneling attenuation constant, we estimate critical charge separation distances of ∼3-4 nm in all materials. In some blends, large fullerene crystals can enhance charge separation yields; however, the important role of the polymers is also highlighted in blends that achieved significant charge separation with minimal fullerene concentration. We expect that our approach of isolating the intrinsic properties of primary charge pairs will be of considerable value in guiding new material development and testing the validity of proposed mechanisms for long-range charge separation.

  4. Range effects of the Coulombic forces on structures, thermodynamic properties and potential energy landscapes: (KCl)32 and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengju; Stephen Berry, R.; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-05-01

    By introducing two shielding parameters into the Coulombic part of the Coulomb plus Born-Mayer potential originally developed for (KCl)n systems, we study the effects of the range of the Coulombic interactions on the structures, thermodynamic properties and the potential energy landscapes of binary ionically bonded systems as illustrated by the case of n = 32. Our calculations show that shortening of the Coulomb interaction range leads to a decrease in the energy of the most stable structure, and the structure itself changes from the rocksalt cubic to a hollow cage type. The energy range, in which the heat capacity exhibits a negative value, gradually narrows and eventually disappears. The number of stationary points on the potential energy surface increases, and their energies get spread over a larger interval. The extent of the Coulombic interaction also affects the energy difference (gap) between the most stable structure and the structure that follows it. All these changes translate into changes in the melting behavior of the system. An analysis of the melting behavior as a function of the range of the Coulombic interaction is presented and correlated with the range-dependent changes in the topography of the underlying potential energy surface.

  5. The interaction between the outer layer of a mixed ion pair amphiphile/double-chained cationic surfactant vesicle and DNA: a Langmuir monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2014-03-21

    The charge density of vesicular bilayers plays an important role in the structure characteristic of the vesicle-DNA complex for gene delivery. In this work, the charge density effect of catanionic vesicle surfaces on the association behavior of the vesicle with DNA was explored with the model Langmuir monolayer approach. The interaction of negatively charged DNA with positively charged Langmuir monolayers composed of catanionic vesicle-forming materials, hexadecyltrimethylammonium-dodecylsulfate (HTMA-DS) and dihexadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DHDAB), was investigated with surface pressure-area isotherms, area-time relaxation curves and Brewster angle microscope images. The results showed that the adsorption of DNA molecules onto the monolayers was enhanced with an increased DHDAB molar fraction (XDHDAB), which was apparently related to the increased charge density of the monolayers. With XDHDAB being increased up to 0.5, the mixed monolayers with a higher XDHDAB, or higher charge density, possessed a more stable characteristic at high surface pressures, at which the molecular status was close to that in a corresponding vesicular bilayer, due to the DHDAB-improved molecular packing/interaction. It was found that the composition of the mixed HTMA-DS-DHDAB monolayers at high surface pressures would be affected by the adsorbed DNA with the extent depending on XDHDAB. For the formation of stable HTMA-DS-DHDAB monolayer-DNA complexes, a strong electrostatic interaction of DNA with a monolayer of high charge density and a high monolayer stability characteristic resulting from DHDAB-improved molecular packing/interaction were thus required. The finding has an implication for the formulation of catanionic vesicles composed of an ion pair amphiphile, HTMA-DS, with DHDAB in gene delivery applications.

  6. Resonantly paired fermionic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarie, V.; Radzihovsky, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present a theory of a degenerate atomic Fermi gas, interacting through a narrow Feshbach resonance, whose position and therefore strength can be tuned experimentally, as demonstrated recently in ultracold trapped atomic gases. The distinguishing feature of the theory is that its accuracy is controlled by a dimensionless parameter proportional to the ratio of the width of the resonance to Fermi energy. The theory is therefore quantitatively accurate for a narrow Feshbach resonance. In the case of a narrow s-wave resonance, our analysis leads to a quantitative description of the crossover between a weakly paired BCS superconductor of overlapping Cooper pairs and a strongly paired molecular Bose-Einstein condensate of diatomic molecules. In the case of pairing via a p-wave resonance, that we show is always narrow for a sufficiently low density, we predict a detuning-temperature phase diagram, that in the course of a BCS-BEC crossover can exhibit a host of thermodynamically distinct phases separated by quantum and classical phase transitions. For an intermediate strength of the dipolar anisotropy, the system exhibits a px + i py paired superfluidity that undergoes a topological phase transition between a weakly coupled gapless ground state at large positive detuning and a strongly paired fully gapped molecular superfluid for a negative detuning. In two dimensions the former state is characterized by a Pfaffian ground state exhibiting topological order and non-Abelian vortex excitations familiar from fractional quantum Hall systems.

