Science.gov

Sample records for pairing correlation effects

  1. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  2. Dynamical correlation effects on pair-correlation functions of spin polarized two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishan; Garg, Vinayak; Moudgil, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report a theoretical study on the spin-resolved pair-correlation functions gσσ'(r) of a two-dimensional electron gas having arbitrary spin polarization ζ by including the dynamics of exchange-correlations within the dynamical self-consistent mean-field theory of Hasegawa and Shimizu. The calculated g↑↑(r), g↓↓(r) and g↑↓(r) exhibit a nice agreement with the recent quantum Monte Carlo simulation data of Gori-Giorgi et al. However, the agreement for the minority spin correlation function g↓↓(r) decreases with increase in ζ and/or decrease in electron density. Nevertheless, the spin-summed correlation function remains close to the simulation data.

  3. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  4. Pair correlation and dynamic Jahn-Teller effect: High-Tc in nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vladimir; Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Friedel, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    Electronic states in metallic nanoclusters form energy shells and degree of their filling depends on the number of delocalized electrons. In the region close to half-filling the cluster's geometry oscillates between the prolate and oblate configurations (dynamic Jahn-Teller effect). For large clusters (N > 102 N is the number of delocalized electrons) this effect competes with pair correlation and, as a result, it is perfectly realistic to observe the transition to the superconducting state. For some clusters (e.g., for Zn76, Al70) the value of the critical temperature is rather high (≳ 140 \\text{K}) .

  5. Effects of pairing correlations on the inverse level density parameter of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Quynh Huong, Le; Quang Hung, Nguyen; Thi Quynh Trang, Le

    2016-06-01

    Angular momentum dependence of the inverse level density parameter K in the excitation-energy region of ˜ 30 - 40 MeV is studied within the finite-temperature Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (FTBCS) theory and the FTBCS theory that includes the effect due to quasiparticle-number fluctuations (FTBCS1). The two theories take into account the noncollective rotation of the nucleus at nonzero values of z-projection M of the total angular momentum. The comparison between the results obtained within the FTBCS and FTBCS1 as well as the case without pairing correlations and the experimental data for two medium-mass even-even nuclei 108Cd and 122Te shows that by including the pairing corrections the FTBCS and FTBCS1 reproduces quite well all the experimental data, whereas the non-pairing case always overestimates the data. Due to the effect of quasiparticle-number fluctuations, the FTBCS1 gaps at different M values do not collapse at critical temperature TC as in the FTBCS ones but monotonously decrease with increasing T and being finite even at high T. As the result, the values of K obtained within the FTBCS1 are always closer to the experimental data than those obtained within the FTBCS.

  6. Effects of a rotating magnetization on pair correlations in a ballistic regime Josephson Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, Andreas; Leal, Luis

    Pair correlations in clean superconducting-magnetic proximity systems are studied with a focus on the singlet-triplet mixing resulting from magnetic inhomogeneities. The system is modeled in the clean limit using a tight-binding Hamiltonian and the Bogoliubov -de Gennes equations are solved to determine the Gor'kov functions of the system. Three different magnetic configurations are considered: an exchange spring, a helical magnet, and misaligned homogeneous ferromagnetic layers; each is sandwiched between two superconductors to form a Josephson junction. The goal of the study is to revisit how pair correlations are affected by different magnetization configurations and magnitudes in the clean limit. We discuss our results in the light of those obtained in the diffusive regime. We gratefully acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation under Grant DMR- 1309341 and the ORSP Student Research Assistantship at CSU Long Beach.

  7. Generalized quantum interference of correlated photon pairs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2015-01-01

    Superposition and indistinguishablility between probability amplitudes have played an essential role in observing quantum interference effects of correlated photons. The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and interferences of the path-entangled photon number state are of special interest in the field of quantum information technologies. However, a fully generalized two-photon quantum interferometric scheme accounting for the Hong-Ou-Mandel scheme and path-entangled photon number states has not yet been proposed. Here we report the experimental demonstrations of the generalized two-photon interferometry with both the interferometric properties of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect and the fully unfolded version of the path-entangled photon number state using photon-pair sources, which are independently generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our experimental scheme explains two-photon interference fringes revealing single- and two-photon coherence properties in a single interferometer setup. Using the proposed interferometric measurement, it is possible to directly estimate the joint spectral intensity of a photon pair source. PMID:25951143

  8. Relativistic effects on the back-to-back correlation functions of boson-antiboson pairs in high energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the back-to-back correlation (BBC) functions of relativistic boson-antiboson pairs in high energy heavy ion collisions using the Monte Carlo method. The relativistic effects on the BBC functions of φφ and K+K- pairs are investigated. The investigations indicate that the relativistic effects on the BBC functions of K+K- pairs with large momenta are significant, and the effect is sensitive to the particle freeze-out temperature. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275037)

  9. Even-parity spin-triplet paired states by combined effect of Hund's rule and correlations in two-band Hubbard model: a brief overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegrodnik, Michał

    2015-02-01

    Universal aspects of the Hund's rule induced spin-triplet pairing are analysed within the two-band Hubbard model on a square lattice. According to our calculations, this pairing mechanism in conjunction with the correlation effect can result in stability of the paired phase in the so-called purely repulsive interactions regime, in which there is no effectively attractive interaction. Furthermore, even though all of the interaction terms are of intrasite character, the pairing contains both intra- and inter-site components. In effect, the gap parameter has a mixture of s-wave and extended s-wave symmetries. The calculations have been carried out with the use of the Statistically Consistent Gutzwiller Approximation developed by us in recent years.

  10. Search for squeezed-pair correlations at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, Sandra S.; Socolowski, O., Jr.; Csörgő, T.; Nagy, M. I.

    2008-10-01

    Squeezed correlations of particle-antiparticle pairs, also called back-to-back correlations (BBC), are predicted to appear if the hadron masses are modified in the hot and dense hadronic medium formed in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Although well established theoretically, the squeezed-particle correlations have not yet been searched for experimentally in high energy hadronic or heavy ion collisions, clearly requiring optimized forms to experimentally search for this effect. Within a non-relativistic treatment developed earlier we show that one promising way to search for the BBC signal is to look into the squeezed correlation function of pairs of phi's at RHIC energies, plotted in terms of the average momentum of the pair, {\\bf K}_{12}=\\frac{1}{2} ({\\bf k}_1 + {\\bf k}_2) . This variable's modulus, 2|K12|, is the non-relativistic limit of the variable Qbbc, introduced herewith. Some squeezing effects on the HBT correlation function are also discussed.

