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Sample records for paired cut-wire arrays

  1. Incidence dependence of negative index in asymmetric cut wire pairs metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Lepetit, Thomas; Lustrac, André de

    2009-11-01

    Metamaterials made of asymmetric cut wire pairs have experimentally demonstrated a negative refractive index at microwave frequencies. In this letter, we begin by presenting the analogy between asymmetric cut wire pairs and S-shaped metamaterials by a simple unifying approach. Then, using simulations and experiments in the microwave domain, we investigate the dependence of resonances and retrieved effective index on the incident angle in asymmetric cut wire pairs. While it is found that resonances shift in frequency with increasing oblique incidence in the E-plane, it is shown that the structure is angle-independent in the H-plane.

  2. Symmetry breaking in metallic cut wire pairs metamaterials for negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Sellier, Alexandre; Kanté, Boubacar; de Lustrac, André

    2009-05-01

    Metamaterials made of exclusively metallic cut wire pairs have been experimentally demonstrated to exhibit a negative refractive index at optical frequencies. However, other related works have not shown a negative index. In this paper, we propose an easy way to manipulate the magnetic and electric resonances of these metamaterials to produce a negative index. We show that judiciously breaking the symmetry of the structure allows tuning of both resonances leading to an overlapping between the negative permeability and negative permittivity regions. Numerical and experimental parametric studies of several cut wire pairs metamaterials are presented to validate our method at microwave frequencies.

  3. Triple negative permeability band in plasmon-hybridized cut-wire-pair metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy, V. T. T.; Viet, D. T.; Hieu, N. V.; Lee, Y. P.; Lam, V. D.; Tung, N. T.

    2010-11-01

    We expand the picture of plasmon hybridization in metamagnetic structure via numerically studying the electromagnetic coupling in the metallic cut-wire-pair super cells. It is shown that a triple negative permeability band can be achieved by systematically controlling the plasmon hybridization in such the structure. The corresponding transmission properties as well as the electromagnetic responses of the plasmon-hybridized structures were presented by using the finite integration technique simulations. Our results would reveal a promising design to obtain the multiple negative refractions based on the combination of hybridized cut-wire-pairs and continuous wires.

  4. Negative refractive index metamaterials using only metallic cut wires.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Alexandre; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Kanté, Boubacar; de Lustrac, André

    2009-04-13

    We present, design and analyze a novel planar Left-Handed (LH) metamaterial at microwave frequencies. This metamaterial is composed of only metallic cut wires and is used under normal-to-plane incidence. Using Finite Element Method (FEM) based simulations and microwave experiments, we have investigated the material properties of the structure. Simultaneous negative values are observed for the permittivity epsilon and permeability mu by the inversion method from the transmission and reflection responses. A negative index n is verified in a bulk prism engineered by stacking several layers of the metamaterial. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of a LH metamaterial composed of only cut wires.

  5. Photon-pair generation in arrays of cubic nonlinear waveguides.

    PubMed

    Solntsev, Alexander S; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-11-19

    We study photon-pair generation in arrays of cubic nonlinear waveguides through spontaneous four-wave mixing. We analyze numerically the quantum statistics of photon pairs at the array output as a function of waveguide dispersion and pump beam power. We show flexible spatial quantum state control such as pump-power-controlled transition between bunching and anti-bunching correlations due to nonlinear self-focusing.

  6. Thermally tunable electric mie resonance of dielectric cut-wire type metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Chen, Lei; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Qian; He, Xuan; Chen, Ke

    2014-10-20

    In this manuscript, we present on a thermally tunable electric Mie resonance of dielectric cut-wire type metamaterial. Dielectric cut-wire exhibits Lorentz-type frequency dependent negative effective permittivity followed by zero value around its fundamental Mie resonance, resulting from dipole-oscillation of displacement currents. Furthermore, the operation frequency of electric resonance frequency can be varied by wire length and temperature variation. As environmental temperature changes by 40 °C, electric Mie resonance can be reversibly tuned by 1000 MHz, due to the thermal dependent permittivity character of ceramic.

  7. Designing an efficient rectifying cut-wire metasurface for electromagnetic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumbé Tékam, Gabin T.; Ginis, Vincent; Danckaert, Jan; Tassin, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic energy harvesting, i.e., capturing energy from ambient microwave signals, may become an essential part in extending the battery lifetime of wearable devices. Here, we present a design of a microwave energy harvester based on a cut-wire metasurface with an integrated PN junction diode. The cut wire with a quasistatic electric-dipole moment is designed to have a resonance at 6.75 GHz, leading to a substantial cross-section for absorption. The external microwaves create a unidirectional current through the rectifying action of the integrated diode. Using an electrical-circuit model, we design the operating frequency and the resistive load of the cut wire. Subsequently, by optimizing our design using full-wave numerical simulations, we obtain an energy harvesting efficiency of 50% for incident power densities in agreement with the typical power density of WiFi signals. Finally, we study the effect of connecting adjacent unit cells of the metasurface in parallel by a thin highly inductive wire and we demonstrate that this allows for the collection of current from all individual cells, while the microwave resonance of the unit cell is not significantly altered, thus solving the wiring problem that arises in many nonlinear metamaterials.

  8. Cell pairing using microwell array electrodes based on dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Tomita, Masahiro; Mizutani, Fumio; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-15

    We report a simple device with an array of 10,000 (100 × 100) microwells for producing vertical pairs of cells in individual microwells with a rapid manipulation based on positive dielectrophoresis (p-DEP). The areas encircled with micropoles which fabricated from an electrical insulating photosensitive polymer were used as microwells. The width (14 μm) and depth (25 μm) of the individual microwells restricted the size to two vertically aligned cells. The DEP device for the manipulation of cells consisted of a microfluidic channel with an upper indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and a lower microwell array electrode fabricated on an ITO substrate. Mouse myeloma cells stained in green were trapped within 1 s in the microwells by p-DEP by applying an alternating current voltage between the upper ITO and the lower microwell array electrode. The cells were retained inside the wells even after switching off the voltage and washing with a fluidic flow. Other myeloma cells stained in blue were then trapped in the microwells occupied by the cells stained in green to form the vertical cell pairing in the microwells. Cells stained in different colors were paired within only 1 min and a pairing efficiency of over 50% was achieved.

  9. Plasmon switching effect based on graphene nanoribbon pair arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Wu, Lingxi; Liu, Qiong; Zhou, Renlong; Xie, Suxia; Chen, Jiangjiamin; Wu, Mengxiong; Zeng, Lisan

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the existence of plasmon switching effect in graphene nanostructure. By using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the plasmon resonance modes are studied in graphene nanoribbon pair arrays with the change of Fermi level, graphene width, and carrier mobility. It is found that the Fermi level and graphene width play an important role in changing the distribution of electric energy on different graphene nanoribbons, resulting in a significant plasmon switching effect. Moreover, we study the characteristic of resonance mode of one graphene ribbon by using glass rod with different shape. The effect of kerr material sandwiched between graphene nanoribbon pair is also considered.

  10. Cell pairing using a dielectrophoresis-based device with interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Şen, Mustafa; Ino, Kosuke; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2013-09-21

    We present a chip device with an array of 900 gourd-shaped microwells designed to pair single cells of different types. The device consists of interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes and uses positive dielectrophoresis to trap cells within the microwells. Each side of a microwell is on a different comb of the IDA, so that cells of different types are trapped on opposite sides of the microwells, leading to close cell pairing. Using this device, a large number of cell pairs can be formed easily and rapidly, making it a highly attractive tool for controllable cell pairing in a range of biological applications.

  11. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  12. Localized suffix array and its application to genome mapping problems for paired-end short reads.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kouichi; Koike, Asako

    2009-10-01

    We introduce a new data structure, a localized suffix array, based on which occurrence information is dynamically represented as the combination of global positional information and local lexicographic order information in text search applications. For the search of a pair of words within a given distance, many candidate positions that share a coarse-grained global position can be compactly represented in term of local lexicographic orders as in the conventional suffix array, and they can be simultaneously examined for violation of the distance constraint at the coarse-grained resolution. Trade-off between the positional and lexicographical information is progressively shifted towards finer positional resolution, and the distance constraint is reexamined accordingly. Thus the paired search can be efficiently performed even if there are a large number of occurrences for each word. The localized suffix array itself is in fact a reordering of bits inside the conventional suffix array, and their memory requirements are essentially the same. We demonstrate an application to genome mapping problems for paired-end short reads generated by new-generation DNA sequencers. When paired reads are highly repetitive, it is time-consuming to naïvely calculate, sort, and compare all of the coordinates. For a human genome re-sequencing data of 36 base pairs, more than 10 times speedups over the naïve method were observed in almost half of the cases where the sums of redundancies (number of individual occurrences) of paired reads were greater than 2,000.

  13. Enhanced extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of bridged nanohole pairs and their sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Li, Jingqi; Wu, Ying; Chen, Longqing; Ooi, Boon; Wang, Xianbin; Zhang, Xi-Xiang

    2014-06-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of gold nanoholes was studied with light across the visible to the near-infrared spectrum. The EOT effect was found to be improved by bridging pairs of nanoholes due to the concentration of the electromagnetic field in the slit between the holes. The geometrical shape and separation of the holes in these pairs of nanoholes affected the intensity of the transmission and the wavelength of resonance. Changing the geometrical shapes of these nanohole pairs from triangles to circles to squares leads to increased transmission intensity as well as red-shifting resonance wavelengths. The performance of bridged nanohole pairs as a plasmonic sensor was investigated. The bridged nanohole pairs were able to distinguish methanol, olive oil and microscope immersion oil for the different surface plasmon resonance in transmission spectra. Numerical simulation results were in agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Deformable L-shaped microwell array for trapping pairs of heterogeneous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kang, AhRan; Takayama, Shuichi; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-03-01

    To study cell-to-cell interactions, there has been a continuous demand on developing microsystems for trapping pairs of two different cells in microwell arrays. Here, we propose an L-shaped microwell (L-microwell) array that relies on the elasticity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate for trapping and pairing heterogeneous cells. We designed an L-microwell suitable for trapping single cell in each branch via stretching/releasing the PDMS substrate, and also performed 3D time-dependent diffusion simulations to visualize how cell-secreted molecules diffuse in the L-microwell and communicate with the partner cell. The computational results showed that the secreted molecule first contacted the partner cell after 35 min, and the secreted molecule fully covered the partner cell in 4 h (when referenced to 10% of the secreted molecular concentration). The molecules that diffused to the outside of the L-microwell were significantly diluted by the bulk solution, which prevented unwanted cellular communication between neighboring L-microwells. We produced over 5000 cell pairs in one 2.25 cm2 array with about 30 000 L-microwells. The proposed L-microwell array offers a versatile and convenient cell pairing method to investigate cell-to-cell interactions in, for example, cell fusion, immune reactions, and cancer metastasis.

  15. One-dimensional Josephson arrays as superlattices for single Cooper pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, A. A.

    1996-07-01

    We investigate uniform one-dimensional arrays of small Josephson junctions [EJ<>1 is the screening length in units of the lattice constant of the array). At low energies this system can be described in terms of interacting Bose particles (extra single Cooper pairs) on the lattice. With increasing concentration ν of extra Cooper pairs, a crossover from the Bose gas phase to the Wigner crystal phase and then to the superlattice regime occurs. The phase diagram in the superlattice regime consists of commensurable insulating phases with ν=1/l (l is integer) separated by superconducting regions where the current is carried by excitations with fractional electric charge q=+/-2e/l. The Josephson current through a ring-shaped array pierced by magnetic flux is calculated for all of the phases.

  16. One-dimensional Josephson arrays as superlattices for single Cooper pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, Arkadi

    1996-03-01

    We investigate uniform one-dimensional arrays of small Josephson junctions (EJ << E_C, EC = (2e)^2/2C) with a realistic Coulomb interaction U(x) = EC λ exp( - |x|/λ) (here λ >> 1 is the screening length in units of the lattice constant of the array). At low energies this system can be described in terms of interacting Bose particles (extra single Cooper pairs) on the lattice. With increasing concentration ν of extra Cooper pairs, a crossover from the Bose gas phase to the Wigner crystal phase and then to the superlattice regime occurs. The phase diagram in the superlattice regime consists of commensurable insulating phases with ν = 1/l (l is integer) separated by superconducting regions where the current is carried by excitations with fractional electric charge q = ± 2e/l. The Josephson current through a ring-shaped array pierced by magnetic flux is calculated for all of the phases.

  17. Plasmon resonances in a stacked pair of graphene ribbon arrays with a lateral displacement.

    PubMed

    He, Meng-Dong; Zhang, Gui; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Jian-Bo; Wang, Xin-Jun; Huang, Zhen-Rong; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2014-03-24

    We find that a stacked pair of graphene ribbon arrays with a lateral displacement can excite plasmon waveguide mode in the gap between ribbons, as well as surface plasmon mode on graphene ribbon surface. When the resonance wavelengthes of plasmon waveguide mode and surface plasmon mode are close to each other, there is a strong electromagnetic interaction between the two modes, and then they contribute together to transmission dip. The plasmon waveguide mode resonance can be manipulated by the lateral displacement and longitudinal interval between arrays due to their influence on the manner and strength of electromagnetic coupling between two arrays. The findings expand our understanding of electromagnetic resonances in graphene-ribbon array structure and may affect further engineering of nanoplasmonic devices and metamaterials.

  18. Numerical analysis of complex impedance and microwave absorption of metamaterials composed of split cut wires on grounded dielectric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun-Hee; Liu, Tian; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2014-06-01

    The microwave absorption of metamaterials composed of split cut wire (SCW) on grounded dielectric substrate has been investigated on the basis of equivalent transmission line circuit. S-parameters (S 11 and S 21) and input impedance are numerically simulated with variations of the thickness and dielectric loss of the substrate and the geometry of the SCW. Magnetic resonance resulting from antiparallel currents between SCW and ground plane was observed at the frequency of minimum reflection loss. The simulated resonance frequency and reflection loss can be explained well on the basis of the circuit theory of an LC resonator. Analysis of the input impedance of the high impedance surface has shown that perfect absorption can be obtained at the optimized impedance-matching condition, which is dependent on SCW width, thickness and the dielectric loss of the substrate. Better insight into the absorption mechanism of metamaterial absorbers can be attained through the parametric analysis on complex impedance of SCW and its relationship with reflection loss.

  19. Observation of pair tunneling and coherent destruction of tunneling in arrays of optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Valiente, Manuel; Goldman, Nathan; Spracklen, Alexander; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Thomson, Robert R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the experimental realization of a photonic system that simulates the one-dimensional two-particle Hubbard model. This analogy is realized by means of two-dimensional arrays of coupled optical waveguides, fabricated using femtosecond laser inscription. By tuning the analogous "interaction strength," we reach the strongly interacting regime of the Hubbard Hamiltonian, and demonstrate the suppression of standard tunneling for individual "particles." In this regime the formation of bound states is identified through the direct observation of pair tunneling. We then demonstrate the coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for the paired particles in the presence of an engineered oscillating force of high frequency. The precise control over the analogous "interaction strength" and driving force offered by our experimental system opens an exciting route towards quantum simulation of few-body physics in photonics.

  20. Performance of the linear array HPV genotyping test on paired cytological and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ronchetti, Livia; Giuliani, Massimo; Carosi, Mariantonia; Rollo, Francesca; Congiu, Mario; Mazza, Domenica; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Vocaturo, Amina; Benevolo, Maria

    2013-05-01

    Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus (HPV) from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples may be difficult when using assays based on amplification of large fragments. The objective of the present study was to investigate the performance of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array) on FFPE cervical cone biopsy specimens using paired cytologic samples obtained immediately before the conization as a criterion standard. Thirty-nine samples of grade 2 or higher cervical intraepithelial neoplasia were selected; all of the corresponding cytological samples were positive by the Linear Array and had a report of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or worse. A valid Linear Array test result was obtained for 38 FFPE specimens (97.4%, 95% CI 88.0 to 99.9). Specifically, 34 were HPV-positive (89.5%, 95% CI 76.5 to 96.9) and 4 were HPV-negative (10.5%, 95% CI 3.4 to 23.5). The overall agreement of the results obtained for the cytologic and histologic paired samples was good (Cohen's κ = 0.85, SE = 0.082, P = 0.000). Further analysis of samples with negative or invalid Linear Array test results, both modifying the nucleic acids extraction protocol and using the INNO-LiPA assay, suggested that failure of the Linear Array test in HPV detection from tissues was probably due to DNA fragmentation. Parallel analysis of paired FFPE and cytologic samples is extremely useful for evaluation of the efficiency of PCR-based assays in HPV detection and genotyping from tissue samples. In the present study, false-negative results were obtained in a limited percentage of cases, our data depicting the successful performance of the Linear Array test on FFPE samples.

  1. Optics system design applying a micro-prism array of a single lens stereo image pair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Yue; Yang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Wen-Shing

    2008-09-29

    In this study we apply a micro-prism array technique to enable a single lens CCD to capture a stereo image for the simulation of double lens vision. A micro-prism array plate serves as the basis for design, which also improves the lightweight and portability of the overall system in addition to lowering the mass-production costs. Most important of all, this design possesses the characteristics of integration compatibility between general-purpose and video camera.

  2. Resonance control of mid-infrared metamaterials using arrays of split-ring resonator pairs.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Whittaker, John; Schedin, Fredrik; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Jiaguang

    2016-02-05

    We present our design, fabrication and characterization of resonance-controllable metamaterials operating at mid-infrared wavelengths. The metamaterials are composed of pairs of back-to-back or face-to-face U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs). Transmission spectra of the metamaterials are measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the transmission resonance is dependent on the distance between the two SRRs in each SRR pair. The dips in the transmission spectrum shift to shorter wavelengths with increasing distance between the two SRRs for both the back-to-back and face-to-face SRR pairs. The position of the resonance dips in the spectrum can hence be controlled by the relative position of the SRRs. This mechanism of resonance control offers a promising way of developing metamaterials with tunability for optical filters and bio/chemical sensing devices in integrated nano-optics.

  3. A microsystem of low-voltage-driven electrophoresis on microchip with array electrode pairs for the separation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Hu, Xiaoguo; Liang, Jing; Sun, Jianxin; Gu, Wenwen; Zhao, Tianming; Wen, Zhiyu

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, a new approach for the separation of amino acids on the electrophoresis chip-based low-voltage-driven electrophoresis was reported in detail. This low-voltage-driven electrophoresis process could be realized by powering directly the arrayed electrode pairs with low direct current (DC) voltage to generate a moving electric field along the separation microchannel, which could maintain enough electric field strength for electrophoresis. The proposed microfluidic electrophoresis chip was bonded directly with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cover plate at room temperature. The microfluidic channels and the arrayed electrodes were etched on SOI wafer by silicon microelectromechanical system technology. A specially integrated circuit was proposed to power a 30-60-V DC voltage to particular sets of these electrode pairs in a controlled sequence such that the moving electric field could be formed, and the low-voltage-driven electrophoresis could be realized in the microchannel. In the experiments, with 10(-4) mol/L phenylalanine and lysine as analytes, the separation of amino acids on the low-voltage-driven electrophoresis microchip was conducted by homemade integrated control circuit; a method for separating amino acids was well established. It was also shown that the phenylalanine and lysine mixture was effectively separated in less than 7 min and with a resolution of 2.0. To the best of our knowledge, the low-voltage-driven microchip electrophoresis device could be of potential prospective in the fields of integrated and miniaturized biochemical analysis system.

  4. Array CGH Analysis of Paired Blood and Tumor Samples from Patients with Sporadic Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Crespo, María; Vallespín, Elena; Palomares-Bralo, María; Martin-Arenas, Rubén; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; Silvestre de Faria, Paulo Antonio; García-Miguel, Purificación; Lapunzina, Pablo; Regla Vargas, Fernando; Seuanez, Hector N.; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT), the most common cancer of the kidney in infants and children, has a complex etiology that is still poorly understood. Identification of genomic copy number variants (CNV) in tumor genomes provides a better understanding of cancer development which may be useful for diagnosis and therapeutic targets. In paired blood and tumor DNA samples from 14 patients with sporadic WT, analyzed by aCGH, 22% of chromosome abnormalities were novel. All constitutional alterations identified in blood were segmental (in 28.6% of patients) and were also present in the paired tumor samples. Two segmental gains (2p21 and 20q13.3) and one loss (19q13.31) present in blood had not been previously described in WT. We also describe, for the first time, a small, constitutive partial gain of 3p22.1 comprising 2 exons of CTNNB1, a gene associated to WT. Among somatic alterations, novel structural chromosomal abnormalities were found, like gain of 19p13.3 and 20p12.3, and losses of 2p16.1-p15, 4q32.5-q35.1, 4q35.2-q28.1 and 19p13.3. Candidate genes included in these regions might be constitutively (SIX3, SALL4) or somatically (NEK1, PIAS4, BMP2) operational in the development and progression of WT. To our knowledge this is the first report of CNV in paired blood and tumor samples in sporadic WT. PMID:26317783

  5. Efficacy of random primer-pair arrays in plant genome analysis: a case study of Cucumis (Cucurbitaceae) for identification of wild and cultivated species.

    PubMed

    Gatphoh, E M; Sharma, S K; Rajkumari, K; Rama Rao, S

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of random primer-pair arrays compared to conventional RAPD method with a single decamer primer was evaluated using DNA from two species of Cucumis. The banding patterns of amplicons revealed enhanced utility of primer-pair arrays over conventional RAPDs, producing more bands and a higher degree of polymorphism, both at intra- and inter-specific levels. Amplification produced by both methods clearly distinguished a wild from a cultivated species of the genus Cucumis. The main advantage of the primer-pair RAPD over single-primer-based RAPD is the increase in the number of reactions and amplification products in the form of novel/unique bands with a limited number of primers. It also enables the generation of reliable amplicons with a large number of polymorphic bands, which can be linked to gene-governing traits, allowing sequence-characterized partial genome analysis.

  6. Self Powered Highly Enhanced Dual Wavelength ZnO@CdS Core-Shell Nanorod Arrays Photodetector: An Intelligent Pair.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sanjit; Basak, Durga

    2015-08-05

    On the face of the impending energy crisis, developing low-energy or even zero-energy photoelectronic devices is extremely important. A multispectral photosensitivity feature of a self-powered device provides an additional powerful tool. We have developed an unprecedented high performance dual wavelength self-powered ZnO@CdS/PEDOT:PSS core-shell nanorods array photodetector through a simple aqueous chemical method wherein a suitable band alignment between an intelligent material pair, i.e. ZnO and CdS, has been utilized. Besides a noteworthy advantage of the devices being that they show a very sharp and prominent dual wavelength photosensitivity, both the ultraviolet and visible light sensitivity (ratio of current under illumination (Iphoto)/current under dark (Idark)) of the device are two orders of higher magnitude than those of pristine ZnO, attaining values of 2.8 × 10(3) and 1.07 × 10(3), respectively. At the same time, temporal responses faster than 20 ms could be achieved with these solution-processed photodetectors. The present study provides a very important direction to engineer core-shell nanostructured devices for dual wavelength high photosensitivity.

  7. Plasmonic spectrum on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle pairs with different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Huang, Jin-Wei; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the near field intensity and absorption spectra of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle (MNP) pairs using the finite element method (FEM) and taking into account the different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications are investigated. A tunable optical spectrum corresponding to the transverse SPR modes is observed. The peak resonance wavelength (λ res) can be shifted to red as the core patterns in rod-shape MNPs have been changed. We find that the 2D periodic array of core-shell MNP pairs (case 2) exhibit a red shifted SPR that can be tuned the gap enhancement and absorption efficiency simultaneously over an extended wavelength range. The tunable optical performances give us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the periodic array of rod-shape MNP pairs on SPRs that can be as a promising candidate for plasmonic biosensor and solar cell applications.

  8. Helmholtz-pair transmit coil with integrated receive array for high-resolution MRI of trabecular bone in the distal tibia at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alexander C.; Lemdiasov, Rostislav; Connick, Thomas J.; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Magland, Jeremy F.; Song, Hee Kwon; Toddes, Steven P.; Ludwig, Reinhold; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2011-05-01

    A Helmholtz-pair local transmit RF coil with an integrated four-element receive array RF coil and foot immobilization platform was designed and constructed for imaging the distal tibia in a whole-body 7 T MRI scanner. Simulations and measurements of the B1 field distribution of the transmit coil are described, along with SAR considerations for operation at 7 T. Results of imaging the trabecular bone of three volunteers at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T are presented, using identical 1.5 T and 3 T versions of the 7 T four-element receive array. The spatially registered images reveal improved visibility for individual trabeculae and show average gains in SNR of 2.8× and 4.9× for imaging at 7 T compared to 3 T and 1.5 T, respectively. The results thus display an approximately linear dependence of SNR with field strength and enable the practical utility of 7 T scanners for micro-MRI of trabecular bone.

  9. Dielectrophoresis-assisted massively parallel cell pairing and fusion based on field constriction created by a micro-orifice array sheet.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuji; Gel, Murat; Techaumnat, Boonchai; Oana, Hidehiro; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Washizu, Masao

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present a novel electrofusion device that enables massive parallelism, using an electrically insulating sheet having a two-dimensional micro-orifice array. The sheet is sandwiched by a pair of micro-chambers with immersed electrodes, and each chamber is filled with the suspensions of the two types of cells to be fused. Dielectrophoresis, assisted by sedimentation, is used to position the cells in the upper chamber down onto the orifices, then the device is flipped over to position the cells on the other side, so that cell pairs making contact in the orifice are formed. When a pulse voltage is applied to the electrodes, most voltage drop occurs around the orifice and impressed on the cell membrane in the orifice. This makes possible the application of size-independent voltage to fuse two cells in contact at all orifices exclusively in 1:1 manner. In the experiment, cytoplasm of one of the cells is stained with a fluorescence dye, and the transfer of the fluorescence to the other cell is used as the indication of fusion events. The two-dimensional orifice arrangement at the pitch of 50 μm realizes simultaneous fusion of 6 × 10³ cells on a 4 mm diameter chip, and the fusion yield of 78-90% is achieved for various sizes and types of cells.

  10. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  11. OH MASER SOURCES IN W49N: PROBING MAGNETIC FIELD AND DIFFERENTIAL ANISOTROPIC SCATTERING WITH ZEEMAN PAIRS USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Avinash A.; Goss, W. M.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E. E-mail: mgoss@aoc.nrao.edu

    2013-09-20

    Our analysis of a Very Long Baseline Array 12 hr synthesis observation of the OH masers in the well-known star-forming region W49N has yielded valuable data that enable us to probe distributions of magnetic fields in both the maser columns and the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). The data, consisting of detailed high angular resolution images (with beam width ∼20 mas) of several dozen OH maser sources, or spots, at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening with typical sizes of a few tens of milliarcseconds and axial ratios between 1.5 and 3. Such anisotropies have been reported previously by Desai et al. and have been interpreted as being induced by the local magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. However, we find (1) apparent angular sizes of, on average, a factor of about 2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al., indicating significantly less scattering than inferred previously, and (2) a significant deviation in the average orientation of the scatter-broadened images (by ∼10°) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, significant differences (up to 6σ) are apparent in the scatter-broadened images for the two hands of circular polarization, even when the apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km s{sup –1}. This may possibly be the first example of a Faraday rotation contribution to the diffractive effects in the ISM. Using the Zeeman pairs, we also study the distribution of the magnetic field in the W49N complex, finding no significant trend in the spatial structure function. In this paper, we present the details of our observations and analysis leading to these findings, discuss implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, and suggest possible implications for the structure of magnetic fields within this star-forming region.

  12. Analysis of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up and ion-pair LC with diode array UV detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusaric acid is a phytotoxin and mycotoxin occasionally found in maize contaminated with Fusarium fungi. A selective sample clean-up procedure was developed to detect fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up coupled with ion-pair liquid chromatography...

  13. Molecular [(Fe3)–(Fe3)] and [(Fe4)–(Fe4)] coordination cluster pairs as single or composite arrays.

    PubMed

    Sañudo, E Carolina; Uber, Jorge Salinas; Pons Balagué, Alba; Roubeau, Olivier; Aromí, Guillem

    2012-08-06

    The synthesis of molecular cluster pairs is a challenge for coordination chemists due to the potential applications of these species in molecular spintronics or quantum computing. The ligand H(4)L, 1,3-bis-(3-oxo-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-propionyl)-2-methoxybenzene, has been successfully used to obtain a series of such complexes using the basic Fe(III) trinuclear carboxylates as starting materials. Synthetic control has allowed the isolation of the two molecular cluster pairs that form the composite [Fe(4)O(2)(PhCO(2))(6)(H(2)L)(pz)](2)[Fe(3)O(PhCO(2))(5)(py)(H(2)L)](2) (1). The dimers of trinuclear units, [Fe(3)O(PhCO(2))(5)(H(2)O)(H(2)L)](2) (2) and [Fe(3)O(o-MePhCO(2))(5)(H(2)L)(py)](2) (3), and the dimers of tetranuclear units, [Fe(4)O(2)(PhCO(2))(6)(H(2)L)(pz)](2) (4) and [Fe(4)O(2)(o-MePhCO(2))(6)(H(2)L)(pz)](2) (5), are presented here. The magnetic properties of the reported aggregates show that they are pairs of semi-independent clusters weakly interacting magnetically as required for two-qubit quantum gates.

  14. Structured exploratory data analysis (SEDA) of finger ridge-count inheritance: II. Association arrays in parent-offspring and sib-sib pairs.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Williams, P T; Chakraborty, R; Mathew, S

    1983-12-01

    Familial similarity of the dermatoglyphic trait values of finger ridge-count scores and pattern intensity index is examined for 125 nuclear families from the Velanadu Brahmin population of Southern India by the method of association arrays. This methodology assesses parent-offspring and sibship similarity through a collection of measures of dependence that is sensitive to a variety of nonlinear trends and stochastic relationships between trait values. The method is used in conjunction with various weights to determine the relationship between family size and the level and form of dependence. These analyses reveal that siblings are most strongly associated for ridge-counts of the middle digit and less associated for the thumb and fifth digit ridge-counts. Further, sibship similarity for ridge-counts increases with family size for the thumb and fifth digit but remains relatively constant over all family sizes for the middle finger. Family size effects are also observed for total ridge-counts of the left hand, right hand, and both hands combined, and for the pattern intensity index. These effects of family size may be due to the most pronounced changes occurring in the amniotic environment between the first and second pregnancy, which are most strongly manifested in the sibship associations of smaller families.

  15. Selective and sensitive speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water samples by fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry after ion pair based-surfactant assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Seyedeh Mahboobeh; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-06-15

    A simple ion pair based-surfactant assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IP-SA-DLLME) was evaluated for extraction and preconcentration of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in aqueous samples. In this method, which was used for the first time for chromium speciation analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as both ion-pairing and disperser agent. Cr(VI) ions were converted into their cationic complex with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) and then extracted into 1-octanol dispersed in aqueous solution. Cr(III) ion also can be determined by this procedure after oxidation to Cr(VI). After extraction and phase separation, upper organic phase was transferred to a micro cell of a fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry (FO-LADS). The effects of various parameters on the extraction recovery were investigated. Under the optimized conditions and preconcentration of 10 mL of sample, the enrichment factor of 159 and the detection limit of 0.05 μgL(-1) were obtained. Validation of the method was performed by spiking-recovery method and comparison of results with those obtained by ET-AAS method.

  16. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  17. Solar array stepping to minimize array excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Mahabaleshwar K. P. (Inventor); Liu, Tung Y. (Inventor); Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical oscillations of a mechanism containing a stepper motor, such as a solar-array powered spacecraft, are reduced and minimized by the execution of step movements in pairs of steps, the period between steps being equal to one-half of the period of torsional oscillation of the mechanism. Each pair of steps is repeated at needed intervals to maintain desired continuous movement of the portion of elements to be moved, such as the solar array of a spacecraft. In order to account for uncertainty as well as slow change in the period of torsional oscillation, a command unit may be provided for varying the interval between steps in a pair.

  18. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  19. Use of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection for complete separation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene metabolites and EPA Method 8330 explosives: influence of temperature and an ion-pair reagent.

    PubMed

    Borch, Thomas; Gerlach, Robin

    2004-01-02

    Explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) are widely distributed environmental contaminants. Complete chromatographic separation is necessary in order to accurately determine and quantify explosives and their degradation products in environmental samples and in (bio)transformation studies. The present study describes a RP-HPLC method with diode array detection using a LC-8 guard column, a Supelcosil LC-8 chromatographic column, and a gradient elution system. This gradient method is capable of baseline separating the most commonly observed explosives and TNT transformation metabolites including 2,4,6-triaminotoluene (TAT) in a single run. The TNT metabolites separated were 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene, 4,4',6,6'-tetranitro-2,2'-azoxytoluene, 2,2',6,6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene, 4,4',6,6'-tetranitro-2,2'-azotoluene, 2,2',6,6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azotoluene, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2, 6-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene, 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene, and TAT. The same gradient method at a different column temperature can also be used to baseline separate the explosives targeted in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 8330 with approximately 22% reduction in total run time and 48% decrease in solvent consumption compared to previously published methods. Good separation was also obtained when all TNT metabolites and EPA Method 8330 compounds (a total of 23 compounds) were analyzed together; only 2,6-DANT and HMX co-eluted in this case. The influence of temperature (35-55 degrees C) and the use of an ion-pair reagent on the chromatographic resolution and retention were investigated. Temperature was identified as the key parameter for optimal baseline separation. Increased temperature resulted in shorter retention times and better peak resolution

  20. Reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography-diode array detection of the bispyridinium compound MB327: plasma analysis of a potential novel antidote for the treatment of organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Mikler, John; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst

    2016-02-01

    In the case of poisoning by organophosphorus nerve agents or pesticides, there is still a lack of pharmacological treatment of the cholinergic crisis selectively targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Recently, the compound MB327 was identified as a potential novel lead structure to close this gap, thus demanding a quantitative assay for initial pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. MB327 is a salt consisting of the dicationic bispyridinium compound (BPC) 1,1´-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(4-tert-butylpyridinium) and two iodide counter ions. Due to the permanent positive charge of the BPC, an isocratic reversed-phase ion-pair chromatographic separation (RPIPC) was developed using heptanesulfonic acid as ion-pairing reagent and 45% v/v methanol as organic modifier (1 mL/min). Selective UV-detection (230 nm) was done by a diode array detector (DAD) for reliable, rugged, precise (RSD < 7%) and accurate (96-104%) quantitative analysis of 50 μL swine plasma (linear range 1-1000 µg BPC/mL plasma, lower limit of quantification 2 µg/mL). During method validation, diverse parameters essential for the chromatographic process were investigated to generate van´t Hoff, van Deemter and width plots allowing calculation of thermodynamic data like the distribution constant K (5.7 ± 0.3), change in enthalpy, ΔH(0) : -23.66 kJ/mol, and entropy, ΔS(0) : -65 J/(mol*K). In addition, RPIPC-DAD analysis enabled calculation of molar absorptivities of the BPC, ε230 : 17 400 ± 1100 L/(mol*cm), and iodide, ε230 : 9900 ± 400 L/(mol*cm), which determination was hampered by interference with each other in conventional cuvette UV-spectrophotometric measurements. Finally, the RPIPC-DAD procedure was applied to samples from an in vivo study of swine.

  1. Pairing Learners in Pair Work Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Neomy; Aldosari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in…

  2. Controlling plasmon hybridization for negative refraction metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanté, B.; Burokur, S. N.; Sellier, A.; de Lustrac, A.; Lourtioz, J.-M.

    2009-02-01

    The hybridization scheme of plasmon modes in cut-wire-based left-handed metamaterials is shown to critically depend on the coupling between paired cut wires. We show that an inverted hybridization scheme obtained with an asymmetric alignment of paired cut wires is the most appropriate to negative refraction. This is validated (numerically and experimentally) by the first demonstration of negative refraction in the microwave domain using only periodic ensembles of cut wires.

  3. Magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  4. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  5. Kokkos Array

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards Daniel Sunderland, Harold Carter

    2012-09-12

    The Kokkos Array library implements shared-memory array data structures and parallel task dispatch interfaces for data-parallel computational kernels that are performance-portable to multicore-CPU and manycore-accelerator (e.g., GPGPU) devices.

  6. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  7. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  8. Ion pair receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Kuk

    2010-01-01

    Compared with simple ion receptors, which are able to bind either a cation or an anion, ion pair receptors bearing both a cation and an anion recognition site offer the promise of binding ion pairs or pairs of ions strongly as the result of direct or indirect cooperative interactions between co-bound ions. This critical review focuses on the recent progress in the design of ion pair receptors and summarizes the various binding modes that have been used to accommodate ion pairs (110 references). PMID:20737073

  9. Interferometric optical vortex array generator

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented.These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  10. Folding of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Andresen, Kurt; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics is central to gene functions including packaging, regulation, and repair. At the molecular level, the basic building block of chromatin is a nucleosome core particle (NCP) made of 147 base pairs (bp) of dsDNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. These NCPs are connected by short 10-90 bps of linker DNA as beads on a string. Key factors determining the packaging of NCP arrays to form chromatin include ionic condition, linker DNA length, and epigenetic modifications, especially of the histone tails. We have investigated how the conformations of model tetra-NCP arrays are modulated by these factors using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Here we present recent studies of the effects of ion (KCl and MgCl2), linker length, and histone modification (tail deletions) on NCP arrays. Our SAXS measurement makes it possible to learn about both the global compaction of NCP arrays and local inter-NCP spatial correlations within the same array.