  7. Temperature-scanned magnetic resonance and the evidence of two-way transfer of a nitrogen nuclear spin hyperfine interaction in coupled NV-N pairs in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babunts, R. A.; Soltamova, A. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Soltamov, V. A.; Gurin, A. S.; Anisimov, A. N.; Preobrazhenskii, V. L.; Baranovi, P. G.

    2012-06-01

    New method for the detection of magnetic resonance signals versus temperature is developed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the paramagnetic system under investigation. The implementation of this technique is demonstrated on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds. Single NV defects and their ensembles are suggested to be almost inertialess temperature sensors. The hyperfine structure of the 14N nitrogen nuclei of the nitrogen-vacancy center appears to be resolved in the hyperfine structure characteristic of the hyperfine interaction between NV and an N s center (substitutional nitrogen impurity) in the optically detected magnetic resonance spectra of the molecular NV-N s complex. Thus, we show that a direct evidence of the two-way transfer of a nitrogen nuclear spin hyperfine interaction in coupled NV-N s pairs was observed. It is shown that more than 3-fold enhancement of the NV optically detected magnetic resonance signal can be achieved by using water as a collection optics medium.

  8. Alteration of intersubunit acid–base pair interactions at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry of Cucumber mosaic virus disrupts aphid vector transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Bricault, Christine A.; Perry, Keith L.

    2013-06-05

    In the atomic model of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), six amino acid residues form stabilizing salt bridges between subunits of the asymmetric unit at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry. To evaluate the effects of these positions on virion stability and aphid vector transmissibility, six charged amino acid residues were individually mutated to alanine. All of the six engineered viruses were viable and exhibited near wild type levels of virion stability in the presence of urea. Aphid vector transmissibility was nearly or completely eliminated in the case of four of the mutants; two mutants demonstrated intermediate aphid transmissibility. For the majority of the engineered mutants, second-site mutations were observed following aphid transmission and/or mechanical passaging, and one restored transmission rates to that of the wild type. CMV capsids tolerate disruption of acid–base pairing interactions at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry, but these interactions are essential for maintaining aphid vector transmissibility. - Highlights: ► Amino acids between structural subunits of Cucumber mosaic virus affect vector transmission. ► Mutant structural stability was retained, while aphid vector transmissibility was disrupted. ► Spontaneous, second-site mutations restored aphid vector transmissibility.

  9. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects. PMID:27287802

  10. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects.

  11. The effect of dispersion forces on the interaction energies and far infrared spectra of protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    We could show by means of dispersion-corrected DFT calculations that the interaction energy in protic ionic liquids can be dissected into Coulomb interaction, hydrogen bonding and dispersion interaction. The H-bond energy as well as the dispersion energy can be quantified to be 50 kJ mol(-1) each representing ten percent of the overall interaction energy. The dispersion interaction could be dissected into two portions. One third could be related to the dispersion interaction within an ion-pair enhancing the H-bond strength, two thirds stem from dispersion interaction between the ion-pairs. This distribution of dispersion interaction is reflected in the far infrared (FIR) spectra. The H-bond band is shifted weaker than the low frequency band where the latter indicates diffuse cation-anion interaction and H-bond bending motions. Finally, we can dissect the different types of interaction energies indicating their characteristic influence on vibrational modes in the FIR.

  12. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  13. Shell model based Coulomb excitation γ-ray intensity calculations in 107Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cederkall, J.; Ekström, A.; Fahlander, C.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we present recent shell model calculations, based on a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction, for the light 107, 109Sn nuclei. By combining the calculations with the semi-classical Coulomb excitation code GOSIA, a set of γ-ray intensities has been generated. The calculated intensities are compared with the data from recent Coulomb excitation studies in inverse kinematics at the REX-ISOLDE facility with the nucleus 107Sn. The results are discussed in the context of the ordering of the single-particle orbits relative to 100Sn.