  11. Nonlinear backbone torsional pair correlations in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Protein allostery requires dynamical structural correlations. Physical origin of which, however, remain elusive despite intensive studies during last two and half decades. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories for ten proteins with different sizes and folds, we found that nonlinear backbone torsional pair (BTP) correlations, which are mainly spatially long-ranged and are dominantly executed by loop residues, exist extensively in most analyzed proteins. Examination of torsional motion for correlated BTPs suggested that such nonlinear correlations are mainly associated aharmonic torsional state transitions and in some cases strongly anisotropic local torsional motion of participating torsions, and occur on widely different and relatively longer time scales. In contrast, correlations between backbone torsions in stable α helices and β strands are mainly linear and spatially short-ranged, and are more likely to associate with harmonic local torsional motion. Further analysis revealed that the direct cause of nonlinear contributions are heterogeneous linear correlations. These findings implicate a general search strategy for novel allosteric modulation sites of protein activities. PMID:27708342

  12. Nonlinear backbone torsional pair correlations in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2016-10-01

    Protein allostery requires dynamical structural correlations. Physical origin of which, however, remain elusive despite intensive studies during last two and half decades. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories for ten proteins with different sizes and folds, we found that nonlinear backbone torsional pair (BTP) correlations, which are mainly spatially long-ranged and are dominantly executed by loop residues, exist extensively in most analyzed proteins. Examination of torsional motion for correlated BTPs suggested that such nonlinear correlations are mainly associated aharmonic torsional state transitions and in some cases strongly anisotropic local torsional motion of participating torsions, and occur on widely different and relatively longer time scales. In contrast, correlations between backbone torsions in stable α helices and β strands are mainly linear and spatially short-ranged, and are more likely to associate with harmonic local torsional motion. Further analysis revealed that the direct cause of nonlinear contributions are heterogeneous linear correlations. These findings implicate a general search strategy for novel allosteric modulation sites of protein activities.

  13. Specific spin-correlation dependent magnetic field effects on radical pairs photo-generated by electron transfer from biphenyl to phenyl-pyrilium salts in micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Partha Pratim; Manoj, N.; Banerjee, Sudip; Chowdhury, Mihir

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the magnetic field effects (MFEs) on photo-generated various geminate phenyl-pyrilium/biphenyl radical pair (PP rad /BP + rad ) of variable singlet/triplet spin-correlations within SDS micelle. When RPs are produced largely with singlet spin-correlation, the MFEs have been observed in two different time domains. It consists of both the initial ( t = 0) decrease of radical yield with field, considering nanosecond phenomenon, and comparatively slow microsecond MFE. However, the RPs of relatively lower singlet spin-correlation shows only slow μs behavior, which may indicate that only singlet spin-state is responsible for exhibiting initial stage MFEs. A kinetic scheme, based on Pedersen's 'super-cage model' for two-stage RP reaction in micelle, has been proposed for analysis.

  14. Interpolation method for pair correlations in classical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Kryuchkov, Nikita P.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of anharmonicity on the pair correlation function of classical crystals are studied. The recently proposed shortest-graph approach using the Gaussian representation of the individual correlation peaks (the peak width is determined by the length of the shortest graph connecting a given pair of particles) is further improved, to account for anharmonic corrections due to finite temperatures and hard-sphere-like interactions. Two major effects are identified, leading to a modification of the correlation peaks at large or short distances: (i) the peaks at large distances, well described by Gaussians, should be calculated from the finite-temperature phonon spectra; (ii) at short distances, the correlation peaks deviate significantly from the Gaussian form due to the lattice discreteness. We propose the analytical interpolation method, based on the shortest-graph approach, which includes both effects. By employing the molecular dynamics simulations, the accuracy of the method is verified for three- and two-dimensional crystals with the Yukawa, inverse-power-law, and pseudo-hard-sphere pair interactions. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by calculating the phase diagram of a three-dimensional Yukawa system.

  15. Interpolation method for pair correlations in classical crystals.

    PubMed

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O; Kryuchkov, Nikita P; Ivlev, Alexei V

    2016-06-15

    Effects of anharmonicity on the pair correlation function of classical crystals are studied. The recently proposed shortest-graph approach using the Gaussian representation of the individual correlation peaks (the peak width is determined by the length of the shortest graph connecting a given pair of particles) is further improved, to account for anharmonic corrections due to finite temperatures and hard-sphere-like interactions. Two major effects are identified, leading to a modification of the correlation peaks at large or short distances: (i) the peaks at large distances, well described by Gaussians, should be calculated from the finite-temperature phonon spectra; (ii) at short distances, the correlation peaks deviate significantly from the Gaussian form due to the lattice discreteness. We propose the analytical interpolation method, based on the shortest-graph approach, which includes both effects. By employing the molecular dynamics simulations, the accuracy of the method is verified for three- and two-dimensional crystals with the Yukawa, inverse-power-law, and pseudo-hard-sphere pair interactions. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by calculating the phase diagram of a three-dimensional Yukawa system. PMID:27157408

  16. Electron Pairing, Repulsion, and Correlation: A Simplistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Lars-Fride; Kloo, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The interplay between a nucleus and an electron pair is explained through a basic application of an electrostatic and balanced model to determine the correlated and repulsive movements of the electron pair. The stable correlation depends on the positive charge produced by the combined force, which in turn establishes a negative potential energy.

  17. Pair correlations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    We started a program to study the ground-state properties of heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. This appears at present to be the most realistic approach for heavy nuclei that contain many loosely bound valence neutrons. The two-neutron density obtained in this approach can be decomposed into two components, one associated with the mean field and one associated with the pairing field. The latter has a structure that is quite similar to the pair-density obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian for a two-neutron halo, which was studied earlier. This allows comparison of the HFB solutions against numerically exact solutions for two-neutron halos. This work is in progress. We intend to apply the HFB method to predict the ground-state properties of heavier, more neutron-rich nuclei that may be produced at future radioactive beam facilities.

  18. Scalar and fermion representations of the Lorentz group in Minkowski plane, QFT correlators, pair creation in electric field and the Unruh effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Alexander M.; Narozhny, Nikolay B.

    2016-02-01

    Boost modes Ψϰ(x) are eigenfunctions of the Lorentz transformations generator in two-dimensional (2D) Minkowski space (MS). We demonstrate and discuss deep interrelation between the boost modes and the field correlators, also known as Wightman functions. In the case of a massive scalar field, the boost modes, as functions of the spectral parameter ϰ, contain the Dirac delta-function singularity δ(ϰ) at the light cone. The zero boost mode coincides up to a constant factor with the Wightman function. The light cone singularity of boost modes for a fermion field is stronger. For this case, they contain the Gelfand δ-function of complex argument δ(ϰ ± i/2), while the Wightman function components coincide with analytical continuation of the boost modes set towards the spectral values ϰ = ∓i/2. We argue that due to the discovered properties of the boost modes the so-called Unruh modes, which are at the core of the Unruh effect derivation, do not constitute a complete set in MS and thus cannot be used for quantization of neither scalar, nor fermion field. Finally, we discuss boost modes for the case of the constant electric background and rederive the well-known result for spontaneous pair creation rate. Solution of this problem in the boost modes representation reveals distinctions between the Unruh problem and the effect of pair creation by an electric field in vacuum.