  11. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  12. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  13. Cooper pairs and bipolarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhno, Victor

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that Cooper pairs are a solution of the bipolaron problem for model Fröhlich Hamiltonian. The total energy of a pair for the initial Fröhlich Hamiltonian is found. Differences between the solutions for the model and initial two-particle problems are discussed.

  14. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  15. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  16. SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Louhelainen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays) focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays. PMID:27792140

  17. Holographic telescope arrays.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, A W; Sauer, F

    1988-07-15

    A typical job in optical computing is to illuminate an array of small nonlinear optical components, separated by wide gaps to avoid crosstalk. We do this by letting a wide uniform beam fall onto a densely packed array of minifying telescopes. Each telescope produces a narrow bundle of parallel rays which illuminates one of the nonlinear optical components. The holographic telescopes can do more than change the width of the bundles of parallel rays. Their image forming capability allows the transmission of many pixels per channel in parallel. The pair of lenslets of a single holographic telescope (Kepler or Galilean) is produced in rigid coupling. The monolithic production avoids adjusting the two lenslets later on.

  18. Enthalpy arrays

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Francisco E.; Kuhn, Peter; De Bruyker, Dirk; Bell, Alan G.; Wolkin, Michal V.; Peeters, Eric; Williamson, James R.; Anderson, Gregory B.; Schmitz, Gregory P.; Recht, Michael I.; Schweizer, Sandra; Scott, Lincoln G.; Ho, Jackson H.; Elrod, Scott A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Lerner, Richard A.; Bruce, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    We report the fabrication of enthalpy arrays and their use to detect molecular interactions, including protein–ligand binding, enzymatic turnover, and mitochondrial respiration. Enthalpy arrays provide a universal assay methodology with no need for specific assay development such as fluorescent labeling or immobilization of reagents, which can adversely affect the interaction. Microscale technology enables the fabrication of 96-detector enthalpy arrays on large substrates. The reduction in scale results in large decreases in both the sample quantity and the measurement time compared with conventional microcalorimetry. We demonstrate the utility of the enthalpy arrays by showing measurements for two protein–ligand binding interactions (RNase A + cytidine 2′-monophosphate and streptavidin + biotin), phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase, and respiration of mitochondria in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupler. PMID:15210951

  19. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated.

  20. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy.

  1. Infrared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, I.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Infrared arrays are small electronic imaging devices subdivided into a grid or `array' of picture elements, or pixels, each of which is made of a material sensitive to photons (ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION) with wavelengths much longer than normal visible light. Typical dimensions of currently available devices are about 27-36 mm square, and formats now range from 2048×2048 pixels for the near-infra...

  2. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  3. Microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutley, Michael C.; Stevens, Richard F.; Daly, Daniel J.

    1992-04-01

    Microlenses have been with us for a long time as indeed the very word lens reminds us. Many early lenses,including those made by Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in the 17th century were small and resembled lentils. Many languages use the same word for both (French tilentillelt and German "Linse") and the connection is only obscure in English because we use the French word for the vegetable and the German for the optic. Many of the applications for arrays of inicrolenses are also well established. Lippmann's work on integral photography at the turn of the century required lens arrays and stimulated an interest that is very much alive today. At one stage, lens arrays played an important part in high speed photography and various schemes have been put forward to take advantage of the compact imaging properties of combinations of lens arrays. The fact that many of these ingenious schemes have not been developed to their full potential has to a large degree been due to the absence of lens arrays of a suitable quality and cost.

  4. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  5. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  6. Minimal Pairs: Minimal Importance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Adam

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that minimal pairs do not merit as much attention as they receive in pronunciation instruction. There are other aspects of pronunciation that are of greater importance, and there are other ways of teaching vowel and consonant pronunciation. (13 references) (VWL)

  7. Low-Cost Fabrication of Centimetre-Scale Periodic Arrays of Single Plasmid DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Brett; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Lenhert, Steven; Gilbert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We report development of a low-cost method to generate a centimetre-scale periodic array of single plasmid DNA of 11 kilobase pairs. The arrayed DNA is amenable to enzymatic and physical manipulation. PMID:23824041

  8. Double biprism arrays design using for stereo-photography of mobile phone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Shing; Chu, Pu-Yi; Chao, Yu-Hao; Pan, Jui-Wen; Tien, Chuen-Lin

    2016-11-01

    Generally, mobile phone use one camera to catch the image, and it is hard to get stereo image pair. Adding a biprism array can help that get the image pair easily. So users can use their mobile phone to catch the stereo image anywhere by adding a biprism array, and if they want to get a normal image just remove it. Using biprism arrays will induce chromatic aberration. Therefore, we design a double biprism arrays to reduce chromatic aberration.

  9. Memory device for two-dimensional radiant energy array computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. H.; Strong, J. P., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A memory device for two dimensional radiant energy array computers was developed, in which the memory device stores digital information in an input array of radiant energy digital signals that are characterized by ordered rows and columns. The memory device contains a radiant energy logic storing device having a pair of input surface locations for receiving a pair of separate radiant energy digital signal arrays and an output surface location adapted to transmit a radiant energy digital signal array. A regenerative feedback device that couples one of the input surface locations to the output surface location in a manner for causing regenerative feedback is also included

  10. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  11. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  12. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, 0 and 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  13. Junctionless Cooper pair transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu.; Lehtinen, J. S.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum phase slip (QPS) is the topological singularity of the complex order parameter of a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor: momentary zeroing of the modulus and simultaneous 'slip' of the phase by ±2π. The QPS event(s) are the dynamic equivalent of tunneling through a conventional Josephson junction containing static in space and time weak link(s). Here we demonstrate the operation of a superconducting single electron transistor (Cooper pair transistor) without any tunnel junctions. Instead a pair of thin superconducting titanium wires in QPS regime was used. The current-voltage characteristics demonstrate the clear Coulomb blockade with magnitude of the Coulomb gap modulated by the gate potential. The Coulomb blockade disappears above the critical temperature, and at low temperatures can be suppressed by strong magnetic field.

  14. Massive Star Studies with the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, D.; Boyajian, T.; Farrington, C.; McAlister, H.; O'Brien, D.; Richardson, N.; Raghavan, D.; Schaefer, G.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Touhami, Y.; Turner, N.

    2010-02-01

    Georgia State University operates the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array at the Mount Wilson Observatory in southern California. This optical/IR interferometer consists of six 1 m telescopes in a Y-shaped configuration. The Array uses three IR and two visible wavelength beam combiners that are optimized in different ways for visibility, spectral resolution, and number of telescope pairs. We describe observational programs underway on OB-stars, Be stars, and binary/multiple systems.

  15. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    DNA molecules such as artificial DNAzymes and DNA machines. In addition, the metallo-base pairing system is a powerful tool for the construction of homogeneous and heterogeneous metal arrays, which can lead to DNA-based nanomaterials such as electronic wires and magnetic devices. Recently researchers have investigated these systems as enzyme replacements, which may offer an additional contribution to chemical biology and synthetic biology through the expansion of the genetic alphabet.

  16. Global Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  17. Pair of Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meters per pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a pair of small meteor impact craters in the Arena Colles region of Mars, located north of Isidis Planitia.

    Location near: 22.7oN, 278.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  18. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  19. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  20. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  1. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  2. Stereo Pair, Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This stereoscopic image pair is a perspective view that shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north toward the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada Flintridge are also shown. The cluster of large buildings left of center, at the base of the mountains, is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Data shown in this image can be used to predict both how wildfires spread over the terrain and how mudflows are channeled down the canyons.

    The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation, U. S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provided the image detail, and the Landsat Thematic Mapper provided the color. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data and the aerial photography. The image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence.

  4. SDSS DR2 Merging pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; SDSS Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    We present and analyze a catalog of 9,000 Merging pairs candidates to g=21 from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Second Data Release (DR2). Candidates were selected using an automated algorithm (Allam et al. 2004) that is efficient in its selection of galaxy pairs. We highlight possible science applications of such a large photometric sample of merging pais and discuss future improvements, including incorporating magnitudes and pushing to higher redshifts and fainter pairs.

  5. Controversies in kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Montgomery, Robert A; Segev, Dorry L

    2012-07-01

    Kidney paired donation represented 10% of living kidney donation in the United States in 2011. National registries around the world and several separate registries in the United States arrange paired donations, although with significant variations in their practices. Concerns about ethical considerations, clinical advisability, and the quantitative effectiveness of these approaches in paired donation result in these variations. For instance, although donor travel can be burdensome and might discourage paired donation, it was nearly universal until convincing analysis showed that living donor kidneys can sustain many hours of cold ischemia time without adverse consequences. Opinions also differ about whether the last donor in a chain of paired donation transplants initiated by a nondirected donor should donate immediately to someone on the deceased donor wait-list (a domino or closed chain) or should be asked to wait some length of time and donate to start another sequence of paired donations later (an open chain); some argue that asking the donor to donate later may be coercive, and others focus on balancing the probability that the waiting donor withdraws versus the number of additional transplants if the chain can be continued. Other controversies in paired donation include simultaneous versus nonsimultaneous donor operations, whether to enroll compatible pairs, and interactions with desensitization protocols. Efforts to expand public awareness of and participation in paired donation are needed to generate more transplant opportunities.

  6. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  7. The Giant Pairing Vibration in Carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Agodi, C.; Azaiez, F.; Assié, M.; de Séréville, N.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    The 13C(18O,16O)15C and 12C(18O,16O)14C reactions at 84 MeV incident energy were explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed in both nuclei, attributed to the Giant Pairing Vibration (GPV). The neutron decay of the 15C resonances, including the GPV, populated via the two- neutron transfer reaction has been studied using an innovative technique, which couples MAGNEX with the EDEN neutron detector array. The data show that the 15C GPV mainly decays via two-neutron emission.

  8. Cooper pair islanding model of insulating nanohoneycomb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollen, S. M.; Rudisaile, E.; Shainline, J.; Xu, J. M.; Valles, J. M., Jr.

    2012-02-01

    Nanohoneycomb (NHC) amorphous Bi thin films, made by thermal evaporation onto substrates that contain a nanometer-scale array of holes and regular surface height variations, exhibit an insulating phase of localized Cooper pairs. Recently, we described how thickness variations induced by the substrate height variations can give rise to superconducting island formation.ootnotetextHollen et. al., Phys. Rev. B, 84(6), August 2011. This work is supported by the AAUW, the NSF through Grant No. DMR-0605797 and No. DMR-0907357, by the AFRL, and by the ONR. Here, we will present an extension of this analysis to suggest how the island sizes evolve through the magnetic field-driven superconductor-insulator transition. Using this islanding picture, we will discuss the applicability of a granular array model to explain the appearance and behavior of the CPI phase in these films. Finally, we will discuss recent experimental tests of this proposal for thickness-undulation-driven Cooper pair localization.

  9. Electronic pairing in exotic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L. ); Maple, M.B. )

    1995-02-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials and high T[sub c] cuprates may involve electronic pairing with unconventional symmetries and mechanisms. Although there has been no smoking-gun proof, numerous pieces of circumstantial evidence combined with heuristic theoretical arguments make a compelling case that these materials have pairs with exotic symmetry bound by nonphonon glue. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Homologous pairing and the role of pairing centers in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; McKee, Bruce D

    2011-06-15

    Homologous pairing establishes the foundation for accurate reductional segregation during meiosis I in sexual organisms. This Commentary summarizes recent progress in our understanding of homologous pairing in meiosis, and will focus on the characteristics and mechanisms of specialized chromosome sites, called pairing centers (PCs), in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. In C. elegans, each chromosome contains a single PC that stabilizes chromosome pairing and initiates synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Specific zinc-finger proteins recruited to PCs link chromosomes to nuclear envelope proteins--and through them to the microtubule cytoskeleton--thereby stimulating chromosome movements in early prophase, which are thought to be important for homolog sorting. This mechanism appears to be a variant of the 'telomere bouquet' process, in which telomeres cluster on the nuclear envelope, connect chromosomes through nuclear envelope proteins to the cytoskeleton and lead chromosome movements that promote homologous synapsis. In Drosophila males, which undergo meiosis without recombination, pairing of the largely non-homologous X and Y chromosomes occurs at specific repetitive sequences in the ribosomal DNA. Although no other clear examples of PC-based pairing mechanisms have been described, there is evidence for special roles of telomeres and centromeres in aspects of chromosome pairing, synapsis and segregation; these roles are in some cases similar to those of PCs.

  11. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  12. Stereo Pair, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, at Los Menucos, Argentina shows remnants of relatively young volcanoes built upon an eroded plain of much older and contorted volcanic, granitic, and sedimentary rocks. The large purple, brown, and green 'butterfly' pattern is a single volcano that has been deeply eroded. Large holes on the volcano's flanks indicate that they may have collapsed soon after eruption, as fluid molten rock drained out from under its cooled and solidified outer shell. At the upper left, a more recent eruption occurred and produced a small volcanic cone and a long stream of lava, which flowed down a gully. At the top of the image, volcanic intrusions permeated the older rocks resulting in a chain of small dark volcanic peaks. At the top center of the image, two halves of a tan ellipse pattern are offset from each other. This feature is an old igneous intrusion that has been split by a right-lateral fault. The apparent offset is about 6.6 kilometers (4 miles). Color, tonal, and topographic discontinuities reveal the fault trace as it extends across the image to the lower left. However, young unbroken basalt flows show that the fault has not been active recently.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive

  13. Stereo Pair: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (green patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (blue). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7 satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The

  14. Reducing interaction in simultaneous paired stimulation with CI

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Dirk; Briaire, Jeroen J.; Kalkman, Randy K.; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study simultaneous paired stimulation of electrodes in cochlear implants is investigated by psychophysical experiments in 8 post-lingually deaf subjects (and one extra subject who only participated in part of the experiments). Simultaneous and sequential monopolar stimulation modes are used as references and are compared to channel interaction compensation, partial tripolar stimulation and a novel sequential stimulation strategy named phased array compensation. Psychophysical experiments are performed to investigate both the loudness integration during paired stimulation at the main electrodes as well as the interaction with the electrode contact located halfway between the stimulating pair. The study shows that simultaneous monopolar stimulation has more loudness integration on the main electrodes and more interaction in between the electrodes than sequential stimulation. Channel interaction compensation works to reduce the loudness integration at the main electrodes, but does not reduce the interaction in between the electrodes caused by paired stimulation. Partial tripolar stimulation uses much more current to reach the needed loudness, but shows the same interaction in between the electrodes as sequential monopolar stimulation. In phased array compensation we have used the individual impedance matrix of each subject to calculate the current needed on each electrode to exactly match the stimulation voltage along the array to that of sequential stimulation. The results show that the interaction in between the electrodes is the same as monopolar stimulation. The strategy uses less current than partial tripolar stimulation, but more than monopolar stimulation. In conclusion, the paper shows that paired stimulation is possible if the interaction is compensated. PMID:28182685

  15. Application of a superword array in genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqiu; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Chinwalla, Asif T; Hillier, LaDeana W; Minx, Patrick; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a data structure called a superword array for finding quickly matches between DNA sequences. The superword array possesses some desirable features of the lookup table and suffix array. We describe simple algorithms for constructing and using a superword array to find pairs of sequences that share a unique superword. The algorithms are implemented in a genome assembly program called PCAP.REP for computation of overlaps between reads. Experimental results produced by PCAP.REP and PCAP on a whole-genome dataset show that PCAP.REP produced a more accurate and contiguous assembly than PCAP.

  16. Older Galaxy Pair Has Surprisingly Youthful Glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    A pair of interacting galaxies might be experiencing the galactic equivalent of a mid-life crisis. For some reason, the pair, called Arp 82, didn't make their stars early on as is typical of most galaxies. Instead, they got a second wind later in life -- about 2 billion years ago -- and started pumping out waves of new stars as if they were young again.

    Arp 82 is an interacting pair of galaxies with a strong bridge and a long tail. NGC 2535 is the big galaxy and NGC 2536 is its smaller companion. The disk of the main galaxy looks like an eye, with a bright 'pupil' in the center and oval-shaped 'eyelids.' Dramatic 'beads on a string' features are visible as chains of evenly spaced star-formation complexes along the eyelids. These are presumably the result of large-scale gaseous shocks from a grazing encounter. The colors of this galaxy indicate that the observed stars are young to intermediate in age, around 2 million to 2 billion years old, much less than the age of the universe (13.7 billion years).

    The puzzle is: why didn't Arp 82 form many stars earlier, like most galaxies of that mass range? Scientifically, it is an oddball and provides a relatively nearby lab for studying the age of intermediate-mass galaxies.

    This picture is a composite captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera with light at wavelength 8 microns shown in red, NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer combined 1530 and 2310 Angstroms shown in blue, and the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy Observatory light at 6940 Angstroms shown in green.

  17. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  18. Diffraction pattern simulation of cellulose fibrils using distributed and quantized pair distances

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Crowley, Michael; ...

    2016-10-14

    Intensity simulation of X-ray scattering from large twisted cellulose molecular fibrils is important in understanding the impact of chemical or physical treatments on structural properties such as twisting or coiling. This paper describes a highly efficient method for the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns from complex fibrils using atom-type-specific pair-distance quantization. Pair distances are sorted into arrays which are labelled by atom type. Histograms of pair distances in each array are computed and binned and the resulting population distributions are used to represent the whole pair-distance data set. These quantized pair-distance arrays are used with a modified and vectorized Debyemore » formula to simulate diffraction patterns. This approach utilizes fewer pair distances in each iteration, and atomic scattering factors are moved outside the iteration since the arrays are labelled by atom type. As a result, this algorithm significantly reduces the computation time while maintaining the accuracy of diffraction pattern simulation, making possible the simulation of diffraction patterns from large twisted fibrils in a relatively short period of time, as is required for model testing and refinement.« less

  19. Diffraction pattern simulation of cellulose fibrils using distributed and quantized pair distances

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Crowley, Michael; Yu, Leiming; Kaeli, David; Makowski, Lee

    2016-10-14

    Intensity simulation of X-ray scattering from large twisted cellulose molecular fibrils is important in understanding the impact of chemical or physical treatments on structural properties such as twisting or coiling. This paper describes a highly efficient method for the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns from complex fibrils using atom-type-specific pair-distance quantization. Pair distances are sorted into arrays which are labelled by atom type. Histograms of pair distances in each array are computed and binned and the resulting population distributions are used to represent the whole pair-distance data set. These quantized pair-distance arrays are used with a modified and vectorized Debye formula to simulate diffraction patterns. This approach utilizes fewer pair distances in each iteration, and atomic scattering factors are moved outside the iteration since the arrays are labelled by atom type. As a result, this algorithm significantly reduces the computation time while maintaining the accuracy of diffraction pattern simulation, making possible the simulation of diffraction patterns from large twisted fibrils in a relatively short period of time, as is required for model testing and refinement.

  20. A Novel Framework for Sib Pair Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poznik, G. David; Adamska, Katarzyna; Xu, Xin; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Rogus, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Sib pair linkage analysis of a dichotomous trait is a popular method for narrowing the search for genes that influence complex diseases. Although the pedigree structures are uncomplicated and the underlying genetic principles straightforward, a surprising degree of complexity is involved in implementing a sib pair study and interpreting the results. Ascertainment may be based on affected, discordant, or unaffected sib pairs, as well as on pairs defined by threshold values for quantitative traits, such as extreme discordant sib pairs. To optimize power, various domain restrictions and null hypotheses have been proposed for each of these designs, yielding a wide array of choices for the analyst. To begin, we systematically classify the major sources of discretion in sib pair linkage analysis. Then, we extend the work of Kruglyak and Lander (1995), to bring the various forms into a unified framework and to facilitate a more general approach to the analysis. Finally, we describe a new, freely available computer program, Splat (Sib Pair Linkage Analysis Testing), that can perform any sib pair statistical test currently in use, as well as any user-defined test yet to be proposed. Splat uses the expectation maximization algorithm to calculate maximum-likelihood estimates of sharing (subject to user-specified conditions) and then plots LOD scores versus chromosomal position. It includes a novel grid-scanning capability that enables simultaneous visualization of multiple test statistics. This can lead to further insight into the genetic basis of the disease process under consideration. In addition, phenotype definitions can be modified without the recalculation of inheritance vectors, thereby providing considerable flexibility for exploratory analysis. The application of Splat will be illustrated with data from studies on the genetics of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:16358216

  1. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Bond, T; Behymer, E; Chang, A

    2010-02-23

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 103 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  2. VERTICAL PILLAR ARRAYS FOR PLASMON NANOCAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Fasenfest, B; Behymer, E; Chang, A; Nguyen, H; Britten, J; Larson, C; Bond, T

    2010-04-02

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 10{sup 3} are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  3. Coupled heterocellular arrays in the brain.

    PubMed

    Fróes, M M; Menezes, J R L

    2002-11-01

    Gap junctions are transcellular pathways that enable a dynamic metabolic coupling and a selective exchange of biological signaling mediators. Throughout the course of the brain development these intercellular channels are assembled into regionally and temporally defined patterns. The present review summarizes the possibilities of heterocellular gap junctional pairing in the brain parenchyma, involving glial cells, neurons and neural precursors as well as it highlights on the meaningfulness of these coupled arrays to the concept of brain functional compartments.

  4. Superconductivity: The persistence of pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, Alex; Littlewood, Peter

    2015-05-20

    Superconductivity stems from a weak attraction between electrons that causes them to form bound pairs and behave much like bosons. These so-called Cooper pairs are phase coherent, which leads to the astonishing properties of zero electrical resistance and magnetic flux expulsion typical of superconducting materials. This coherent state may be qualitatively understood within the Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) model, which predicts that a gas of interacting bosons will become unstable below a critical temperature and condense into a phase of matter with a macroscopic, coherent population in the lowest energy state, as happens in 4He or cold atomic gases. The successful theory proposed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) predicts that at the superconducting transition temperature Tc, electrons simultaneously form pairs and condense, with no sign of pairing above Tc. Theorists have long surmised that the BCS and BEC models are opposite limits of a single theory and that strong interactions or low density can, in principle, drive the system to a paired state at a temperature Tpair higher than Tc, making the transition to the superconducting state BEC-like (Fig. 1). Yet most superconductors to date are reasonably well described by BCS theory or its extensions, and there has been scant evidence in electronic materials for the existence of pairing independent of the full superconducting state (though an active debate rages over the cuprate superconductors). Writing in Nature, Jeremy Levy and colleagues have now used ingenious nanostructured devices to provide evidence for electron pairing1. Perhaps surprisingly, the material they have studied is a venerable, yet enigmatic, low-temperature superconductor, SrTiO3.

  5. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  6. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  7. M&A For Lithography Of Sparse Arrays Of Sub-Micrometer Features

    DOEpatents

    Brueck, Steven R.J.; Chen, Xiaolan; Zaidi, Saleem; Devine, Daniel J.

    1998-06-02

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for the exposure of sparse hole and/or mesa arrays with line:space ratios of 1:3 or greater and sub-micrometer hole and/or mesa diameters in a layer of photosensitive material atop a layered material. Methods disclosed include: double exposure interferometric lithography pairs in which only those areas near the overlapping maxima of each single-period exposure pair receive a clearing exposure dose; double interferometric lithography exposure pairs with additional processing steps to transfer the array from a first single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair into an intermediate mask layer and a second single-period interferometric lithography exposure to further select a subset of the first array of holes; a double exposure of a single period interferometric lithography exposure pair to define a dense array of sub-micrometer holes and an optical lithography exposure in which only those holes near maxima of both exposures receive a clearing exposure dose; combination of a single-period interferometric exposure pair, processing to transfer resulting dense array of sub-micrometer holes into an intermediate etch mask, and an optical lithography exposure to select a subset of initial array to form a sparse array; combination of an optical exposure, transfer of exposure pattern into an intermediate mask layer, and a single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair; three-beam interferometric exposure pairs to form sparse arrays of sub-micrometer holes; five- and four-beam interferometric exposures to form a sparse array of sub-micrometer holes in a single exposure. Apparatuses disclosed include arrangements for the three-beam, five-beam and four-beam interferometric exposures.

  8. Pair-Starved Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model for the innermost (within the light cylinder of canonical radius, approx. c/Omega) structure of open-magnetic-field lines of a rotating neutron star (NS) with relativistic outflow of charged particles (electrons/positrons) and arbitrary angle between the NS spin and magnetic axes. We present the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations for the magnetic field and electric current in the pair-starved regime where the density of electron-positron plasma generated above the pulsar polar cap is not sufficient to completely screen the accelerating electric field and thus establish thee E . B = 0 condition above the pair-formation front up to the very high altitudes within the light cylinder. The proposed mode1 may provide a theoretical framework for developing the refined model of the global pair-starved pulsar magnetosphere.

  9. Invisibly Sanitizable Signature without Pairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Lee, Pil Joong

    Sanitizable signatures allow sanitizers to delete some pre-determined parts of a signed document without invalidating the signature. While ordinary sanitizable signatures allow verifiers to know how many subdocuments have been sanitized, invisibly sanitizable signatures do not leave any clue to the sanitized subdocuments; verifiers do not know whether or not sanitizing has been performed. Previous invisibly sanitizable signature scheme was constructed based on aggregate signature with pairings. In this article, we present the first invisibly sanitizable signature without using pairings. Our proposed scheme is secure under the RSA assumption.

  10. Missing energies at pair creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ela, A. A.; Hassan, S.; Bagge, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Wilson cloud chamber measurements of the separated spectra of positrons and electrons produced by gamma quanta of 6.14 MeV differ considerably from the theoretically predicted spectra by BETHE and HEITLER, but are in good agreement with those of a modified theory of pair creation.

  11. Pairing Linguistic and Music Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiEdwardo, MaryAnn Pasda

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how music in the language classroom setting can be a catalyst for developing reading, writing, and understanding skills. Studies suggest that pairing music and linguistic intelligences in the college classroom improves students' grades and abilities to compose theses statements for research papers in courses that emphasize…

  12. Pick a Pair. Being Bony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2004-01-01

    This column suggests pairings of fiction and nonfiction books to meet curricular needs and help students to compare/contrast the texts as they may be asked on state tests. The author of this paper focuses on activities surrounding Halloween. Since many schools are discouraged from teaching about Halloween, this can be a great time to investigate…

  13. Internal Pair Decay of Giant Resonances in Hot LEAD-200.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Susan

    Electron-positron pairs emitted during the de -excitation of the hot ^{200}Pb were detected with the Stony Brook pair detector, a phoswich array, in order to observe the internal pair decay of giant resonances (GR) built on excited states. These collective excitations are particularly well defined in heavy nuclei, and the full GR sum rule had been found in the ground state excitations of both the giant dipole resonance and the isoscalar monopole resonance. The excited compound nucleus was formed by bombarding a ^{181} Ta target with a 95 MeV pulsed ^ {19}F beam. While the gamma-decay from giant resonances of multipolarities L >=q 1 results in cross-sections 3-4 orders of magnitudes bigger than the internal pair decay, the decay of giant monopole resonances via a collective E0 transition can only be observed in the e^+ - e^ --decay channel. Another advantage of investigating electro-magnetic transitions via the pair decay channel is the fact that the correlation angle (and also the energy sharing) between the electron and the positron provides insight in the multipolarity of the observed transition. Especially the angular correlation distribution of an L = 0 transition is easily distinguished from the L >=q 1 cases. In the data analysis, the pair spectra were compared to calculations using the statistical model code CASCADE, which was modified to include the internal pair decay of giant resonances from the compound nucleus as well as from the fission fragments. In addition, gamma measurements from the same reaction at a comparable excitation energy (93 MeV) were available. The extracted pair spectra confirmed the CASCADE prediction that the giant dipole resonance dominates the pair decay from a hot, heavy nucleus. Superior statistics would be necessary in order to extract weaker modes like the monopole or quadrupole resonances and due to the lack in statistics this work can only offer a rough estimate for the width and position of the isoscalar giant monopole

  14. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  15. Polarization of drifting pairs at decameter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.

    2006-08-01

    The results of polarization researches of drifting pairs (DP) observed during Type III bursts storm in July[S:,:S][Author ID2: at Fri Jul 14 10:33:00 2006 ] 11-21, 2002 with radio telescope URAN-2 are presented. The array of the radio telescope consists of 512 broadband cross dipoles, that enables to receive signals of two polarizations, has the area about of 28000 m^2 and works in 9-30 MHz range. Circular polarization measurements were made at frequency 24.75 MHz in frequency band 10 μHz with time resolution 10 ms. Some hundreds bursts, both forward and reverse DPs, which have been registered with radio telescope UTR-2 in the frequency range 18-32 μHz, were analyzed. For the first time we find that DP polarizations strongly depend on the location of the active area associated with these bursts. When an active area is near to the central meridian, polarizations of both DP components have the same signs and their values are up to 30%. In other days in most cases polarizations of both components have opposite signs and only for some bursts polarization reaches 10%. In all cases both DP components have comparable polarization degrees.

  16. Electronic Switch Arrays for Managing Microbattery Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Alahmad, Mahmoud; Sukumar, Vinesh; Zghoul, Fadi; Buck, Kevin; Hess, Herbert; Li, Harry; Cox, David

    2008-01-01

    Integrated circuits have been invented for managing the charging and discharging of such advanced miniature energy-storage devices as planar arrays of microscopic energy-storage elements [typically, microscopic electrochemical cells (microbatteries) or microcapacitors]. The architecture of these circuits enables implementation of the following energy-management options: dynamic configuration of the elements of an array into a series or parallel combination of banks (subarrarys), each array comprising a series of parallel combination of elements; direct addressing of individual banks for charging/or discharging; and, disconnection of defective elements and corresponding reconfiguration of the rest of the array to utilize the remaining functional elements to obtain the desited voltage and current performance. An integrated circuit according to the invention consists partly of a planar array of field-effect transistors that function as switches for routing electric power among the energy-storage elements, the power source, and the load. To connect the energy-storage elements to the power source for charging, a specific subset of switches is closed; to connect the energy-storage elements to the load for discharging, a different specific set of switches is closed. Also included in the integrated circuit is circuitry for monitoring and controlling charging and discharging. The control and monitoring circuitry, the switching transistors, and interconnecting metal lines are laid out on the integrated-circuit chip in a pattern that registers with the array of energy-storage elements. There is a design option to either (1) fabricate the energy-storage elements in the corresponding locations on, and as an integral part of, this integrated circuit; or (2) following a flip-chip approach, fabricate the array of energy-storage elements on a separate integrated-circuit chip and then align and bond the two chips together.

  17. Design methodology and application of high speed gate arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R.

    A system to provide real-time signal averaging of waveforms from a 50 MHz analog to digital converter has been fabricated to operate over a wide temperature range. This system evolved from conception, through an initial simulated design for emitter coupled logic (ECL), to a pair of CMOS gate array designs. Changing the implementation technology to CMOS gate arrays resulted in savings in cost, size, weight, and power. Design rules employed to obtain working silicon on the first cycle, at double state-of-the-art gate array speeds, are discussed. Also discussed are built-in, run-time, self-test features.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  20. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  1. Interaction Effects on Combustion of Alcohol Droplet Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Keiichi; Ono, Yutaka; Moriue, Osamu; Shiba, Seiji; Araki, Mikiya; Nomura, Hiroshi; Shiga, Seiichi; Tsue, Mitsuhiro; Kono, Michikata

    Experimental investigation was conducted on two droplet-array combustion of methanol and methanol/dodecanol mixture fuels in microgravity. For methanol, effects of ambient pressure and droplet spacing were examined. Results show that the droplet lifetime decreases with increasing spacing at relatively low pressure and the droplet lifetime becomes independent of spacing at higher-subcritical and supercritical pressures. For methanol/dodecanol mixture, effects of pressure, fuel composition were investigated in terms of occurrence of disruption. Disruption of droplet during combustion was demonstrated both for single droplet and droplet pairs.

  2. Neutron decay of the Giant Pairing Vibration in 15C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Assié, M.; Azaiez, F.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; de Séréville, N.; Foti, A.; Pandola, L.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.

    2016-06-01

    The neutron decay of the resonant states of light neutron-rich nuclei is an important and poorly explored property, useful to extract valuable nuclear structure information. The neutron decay of the 15C resonances populated via the two-neutron transfer reaction 13C(18O,16O n) at 84 MeV incident energy is studied using an innovative technique which couples the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer and the EDEN neutron detector array. The data show that the recently observed 15C Giant Pairing Vibration at 13.7 MeV mainly decays via two-neutron emission.

  3. A photovoltaic array simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtsevanos, G. J.; Grimbas, E. J.

    A system simulating the output voltage-current characteristics of a photovoltaic array is described. The simulator may be used to test the performance of PV arrays and associated power conditioning equipment necessary for the autonomous or interconnected operation of photovoltaic energy sources. The simulator's main features include simplicity of construction, wide parametric variability and low cost. It is capable of reproducing the output characteristics of commercially available arrays at varying solar irradiation levels with sufficient accuracy. The design ensures the lowest possible power dissipation and minimal thermal drift. It is estimated that the cost of the simulator is an insignificant fraction of the actual array cost in the kilowatt power range.

  4. Interferometric array generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. S.; Khare, Alika

    2006-02-01

    We report the formation of square, rectangular as well as hexagonal arrays of small light spots in one single setup using Michelson and Mach-Zehnder interferometers in tandem. The geometry of arrays can be altered easily online, by changing the relative orientations of the mirrors. The arrays could be scanned over large longitudinal distances and could be compressed to give large spot density. The expression for the resultant intensity distribution for the arrays has been worked out and the computed pattern is compared with the experimental data.

  5. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  6. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  7. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  8. Septin pairs, a complex choreography.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Helge

    2011-06-13

    Septins form a filamentous collar at the mother-bud neck in budding yeast. In cytokinesis, this collar splits into two rings and the septin complexes undergo a dramatic reorientation. Using fluorescence polarization microscopy, DeMay et al. (2011. J. Cell Biol. doi:10.1083/jcb.201012143) now demonstrate that septin complexes assemble as paired filaments in vivo and reveal new insights into septin organization during cytokinesis.

  9. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  10. Deduction of the acoustic impedance of the ground via a simulated three-dimensional microphone array.

    PubMed

    Alberts, W C Kirkpatrick; Sanchez, Kevin J

    2013-11-01

    While commonly used ground impedance deduction methods often utilize pairs of vertically separated microphones, deployed arrays rarely have this configuration, which increases the difficulty in automatically deducing local ground impedance from these arrays. The ability to deduce ground impedance using random sounds incident on a three-dimensional array would increase, for example, the accuracy of estimated elevation angles. The methods described by the American National Standards Institute Method for Determining the Acoustic Impedance of Ground Surfaces are extended to simulate deducing ground impedance by a three-dimensional array. Ground parameters indicative of grassland are successfully determined using a simulated three-dimensional array.

  11. Cooper pair localization in a-Bi thin films near the superconductor-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollen, S. M.; Nguyen, H. Q.; Rudisaile, E.; Shainline, J.; Fernandes, G.; Xu, J. M.; Valles, J. M., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrathin films near the Superconductor-Insulator Transition (SIT) can exhibit Cooper pair transport in their insulating phase. This Cooper Pair Insulator state is achieved in amorphous Bi films patterned with a nanohoneycomb array of holes. We will present evidence from a number of experiments on these substrates supporting that 1) thickness variations, which result in variations in Tc and Δ , serve to localize the Cooper pairs; 2) the weak links between these superconducting islands control the SIT. Finally, we will discuss our most recent experiments that aim to characterize this Cooper pair insulator state and confirm the role of the thickness variations in the localization of Cooper pairs. This work was supported by the NSF through No. DMR-0907357, by the AFRL, and by the ONR.

  12. An Investigation of Stimulus Pairing and Listener Training to Establish Emergent Intraverbals in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallinger-Brown, Mary; Rosales, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    We examined two methods to facilitate the emergence of untaught intraverbal responses to children with autism. Listener behavior training (LT) involved reinforcement of a selection-based response following presentation of an array of pictures on an iPad® and an auditory instruction describing a characteristic of the picture. Stimulus pairing (SP)…

  13. Simplicity and Typical Rank Results for Three-Way Arrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    2011-01-01

    Matrices can be diagonalized by singular vectors or, when they are symmetric, by eigenvectors. Pairs of square matrices often admit simultaneous diagonalization, and always admit block wise simultaneous diagonalization. Generalizing these possibilities to more than two (non-square) matrices leads to methods of simplifying three-way arrays by…

  14. ISS Solar Array Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  15. Array for detecting microbes

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  16. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  17. High density pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener-Avnear, Eliezer (Inventor); McFall, James Earl (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pixel array device is fabricated by a laser micro-milling method under strict process control conditions. The device has an array of pixels bonded together with an adhesive filling the grooves between adjacent pixels. The array is fabricated by moving a substrate relative to a laser beam of predetermined intensity at a controlled, constant velocity along a predetermined path defining a set of grooves between adjacent pixels so that a predetermined laser flux per unit area is applied to the material, and repeating the movement for a plurality of passes of the laser beam until the grooves are ablated to a desired depth. The substrate is of an ultrasonic transducer material in one example for fabrication of a 2D ultrasonic phase array transducer. A substrate of phosphor material is used to fabricate an X-ray focal plane array detector.