  14. Identification of paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor α as hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Lun, Yong-Zhi; Chi, Qing; Wang, Xue-Lei; Wang, Fang; Sui, Wen

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 (HBVDNAPTP1) is a novel protein transfected by HBV DNA polymerase, which has been screened by a suppression subtractive hybridization technique. In the present study, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen the proteins interacting with HBVDNAPTP1 in leukocytes in order to investigate the biological function of HBVDNAPTP1. The HBVDNAPTP1 coding sequence was cloned into a pGEM-T vector. Subsequent to sequencing, the HBVDNAPTP1 was subcloned into the bait plasmid pGBKT7 and transformed into yeast AH109. Western blotting confirmed the presence of HBVDNAPTP1 expression in the AH109 yeast strains. The transformed yeast AH109 cells were mated with Y187 yeast cells containing the leucocyte cDNA library pACT2 plasmids in 2X yeast extract peptone D-glucose adenine (YPDA) medium. For selection and screening, diploid yeast was plated on synthetic dropout medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade) containing X-α-gal. Following sequencing and the verification of the open reading frames of positive colonies, four different proteins were obtained. To further confirm the interaction between HBVDNAPTP1 and the screened proteins, paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor α (PILRA), one of the positive colonies, was cloned. The glutathione S-transferase pull-down in vitro assay and a co-immunoprecipitation in vivo assay were used to examine the interaction between HBVDNAPTP1 and PILRA, respectively. HBVDNAPTP1 may be involved in the negative regulation of the PILRA‑mediated Janus-activated kinase/signal tranducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway, and exert a positive effect on the initiation of monocyte apoptosis. These results contribute our knowledge of the biological functions of HBVDNAPTP1 and provide novel data to aid in the further analysis of the regulatory mechanism of this protein.

  15. Fermi-Edge Transmission Resonance in Graphene Driven by a Single Coulomb Impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnatak, Paritosh; Goswami, Srijit; Kochat, Vidya; Nath Pal, Atindra; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-07-01

    The interaction between the Fermi sea of conduction electrons and a nonadiabatic attractive impurity potential can lead to a power-law divergence in the tunneling probability of charge through the impurity. The resulting effect, known as the Fermi edge singularity (FES), constitutes one of the most fundamental many-body phenomena in quantum solid state physics. Here we report the first observation of FES for Dirac fermions in graphene driven by isolated Coulomb impurities in the conduction channel. In high-mobility graphene devices on hexagonal boron nitride substrates, the FES manifests in abrupt changes in conductance with a large magnitude ≈e2/h at resonance, indicating total many-body screening of a local Coulomb impurity with fluctuating charge occupancy. Furthermore, we exploit the extreme sensitivity of graphene to individual Coulomb impurities and demonstrate a new defect-spectroscopy tool to investigate strongly correlated phases in graphene in the quantum Hall regime.

  16. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Hao, Xiaolei; Chen, Yongju; Yu, Shaogang; Xu, Songpo; Wang, Yanlan; Sun, Renping; Lai, Xuanyang; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; He, Xiantu; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends.

  17. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Wei; Hao, XiaoLei; Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Lai, XuanYang; Wu, ChengYin; Gong, QiHuang; He, XianTu; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends. PMID:27256904

  18. On the Klein–Gordon oscillator subject to a Coulomb-type potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, K. Furtado, C.

    2015-04-15

    By introducing the scalar potential as modification in the mass term of the Klein–Gordon equation, the influence of a Coulomb-type potential on the Klein–Gordon oscillator is investigated. Relativistic bound states solutions are achieved to both attractive and repulsive Coulomb-type potentials and the arising of a quantum effect characterized by the dependence of angular frequency of the Klein–Gordon oscillator on the quantum numbers of the system is shown. - Highlights: • Interaction between the Klein–Gordon oscillator and a modified mass term. • Relativistic bound states for both attractive and repulsive Coulomb-type potentials. • Dependence of the Klein–Gordon oscillator frequency on the quantum numbers. • Relativistic analogue of a position-dependent mass system.

  19. Fermi-edge transmission resonance in graphene driven by a single Coulomb impurity.

    PubMed

    Karnatak, Paritosh; Goswami, Srijit; Kochat, Vidya; Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-07-11

    The interaction between the Fermi sea of conduction electrons and a nonadiabatic attractive impurity potential can lead to a power-law divergence in the tunneling probability of charge through the impurity. The resulting effect, known as the Fermi edge singularity (FES), constitutes one of the most fundamental many-body phenomena in quantum solid state physics. Here we report the first observation of FES for Dirac fermions in graphene driven by isolated Coulomb impurities in the conduction channel. In high-mobility graphene devices on hexagonal boron nitride substrates, the FES manifests in abrupt changes in conductance with a large magnitude ≈e(2)/h at resonance, indicating total many-body screening of a local Coulomb impurity with fluctuating charge occupancy. Furthermore, we exploit the extreme sensitivity of graphene to individual Coulomb impurities and demonstrate a new defect-spectroscopy tool to investigate strongly correlated phases in graphene in the quantum Hall regime. PMID:25062215