  19. Correlated photon pairs generated from a warm atomic ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, R. T.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Becerra, F. E.

    2010-11-15

    We present measurements of the cross-correlation function of photon pairs at 780 and 1367 nm, generated in a hot rubidium vapor cell. The temporal character of the biphoton is determined by the dispersive properties of the medium where the pair generation takes place. We show that short correlation times occur for optically thick samples, which can be understood in terms of off-resonant pair generation. By modifying the linear response of the sample, we produce near-resonant photon pairs, which could in principle be used for entanglement distribution.

  20. Pair correlation function integrals: Computation and use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedberg, Rasmus; O'Connell, John P.; Peters, Günther H.; Abildskov, Jens

    2011-08-01

    We describe a method for extending radial distribution functions obtained from molecular simulations of pure and mixed molecular fluids to arbitrary distances. The method allows total correlation function integrals to be reliably calculated from simulations of relatively small systems. The long-distance behavior of radial distribution functions is determined by requiring that the corresponding direct correlation functions follow certain approximations at long distances. We have briefly described the method and tested its performance in previous communications [R. Wedberg, J. P. O'Connell, G. H. Peters, and J. Abildskov, Mol. Simul. 36, 1243 (2010);, 10.1080/08927020903536366 Fluid Phase Equilib. 302, 32 (2011)], 10.1016/j.fluid.2010.10.004, but describe here its theoretical basis more thoroughly and derive long-distance approximations for the direct correlation functions. We describe the numerical implementation of the method in detail, and report numerical tests complementing previous results. Pure molecular fluids are here studied in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble with isothermal compressibilities evaluated from the total correlation function integrals and compared with values derived from volume fluctuations. For systems where the radial distribution function has structure beyond the sampling limit imposed by the system size, the integration is more reliable, and usually more accurate, than simple integral truncation.

  1. Microscopic theory for anisotropic pair correlations in driven binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Matthias; Ivlev, Alexei V; Brandt, Philip; Morfill, Gregor E; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-21

    A self-consistent microscopic approach to calculate non-equilibrium pair correlations in strongly interacting driven binary mixtures is presented. The theory is derived from the many-body Smoluchowski equation for interacting Brownian particles by employing Kirkwood's superposition approximation as a closure relation. It is shown that the pair correlations can exhibit notable anisotropy and a strong tendency to laning in the driving direction. Furthermore, there are strong indications that pair correlations are characterized by a long-range decay along the drive. The theoretical results are in good quantitative agreement with the complementary Brownian dynamics computer simulations.

  2. Particle-number fluctuation of pairing correlations for Dy isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ming-Jian; Liu, Lang; Zhang, Yi-Xin

    2015-10-01

    Within the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, the ground state properties of dysprosium isotopes are studied using the shell-model-like approach (SLAP), in which pairing correlations are treated with particle-number conservation, and the Pauli blocking effects are taken into account exactly. For comparison, calculations of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) model with the RMF are also performed. It is found that the RMF+SLAP calculation results, as well as the RMF+BCS ones, reproduce the experimental binding energies and one- and two-neutron separation energies quite well. However, the RMF+BCS calculations give larger pairing energies than those obtained by the RMF+SLAP calculations, in particular for nuclei near the proton and neutron drip lines. This deviation is discussed in terms of the BCS particle-number fluctuation, which leads to the sizable deviation of pairing energies between the RMF+BCS and RMF+SLAP models, where the fluctuation of the particle number is eliminated automatically. Supported by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (JUSRP1035), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305077)

  3. A Multiscale Modeling Demonstration Based on the Pair Correlation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Carrie Y; Nicholson, Don M; Keffer, David; Edwards, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    For systems with interatomic interactions that are well described by pair-wise potentials, the pair correlation function provides a vehicle for passing information from the molecular level to the macroscopic level of description. In this work, we present a complete demonstration of the use of the pair correlation function to simulate a fluid at the molecular and macroscopic levels. At the molecular level, we describe a monatomic fluid using the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theory closed with the Percus-Yevick approximation. We show that all of the required thermodynamic properties can be evaluated knowing the pair correlation function. At the macroscopic level, we perform a multiscale simulation with macroscopic evolution equations for the mass, momentum, temperature, and pair correlation function, using molecular-level simulation to provide the boundary conditions. We perform a self-consistency check by comparing the pair correlation function that evolved from the multiscale simulation with the one evaluated at the molecular-level; excellent agreement is achieved.

  4. Density functional theory for pair correlation functions in polymeric liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Fynewever, Herb; Shew, Chwen-Yang

    2001-03-01

    A density functional theory is presented for the pair correlation functions in polymeric liquids. The theory uses the Yethiraj-Woodward free-energy functional for the polymeric liquid, where the ideal gas free-energy functional is treated exactly and the excess free-energy functional is obtained using a weighted density approximation with the simplest choice of the weighting function. Pair correlation functions are obtained using the Percus trick, where the external field is taken to be a single polymer molecule. The minimization of the free energy in the theory requires a two molecule simulation at each iteration. The theory is very accurate for the pair correlation functions in freely jointed tangent-hard-sphere chains and freely rotating fused-hard-sphere chains, especially at low densities and for long chains. In addition, the theory allows the calculation of the virial pressure in these systems and shows a remarkable degree of consistency between the virial and compressibility pressure.

  5. Estimation of pairing correlations for nuclear mass table evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, Luis; Bertsch, George

    2010-11-01

    Mean field models provide a well-justified theoretical approach to generate mass tables, but without some extension the energy misses the correlation energy associated with the restoration of broken symmetries such as angular momentum or particle number. The Lipkin-Nogami (LN) method is often used to treat the pairing correlation energy in mass table evaluations, mainly because of its simplicity. However, it has been found that in many nuclei pairing correlations are weak and the LN method, which is an approximation to the more sophisticated Particle Number Projection (PNP), fails. We propose an alternative to the LN method which can be safely applied in the regime of weak pairing correlations and is simpler than variation after projection (VAP) for the PNP. It is based on a Restricted VAP for PNP using the fluctuation on particle number as coordinate. We show that in the strong pairing correlation limit the LN method is recovered. The method is applied to the evaluation of the even-even nuclei mass table with the Gogny parametrization of the nuclear interaction.