  18. Micromachined electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  19. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-10-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  20. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  1. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  2. Study of Molecular Trapping by Gold Nanofinger Arrays on Surface-Enhanced Raman Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-21

    finger, nanoimprint lighography Abstract: The binding of trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene ( BPE ) molecules on substrates arrayed with gold...XPS results, BPE molecules are found to interact with the gold nanofingers through the lone pair electrons of pyridyl nitrogens, not through...delocalized π electrons. Furthermore, by comparing the AR-XPS spectra of finger arrays pre-closed before exposure to BPE with the spectra of arrays that

  3. Multibeam Spatially-Fed Antenna Arrays with Amplitude-Controlled Beam Steering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    connections between antenna pair feeds corresponding to the two linear polarizations. The lens array designed for this study is a cylindrical 45-element...multibeam array that can be designed to have low loss for large numbers of elements for two orthogonal well-isolated (30dB) polarizations. In a transmitter...This loss can be significantly reduced if the lens array and the receiving antenna are designed as a system, which was attempted in the case of the 10

  4. Phenomenology of transionospheric pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, R. S.; Holden, D. N.

    1995-09-01

    Recent observations of transient radio impulses by an Earth-orbiting satellite appear to be quite unlike any previously reported. They appear as pairs of brief (a few microseconds), noiselike bursts, separated by a few tens of microseconds, and are dispersed in a way that implies subionospheric origin. Over 300 of these events have now been observed. These "transionospheric pulse pairs" (TIPPs) have not yet been associated with any known source, although thunderstorms are suspected. The observations, made by the Blackbeard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite, are digitized records of the electric field in a passband from about 25 to 100 MHz. Ground-based observations of lightning in this band appear quite different, even accounting for ionospheric dispersion: bursts of short pulses last hundreds of microseconds and have much lower power (when propagated to the satellite) than TIPP events. Signals that resemble the ground-based data have been observed by Blackbeard but, being much weaker, are much less likely to trigger the instrument than are the strong pulse pair events. In this paper we analyze 97 of the early TIPP observations. We compute several parameters that describe the events: the location of the satellite at the time of reception, the energy in each pulse, the separation between pulses, the duration of each pulse, and the dispersion of each pulse. The statistical distributions of these parameters provide clues to and constraints on possible source mechanisms. The possibility that the pulses might be the direct and reflected signals from a high-altitude source is considered and cannot be rejected by the data.

  5. Paired circularly polarized heterodyne ellipsometer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.-J.; Lin, C.-E.; Yu, L.-P.; Chou, C

    2009-02-01

    We develop a paired circularly polarized heterodyne ellipsometer (PCPHE), in which a heterodyne interferometer based on a two-frequency circularly polarized laser beam is set up. It belongs to an amplitude-sensitive ellipsometer that is able to provide not only a wider dynamic range of polarization modulation frequency but also a higher detection sensitivity than that of a conventional photometric ellipsometer. A real-time and precise measurement of ellipsometric parameters, which demonstrated an accuracy of less than 1 nm on thickness measurement of SiO2 thin film deposited on silicon substrate, can be applied with the PCPHE.

  6. Developing an Inflatable Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Patrick K.; Jankowski, Francis J.; Williams, Geoffery T.; Vendura, George J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs describing the development of an inflatable solar array as part of the Inflatable Torus Solar Array Technology (ITSAT) program are presented. Program phases, overall and subsystem designs, and array deployment are addressed.

  7. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhter, R. I.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Jonson, M.; Aharony, A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals.

  8. Optical conductivity from pair density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhehao; Lee, Patrick A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theory of optical conductivity in systems with finite-momentum Cooper pairs. In contrast to the BCS pairing where ac conductivity is purely imaginary in the clean limit, there is nonzero ac absorption across the superconducting gap for finite-momentum pairing if we break the Galilean symmetry explicitly in the electronic Hamiltonian. Vertex correction is crucial for maintaining the gauge invariance in the mean-field formalism and dramatically changes the optical conductivity in the direction of the pairing momentum. We carried out a self-consistent calculation and gave an explicit formula for optical conductivity in a simple case. This result applies to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state and candidates with pair density waves proposed for high-Tc cuprates. It may help detect pair density waves and determine the pairing gap as well as the direction of the pairing momentum in experiments.

  9. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  10. Dense array expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joseph N.; Chen, LiangMing

    1999-10-01

    Various researchers have realized the value of implementing loop fusion to evaluate dense (pointwise) array expressions. Recently, the method of template metaprogramming in C++ has been used to significantly speed-up the evaluation of array expressions, allowing C++ programs to achieve performance comparable to or better than FORTRAN for numerical analysis applications. Unfortunately, the template metaprogramming technique suffers from several limitations in applicability, portability, and potential performance. We present a framework for evaluating dense array expressions in object-oriented programming languages. We demonstrate how this technique supports both common subexpression elimination and threaded implementation and compare its performance to object-library and hand-generated code.

  11. Arrays vs. single telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. L.

    The question of the relative efficiencies of telescope arrays versus an equivalent mirror-area very large telescope is re-examined and summarized. Four separate investigations by Bowen, Johnson and Richards, Code, and Disney all came to the same conclusion: that an array of telescopes is superior, both scientifically and economically, to a single very large telescope. The costs of recently completed telescopes are compared. The costs of arrays of telescopes are shown to be significantly lower than that of a single, very large telescope, with the further advantage that because existing, proven, designs can be used, no engineering 'break-throughs' are needed.

  12. Teleportation on a quantum dot array.

    PubMed

    de Pasquale, F; Giorgi, G; Paganelli, S

    2004-09-17

    We present a model of quantum teleportation protocol based on a double quantum dot array. The unknown qubit is encoded using a pair of quantum dots, with one excess electron, coupled by tunneling. It is shown how to create a maximally entangled state using an adiabatically increasing Coulomb repulsion between different dot pairs. This entangled state is exploited to perform teleportation again using an adiabatic coupling between itself and the incoming unknown state. Finally, a sudden separation of Bob's qubit allows a time evolution of Alice's, which amounts to a modified version of standard Bell measurement. A transmission over a long distance could be obtained by considering the entangled state of a chain of N coupled double quantum dots. The system is shown to be increasingly robust with N against decoherence due to phonons.

  13. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  14. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.; Fasenfest, Benjamin J.; Behymer, Elaine M.

    2014-07-15

    Tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides are presented. Resonances can be observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides can satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors of over 10.sup.3 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  15. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    PubMed

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  16. Virtual center arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Lipes, R. G.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to increase the amount of data that can be received from outer planet missions are described with emphasis on antenna arraying systems designed to increase the total effective aperture of the receiving system. One such method is virtual center arraying (VCA). In VCA, a combined carrier reference is derived at a point that is, conceptually, the geometric center of the array. This point need not coincide with any of the actual antennas of the array. A noise analysis of the VCA system is given along with formulas for the phase jitter as a function of loop bandwidths and the amount of loop damping. If the ratio of the loop bandwidths of the center loop to the vertex loops is greater than 100, then the jitter is very nearly equal to that expected for ideal combined carrier referencing.

  17. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  18. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  19. Economical custom LSI arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, A.; Smith, A.; Ramondetta, P.; Noto, R.; Lombardi, T.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic design technique uses standard circuit cells for producing large-scale integrated arrays. Computerized fabrication process provides individual cells of high density and efficiency, quick turnaround time, low cost, and ease of corrections for changes and errors.

  20. Conformal array antenna subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    An antenna subsystem to communicate between Ariane 4 and a data relay satellite was studied, concluding that the original ideas on ring antennas should be corrected due to the wide margin of coverage required in elevation for such antennas, which implies the need of splitting the coverage. Nevertheless, the study of cylindrical and conical conformal arrays was continued in view of their intrinsic interest. Needed coverages with specified gain can be obtained with a set of microstrip circular patch antennas. For the lower stage, a single patch is enough. For geostationary missions, one horizontal array is used, and for heliosynchronous missions two horizontal arrays and a vertical one. The numerical study carried out on omniazimuthal ring antennas shows that a tendency to omnidirectional pattern exists in spite of the directivity of the elementary radiators. A small pointing improvement of the meridian pattern can be obtained by means of conical arrays instead of the cylindrical ones.

  1. Multi Sensor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the Multi Sensor Array. The topics include: 1) MSA Algorithm; 2) Types of Sensors for the MSA; 3) How to test the MSA; 4) Monte Carlo Simulation; and 5) Accelerated Life Tests.

  2. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  3. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  4. Sampled Longest Common Prefix Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirén, Jouni

    When augmented with the longest common prefix (LCP) array and some other structures, the suffix array can solve many string processing problems in optimal time and space. A compressed representation of the LCP array is also one of the main building blocks in many compressed suffix tree proposals. In this paper, we describe a new compressed LCP representation: the sampled LCP array. We show that when used with a compressed suffix array (CSA), the sampled LCP array often offers better time/space trade-offs than the existing alternatives. We also show how to construct the compressed representations of the LCP array directly from a CSA.

  5. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  6. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST’s position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed. PMID:26958435

  7. FIR statistics of paired galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the effects of interaction on galaxies (see reviews in this volume by Heckman and Kennicutt). Evidence for enhanced emission from galaxies in pairs first emerged in the radio (Sulentic 1976) and optical (Larson and Tinsley 1978) domains. Results in the far infrared (FIR) lagged behind until the advent of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). The last five years have seen numerous FIR studies of optical and IR selected samples of interacting galaxies (e.g., Cutri and McAlary 1985; Joseph and Wright 1985; Kennicutt et al. 1987; Haynes and Herter 1988). Despite all of this work, there are still contradictory ideas about the level and, even, the reality of an FIR enhancement in interacting galaxies. Much of the confusion originates in differences between the galaxy samples that were studied (i.e., optical morphology and redshift coverage). Here, the authors report on a study of the FIR detection properties for a large sample of interacting galaxies and a matching control sample. They focus on the distance independent detection fraction (DF) statistics of the sample. The results prove useful in interpreting the previously published work. A clarification of the phenomenology provides valuable clues about the physics of the FIR enhancement in galaxies.

  8. Pulsational Pair-instability Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 70–140 {\\text{}}{M}ȯ is explored. Depending upon their mass loss history and rotation rates, these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae (PPISN) producing a great variety of observational transients with total durations ranging from weeks to millennia and luminosities from 1041 to over 1044 erg s‑1. No nonrotating model radiates more than 5× {10}50 erg of light or has a kinetic energy exceeding 5× {10}51 erg, but greater energies are possible, in principle, in magnetar-powered explosions, which are explored. Many events resemble SNe Ibn, SNe Icn, and SNe IIn, and some potential observational counterparts are mentioned. Some PPISN can exist in a dormant state for extended periods, producing explosions millennia after their first violent pulse. These dormant supernovae contain bright Wolf–Rayet stars, possibly embedded in bright X-ray and radio sources. The relevance of PPISN to supernova impostors like Eta Carinae, to superluminous supernovae, and to sources of gravitational radiation is discussed. No black holes between 52 and 133 {\\text{}}{M}ȯ are expected from stellar evolution in close binaries.

  9. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J M; Valles, James M

    2017-03-10

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  10. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C.; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  11. Striped tertiary storage arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.

    1993-01-01

    Data stripping is a technique for increasing the throughput and reducing the response time of large access to a storage system. In striped magnetic or optical disk arrays, a single file is striped or interleaved across several disks; in a striped tape system, files are interleaved across tape cartridges. Because a striped file can be accessed by several disk drives or tape recorders in parallel, the sustained bandwidth to the file is greater than in non-striped systems, where access to the file are restricted to a single device. It is argued that applying striping to tertiary storage systems will provide needed performance and reliability benefits. The performance benefits of striping for applications using large tertiary storage systems is discussed. It will introduce commonly available tape drives and libraries, and discuss their performance limitations, especially focusing on the long latency of tape accesses. This section will also describe an event-driven tertiary storage array simulator that is being used to understand the best ways of configuring these storage arrays. The reliability problems of magnetic tape devices are discussed, and plans for modeling the overall reliability of striped tertiary storage arrays to identify the amount of error correction required are described. Finally, work being done by other members of the Sequoia group to address latency of accesses, optimizing tertiary storage arrays that perform mostly writes, and compression is discussed.

  12. Adaptive multibeam antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. I.

    1984-01-01

    An adaptive multibeam antenna array is considered which will enhance the advantages of a plain one. By providing simultaneous reception of signals from different directions and their sequential processing. The optimization of the array control for maximum interference suppression in the radiation pattern is emphasized. The optimum control is sought with respect to the signal-to-interference power ratio as a genaralized criterion. Sampled useful signals and transmission coefficients are found to be complex-conjugate quantities, assuming compatible formation of beams, so that synphasal equiamplitude addition of signals from all array element is attainable by unique settings of the weight factors. Calculations are simplified by letting the useful signal power in the 1-th beam be approximately equal to the k-th weight factor, before optimizing the weight vector for maximum signal-to-interference ratio. A narrowband interference described by power P and vector V of signal distribution over the array is considered as an example, to demonstrate the algorithm of synthesis. The algorithm, using the Butler matrix, was executed experimentally on a computer for a linear equidistant antenna array of 32 elements with compatible formation of beams.

  13. Solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Emerging satellite designs require increasing amounts of electrical power to operate spacecraft instruments and to provide environments suitable for human habitation. In the past, electrical power was generated by covering rigid honeycomb panels with solar cells. This technology results in unacceptable weight and volume penalties when large amounts of power are required. To fill the need for large-area, lightweight solar arrays, a fabrication technique in which solar cells are attached to a copper printed circuit laminated to a plastic sheet was developed. The result is a flexible solar array with one-tenth the stowed volume and one-third the weight of comparably sized rigid arrays. An automated welding process developed to attack the cells to the printed circuit guarantees repeatable welds that are more tolerant of severe environments than conventional soldered connections. To demonstrate the flight readiness of this technology, the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) was developed and flown on the space shuttle Discovery in September 1984. The tests showed the modes and frequencies of the array to be very close to preflight predictions. Structural damping, however, was higher than anticipated. Electrical performance of the active solar panel was also tested. The flight performance and postflight data evaluation are described.

  14. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  15. Electrostatically clean solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore Garry (Inventor); Krumweide, Duane Eric (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Provided are methods of manufacturing an electrostatically clean solar array panel and the products resulting from the practice of these methods. The preferred method uses an array of solar cells, each with a coverglass where the method includes machining apertures into a flat, electrically conductive sheet so that each aperture is aligned with and undersized with respect to its matched coverglass sheet and thereby fashion a front side shield with apertures (FSA). The undersized portion about each aperture of the bottom side of the FSA shield is bonded to the topside portions nearest the edges of each aperture's matched coverglass. Edge clips are attached to the front side aperture shield edges with the edge clips electrically and mechanically connecting the tops of the coverglasses to the solar panel substrate. The FSA shield, edge clips and substrate edges are bonded so as to produce a conductively grounded electrostatically clean solar array panel.

  16. Interagency Array Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayland, J. W.; Ruskin, A. M.; Bathker, D. A.; Rydgig, R. C.; Brown, D. W.; Madsen, B. D.; Clauss, R. C.; Levy, G. S.; Kerridge, S. J.; Klein, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The interagency array study that was convened in early 1982 to determine which of the world's large radio reception facilities might be feasibly and beneficially enlisted to help support the Voyager encounters at Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989), and also to examine the future for such similar events and options as might appear is discussed. A similar but more specific study of the Parkes Radio Telescope at Uranus Encounter was just then being completed with a strong positive recommendation, and formed the foundation of the broader study. The approach, driving considerations, and outcome of the interagency array study are discussed. The recommendations of the study team concentrated upon the Voyager Encounters are: specifically to develop Parkes for the Uranus Encounter, while pursuing related Advanced Systems development work with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, and to seek support for the Neptune Encounter from Parkes, the Very Large Array near Socorro, Mexico, and the Japanese institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences 64 meter station.

  17. Cooper-pair charge solitons: The electrodynamics of localized charge in a superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Haviland, D.B.; Delsing, P.

    1996-09-01

    One-dimensional arrays of small-capacitance Josephson junctions exhibit a current-voltage curve that is characterized by a zero-current state for bias voltage below a threshold voltage {ital V}{sub {ital t}}. The threshold voltages can be modulated with an external magnetic field {ital B}, which tunes effective Josephson coupling between adjacent electrodes of the array. The dependance of {ital V}{sub {ital t}} on {ital B} is well explained by a model where {ital V}{sub {ital t}} is the injection voltage for a Cooper-pair charge soliton. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Ordered pairing in liquid metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsson, A. E.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1983-01-01

    We study two possible types of pairing involving the protons of a proposed low-temperature liquid phase metallic hydrogen. Electron-proton pairing, which can result in an insulating phase, is investigated by using an approximate solution of an Eliashberg-type equation for the anomalous self-energy. A very low estimate of the transition temperature is obtained by including proton correlations in the effective interaction. For proton-proton pairing, we derive a new proton pair potential based on the Abrikosov wave function. This potential includes the electron-proton interaction to all orders and has a much larger well depth than is obtained with linear screening methods. This suggests the possibility of either a superfluid paired phase analogous to that in He-3, or alternatively a phase with true molecular pairing.

  19. Ensemble treatments of thermal pairing in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen Quang; Dang, Nguyen Dinh

    2009-10-01

    A systematic comparison is conducted for pairing properties of finite systems at nonzero temperature as predicted by the exact solutions of the pairing problem embedded in three principal statistical ensembles, namely the grandcanonical ensemble, canonical ensemble and microcanonical ensemble, as well as the unprojected (FTBCS1+SCQRPA) and Lipkin-Nogami projected (FTLN1+SCQRPA) theories that include the quasiparticle number fluctuation and coupling to pair vibrations within the self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The numerical calculations are performed for the pairing gap, total energy, heat capacity, entropy, and microcanonical temperature within the doubly-folded equidistant multilevel pairing model. The FTLN1+SCQRPA predictions are found to agree best with the exact grand-canonical results. In general, all approaches clearly show that the superfluid-normal phase transition is smoothed out in finite systems. A novel formula is suggested for extracting the empirical pairing gap in reasonable agreement with the exact canonical results.

  20. Dynamical evolution of comet pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Andrea; Fernández, Julio A.

    2016-10-01

    Some Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits (thereafter NEJFCs) show a remarkable similarity in their present orbits, like for instance 169P/NEAT and P/2003 T12 (SOHO), or 252P/LINEAR and P/2016 BA14 (PANSTARRS). By means of numerical integrations we studied the dynamical evolution of these objects. In particular, for each pair of presumably related objects, we are interested in assessing the stability of the orbital parameters for several thousand years, and to find a minimum of their relative spatial distance, coincident with a low value of their relative velocity. For those cases for which we find a well defined minimum of their relative orbital separation, we are trying to reproduce the actual orbit of the hypothetical fragment by modeling a fragmentation of the parent body. Some model parameters are the relative ejection velocity (a few m/s), the orbital point at which the fragmentation could have happened (e.g. perihelion), and the elapsed time since fragmentation. In addition, some possible fragmentation mechanisms, like thermal stress, rotational instability, or collisions, could be explored. According to Fernández J.A and Sosa A. 2015 (Planetary and Space Science 118,pp.14-24), some NEJFCs might come from the outer asteroid belt, and then they would have a more consolidated structure and a higher mineral content than that of comets coming from the trans-Neptunian belt or the Oort cloud. Therefore, such objects would have a much longer physical lifetime in the near-Earth region, and could become potential candidates to produce visible meteor showers (as for example 169P/NEAT which has been identified as the parent body of the alpha-Capricornid meteoroid stream, according to Jenniskens, P., Vaubaillon, J., 2010 (Astron. J. 139), and Kasuga, T., Balam, D.D., Wiegert, P.A., 2010 (Astron. J. 139).

  1. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  2. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  3. Solar array welding developement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  4. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  5. ALMA Extended Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameno, S.; Nakai, N.; Honma, M.

    2013-10-01

    We propose to append five 12-m antennas within 300-km from ALMA to realize high angular resolution of < 1 mas and sensitivity to detect Tb < 1000 K. This ALMA extended array offers a new parameter space of "Thermal universe with VLBI resolution". Proposed science case includes black-hole formation in sub-mm galaxies, mass accretion processes onto protostars, imaging stellar photospheres, distance measurements of stars, and so on. The array also functions as a part of sub-mm VLBI that targets black-hole imaging.

  6. Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. F.

    1976-01-01

    Manufacturing techniques are evaluated using expenses based on experience and studying basic cost factors for each step to evaluate expenses from a first-principles point of view. A formal cost accounting procedure is developed which is used throughout the study for cost comparisons. The first test of this procedure is a comparison of its predicted costs for array module manufacturing with costs from a study which is based on experience factors. A manufacturing cost estimate for array modules of $10/W is based on present-day manufacturing techniques, expenses, and materials costs.

  7. Lax pairs for deformed Minkowski spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyono, Hideki; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    We proceed to study Yang-Baxter deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime based on a conformal embedding. We first revisit a Melvin background and argue a Lax pair by adopting a simple replacement law invented in 1509.00173. This argument enables us to deduce a general expression of Lax pair. Then the anticipated Lax pair is shown to work for arbitrary classical r-matrices with Poincaré generators. As other examples, we present Lax pairs for pp-wave backgrounds, the Hashimoto-Sethi background, the Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich background.

  8. Dual origin of pairing in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idini, A.; Potel, G.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    The pairing correlations of the nucleus 120Sn are calculated by solving the Nambu-Gor'kov equations, including medium polarization effects resulting from the interweaving of quasiparticles, spin and density vibrations, taking into account, within the framework of nuclear field theory (NFT), processes leading to self-energy and vertex corrections and to the induced pairing interaction. From these results one can not only demonstrate the inevitability of the dual origin of pairing in nuclei, but also extract information which can be used at profit to quantitatively disentangle the contributions to the pairing gap Δ arising from the bare and from the induced pairing interaction. The first is the strong 1 S 0 short-range NN potential resulting from meson exchange between nucleons moving in time reversal states within an energy range of hundreds of MeV from the Fermi energy. The second results from the exchange of vibrational modes between nucleons moving within few MeV from the Fermi energy. Short- ( v p bare) and long-range ( v p ind) pairing interactions contribute essentially equally to nuclear Cooper pair stability. That is to the breaking of gauge invariance in open-shell superfluid nuclei and thus to the order parameter, namely to the ground state expectation value of the pair creation operator. In other words, to the emergent property of generalized rigidity in gauge space, and associated rotational bands and Cooper pair tunneling between members of these bands.

  9. Analyzing Responses of Chemical Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Hanying

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a third-generation electronic nose (ENose) capable of continuous monitoring of the International Space Station s cabin atmosphere for specific, harmful airborne contaminants. Previous generations of the ENose have been described in prior NASA Tech Briefs issues. Sensor selection is critical in both (prefabrication) sensor material selection and (post-fabrication) data analysis of the ENose, which detects several analytes that are difficult to detect, or that are at very low concentration ranges. Existing sensor selection approaches usually include limited statistical measures, where selectivity is more important but reliability and sensitivity are not of concern. When reliability and sensitivity can be major limiting factors in detecting target compounds reliably, the existing approach is not able to provide meaningful selection that will actually improve data analysis results. The approach and software reported here consider more statistical measures (factors) than existing approaches for a similar purpose. The result is a more balanced and robust sensor selection from a less than ideal sensor array. The software offers quick, flexible, optimal sensor selection and weighting for a variety of purposes without a time-consuming, iterative search by performing sensor calibrations to a known linear or nonlinear model, evaluating the individual sensor s statistics, scoring the individual sensor s overall performance, finding the best sensor array size to maximize class separation, finding optimal weights for the remaining sensor array, estimating limits of detection for the target compounds, evaluating fingerprint distance between group pairs, and finding the best event-detecting sensors.

  10. Fast 2D DOA Estimation Algorithm by an Array Manifold Matching Method with Parallel Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lisheng; Liu, Sheng; Li, Dong; Jiang, Qingping; Cao, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of two-dimensional (2D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with parallel linear arrays is addressed. Two array manifold matching (AMM) approaches, in this work, are developed for the incoherent and coherent signals, respectively. The proposed AMM methods estimate the azimuth angle only with the assumption that the elevation angles are known or estimated. The proposed methods are time efficient since they do not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) or peak searching. In addition, the complexity analysis shows the proposed AMM approaches have lower computational complexity than many current state-of-the-art algorithms. The estimated azimuth angles produced by the AMM approaches are automatically paired with the elevation angles. More importantly, for estimating the azimuth angles of coherent signals, the aperture loss issue is avoided since a decorrelation procedure is not required for the proposed AMM method. Numerical studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. PMID:26907301

  11. TANGO Array.. 2. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10 14 to 10 18 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of ˜60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜4°. The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  12. Frequency Diverse Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    the methods for electronic scanning of antenna systems. Techniques that have been studied in this connection include frequency variation, phase shift...an array antenna instantaneously into a desired direction where no mechanical mechanism is involved in the scanning process. Electronic scanning... methods including phase scanning, time delay scanning, and frequency scanning have been used in various radar applications; however new and cheaper

  13. A portable array biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Joel P.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Taitt, Chris R.; Fertig, Stephanie; Sapsford, Kim E.; Ligler, Fran S.

    2004-12-01

    An array biosensor developed for performing simultaneous analysis of multiple samples for multiple analytes has been miniaturized and fully automated. The biochemical component of the multi-analyte biosensor consists of a patterned array of biological recognition elements ("capture" antibodies) immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide. A fluorescence assay is performed on the patterned surface, yielding an array of fluorescent spots, the locations of which are used to identify what analyte is present. Signal transduction is accomplished by means of a diode laser for fluorescence excitation, optical filters and a CCD camera for image capture. A laptop computer controls the miniaturized fluidics system and image capture. Data analysis software has been developed to locate each spot and quantify the fluorescent signal in each spot. The array biosensor is capable of detecting a variety of analytes including toxins, bacteria and viruses and shows minimal interference from complex physiological sample matrices such whole blood and blood components, fecal matter, saliva, nasal secretions, and urine. Some results from recent field trials are presented.

  14. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  15. Cellular Array Processing Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harry C.; Preston, Earl W.

    1981-11-01

    The Cellular Array Processing Simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. The synergistic environment that exists between the minicomputer and the array processor gives CAPS its high-speed throughput, while maintaining a convenient conversational user language. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps that are scheduled to be executed on the array processor. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. This feature reduces the need for image storage space, since it is feasible to retain only original images and produce resultant images when needed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms.

  16. Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis was presented. A near-term (1982) factory design is described, and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon and solar-cell arrays are detailed.

  17. The Askaryan Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kara D.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high energy cosmogenic neutrinos could be most efficiently detected in dense, radio frequency (RF) transparent media via the Askaryan effect. Building on the expertise gained by RICE, ANITA and IceCube's radio extension in the use of the Askaryan effect in cold Antarctic ice, we are currently developing an antenna array known as ARA (The Askaryan Radio Array) to be installed in boreholes extending 200 m below the surface of the ice near the geographic South Pole. The unprecedented scale of ARA, which will cover a fiducial area of ~ 100 square kilometers, was chosen to ensure the detection of the flux of neutrinos suggested by the observation of a drop in high energy cosmic ray flux consistent with the GZK cutoff by HiRes and the Pierre Auger Observatory. Funding to develop the instrumentation and install the first prototypes has been granted, and the first components of ARA were installed during the austral summer of 2010-2011. Within 3 years of commencing operation, the full ARA will exceed the sensitivity of any other instrument in the 0.1-10 EeV energy range by an order of magnitude. The primary goal of the ARA array is to establish the absolute cosmogenic neutrino flux through a modest number of events. This information would frame the performance requirements needed to expand the array in the future to measure a larger number of neutrinos with greater angular precision in order to study their spectrum and origins.

  18. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  19. Pair condensation in a finite Fermi system

    SciTech Connect

    Sambataro, M.

    2007-05-15

    The lowest seniority-zero eigenstates of an exactly solvable multilevel pairing Hamiltonian for a finite Fermi system are examined at different pairing regimes. After briefly reviewing the form of the eigenstates in the Richardson formalism, we discuss a different representation of these states in terms of the collective pairs resulting from the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian in a space of two degenerate time-reversed fermions. We perform a two-fold analysis by working both in the fermionic space of these collective pairs and in a space of corresponding elementary bosons. On the fermionic side, we monitor the variations which occur, with increasing the pairing strength, in the structure of both these collective pairs and the lowest eigenstates. On the bosonic side, after reviewing a fermion-boson mapping procedure, we construct exact images of the fermion eigenstates and study their wave function. The analysis allows a close examination of the phenomenon of pair condensation in a finite Fermi system and gives new insights into the evolution of the lowest (seniority-zero) excited states of a pairing Hamiltonian from the unperturbed regime up to a strongly interacting one.

  20. Exploring Pair Programming Benefits for MIS Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dongo, Tendai; Reed, April H.; O'Hara, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Pair programming is a collaborative programming practice that places participants in dyads, working in tandem at one computer to complete programming assignments. Pair programming studies with Computer Science (CS) and Software Engineering (SE) majors have identified benefits such as technical productivity, program/design quality, academic…

  1. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  2. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  3. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  4. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  5. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  6. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  7. Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking north-northeast - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Columbia Falls Radar Site Receive Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Shadagee Ridge Road, Columbia Falls, Washington County, ME

  8. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, T. A.; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  9. PAIR: the predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhi; Shen, Xueling; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    The predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource (PAIR, http://www.cls.zju.edu.cn/pair/), comprised of 5990 experimentally reported molecular interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana together with 145,494 predicted interactions, is currently the most comprehensive data set of the Arabidopsis interactome with high reliability. PAIR predicts interactions by a fine-tuned support vector machine model that integrates indirect evidences for interaction, such as gene co-expressions, domain interactions, shared GO annotations, co-localizations, phylogenetic profile similarities and homologous interactions in other organisms (interologs). These predictions were expected to cover 24% of the entire Arabidopsis interactome, and their reliability was estimated to be 44%. Two independent example data sets were used to rigorously validate the prediction accuracy. PAIR features a user-friendly query interface, providing rich annotation on the relationships between two proteins. A graphical interaction network browser has also been integrated into the PAIR web interface to facilitate mining of specific pathways.

  10. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (about 200 feet) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 192 km (119 miles) x 142 km (88 miles) Location: 17.8 deg. South lat., 178.0 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  11. Two-Dimensional Planar Lightwave Circuit Integrated Spatial Filter Array and Method of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ai, Jun (Inventor); Dimov, Fedor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A large coherent two-dimensional (2D) spatial filter array (SFA), 30 by 30 or larger, is produced by coupling a 2D planar lightwave circuit (PLC) array with a pair of lenslet arrays at the input and output side. The 2D PLC array is produced by stacking a plurality of chips, each chip with a plural number of straight PLC waveguides. A pupil array is coated onto the focal plane of the lenslet array. The PLC waveguides are produced by deposition of a plural number of silica layers on the silicon wafer, followed by photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE) processes. A plural number of mode filters are included in the silica-on-silicon waveguide such that the PLC waveguide is transparent to the fundamental mode but higher order modes are attenuated by 40 dB or more.

  12. A prototypic system of parallel electrophoresis in multiple capillaries coupled with microwell arrays.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhao, Yihua; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-11-01

    We present a microfluidic system that can be directly coupled with microwell array and perform parallel electrophoresis in multiple capillaries simultaneously. The system is based on an array of glass capillaries, fixed in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic scaffold, with one end open for interfacing with microwells. In this capillary array, every two adjacent capillaries act as a pair to be coupled with one microwell; samples in the microwells are introduced and separated by simply applying voltage between two electrodes that are placed at the other ends of capillaries; thus no complicated circuit design is required. We evaluate the performance of this system and perform multiple CE with direct sample introduction from microwell array. Also with this system, we demonstrate the analysis of cellular contents of cells lysed in a microwell array. Our results show that this prototypic system is a promising platform for high-throughput analysis of samples in microwell arrays.

  13. Coherence analysis using canonical coordinate decomposition with applications to sparse processing and optimal array deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.; Pezeshki, Ali; Wade, Robert L.

    2004-09-01

    Sparse array processing methods are typically used to improve the spatial resolution of sensor arrays for the estimation of direction of arrival (DOA). The fundamental assumption behind these methods is that signals that are received by the sparse sensors (or a group of sensors) are coherent. However, coherence may vary significantly with the changes in environmental, terrain, and, operating conditions. In this paper canonical correlation analysis is used to study the variations in coherence between pairs of sub-arrays in a sparse array problem. The data set for this study is a subset of an acoustic signature data set, acquired from the US Army TACOM-ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ. This data set is collected using three wagon-wheel type arrays with five microphones. The results show that in nominal operating conditions, i.e. no extreme wind noise or masking effects by trees, building, etc., the signals collected at different sensor arrays are indeed coherent even at distant node separation.

  14. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  15. Lightweight Parameterized Suffix Array Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomohiro, I.; Deguchi, Satoshi; Bannai, Hideo; Inenaga, Shunsuke; Takeda, Masayuki

    We present a first algorithm for direct construction of parameterized suffix arrays and parameterized longest common prefix arrays for non-binary strings. Experimental results show that our algorithm is much faster than naïve methods.

  16. Concurrent array-based queue

    SciTech Connect

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  17. Initiation of Long-Wave Instability of Vortex Pairs at Cruise Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have usually attributed the initiation of the long-wave instability of a vortex pair to turbulence in the atmosphere or in the wake of the aircraft. The purpose here is to show by use of observations and photographs of condensation trails shed by aircraft at cruise altitudes that another initiating mechanism is not only possible but is usually the mechanism that initiates the long-wave instability at cruise altitudes. The alternate initiating mechanism comes about when engine thrust is robust enough to form an array of circumferential vortices around each jet-engine-exhaust stream. In those cases, initiation begins when the vortex sheet shed by the wing has rolled up into a vortex pair and descended to the vicinity of the inside bottom of the combined shear-layer vortex arrays. It is the in-and-out (up and down) velocity field between sequential circumferential vortices near the bottom of the array that then impresses disturbance waves on the lift-generated vortex pair that initiate the long-wave instability. A time adjustment to the Crow and Bate estimate for vortex linking is then derived for cases when thrust-based linking occurs.

  18. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  19. Conformal Antenna Array Design Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    PLANAR ARRAY PHASE C LbP=IowITH CORRECT CONFORMAL ARRAY PHASE C NbPt NOe OF PhS&. SH-IFT UITSPII- NoP*.GT*1O CONRCLT PHASES ARE USED C TAP19PATTLRN...of Antenna Arrays, Radio Science , Vol. 3, May 1968, pp. 401-522. M. T. Ma, "Theory and Application of Antenna Arrays", Wiley, New York, 1974, Chapter

  20. Detecting a preformed pair phase: Response to a pairing forcing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliavini, A.; Capone, M.; Toschi, A.

    2016-10-01

    The normal state of strongly coupled superconductors is characterized by the presence of "preformed" Cooper pairs well above the superconducting critical temperature. In this regime, the electrons are paired, but they lack the phase coherence necessary for superconductivity. The existence of preformed pairs implies the existence of a characteristic energy scale associated with a pseudogap. Preformed pairs are often invoked to interpret systems where some signatures of pairing are present without actual superconductivity, but an unambiguous theoretical characterization of a preformed-pair system is still lacking. To fill this gap, we consider the response to an external pairing field of an attractive Hubbard model, which hosts one of the cleanest realizations of a preformed pair phase, and a repulsive model where s -wave superconductivity cannot be realized. Using dynamical mean-field theory to study this response, we identify the characteristic features which distinguish the reaction of a preformed pair state from a normal metal without any precursor of pairing. The theoretical detection of preformed pairs is associated with the behavior of the second derivative of the order parameter with respect to the external field, as confirmed by analytic calculations in limiting cases. Our findings provide a solid test bed for the interpretation of state-of-the-art calculations for the normal state of the doped Hubbard model in terms of d -wave preformed pairs and, in perspective, of nonequilibrium experiments in high-temperature superconductors.

  1. Waveguide-excited slot arrays for synthetic array radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostrom, D. E.; Lewis, D. J.; Rupp, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    The basic design considerations for waveguide slottery arrays are reviewed, with emphasis on those design requirements that are most significant to both airborne and spaceborne synthetic array radar (SAR) systems. As an illustration of both design procedures and performance capability of slotted waveguide planar arrays, an L-band planar array was designed, fabricated, and tested. This array has an aperture approximately one meter wide by two meters high and was designed to be a typical submodule of a larger antenna. Measurements of radiation patterns, gain, and VSWR were recorded and are presented, together with the performance characteristics predicted on the basis of theoretical analysis.

  2. Dynamics of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael

    2007-03-01

    DNA sites wrapped into chromatin are sterically occluded from proteins that must bind for processes such as RNA transcription and DNA repair. However, the role of chromatin compaction in biological function is poorly understood. To understand the biological functions of chromatin compaction, we constructed nucleosome arrays that are built with a tandem repeat of high affinity nucleosome positioning sequences, which contain probes for DNA accessibility and chromatin structure. I will describe our results that use restriction enzyme digestion and fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine the probability for DNA site exposure within compacted nucleosome arrays and the time scale for changes in chromatin compaction. I will then discuss how these results help explain how proteins gain access to DNA sites buried within chromatin.