  20. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-09-01

    The term "Coulombic viscosity" is introduced here to define an empirically observed phenomenon from experiments conducted in both microgravity, and in ground-based 1-g conditions. In the latter case, a sand attrition device was employed to test the longevity of aeolian materials by creating two intersecting grain-circulation paths or cells that would lead to most of the grain energy being expended on grain-to-grain collisions (simulating dune systems). In the areas in the device where gravitationally-driven grain-slurries recycled the sand, the slurries moved with a boundary-layer impeded motion down the chamber walls. Excessive electrostatic charging of the grains during these experiments was prevented by the use of an a.c. corona (created by a Tesla coil) through which the grains passed on every cycle. This created both positive and negative ions which neutralized the triboelectrically-generated grain charges. When the corona was switched on, the velocity of the wall-attached slurries increased by a factor of two as approximately determined by direct observation. What appeared to be a freely-flowing slurry of grains impeded only by intergranular mechanical friction, had obviously been significantly retarded in its motion by electrostatic forces between the grains; with the charging reduced, the grains were able to move past one another without a flow "viscosity" imposed by the Coulombic intergranular forces. A similar phenomenon was observed during microgravity experiments aboard Space Shuttle in USML-1 & USML-2 spacelabs where freely-suspended clouds of sand were being investigated for their potential to for-m aggregates. In this environment, the grains were also charged electrostatically (by natural processes prior to flight), but were free from the intervention of gravity in their interactions. The grains were dispersed into dense clouds by bursts of air turbulence and allowed to form aggregates as the ballistic and turbulent motions damped out. During this

  1. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The term "Coulombic viscosity" is introduced here to define an empirically observed phenomenon from experiments conducted in both microgravity, and in ground-based 1-g conditions. In the latter case, a sand attrition device was employed to test the longevity of aeolian materials by creating two intersecting grain-circulation paths or cells that would lead to most of the grain energy being expended on grain-to-grain collisions (simulating dune systems). In the areas in the device where gravitationally-driven grain-slurries recycled the sand, the slurries moved with a boundary-layer impeded motion down the chamber walls. Excessive electrostatic charging of the grains during these experiments was prevented by the use of an a.c. corona (created by a Tesla coil) through which the grains passed on every cycle. This created both positive and negative ions which neutralized the triboelectrically-generated grain charges. When the corona was switched on, the velocity of the wall-attached slurries increased by a factor of two as approximately determined by direct observation. What appeared to be a freely-flowing slurry of grains impeded only by intergranular mechanical friction, had obviously been significantly retarded in its motion by electrostatic forces between the grains; with the charging reduced, the grains were able to move past one another without a flow "viscosity" imposed by the Coulombic intergranular forces. A similar phenomenon was observed during microgravity experiments aboard Space Shuttle in USML-1 & USML-2 spacelabs where freely-suspended clouds of sand were being investigated for their potential to for-m aggregates. In this environment, the grains were also charged electrostatically (by natural processes prior to flight), but were free from the intervention of gravity in their interactions. The grains were dispersed into dense clouds by bursts of air turbulence and allowed to form aggregates as the ballistic and turbulent motions damped out. During this

  2. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Dyall, Kenneth G; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-21

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  3. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Dyall, Kenneth G.; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  4. Coulomb excitation of a {sup 78}Rb radioactive beam.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.

    1998-11-18

    In order to test the feasibility of Coulomb excitation of radioactive projectiles with low beam energies and intensities, they have produced a secondary radioactive beam of {sup 78}Rb and Coulomb re-excited it. The beam was produced in the fusion evaporation reaction {sup 24}Mg({sup 58}Ni,3pn){sup 78}Rb at a beam energy of 260 MeV, using the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS accelerator. The residues of interest were separated from other reaction products and non-interacting beam using the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA). The beam leaving the FMA was {sup 78}Kr and {sup 78}Rb{sup gs,m1,m2}, which was refocused onto a {sup 58}Ni secondary target. They have extracted a spectrum of {gamma}-rays associated with re-excitation of A = 78 isobars. The re-excitation of stable {sup 78}Kr was observed, which serves as a reference. Gamma-rays associated with excitation of {sup 78}Rb{sup gs,m1,m2} were also seen. The measured yields indicate that all the {sup 78}Rb states are highly deformed.