  6. On the pairing effects in triaxial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.

    2014-03-05

    Triaxial deformation effect on the pairing correlations is studied in the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Quantities such as binding energy, gap parameter and particle-number fluctuation are considered in neutron-rich Mo isotopes. The results are compared with those of axially symmetric calculation and with available experimental data. The role played by the particle-number projection is outlined.

  7. Spectral correlation control in down-converted photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajewski, Andrzej; Kolenderski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    Sources of photon pairs based on the spontaneous parametric down-conversion process are commonly used for long-distance quantum communication and quantum information processing. The key feature for improving the range of transmission is engineering their spectral properties. Our analysis shows the way for full control of spectral correlation within a fiber-coupled photon pair. The result of extensive numerical simulations allows us to specify the settings for the generation of pairs featuring positive-energy correlation, which can potentially improve the signal-to-noise ratio in practical implementation of quantum communication protocols. We analytically and numerically analyze the characteristics of a source based on a β -barium borate crystal cut for type-II phase matching at the degenerated frequencies 755 nm →1550 nm +1550 nm . The presented framework is general and can be applied to other crystals.

  8. Nonclassical correlation of cascaded photon pairs emitted from quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuan-Feng; Zou, Yang; Xu, Jin-Shi; Ge, Rong-Chun; Guo, Guang-Can

    2011-11-15

    We studied the quantum correlation of the photon pairs generated by biexciton cascade decays of self-assembled quantum dots, and determined the correlation sudden-change temperature, which is shown to be independent of the background noise, far lower than the entanglement sudden-death temperature, and therefore, easier to be observed in experiments. The relationship between the fine-structure splitting and the sudden-change temperature is also provided.

  9. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Dyall, Kenneth G; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-21

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  10. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Dyall, Kenneth G.; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  11. Exact treatment of pairing correlations in Yb isotopes with covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lang; Zhao, Peng-Wei

    2014-07-01

    The effects of pairing correlation in Yb isotopes are investigated by covariant density functional theory with pairing correlations and blocking effects treated exactly by a shell model like approach (SLAP). Experimental one- and two-neutron separation energies are reproduced quite well. The traditional BCS calculations always give larger pairing energies than those given by SLAP calculations, particularly for the nuclei near the proton and neutron drip lines. This may be caused because many of the single particle orbits above the Fermi surface are involved in the BCS calculations, but many of them are excluded in the SLAP calculations.

  12. Correlations in bottom quark pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason Edward

    2009-01-01

    I present an analysis of b$\\bar{b}$ pair production correlations, using dimuon-triggered data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV during Run II of the TeVatron. The leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) b quark production processes are discriminated by the angular and momentum correlations between the b{bar b} pair. Track-level jets containing a muon are classified by b quark content and used to estimate the momentum vector of the progenitor b quark. The theoretical distributions given by the MC@NLO event generator are tested against the data.

  13. Attractive Correlated Electron-Pair Ground State of Resonant Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraverty, B. K.

    We consider a strictly one-band Hamiltonian of electrons with attractive interaction between them. We show that in the interesting intermediate density regime, where V ≤ ɛF, the system admits a mixed state of free fermions and dynamic correlated pairs or resonant bosons. The inevitable coupling between the two sub-system produces a superconducting ground state. This should be called Schafroth Condensation.

  14. Electron correlation within the relativistic no-pair approximation.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Dyall, Kenneth G; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-21

    This paper addresses the definition of correlation energy within 4-component relativistic atomic and molecular calculations. In the nonrelativistic domain the correlation energy is defined as the difference between the exact eigenvalue of the electronic Hamiltonian and the Hartree-Fock energy. In practice, what is reported is the basis set correlation energy, where the "exact" value is provided by a full Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation with some specified one-particle basis. The extension of this definition to the relativistic domain is not straightforward since the corresponding electronic Hamiltonian, the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, has no bound solutions. Present-day relativistic calculations are carried out within the no-pair approximation, where the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is embedded by projectors eliminating the troublesome negative-energy solutions. Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out with the implicit use of such projectors and only positive-energy orbitals are retained at the correlated level, meaning that the Hartree-Fock projectors are frozen at the correlated level. We argue that the projection operators should be optimized also at the correlated level and that this is possible by full Multiconfigurational Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) calculations, that is, MCSCF calculations using a no-pair full CI expansion, but including orbital relaxation from the negative-energy orbitals. We show by variational perturbation theory that the MCSCF correlation energy is a pure MP2-like correlation expression, whereas the corresponding CI correlation energy contains an additional relaxation term. We explore numerically our theoretical analysis by carrying out variational and perturbative calculations on the two-electron rare gas atoms with specially tailored basis sets. In particular, we show that the correlation energy obtained by the suggested MCSCF procedure is smaller than the no-pair full CI correlation energy, in accordance with the underlying

  15. Triplet p + ip pairing correlations in the doped Kane-Mele-Hubbard model: A quantum Monte Carlo study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Tianxing; Lin, Hai-Qing; Gubernatis, James E.

    2015-09-01

    By using the constrained-phase quantum Monte Carlo method, we performed a systematic study of the pairing correlations in the ground state of the doped Kane-Mele-Hubbard model on a honeycomb lattice. We find that pairing correlations with d + id symmetry dominate close to half filling, but pairing correlations with p+ip symmetry dominate as hole doping moves the system below three-quarters filling. We correlate these behaviors of the pairing correlations with the topology of the Fermi surfaces of the non-interacting problem. We also find that the effective pairing correlation is enhanced greatly as the interaction increases, and these superconducting correlations aremore » robust against varying the spin-orbit coupling strength. Finally, our numerical results suggest a possible way to realize spin triplet superconductivity in doped honeycomb-like materials or ultracold atoms in optical traps.« less

  16. Triplet p + ip pairing correlations in the doped Kane-Mele-Hubbard model: A quantum Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianxing; Lin, Hai-Qing; Gubernatis, J. E.

    2015-08-01

    By using the constrained-phase quantum Monte Carlo method, we performed a systematic study of the pairing correlations in the ground state of the doped Kane-Mele-Hubbard model on a honeycomb lattice. We find that pairing correlations with d + id symmetry dominate close to half-filling, but pairing correlations with p + ip symmetry dominate as hole doping moves the system below three-quarters filling. We correlate these behaviors of the pairing correlations with the topology of the Fermi surfaces of the non-interacting problem. We also find that the effective pairing correlation is enhanced greatly as the interaction increases, and these superconducting correlations are robust against varying the spin-orbit coupling strength. Our numerical results suggest a possible way to realize spin triplet superconductivity in doped honeycomb-like materials or ultracold atoms in optical traps.

  17. The influence of pairing correlations on the isospin symmetry breaking corrections of superallowed Fermi beta decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k, A. E.; Gerceklioglu, M.; Selam, C.