  3. Large solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabtree, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A spectrophotovoltaic converter, a thermophotovoltaic converter, a cassegrainian concentrator, a large silicon cell blanket, and a high flux approach are among the concepts being investigated as part of the multihundred kW solar array program for reducing the cost of photovoltaic energy in space. These concepts involve a range of technology risks, the highest risk being represented by the thermophotovoltaics and spectrophotovoltaics approaches which involve manipulation to of the incoming spectrum to enhance system efficiency. The planar array (solar blanket) has no technology risk and a moderate payback. The primary characteristics, components, and technology concerns of each of these concepts are summarized. An orbital power platform mission in the late 1980's is being used to allow a coherent technology advancement program in order to achieve a ten year life with maintenance at a capital recurring cost of $30/watt based on 1978 dollars.

  4. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  5. Microreactor Array Device

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented. PMID:25736721

  6. Microreactor Array Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Labaer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented.

  7. A Curious Pair of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope has taken the best image ever of a strange and chaotic duo of interwoven galaxies. The images also contain some surprises -- interlopers both far and near. ESO PR Photo 11a/09 A Curious Pair of Galaxies ESO PR Video 11a/09 Arp 261 zoom in ESO PR Video 11b/09 Pan over Arp 261 Sometimes objects in the sky that appear strange, or different from normal, have a story to tell and prove scientifically very rewarding. This was the idea behind Halton Arp's catalogue of Peculiar Galaxies that appeared in the 1960s. One of the oddballs listed there is Arp 261, which has now been imaged in more detail than ever before using the FORS2 instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The image proves to contain several surprises. Arp 261 lies about 70 million light-years distant in the constellation of Libra, the Scales. Its chaotic and very unusual structure is created by the interaction of two galaxies that are engaged in a slow motion, but highly disruptive close encounter. Although individual stars are very unlikely to collide in such an event, the huge clouds of gas and dust certainly do crash into each other at high speed, leading to the formation of bright new clusters of very hot stars that are clearly seen in the picture. The paths of the existing stars in the galaxies are also dramatically disrupted, creating the faint swirls extending to the upper left and lower right of the image. Both interacting galaxies were probably dwarfs not unlike the Magellanic Clouds orbiting our own galaxy. The images used to create this picture were not actually taken to study the interacting galaxies at all, but to investigate the properties of the inconspicuous object just to the right of the brightest part of Arp 261 and close to the centre of the image. This is an unusual exploding star, called SN 1995N, that is thought to be the result of the final collapse of a massive star at the end of its life, a so-called core collapse supernova. SN 1995N is unusual because

  8. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  9. Giant Magnetic Loop Sweeps Through Space Between Stellar Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    Astronomers have found a giant magnetic loop stretched outward from one of the stars making up the famous double-star system Algol. The scientists used an international collection of radio telescopes to discover the feature, which may help explain details of previous observations of the stellar system. "This is the first time we've seen a feature like this in the magnetic field of any star other than the Sun," said William Peterson, of the University of Iowa. The pair, 93 light-years from Earth, includes a star about 3 times more massive than the Sun and a less-massive companion, orbiting it at a distance of 5.8 million miles, only about six percent of the distance between Earth and the Sun. The newly-discovered magnetic loop emerges from the poles of the less-massive star and stretches outward in the direction of the primary star. As the secondary star orbits its companion, one side -- the side with the magnetic loop -- constantly faces the more-massive star, just as the same side of our Moon always faces the Earth. The scientists detected the magnetic loop by making extremely detailed images of the system using an intercontinental set of radio telescopes, including the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array, Very Large Array, and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, along with the Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany. These radio telescopes were used as a single observing system that offered both great detail, or resolving power, and high sensitivity to detect very faint radio waves. When working together, these telescopes are known as the High Sensitivity Array. Algol, in the constellation Perseus, is visible to the naked eye and well-known to amateur astronomers. As seen from Earth, the two stars regularly pass in front of each other, causing a notable change in brightness. The pair completes a cycle of such eclipses in less than three days, making it a popular object for amateur observers. The variability in brightness was discovered by an

  10. Pure Pairing Modes in Trapped Fermion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzi, P.; Hernández, E. S.; Szybisz, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present numerical predictions for the shape of the pairing fluctuations in harmonically trapped atomic 6Li with two spin projections, based on the fluiddynamical description of cold fermions with pairing interactions. In previous works it has been shown that when the equilibrium of a symmetric mixture is perturbed, the linearized fluiddynamic equations decouple into two sets, one containing the sound mode of fermion superfluids and the other the pairing mode. The latter corresponds to oscillations of the modulus of the complex gap and is driven by the kinetic energy densities of the particles and of the pairs. Assuming proportionality between the heat flux and the energy gradient, the particle kinetic energy undergoes a diffusive behavior and the diffusion parameter is the key parameter for the relaxation time scale. We examine a possible range of values for this parameter and find that the shape of the pairing oscillation is rather insensitive to the precise value of the transport coefficient. Moreover, the pairing fluctuation is largely confined to the center of the trap, and the energy of the pairing mode is consistent with the magnitude of the equilibrium gap.

  11. Array Transposition in SSD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    One obstacle to running very large two- and three-dimensional codes on the Cray X-MP and Y-MP systems is to efficiently perform array transpositions using SSD storage. This article discusses how such transpositions can be performed by means of algorithms that feature exclusively unit stride, long vector transfers between main memory and SSD, and which only require a single pass through the data (provided sufficient main memory buffers are available).

  12. Microelectronic Stimulator Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-09

    number of researchers and is an active area of medical research. In a normal eye, in a basic concept 10, 20 Figures la and lb shows a ray trace of two...containing an embedded array of microwires . The glass has a curved surface that conforms to the inner radius of the retina 21. The microelectronic imaging...very small channels perpendicular to the plane of the wafer. The channels are filled with a good electrical conductor forming microwires with one

  13. Polymeric Microcapsule Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-24

    support, microencapsulation and entrapment within a membrane/film or gel. The ideal enzyme immobilization method would (1) Employ mild chemical...yields hollow polymeric microcapsules of uniform diameter and length. These microcapsules are arranged in a high density array in which the...individual capsules protrude from a surface like the bristles of a brush. We have developed procedures for filling these microcapsules with high

  14. Subsurface Deployable Antenna Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-25

    States Patent No. 6,710,746, issued March 23, 2004, to Anderson et al., discloses an antenna having a reconfigurable length, and a method of...an antenna linear extension and retraction apparatus and method of use for a submersible device. The apparatus includes a body having a cavity... microwave communications while at cruising speed and depth. [0027] It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an antenna array

  15. Solar collector array

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  16. The CHARA optical array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlister, Harold A.

    1992-11-01

    The Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) was established in the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia State University in 1984 with the goals of designing, constructing, and then operating a facility for very high spatial resolution astronomy. The interest in such a facility grew out of the participants' decade of activity in speckle interferometry. Although speckle interferometry continues to provide important astrophysical measurements of a variety of objects, many pressing problems require resolution far beyond that which can be expected from single aperture telescopes. In early 1986, CHARA received a grant from the National Science Foundation which has permitted a detailed exploration of the feasibility of constructing a facility which will provide a hundred-fold increase in angular resolution over what is possible by speckle interferometry at the largest existing telescopes. The design concept for the CHARA Array was developed initially with the contractural collaboration of United Technologies Optical Systems, Inc., in West Palm Beach, Florida, an arrangement that expired in August 1987. In late November 1987, the Georgia Tech Research Institute joined with CHARA to continue and complete the design concept study. Very high-resolution imaging at optical wavelengths is clearly coming of age in astronomy. The CHARA Array and other related projects will be important and necessary milestones along the way toward the development of a major national facility for high-resolution imaging--a true optical counterpart to the Very Large Array. Ground-based arrays and their scientific output will lead to high resolution facilities in space and, ultimately, on the Moon.

  17. Large Aperture Acoustic Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    1730 GMT. Several propagation models, encompassing normal mode, parabolic equation, fast field and eigenray approaches, were compared using the array... eigenray ) was chosen as the prediction vehicle due to its robust simplicity in this application where the amplitude is controlled by two dominant paths...to the program as a slant range assuming a homogeneous medium with a sound speed of 1500 in/s. This is not normally the case, and for the Septeller

  18. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, L.; Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.; Domiciano, A.

    We present an interferometric beam recombination technique which allows achromatic and direct true imaging of targets at very high angular resolution. This technique intrinsically overcomes the main problems of Labeyrie's hypertelescope design, and can be used in a nulling configuration. It is thus particularly well suited for high contrast imaging in the context of exo-planet search and characterization especially for future space-borne arrays. We present the concept on a formal basis, and discuss its instrumental implementation.

  19. MEMS Colloid Thruster Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    design the electrodes are recessed relative to the nozzle to avoid voltage breakdown by surface flashover . Their work shows promise, since they have...plated onto the substrate upper surface . One goal of our simulations was to determine an electrode configuration that optimized performance. The...transmission line and electrode pattern. Thus, we can precisely define the emitter electrode separation in the array to avoid surface flashover , which occurs

  20. Hexagonal Mirror Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century, including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. A segmented array of mirrors was designed by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center for solar the concentrator test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for powering solar thermal propulsion engines. Each hexagon mirror has a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The aluminum mirrors were polished with a diamond turning machine, that creates a glass-like reflective finish on metal. The precision fabrication machinery at the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center at MSFC can polish specialized optical elements to a world class quality of smoothness. This image shows optics physicist, Vince Huegele, examining one of the 144-segment hexagonal mirrors of the 18-foot diameter array at the MSFC solar concentrator test stand.

  1. Hexagonal Mirror Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century, including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. A segmented array of mirrors was designed by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center for the solar concentrator test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for powering solar thermal propulsion engines. Each hexagon mirror has a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The aluminum mirrors were polished with a diamond turning machine that creates a glass-like reflective finish on metal. The precision fabrication machinery at the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center at MSFC can polish specialized optical elements to a world class quality of smoothness. This image shows optics physicist, Vince Huegele, examining one of the 144-segment hexagonal mirrors of the 18-foot diameter array at the MSFC solar concentrator test stand.

  2. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  3. Spaceborne Processor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  4. TANGO ARRAY II: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    The angular and energy resolution of the TANGO Array has been obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The AIRES code, with the SYBILL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 1014 eV to 1018 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detector stations (water ˇCerenkov detectors), including the electronics, pick up noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cabling. The trigger stage is taken into account in order to produce estimates of the trigger efficiency of the array and to check the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper describes the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and presents the simulated data. These simulations indicate that the accuracy of the cosmic ray primary energy determination is expected to be ˜ 60 % and the precision in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜ 4 degrees.

  5. Solar array construction

    DOEpatents

    Crouthamel, Marvin S.; Coyle, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    An interconnect tab on each cell of a first set of circular solar cells connects that cell in series with an adjacent cell in the set. This set of cells is arranged in alternate columns and rows of an array and a second set of similar cells is arranged in the remaining alternate columns and rows of the array. Three interconnect tabs on each solar cell of the said second set are employed to connect the cells of the second set to one another, in series and to connect the cells of the second set to those of the first set in parallel. Some tabs (making parallel connections) connect the same surface regions of adjacent cells to one another and others (making series connections) connect a surface region of one cell to the opposite surface region of an adjacent cell; however, the tabs are so positioned that the array may be easily assembled by depositing the cells in a certain sequence and in proper orientation.

  6. Transmissive Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Moseley, H. S.; Fettig, R. K.; Kuhn, J. L.; Woodgate, B. E.; Kimble, R. A.; Orloff, J. H.

    1999-12-01

    We report further progress on the development of a two-dimensional array of microshutters, which can be used as a high efficiency, high contrast field selection device for a multi-object spectrometer for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The device is a close packed array of shutters, with a typical size of 100 microns square and an area filling factor of up to 80%. Each shutter, made of single crystal silicon or silicon nitride with an appropriate optical coating, pivots on a torsion flexure along one edge. Each of the shutters is individually selectable. Although these devices can be used as reflection devices, their primary mode of operation is in transmission, which provides the minimum possible level of scattered light. An original double-shutter mechanism is employed for actuation. Small shutter arrays have been built using a Focus Ion Beam milling machine is a 3 x 3 double shutter actuation with a micro-manipulator under electron microscope observation has been demonstrated. An important aspect of this study has been to demonstrate the reliability of the structures over its expected lifetime. We analyzed stiffness, strength and fatigue issues of two good candidate materials, single crystal silicon and silicon nitride. Both appear to be suitable from the mechanical point of view. This project is supported by NASA grants.

  7. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, F.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Lopez, B.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by reconfiguring images instead of pupils. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID by comparison to the more commonly quoted point-spread function, PSF) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field limited to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance. We also discuss the application of IRAN to improve the performances of imaging and/or nulling interferometers like the full-fledged VLTI array or the DARWIN space-borne mission.

  8. Pair supersolid with atom-pair hopping on the state-dependent triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanzhou; Yin, Ruoxi; Wang, Yancheng

    2013-11-01

    We systematically study an extended Bose-Hubbard model with atom hopping and atom-pair hopping in the presence of a three-body constraint on the triangular lattice. By means of large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations, the ground-state phase diagram is studied. We find a first-order transition between the atomic superfluid phase and the pair superfluid phase when the ratio of the atomic hopping and the atom-pair hopping is adapted. The first-order transition remains unchanged under various conditions. We then focus on the interplay among the atom-pair hopping, the on-site repulsion, and the nearest-neighbor repulsion. With on-site repulsion present, we observe first-order transitions between the Mott insulators and pair superfluid driven by the pair hopping. With the nearest-neighbor repulsion turning on, three typical solid phases with 2/3, 1, and 4/3 filling emerge at small atom-pair hopping region. A stable pair supersolid phase is found at small on-site repulsion. This is due to the three-body constraint and the pair hopping, which essentially make the model a quasihardcore boson system. Thus the pair supersolid state emerges basing on the order-by-disorder mechanism, by which hardcore bosons avoid classical frustration on the triangular lattice. Without on-site repulsion, the transitions between the pair supersolid and the atom superfluid or pair superfluid are first order, except for the particle-hole symmetric point. With weak on-site repulsion and atom hopping turning on, the transition between the pair supersolid and pair superfluid phase becomes continuous. The transition between solid and pair supersolid is three-dimensional XY university, with dynamical exponent z=1 and correlation exponent ν=0.67155. The thermal melting of pair supersolid belongs to the two-dimensional Ising university. We check both energetic and mechanical balance of pair supersolid phase. Lowering the three-body constraint, no pair supersolid is found due to the absence of

  9. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Harman, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  10. Pair Creation at Large Inherent Angles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T.; Schroeder, D.V.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    In the next-generation linear colliders, the low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs created during the collision of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} beams would cause potential deleterious background problems to the detectors. At low collider energies, the pairs are made essentially by the incoherent process, where the pair is created by the interaction of beamstrahlung photons on the individual particles in the oncoming beam. This problem was first identified by Zolotarev, et al[1]. At energies where the beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon} lies approximately in the range 0.6 {approx}< {Upsilon} {approx}< 100, pair creation from the beamstrahlung photons is dominated by a coherent process, first noted by Chen[2]. The seriousness of this pair creation problem lies in the transverse momenta that the pair particles carry when leaving the interaction point (IP) with large angles. One source of transverse momentum is from the kick by the field of the oncoming beam which results in an outcoming angle {theta} {proportional_to} 1/{radical}x, where x is the fractional energy of the particle relative to the initial beam particle energy[2,3]. As was shown in Ref. 131, there in fact exists an energy threshold for the coherent pairs, where x{sub th} {approx}> 1/2{Upsilon}. Thus within a tolerable exiting angle, there exists an upper limit for {Upsilon} where all coherent pairs would leave the detector through the exhaust port[4]. A somewhat different analysis has been done by Schroeder[5]. In the next generation of linear colliders, as it occurs, the coherent pairs can be exponentially suppressed[2] by properly choosing the {Upsilon}({approx}< 0.6). When this is achieved, the incoherent pairs becomes dominant. Since the central issue is the transverse momentum for particles with large angles, we notice that there is another source for it. Namely, when the pair particles are created at low energies, the intrinsic angles of these pairs when produced may already be large. This issue was

  11. Complementary layer pairs of plasmonic ladder-like structured films: Fabrication and visible-near-infrared properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Gangadhar; Mandal, P.; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-08-01

    Complementary layer pairs consisting of an array of elongated gold patches on one layer with the complementary elongated holes on a second separated gold layer were fabricated by laser interference lithography using a double-exposure method. The anisotropic complementary layers, with a stretched hexagonal lattice, show polarization dependent enhanced transmittance at near-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths of the peak transmittance through the plasmonic films are well correlated with the wavelengths of the resonant excitations of surface plasmon resonances of the system. The enhanced transmittance through such complementary layer pairs and the role played by the plasmonic resonances at the wavelengths with peak transmittance are confirmed through electromagnetic simulations. The enhanced transmittance is mediated by the plasmonic resonances of the hole arrays or cavity resonances due to the pair of complementary layers.

  12. Solid state neutron detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  13. Closed-Form Evaluation of Mutual Coupling in a Planar Array of Circular Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    The integral expression for the mutual admittance between circular apertures in a planar array is evaluated in closed form. Very good accuracy is realized when compared with values that were obtained by numerical integration. Utilization of this closed-form expression, for all element pairs that are separated by more than one element spacing, yields extremely accurate results and significantly reduces the computation time that is required to analyze the performance of a large electronically scanning antenna array.

  14. Resolving phase ambiguities in the calibration of redundant interferometric arrays: implications for array design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurien, Binoy G.; Tarokh, Vahid; Rachlin, Yaron; Shah, Vinay N.; Ashcom, Jonathan B.

    2016-10-01

    We provide new results enabling robust interferometric image reconstruction in the presence of unknown aperture piston variation via the technique of redundant spacing calibration (RSC). The RSC technique uses redundant measurements of the same interferometric baseline with different pairs of apertures to reveal the piston variation among these pairs. In both optical and radio interferometry, the presence of phase-wrapping ambiguities in the measurements is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed for reliable image reconstruction. In this paper, we show that these ambiguities affect recently developed RSC phasor-based reconstruction approaches operating on the complex visibilities, as well as traditional phase-based approaches operating on their logarithm. We also derive new sufficient conditions for an interferometric array to be immune to these ambiguities in the sense that their effect can be rendered benign in image reconstruction. This property, which we call wrap-invariance, has implications for the reliability of imaging via classical three-baseline phase closures as well as generalized closures. We show that wrap-invariance is conferred upon arrays whose interferometric graph satisfies a certain cycle-free condition. For cases in which this condition is not satisfied, a simple algorithm is provided for identifying those graph cycles which prevent its satisfaction. We apply this algorithm to diagnose and correct a member of a pattern family popular in the literature.

  15. Anyon pairing via phonon-mediated interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, B. S.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we study the pairing of anyons subjected to an external uniform magnetic field and confined in a two-dimensional parabolic quantum dot within the framework of Fröhlich large bipolaron theory, motivated by the Wilczek’s prescription that treats anyons as composites having both charges and fictitious flux tubes. In this model, electrons bound to Aharanov-Bohm type flux tubes and surrounded by a cloud of virtual LO phonons interact with each other through the long range Coulomb and statistical potentials. In order to discuss the effects of both spatial confinement potential and external uniform magnetic field on the boundaries of the stability region of such a pairing in real space, we perform a self-consistent treatment of the ground-state energies of both an interacting anyon pair and two noninteracting anyons. Our results suggest that two interacting anyons can be bound into a condensate anyon pair through a phonon-mediated interaction.

  16. Temporal Multimode Storage of Entangled Photon Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiranov, Alexey; Strassmann, Peter C.; Lavoie, Jonathan; Brunner, Nicolas; Huber, Marcus; Verma, Varun B.; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P.; Lita, Adriana E.; Marsili, Francesco; Afzelius, Mikael; Bussières, Félix; Gisin, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Multiplexed quantum memories capable of storing and processing entangled photons are essential for the development of quantum networks. In this context, we demonstrate and certify the simultaneous storage and retrieval of two entangled photons inside a solid-state quantum memory and measure a temporal multimode capacity of ten modes. This is achieved by producing two polarization-entangled pairs from parametric down-conversion and mapping one photon of each pair onto a rare-earth-ion-doped (REID) crystal using the atomic frequency comb (AFC) protocol. We develop a concept of indirect entanglement witnesses, which can be used as Schmidt number witnesses, and we use it to experimentally certify the presence of more than one entangled pair retrieved from the quantum memory. Our work puts forward REID-AFC as a platform compatible with temporal multiplexing of several entangled photon pairs along with a new entanglement certification method, useful for the characterization of multiplexed quantum memories.

  17. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  18. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  19. Mixed parity pairing in a dipolar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruun, G. M.; Hainzl, C.; Laux, M.

    2016-10-01

    We show that fermionic dipoles in a two-layer geometry form Cooper pairs with both singlet and triplet components when they are tilted with respect to the normal of the planes. The mixed parity pairing arises because the interaction between dipoles in the two different layers is not inversion symmetric. We use an efficient eigenvalue approach to calculate the zero-temperature phase diagram of the system as a function of the dipole orientation and the layer distance. The phase diagram contains purely triplet as well as mixed singlet and triplet superfluid phases. We show in detail how the pair wave function for dipoles residing in different layers smoothly changes from singlet to triplet symmetry as the orientation of the dipoles is changed. Our results indicate that dipolar quantum gases can be used to unambiguously observe mixed parity pairing.

  20. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-02-14

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  1. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    ScienceCinema

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  2. Pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Smith, R. A.; Jackson, A. D.

    1981-12-01

    The correlated-basis-function method is extended to deal with pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. With a variational ansatz for the model wave function we derive the "correlated" analog of the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (or Balian-Werthamer), Anderson-Brinkman-Morel theory of pairing. A suitable (and well-controlled) set of approximations brings the theory into a form identical to the conventional theories, but with the bare interaction replaced by a weak effective interaction and the bare single-particle energies replaced by an effective single-particle spectrum. As usual, liquid 3He provides a very stringent test of the theory, as both the interaction and the experimental facts are pretty clear. The variational estimates for the pairing interaction are improved by nonorthogonal perturbation theory. We find the expected enhancement of the attraction in P waves, although the restriction to effective two-body interactions appears to be insufficient to generate P-wave pairing.

  3. Polarization proximity effect in isolator crystal pairs.

    PubMed

    Linzon, Y; Ferrera, M; Razzari, L; Pignolet, A; Morandotti, R

    2008-12-01

    We experimentally study the polarization dynamics (orientation and ellipticity) of near-infrared light transmitted through magneto-optical yttrium iron garnet isolator crystal pairs using a modified balanced detection scheme. When the pair separation is in the submillimeter range, we observed a proximity effect in which the saturation field is reduced by up to 20%. One-dimensional calculations suggest that the proximity effect originates from magnetostatic interactions between the dipole moments of the isolator crystals.

  4. Alternative DNA base pairing through metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Clever, Guido H; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Base-pairing in the naturally occurring DNA and RNA oligonucleotide duplexes is based on π-stacking, hydrogen bonding, and shape complementarity between the nucleobases adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine as well as on the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance in aqueous media. This complex system of multiple supramolecular interactions is the product of a long-term evolutionary process and thus highly optimized to serve its biological functions such as information storage and processing. After the successful implementation of automated DNA synthesis, chemists have begun to introduce artificial modifications inside the core of the DNA double helix in order to study various aspects of base pairing, generate new base pairs orthogonal to the natural ones, and equip the biopolymer with entirely new functions. The idea to replace the hydrogen bonding interactions with metal coordination between ligand-like nucleosides and suitable transition metal ions culminated in the development of a plethora of artificial base-pairing systems termed "metal base-pairs" which were shown to strongly enhance the DNA duplex stability. Furthermore, they show great potential for the use of DNA as a molecular wire in nanoscale electronic architectures. Although single electrons have proven to be transmitted by natural DNA over a distance of several base pairs, the high ohmic resistance of unmodified oligonucleotides was identified as a serious obstacle. By exchanging some or all of the Watson-Crick base pairs in DNA with metal complexes, this problem may be solved. In the future, these research efforts are supposed to lead to DNA-like materials with superior conductivity for nano-electronic applications. Other fields of potential application such as DNA-based supramolecular architecture and catalysis may be strongly influenced by these developments as well. This text is meant to illustrate the basic concepts of metal-base pairing and give an outline over recent developments in this field.

  5. Ultrabright source of entangled photon pairs.

    PubMed

    Dousse, Adrien; Suffczyński, Jan; Beveratos, Alexios; Krebs, Olivier; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Bloch, Jacqueline; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale

    2010-07-08

    A source of triggered entangled photon pairs is a key component in quantum information science; it is needed to implement functions such as linear quantum computation, entanglement swapping and quantum teleportation. Generation of polarization entangled photon pairs can be obtained through parametric conversion in nonlinear optical media or by making use of the radiative decay of two electron-hole pairs trapped in a semiconductor quantum dot. Today, these sources operate at a very low rate, below 0.01 photon pairs per excitation pulse, which strongly limits their applications. For systems based on parametric conversion, this low rate is intrinsically due to the Poissonian statistics of the source. Conversely, a quantum dot can emit a single pair of entangled photons with a probability near unity but suffers from a naturally very low extraction efficiency. Here we show that this drawback can be overcome by coupling an optical cavity in the form of a 'photonic molecule' to a single quantum dot. Two coupled identical pillars-the photonic molecule-were etched in a semiconductor planar microcavity, using an optical lithography method that ensures a deterministic coupling to the biexciton and exciton energy states of a pre-selected quantum dot. The Purcell effect ensures that most entangled photon pairs are emitted into two cavity modes, while improving the indistinguishability of the two optical recombination paths. A polarization entangled photon pair rate of 0.12 per excitation pulse (with a concurrence of 0.34) is collected in the first lens. Our results open the way towards the fabrication of solid state triggered sources of entangled photon pairs, with an overall (creation and collection) efficiency of 80%.

  6. Formation of asteroid pairs by rotational fission.

    PubMed

    Pravec, P; Vokrouhlický, D; Polishook, D; Scheeres, D J; Harris, A W; Galád, A; Vaduvescu, O; Pozo, F; Barr, A; Longa, P; Vachier, F; Colas, F; Pray, D P; Pollock, J; Reichart, D; Ivarsen, K; Haislip, J; Lacluyze, A; Kusnirák, P; Henych, T; Marchis, F; Macomber, B; Jacobson, S A; Krugly, Yu N; Sergeev, A V; Leroy, A

    2010-08-26

    Pairs of asteroids sharing similar heliocentric orbits, but not bound together, were found recently. Backward integrations of their orbits indicated that they separated gently with low relative velocities, but did not provide additional insight into their formation mechanism. A previously hypothesized rotational fission process may explain their formation-critical predictions are that the mass ratios are less than about 0.2 and, as the mass ratio approaches this upper limit, the spin period of the larger body becomes long. Here we report photometric observations of a sample of asteroid pairs, revealing that the primaries of pairs with mass ratios much less than 0.2 rotate rapidly, near their critical fission frequency. As the mass ratio approaches 0.2, the primary period grows long. This occurs as the total energy of the system approaches zero, requiring the asteroid pair to extract an increasing fraction of energy from the primary's spin in order to escape. We do not find asteroid pairs with mass ratios larger than 0.2. Rotationally fissioned systems beyond this limit have insufficient energy to disrupt. We conclude that asteroid pairs are formed by the rotational fission of a parent asteroid into a proto-binary system, which subsequently disrupts under its own internal system dynamics soon after formation.

  7. On cooperative instabilities of parallel vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, R. L.; Ortega, J. M.; Marcus, P. S.; Savas, Ö.

    2004-10-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the instabilities of a pair of parallel unequal-strength vortices. We extend the analyses of a vortex in an external strain field (Crow, AIAA J. vol. 8, 1970, p. 2172; Widnall et al., J. Fluid Mech. vol. 66, 1974, p. 35) to include the orbital motion of the vortex pair. For counter-rotating pairs, the classic Crow-type periodic displacement perturbations are unstable for all vortex strength ratios, with fastest-growing wavelengths several times the vortex spacing. For co-rotating pairs, the orbital motion acts to suppress instability due to displacement perturbations. Instabilities in this case arise for elliptic perturbations at wavelengths that scale with the vortex core size. We also examine the influence of a second vortex pair by extending Crouch's (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 350, 1997, p. 311) analysis. Numerical results from a spectral initial-value code with subgrid-scale modelling agree with the growth rates from the theoretical models. Computations reveal the nonlinear evolution at late times, including wrapping and ring-rejection behaviour observed in experiments. A pair of co-rotating Gaussian vortices perturbed by noise develops elliptic instabilities, leading to the formation of vorticity bridges between the two vortices. The bridging is a prelude to vortex merger. Analytic, computational and experimental results agree well at circulation Reynolds numbers of order 10(5) .

  8. Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; Verma, Savita Arora

    2011-01-01

    Parallel runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace but poor visibility conditions reduce the use of these operations. The NextGen and SESAR Programs have identified the capacity benefits from increased use of closely-space parallel runway. Previous research examined the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This simulation study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s (+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that was about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation and auto speed control future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Results show the operations in this study were acceptable and safe. Subjective workload, when using the pairing procedures and tools, was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness was typically moderate to high. Pilot workload was influenced by display type and automation condition. Further research on pairing and off-nominal conditions is required however, this investigation identified promising findings about the feasibility of closely-spaced parallel runway operations.

  9. Seniority zero pair coupled cluster doubles theory.

    PubMed

    Stein, Tamar; Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2014-06-07

    Coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations accurately describes weak electron correlation but is known to fail in cases of strong static correlation. Fascinatingly, however, pair coupled cluster doubles (p-CCD), a simplified version of the theory limited to pair excitations that preserve the seniority of the reference determinant (i.e., the number of unpaired electrons), has mean field computational cost and is an excellent approximation to the full configuration interaction (FCI) of the paired space provided that the orbital basis defining the pairing scheme is adequately optimized. In previous work, we have shown that optimization of the pairing scheme in the seniority zero FCI leads to a very accurate description of static correlation. The same conclusion extends to p-CCD if the orbitals are optimized to make the p-CCD energy stationary. We here demonstrate these results with numerous examples. We also explore the contributions of different seniority sectors to the coupled cluster doubles (CCD) correlation energy using different orbital bases. We consider both Hartree-Fock and Brueckner orbitals, and the role of orbital localization. We show how one can pair the orbitals so that the role of the Brueckner orbitals at the CCD level is retained at the p-CCD level. Moreover, we explore ways of extending CCD to accurately describe strongly correlated systems.

  10. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y.

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  11. Phased array ghost elimination

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  12. Compact Transducers and Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Soc. Am., 104, pp.64-71 44 25.Decarpigny, J.N., J.C. Debus, B. Tocquet & D. Boucher. 1985. "In-Air Analysis Of Piezoelectric Tonpilz Transducers In A... Transducers and Arrays Final Report May 2005 Contacts: Dr. Robert E. Newnham The Pennsylvania State University, 251 MRL, University Park, PA 16802 phone...814) 865-1612 fax: (814) 865-2326 email: ....c xx.....i.i.....ht.. .u a.p.u..c.e.du. Dr. Richard J. Meyer, Jr. Systems Engineering ( Transducers ), ARL

  13. Electromagnetic energy transport in a chain waveguide of silver nanoshell cylinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Jesly; Ajith, R.; Mathew, Vincent

    2013-08-01

    Plasmonic wave propagation in a chain waveguide created by a triangular array of silver nanoshell cylinder was investigated using finite element method and Finite Difference Time Domain Method. It is observed that the trimer nanoshell cylinder array provides better field propagation compared to single-chain and pair-chain nanoshell cylinder arrays. Results show that the resonant wavelength of the structure is highly sensitive to the permittivity of either the core or the surrounding medium. It is also observed that as the core thickness of the waveguide is increased surface plasmon resonance shows a red shift.

  14. Polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2013-01-01

    Main-group classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (CLPs and FLPs) comprising strong Lewis acids (LAs) and strong Lewis bases (LBs) are highly active for polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes, affording typically high molecular weight polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Especially effective systems are the Lewis pairs (LPs) consisting of the strong LA Al(C6F5)3 and strong LBs, such as achiral phosphines and chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes, and phosphazene superbases, for polymerization of methacrylates and acrylamides as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones. Chain initiation involves cooperative addition of LPs to the monomer to generate zwitterionic active species, and chain propagation proceeds via a bimetallic, activated-monomer addition mechanism. Transition metal nucleophile/electrophile pairs comprising neutral metallocene bis(ester enolate)s and strong LAs E(C6F5)3 (E = Al, B) generate two drastically different polymerization systems, depending on the LA. With E = Al, catalyst activation and chain initiating events lead to dually active ion-pairs, thereby effecting ion-pairing polymerization that affords polymers with unique stereo-multiblock microstructures. With E = B, on the other hand, the FLP-induced catalyst activation generates metallacyclic cations paired with the hydridoborate anion [HB(C6F5)3](-); uniquely, such ion-pairs effect catalytic polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes by an H-shuttling mechanism, with the cation catalyzing chain growth and the anion promoting chain transfer by shuttling the hydride between the cation and anion centers through the neutral borane.

  15. Algorithm for Aligning an Array of Receiving Radio Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, David

    2006-01-01

    A digital-signal-processing algorithm (somewhat arbitrarily) called SUMPLE has been devised as a means of aligning the outputs of multiple receiving radio antennas in a large array for the purpose of receiving a weak signal transmitted by a single distant source. As used here, aligning signifies adjusting the delays and phases of the outputs from the various antennas so that their relatively weak replicas of the desired signal can be added coherently to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved reception, as though one had a single larger antenna. The method was devised to enhance spacecraft-tracking and telemetry operations in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN); the method could also be useful in such other applications as both satellite and terrestrial radio communications and radio astronomy. Heretofore, most commonly, alignment has been effected by a process that involves correlation of signals in pairs. This approach necessitates the use of a large amount of hardware most notably, the N(N - 1)/2 correlators needed to process signals from all possible pairs of N antennas. Moreover, because the incoming signals typically have low SNRs, the delay and phase adjustments are poorly determined from the pairwise correlations. SUMPLE also involves correlations, but the correlations are not performed in pairs. Instead, in a partly iterative process, each signal is appropriately weighted and then correlated with a composite signal equal to the sum of the other signals (see Figure 1). One benefit of this approach is that only N correlators are needed; in an array of N much greater than 1 antennas, this results in a significant reduction of the amount of hardware. Another benefit is that once the array achieves coherence, the correlation SNR is N - 1 times that of a pair of antennas.

  16. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  17. Microplasma generating array

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Chen; Hoskinson, Alan R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-10-04

    A microplasma generator includes first and second conductive resonators disposed on a first surface of a dielectric substrate. The first and second conductive resonators are arranged in line with one another with a gap defined between a first end of each resonator. A ground plane is disposed on a second surface of the dielectric substrate and a second end of each of the first and second resonators is coupled to the ground plane. A power input connector is coupled to the first resonator at a first predetermined distance from the second end chosen as a function of the impedance of the first conductive resonator. A microplasma generating array includes a number of resonators in a dielectric material substrate with one end of each resonator coupled to ground. A micro-plasma is generated at the non-grounded end of each resonator. The substrate includes a ground electrode and the microplasmas are generated between the non-grounded end of the resonator and the ground electrode. The coupling of each resonator to ground may be made through controlled switches in order to turn each resonator off or on and therefore control where and when a microplasma will be created in the array.

  18. Chirped microlens arrays for diode laser circularization and beam expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Peter; Dannberg, Peter; Hoefer, Bernd; Beckert, Erik

    2005-08-01

    Single-mode diode lasers are well-established light sources for a huge number of applications but suffer from astigmatism, beam ellipticity and large manufacturing tolerances of beam parameters. To compensate for these shortcomings, various approaches like anamorphic prism pairs and cylindrical telescopes for circularization as well as variable beam expanders based on zoomed telescopes for precise adjustment of output beam parameters have been employed in the past. The presented new approach for both beam circularization and expansion is based on the use of microlens arrays with chirped focal length: Selection of lenslets of crossed cylindrical microlens arrays as part of an anamorphic telescope enables circularization, astigmatism correction and divergence tolerance compensation of diode lasers simultaneously. Another promising application of chirped spherical lens array telescopes is stepwise variable beam expansion for circular laser beams of fiber or solid-state lasers. In this article we describe design and manufacturing of beam shaping systems with chirped microlens arrays fabricated by polymer-on-glass replication of reflow lenses. A miniaturized diode laser module with beam circularization and astigmatism correction assembled on a structured ceramics motherboard and a modulated RGB laser-source for photofinishing applications equipped with both cylindrical and spherical chirped lens arrays demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system design approach.