  5. Coulomb effects on pions produced in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.

    1981-11-01

    Double differential cross sections for the production of ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ near the velocity of the incident beam for pion lab angles less than 40 degrees are presented. The experimental apparatus and the techniques are discussed. Beams of /sup 20/Ne with E/A from 80 to 655 MeV and /sup 40/Ar with E/A = 535 MeV incident on Be, C, NaF, KC1, Cu, and U targets were used. A sharp peak in the ..pi../sup -/ spectrum and a depression in the ..pi../sup +/ spectrum were observed at zero degrees near the incident beam velocity. The effect is explained in terms of Coulomb interactions between the pions and fragments of the incident beam. Least squares fits to the data using the Coulomb correction formulas of Gyulassy and Kauffman and an effective projectile fragment charge are made. The relationship between these data and previously measured pion production and projectile fragmentation data is discussed. The data are also compared to some theoretical models. A simple expression is given for the differential cross section as a function of the projectile mass, target mass, and beam energy.

  6. Coulomb correlations in the honeycomb lattice: Role of translation symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Ansgar; Wu, Wei

    2013-05-01

    The effect of Coulomb correlations in the half-filled Hubbard model of the honeycomb lattice is studied within the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) combined with exact diagonalization (ED) and continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), for unit cells consisting of six-site rings. The important difference between this approach and the previously employed cluster dynamical mean-field theory (CDMFT) is that DCA preserves the translation symmetry of the system, while CDMFT violates this symmetry. As the Dirac cones of the honeycomb lattice are the consequence of perfect long-range order, DCA yields semimetallic behavior at small on-site Coulomb interactions U, whereas CDMFT gives rise to a spurious excitation gap even for very small U. This basic difference between the two cluster approaches is found regardless of whether ED or QMC is used as the impurity solver. At larger values of U, the lack of translation symmetry becomes less important, so that the CDMFT reveals a Mott gap, in qualitative agreement with large-scale QMC calculations. In contrast, the semimetallic phase obtained in DCA persists even at U values where CDMFT and large-scale QMC consistently show Mott-insulating behavior.

  7. Coulomb dissociation of {sup 27} P

    SciTech Connect

    Beceiro, S.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Suemmerer, K.

    2010-04-26

    The {sup 26}Al nucleus has a shorter life-time than the Universe showing that the nucleosynthesis of this element might be an ongoing process in stars. The reaction {sup 26}Si(p,gamma){sup 27} P competes with the production of {sup 26}Al. Coulomb dissociation of {sup 27} P is an indirect method to measure that reaction. An experiment was performed at GSI with a {sup 36}Ar primary beam at 500 MeV to measure this reaction.

  8. Dynamics of Coulombic and gravitational periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Miller, Bruce N

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics and the phase-space structures of Coulombic and self-gravitating versions of the classical one-dimensional three-body system with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate that such a three-body system may be reduced isomorphically to a spatially periodic system of a single particle experiencing a two-dimensional potential on a rhombic plane. For the case of both Coulombic and gravitational versions, exact expressions of the Hamiltonian have been derived in rhombic coordinates. We simulate the phase-space evolution through an event-driven algorithm that utilizes analytic solutions to the equations of motion. The simulation results show that the motion exhibits chaotic, quasiperiodic, and periodic behaviors in segmented regions of the phase space. While there is no evidence of global chaos in either the Coulombic or the gravitational system, the former exhibits a transition from a completely nonchaotic phase space at low energies to a mixed behavior. Gradual yet striking transitions from mild to intense chaos are indicated with changing energy, a behavior that differentiates the spatially periodic systems studied in this Rapid Communication from the well-understood free-boundary versions of the three-body problem. Our treatment of the three-body systems opens avenues for analysis of the dynamical properties exhibited by spatially periodic versions of various classes of systems studied in plasma and gravitational physics as well as in cosmology. PMID:27176238

  9. Dynamics of Coulombic and gravitational periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Miller, Bruce N.

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics and the phase-space structures of Coulombic and self-gravitating versions of the classical one-dimensional three-body system with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate that such a three-body system may be reduced isomorphically to a spatially periodic system of a single particle experiencing a two-dimensional potential on a rhombic plane. For the case of both Coulombic and gravitational versions, exact expressions of the Hamiltonian have been derived in rhombic coordinates. We simulate the phase-space evolution through an event-driven algorithm that utilizes analytic solutions to the equations of motion. The simulation results show that the motion exhibits chaotic, quasiperiodic, and periodic behaviors in segmented regions of the phase space. While there is no evidence of global chaos in either the Coulombic or the gravitational system, the former exhibits a transition from a completely nonchaotic phase space at low energies to a mixed behavior. Gradual yet striking transitions from mild to intense chaos are indicated with changing energy, a behavior that differentiates the spatially periodic systems studied in this Rapid Communication from the well-understood free-boundary versions of the three-body problem. Our treatment of the three-body systems opens avenues for analysis of the dynamical properties exhibited by spatially periodic versions of various classes of systems studied in plasma and gravitational physics as well as in cosmology.