    2013-05-15

    Within the framework of quasi-particle random phase approximation, the isospin breaking correction of superallowed 0{sup +} {yields} 0{sup +} beta decay and unitarity of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix have been investigated. The broken isotopic symmetry of nuclear part of Hamiltonian has been restored by Pyatov's method. The isospin symmetry breaking correction with pairing correlations has been compared with the previous results without pairing. The effect of pairing interactions has been examined for nine superallowed Fermi beta decays; their parent nuclei are {sup 26}Al, {sup 34}Cl, {sup 38}K, {sup 42}Sc, {sup 46}V, {sup 50}Mn, {sup 54}Co, {sup 62}Ga, {sup 74}Rb.

  18. Pairing in high-density neutron matter including short- and long-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Rios, A.; Dussan, H.; Dickhoff, W. H.; Witte, S. J.; Carbone, A.; Polls, A.

    2016-08-01

    Pairing gaps in neutron matter need to be computed in a wide range of densities to address open questions in neutron-star phenomenology. Traditionally, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer approach has been used to compute gaps from bare nucleon-nucleon interactions. Here we incorporate the influence of short- and long-range correlations in the pairing gaps. Short-range correlations are treated, including the appropriate fragmentation of single-particle states, and substantially suppress the gaps. Long-range correlations dress the pairing interaction via density and spin modes and provide a relatively small correction. We use different interactions, some with three-body forces, as a starting point to control for any systematic effects. Results are relevant for neutron-star cooling scenarios, in particular in view of the recent observational data on Cassiopeia A.

  19. Coulomb-enhanced superconducting pair correlations and paired-electron liquid in the frustrated quarter-filled band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Niladri; De Silva, W. Wasanthi; Dutta, Tirthankar; Clay, R. Torsten; Mazumdar, S.

    2016-04-01

    A necessary condition for superconductivity (SC) driven by electron correlations is that electron-electron (e-e) interactions enhance superconducting pair-pair correlations, relative to the noninteracting limit. We report high-precision numerical calculations of the ground state on four different finite lattices of up to 100 sites within the frustrated two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard Hamiltonian for a wide range of carrier concentration ρ (0 <ρ <1 ). The average long-range pair-pair correlation for each cluster is enhanced by Hubbard U only for ρ ≈0.5 . At all other fillings e-e interactions mostly suppress pair correlations. Our work provides a key ingredient to the mechanism of SC in the 2D organic charge-transfer solids and many other unconventional superconductors with frustrated crystal lattices and ρ ≃0.5 .

  20. Pair correlation functions of FeAs-based superconductors: Quantum Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Krasavin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The new generalized quantum continuous time world line Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to calculate pair correlation functions for two-dimensional FeAs-clusters modeling of iron-based superconductors within the framework of the two-orbital model. The analysis of pair correlations depending on the cluster size, temperature, interaction, and the type of symmetry of the order parameter is carried out. The data obtained for clusters with sizes up to 1 0x1 0 FeAs-cells favor the possibility of an effective charge carrier's attraction that is corresponding the A1g-symmetry, at some parameters of interaction.

  1. Current correlations in an interacting Cooper-pair beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J.; Chevallier, D.; Jonckheere, T.; Martin, T.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an approach allowing the computation of currents and their correlations in interacting multiterminal mesoscopic systems involving quantum dots coupled to normal and/or superconducting leads. The formalism relies on the expression of branching currents and noise crossed correlations in terms of one- and two-particle Green's functions for the dots electrons, which are then evaluated self-consistently within a conserving approximation. We then apply this to the Cooper-pair beam-splitter setup recently proposed [L. Hofstetter , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08432 461, 960 (2009); Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.136801 107, 136801 (2011); L. G. Herrmann , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.026801 104, 026801 (2010)], which we model as a double quantum dot with weak interactions, connected to a superconducting lead and two normal ones. Our method not only enables us to take into account a local repulsive interaction on the dots, but also to study its competition with the direct tunneling between dots. Our results suggest that even a weak Coulomb repulsion tends to favor positive current cross correlations in the antisymmetric regime (where the dots have opposite energies with respect to the superconducting chemical potential).

  2. Probing charge fluctuator correlations using quantum dot pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, V.; Braunecker, B.; Lovett, B. W.

    2015-06-01

    We study a pair of quantum dot exciton qubits interacting with a number of fluctuating charges that can induce a Stark shift of both exciton transition energies. We do this by solving the optical master equation using a numerical transfer matrix method. We find that the collective influence of the charge environment on the dots can be detected by measuring the correlation between the photons emitted when each dot is driven independently. Qubits in a common charge environment display photon bunching, if both dots are driven on resonance or if the driving laser detunings have the same sense for both qubits, and antibunching if the laser detunings have opposite signs. We also show that it is possible to detect several charges fluctuating at different rates using this technique. Our findings expand the possibility of measuring qubit dynamics in order to investigate the fundamental physics of the environmental noise that causes decoherence.

  3. Applicability of effective pair potentials for active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Rein, Markus; Speck, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We have performed a case study investigating a recently proposed scheme to obtain an effective pair potential for active Brownian particles (Farage et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 042310 (2015)). Applying this scheme to the Lennard-Jones potential, numerical simulations of active Brownian particles are compared to simulations of passive Brownian particles interacting by the effective pair potential. Analyzing the static pair correlations, our results indicate a limited range of activity parameters (speed and orientational correlation time) for which we obtain quantitative, or even qualitative, agreement. Moreover, we find a qualitatively different behavior for the virial pressure even for small propulsion speeds. Combining these findings we conclude that beyond linear response active particles exhibit genuine non-equilibrium properties that cannot be captured by effective pair interaction alone. PMID:27628695

  4. Consequences of minimising pair correlations in fluids for dynamics, thermodynamics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadrich, R. B.; Lindquist, B. A.; Bollinger, J. A.; Truskett, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    Liquid-state theory, computer simulation, and numerical optimization are used to investigate the extent to which positional correlations of a hard-sphere fluid--as characterized by the radial distribution function and the two-particle excess entropy--can be suppressed via the introduction of auxiliary pair interactions. The corresponding effects of such interactions on total excess entropy, density fluctuations, and single-particle dynamics are explored. Iso-g processes, whereby hard-sphere-fluid pair structure at a given density is preserved at higher densities via the introduction of a density-dependent, soft repulsive contribution to the pair potential, are considered. Such processes eventually terminate at a singular density, resulting in a state that--while incompressible and hyperuniform--remains unjammed and exhibits fluid-like dynamic properties. The extent to which static pair correlations can be suppressed to maximize pair disorder in a fluid with hard cores, determined via direct functional maximization of two-body excess entropy, is also considered. Systems approaching a state of maximized two-body entropy display a progressively growing bandwidth of suppressed density fluctuations, pointing to a relation between "stealthiness" and maximal pair disorder in materials.