  19. Biomolecule derived nanostructured arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen

    During the last decade, intensive research have been reported on biomimetic approaches towards achieving mono-dispersed nanoparticles, and building self-assembled system out of those (organizing nanoparticles). However the development of this research avenue is being hindered by the limited knowledge and very few practical, efficient, cost-effective approaches for implementation of the bio-derived arrays into engineering practice. The objective of this work is to biomimeticaly form nanocomposite materials using a simple, rapid, inexpensive, scalable approach, which is general enough and not limited to colloidal particle self-assembly. Throughout the studies, we have developed a universally applicable process, which is to fabricate macro-biomolecular arrays on solid substrates based on the convective self-assembly of colloidal particles. We have demonstrated that protein (ferritin) and virus (phage) arrays were directly deposited onto solid substrates such as glass, silicon wafer, and gold substrate in closed or near closed-packed order. The arrays were further incorporated into a more robust silica matrix, in such that strengthens the thermal stability and provides porous accessibility. After treatment in controlled pyrolysis, the organic protein shell was removed, left mono-dispersed iron-oxide nanoparticles intact on the substrate or in the silica matrix. Both iron-oxide nanoparticles arrays with or without silica matrix have been further characterized to possess superferromagnetic properties at low temperature (15 K), same as that in bulk material. Initial work on protein patterning, through combining either lithography based top-down or bottom-up techniques with our novel deposition approach, was presented as well. Thin film deposition of mesoporous materials using convective self-assembly is another main part in this work. Both silica and carbon mesoporous thin films were successfully formed using the convective self-assembly horizontal-coating approach. We

  20. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  1. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Okandan, Murat; Stein, David J.; Yang, Pin; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Dellinger, Jennifer

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  2. Geometrical parameters of E+S pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Local environmental conditions (i.e., density and angular momentum properties of protogalactic clouds) are thought to be factors affecting the ultimate morphology of a galaxy. The existence of significant numbers of mixed morphology (E/SO+S) pairs of galaxies would represent a direct challenge to this idea unless all early-type components are formed by mergers. The authors wished to isolate candidate E+S pairs for detailed study. The authors have observed 22 pairs of mixed morphology galaxies (containing at least one early-type component) selected from a catalog of Sulentic (1988: unpublished) based upon the ESO sky survey. The observed sample and relevant morphological and interaction characteristics are summarized in tabular form. The authors report the relevant geometrical properties of the galaxies in another table. They list the maximum values measured for the ellipticity and the a(4)/a shape parameter together with the total measured twisting along the profile beyond the seeing disk (they set an inner limit of 3 arcsed). An asterisk indicates objects in which a(4)/a is neither predominantly boxy nor disky. They found a large number of true mixed pairs with 13/22 E+S pairs in the present sample. The remaining objects include 5 disk pairs (composed of SO and S members) and 3 early-type pairs comprising E and SO members. They estimate that between 25 and 50 percent of the pairs in any complete sample will be of the E+S type. This suggests that 100 to 200 such pairs exist on the sky brighter than m sub pg = 16.0. They found no global evidence for a difference between E members of this sample and those in more general samples (e.g., Bender et al. 1989). In particular, they found that about 30 percent of the early-type galaxies cannot be classified either predominantly boxy or disky because the a(4)/a profile shows both of these features at a comparable level or does not show any significant trend. Isophotal twisting is observed with a range and distribution

  3. Theoretical study of pair density wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhichao

    In conventional superconductors, the Cooper pairs are formed from quasiparticles. We explore another type of superconducting state, a pair density wave (PDW) order, which spontaneously breaks some of the translational and point group symmetries. In a PDW superconductor, the order parameter is a periodic function of the center-of-mass coordinate, and the spatial average value of the superconducting order parameter vanishes. In the early 1960s, following the success of the BCS theory of superconductivity, Fulde and Ferrell and Larkin and Ovchinnikov (FFLO) developed theories of inhomogeneous superconducting states. Because of this Zeeman splitting in a magnetic field, the Cooper pairs having a nonzero center-of-mass momentum are more stable than the normal pairing, leading to the FFLO state. Experiments suggest possible occurrence of the FFLO state in the heavy-fermion compound CeCoIn5, and in quasi-low-dimensional organic superconductors. FFLO phases have also been argued to be of importance in understanding ultracold atomic Fermi gases and in the formation of color superconductivity in high density quark matter. In all Fermi superfluids known at the present time, Cooper pairs are composed of particles with spin 1/2. The spin component of a pair wave function can be characterized by its total spin S = 0 (singlet) and S = 1 (triplet). In the discovered broken inversion superconductors CePt3Si, Li2Pt3B, and Li2Pd3B, the magnetic field leads to novel inhomogeneous superconducting states, namely the helical phase and the multiple-q phase. Its order parameter exhibits periodicity similar to FFLO phase, and the consequences of both phases are same: the enhancement of transition temperature as a function of magnetic field. We have studied the PDW phases in broken parity superconductors with vortices included. By studying PDW vortex states, we find the usual Abrikosov vortex solution is unstable against a new solution with fractional vortex pairs. We have also studied the

  4. Solid state image sensing arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadasiv, G.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of a photodiode transistor image sensor array in silicon, and tests on individual elements of the array are described along with design for a scanning system for an image sensor array. The spectral response of p-n junctions was used as a technique for studying the optical-absorption edge in silicon. Heterojunction structures of Sb2S3- Si were fabricated and a system for measuring C-V curves on MOS structures was built.

  5. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  6. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  7. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, Utpal; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  8. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Lacroix, Denis; Sandulescu, N.

    2013-09-01

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that the predictions of the FT-VAP approach are very accurate when compared to the results obtained by an exact diagonalization of the pairing Hamiltonian. The influence of pairing correlations on specific heat is analyzed for the isotopes 161,162Dy and 171,172Yb. It is shown that the FT-VAP approach, applied with a level density provided by mean field calculations and supplemented, at high energies, by the level density of the back-shifted Fermi gas model, can approximate reasonably well the main properties of specific heat extracted from experimental data. However, the detailed shape of the calculated specific heat is rather sensitive to the assumption made for the mean field.

  9. Pairing instabilities of Dirac composite fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, M. V.; Ćirić, M. Dimitrijević; Juričić, V.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a Dirac (particle-hole symmetric) description of composite fermions in the half-filled Landau level (LL) was proposed [D. T. Son, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027], and we study its possible consequences on BCS (Cooper) pairing of composite fermions (CFs). One of the main consequences is the existence of anisotropic states in single-layer and bilayer systems, which was previously suggested in Jeong and Park [J. S. Jeong and K. Park, Phys. Rev. B 91, 195119 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.195119]. We argue that in the half-filled LL in the single-layer case the gapped states may sustain anisotropy, because isotropic pairings may coexist with anisotropic ones. Furthermore, anisotropic pairings with the addition of a particle-hole symmetry-breaking mass term may evolve into rotationally symmetric states, i.e., Pfaffian states of Halperin-Lee-Read (HLR) ordinary CFs. On the basis of the Dirac formalism, we argue that in the quantum Hall bilayer at total filling factor 1, with decreasing distance between the layers, weak pairing of p -wave paired CFs is gradually transformed from Dirac to ordinary, HLR-like, with a concomitant decrease in the CF number. Global characterization of low-energy spectra based on the Dirac CFs agrees well with previous calculations performed by exact diagonalization on a torus. Finally, we discuss features of the Dirac formalism when applied in this context.

  10. On the analysis of phylogenetically paired designs

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L; Rakovski, Cyril S; Macpherson, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As phylogenetically controlled experimental designs become increasingly common in ecology, the need arises for a standardized statistical treatment of these datasets. Phylogenetically paired designs circumvent the need for resolved phylogenies and have been used to compare species groups, particularly in the areas of invasion biology and adaptation. Despite the widespread use of this approach, the statistical analysis of paired designs has not been critically evaluated. We propose a mixed model approach that includes random effects for pair and species. These random effects introduce a “two-layer” compound symmetry variance structure that captures both the correlations between observations on related species within a pair as well as the correlations between the repeated measurements within species. We conducted a simulation study to assess the effect of model misspecification on Type I and II error rates. We also provide an illustrative example with data containing taxonomically similar species and several outcome variables of interest. We found that a mixed model with species and pair as random effects performed better in these phylogenetically explicit simulations than two commonly used reference models (no or single random effect) by optimizing Type I error rates and power. The proposed mixed model produces acceptable Type I and II error rates despite the absence of a phylogenetic tree. This design can be generalized to a variety of datasets to analyze repeated measurements in clusters of related subjects/species. PMID:25750719

  11. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T. A; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and −k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  12. Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace (NAS) however, poor visibility conditions reduce this capacity [1]. Much research has been conducted to examine the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s(+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that is about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: Two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation, and a prototype future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Data showed that the operations in this study were found to be acceptable and safe. Workload when using the pairing procedures and tools was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness (SA) was typically moderate to high. There were some differences based upon the display and automation conditions for the pilots. Future research should consider the refinement of the concepts and tools for pilot and controller displays and automation for parallel runway concepts.

  13. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    DOE PAGES

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; ...

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, wemore » report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.« less

  14. Probing the tides in interacting galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed spectroscopic and imaging observations of colliding elliptical galaxies revealed unmistakable diagnostic signatures of the tidal interactions. It is possible to compare both the distorted luminosity distributions and the disturbed internal rotation profiles with numerical simulations in order to model the strength of the tidal gravitational field acting within a given pair of galaxies. Using the best-fit numerical model, one can then measure directly the mass of a specific interacting binary system. This technique applies to individual pairs and therefore complements the classical methods of measuring the masses of galaxy pairs in well-defined statistical samples. The 'personalized' modeling of galaxy pairs also permits the derivation of each binary's orbit, spatial orientation, and interaction timescale. Similarly, one can probe the tides in less-detailed observations of disturbed galaxies in order to estimate some of the physical parameters for larger samples of interacting galaxy pairs. These parameters are useful inputs to the more universal problems of (1) the galaxy merger rate, (2) the strength and duration of the driving forces behind tidally stimulated phenomena (e.g., starbursts and maybe quasi steller objects), and (3) the identification of long-lived signatures of interaction/merger events.

  15. Metal-enhanced fluorescence and FRET on nanohole arrays excited at angled incidence.

    PubMed

    Poirier-Richard, H-P; Couture, M; Brule, T; Masson, J-F

    2015-07-21

    The influence of experimental parameters on the performance of plasmonic sensors is of great importance in analytical sciences. The plasmon coupling conditions (angle of incidence, metal composition, laser frequency and excitation/emission properties of fluorophores) were thus investigated for surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on metallic nanohole arrays. Optimal fluorescence enhancements were achieved when the plasmon resonance, the excitation laser and the fluorophore's excitation wavelengths were matched. The enhancement of the acceptor emission of a rhodamine 6G(Rh6G)-Quasar670™ FRET pair was achieved on the nanohole arrays by tuning the plasmon wavelength with the maximal overlap of the donor's emission and acceptor excitation. Silver nanohole arrays achieved larger fluorescence enhancement than gold nanohole arrays at 532 nm, while gold nanohole arrays led to larger fluorescence enhancement at 635 nm. These results demonstrate the importance of tuning the plasmon coupling conditions for surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence sensing.

  16. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Yelton, William G.; Siegal, Michael P.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  17. Future directions for NICMOS arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Young, Erick T.; Mccarthy, D.; Rasche, Robert; Blessinger, Michael; Vural, Kadri; Kleinhans, William

    1989-01-01

    The Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) requires focal plane arrays of 256x256 pixels for both its cameras and its spectrometers. The new arrays, developed by the Rockwell Corporation for NICMOS, have 40 microns pixels of HgCdTe bump bonded to a switched MOSFET readout. Expected read noise and dark current for the arrays at 60 K are 30 e and 1 e/sec. respectively. The basis for these numbers is previous experience with 128x128 arrays.

  18. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, universally-mountable, integrated residential photovoltaic array concept was defined based upon an in-depth formulation and evaluation of three candidate approaches which were synthesized from existing or proposed residential array concepts. The impact of module circuitry and process sequence is considered and technology gaps and performance drivers associated with residential photovoltaic array concepts are identified. The actual learning experience gained from the comparison of the problem areas of the hexagonal shingle design with the rectangular module design led to what is considered an advanced array concept. Building the laboratory mockup provided actual experience and the opportunity to uncover additional technology gaps.

  19. Improving protein array performance: focus on washing and storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Hurst, Robin; Hook, Brad; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Zhao, Kate Q; Nassif, Nadine; Bulleit, Robert F; Storts, Douglas R

    2008-10-01

    For protein microarrays, maintaining protein stability during the slide processing steps of washing, drying, and storage is of major concern. Although several studies have focused on the stability of immobilized antibodies in antibody microarrays, studies on protein-protein interaction arrays and enzyme arrays are lacking. In this paper we used five bait-prey protein interaction pairs and three enzymes to optimize the washing, drying, and storage conditions for protein arrays. The protein arrays for the study were fabricated by combining HaloTag technology and cell-free protein expression. The HaloTag technology, in combination with cell-free expression, allowed rapid expression and immobilization of fusion proteins on hydrogel-coated glass slides directly from cell extracts without any prior purification. Experimental results indicate enzyme captured on glass slides undergoes significant loss of activity when washed and spin-dried using only phosphate buffer, as is typically done with antibody arrays. The impact of washing and spin-drying in phosphate buffer on protein-protein interaction arrays was minimal. However, addition of 5% glycerol to the wash buffer helps retain enzyme activity during washing and drying. We observed significant loss of enzyme activity when slides were stored dry at 4 degrees C, however immobilized enzymes remained active for 30 days when stored at -20 degrees C in 50% glycerol. We also found that cell-free extract containing HaloTag-fused enzymes could undergo multiple freeze/thaw cycles without any adverse impact on enzyme activity. The findings indicate that for large ongoing studies, proteins of interest expressed in cell-free extract can be stored at -70 degrees C and repeatedly used to print small batches of protein array slides to be used over a few weeks.

  20. Hard Photodisintegration of a Proton Pair

    DOE PAGES

    Pomerantz, Ishay; Bubis, Nathaniel; Allada, Kalyan; ...

    2010-01-08

    We present the first study of high energy photodisintegration of proton-pairs through the gamma + 3He -> p+p+n channel. Photon energies from 0.8 to 4.7 GeV were used in kinematics corresponding to a proton pair with high relative momentum and a neutron nearly at rest. An s^{-11} scaling of the cross section was observed, as predicted by the constituent counting rule. The onset of the scaling is at a higher energy and the cross section is significantly lower then for pn pair photodisintegration. For photon energies below the scaling region, the scaled cross section was found to present a strongmore » energy-dependent structure not observed in deuteron photodisintegration.« less

  1. Pairing dynamics and the origin of species

    PubMed Central

    Puebla, Oscar; Bermingham, Eldredge; Guichard, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Whether sexual selection alone can drive the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. Here, we report a role for pairing dynamics of individuals when mate choice is mutual, which is sufficient for the evolution of assortative mating by sexual selection alone in the presence of gene flow. Through behavioural observation, individual-based simulation and population genetic analysis, we evaluate the pairing dynamics of coral reef fish in the genus Hypoplectrus (Serranidae), and the role these dynamics can play for the evolution of assortative mating. When mate choice is mutual and the stability of mating pairs is critical for reproductive success, the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is not only possible, but is also a robust evolutionary outcome. PMID:21937496

  2. ION PAIR DISSOCIATION: Spectroscopy and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Hepburn, John W.

    2006-05-01

    Ion pair dissociation processes may be studied using coherent vacuum ultraviolet laser sources in a manner entirely analogous to photoelectron spectroscopy, albeit with the anion playing the role of a heavy electron. If the excitation energy is above the dissociation energy and the kinetic energy of the fragment is measured using ion imaging, this approach is termed ion pair imaging spectroscopy (IPIS) and is related to conventional photoelectron spectroscopy. If the excitation energy is just below the dissociation energy and pulsed-field dissociation is employed, this approach is analogous to mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy and is termed threshold ion pair production spectroscopy (TIPPS). These approaches provide a novel means of investigating ion thermochemistry and spectroscopy and superexcited state decay dynamics at high resolution.

  3. The inverse problem for Schwinger pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The production of electron-positron pairs in time-dependent electric fields (Schwinger mechanism) depends non-linearly on the applied field profile. Accordingly, the resulting momentum spectrum is extremely sensitive to small variations of the field parameters. Owing to this non-linear dependence it is so far unpredictable how to choose a field configuration such that a predetermined momentum distribution is generated. We show that quantum kinetic theory along with optimal control theory can be used to approximately solve this inverse problem for Schwinger pair production. We exemplify this by studying the superposition of a small number of harmonic components resulting in predetermined signatures in the asymptotic momentum spectrum. In the long run, our results could facilitate the observation of this yet unobserved pair production mechanism in quantum electrodynamics by providing suggestions for tailored field configurations.

  4. Pairing dynamics and the origin of species.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Oscar; Bermingham, Eldredge; Guichard, Frédéric

    2012-03-22

    Whether sexual selection alone can drive the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. Here, we report a role for pairing dynamics of individuals when mate choice is mutual, which is sufficient for the evolution of assortative mating by sexual selection alone in the presence of gene flow. Through behavioural observation, individual-based simulation and population genetic analysis, we evaluate the pairing dynamics of coral reef fish in the genus Hypoplectrus (Serranidae), and the role these dynamics can play for the evolution of assortative mating. When mate choice is mutual and the stability of mating pairs is critical for reproductive success, the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is not only possible, but is also a robust evolutionary outcome.

  5. Pair production in superstrong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The production of electron-positron pairs by single photons in magnetic fields 10 to the twelth power G was investigated in detail for photon energies near threshold as well as for the asymptotic limit of high photon energy. The exact attenuation coefficient, which is derived and then evaluated numerically, is strongly influenced by the discrete energy states of the electron and positron. Near threshold, it exhibits a sawtooth pattern as a function of photon energy, and its value is significantly below that predicted by the asymptotic expression for the attenuation coefficient. The energy distributions of the created pair are computed numerically near threshold and analytic expressions are derived in the asymptotic limit. These results indicate that as field strength and photon energy increase, it becomes increasingly probable for the pair to divide the photon energy unequally. This effect, as well as the threshold behavior of the attenuation coefficient, could have important consequences for pulsar models.

  6. Hard photodisintegration of a proton pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, I.; Bubis, N.; Allada, K.; Beck, A.; Beck, S.; Berman, B. L.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Cisbani, E.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Dutta, C.; Garibaldi, F.; Geagla, O.; Gilman, R.; Glister, J.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Jiang, X.; Katramatou, A. T.; Khrosinkova, E.; Lee, B. W.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; McCullough, E.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Petratos, G. G.; Piasetzky, E.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rodriguez, I.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sarty, A. J.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shneor, R.; Sparveris, N.; Subedi, R.; Strauch, S.; Sulkosky, V.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhan, X.; Zheng, X.

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of high energy photodisintegration of proton-pairs through the γ+He3→p+p+n channel. Photon energies, Eγ, from 0.8 to 4.7 GeV were used in kinematics corresponding to a proton pair with high relative momentum and a neutron nearly at rest. The s scaling of the cross section, as predicted by the constituent counting rule for two nucleon photodisintegration, was observed for the first time. The onset of the scaling is at a higher energy and the cross section is significantly lower than for deuteron (pn pair) photodisintegration. For Eγ below the scaling region, the scaled cross section was found to present a strong energy-dependent structure not observed in deuteron photodisintegration.

  7. Cooper-pair splitter: towards an efficient source of spin-entangled EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonenberger, Christian

    2011-03-01

    In quantum mechanics the properties of two and more particles can be entangled. In basic science pairs of entangled particles, so called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs, play a special role as toy objects for fundamental studies. They provide such things as ``spooky interaction at distance,'' but they also enable secure encoding and teleportation and are thus important for applications in quantum information technology. Whereas EPR pairs of photons can be generated by parametric down conversion (PDC) in a crystal, a similar source for EPR pairs of electrons does not exists yet. In several theory papers, it has been suggested to use a superconductor for this purpose. The superconducting ground state is formed by a condensate of Cooper-pairs which are electron pairs in a spin-singlet state. Since there are many Cooper pairs in a metallic superconductor like Al, the main tasks are to extract Cooper pairs one by one and to split them into different arms. A controlled and efficient splitting is possible if one makes use of Coulomb interaction. This has recently be demonstrated by two groups [2-4] using hybrid quantum-dot devices with both superconducting and normal metal contacts. In the present talk, I will discuss the Cooper-pair splitter results from the Basel-Budapest-Copenhagen team and compare with the other experiments. As an outlook we discuss approaches that aim at entanglement detection. The Cooper pair splitter holds great promises because very large splitting efficiencies approaching 100% and large pair current rates appear feasible. This work has been done by L. Hofstetter, S. Csonka, A. Geresdi, M. Aagesen, J. Nygard and C. Schönenberger

  8. Etalon Array Reconstructive Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    Compact spectrometers are crucial in areas where size and weight may need to be minimized. These types of spectrometers often contain no moving parts, which makes for an instrument that can be highly durable. With the recent proliferation in low-cost and high-resolution cameras, camera-based spectrometry methods have the potential to make portable spectrometers small, ubiquitous, and cheap. Here, we demonstrate a novel method for compact spectrometry that uses an array of etalons to perform spectral encoding, and uses a reconstruction algorithm to recover the incident spectrum. This spectrometer has the unique capability for both high resolution and a large working bandwidth without sacrificing sensitivity, and we anticipate that its simplicity makes it an excellent candidate whenever a compact, robust, and flexible spectrometry solution is needed.

  9. Etalon Array Reconstructive Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    Compact spectrometers are crucial in areas where size and weight may need to be minimized. These types of spectrometers often contain no moving parts, which makes for an instrument that can be highly durable. With the recent proliferation in low-cost and high-resolution cameras, camera-based spectrometry methods have the potential to make portable spectrometers small, ubiquitous, and cheap. Here, we demonstrate a novel method for compact spectrometry that uses an array of etalons to perform spectral encoding, and uses a reconstruction algorithm to recover the incident spectrum. This spectrometer has the unique capability for both high resolution and a large working bandwidth without sacrificing sensitivity, and we anticipate that its simplicity makes it an excellent candidate whenever a compact, robust, and flexible spectrometry solution is needed. PMID:28074883

  10. Array biosensor: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Joel P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.; Feldstein, Mark J.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1999-05-01

    A fluorescence-based immunosensor has been developed for simultaneous analyses of multiple samples for 1 to 6 different antigens. A patterned array of recognition antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide is used to 'capture' analyte present in samples. Bound analyte is then quantified by means of fluorescent detector molecules. Upon excitation of the fluorescent label by a small diode laser, a CCD camera detects the pattern of fluorescent antigen:antibody complexes on the sensor surface. Image analysis software correlates the position of fluorescent signals with the identity of the analyte. A new design for a fluidics distribution system is shown, as well as results from assays for physiologically relevant concentrations of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), F1 antigen from Yersinia pestis, and D- dimer, a marker of sepsis and thrombotic disorders.

  11. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  12. Networked Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tighe

    2002-10-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical.

  13. TRMM Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Basic requirement of 978.59 watts per Panel output @ 58.9 volts B.O.L. was met on an average basis per agreement with NASA. Lower grade Cells were used on the shadowed Panel (Boom shadow) to maximize available power to the Spacecraft. The average output @ 58.9 volts was 991 watts. The outputs of the four t4) Panels ranged from 960 to 1,022 watts. The Panels successfully passed environmental testing at TRW to the contract specification and subsequent testing at NASA which involved output measurements at elevated temperatures. As this type of Array had never previously been built by TRW (aluminum Substrate with 4 cm x 4.4 cm GaAs Cells), the TRMM Program was a development effort combined with a Qual and Flight production effort. The most significant technical problem was Cell cracking during Qual thermal cycling. The cracking problem was determined to be generic within our Solar Array factory in the application of GaAs Cells to our designs. As a result, a TRW funded manufacturing process verification panel (known as the Manufacturing Verification Panel) was built to demonstrate our ability to properly apply GaAs Cells. The original Qual Panel comprised three (3) design variations with respect to Coverglass-to-Cell and Cell-to-Substrate adhesives. The intent was to qualify multiple designs in case one or more failed. When two of the three combinations failed due to excessive Cell breakage during thermal cycling, NASA was reluctant to allow Flight production based on the one remaining good Qual Panel Quadrant. This issue was pivotal for continuing the contract. Facts and recommendations are as follows: (1) The cause of the excessive cracking was never determined. and (2) The areas where the excessive cracking occurred utilized DC93-500 glassing adhesive which was NASA approved, and had been widely used by TRW on a multitude of projects.

  14. Shrinking of the Cooper Pair Insulator Phase in Thin Films with Ultrasmall Superconducting Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, J. C.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, C.; Valles, J. M., Jr.; Fernandes, G.; Xu, J. M.

    The ubiquity of the bosonic Cooper Pair Insulator (CPI) phase near the two-dimensional superconductor to insulator transition (SIT) is a long standing question. While a number of two dimensional materials exhibit bosonic insulating phases similar to the Mott Insulator in arrays of ultrasmall, Josephson coupled superconducting islands, others show behaviors consistent with a fermionic insulating phase. Utilizing specially prepared anodized aluminum oxide substrates, we are able to fabricate films reminiscent of arrays of superconducting islands whose properties are tunable by varying the substrate morphology. Our recent work has focused on arrays of islands which possess an energy level spacing comparable to the mean field superconducting gap, where one expects pair breaking followed by fermionic Anderson Localization as the dominant mechanism by which superconductivity is destroyed. Early results show that the paradigmatic bosonic insulator exists only very near the disorder tuned SIT, while films only marginally deeper in the insulating phase exhibit transport distinct from the CPI's reentrant, activated transport. We are grateful for the support of NSF Grant No. DMR-1307290, the AFOSR, and the AOARD. Currently at Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian, China.

  15. Age-dependent trajectories differ between within-pair and extra-pair paternity success.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y-H; Simons, M J P; Schroeder, J; Girndt, A; Winney, I S; Burke, T; Nakagawa, S

    2017-02-24

    Reproductive success is associated with age in many taxa, increasing in early life followed by reproductive senescence. In socially monogamous but genetically polygamous species, this generates the interesting possibility of differential trajectories of within-pair and extra-pair siring success with age in males. We investigate these relationships simultaneously using within-individual analyses with 13 years of data from an insular house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population. As expected, we found that both within- and extra-pair paternity success increased with age, followed by a senescence-like decline. However, the age trajectories of within- and extra-pair paternity successes differed significantly, with the extra-pair paternity success increasing faster, although not significantly, in early life, and showing a delayed decline by 1.5 years on average later in life compared to within-pair paternity success. These different trajectories indicate that the two alternative mating tactics should have age-dependent pay-offs. Males may partition their reproductive effort between within- and extra-pair matings depending on their current age to reap the maximal combined benefit from both strategies. The interplay between these mating strategies and age-specific mortality may explain the variation in rates of extra-pair paternity observed within and between species.

  16. Paired Learning: Tutoring by Non-Teachers. Incorporating "The Paired Reading Bulletin" No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paired Reading Bulletin, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The eight papers constituting the Proceedings of the fourth National Paired Reading Conference are published in an annual bulletin of the Paired Reading Project, together with seven papers constituting the Supplementary Proceedings of the Peer Tutoring Conference, and nine feature articles, as follows: (1) "Whole-School Policy on Parental…

  17. Communication: Multipole approximations of distant pair energies in local correlation methods with pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of multipole approximations for distant pair energies in local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) as introduced by Hetzer et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 290, 143 (1998)] is investigated for three chemical reactions involving molecules with up to 92 atoms. Various iterative and non-iterative approaches are compared, using different energy thresholds for distant pair selection. It is demonstrated that the simple non-iterative dipole-dipole approximation, which has been used in several recent pair natural orbitals (PNO)-LMP2 and PNO-LCCSD (local coupled-cluster with singles and doubles) methods, may underestimate the distant pair energies by up to 50% and can lead to significant errors in relative energies, unless very tight thresholds are used. The accuracy can be much improved by including higher multipole orders and by optimizing the distant pair amplitudes iteratively along with all other amplitudes. A new approach is presented in which very small special PNO domains for distant pairs are used in the iterative approach. This reduces the number of distant pair amplitudes by 3 orders of magnitude and keeps the additional computational effort for the iterative optimization of distant pair amplitudes minimal.

  18. Communication: Multipole approximations of distant pair energies in local correlation methods with pair natural orbitals.

    PubMed

    Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-28

    The accuracy of multipole approximations for distant pair energies in local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) as introduced by Hetzer et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 290, 143 (1998)] is investigated for three chemical reactions involving molecules with up to 92 atoms. Various iterative and non-iterative approaches are compared, using different energy thresholds for distant pair selection. It is demonstrated that the simple non-iterative dipole-dipole approximation, which has been used in several recent pair natural orbitals (PNO)-LMP2 and PNO-LCCSD (local coupled-cluster with singles and doubles) methods, may underestimate the distant pair energies by up to 50% and can lead to significant errors in relative energies, unless very tight thresholds are used. The accuracy can be much improved by including higher multipole orders and by optimizing the distant pair amplitudes iteratively along with all other amplitudes. A new approach is presented in which very small special PNO domains for distant pairs are used in the iterative approach. This reduces the number of distant pair amplitudes by 3 orders of magnitude and keeps the additional computational effort for the iterative optimization of distant pair amplitudes minimal.

  19. Experimental demonstration of ray-optical refraction with confocal lenslet arrays.

    PubMed

    Courtial, Johannes; Kirkpatrick, Blair C; Logean, Eric; Scharf, Toralf

    2010-12-01

    We observe imaging through windows comprising pairs of confocal lenslet arrays that have different focal lengths but that are otherwise identical. Image space is stretched in the longitudinal direction only. Such windows are examples of METATOYs, optical components that can change light-ray direction in ways that appear wave-optically forbidden.

  20. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  1. Extracting an entangled photon pair from collectively decohered pairs at a telecommunication wavelength.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Yoshiaki; Sugiura, Yukihiro; Ando, Makoto; Katsuse, Daisuke; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-18

    We experimentally demonstrated entanglement extraction scheme by using photons at the telecommunication band for optical-fiber-based quantum communications. We generated two pairs of non-degenerate polarization entangled photons at 780 nm and 1551 nm by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and distributed the two photons at 1551 nm through a collective phase damping channel which gives the same amount of random phase shift on the two photons. Through local operation and classical communication, we extracted an entangled photon pair from two phase-disturbed photon pairs. An observed fidelity of the extracted photon pair to a maximally entangled photon pair was 0.73 ± 0.07 which clearly shows the recovery of entanglement.

  2. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  3. Phase multiplying electronic scanning array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning array was designed with properties of low RF loss and phase control. The array consists of a series of special waveguides, hybrids made up of two variable reactance branch arms for input signals, an edge slot for the difference port, and a sum arm for the unradiated signal.

  4. High Voltage Space Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.; Vayner, B. V.; Galofaro, J. T.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent tests performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center and elsewhere have shown promise in the design and construction of high voltage (300-1000 V) solar arrays for space applications. Preliminary results and implications for solar array design will be discussed, with application to direct-drive electric propulsion and space solar power.

  5. Array tomography: semiautomated image alignment.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. Successful array tomography requires that the captured images be properly stacked and aligned, and the software to achieve these ends is freely available. This protocol describes the construction of volumetric image stacks from images of fluorescently labeled arrays for three-dimensional image visualization, analysis, and archiving.

  6. Automated Solar-Array Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffa, A.; Bycer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Large arrays are rapidly assembled from individual solar cells by automated production line developed for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Apparatus positions cells within array, attaches interconnection tabs, applies solder flux, and solders interconnections. Cells are placed in either straight or staggered configurations and may be connected either in series or in parallel. Are attached at rate of one every 5 seconds.

  7. Reduced rDNA copy number does not affect "competitive" chromosome pairing in XYY males of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Maggert, Keith A

    2014-03-20

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a "competitive" situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments.

  8. Reduced rDNA Copy Number Does Not Affect “Competitive” Chromosome Pairing in XYY Males of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a “competitive” situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments. PMID:24449686

  9. Loudspeaker line array educational demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Moser, Brad; Gee, Kent L

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a physical demonstration of an audio-range line array used to teach interference of multiple sources in a classroom or laboratory exercise setting. Software has been developed that permits real-time control and steering of the array. The graphical interface permits a user to vary the frequency, the angular response by phase shading, and reduce sidelobes through amplitude shading. An inexpensive, eight-element loudspeaker array has been constructed to test the control program. Directivity measurements of this array in an anechoic chamber and in a large classroom are presented. These measurements have good agreement with theoretical directivity predictions, thereby allowing its use as a quantitative learning tool for advanced students as well as a qualitative demonstration of arrays in other settings. Portions of this paper are directed toward educators who may wish to implement a similar demonstration for their advanced undergraduate or graduate level course in acoustics.

  10. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Three basic module design concepts were analyzed with respect to both production and installation costs. The results of this evaluation were used to synthesize a fourth design which incorporates the best features of these initial concepts to produce a module/array design approach which offers the promise of a substantial reduction in the installed cost of a residential array. A unique waterproofing and mounting scheme was used to reduce the cost of installing an integral array while still maintaining a high probability that the installed array will be watertight for the design lifetime of the system. This recommended concept will also permit the array to be mounted as a direct or stand-off installation with no changes to the module design.

  11. PEP solar array definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The conceptual design of a large, flexible, lightweight solar array is presented focusing on a solar array overview assessment, solar array blanket definition, structural-mechanical systems definition, and launch/reentry blanket protection features. The overview assessment includes a requirements and constraints review, the thermal environment assessment on the design selection, an evaluation of blanket integration sequence, a conceptual blanket/harness design, and a hot spot analysis considering the effects of shadowing and cell failures on overall array reliability. The solar array blanket definition includes the substrate design, hinge designs and blanket/harness flexibility assessment. The structural/mechanical systems definition includes an overall loads and deflection assessment, a frequency analysis of the deployed assembly, a components weights estimate, design of the blanket housing and tensioning mechanism. The launch/reentry blanket protection task includes assessment of solar cell/cover glass cushioning concepts during ascent and reentry flight condition.

  12. Optimization of isopolar microtubule arrays.

    PubMed

    Agayan, Rodney R; Tucker, Robert; Nitta, Takahiro; Ruhnow, Felix; Walter, Wilhelm J; Diez, Stefan; Hess, Henry

    2013-02-19

    Isopolar arrays of aligned cytoskeletal filaments are components in a number of designs of hybrid nanodevices incorporating biomolecular motors. For example, a combination of filament arrays and motor arrays can form an actuator or a molecular engine resembling an artificial muscle. Here, isopolar arrays of microtubules are fabricated by flow alignment, and their quality is characterized by their degree of alignment. We find, in agreement with our analytical models, that the degree of alignment is ultimately limited by thermal forces, while the kinetics of the alignment process are influenced by the flow strength, the microtubule stiffness, the gliding velocity, and the tip length. Strong flows remove microtubules from the surface and reduce the filament density, suggesting that there is an optimal flow strength for the fabrication of ordered arrays.

  13. A systolic array parallelizing compiler

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a completely new approach to the problem of systolic array parallelizing compiler. It describes the AL parallelizing compiler for the Warp systolic array, the first working systolic array parallelizing compiler which can generate efficient parallel code for complete LINPACK routines. This book begins by analyzing the architectural strength of the Warp systolic array. It proposes a model for mapping programs onto the machine and introduces the notion of data relations for optimizing the program mapping. Also presented are successful applications of the AL compiler in matrix computation and image processing. A complete listing of the source program and compiler-generated parallel code are given to clarify the overall picture of the compiler. The book concludes that systolic array parallelizing compiler can produce efficient parallel code, almost identical to what the user would have written by hand.

  14. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  15. Nanocoax Arrays for Sensing Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal, Binod

    We have adapted a nanocoax array architecture for high sensitivity, all-electronic, chemical and biological sensing. Arrays of nanocoaxes with various dielectric annuli were developed using polymer replicas of Si nanopillars made via soft lithography. These arrays were implemented in the development of two different kinds of chemical detectors. First, arrays of nanocoaxes constructed with different porosity dielectric annuli were employed to make capacitive detectors for gaseous molecules and to investigate the role of dielectric porosity in the sensitivity of the device. Second, arrays of nanocoaxes with partially hollowed annuli were used to fabricate three-dimensional electrochemical biosensors within which we studied the role of nanoscale gap between electrodes on device sensitivity. In addition, we have employed a molecular imprint technique to develop a non-conducting molecularly imprinted polymer thin film of thickness comparable to size of biomolecules as an "artificial antibody" architecture for the detection of biomolecules.

  16. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; ...

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  17. Analysis of Paired Comparison Data Using Mx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Rung-Ching; Wu, Tsung-Lin

    2004-01-01

    By postulating that the random utilities associated with the choice options follow a multivariate normal distribution, Thurstonian models (Thurstone, 1927) provide a straightforward representation of paired comparison data. The use of Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization (MCEM) algorithms and limited information approaches have been proposed to…

  18. Assessing Paired Orals: Raters' Orientation to Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducasse, Ana Maria; Brown, Annie

    2009-01-01

    Speaking tasks involving peer-to-peer candidate interaction are increasingly being incorporated into language proficiency assessments, in both large-scale international testing contexts, and in smaller-scale, for example course-related, ones. This growth in the popularity and use of paired and group orals has stimulated research, particularly into…

  19. Pair Negotiation When Developing English Speaking Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohórquez Suárez, Ingrid Liliana; Gómez Sará, Mary Mily; Medina Mosquera, Sindy Lorena

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes what characterizes the negotiations of seventh graders at a public school in Bogotá when working in pairs to develop speaking tasks in EFL classes. The inquiry is a descriptive case study that follows the qualitative paradigm. As a result of analyzing the data, we obtained four consecutive steps that characterize students'…

  20. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  1. Phenomena, dynamics and instabilities of vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. H. K.; Leweke, T.; Asselin, D. J.; Harris, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Our motivation for studying the dynamics of vortex pairs stems initially from an interest in the trailing wake vortices from aircraft and the dynamics of longitudinal vortices close to a vehicle surface. However, our motivation also comes from the fact that vortex-vortex interactions and vortex-wall interactions are fundamental to many turbulent flows. The intent of the paper is to present an overview of some of our recent work concerning the formation and structure of counter-rotating vortex pairs. We are interested in the long-wave and short-wave three-dimensional instabilities that evolve for an isolated vortex pair, but also we would like to know how vortex pairs interact with a wall, including both two-dimensional interactions, and also the influence of the surface on the three-dimensional instabilities. The emphasis of this presentation is on physical mechanisms by which vortices interact with each other and with surfaces, principally from an experimental approach, but also coupled with analytical studies.