  10. Interdot Coulomb correlation effects and spin-orbit coupling in two carbon nanotube quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen-Hua; Kuang, Xiao-Yu Zhong, Ming-Min; Shao, Peng; Li, Hui

    2014-01-28

    Transport properties of the two-level Kondo effect involving spin, orbital, and pseudospin degrees of freedom are examined in a parallel carbon nanotube double quantum dot with a sufficient interdot Coulomb interaction and small interdot tunneling. The interdot Coulomb correlation effects are taken into account, and it plays an important role in forming bonding and antibonding states. Attached to ferromagnetic leads, the Kondo effect is observed at the interdot Coulomb blockade region with degeneracy of spin, orbital, and pseudospin degrees of freedom. A crossover from a two-level Kondo state involving the fivefold degeneracy of the double quantum dots to an SU(4) spin-orbit Kondo state and to an SU(2) spin-Kondo effect is demonstrated. At finite magnetic field, the splitting of the spin, orbital, and pseudospin Kondo resonance can be restored. For finite intradot Coulomb interaction U, there is a competition between the single-dot Kondo effect and the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J{sub AFM}, resulting in the suppression of the Kondo resonance. Moreover, both the J{sub AFM} and the Zeeman interactions compete, leading to need a much higher value of the magnetic field to compensate for the Kondo splitting.

  11. Neutron scattering studies of short-range order, atomic displacements, and effective pair interactions in a null-matrix Ni0.5262Pt0.48 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. A.; Moss, S. C.; Robertson, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Neumann, D. A.; Major, J.

    2006-09-01

    The best known exception to the Heine-Sampson and Bieber-Gauthier arguments for ordering effects in transition metal alloys (similar to the Hume-Rothery rules) is a NiPt alloy, whose phase diagram is similar to that of the CuAu system. Using neutron scattering we have investigated the local atomic order in a null-matrix Ni0.5262Pt0.48 single crystal. In a null-matrix alloy, the isotopic composition is adjusted so that the average neutron scattering length vanishes ( Ni62 has a negative scattering length nearly equal in magnitude to that of Pt). Consequently, all contributions to the total scattering depending on the average lattice are suppressed. The only remaining components of the elastic scattering are the short-range order (SRO) and size effect terms. These data permit the extraction of the SRO parameters (concentration-concentration correlations) as well as the displacement parameters (concentration-displacement correlations). Using the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss theory, we obtain the effective pair interactions (EPIs) between near neighbors in the alloy. The results can be used by theorists to model the alloy in the context of the electronic theory of alloy phase stability, including a preliminary evaluation of the local species-dependent displacements. Our maps of V(q) , the Fourier transform of the EPIs, show very similar shapes in the experimental and reconstructed data. This is of importance when comparing to electronic structure calculations.

  12. WITNESSING THE KEY EARLY PHASE OF QUASAR EVOLUTION: AN OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIR IN THE INTERACTING GALAXY IRAS 20210+1121

    SciTech Connect

    Piconcelli, Enrico; Fiore, Fabrizio; Maiolino, Roberto; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Vignali, Cristian; Bianchi, Stefano; Mathur, Smita; Guainazzi, Matteo; Lanzuisi, Giorgio

    2010-10-20

    We report the discovery of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair in the interacting galaxy system IRAS 20210+1121 at z = 0.056. An XMM-Newton observation reveals the presence of an obscured (N {sub H} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}), Seyfert-like (L {sub 2-10keV} = 4.7 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) nucleus in the northern galaxy, which lacks unambiguous optical AGN signatures. Our spectral analysis also provides strong evidence that the IR-luminous southern galaxy hosts a Type 2 quasar embedded in a bright starburst emission. In particular, the X-ray primary continuum from the nucleus appears totally depressed in the XMM-Newton band as expected in the case of a Compton-thick absorber, and only the emission produced by Compton scattering ('reflection') of the continuum from circumnuclear matter is seen. As such, IRAS 20210+1121 seems to provide an excellent opportunity to witness a key, early phase in the quasar evolution predicted by the theoretical models of quasar activation by galaxy collisions.