  5. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.

  6. Neural Correlates of Pair-bonding in a Monogamous Primate

    PubMed Central

    Bales, Karen L.; Mason, William A.; Catana, Cipiran; Cherry, Simon R.; Mendoza, Sally P.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiology of social bonding, despite its relevance to human mental health, has been studied primarily in rodents. In this study we used position emission tomography (PET), registered with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate central glucose uptake in seventeen males of a monogamous primate species, the titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus). Twelve pair-bonded males (including six with a lesion of the prefrontal cortex) and five lone males were scanned. The five lone males were re-scanned 48 hours after pairing with a female. Significant differences in glucose uptake were found between males in long-term pair-bonds and lone males in areas including the nucleus accumbens, ventral pallidum, medial preoptic area, medial amygdala, and the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus. In paired before and after comparisons, males showed significant changes following pairing in the right nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum but not in other areas. Lesioned males showed significantly higher uptake in the posterior cingulate cortex than all other males. These results indicate some basic similarities between rodents and primates in the formation and maintenance of selective social bonds, but emphasize the importance of studying long-term maintenance in addition to short-term formation of social bonds. PMID:17976540

  7. Spatial correlation of photon pairs produced in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Procopio, L. M.; Rosas-Ortiz, O.; Velazquez, V.

    2010-10-11

    We report the observation of spatial biphoton correlation in spontaneous parametric down conversion. The optical bench includes a type-I BBO crystal of effective length 2 mm, pumped by a 100 mW violet laser diode centered at 405.38 nm. Photon pairs are created with degenerate wavelength {approx_equal}810.76 nm. Once the horizontal counting rates have been measured, a simple geometrical recipe is shown to be useful in calculating bounds for the width of vertical counting rates. The spatial correlation between idler and signal photons is illustrated with a coincidence distribution of the coordinate pair (x{sub s},x{sub i}), with x{sub i,s} the idler (signal) detector position in horizontal scan.

  8. Study of correlations between photoproduced pairs of charmed particles at Experiment E831/FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Castromonte Flores, Cesar Manuel

    2008-08-01

    The authors present the study of the charm-pair correlations produced in photon-nucleon interactions at $\\langle$Eγ$\\rangle$ = 175 GeV/c, by the Fermilab fixed target experiment E831/FOCUS. The E831/FOCUS experiment produced and reconstructed over one million charm particles. This high statistics allows the reconstruction of more than 7000 charm-pair mesons D$\\bar{D}$, 10 times the statistic of former experiments, and also allows to get, for the first time, about 600 totally reconstructed charm-pairs in the DDs and DΛc channels. They were able to study, with some detail, the kinematical correlations between the charm and anticharm particle forming a pair, in the square transverse momentum (pT2), azimuthal angle difference (ΔΦ), rapidity difference (Δy) and the charm-pair mass variables. They observe some correlation for the longitudinal momenta, and a significant correlation for the transverse momenta of the charm and anticharm particles. They compare the experimental distributions with theoretical predictions based on the photon-gluon fusion model (PGF), for the production of c$\\bar{c}$ quarks, and the standard Lund hadronization model. These models are implemented by the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA program allows the inclusion, in the simulation, of non-perturbative effects that have been shown to be important for charm production. In order to compare data and simulation, they have generated two Monte Carlo samples, the first one set to favor the production of D$\\bar{D}$ pairs (MCDD2), and the second one set to favor the production of DDsand DΛc pairs, where each one uses different functions and parameters values for the theoretical models in the simulation. They observe, for the correlation distributions, that the set of parameters used by the MCDD2 model together with the intrinsic transverse momentum (k$\\perp$) of the partons inside the

  9. Cost-effective instrumentation for quantitative depth measurement of optic nerve head using stereo fundus image pair and image cross correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Luis Alberto V.; Carvalho, Valeria

    2014-02-01

    One of the main problems with glaucoma throughout the world is that there are typically no symptoms in the early stages. Many people who have the disease do not know they have it and by the time one finds out, the disease is usually in an advanced stage. Most retinal cameras available in the market today use sophisticated optics and have several other features/capabilities (wide-angle optics, red-free and angiography filters, etc) that make them expensive for the general practice or for screening purposes. Therefore, it is important to develop instrumentation that is fast, effective and economic, in order to reach the mass public in the general eye-care centers. In this work, we have constructed the hardware and software of a cost-effective and non-mydriatic prototype device that allows fast capturing and plotting of high-resolution quantitative 3D images and videos of the optical disc head and neighboring region (30° of field of view). The main application of this device is for glaucoma screening, although it may also be useful for the diagnosis of other pathologies related to the optic nerve.

  10. Electrical Conductivity through a Single Atomic Step Measured with the Proximity-Induced Superconducting Pair Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Howon; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Graf, Matthias J.; Miyata, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Takeo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Local disordered nanostructures in an atomically thick metallic layer on a semiconducting substrate play significant and decisive roles in transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) conductive systems. We measured the electrical conductivity through a step of monoatomic height in a truly microscopic manner by using as a signal the superconducting pair correlation induced by the proximity effect. The transport property across a step of a one-monolayer Pb surface metallic phase, formed on a Si(111) substrate, was evaluated by inducing the pair correlation around the local defect and measuring its response, i.e., the reduced density of states at the Fermi energy using scanning tunneling microscopy. We found that the step resistance has a significant contribution to the total resistance on a nominally flat surface. Our study also revealed that steps in the 2D metallic layer terminate the propagation of the pair correlation. Superconductivity is enhanced between the first surface step and the superconductor-normal-metal interface by reflectionless tunneling when the step is located within a coherence length.

  11. Electrical Conductivity through a Single Atomic Step Measured with the Proximity-Induced Superconducting Pair Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Howon; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Graf, Matthias J; Miyata, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Takeo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Local disordered nanostructures in an atomically thick metallic layer on a semiconducting substrate play significant and decisive roles in transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) conductive systems. We measured the electrical conductivity through a step of monoatomic height in a truly microscopic manner by using as a signal the superconducting pair correlation induced by the proximity effect. The transport property across a step of a one-monolayer Pb surface metallic phase, formed on a Si(111) substrate, was evaluated by inducing the pair correlation around the local defect and measuring its response, i.e., the reduced density of states at the Fermi energy using scanning tunneling microscopy. We found that the step resistance has a significant contribution to the total resistance on a nominally flat surface. Our study also revealed that steps in the 2D metallic layer terminate the propagation of the pair correlation. Superconductivity is enhanced between the first surface step and the superconductor-normal-metal interface by reflectionless tunneling when the step is located within a coherence length. PMID:27661710

  12. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; et al

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore » such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  13. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  14. Cluster pair correlation function of simple fluids: energetic connectivity criteria.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J; Vericat, Fernando

    2006-11-21

    We consider the clustering of Lennard-Jones particles by using an energetic connectivity criterion proposed long ago by Hill [J. Chem. Phys. 32, 617 (1955)] for the bond between pairs of particles. The criterion establishes that two particles are bonded (directly connected) if their relative kinetic energy is less than minus their relative potential energy. Thus, in general, it depends on the direction as well as on the magnitude of the velocities and positions of the particles. An integral equation for the pair connectedness function, proposed by two of the authors [Phys. Rev. E 61, R6067 (2000)], is solved for this criterion and the results are compared with those obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and from a connectedness Percus-Yevick-type integral equation for a velocity-averaged version of Hill's energetic criterion.