  2. Paired Field Placements: A Means for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy; Robinson, Karen Shipley

    2009-01-01

    In this qualitative study, pairs of preservice teachers were placed with single cooperating teachers in a 100-hour urban field placement. The question guiding this research was would preservice teachers collaborate in ways that contributed to their professional development and if so why, how, and to what end? Results from field notes, multiple…

  3. Two New CPM Pairs in Libra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, Abdul

    2014-10-01

    In this paper two new double stars are reported in the constellation of Libra that are currently not in the WDS catalog, the components of which share common proper motions. On observed photometric characteristics, calibration of distances, and other assumptions, all the indications are that both pairs comprise possible wide physical systems.

  4. Diagnostics for conformity of paired quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Douglas M

    2002-07-15

    Matched pairs data arise in many contexts - in case-control clinical trials, for example, and from cross-over designs. They also arise in experiments to verify the equivalence of quantitative assays. This latter use (which is the main focus of this paper) raises difficulties not always seen in other matched pairs applications. Since the designs deliberately vary the analyte levels over a wide range, issues of variance dependent on mean, calibrations of differing slopes, and curvature all need to be added to the usual model assumptions such as normality. Violations in any of these assumptions invalidate the conventional matched pairs analysis. A graphical method, due to Bland and Altman, of looking at the relationship between the average and the difference of the members of the pairs is shown to correspond to a formal testable regression model. Using standard regression diagnostics, one may detect and diagnose departures from the model assumptions and remedy them - for example using variable transformations. Examples of different common scenarios and possible approaches to handling them are shown.

  5. Pairing the Adult Learner and Boutique Wineries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoke, Laura; Heath-Simpson, Delta

    2013-01-01

    This study explored connections between adult learners and their experiences in the context of small boutique wineries operating in the start-up phase of the organizational life cycle. The research objective was to gain insight regarding the pairing of adult learners with the entering of a specialty industry. Fourteen individuals from four…

  6. A Novel Approach for Collaborative Pair Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Sanjay; Kathuria, Vanshi

    2010-01-01

    The majority of an engineer's time in the software industry is spent working with other programmers. Agile methods of software development like eXtreme Programming strongly rely upon practices like daily meetings and pair programming. Hence, the need to learn the skill of working collaboratively is of primary importance for software developers.…

  7. Binaries and triples among asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Scheirich, Peter; Kušnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián

    2015-08-01

    Despite major achievements obtained during the past two decades, our knowledge of the population and properties of small binary and multiple asteroid systems is still far from advanced. There is a numerous indirect evidence for that most small asteroid systems were formed by rotational fission of cohesionless parent asteroids that were spun up to the critical frequency presumably by YORP, but details of the process are lacking. Furthermore, as we proceed with observations of more and more binary and paired asteroids, we reveal new facts that substantially refine and sometimes change our understanding of the asteroid systems. One significant new finding we have recently obtained is that primaries of many asteroid pairs are actually binary or triple systems. The first such case found is (3749) Balam (Vokrouhlický, ApJL 706, L37, 2009). We have found 9 more binary systems among asteroid pairs within our ongoing NEOSource photometric project since October 2012. They are (6369) 1983 UC, (8306) Shoko, (9783) Tensho-kan, (10123) Fideoja, (21436) Chaoyichi, (43008) 1999 UD31, (44620) 1999 RS43, (46829) 1998 OS14 and (80218) 1999 VO123. We will review their characteristics. These paired binaries as we call them are mostly similar to binaries in the general ("background") population (of unpaired asteroids), but there are a few trends. The paired binaries tend to have larger secondaries with D_2/D_1 = 0.3 to 0.5 and they also tend to be wider systems with 8 of the 10 having orbital periods between 30 and 81 hours, than average among binaries in the general population. There may be also a larger fraction of triples; (3749) Balam is a confirmed triple, having a larger close and a smaller distant satellite, and (8306) Shoko and (10123) Fideoja are suspect triples as they show additional rotational lightcurve components with periods of 61 and 38.8 h that differ from the orbital period of 36.2 and 56.5 h, respectively. The unbound secondaries tend to be of the same size or

  8. Asteroid clusters similar to asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Vokrouhlicky, David; Fatka, Petr; Kusnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián

    2016-10-01

    We study five small, tight and young clusters of asteroids. They are placed around following largest (primary) bodies: (11842) Kap'bos, (14627) Emilkowalski, (16598) 1992 YC2, (21509) Lucascavin and (39991) 1998 HR37. Each cluster has 2-4 secondaries that are tightly clustered around the primary body, with distance in the 5-dimensional space of mean orbital elements mostly within 10 m/s, and always < 23 m/s. Backward orbital integrations indicate that they formed between 105 and 106 yr ago. In the P1-q space, where P1 is the primary's spin period and q = Σ Mj/M1 is the total secondary-to-primary mass ratio, the clusters lie in the same range as asteroid pairs formed by rotational fission. We have extended the model of a proto-system separation after rotational fission by Pravec et al. (2010) for application to systems with more than one secondary and found a perfect match for the five tight clusters. We find these clusters to be similar to asteroid pairs and we suggest that they are "extended pairs", having 2-4 escaped secondaries rather than just one secondary as in the case of an asteroid pair. We compare them to six young mini-families (1270) Datura, (2384) Schulhof, (3152) Jones, (6825) Irvine, (10321) Rampo and (20674) 1999 VT1. These mini-families have similar ages, but they have a higher number of members and/or they show a significantly larger spread in the mean orbital elements (dmean on an order of tens m/s) than the five tight clusters. In the P1-q space, all but one of the mini-families lie in the same range as asteroid pairs and the tight clusters; the exception is the mini-family of (3152) Jones which appears to be a collisional family. A possibility that the other five mini-families were also formed by rotational fission as we suggest for the tight clusters ("extended asteroid pairs") is being explored.Reference:Pravec, P., et al. Formation of asteroid pairs by rotational fission. Nature 466, 1085-1088.

  9. Flavor violating processes with sgoldstino pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2012-04-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics (SM), goldstino superpartners—scalar and pseudoscalar sgoldstinos—can be light enough for emerging in decays of SM particles. Sgoldstino interaction with SM fields is suppressed by the scale of supersymmetry breaking in the whole theory. Hence, searches for sgoldstinos give an opportunity to probe the underlying mechanism of supersymmetry breaking. Sgoldstino couplings to SM fields are proportional to the supersymmetry breaking parameters—MSSM soft terms—and therefore can lead to flavor violating processes in quark and lepton sectors. We consider flavor violating processes involving sgoldstino pair production which are driven by sgoldstino couplings proportional to squark and slepton soft mass terms, m˜LL2 and m˜RR2. We find that present limits on off-diagonal entries in squark and slepton squared mass matrices allow t-, b-, c-quark and τ-lepton decays at levels available for study with existing data (BaBar, Belle, CLEOc) and in ongoing experiments (LHCb, CMS, ATLAS). In particular, we obtain the following branching ratios Br(t→cSP)≲10-7, Br(τ→μSP)≲10-7, Br(Bs→SP)≲10-4, Br(B→K(*)SP)≲10-4, Br(D→SP)≲10-7 with sgoldstino subsequent decays into kinematically allowed pairs of SM particles γγ, e+e-, μ+μ-, etc. Remarkably, the prominent signature of sgoldstino pair production is two muon pairs with pair momenta peaked at sgoldstino masses.

  10. Characteristics of compatible pair participants in kidney paired donation at a single center.

    PubMed

    Weng, Francis L; Grogan, Tracy; Patel, Anup M; Mulgaonkar, Shamkant; Morgievich, Marie M

    2017-03-25

    Compatible pairs of living kidney donors and their intended recipients can enter into kidney paired donation (KPD) and facilitate additional living donor kidney transplants (LDKTs). We examined 11 compatible pairs (the intended recipients and their intended, compatible donors) who participated in KPD, along with the recipients' 11 matched, exchange donors. The 11 pairs participated in 10 separate exchanges (3 were multi-center exchanges) that included 33 total LDKTs (22 additional LDKTs). All the intended donors were blood group O and female, with a mean living kidney donor profile index (LKDPI) of 27.6 (SD 16.8). The matched donors had a mean LKDPI of 9.4 (SD 31.7). Compatible pairs entered KPD for altruistic reasons (N=2) or due to mismatch of age (N=7) or body/kidney size (N=2) between the recipient and intended donor. In four cases, retrospective calculation of the LKDPI revealed that the matched donor had a higher LKDPI than the intended donor. Of the 22 recipients of LDKTs enabled by the compatible pairs, three were highly sensitized, with PRA >80%. In conclusion, most compatible pairs entered into KPD so that the recipient could receive a LDKT transplant from a donor whose age or body/kidney size were more favorable to post-transplant outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanomechanical Cantilever Array Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Hans; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilever sensors have attracted much interest in recent years as devices for the fast and reliable detection of small concentrations of molecules in air and solution. In addition to application of such sensors for gas and chemical-vapor sensing, for example as an artificial nose, they have also been employed to measure physical properties of tiny amounts of materials in miniaturized versions of conventional standard techniques such as calorimetry, thermogravimetry, weighing, photothermal spectroscopy, as well as for monitoring chemical reactions such as catalysis on small surfaces. In the past few years, the cantilever-sensor concept has been extended to biochemical applications and as an analytical device for measurements of biomaterials. Because of the label-free detection principle of cantilever sensors, their small size and scalability, this kind of device is advantageous for diagnostic applications and disease monitoring, as well as for genomics or proteomics purposes. The use of microcantilever arrays enables detection of several analytes simultaneously and solves the inherent problem of thermal drift often present when using single microcantilever sensors, as some of the cantilevers can be used as sensor cantilevers for detection, and other cantilevers serve as passivated reference cantilevers that do not exhibit affinity to the molecules to be detected.

  12. Particle sensor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particle sensor array which in a preferred embodiment comprises a static random access memory having a plurality of ion-sensitive memory cells, each such cell comprising at least one pull-down field effect transistor having a sensitive drain surface area (such as by bloating) and at least one pull-up field effect transistor having a source connected to an offset voltage. The sensitive drain surface area and the offset voltage are selected for memory cell upset by incident ions such as alpha-particles. The static random access memory of the present invention provides a means for selectively biasing the memory cells into the same state in which each of the sensitive drain surface areas is reverse biased and then selectively reducing the reversed bias on these sensitive drain surface areas for increasing the upset sensitivity of the cells to ions. The resulting selectively sensitive memory cells can be used in a number of applications. By way of example, the present invention can be used for measuring the linear energy transfer of ion particles, as well as a device for assessing the resistance of CMOS latches to Cosmic Ray induced single event upsets. The sensor of the present invention can also be used to determine the uniformity of an ion beam.

  13. Optical communications receiver array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Clair, Jonathan M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Koshinz, Dennis G.; Wilcken, Stephen K.; Soreide, David C.; Joshi, Atul; Durmus, Hakan

    2010-04-01

    One of the major challenges to free space laser communications and ladar is the impact of turbulence on beam propagation, one example of which is signal fading. These impacts can be exacerbated on airborne platforms by turbulence in the vicinity of the laser system aperture and the platform wake. There are a number of strategies to mitigate this, including adaptive optics, active flow control, and various dimensions of diversity: wavelength, polarization, temporal, and spatial diversity. In this paper we will discuss spatial diversity implemented in the focal region of optical telescopes. We will briefly compare this with other methods, describe results of requirements analysis of array features and optical configurations for various atmospheric turbulence states, and suggest several attractive configurations. We will also report on the design and test of one configuration, implemented in a prototype, and tested for noise performance, optical transmission, modulation bandwidth, and BER performance with our dynamic turbulence simulator. Early evidence shows significant BER improvements of several orders of magnitude at high turbulence fluctuation frequencies using this technique.

  14. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  15. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  16. Schwinger pair creation of Kaluza-Klein particles: Pair creation without tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Tamar; Verlinde, Herman

    2005-03-15

    We study Schwinger pair creation of charged Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles from a static KK electric field. We find that the gravitational backreaction of the electric field on the geometry--which is incorporated via the electric KK-Melvin solution--prevents the electrostatic potential from overcoming the rest mass of the KK particles, thus impeding the tunneling mechanism which is often thought of as responsible for the pair creation. However, we find that pair creation still occurs with a finite rate formally similar to the classic Schwinger result, but via an apparently different mechanism, involving a combination of the Unruh effect and vacuum polarization due to the E-field.

  17. Molecularly imprinted polymer sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ken D; Stephenson, Clifton J

    2010-12-01

    The sensor array format has proved an effective method of transforming sensors of modest selectivity into highly selective and discriminating sensors. The primary challenge in developing new sensor arrays is collecting together a sufficient number of recognition elements that possess different binding affinities for the analytes of interest. In this regard, the use of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the recognition elements in sensor arrays has a number of unique advantages. MIPs can be rapidly and inexpensively prepared with different selectivities and tuned with different selectivity patterns via the choice of templates in the imprinting process. The array format also helps compensate for the low selectivities and high cross-reactivities of MIP sensors. These attractive qualities of MIP sensor arrays have been demonstrated in recent examples, which have established the viability and generality of the approach. In particular, the versatility of the imprinting process enables MIP sensor arrays to be tailored to specific analytes. MIP sensor arrays have also shown surprisingly broad utility, as even analytes that were not used as templates in the imprinting process can be effectively discriminated.

  18. Proposal of a Bulk HTSC Staggered Array Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kii, Toshiteru; Kinjo, Ryota; Bakr, Mahmoud A.; Sonobe, Taro; Higashimura, Keisuke; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heisyun

    2010-06-23

    We proposed a new type of undulator based on bulk high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSC) which consists of a single solenoid and a stacked array of bulk HTSC. The main advantage of this configuration is that a mechanical structure is not required to produce and control the undulator field. In order to perform a proof of principle experiment, we have developed a prototype of bulk HTSC staggered array undulator using 11 pairs of DyBaCuO bulk superconductors and a normal conducting solenoid. Experimental results obtained by using the prototype undulator and numerical results obtained by a loop current model based on the Bean mode for a type-II superconductor were compared.

  19. Composite thermal micro-actuator array for tactile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enikov, Eniko T.; Lazarov, Kalin V.

    2003-07-01

    Tactile perception of complex symbols through tactile stimulation is an exciting application of a phenomenon known as tactile illusion (TI). Sensation of motion on the skin can be produced by a limited number of discrete mechanical actuators applying light pressure over the skin. This phenomenon can thus be used as a neurophysiological testing tool to determine central and peripheral nervous system injury as well as providing an additional human-machine communication channel. This paper describes the development of a 4 x 5 actuator array of individual vibrating pixels for fingertip tactile communication. The array is approximately one square centimeter and utilizes novel micro-clutch MEMS technology. The individual pixels are turned ON and OFF by pairs of microscopic composite thermal actuators, while the main vibration is generated by a vibrating piezo-electric plate. The physiological parameters required for inducing tactile illusion are described. The fabrication sequence for the thermal micro-actuators along with actuation results are also presented.

  20. Optical simulation of neutrino oscillations in binary waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Marini, Andrea; Longhi, Stefano; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-10-10

    We theoretically propose and investigate an optical analogue of neutrino oscillations in a pair of vertically displaced binary waveguide arrays with longitudinally modulated effective refractive index. Optical propagation is modeled through coupled-mode equations, which in the continuous limit converge to two coupled Dirac equations for fermionic particles with different mass states, analogously to neutrinos. In addition to simulating neutrino oscillation in the noninteracting regime, our optical setting enables us to explore neutrino interactions in extreme regimes that are expected to play an important role in massive supernova stars. In particular, we predict the quenching of neutrino oscillations and the existence of topological defects, i.e., neutrino solitons, which in our photonic simulator should be observable as excitation of optical gap solitons propagating along the binary arrays at high excitation intensities.

  1. Progress of the array laser detonation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Rui; He, Ai-feng; Wang, Hao-yu

    2016-01-01

    This paper stated the main characteristics of the array laser technology, introduced high application and development at home and abroad, especially having a comparison of solid array laser technology with semiconductor array laser technology on fast initiation and fire energy, etc. by researchment of the array laser technology, this paper forsaw the prospect of the array laser. at last, this paper summaries plenty of advantages of the laser array technology on miniaturization, intellectualization, integration.

  2. Plasmonic polarization nano-splitter based on asymmetric optical slot antenna pairs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Jing; Hu, Chuang; Wang, Shaoxin; Wen, Qiuling; Zhang, Jiasen

    2016-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a plasmonic polarization nano-splitter composed of asymmetric optical slot antenna pairs. Broadband polarization-controlled unidirectional surface plasmon polariton (SPP) launching and splitting are achieved experimentally using an asymmetric optical slot antenna pair array. Both transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic-polarized incident light is coupled to SPPs on the metal surface, but with opposite directions. The measured extinction ratio for the two opposite propagating directions is larger than 5 dB within a bandwidth of 160 nm and reaches up to ∼12  dB at an incident wavelength of 790 nm. This plasmonic polarization nano-splitter, together with the polarization-controlled unidirectional SPP coupler, may have promising applications in the nano-optics and integrated optical circuits.

  3. It’s Not Just Lunch: Extra-Pair Commensality Can Trigger Sexual Jealousy

    PubMed Central

    Kniffin, Kevin M.; Wansink, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Do people believe that sharing food might involve sharing more than just food? To investigate this, participants were asked to rate how jealous they (Study 1) – or their best friend (Study 2) – would be if their current romantic partner were contacted by an ex-romantic partner and subsequently engaged in an array of food- and drink-based activities. We consistently find – across both men and women – that meals elicit more jealousy than face-to-face interactions that do not involve eating, such as having coffee. These findings suggest that people generally presume that sharing a meal enhances cooperation. In the context of romantic pairs, we find that participants are attuned to relationship risks that extra-pair commensality can present. For romantic partners left out of a meal, we find a common view that lunch, for example, is not “just lunch.” PMID:22792327

  4. It's not just lunch: extra-pair commensality can trigger sexual jealousy.

    PubMed

    Kniffin, Kevin M; Wansink, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Do people believe that sharing food might involve sharing more than just food? To investigate this, participants were asked to rate how jealous they (Study 1)--or their best friend (Study 2)--would be if their current romantic partner were contacted by an ex-romantic partner and subsequently engaged in an array of food- and drink-based activities. We consistently find--across both men and women--that meals elicit more jealousy than face-to-face interactions that do not involve eating, such as having coffee. These findings suggest that people generally presume that sharing a meal enhances cooperation. In the context of romantic pairs, we find that participants are attuned to relationship risks that extra-pair commensality can present. For romantic partners left out of a meal, we find a common view that lunch, for example, is not "just lunch."

  5. Universal optical transmission features in periodic and quasiperiodic hole arrays.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Domenico; Lezec, Henri J; Sweatlock, Luke A; Walters, Robert J; Atwater, Harry A

    2008-06-09

    We investigate the influence of array order in the optical transmission properties of subwavelength hole arrays, by comparing the experimental spectral transmittance of periodic and quasiperiodic hole arrays as a function of frequency. We find that periodicity and long-range order are not necessary requirements for obtaining enhanced and suppressed optical transmission, provided short-range order is maintained. Transmission maxima and minima are shown to result, respectively, from constructive and destructive interference at each hole, between the light incident upon and exiting from a given hole, and surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) arriving from individual neighboring holes. These SPPs are launched along both illuminated and exit surfaces, by diffraction of the incident and emerging light at the neighboring individual subwavelength holes. By characterizing the optical transmission of a pair of subwavelength holes as a function of hole-hole distance, we demonstrate that a subwavelength hole can launch SPPs with an efficiency up to 35%, and with an experimentally determined launch phase phi = pi /2, for both input-side and exit-side SPPs. This characteristic phase has a crucial influence on the shape of the transmission spectra, determining transmission minima in periodic arrays at those frequencies where grating coupling arguments would instead predict maxima.

  6. Uncertainties associated with parameter estimation in atmospheric infrasound arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuberla, Curt A. L.; Olson, John V.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a method for determining the statistical confidence in estimates of direction-of-arrival and trace velocity stemming from signals present in atmospheric infrasound data. It is assumed that the signal source is far enough removed from the infrasound sensor array that a plane-wave approximation holds, and that multipath and multiple source effects are not present. Propagation path and medium inhomogeneities are assumed not to be known at the time of signal detection, but the ensemble of time delays of signal arrivals between array sensor pairs is estimable and corrupted by uncorrelated Gaussian noise. The method results in a set of practical uncertainties that lend themselves to a geometric interpretation. Although quite general, this method is intended for use by analysts interpreting data from atmospheric acoustic arrays, or those interested in designing and deploying them. The method is applied to infrasound arrays typical of those deployed as a part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization.

  7. Application specific serial arithmetic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, K.; Mathews, D.; Thompson, T.

    1990-01-01

    High performance systolic arrays of serial-parallel multiplier elements may be rapidly constructed for specific applications by applying hardware description language techniques to a library of full-custom CMOS building blocks. Single clock pre-charged circuits have been implemented for these arrays at clock rates in excess of 100 Mhz using economical 2-micron (minimum feature size) CMOS processes, which may be quickly configured for a variety of applications. A number of application-specific arrays are presented, including a 2-D convolver for image processing, an integer polynomial solver, and a finite-field polynomial solver.

  8. Hybrid-integrated prism array optoelectronic targeting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. C.; Chang, H. C.; Tang, L. C.; Young, W. K.; Wang, J. C.; Huang, K. L.

    2005-11-01

    This investigation proposes a cost-effective, compact, and robust optoelectronic targeting system for measuring ballistic impact velocity and the distribution of projectile motion. The major elements of this system are four photo-gates hybridized by compound one-dimensional prism array and analog/digital electronic components. The number of light sources and photodetectors used in a photo-gate was reduced to one pair of light source and photodetector. The average velocity and location of the projectile are determined according to the measured time intervals ( ˜10 -8 s) passing each pair. The system can accurately measure the velocity of a bullet as it leaves a gun barrel, as well as the velocity at specific points along the trajectory outside the firearm. Additionally, the system uses a widespread low-powered laser pointer as a light source. Compared with other optoelectronic targeting systems that use high-powered lasers, the proposed system is both economical and safe.

  9. Naval Research Laboratory array cable qualifying test program. Contract report

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, R.C.; Howell, T.A.

    1994-08-01

    In 1993, Neptune Technologies designed and fabricated two prototype array cables under NRL`s support. Briefly, these two generic cables consisted of a monolay construction utilizing 18 singles and atwisted pair construction incorporating seven twisted pairs. Each conductor core was strengthened with an overbraid of Kevlar, then one core was jacketed with a braided sleeve of polyester which incorporated a fuzz type fairing, while the monocore incorporated an extruded jacket with a straked strum suppressor. The essence of the new cables are small AWG number 26 conductors insulated with a thin coating of Surlyn. These much smaller conductors are expected to provide a smaller cable with higher reliability. See Neptune Report dated December 32,1993, entitled Prototype Cable Final Technical Report.

  10. Model for large arrays of Josephson junctions with unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khveshchenko, D. V.; Crooks, R.

    2011-10-01

    We study large arrays of mesoscopic junctions made out of gapless unconventional superconductors where the tunneling processes of both particle-hole and Cooper pairs give rise to a strongly retarded effective action which, contrary to the standard case, cannot be readily characterized in terms of a local Josephson energy. This action can be relevant, for example, to grain boundary and c-axis junctions in layered high-Tc superconductors. By using a particular functional representation, we describe emergent collective phenomena in this system, ascertain its phase diagram, and compute electrical conductivity.

  11. Chemical sensors using peptide-functionalized conducting polymer nanojunction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Alvaro Díaz; Forzani, Erica S.; Li, Xiulan; Tao, Nongjian; Nagahara, Larry A.; Amlani, Islamshah; Tsui, Raymond

    2005-11-01

    We demonstrate a heavy metal-ion sensor for drinking water analysis using a conducting polymer nanojunction array. Each nanojunction is formed by bridging a pair of nanoelectrodes separated with a small gap (<60nm) with electrodeposited peptide-modified polyanilines. The signal transduction mechanism of the sensor is based on the change in the nanojunction conductance as a result of polymer conformational changes induced by the metal-ion chelating peptide. The nanojunction sensor allows real-time detection of Cu2+ and Ni2+ at ppt range.

  12. Direct Cavity Detection of Majorana Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartiailh, Matthieu C.; Kontos, Takis; Douçot, Benoit; Cottet, Audrey

    2017-03-01

    No experiment could directly test the particle-antiparticle duality of Majorana fermions, so far. However, this property represents a necessary ingredient towards the realization of topological quantum computing schemes. Here, we show how to complete this task by using microwave techniques. The direct coupling between a pair of overlapping Majorana bound states and the electric field from a microwave cavity is extremely difficult to detect due to the self-adjoint character of Majorana fermions which forbids direct energy exchanges with the cavity. We show theoretically how this problem can be circumvented by using photoassisted tunneling to fermionic reservoirs. The absence of a direct microwave transition inside the Majorana pair in spite of the light-Majorana coupling would represent a smoking gun for the Majorana self-adjoint character.

  13. Near-Unity Cooper Pair Splitting Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindele, J.; Baumgartner, A.; Schönenberger, C.

    2012-10-01

    The two electrons of a Cooper pair in a conventional superconductor form a spin singlet and therefore a maximally entangled state. Recently, it was demonstrated that the two particles can be extracted from the superconductor into two spatially separated contacts via two quantum dots in a process called Cooper pair splitting (CPS). Competing transport processes, however, limit the efficiency of this process. Here we demonstrate efficiencies up to 90%, significantly larger than required to demonstrate interaction-dominated CPS, and on the right order to test Bell’s inequality with electrons. We compare the CPS currents through both quantum dots, for which large apparent discrepancies are possible. The latter we explain intuitively and in a semiclassical master equation model. Large efficiencies are required to detect electron entanglement and for prospective electronics-based quantum information technologies.

  14. Extra-pair paternity in waved albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Huyvaert, K P; Anderson, D J; Jones, T C; Duan, W; Parker, P G

    2000-09-01

    We estimated the rate of extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs) in waved albatrosses (Phoebastria irrorata) on Isla Española, Galápagos, Ecuador, using multilocus minisatellite DNA fingerprinting. Waved albatrosses are socially monogamous, long-lived seabirds whose main population is on Española. Aggressive extra-pair copulation (EPC) attempts have been observed in the breeding colony during the days preceding egg-laying. Our genetic analyses of 16 families (single chicks and their attending parents) revealed evidence of EPFs in four families. In all cases males were the excluded parent. These data suggest that waved albatrosses have an unusually high rate of EPF relative to taxa with similar life histories. Future behavioural observations will determine the extent to which forced vs. unforced EPCs contribute to this high EPF rate.

  15. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.

  16. Satellite observations of transionospheric pulse pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, D.N.; Munson, C.P.; Devenport, J.C.

    1995-04-15

    The BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite has been making broadband observations in the VHF band of the radio spectrum. Since November of 1993 several hundred unusual signals have been recorded. The peculiar nature of these bursts of radio noise is that they have a duration of approximately 10 {mu}sec, are typically 20 to 40 dB brighter than the average background, and occur in pairs separated by approximately 50 {mu}sec. The authors have dubbed these emissions TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs, or TIPP events. They do not know what the source of these emissions is, but the dispersion of these signals is consistent with an origin at or near the earth`s surface. The satellite field of view and time of day when TIPP events are generally detected are consistent with regions of thunderstorm activity such as south-central Africa or Indonesia. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Pairing correlations in high-spin isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Odahara, A.; Gono, Y.; Fukuchi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Sagawa, H.; Satula, W.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2005-12-15

    High-spin isomers with J{sup {pi}}=49/2{sup +} and 27{sup +} have been systematically observed in a number of N=83 isotones with 60{<=}Z{<=}67 at excitation energies {approx}9 MeV. Based on experimental excitation energies, an odd-even binding energy staggering has been extracted for the first time for these multi-quasiparticle states. Surprisingly, the magnitude of the odd-even effect in high-spin isomers turned out to be very close to that in ground states, thus challenging conventional wisdom that pairing correlations are reduced in highly excited states. Theoretical analysis based on mean-field theory explains the observed proton number dependence of the odd-even effect as a manifestation of strong pairing correlations in the highly excited states. Mean-field effects and the proton-neutron residual interaction on the odd-even staggering are also examined.

  18. Pair creation: Back reactions and damping

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J. C. R.; Mizerny, V. A.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Smolyansky, S. A.; Vinnik, D. V.

    1999-12-01

    We solve the quantum Vlasov equation for fermions and bosons, incorporating spontaneous pair creation in the presence of back reactions and collisions. Pair creation is initiated by an external impulse field and the source term is non-Markovian. A simultaneous solution of Maxwell's equation in the presence of feedback yields an internal current and electric field that exhibit plasma oscillations with a period {tau}{sub pl}. Allowing for collisions, these oscillations are damped on a time scale {tau}{sub r} determined by the collision frequency. Plasma oscillations cannot affect the early stages of the formation of a quark-gluon plasma unless {tau}{sub r}>>{tau}{sub pl} and {tau}{sub pl}{approx}1/{lambda}{sub QCD}{approx}1 fm/c. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  19. Dissipative solitons in pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Adak, Ashish Khan, Manoranjan

    2014-01-15

    The effects of ion-neutral collisions on the dynamics of the nonlinear ion acoustic wave in pair-ion plasma are investigated. The standard perturbative approach leads to a Korteweg-de Vries equation with a linear damping term for the dynamics of the finite amplitude wave. The ion-neutral collision induced dissipation is responsible for the linear damping. The analytical solution and numerical simulation reveal that the nonlinear wave propagates in the form of a weakly dissipative compressive solitons. Furthermore, the width of the soliton is proportional to the amplitude of the wave for fixed soliton velocity. Results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  20. Supersymmetric pairing of kinks for polynomial nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosu, H.C.; Cornejo-Perez, O.

    2005-04-01

    We show how one can obtain kink solutions of ordinary differential equations with polynomial nonlinearities by an efficient factorization procedure directly related to the factorization of their nonlinear polynomial part. We focus on reaction-diffusion equations in the traveling frame and damped-anharmonic-oscillator equations. We also report an interesting pairing of the kink solutions, a result obtained by reversing the factorization brackets in the supersymmetric quantum-mechanical style. In this way, one gets ordinary differential equations with a different polynomial nonlinearity possessing kink solutions of different width but propagating at the same velocity as the kinks of the original equation. This pairing of kinks could have many applications. We illustrate the mathematical procedure with several important cases, among which are the generalized Fisher equation, the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation, and the polymerization fronts of microtubules.

  1. Superrotations and black hole pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Recent work has shown that the symmetries of classical gravitational scattering in asymptotically flat spacetimes include, at the linearized level, infinitesimal superrotations. These act like Virasoro generators on the celestial sphere at null infinity. However, due to the singularities in these generators, the physical status of finite superrotations has remained unclear. Here we address this issue in the context of the breaking of a cosmic string via quantum black hole pair nucleation. This process is described by a gravitational instanton known as the C-metric. After pair production, the black holes are pulled by the string to null infinity with a constant acceleration. At late times the string decays and the spacetime settles into a vacuum state. We show that the early and late spacetimes before and after string decay differ by a finite superrotation. This provides a physical interpretation of superrotations. They act on spacetimes which are asymptotically flat everywhere except at isolated singularities with cosmic string defects.

  2. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    DOE PAGES

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool formore » direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.« less

  3. Asteroid Systems: Binaries, Triples, and Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.-L.; Pravec, P.; Taylor, P.; Carry, B.; Jacobson, S.

    In the past decade, the number of known binary near-Earth asteroids has more than quadrupled and the number of known large main-belt asteroids with satellites has doubled. Half a dozen triple asteroids have been discovered, and the previously unrecognized populations of asteroid pairs and small main-belt binaries have been identified. The current observational evidence confirms that small (≲20 km) binaries form by rotational fission and establishes that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect powers the spin-up process. A unifying paradigm based on rotational fission and post-fission dynamics can explain the formation of small binaries, triples, and pairs. Large (>~20 km) binaries with small satellites are most likely created during large collisions.

  4. Multidimensional simulations of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Chardonnet, P.; Chechetkin, V. M.; Filina, A. A.; Popov, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    According to theoretical models, massive stars with masses within the 100-250 M⊙ range should explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). Since the first stars of the Universe are believed to be very massive, these supernovae should play a significant role in the early stages of its history. But these stars represent the last unobserved population, owing to detection limits of current telescopes. In this work we analyze pair-instability supernovae explosions using various numerical codes. We evolve series of the configurations of oxygen cores to establish a range of masses and initial conditions where this type of explosion is possible. We also study the role of possible instabilities in the propagation of shockwaves during the last stage of the explosion. This investigation could help us to predict the observational properties of PISNe for future space and ground telescopes.

  5. Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 30 is being distributed for use in development and testing of fingerprint compression and fingerprint matching systems. The database allows the user to develop and evaluate data compression algorithms for fingerprint images scanned at both 19.7 ppmm (500 dpi) and 39.4 ppmm (1000 dpi). The data consist of 36 ten-print paired cards with both the rolled and plain images scanned at 19.7 and 39.4 pixels per mm. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  6. Satellite observations of transionospheric pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, D. N.; Munson, C. P.; Devenport, J. C.

    1995-04-01

    The BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite has been making broadband observations in the VHF band of the radio spectrum. Since November of 1993 several hundred unusual signals have been recorded. The peculiar nature of these bursts of radio noise is that they have a duration of approximately 10 microseconds, are typically 20 to 40 dB brighter than the average background, and occur in pairs separated by approximately 50 microseconds. We have dubbed these emissions TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs, or TIPP events. We do not know what the source of these emissions is, but the dispersion of these signals is consistent with an origin at or near the earth's surface. The satellite field of view and time of day when TIPP events are generally detected are consistent with regions of thunderstorm activity such as south-central Africa or Indonesia.

  7. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  8. A search for resonant Z pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Boveia, Antonio

    2008-12-01

    I describe a search for anomalous production of Z pairs through a new massive resonance X in 2.5-2.9 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the CDFII Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. I reconstruct Z pairs through their decays to electrons, muons, and quarks. To achieve perhaps the most efficient lepton reconstruction ever used at CDF, I apply a thorough understanding of the detector and new reconstruction software heavily revised for this purpose. In particular, I have designed and employ new general-purpose algorithms for tracking at large η in order to increase muon acceptance. Upon analyzing the unblinded signal samples, I observe no X → ZZ candidates and set upper limits on the production cross section using a Kaluza-Klein graviton-like acceptance.

  9. Pair correlations in magnetic nanodispersed fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Elfimova, E. A. Ivanov, A. O.

    2010-07-15

    The pair distribution function of a monodisperse magnetic fluid simulated by a liquid made of dipolar hard spheres with constant magnetic moments is calculated. The anisotropy of the pair distribution function and the related structure factor of scattering in a dc uniform magnetic field are studied. The calculation is performed by diagrammatic expansion in the volume concentration of particles and the interparticle magnetic-dipole interaction intensity using a thermodynamic perturbation theory. Limitation by three-particle diagrams makes it possible to apply the results obtained to magnetic fluids with a moderate concentration. Even for low-concentration and weakly nonideal magnetic fluids, the anisotropic interparticle magnetic-dipole correlations in a magnetic field lead to the repulsion of particles in the direction normal to the field and to the formation of particle dimers along the field.

  10. Average prime-pair counting formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Jaap; Riele, Herman Te

    2010-04-01

    Taking r>0 , let π_{2r}(x) denote the number of prime pairs (p, p+2r) with p≤ x . The prime-pair conjecture of Hardy and Littlewood (1923) asserts that π_{2r}(x)˜ 2C_{2r} {li}_2(x) with an explicit constant C_{2r}>0 . There seems to be no good conjecture for the remainders ω_{2r}(x)=π_{2r}(x)- 2C_{2r} {li}_2(x) that corresponds to Riemann's formula for π(x)-{li}(x) . However, there is a heuristic approximate formula for averages of the remainders ω_{2r}(x) which is supported by numerical results.

  11. PAIR (Planning and Analysis of Inspection Resources)

    SciTech Connect

    Teichmann, T.; Santaniello, A.; Fishbone, L.G.

    1994-03-01

    The safeguards inspection effort of the International Atomic Energy Agency consists of the efforts for the Physical Inventory Verifications to close the annual material balance, Interim Inventory Verifications, conducted mainly to satisfy the Timeliness Criteria, Flow Verifications to verify the transfer of material, and Containment and Surveillance activities, which help preserve continuity of knowledge concerning the material. Estimating the requiring overall future inspection effort under a variety of conditions is an important part of Agency planning. As exemplified by the sample results provides a straightforward means to analyze `What if` situations in safeguards implementation. It thereby permits managers and analysts to study future scenarios and their effect on human resources. It is planned to introduce into PAIR a direct capability for studying costs associated with these hypothetical changes in safeguards implementation. In this way PAIR could more easily assist the Safeguards Department in its current program of investigating new safeguards approaches.