  13. Investigation of quantum phase transitions in the spdf interacting boson model based on dual algebraic structures for the four-level pairing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Jalili Majarshin, A.; Fouladi, N.; Ghapanvari, M.

    2016-09-01

    The building blocks of the interacting boson model (IBM) are associated with both s and d bosons for positive parity states. An extension of sd-IBM along these models to spdf-IBM can provide the appropriate framework to describe negative parity states. In this paper, a solvable extended transitional Hamiltonian based on the affine \\widehat{{SU}(1,1)} Lie algebra is proposed to describe low lying positive and negative parity states between the spherical and deformed gamma-unstable shape. Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) are investigated based on dual algebraic structures for the four-level pairing model. Numerical extraction to low-lying energy levels and transition rates within the control parameters of this evaluated Hamiltonian are presented for various N values. By reproducing the experimental results, the method based on the signatures of the phase transition, such as the expectation value of the boson number operators in the lowest excited states, are used to provide a better description of Ru isotopes in this transitional region.

  14. Interaction of an anti-cancer photosensitizer with a genomic DNA: From base pair specificity and thermodynamic landscape to tuning the rate of detergent-sequestered dissociation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-05-15

    A detailed characterization of the binding interaction of a potent cancer cell photosensitizer, norharmane (NHM) with a genomic DNA (herring sperm; hsDNA) is undertaken with particular emphasis on deciphering the strength, mode, dynamics, energetics and kinetics of binding. A major focus of the study underlies a successful exploration of the concept of detergent-sequestered dissociation of drug from the drug-DNA complex. Biophysical techniques such as absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, DNA helix melting, stopped-flow fluorescence kinetics and calorimetry have been used. A primarily intercalative mode of binding of NHM with DNA is shown. However, the overall interaction is governed by more than one type of binding forces. We demonstrate that the essential prerequisite of a slower dissociation rate of drug from DNA helix is achieved by tenable choice surfactants. Our results also highlight an effective tunability of the rate of dissociation of the DNA-intercalated drug via detergent-sequestration. A detailed isothermal titration calorimetric study unveils the key role of hydrophobic force underlying NHM-hsDNA association. This is further substantiated by the enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior. The major entropic contribution in detergent-induced dissociation of NHM from NHM-hsDNA complex is also demonstrated. Our results present not only a comprehensive structural and thermodynamic profile, base pair specificity, association kinetics for binding of NHM with DNA but also explore the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of dissociation of bound drug. Characterization and tuning of the essential prerequisites for a drug to be efficient in anti-cancer functionality bear direct and widespread significance in contemporary global research. PMID:26945117

  15. Nonlinear organic plasmonics: Applications to optical control of Coulomb blocking in nanojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Fainberg, B. D.; Li, G.

    2015-08-03

    Purely organic materials with negative and near-zero dielectric permittivity can be easily fabricated. Here, we develop a theory of nonlinear non-steady-state organic plasmonics with strong laser pulses that enable us to obtain near-zero dielectric permittivity during a short time. Our consideration is based on the model of the interaction of strong (phase modulated) laser pulse with organic molecules developed by one of the authors before, extended to the dipole-dipole intermolecular interactions in the condensed matter. We have proposed to use non-steady-state organic plasmonics for the enhancement of intersite dipolar energy-transfer interaction in the quantum dot wire that influences on electron transport through nanojunctions. Such interactions can compensate Coulomb repulsions for particular conditions. We propose the exciton control of Coulomb blocking in the quantum dot wire based on the non-steady-state near-zero dielectric permittivity of the organic host medium.

  16. Gauge symmetry, chirality and parity effects in four-particle systems: Coulomb's law as a universal function for diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Van Hooydonk, G