  15. Ground state pairing correlation competes in the doped triangular lattice Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shuai; Wang, Xin; Liu, Suhang; Ma, Tianxing

    2014-11-01

    By using the constrained path quantum Monte carlo method, we study the ground state paring correlations in the t - U - V Hubbard model on the triangular lattice. It is shown that pairings with various symmetries dominate in different electron filling regions. The pairing correlation with fn-wave symmetry dominates over other pairings around half fillings, and as the electron filling decreases away from the half filling, the d + id-wave pairing correlation tends to dominate. As the electron filling is bellow the Van Hove singularity, the f-wave pairing dominates. These crossovers are due to the interplay of electronic correlation and geometric frustration, associating with the competition between the antiferromagnetic correlations and ferromagnetic fluctuations. Our findings reveal the possible magnetic origin of superconductivity, and also provide useful information for the understanding of superconductivity in NaxCoO2·H2O and the organic compounds.

  16. Spin-triplet paired state induced by Hund's rule coupling and correlations: a fully statistically consistent Gutzwiller approach.

    PubMed

    Spałek, J; Zegrodnik, M

    2013-10-30

    The intrasite and intersite spin-triplet pairing gaps induced by interband Hund's rule coupling and their correlations are analyzed in the doubly degenerate Hubbard Hamiltonian. To include the effect of correlations, the statistically consistent Gutzwiller approximation is used. In this approach the consistency means that the averages calculated from the self-consistent equations and those determined variationally coincide with each other. Emphasis is put on the solution for which the average particle number is conserved when carrying out the Gutzwiller projection. This method leads to a stable equal-spin paired state in the so-called repulsive interactions limit (U > 3J) in the regime of moderate correlations. The interband hybridization introduces an inequivalence of the bands which, above a critical magnitude, suppresses the paired state due to both the Fermi-wavevector mismatch for the Cooper pair and the interband hopping allowed by the Pauli principle.

  17. Spectral analysis of pair-correlation bandwidth: application to cell biology images

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Benjamin J.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Images from cell biology experiments often indicate the presence of cell clustering, which can provide insight into the mechanisms driving the collective cell behaviour. Pair-correlation functions provide quantitative information about the presence, or absence, of clustering in a spatial distribution of cells. This is because the pair-correlation function describes the ratio of the abundance of pairs of cells, separated by a particular distance, relative to a randomly distributed reference population. Pair-correlation functions are often presented as a kernel density estimate where the frequency of pairs of objects are grouped using a particular bandwidth (or bin width), Δ>0. The choice of bandwidth has a dramatic impact: choosing Δ too large produces a pair-correlation function that contains insufficient information, whereas choosing Δ too small produces a pair-correlation signal dominated by fluctuations. Presently, there is little guidance available regarding how to make an objective choice of Δ. We present a new technique to choose Δ by analysing the power spectrum of the discrete Fourier transform of the pair-correlation function. Using synthetic simulation data, we confirm that our approach allows us to objectively choose Δ such that the appropriately binned pair-correlation function captures known features in uniform and clustered synthetic images. We also apply our technique to images from two different cell biology assays. The first assay corresponds to an approximately uniform distribution of cells, while the second assay involves a time series of images of a cell population which forms aggregates over time. The appropriately binned pair-correlation function allows us to make quantitative inferences about the average aggregate size, as well as quantifying how the average aggregate size changes with time. PMID:26064605

  18. Peculiar oxygen and copper isotope effects on the pseudogap formation temperature in underdoped to overdoped cuprates: Pseudogap induced by pairing correlations above Tc in cuprates with large and small Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Khudayberdiev, Z. S.; Djumanov, Sh. S.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the pseudogap (PG) state and the peculiar oxygen and copper isotope effects on the PG onset temperature T* in cuprate superconductors with large and small Fermi surfaces within the polaron model and two different BCS-based approaches extended to the intermediate coupling regime. We argue that the unconventional electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the polaron formation and BCS-like pairing correlations above Tc in underdoped to overdoped cuprates, which are exotic (non-BCS) superconductors. Using the generalized BCS-like theory, we calculate pseudogap formation temperatures T*, isotope shifts ΔT*, oxygen and copper isotope exponents (i.e. αT*O and αT*Cu) and show that isotope effects on T* strongly depend on strengths of Coulomb and electron-phonon interactions, doping levels and dielectric constants of the cuprates. This theory explains the existence of small positive or sign reversed oxygen isotope effect, sizable and very large negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on T* in cuprates with large Fermi surfaces. Further, we use another version of the extended BCS-like model to study the PG formation and the peculiar isotope effects on T* in deeply underdoped cuprates with small Fermi surfaces and predict the existence of small and sizable negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on T* in such underdoped cuprates. The results for T*, isotope shifts ΔT* and exponents (αT*O and αT*Cu) in different classes of high-Tc cuprates are in good agreement with the existing well-established experimental data and explain the controversy between various experiments on isotope effects for T* in the cuprates.

  19. A viscous vortex pair in ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peace, A. J.; Riley, N.

    1983-04-01

    Attention is given to the unsteady fluid motion which is induced when a vortex pair moves in an incompressible viscous fluid towards a plane boundary. The vortex pair at the initial instant is represented by two inviscid line vortices and the line which joins them is parallel to the boundary surface. The boundary surface may be either a rigid boundary at which the no-slip condition must be satisfied or a free surface corresponding to zero shear stress. The governing equations and a solution procedure are discussed, taking into account a finite-difference approach. Research of calculations are presented for both a non-slip boundary and a stress-free boundary. The phenomenon or rebound of the vortices from the boundary is found to occur in both cases. An explanation for this result in terms of viscous effects is provided.