  12. Heterogeneity between primary colon carcinoma and paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huanrong; Jin, Ketao; Xie, Bojian; Han, Na; Cui, Binbin; Cao, Feilin; Teng, Lisong

    2012-11-01

    Heterogeneity is one of the recognized characteristics of human tumors, and occurs on multiple levels in a wide range of tumors. A number of studies have focused on the heterogeneity found in primary tumors and related metastases with the consideration that the evaluation of metastatic rather than primary sites could be of clinical relevance. Numerous studies have demonstrated particularly high rates of heterogeneity between primary colorectal tumors and their paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases. It has also been proposed that the heterogeneity between primary colon carcinomas and their paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in different responses to anticancer therapies. The heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and corresponding metastases by genome‑wide gene expression analysis has not been extensively studied. In the present study, we investigated the differentially expressed genes between a primary colon carcinoma specimen (obtained from a 40-year-old female colon carcinoma patient with lymphatic and hepatic metastases) and its paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases by genome-wide gene expression analysis using GeneChip HGU133Plus2.0 expression arrays. Our results demonstrate that genome-wide gene expression varies between primary colon carcinoma and its paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

  13. Pair density wave superconducting states and statistical mechanics of dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto Garrido, Rodrigo Andres

    3 we show that the pair-density-wave superconducting state emergent in extended Heisenberg-Hubbard models in two-leg ladders is topological in the presence of an Ising spin symmetry and supports a Majorana zero mode (MZM) at an open boundary and at a junction with a uniform d-wave one-dimensional superconductor. Similarly to a conventional finite-momentum paired state, the order parameter of the PDW state is a charge-2e field with finite momentum. However, the order parameter here is a quartic electron operator and conventional mean-field theory cannot be applied to study this state. We use bosonization to show that the 1D PDW state has a MZM at a boundary. This superconducting state is an exotic topological phase supporting Majorana fermions with finite-momentum pairing fields and charge-4e superconductivity. In chapter 4 we provide a quasi-one-dimensional model which can support a PDW state. The model consists of an array of strongly-interacting one-dimensional systems, where the one-dimensional systems are coupled to each other by local interactions.Within the interchain mean-field theory (MFT), we find several SC states from the model, including a conventional uniform SC state, PDW SC state, and a coexisting phase of the uniform SC and PDW states. In this quasi-1D regime we can treat the strong correlation physics essentially exactly using bosonization methods and the crossover to the 2D system by means of interchain MFT. The resulting critical temperatures of the SC phases generically exhibit a power-law scaling with the coupling constants of the array, instead of the essential singularity found in weak-coupling BCS-type theories. Electronic excitations with an open Fermi surface, which emerge from the electronic Luttinger liquid systems below their crossover temperature to the Fermi liquid, are then coupled to the SC order parameters via the proximity effect. From the Fermi surface thus coupled to the SC order parameters, we calculate the quasiparticle

  14. Intelligent Pairing Assistant for Air Operation Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    center, intelligent user interface, reinforcement learning , pairing. ACM Classification Keywords H.4.1. Office Automation: Workflow management...took to learning how to adjust the weights associated with rules based on the user’s feedback falls into the category of reinforcement learning problems...Press, 93-100. 13. Sutton, R. and Barto, A, Reinforcement Learning : An Introduction. MIT Press, Cambridge MA, 1998. Figure 2. Annotation

  15. (Photoexcited charge pair escape and recombination)

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    Progress in four research areas on this project are summarized under the following topics: (1) Geminate charge pair recombination in hexane; (2) Fast current measurements resulting from excitation of charge transfer (CT) states; (3) Measurement of the dipole moment of excited states by DC conductivity; and (4) Charge separation at macroscopic interfaces between electron donor and acceptor solids. In a final section, personnel who have contributed to the project during the past budget period are described.

  16. Are all Linear Paired Comparison Models Equivalent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Previous authors (Jackson and Fleckenstein 1957, Mosteller 1958, Noether 1960) have found that different models of paired comparisons data lead to simi...ponential distribution with a location parameter (Mosteller 1958, Noether 1960). Formal statements describing the limiting behavior of the gamma...that are not convolu- tion type linear models (the uniform model considered by Smith (1956), Mosteller (1958), Noether (1960)) and other convolution

  17. On the pairing effects in triaxial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.

    2014-03-05

    Triaxial deformation effect on the pairing correlations is studied in the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Quantities such as binding energy, gap parameter and particle-number fluctuation are considered in neutron-rich Mo isotopes. The results are compared with those of axially symmetric calculation and with available experimental data. The role played by the particle-number projection is outlined.

  18. Precise predictions for slepton pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres Freitas; Andreas von Manteuffel

    2002-11-07

    At a future linear collider, the masses and couplings of scalar leptons can be measured with high accuracy, thus requiring precise theoretical predictions for the relevant processes. In this work, after a discussion of the expected experimental precision, the complete one-loop corrections to smuon and selectron pair production in the MSSM are presented and the effect of different contributions in the result is analyzed.

  19. Radiation damping in metal nanoparticle pairs.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Christian; Schmidt, Benjamin; von Plessen, Gero

    2007-02-01

    The radiation damping rate of plasmon resonances in pairs of spherical gold nanoparticles is calculated. The radiative line width of the plasmon resonance indicates significant far-field coupling between the nanoparticles over distances many times the particle diameter. The radiation damping of the coupled particle-plasmon mode alternates between superradiant and subradiant behavior when the particle spacing is varied. At small particle spacings where near-field coupling occurs, the radiation damping rate lies far below that of an isolated particle.

  20. Expression of myriapod pair rule gene orthologs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Segmentation is a hallmark of the arthropods; most knowledge about the molecular basis of arthropod segmentation comes from work on the fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this species a hierarchic cascade of segmentation genes subdivides the blastoderm stepwise into single segment wide regions. However, segmentation in the fly is a derived feature since all segments form virtually simultaneously. Conversely, in the vast majority of arthropods the posterior segments form one at a time from a posterior pre-segmental zone. The pair rule genes (PRGs) comprise an important level of the Drosophila segmentation gene cascade and are indeed the first genes that are expressed in typical transverse stripes in the early embryo. Information on expression and function of PRGs outside the insects, however, is scarce. Results Here we present the expression of the pair rule gene orthologs in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda). We find evidence that these genes are involved in segmentation and that components of the hierarchic interaction of the gene network as found in insects may be conserved. We further provide evidence that segments are formed in a single-segment periodicity rather than in pairs of two like in another myriapod, the centipede Strigamia maritima. Finally we show that decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation in Glomeris appears already at the level of the PRGs. Conclusions Although the pair rule gene network is partially conserved among insects and myriapods, some aspects of PRG interaction are, as suggested by expression pattern analysis, convergent, even within the Myriapoda. Conserved expression patterns of PRGs in insects and myriapods, however, may represent ancestral features involved in segmenting the arthropod ancestor. PMID:21352542

  1. Introduction to Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    King, Graham Missell

    2015-02-17

    By collecting a total scattering pattern, subtracting the non-sample background, applying corrections, and taking the Fourier transform, the real space pair distribution function can be obtained. A PDF gives the distribution of inter-atomic distances in a material and is an excellent probe of short and intermediate range structure. RMC refinements using multiple data types are an excellent method for multi-scale modeling, including the mesoscale range.

  2. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  3. The Square Kilometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.

    2006-06-01

    The SKA is an observatory for m/cm wavelengths that will provide quantum leaps in studies of the early universe, the high-energy universe, and astrobiology. Key science areas include:(1) Galaxy Evolution and Large-Scale Structure, including Dark Energy;(2) Probing the Dark Ages through studies of highly redshifted hydrogen and carbon monoxide;(3) Cosmic magnetism;(4) Probing Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes; and(5) The Cradle of Life, including real-time images of protoplanetary disks, inventory of organic molecules, and the search for signals from extraterrestrial intelligence.From a phase-space point of view, the SKA will expand enormously our ability to discover new and known phenomena, including transient sources with time scales from nano-seconds to years. Particular examples include coherent emissions from extrasolar planets and gamma-ray burst afterglows, detectable at levels 100 times smaller than currently. Specifications needed to meet the science requirements are technically quite challenging: a frequency range of approximately 0.1 to 25 GHz; wide field of view, tens of square degrees (frequency dependent); high dynamic range and image fidelity; flexibility in imaging on scales from sub-mas to degrees; and sampling the time-frequency domain as demanded by transient objects. Meeting these specifications requires collaboration of a world-wide group of engineers and scientists. For this and other reasons, the SKA will be realized internationally. Initially, several concepts have been explored for building inexpensive collecting area that provides broad frequency coverage. The Reference Design now specifies an SKA based on a large number of small-diameter dish antennas with "smart feeds." Complementary to the dishes is a phased aperture array that will provide very wide-field capability. I will discuss the Reference Design, along with a timeline for developing the technology, building the first 10% of the SKA, and finishing the full SKA, along with the

  4. Imidazolium salt ion pairs in solution.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Hubert K; Ludwig, Ralf; Wulf, Alexander; Dupont, Jairton

    2015-06-01

    The formation, stabilisation and reactivity of contact ion pairs of non-protic imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) in solution are conceptualized in light of selected experimental evidence as well theoretical calculations reported mainly in the last ten years. Electric conductivity, NMR, ESI-MS and IR data as well as theoretical calculations support not only the formation of contact ion pairs in solution, but also the presence of larger ionic and neutral aggregates even when dissolved in solvents with relatively high dielectric constants, such as acetonitrile and DMSO. The presence of larger imidazolium supramolecular aggregates is favoured at higher salt concentrations in solvents of low dielectric constant for ILs that contain shorter N-alkyl side chains associated with anions of low coordination ability. The stability and reactivity of neutral contact species are also dependent on the nature of the anion, imidazolium substituents, and are more abundant in ILs containing strong coordinating anions, in particular those that can form charge transfer complexes with the imidazolium cation. Finally, some ILs display reactivities as contact ion pairs rather than solvent-separated ions.

  5. Pairing in the presence of a pseudogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalapino, Douglas; Maier, Thomas; Staar, Peter; Mishra, Vivek

    After 30 years, the quest to experimentally identify the mechanism responsible for pairing in the high Tc superconductors continues. Here we discuss an approach in which angle resolved photoemission (ARPES)data for BSCCO 2212(Tc=89K) is used to extract the single particle spectral weight A(k,w). This spectral weight is then used to calculate the BCS kernel and estimate the RPA spin-fluctuation d-wave pairing strength. Previously A(k,w) results at T=140K, extrapolated to lower temperatures, found that the BSCCO pseudo gap suppressed the logarithmic singularity of the BCS kernel and the spin-fluctuation interaction was too weak to produce superconductivity [V.Mishra et al.,Nat.Phys.10,357]. Here using results for A(k,w) at T=40K for this same system, we find that while the BCS kernel is suppressed, there is a significant increase in the d-wave pairing strength for the spin-fluctuation interaction when the temperature drops from T=140K and 40K. These results are shown to be consistent with DCA calculations for a 2D Hubbard model of a BSCCO like system which has a pseudo gap. We conclude that in spite of the suppression of the usual BCS logarithmic instability by the pseudo gap, the increase in strength of the spin-fluctuation interaction is sufficient to lead to superconductivity. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2015-03-01

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current-current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin-Lee-Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that l = 1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momentum channel l >= 3 . Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν =1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively. This work was supported by US NSF under the Grant DMR-1004520, the funds from the David S. Saxon Presidential Chair at UCLA(37952), and by the Institute for Basic Science in Korea through the Young Scientist grant (5199-2014003).

  7. Persistent ion pairing in aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Baer, Marcel D; Fulton, John L; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of chloride-hydronium (Cl(-)···H3O(+)) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counterions do not behave merely as spectators. Through comparison of recent extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements to state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain a unique view into the molecular structure of medium-to-high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl(-)···H3O(+) contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in microsolvated hydrochloric acid gas phase clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to view the reaction network for acid dissociation and how it relates to our picture of acid-base equilibria.

  8. Grandmothering life histories and human pair bonding

    PubMed Central

    Coxworth, James E.; Kim, Peter S.; McQueen, John S.; Hawkes, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of distinctively human life history and social organization is generally attributed to paternal provisioning based on pair bonds. Here we develop an alternative argument that connects the evolution of human pair bonds to the male-biased mating sex ratios that accompanied the evolution of human life history. We simulate an agent-based model of the grandmother hypothesis, compare simulated sex ratios to data on great apes and human hunter–gatherers, and note associations between a preponderance of males and mate guarding across taxa. Then we explore a recent model that highlights the importance of mating sex ratios for differences between birds and mammals and conclude that lessons for human evolution cannot ignore mammalian reproductive constraints. In contradiction to our claim that male-biased sex ratios are characteristically human, female-biased ratios are reported in some populations. We consider the likelihood that fertile men are undercounted and conclude that the mate-guarding hypothesis for human pair bonds gains strength from explicit links with our grandmothering life history. PMID:26351687

  9. Pair fireball precursors of neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Zivancev, Charles

    2016-10-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the NSs. If a modest fraction η of the extracted electromagnetic power extracted accelerates relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission a compact volume will result in the formation of an electron-positron pair fireball. Applying a steady-state pair wind model, we quantify the detectability of the precursor fireball with gamma-ray satellites. For η ˜ 1 the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ≈ 10(Bd/1014 G)3/4 Mpc is much closer than the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the NS surface magnetic field strength is very large, B_d ≲ 10^{15} G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, mergers with weaker NS fields could contribute a nearby population of short gamma-ray bursts. Power not dissipated close to the binary is carried to infinity along the open field lines by a large-scale Poynting flux. Reconnection within this outflow, well outside of the pair photosphere, provides a potential site for non-thermal emission, such as a coherent millisecond radio burst.

  10. Persistent Ion Pairing in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of a chloride-Hyronium (Cl-H3O+) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counter ions do not behave merely as spectators. Through the use of modern extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements in conjunction with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain an unprecedented view into the molecular structure of medium to high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl-H3O+ contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in micro-solvated hydrochloric acid clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to think about the activity of the proton that impacts our picture of the pH scale. Funding for CJM, GKS, and JLF was provided by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Funding for MDB was provided throught the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MB was funded through Argonne National Laboratory.

  11. Banach Algebras Associated to Lax Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazebrook, James F.

    2015-04-01

    Lax pairs featuring in the theory of integrable systems are known to be constructed from a commutative algebra of formal pseudodifferential operators known as the Burchnall- Chaundy algebra. Such pairs induce the well known KP flows on a restricted infinite-dimensional Grassmannian. The latter can be exhibited as a Banach homogeneous space constructed from a Banach *-algebra. It is shown that this commutative algebra of operators generating Lax pairs can be associated with a commutative C*-subalgebra in the C*-norm completion of the *-algebra. In relationship to the Bose-Fermi correspondence and the theory of vertex operators, this C*-algebra has an association with the CAR algebra of operators as represented on Fermionic Fock space by the Gelfand-Naimark-Segal construction. Instrumental is the Plücker embedding of the restricted Grassmannian into the projective space of the associated Hilbert space. The related Baker and tau-functions provide a connection between these two C*-algebras, following which their respective state spaces and Jordan-Lie-Banach algebras structures can be compared.

  12. Paired and interacting galaxies: Conference summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1990-01-01

    The author gives a summary of the conference proceedings. The conference began with the presentation of the basic data sets on pairs, groups, and interacting galaxies with the latter being further discussed with respect to both global properties and properties of the galactic nuclei. Then followed the theory, modelling and interpretation using analytic techniques, simulations and general modelling for spirals and ellipticals, starbursts and active galactic nuclei. Before the conference the author wrote down the three questions concerning pairs, groups and interacting galaxies that he hoped would be answered at the meeting: (1) How do they form, including the role of initial conditions, the importance of subclustering, the evolution of groups to compact groups, and the fate of compact groups; (2) How do they evolve, including issues such as relevant timescales, the role of halos and the problem of overmerging, the triggering and enhancement of star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei, and the relative importance of dwarf versus giant encounters; and (3) Are they important, including the frequency of pairs and interactions, whether merging and interactions are very important aspects of the life of a normal galaxy at formation, during its evolution, in forming bars, shells, rings, bulges, etc., and in the formation and evolution of active galaxies? Where possible he focuses on these three central issues in the summary.

  13. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2014-12-15

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current–current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin–Lee–Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that ℓ=1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momenta ℓ≥3. Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν=1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively.

  14. Extra-pair copulations in Black Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Daniel; Sedinger, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Monogamy is the primary mating system among waterfowl, but extra-pair copulations (EPCs) have been documented in at least 39 species (McKinney et al. 1983). Extra-pair copulations occur in most Holarctic species of dabbling ducks (Anas spp.), but have been recorded in only three species of geese: Lesser Snow Geese, Chen caerulescens caerulescens (Mineau and Cooke 1979a), Ross’ Geese, C. rossii (J. Ryder in McKinney et al. 1984), and Greater White-fronted Geese, Anser albifrons frontalis (C.R. Ely, pers. comm.).In colonial Lesser Snow Geese, the close proximity of nesting conspecifics may enable males to pursue EPCs as a secondary reproductive strategy (Mineau and Cooke, 1979a, 1979b). Copulatory behavior of other geese has not been studied in sufficient detail to permit comparison with Lesser Sone Geese. Here we report on timing and rates of pair copulations (PCs) and EPCs, and describe behaviors associated with EPCs in colonially nesting Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans).

  15. Field induced Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in two-dimensional array of Nb-AlO-Nb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeenkov, S.; Rivera, V. A. G.; Marega, E.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.

    2011-06-01

    We present recent results on the magnetic field dependence of current-voltage characteristics (CVC) for an artificially prepared two-dimensional array of unshunted Nb-AlO x-Nb Josephson junctions. The results obtained from the measured CVC and critical current IC(T,H) differential magnetoresistance (DMR) R(T,H)=[ of the array are found to exhibit behavior compatible with field induced Kosterlitz-Thouless transition describing unbinding of vortex-antivortex pairs under applied magnetic field.

  16. An Update on the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gregory B.; Tremblay, S. E.; Pihlstrom, Y.; Craig, J.; Rickard, L.; Dowell, J.; Kassim, N.; Clarke, T.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Ray, P.; Schmitt, H.; Woods, D.; Hartman, J.; Ellingson, S.; Wolfe, C.; Navarro, R.; Sigman, E.; Soriano, M.; Owen, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a SKA Pathfinder, will be a new multi-purpose radio telescope operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz. Scientific programs include pulsars, supernova remnants, general transient searches, radio recombination lines, solar and Jupiter bursts, investigations into the "dark ages" using redshifted hydrogen, and ionospheric phenomena. Upon completion, LWA will consist of 53 phased array "stations” distributed across a region over 400 km in diameter. Each station consists of 256 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose signals are formed into beams, with outputs transported to a central location for high-resolution aperture synthesis imaging. The resulting image sensitivity is estimated to be a few mJy (5sigma, 8 MHz, 2 polarizations, 1 h, zenith) from 20-80 MHz; with angular resolution of a few arcseconds. A technical overview of the LWA project is available (Ellingson etal. 2009, Proc. IEEE, 97, 1421), and additional information is online at http://lwa.unm.edu. Partners in the LWA project include LANL, JPL, NRAO, NRL, UNM, NMT, and Virginia Tech. The first station of the LWA, called "LWA-1", is located near the center of the EVLA and is expected to achieve initial operational capability in early 2011. As of September 2010, all antennas have been installed as well as a subset of the "production” versions of receivers, digital electronics, data recorders, and monitoring and control system. The "transient buffer - wideband” (TBW) capability is operational with 20 dipoles, and provides the ability to capture simultaneous raw 196 MSPS A/D output over the entire 10-88 MHz tuning range in 61 ms bursts. Other operating modes are in the final stages of implementation. Some early results obtained with LWA-1 will be presented. Funding for the LWA has been provided by the Office of Naval Research.

  17. Light propagation in nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahachou, A. I.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2007-03-01

    We study the propagation of TM- and TE-polarized light in two-dimensional arrays of silver nanorods of various diameters in a gelatin background. We calculate the transmittance, reflectance and absorption of arranged and disordered nanorod arrays and compare the exact numerical results with the predictions of the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory. We show that interactions between nanorods, multipole contributions and formations of photonic gaps affect strongly the transmittance spectra that cannot be accounted for in terms of the conventional effective-medium theory. We also demonstrate and explain the degradation of the transmittance in arrays with randomly located rods as well as the weak influence of their fluctuating diameter. For TM modes we outline the importance of the skin effect, which causes the full reflection of the incoming light. We then illustrate the possibility of using periodic arrays of nanorods as high-quality polarizers.

  18. Downsampling Photodetector Array with Windowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patawaran, Ferze D.; Farr, William H.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Sahasrabudhe, Adit

    2012-01-01

    In a photon counting detector array, each pixel in the array produces an electrical pulse when an incident photon on that pixel is detected. Detection and demodulation of an optical communication signal that modulated the intensity of the optical signal requires counting the number of photon arrivals over a given interval. As the size of photon counting photodetector arrays increases, parallel processing of all the pixels exceeds the resources available in current application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and gate array (GA) technology; the desire for a high fill factor in avalanche photodiode (APD) detector arrays also precludes this. Through the use of downsampling and windowing portions of the detector array, the processing is distributed between the ASIC and GA. This allows demodulation of the optical communication signal incident on a large photon counting detector array, as well as providing architecture amenable to algorithmic changes. The detector array readout ASIC functions as a parallel-to-serial converter, serializing the photodetector array output for subsequent processing. Additional downsampling functionality for each pixel is added to this ASIC. Due to the large number of pixels in the array, the readout time of the entire photodetector is greater than the time between photon arrivals; therefore, a downsampling pre-processing step is done in order to increase the time allowed for the readout to occur. Each pixel drives a small counter that is incremented at every detected photon arrival or, equivalently, the charge in a storage capacitor is incremented. At the end of a user-configurable counting period (calculated independently from the ASIC), the counters are sampled and cleared. This downsampled photon count information is then sent one counter word at a time to the GA. For a large array, processing even the downsampled pixel counts exceeds the capabilities of the GA. Windowing of the array, whereby several subsets of pixels are designated

  19. A lightweight solar array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josephs, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A sample module was assembled to model a portion of a flexible extendable solar array, a type that promises to become the next generation of solar array design. The resulting study of this module is intended to provide technical support to the array designer for lightweight component selection, specifications, and tests. Selected from available lightweight components were 127-micron-thick wrap-around contacted solar cells, 34- micron-thick sputtered glass covers, and as a substrate a 13-micron-thick polyimide film clad with a copper printed circuit. Each component displayed weaknesses. The thin solar cells had excessive breakage losses. Sputtered glass cover adhesion was poor, and the covered cell was weaker than the cell uncovered. Thermal stresses caused some cell delamination from the model solar array substrate.

  20. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind; Barnes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework has been developed that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), which allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and a hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms, and is extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems. FPGA chips can be responsive to realtime demands for changing applications needs, but only if the electronic fabric can respond fast enough. This systolic array framework allows for rapid partial and dynamic reconfiguration of the chip in response to the real-time needs of scalability, and adaptability of executables.

  1. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  2. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.

    2014-03-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) are highly diverse in size and configuration, with apertures ranging from under 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high-frequency phases lacking coherence between sensors. Pipeline detection algorithms often miss such phases, since they only consider frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing, and phases that are detected are often attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates. This can result in missed events, due to either a lack of contributing phases or by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. It has been demonstrated previously that continuous spectral estimation can both detect and estimate phases on the largest aperture arrays, with arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity, as is the case for classical f-k analysis, and the ability to estimate slowness vectors requires sufficiently large inter-sensor distances to resolve time-delays between pulses with a period of the order 4-5 s. Spectrogram beampacking works well on five IMS arrays with apertures over 20 km (NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK) without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with 10-20 km aperture (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 s period signal. Even for medium aperture arrays which can provide high-quality coherent slowness estimates, a complementary spectrogram beampacking procedure could act as a quality control by providing non-aliased estimates when the coherent slowness grids display

  3. Flexible solar-array mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    One of the key elements of the flexible rolled-up solar array system is a mechanism to deploy, retract, and store the flexible solar-cell arrays. The selection of components, the design of the mechanism assembly, and the tests that were performed are discussed. During 6 months in orbit, all mission objectives were satisfied, and inflight performance has shown good correlation with preflight analyses and tests.

  4. Conformal Impulse Receive Antenna Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    equations then becomes the integro - differential equation )26()()(’)’()’( 1 ’)’()’( 0 2 02 0 2...air-dielectric interface and backed by a perfectly conducting plane. We obtained an integro - differential equation for the surface current density on...multi-element array requires that we solve a certain integro - differential equation for the surface current density on the array. This equation

  5. Advanced photovoltaic solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard M.; Stella, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Phase 2 of the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array (APSA) program, started in mid-1987, is currently in progress to fabricate prototype wing hardware that will lead to wing integration and testing in 1989. The design configuration and key details are reviewed. A status of prototype hardware fabricated to date is provided. Results from key component-level tests are discussed. Revised estimates of array-level performance as a function of solar cell device technology for geosynchronous missions are given.

  6. Matrix computations on mesh arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the systematic derivation of mesh arrays for matrix computations, in particular realizing the algorithm-specific arrays and mapping algorithms onto class-specific arrays. A data-dependency graph-based transformational method is proposed in a design frame work consisting of two stages, namely algorithm regularization and derivation of arrays. The first stage derives the fully-parallel data-dependency graph (FPG) of an algorithm and transforms this graph into a three-dimensional one with unidirectional nearest-neighbor dependencies (a multi-mesh graph MMG). The second stage transforms the MMG into a two-dimensional G-graph, which is realized as an algorithm-specific array or mapped onto a class-specific array. This stage allows the incorporation of implementation restrictions and the evaluation of tradeoffs in properties of cells, as well as the derivation of arrays for fixed-size data and partitioned problems, while performing optimization of specific performance/cost measures. The proposed method is formalized by presenting a sufficient set of transformations and demonstrating the equivalence of graphs obtained from those transformations. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the MMG representation is always possible, due to the characteristics of the operators. The method has been applied to a collection of matrix algorithms, including matrix multiplication, convolution, matrix decompositions, transitive closure, the Faddeev algorithm, and BBA{sup {minus}1}. The examples show that, in addition to the features listed earlier, this method is easy to apply. Moreover, the method is compared with other techniques, concluding that it is advantageous because it meets evaluation criteria and produces more efficient arrays.

  7. Conformal microstrip arrays on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, J.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1988-04-01

    Design and measured results for two X-band conformal microstrip arrays are presented. The two 4 x 4 arrays are built on the surface of a cylinder of small radius. They differ by the orientation of small radius. They differ by the orientation of the elements relative to the cylinder axis. The measured directivities and radiation patterns are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions.

  8. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelorators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind (Inventor); Barnes, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on an FPGA, that allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms and extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems.

  9. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.

  10. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  11. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-04-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  12. Solar maximum: Solar array degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    The 5-year in-orbit power degradation of the silicon solar array aboard the Solar Maximum Satellite was evaluated. This was the first spacecraft to use Teflon R FEP as a coverglass adhesive, thus avoiding the necessity of an ultraviolet filter. The peak power tracking mode of the power regulator unit was employed to ensure consistent maximum power comparisons. Telemetry was normalized to account for the effects of illumination intensity, charged particle irradiation dosage, and solar array temperature. Reference conditions of 1.0 solar constant at air mass zero and 301 K (28 C) were used as a basis for normalization. Beginning-of-life array power was 2230 watts. Currently, the array output is 1830 watts. This corresponds to a 16 percent loss in array performance over 5 years. Comparison of Solar Maximum Telemetry and predicted power levels indicate that array output is 2 percent less than predictions based on an annual 1.0 MeV equivalent election fluence of 2.34 x ten to the 13th power square centimeters space environment.

  13. Array imaging system for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Raoul; Mueller, Kevin; Malaurie, Pauline; Vogler, Uwe; Noell, Wilfried; Scharf, Toralf; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated array imaging system based on a stack of microlens arrays. The microlens arrays are manufactured by melting resist and reactive ion etching (RIE) technology on 8'' wafers (fused silica) and mounted by wafer-level packaging (WLP)1. The array imaging system is configured for 1X projection (magnification m = +1) of a mask pattern onto a planar wafer. The optical system is based on two symmetric telescopes, thus anti-symmetric wavefront aberrations like coma, distortion, lateral color are minimal. Spherical aberrations are reduced by using microlenses with aspherical lens profiles. In our system design approach, sub-images of individual imaging channels do not overlap to avoid interference. Image superposition is achieved by moving the array imaging system during the exposure time. A tandem Koehler integrator illumination system (MO Exposure Optics) is used for illumination. The angular spectrum of the illumination light underfills the pupils of the imaging channels to avoid crosstalk. We present and discuss results from simulation, mounting and testing of a first prototype of the investigated array imaging system for lithography.

  14. Scan-independent slot arrays with parasitic wire arrays in stratified medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Kwong T.; Munk, Benedikt A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a parasitic wire array on the scan admittance of a slot array has been investigated. Structures considered can consist of an infinite slot array and an arbitrary number of parasitic infinte arrays of piecewise linear wires, all arrays being embedded in a stratified medium. These include, as particular cases, phased arrays of Clavin elements. Expressing the fields from the arrays as plane waves, a procedure similar to the periodic moment method for infinite periodic structures is set up to obtain the the scan admittance of the slot array. Scan admittances are presented for a slot array with monopole arrays in free space, and a slot array with a tilted dipole array in a stratified medium. Blind spots at which the incident energy is mainly reflected rather than transmitted were found. Results obtained indicate the possibility of using parasitic wire arrays for scan compensation of active slot arrays.

  15. Design of diffractive microlens array integration with focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sihai; Yi, Xinjian; Li, Yi; He, Miao; Chen, Sixiang; Kong, Lingbin

    2000-10-01

    The IR spectrum from 3 to 5micrometers has numerous applications in both military and civil industries. High performance at high operating temperature is often important in these applications. Conventional Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) without integration with concentrator such as microlens have poor sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio because of their lower fill factor. The binary optics microlens arrays reported in this paper are designed for integration with FPAs. Thus, the FPAs' fill factor, sensitivity, and signal- to-noise ratio can be improved while retaining a given image resolution and optical collection area. In the paper, we discussed the 256(Horizontal)x290(Vertical) microlens arrays designed for a center wavelength of 4micrometers , with 50micrometers (Horizontalx33micrometers (Vertical) quadrate pixel dimension and a speed (F number) of F/1.96. PtSi FPAs were fabricated on the front side of a 400-micrometers -thick Si substrate. The designed diffractive microlens arrays will be etched on the back side of the same wafer in a register fashion and it will be reported in other paper. Considering the diffraction efficiency, 8-phase-level approximation is enough. For the diffraction efficiency of 8-phase-level diffractive microlens reaches 95%. The process only need three mask-level, so we designed and fabricated three masks with the same dimension 4'x4'. Also, a set of fine verniers was designed and fabricated on each mask to allow accurate alignment during the fabrication process. Through a computer simulation, the microlens arrays are nearly diffraction limited, with the diffraction efficiency of 93%, a bit lower than the theoretical value of 95%. Introduction of microlens arrays has the ability to increase the FPAs' fill factor to 100%, while it is only about 21.6% without microlens. To our knowledge, this is the first trial of integration large area microlens arrays with FPAs at home.

  16. Prospects for quantum computing with an array of ultracold polar paramagnetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Karra, Mallikarjun; Sharma, Ketan; Friedrich, Bretislav; Kais, Sabre; Herschbach, Dudley

    2016-03-07

    Arrays of trapped ultracold molecules represent a promising platform for implementing a universal quantum computer. DeMille [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 067901 (2002)] has detailed a prototype design based on Stark states of polar (1)Σ molecules as qubits. Herein, we consider an array of polar (2)Σ molecules which are, in addition, inherently paramagnetic and whose Hund's case (b) free-rotor pair-eigenstates are Bell states. We show that by subjecting the array to combinations of concurrent homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields, the entanglement of the array's Stark and Zeeman states can be tuned and the qubit sites addressed. Two schemes for implementing an optically controlled CNOT gate are proposed and their feasibility discussed in the face of the broadening of spectral lines due to dipole-dipole coupling and the inhomogeneity of the electric and magnetic fields.

  17. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Cecil H.; Green, Ida M.

    1998-01-01

    The southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) was established in the spring of 1990 to evaluate continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements as a new too] for monitoring crustal deformation. Southern California is an ideal location because of the relatively high rate of tectonic deformation, the high probability of intense seismicity, the long history of conventional and space geodetic measurements, and the availability of a well developed infrastructure to support continuous operations. Within several months of the start of regular operations, the PGGA recorded far-field coseismic displacements induced by the June 28, 1992 (M(sub w)=7.3), Landers earthquake, the largest magnitude earthquake in California in the past 40 years and the first one to be recorded by a continuous GPS array. Only nineteen months later, on 17 January 1994, the PGGA recorded coseismic displacements for the strongest earthquake to strike the Los Angeles basin in two decades, the (M(sub e)=6.7) Northridge earthquake. At the time of the Landers earthquake, only seven continuous GPS sites were operating in southern California; by the beginning of 1994, three more sites had been added to the array. However, only a pair of sites were situated in the Los Angeles basin. The destruction caused by the Northridge earthquake spurred a fourfold increase in the number of continuous GPS sites in southern California within 2 years of this event. The PGGA is now the regional component of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN), a major ongoing densification of continuous GPS sites, with a concentration in the Los Angeles metropolitan region. Continuous GPS provides temporally dense measurements of surface displacements induced by crustal deformation processes including interseismic, coseismic, postseismic, and aseismic deformation and the potential for detecting anomalous events such as preseismic deformation and interseismic strain variations. Although strain meters

  18. Interference in the recombination of frequency-entangled photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Kevin A.; Garces, Veneranda G.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental studies of the recombination of frequency-entangled photon pairs into single photons in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. With a delay ? between pair members, the measured rate of pair recombination ? presents a width of 25.6 fsec. It is observed that, depending on experimental conditions, ? can contain interference fringes that arise from the spatial correlations of the photon pairs. In particular, these correlations imply that each photon of a pair interferes with itself in the experiment before pair recombination, leading to the fringes in ?. A theoretical model is developed that provides favorable comparisons with the experimental results.

  19. Long-term pair bonds in the Laysan Duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Breeden, J.H.; Vekasy, M.S.; Ellis, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We describe long-term pair bonds in the endangered Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis), a dabbling duck endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago. Individually marked birds were identified on Laysan Island between 1998 and 2006 (n = 613 marked adults). We recorded pair bonds while observing marked birds, and documented within and between year mate switches and multi-year pair bonds. Twenty pairs banded before 2001 had stable pair bonds lasting ???5 years with a maximum enduring pair bond of nine breeding seasons. Understanding reproductive strategy, including mate retention, would aid conservation planning and management efforts for the Laysan Duck. Further study is needed to characterize the social system of this endangered species.

  20. Series-Coupled Pairs of Silica Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Handley, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Series-coupled pairs of whispering-gallery-mode optical microresonators have been demonstrated as prototypes of stable, narrow-band-pass photonic filters. Characteristics that are generally considered desirable in a photonic or other narrow-band-pass filter include response as nearly flat as possible across the pass band, sharp roll-off, and high rejection of signals outside the pass band. A single microresonator exhibits a Lorentzian filter function: its peak response cannot be made flatter and its roll-off cannot be made sharper. However, as a matter of basic principle applicable to resonators in general, it is possible to (1) use multiple resonators, operating in series or parallel, to obtain a roll-off sharper, and out-of-band rejection greater, relative to those of a Lorentzian filter function and (2) to make the peak response (the response within the pass band) flatter by tuning the resonators to slightly different resonance frequencies that span the pass band. The first of the two microresonators in each series-coupled pair was a microtorus made of germania-doped silica (containing about 19 mole percent germania), which is a material used for the cores of some optical fibers. The reasons for choosing this material is that exposing it to ultraviolet light causes it to undergo a chemical change that changes its index of refraction and thereby changes the resonance frequency. Hence, this material affords the means to effect the desired slight relative detuning of the two resonators. The second microresonator in each pair was a microsphere of pure silica. The advantage of making one of the resonators a torus instead of a sphere is that its spectrum of whispering-gallery-mode resonances is sparser, as needed to obtain a frequency separation of at least 100 GHz between resonances of the filter as a whole.