    2000-11-01

    Following recent work in search for a universal function (Van Hooydonk, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., (1999), 1617), we test four symmetric +/- a(n)Rn potentials for reproducing molecular potential energy curves (PECs). Classical gauge symmetry for 1/R-potentials results in generic left right asymmetric PECs. A pair of symmetric perturbed Coulomb potentials is quantitatively in accordance with observed PECs. For a bond, a four-particle system, charge inversion (a parity effect, atom chirality) is the key to explain this shape generically. A parity adapted Hamiltonian reduces from ten to two terms and to a soluble Bohr-like formula, a Kratzer (1 - Re/R)2 potential. The result is similar to the combined action of spin and wave function symmetry upon the Hamiltonian in Heitler-London theory. Analytical perturbed Coulomb functions varying with (1 - Re/R) scale attractive and repulsive branches of PECs for 13 bonds H2, HF, LiH, KH, AuH, Li2, LiF, KLi, NaCs, Rb2, RbCs, Cs2 and I2 in a single straight line. The 400 turning points for 13 bonds are reproduced with a deviation of 0.007 A at both branches. For 230 points at the repulsive side, the deviation is 0.003 A. The perturbed electrostatic Coulomb law is a universal molecular function. Ab initio zero molecular parameter functions give PECs of acceptable quality, just using atomic ionisation energies. The function can be used as a model potential for inverting levels and gives a first principle's comparison of short- and long-range interactions, important for the study of cold atoms. Wave-packet dynamics, femto-chemistry applied to the crossing of covalent and ionic curves, can provide evidence for this theory. We anticipate this scale/shape invariant scheme applies to smaller scales in nuclear and high-energy particle physics. For larger gravitational scales (Newton 1/R potentials), problems with super-unification are discussed. Reactions between hydrogen and antihydrogen, feasible in the near future, will probably produce

  17. Gauge symmetry, chirality and parity effects in four-particle systems: Coulomb's law as a universal function for diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hooydonk, G.

    2000-11-01

    Following recent work in search for a universal function (Van Hooydonk, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., (1999), 1617), we test four symmetric ± anRn potentials for reproducing molecular potential energy curves (PECs). Classical gauge symmetry for 1/ R-potentials results in generic left-right asymmetric PECs. A pair of symmetric perturbed Coulomb potentials is quantitatively in accordance with observed PECs. For a bond, a four-particle system, charge inversion (a parity effect, atom chirality) is the key to explain this shape generically. A parity adapted Hamiltonian reduces from ten to two terms and to a soluble Bohr-like formula, a Kratzer (1- Re/ R) 2 potential. The result is similar to the combined action of spin and wave function symmetry upon the Hamiltonian in Heitler-London theory. Analytical perturbed Coulomb functions varying with (1- Re/ R) scale attractive and repulsive branches of PECs for 13 bonds H 2, HF, LiH, KH, AuH, Li 2, LiF, KLi, NaCs, Rb 2, RbCs, Cs 2 and I 2 in a single straight line. The 400 turning points for 13 bonds are reproduced with a deviation of 0.007 Å at both branches. For 230 points at the repulsive side, the deviation is 0.003 Å. The perturbed electrostatic Coulomb law is a universal molecular function. Ab initio zero molecular parameter functions give PECs of acceptable quality, just using atomic ionisation energies. The function can be used as a model potential for inverting levels and gives a first principle's comparison of short- and long-range interactions, important for the study of cold atoms. Wave-packet dynamics, femto-chemistry applied to the crossing of covalent and ionic curves, can provide evidence for this theory. We anticipate this scale/shape invariant scheme applies to smaller scales in nuclear and high-energy particle physics. For larger gravitational scales (Newton 1/ R potentials), problems with super-unification are discussed. Reactions between hydrogen and antihydrogen, feasible in the near future, will probably

  18. Self-aligned placement of biologically synthesized Coulomb islands within nanogap electrodes for single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Yoshii, Shigeo; Matsukawa, Nozomu; Nishio, Kazuaki; Tsukamoto, Rikako; Yamashita, Ichiro

    2009-02-01

    Biological synthesis and self-aligned placement of a Coulomb island was demonstrated for single electron transistor (SET) fabrication using a cage-shaped protein, apoferritin. Homogenous ϕ7 nm Co3O4 and In oxide nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized utilizing the apoferritin cavity as a spatially restricted chemical reaction chamber. Apoferritin accommodating a NP (Co3O4, In oxide) showed specific affinity to a Ti surface and self-aligned itself between a pair of Au/Ti nanogap electrodes. After the protein cage was eliminated, two tunnel junctions between the NP and each electrode had the same gap, thereby forming an ideal SET structure. The produced SET exhibited a Coulomb-staircase/oscillation at 4.2 K.

  19. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  20. Pairing Properties of Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Pairing properties of even-even superheavy N=184 isotones are studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS approach. In the particle-hole channel we take the Skyrme energy density functional SLy4, while in the particle-particle channel we employ the seniority pairing force and zero-range delta-interactions with different forms of density dependence. We conclude that the calculated static fission trajectories weakly depend on the specific form of the delta-pairing interaction. We also investigate the impact of triaxiality on the inner fission barrier and find a rather strong Z dependence of the effect.