  1. Augmenting Think-Pair-Share with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin M.; Siedell, C. M.; Prather, E. E.; CATS

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations are valuable tools for the teaching and learning of introductory astronomy. They enable students to link together small pieces of information into mental models of complex physical systems that are far beyond their everyday experience. They can also be used to authentically test a student's conceptual understanding of a physical system by asking the student to make predictions regarding its behavior. Students receive formative feedback by testing their predictions in simulations. Think-Pair-Share - the posing of conceptual questions to students and having them vote on the answer before and after discussion with their peers - can benefit considerably from the incorporation of simulations. Simulations can be used for delivering content that precedes Think-Pair-Share, as the prompt the questions is based upon, or as a feedback tool to illustrate the answer to a question. These techniques are utilized in ClassAction - a collection of materials designed to enhance the metacognitive skills of Astro 101 students by promoting interactive engagement and providing rapid feedback. The main focus is dynamic conceptual questions largely based upon graphics that can be projected in the classroom. Many questions are available in a Flash computer database and instructors have the capability to recast these questions into alternate permutations based on their own preferences and student responses. Outlines, graphics, and simulations are included which instructors can use to provide feedback. This poster provides examples of simulation usage in Think-Pair-Share related to sky motions, lunar phases, and stellar properties. A multi-institutional classroom validation study of ClassAction is currently underway as a Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) research project. All materials are publicly available at http://astro.unl.edu. We would like to thank the NSF for funding under Grant Nos. 0404988 and 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the

  2. Comparative proteomics of paired vocal fold and oral mucosa fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Karbiener, Michael; Darnhofer, Barbara; Frisch, Marie-Therese; Rinner, Beate; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Gugatschka, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Injuries of the vocal folds frequently heal with scar formation, which can have lifelong detrimental impact on voice quality. Current treatments to prevent or resolve scars of the vocal fold mucosa are highly unsatisfactory. In contrast, the adjacent oral mucosa is mostly resistant to scarring. These differences in healing tendency might relate to distinct properties of the fibroblasts populating oral and vocal fold mucosae. We thus established the in vitro cultivation of paired, near-primary vocal fold fibroblasts (VFF) and oral mucosa fibroblasts (OMF) to perform a basic cellular characterization and comparative cellular proteomics. VFF were significantly larger than OMF, proliferated more slowly, and exhibited a sustained TGF-β1-induced elevation of pro-fibrotic interleukin 6. Cluster analysis of the proteomic data revealed distinct protein repertoires specific for VFF and OMF. Further, VFF displayed a broader protein spectrum, particularly a more sophisticated array of factors constituting and modifying the extracellular matrix. Conversely, subsets of OMF-enriched proteins were linked to cellular proliferation, nuclear events, and protection against oxidative stress. Altogether, this study supports the notion that fibroblasts sensitively adapt to the functional peculiarities of their respective anatomical location and presents several molecular targets for further investigation in the context of vocal fold wound healing. Biological significance Mammalian vocal folds are a unique but delicate tissue. A considerable fraction of people is affected by voice problems, yet many of the underlying vocal fold pathologies are sparsely understood at the molecular level. One such pathology is vocal fold scarring - the tendency of vocal fold injuries to heal with scar formation -, which represents a clinical problem with highly suboptimal treatment modalities. This study employed proteomics to obtain comprehensive insight into the protein repertoire of vocal fold

  3. Biomimetic control for DEA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Gisby, Todd; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio; Anderson, Iain

    2010-04-01

    Arrays of actuators are ubiquitous in nature for manipulation, pumping and propulsion. Often these arrays are coordinated in a multi-level fashion with distributed sensing and feedback manipulated by higher level controllers. In this paper we present a biologically inspired multi-level control strategy and apply it to control an array of Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA). A test array was designed consisting of three DEA arranged to tilt a set of rails on which a ball rolls. At the local level the DEA were controlled using capacitive self-sensing state machines that switched the actuator off and on when capacitive thresholds were exceeded, resulting in the steady rolling of the ball around the rails. By varying the voltage of the actuators in the on state, it was possible to control the speed of the ball to match a set point. A simple integral derivative controller was used to do this and an observer law was formulated to track the speed of the ball. The array demonstrated the ability to self start, roll the ball in either direction, and run at a range of speeds determined by the maximum applied voltage. The integral derivative controller successfully tracked a square wave set point. Whilst the test application could have been controlled with a classic centralised controller, the real benefit of the multi-level strategy becomes apparent when applied to larger arrays and biomimetic applications that are ideal for DEA. Three such applications are discussed; a robotic heart, a peristaltic pump and a ctenophore inspired propulsion array.

  4. Pair Potential of Charged Colloidal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Addas, K.; Ward, A.; Flynn, N. T.; Velasco, E.; Hagan, M. F.; Dogic, Z.; Fraden, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the construction of colloidal stars: 1μm polystyrene beads grafted with a dense brush of 1μm long and 10 nm wide charged semiflexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  5. Holographic pair and charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Sera; Li, Li; Ren, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We examine a holographic model in which a U (1 ) symmetry and translational invariance are broken spontaneously at the same time. Our construction provides an example of a system with pair-density wave order, in which the superconducting order parameter is spatially modulated but has a zero average. In addition, the charge density oscillates at twice the frequency of the scalar condensate. Depending on the choice of parameters, the model also admits a state with coexisting superconducting and charge-density wave orders, in which the scalar condensate has a uniform component.

  6. Slepton Pair Production at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, B.

    2007-04-01

    In R-parity conserving supersymmetric models, sleptons are produced in pairs at hadron colliders. We show that measurements of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetry at possible polarization upgrades of existing colliders allow for a direct extraction of the slepton mixing angle. A calculation of the transverse-momentum spectrum shows the importance of resummed contributions at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy in the small and intermediate transverse-momentum regions and little dependence on unphysical scales and non-perturbative contributions.

  7. Molecular associations from ab initio pair potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, E.; Sordo, T. L.; Sordo, J. A.

    1991-12-01

    A method of building up stable molecular associations by using pair potentials from ab initio calculations is presented. The Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine potential has been chosen to emulate the water-water interactions while 1-6-12 potentials are used to compute both solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. Parameters for neutral-amino-acid-water and neutral- amino-acid-neutral-amino-acid interactions are provided by the program. Supermolecules are constructed by minimization of the interaction energy of the molecules involved. Both steepest-decent and Fletcher-Powell algorithms are available to carry out such a minimization.

  8. A biometric signcryption scheme without bilinear pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingwen; Ren, Zhiyuan; Cai, Jun; Zheng, Wentao

    2013-03-01

    How to apply the entropy in biometrics into the encryption and remote authentication schemes to simplify the management of keys is a hot research area. Utilizing Dodis's fuzzy extractor method and Liu's original signcryption scheme, a biometric identity based signcryption scheme is proposed in this paper. The proposed scheme is more efficient than most of the previous proposed biometric signcryption schemes for that it does not need bilinear pairing computation and modular exponentiation computation which is time consuming largely. The analysis results show that under the CDH and DL hard problem assumption, the proposed scheme has the features of confidentiality and unforgeability simultaneously.

  9. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations.

  10. Pair creation in noncommutative space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, B.; Chetouani, L.

    2016-09-01

    By taking two interactions, the Volkov plane wave and a constant electromagnetic field, the probability related to the process of pair creation from the vacuum is exactly and analytically determined via the Schwinger method in noncommutative space-time. For the plane wave, it is shown that the probability is simply null and for the electromagnetic wave it is found that the expression of the probability has a similar form to that obtained by Schwinger in a commutative space-time. For a certain critical value of H, the probability is simply equal to 1.

  11. Relativistic thermal plasmas - Pair processes and equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightman, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    The work of Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Zel'dovich and Sunyaev (1971) is extended and generalized, through the inclusion of pair-producing photon processes and effects due to the finite size of the plasma, in an investigation of the equilibria of relativistic thermal plasmas which takes into account electron-positron creation and annihilation and photons produced within the plasma. It is shown that the bridge between an effectively thin plasma and an effectively thick plasma occurs in the transrelativistic region, where the dimensionless temperature value is between 0.1 and 1.0 and the temperature remains in this region over a great luminosity range.

  12. Computational complexity of projected entangled pair states.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Norbert; Wolf, Michael M; Verstraete, Frank; Cirac, J Ignacio

    2007-04-06

    We determine the computational power of preparing projected entangled pair states (PEPS), as well as the complexity of classically simulating them, and generally the complexity of contracting tensor networks. While creating PEPS allows us to solve PP problems, the latter two tasks are both proven to be #P-complete. We further show how PEPS can be used to approximate ground states of gapped Hamiltonians and that creating them is easier than creating arbitrary PEPS. The main tool for our proofs is a duality between PEPS and postselection which allows us to use existing results from quantum complexity.

  13. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  14. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  15. Mated Fingerprint Card Pairs 2 (MFCP2)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Mated Fingerprint Card Pairs 2 (MFCP2) (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 14 is being distributed for use in development and testing of automated fingerprint classification and matching systems on a set of images which approximate a natural horizontal distribution of the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) fingerprint classes. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  16. Pair correlation function for spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2012-10-01

    We extract a pair correlation function (PCF) from probability distributions of the spin-overlap parameter q. The distributions come from Monte Carlo simulations. A measure, w, of the thermal fluctuations of magnetic patterns follows from the PCFs. We also obtain rms deviations (over different system samples) δp away from average probabilities for q. For the linear system sizes L that we have studied, w and δp are independent of L in the Edwards-Anderson model but scale as 1/L and L, respectively, in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.

  17. Frustrated Lewis pair chemistry: development and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W; Erker, Gerhard

    2015-05-26

    Frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) are combinations of Lewis acids and Lewis bases in solution that are deterred from strong adduct formation by steric and/or electronic factors. This opens pathways to novel cooperative reactions with added substrates. Small-molecule binding and activation by FLPs has led to the discovery of a variety of new reactions through unprecedented pathways. Hydrogen activation and subsequent manipulation in metal-free catalytic hydrogenations is a frequently observed feature of many FLPs. The current state of this young but rapidly expanding field is outlined in this Review and the future directions for its broadening sphere of impact are considered.

  18. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-15

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  19. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-01

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  20. An intercontinental array--a next-generation radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Swenson, G W; Kellermann, K I

    1975-06-27

    It is difficult to estimate accurately the cost of constructing a large scientific instrument that involves many techniques. On the other hand, most of the component parts of the VLBA consist of antennas and electronic systems that already exist or are being fabricated. The kind of 25-m antennas being constructed for the VLA will cost about $900,000 each and will work at wavelengths as short as 1 cm. A multifrequency radiometer, hydrogen maser frequency standard, small control computer, control building, and wide-band instrumentation recorder bring the cost to about $1.5 million per element, or $15 million for a ten-element array using tape recorders. A multistation playback facility, with ten recorders and enough correlators to handle all interferometer pairs simultaneously, together with the necessary computers to control the processor and reduce the data, may add $5 million. The total cost is thus about $20 million at current prices, including an adequate supply of magnetic tape. This is comparable to the cost of existing large radio telescopes and arrays. An array that used a geostationary communication satellite to transmit the data to a real-time correlator would cost $30 million to $50 million more, but this is still within the price range of other space astronomy projects. It is thus feasible to construct at reasonable cost an intercontinental very long baseline array which has sub-milliarcsecond resolution. This would complement the Very Large Array now being constructed (4), which is much more sensitive to objects of low surface brightness. This next step would permit the study of the universe with unprecedented angular resolution.

  1. Remote operation of the CHARA array via the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Thomas John

    Georgia State University's Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array is located atop California's Mount Wilson in the San Gabriel Mountains northeast of Los Angeles. Approximately 2000 miles due west of the university's central campus, located in Atlanta Georgia, travel time to/from the array is generally several hours by air and ground for those individuals visiting the array who do not live in southern California. In Internet time, however, the array is a mere 60 milliseconds (ms) distance from Atlanta! A remote operations system allowing multiple individuals to participate in remote observation sessions was designed and implemented. Several technological considerations were incorporated into the overall design including a secure network infrastructure with acceptable end-to-end latency, a control room replete with appropriate computing and projection systems, an efficient client-server model, and a data archival system. The remote operations system was initially used to begin a prototypical survey of extra-solar planetary systems, establish operational procedures, and define performance expectations. The observations, comprised of the target/calibrator star pairs 51 Peg/HD 218792 and ɛ Eri/HD 21530, involved the sampling of several baseline- visibility data points collected over the course of several hours per evening per star. The downloaded scientific data were reduced and analyzed thus yielding the results contained herein. Although independent of the local weather, remote operations have practical considerations such as routine preparations requiring on-site personnel and observation of astronomical targets with celestial coordinates appropriate to the Local Sidereal Time (LST) and U-V plane coverage of the array. Such considerations are necessary in order to obtain desired scientific data. This present work details all of the aforementioned topics that were required to produce the first-generation of the remote operations system.

  2. Multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiwavelength focal plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y<1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  3. Nanopillars array for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Chang, A; Bora, M; Nguyen, H T; Behymer, E M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Carter, J C; Bond, T C

    2011-04-14

    The authors present a new class of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. Two types of nanopillars within this class are discussed: vertical pillars and tapered pillars. For the vertical pillars, the gap between each pair of nanopillars is small enough (< 50 nm) such that highly confined plasmonic cavity resonances are supported between the pillars when light is incident upon them, and the anti-nodes of these resonances act as three-dimensional hotspots for SERS. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of 1,2 bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE), benzenethiol (BT) monolayer and toluene vapor. The results show that SERS enhancement factor of over 0.5 x 10{sup 9} can be achieved, and BPE can be detected down to femto-molar concentration level. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors such as volatile organic compounds.

  4. Generation of blue light by sum-frequency generation of a spectrally combined broad-area diode laser array.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhanda; Jiang, Menghua; Yu, Haoyang; Hui, Yongling; Lei, Hong; Li, Qiang

    2016-10-15

    We present the first demonstration of a spectrally beam combined diode laser array with subsequent sum-frequency generation (SFG). The combined beam of the diode laser array with 19 emitters has the same beam quality as a single emitter, and the wavelength of each emitter is different. The blue light is generated by sum-frequency mixing of pairs of emitters in the diode laser array. About 93 mW of blue light power is produced using a PPLN crystal. Compared with the SFG of two emitters, this approach can increase the number of lasers participating in nonlinear frequency conversion. Thus, it can enhance the available power.

  5. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females' alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females' within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases.

  6. High-seniority states in spherical nuclei: Triple pair breaking in tin isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, Alain

    2013-03-01

    The 119-126Sn nuclei have been produced as fission fragments in two reactions induced by heavy ions: 12C+238U at 90 MeV bombarding energy, 18O+208Pb at 85 MeV. Their level schemes have been built from gamma rays detected using the Euroball array. High-spin states located above the long-lived isomeric states of the even- A and odd-A 120-126Sn nuclei have been identified. Moreover isomeric states lying around 4.5 MeV have been established in the even-A 120-126Sn from the delayed coincidences between the fission fragment detector SAPhIR and the Euroball array. All the states located above 3-MeV excitation energy are ascribed to several broken pairs of neutrons occupying the h11/2 orbit. The maximum value of angular momentum available in such a high-j shell, i.e. for mid-occupation and the breaking of the three neutron pairs (seniority v=6), has been identified.

  7. Probe Array Correction With Strong Target Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    loads. We provide a probe array compensation theory based on the Lorentz reciprocity theorem giving the open circuit probe array voltages... circuit probe array voltages in terms of (1) the required surface integral involving the near fields scattered by the target and the near fields radiated...cancel the array currents during near field measurements, errors in the open circuit voltages can be large for array elements that are close to the

  8. Synergy between pair coupled cluster doubles and pair density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-28

    Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has been recently studied as a method capable of accounting for static correlation with low polynomial cost. We present three combinations of pCCD with Kohn–Sham functionals of the density and on-top pair density (the probability of finding two electrons on top of each other) to add dynamic correlation to pCCD without double counting. With a negligible increase in computational cost, these pCCD+DFT blends greatly improve upon pCCD in the description of typical problems where static and dynamic correlations are both important. We argue that—as a black-box method with low scaling, size-extensivity, size-consistency, and a simple quasidiagonal two-particle density matrix—pCCD is an excellent match for pair density functionals in this type of fusion of multireference wavefunctions with DFT.

  9. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  10. Integrated Array/Metadata Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Data comes in various forms and types, and integration usually presents a problem that is often simply ignored and solved with ad-hoc solutions. Multidimensional arrays are an ubiquitous data type, that we find at the core of virtually all science and engineering domains, as sensor, model, image, statistics data. Naturally, arrays are richly described by and intertwined with additional metadata (alphanumeric relational data, XML, JSON, etc). Database systems, however, a fundamental building block of what we call "Big Data", lack adequate support for modelling and expressing these array data/metadata relationships. Array analytics is hence quite primitive or non-existent at all in modern relational DBMS. Recognizing this, we extended SQL with a new SQL/MDA part seamlessly integrating multidimensional array analytics into the standard database query language. We demonstrate the benefits of SQL/MDA with real-world examples executed in ASQLDB, an open-source mediator system based on HSQLDB and rasdaman, that already implements SQL/MDA.

  11. Contact Printing of Arrayed Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Luikart, Alicia M.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel contact printing method utilizing a sacrificial layer of polyacrylic acid (PAA) was developed to selectively modify the upper surfaces of arrayed microstructures. The method was characterized by printing polystyrene onto SU-8 microstructures to create an improved substrate for a cell-based microarray platform. Experiments measuring cell growth SU-8 arrays modified with polystyrene and fibronectin demonstrated improved growth of NIH 3T3 (93% vs. 38%), HeLa (97% vs. 77%), and HT1080 (76% vs. 20%) cells relative to that for the previously used coating method. In addition, use of the PAA sacrificial layer permitted the printing of functionalized polystyrene, carboxylate polystyrene nanospheres, and silica nanospheres onto the arrays in a facile manner. Finally, a high concentration of extracellular matrix materials (ECM), such as collagen (5 mg/mL) and gelatin (0.1%), was contact printed onto the array structures using as little as 5 μL of the ECM reagent and without the formation of a continuous film bridge across the microstructures. Murine embryonic stem cells cultured on arrays printed with this gelatin-hydrogel remained in an undifferentiated state indicating an adequate surface gelatin layer to maintain these cells over time. PMID:20425106

  12. Mean and turbulent flow development through an array of rotating elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    The adjustment of an incoming boundary layer profile as it impacts and interacts with an array of elements has received significant attention in the context of terrestrial and aquatic canopies and more recently in the context of horizontal axis wind farms. The distance required for the mean flow profile to stabilize, the energy transport through the array, and the structure of the turbulence within the array are directly dependent upon such factors as the element height, density, rigidity/flexibility, frontal area distribution, element homogeneity, and underlying topography. In the present study, the mean and turbulent development of the flow through an array of rotating elements was examined experimentally. Element rotation has been shown to drastically alter wake dynamics of single and paired elements, but the possible extension of such rotation-driven dynamics had not previously been examined on larger groups of elements. Practically, such an array of rotating elements may provide insight into the flow dynamics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines. 2D particle image velocimetry was used along the length of the array in order to examine the effects of an increasing ratio of cylinder rotation speed to streamwise freestream velocity on flow development and structure. Work supported by a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship & Stanford Graduate Fellowship to A.E.C, by funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2645, and by funding from the EFML.

  13. Schwinger pair production at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Leandro; Ogilvie, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal corrections to Schwinger pair production are potentially important in particle physics, nuclear physics and cosmology. However, the lowest-order contribution, arising at one loop, has proved difficult to calculate unambiguously. We show that this thermal correction may be calculated for charged scalars using the worldline formalism, where each term in the decay rate is associated with a worldline instanton. We calculate all finite-temperature worldline instantons, their actions and fluctuation prefactors, thus determining the complete one-loop decay rate at finite temperature. The thermal contribution to the decay rate becomes nonzero at a threshold temperature T =e E /2 m , above which it dominates the zero-temperature result. This is the lowest of an infinite set of thresholds at T =n e E /2 m . The decay rate is singular at each threshold as a consequence of the failure of the quadratic approximation to the worldline path integral. We argue that higher-order effects will make the decay rates finite everywhere and model those effects by the inclusion of hard thermal loop damping rates. We also demonstrate that the formalism developed here generalizes to the case of finite-temperature pair production in inhomogeneous fields.

  14. ``Schooling'' of wing pairs in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif; AML, Courant Collaboration; Physics NYU Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The experimental setup implements two independent flapping wings swimming in tandem. Both are driven with the same prescribed vertical heaving motion, but the horizontal motion is free, which means that the swimmers can take up any relative position and forward speed. Experiments show however clearly coordinated motions, where the pair of wings `crystallize' into specific stable arrangements. The follower wing locks into the path of the leader, adopting its speed, and with a separation distance that takes on one of several discrete values. By systematically varying the kinematics and wing size, we show that the set of stable spacings is dictated by the wavelength of the periodic wake structure. The forces maintaining the pair cohesion are characterized by applying an external force to the follower to perturb it away from the `stable wells'. These results show that hydrodynamics alone is sufficient to induce cohesive and coordinated collective locomotion through a fluid, and we discuss the hypothesis that fish schools and bird flocks also represent stable modes of motion.

  15. Generalized quantum interference of correlated photon pairs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2015-01-01

    Superposition and indistinguishablility between probability amplitudes have played an essential role in observing quantum interference effects of correlated photons. The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and interferences of the path-entangled photon number state are of special interest in the field of quantum information technologies. However, a fully generalized two-photon quantum interferometric scheme accounting for the Hong-Ou-Mandel scheme and path-entangled photon number states has not yet been proposed. Here we report the experimental demonstrations of the generalized two-photon interferometry with both the interferometric properties of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect and the fully unfolded version of the path-entangled photon number state using photon-pair sources, which are independently generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our experimental scheme explains two-photon interference fringes revealing single- and two-photon coherence properties in a single interferometer setup. Using the proposed interferometric measurement, it is possible to directly estimate the joint spectral intensity of a photon pair source. PMID:25951143

  16. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  17. The cavity-embedded-cooper pair transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei

    Nearly eight decades after Erwin Schrodinger proposed his famous cat paradox, the boundary between classical and quantum physics is becoming accessible to experimental study in condensed matter systems, in which macroscopic and microscopic degrees of freedom interact with each other. The cavity-embedded-Cooper pair transistor (cCPT) is an ideal candidate for such a study in that it is not only strongly and intrinsically nonlinear but also fully quantum mechanical. A novel technique, based on the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, is first introduced for applying a dc bias to a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity. The development and investigation of the cCPT system, in which a Cooper pair transistor acting as a single artificial atom is directly coupled to an on-chip dc-biased high-Q resonator, is then presented. Self-oscillations in the cCPT, internally driven by the ac Josephson effect, demonstrate the strong and phase coherent coupling between matter and light in the cCPT. Meanwhile, photons continually produced by the system are collected and characterized by quantum state tomography, which indicates the non-classical nature of the emitted light and the nonlinear quantum dynamics of the cCPT system.

  18. Odd frequency pairing of interacting Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen; Woelfle, Peter; Balatsky, Alexandar

    Majorana fermions are rising as a promising key component in quantum computation. While the prevalent approach is to use a quadratic (i.e. non-interacting) Majorana Hamiltonian, when expressed in terms of Dirac fermions, generically the Hamiltonian involves interaction terms. Here we focus on the possible pair correlations in a simple model system. We study a model of Majorana fermions coupled to a boson mode and show that the anomalous correlator between different Majorana fermions, located at opposite ends of a topological wire, exhibits odd frequency behavior. It is stabilized when the coupling strength g is above a critical value gc. We use both, conventional diagrammatic theory and a functional integral approach, to derive the gap equation, the critical temperature, the gap function, the critical coupling, and a Ginzburg-Landau theory allowing to discuss a possible subleading admixture of even-frequency pairing. Work supported by USDOE DE-AC52-06NA25396 E304, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and ERC DM-321031.

  19. Giant Kerr nonlinearity and low-power gigahertz solitons via plasmon-induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhengyang; Huang, Guoxiang; Liu, Lixiang; Zhang, Shuang

    2015-09-08

    We propose a method to enhance Kerr nonlinearity and realize low-power gigahertz solitons via plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) in a new type of metamaterial, which is constructed by an array of unit cell consisting of a cut-wire and a pair of varactor-loaded split-ring resonators. We show that the PIT in such metamaterial can not only mimic the electromagnetically induced transparency in coherent three-level atomic systems, but also exhibit a crossover from PIT to Autler-Townes splitting. We further show that the system suggested here also possess a giant third-order nonlinear susceptibility and may be used to create solitons with extremely low generation power. Our study raises the possibility for obtaining strong nonlinear effect of gigahertz radiation at very low intensity based on room-temperature metamaterials.

  20. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. II. Recoupled pair bond dyads in carbon and sulfur difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Takeshita, Tyler Y.; Xu, Lu T.

    2015-01-21

    Formation of a bond between a second ligand and a molecule with a recoupled pair bond results in a recoupled pair bond dyad. We examine the recoupled pair bond dyads in the a{sup 3}B{sub 1} states of CF{sub 2} and SF{sub 2}, which are formed by the addition of a fluorine atom to the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, both of which possess recoupled pair bonds. The two dyads are very different. In SF{sub 2}, the second FS–F bond is very strong (D{sub e} = 106.3 kcal/mol), the bond length is much shorter than that in the SF(a{sup 4}Σ{sup −}) state (1.666 Å versus 1.882 Å), and the three atoms are nearly collinear (θ{sub e} = 162.7°) with only a small barrier to linearity (0.4 kcal/mol). In CF{sub 2}, the second FC–F bond is also very strong (D{sub e} = 149.5 kcal/mol), but the bond is only slightly shorter than that in the CF(a{sup 4}Σ{sup −}) state (1.314 Å versus 1.327 Å), and the molecule is strongly bent (θ{sub e} = 119.0°) with an 80.5 kcal/mol barrier to linearity. The a{sup 3}B{sub 1} states of CF{sub 2} and SF{sub 2} illustrate the fundamental differences between recoupled pair bond dyads formed from 2s and 3p lone pairs.

  1. Physicochemical Properties of Ion Pairs of Biological Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Junji; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandarashvili, Levani

    2015-01-01

    Ion pairs (also known as salt bridges) of electrostatically interacting cationic and anionic moieties are important for proteins and nucleic acids to perform their function. Although numerous three-dimensional structures show ion pairs at functionally important sites of biological macromolecules and their complexes, the physicochemical properties of the ion pairs are not well understood. Crystal structures typically show a single state for each ion pair. However, recent studies have revealed the dynamic nature of the ion pairs of the biological macromolecules. Biomolecular ion pairs undergo dynamic transitions between distinct states in which the charged moieties are either in direct contact or separated by water. This dynamic behavior is reasonable in light of the fundamental concepts that were established for small ions over the last century. In this review, we introduce the physicochemical concepts relevant to the ion pairs and provide an overview of the recent advancement in biophysical research on the ion pairs of biological macromolecules. PMID:26437440

  2. Constrained-pairing mean-field theory. V. Triplet pairing formalism.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason K; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Henderson, Thomas M; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2011-07-21

    Describing strong (also known as static) correlation caused by degenerate or nearly degenerate orbitals near the Fermi level remains a theoretical challenge, particularly in molecular systems. Constrained-pairing mean-field theory has been quite successful, capturing the effects of static correlation in bond formation and breaking in closed-shell molecular systems by using singlet electron entanglement to model static correlation at mean-field computational cost. This work extends the previous formalism to include triplet pairing. Additionally, a spin orbital extension of the "odd-electron" formalism is presented as a method for understanding electron entanglement in molecules.

  3. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  4. Optical phased-array ladar.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Hatch, Robert; Payson, Harold

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a ladar with 0.5 m class range resolution obtained by integrating a continuous-wave optical phased-array transmitter with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode receiver array. In contrast with conventional ladar systems, an array of continuous-wave sources is used to effectively pulse illuminate a target by electro-optically steering far-field fringes. From the reference frame of a point in the far field, a steered fringe appears as a pulse. Range information is thus obtained by measuring the arrival time of a pulse return from a target to a receiver pixel. This ladar system offers a number of benefits, including broad spectral coverage, high efficiency, small size, power scalability, and versatility.

  5. An Integrated ISFET Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    A monolithically integrated ISFET sensor array and interface circuit are described. A new high-density, low-power source-drain follower was developed for the sensor array. ISFETs were formed by depositing Au/Ti extended-gate electrodes on standard MOSFETs, then thin silicon nitride layers using catalytic chemical vapor deposition and/or SU-8 protective layers were formed on the extended-gate electrodes. Applications for the array include: (1) pH detection by statistical distribution observing time and space fluctuations; (2) DNA detection using thiol-modified or silane-coupled oligonucleotides; (3) bio-image sensing by converting photons to electrons using Photosystem I of Thermosynechococcus elongatus, and sensing the converted electric charges by ISFETs. PMID:22291539

  6. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  7. High voltage solar array experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennerud, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction between the components of a high voltage solar array and a simulated space plasma is studied to obtain data for the design of a high voltage solar array capable of 15kW at 2 to 16kV. Testing was conducted in a vacuum chamber 1.5-m long by 1.5-m diameter having a plasma source which simulated the plasma conditions existing in earth orbit between 400 nautical miles and synchronous altitude. Test samples included solar array segments pinholes in insulation covering high voltage electrodes, and plain dielectric samples. Quantitative data are presented in the areas of plasma power losses, plasma and high voltage induced damage, and dielectric properties. Limitations of the investigation are described.

  8. On magnetic pair production above fast pulsar polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic pair production is one of high-energy electromagnetic conversion processes important to the development of pair-photon cascades in pulsars. On the basis of current polar cap models, the properties of magnetic pair production in fast pulsars are discussed. Suppose there is a roughly dipole magnetic field at the stellar surface, the author estimate the effects on non-zero curvature of magnetic field lines upon curvature radiation from primary particles and pair production rate near the surface of pulsars.

  9. Self-organized arrays of Cd nanocluster on Si (111)-7×7 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shao-Jie; Xiao, Hua-Fang; Ye, Juan; Sun, Kai; Tao, Min-Long; Tu, Yu-Bing; Wang, Ya-Li; Xie, Zheng-Bo; Wang, Jun-Zhong

    2017-02-01

    We studied the self-organization of Cd clusters on Si(111)-7×7 surface with an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). Highly-ordered arrays of Cd nanoclusters have been fabricated by elevating the substrate temperature. The Cd clusters occupy equally the faulted and unfaulted half-unit cells of Si(111)-7×7 without obvious preference to either of them, forming Cd cluster pairs or hexamers. Furthermore, high-resolution STM images demonstrate that the charge transfer between Cd and Si atoms is responsible for cluster-cluster attractions, which in turn drive the self-organization of Cd nanoclusters into highly ordered arrays.

  10. Astronaut Norman E. Thagard is briefed on array of tools for EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Astronaut Norman E. Thagard is briefed on the array of tools for extravehicular activity by James McBride, a crew trainer. An array of special tools is lined up on the table in front of them. Some of the tools include, bottom row from right to left, allen wrench with extension, diagonal cutters, a hammer, drive ratchet with hex socket extension, contingency strut wrench, forceps, bolt puller, and compound cable cutters. Above the hammer is a pair of french hooks, and a remote manipulator rope reel. Above the diagonal cutters is a power drive unit disconnect.

  11. EHF multifunction phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1986-07-01

    The design of a low cost demonstration EHF multifunction-phased array antenna is described. Both, the radiating elements and the phase-shifter circuits are realized on microstrip substrate material in order to allow photolithographic batch fabrication. Self-encapsulated beam-lead PIN-diodes are employed as the electronic switch elements to avoid expensive hermetic encapsulation of the semiconductors or complete circuits. A space-feed using a horn-radiator to illuminate the array from the front-side is found to be the simplest and most inexpensive feed. The phased array antenna thus operates as a reflect-array, the antenna elements employed in a dual role for the collection of energy from the feed-horn and for the re-radiation of the phase-shifted waves (in transmit-mode). The antenna is divided into modules containing the radiator/phase-shifter plate plus drive- and BITE-circuitry at the back. Both drive- and BITE-components use gate-array integrated circuits especially designed for the purpose. Several bus-systems are used to supply bias and logical data flows to the modules. The beam-steering unit utilizes several signal processors and high-speed discrete adder circuits to combine the pointing, frequency and beam-shape information from the radar system computer with the stored phase-shift codes for the array elements. Since space, weight and power consumption are prime considerations only the most advanced technology is used in the design of both the microwave and the digital/drive circuitry.

  12. Using Pair Programming to Teach CAD Based Engineering Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leland, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Pair programming was introduced into a course in engineering graphics that emphasizes solid modeling using SolidWorks. In pair programming, two students work at a single computer, and periodically trade off roles as driver (hands on the keyboard and mouse) and navigator (discuss strategy and design issues). Pair programming was used in a design…

  13. Linking Associative and Serial List Memory: Pairs Versus Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Jeremy B.; Glaholt, Mackenzie G.; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    Paired associates and serial list memory are typically investigated separately. An "isolation principle" (J. B. Caplan, 2005) was proposed to explain behavior in both paradigms by using a single model, in which serial list and paired associates memory differ only in how isolated pairs of items are from interference from other studied items. In…

  14. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical channel pair assignment criteria. 22....813 Technical channel pair assignment criteria. The rules in this section establish technical assignment criteria for the channel pairs listed in § 22.805. These criteria are intended to...

  15. Versatile Flexible Graphene Multielectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kireev, Dmitry; Seyock, Silke; Ernst, Mathis; Maybeck, Vanessa; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a promising material possessing features relevant to bioelectronics applications. Graphene microelectrodes (GMEAs), which are fabricated in a dense array on a flexible polyimide substrate, were investigated in this work for their performance via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and suitability of the GMEAs for extracellular recordings were tested by measuring electrical activities from acute heart tissue and cardiac muscle cells. The recordings show encouraging signal-to-noise ratios of 65 ± 15 for heart tissue recordings and 20 ± 10 for HL-1 cells. Considering the low noise and excellent robustness of the devices, the sensor arrays are suitable for diverse and biologically relevant applications. PMID:28025564

  16. Versatile Flexible Graphene Multielectrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Kireev, Dmitry; Seyock, Silke; Ernst, Mathis; Maybeck, Vanessa; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-12-23

    Graphene is a promising material possessing features relevant to bioelectronics applications. Graphene microelectrodes (GMEAs), which are fabricated in a dense array on a flexible polyimide substrate, were investigated in this work for their performance via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and suitability of the GMEAs for extracellular recordings were tested by measuring electrical activities from acute heart tissue and cardiac muscle cells. The recordings show encouraging signal-to-noise ratios of 65 ± 15 for heart tissue recordings and 20 ± 10 for HL-1 cells. Considering the low noise and excellent robustness of the devices, the sensor arrays are suitable for diverse and biologically relevant applications.

  17. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The design details of an optimized integrated residential photovoltaic module/array are presented. This selected design features a waterproofing and mounting scheme which was devised to simplify the installation procedures by the avoidance of complex gasketed or caulked joints, while still maintaining a high confidence that the watertight integrity of the integral roofing surface will be achieved for the design lifetime of the system. The production and installation costs for the selected module/array design are reported for a range of annual production rates as a function of the cost of solar cells.

  18. Hybrid Arrays for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Kirsten E.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Johnson, Kevin J.; Minor, Christian P.

    In recent years, multisensory approaches to environment monitoring for chemical detection as well as other forms of situational awareness have become increasingly popular. A hybrid sensor is a multimodal system that incorporates several sensing elements and thus produces data that are multivariate in nature and may be significantly increased in complexity compared to data provided by single-sensor systems. Though a hybrid sensor is itself an array, hybrid sensors are often organized into more complex sensing systems through an assortment of network topologies. Part of the reason for the shift to hybrid sensors is due to advancements in sensor technology and computational power available for processing larger amounts of data. There is also ample evidence to support the claim that a multivariate analytical approach is generally superior to univariate measurements because it provides additional redundant and complementary information (Hall, D. L.; Linas, J., Eds., Handbook of Multisensor Data Fusion, CRC, Boca Raton, FL, 2001). However, the benefits of a multisensory approach are not automatically achieved. Interpretation of data from hybrid arrays of sensors requires the analyst to develop an application-specific methodology to optimally fuse the disparate sources of data generated by the hybrid array into useful information characterizing the sample or environment being observed. Consequently, multivariate data analysis techniques such as those employed in the field of chemometrics have become more important in analyzing sensor array data. Depending on the nature of the acquired data, a number of chemometric algorithms may prove useful in the analysis and interpretation of data from hybrid sensor arrays. It is important to note, however, that the challenges posed by the analysis of hybrid sensor array data are not unique to the field of chemical sensing. Applications in electrical and process engineering, remote sensing, medicine, and of course, artificial

  19. Speckle imaging from an array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, Jim F.; Tyler, Glenn A.; Vaughn, Jeff L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present two analytic theories developed recently to predict the performance of an imaging system composed of a phased array illuminator and a set of receiver subapertures. The receiver need not coincide with the transmitter. The two theories have been documented separately (ref. 1, 2), and the reader can find more details there - the theories present the analytic phased array irradiance on target in the presence of piston errors, and the resulting speckle pattern-induced imaging noise. The principal results presented here are the Signal to Noise Ratios (SNR) for both the radiometric portion of the problem and the speckle imaging portion of the problem.

  20. Mosaic of coded aperture arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Cannon, Thomas M.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a mosaic of coded aperture arrays which is capable of imaging off-axis sources with minimum detector size. Mosaics of the basic array pattern create a circular on periodic correlation of the object on a section of the picture plane. This section consists of elements of the central basic pattern as well as elements from neighboring patterns and is a cyclic version of the basic pattern. Since all object points contribute a complete cyclic version of the basic pattern, a section of the picture, which is the size of the basic aperture pattern, contains all the information necessary to image the object with no artifacts.