  20. Pair-correlation function of a metastable helium Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zin, Pawel; Trippenbach, Marek; Gajda, Mariusz

    2004-02-01

    The pair-correlation function is one of the basic quantities to characterize the coherence properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate. We calculate this function in the experimentally important case of a zero temperature Bose-Einstein condensate in a metastable triplet helium state using the variational method with a pair-excitation ansatz. We compare our result with a pair-correlation function obtained for the hard-sphere potential with the same scattering length. Both functions are practically indistinguishable for distances greater than the scattering length. At smaller distances, due to interatomic interactions, the helium condensate shows strong correlations.

  1. Triplet p + ip pairing correlations in the doped Kane-Mele-Hubbard model: A quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tianxing; Lin, Hai-Qing; Gubernatis, James E.

    2015-09-01

    By using the constrained-phase quantum Monte Carlo method, we performed a systematic study of the pairing correlations in the ground state of the doped Kane-Mele-Hubbard model on a honeycomb lattice. We find that pairing correlations with d + id symmetry dominate close to half filling, but pairing correlations with p+ip symmetry dominate as hole doping moves the system below three-quarters filling. We correlate these behaviors of the pairing correlations with the topology of the Fermi surfaces of the non-interacting problem. We also find that the effective pairing correlation is enhanced greatly as the interaction increases, and these superconducting correlations are robust against varying the spin-orbit coupling strength. Finally, our numerical results suggest a possible way to realize spin triplet superconductivity in doped honeycomb-like materials or ultracold atoms in optical traps.

  2. Variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method applied to pairing correlations in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pillet, N.; Berger, J.-F.; Caurier, E.

    2008-08-15

    Applying a variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method whose purpose is to include correlations beyond the mean field in a unified way without particle number and Pauli principle violations, we investigate pairing-like correlations in the ground states of {sup 116}Sn, {sup 106}Sn, and {sup 100}Sn. The same effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, namely, the D1S parametrization of the Gogny force, is used to derive both the mean field and correlation components of nuclear wave functions. Calculations are performed using an axially symmetric representation. The structure of correlated wave functions, their convergence with respect to the number of particle-hole excitations, and the influence of correlations on single-particle level spectra and occupation probabilities are analyzed and compared with results obtained with the same two-body effective interaction from BCS, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov, and particle number projected after variation BCS approaches. Calculations of nuclear radii and the first theoretical excited 0{sup +} states are compared with experimental data.

  3. Pair Correlations of a Spin-Imbalanced Fermi Gas on Two-Leg Ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, A. E.; Heidrich-Meisner, F.

    2009-02-20

    We study the pair correlations of a spin-imbalanced two-leg ladder with attractive interactions, using the density matrix renormalization group method. We identify regions in the phase diagram spanned by the chemical potential and the magnetic field that can harbor Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov- (FFLO-)like physics. Results for the pair structure factor, exhibiting multiple pairing wave vectors, substantiate the presence of FFLO-like correlations. We further discuss phase separation scenarios induced by a harmonic trap, which differ from the case of isolated chains00.

  4. Enhanced Correlation of Electron-Positron Pair in Two and Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Suo; Xie, Bai-Song; Wang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin; Yu, Ming-Young

    2014-01-01

    Early time electron-positron correlation in vacuum pair-production in an external field is investigated. The entangled electron and positron wave functions are obtained analytically in the configuration and momentum spaces. It is shown that, relative to that of the one-dimensional theory, two- and three-dimensional calculations yield enhanced spatial correlation and broadened momentum spectra. In fact, at early times the electron and positron almost coincide spatially. The correlation also depends on the direction of the applied field. For the spatial correlation, the transverse correlation is stronger than the longitudinal correlation.

  5. Femtoscopic pair correlations of mesons and baryons at RHIC and LHC from hydrokinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Shapoval, V. M.; Naboka, V. Yu.

    2014-11-01

    The femtoscopic scales for identical pions and kaons obtained in hydrokinetic model (HKM) are presented for the top energy RHIC and LHC A + A collisions. The source functions for p Λ bar ⊕ p bar Λ pairs in Au + Au collisions are found and used for extraction of the scattering length in these two-baryon systems by means of FSI correlation technique. The role of residual correlations in formation of the total baryon-antibaryon correlation function is analyzed.

  6. Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlations of Cooper pairs in helical liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) experiment of Cooper pairs on the edge channels of quantum spin Hall insulators. The helical edge channels provide a well-defined beam of Cooper pairs and perfect Andreev reflections from superconductors. This allows our setup to be identical in spirit to the original HBT experiment. Interestingly, the cross correlation is always negative and provides no hint of the bosonic nature of Cooper pairs. This counterintuitive result is attributed to the perfect Andreev reflection and the true beam splitter in the setup.

  7. The impact of nonlinear losses in the silicon micro-ring cavities on CW pumping correlated photon pair generation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Ning; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, 1.5 μm correlated photon pairs are generated under continuous wave (CW) pumping in a silicon micro-ring cavity with a Q factor of 8.1 × 10(4). The ratio of coincidences to accidental coincidences (CAR) is up to 200 under a coincidence time bin width of 5 ns. The experiment result of single side photon count shows that the generation rate does not increase as the square of the pump level due to the nonlinear losses in the cavity which reduce the Q factor and impact the field enhancement effect in the cavity under high pump level. Theoretical analysis shows that the photon pair generation rate in the cavity is proportional to the seventh power of the Q factor, which agrees well with the experiment result. It provides a way to analyze the performance of CW pumping correlated photon pair generation in silicon micro-ring cavities under high pump levels.

  8. Students' Perceptions of Dynamics Concept Pairs and Correlation with Their Problem-Solving Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ning

    2012-10-01

    A concept pair is a pair of concepts that are fundamentally different but closely related. To develop a solid conceptual understanding in dynamics (a foundational engineering science course) and physics, students must understand the fundamental difference and relationship between two concepts that are included in each concept pair. However, all existing research in dynamics and physics education has been focused on the identification and repair of students' misunderstanding of individual concepts, but not concept pairs. The present research fills the gap of existing research by studying students' perceptions of dynamics concept pairs and correlation with their problem-solving performance in both particle and rigid-body dynamics. A total of 88 engineering undergraduate students participated in the present study. Students' perceptions were assessed using a 40-item instrument that included 20 dynamics concept pairs at fundamental Level One and higher-order Level Two. Students' problem-solving performance was assessed using four exams that included 66 dynamics problems. The coefficients of reliability (Cronbach's α) of assessment instruments vary between 0.69 and 0.93. The research findings from the present study show that students were not confident in their understanding of Level-Two concept pairs, especially the relationship between the Principle of Linear Impulse and Momentum and the Principle of Angular Impulse and Momentum, and the relationship between the Principle of Angular Impulse and Momentum and the Conservation of Angular Momentum. A statistically significant correlation exists between students' perceptions of Level-Two concept pairs and their problem-solving performance on both particle dynamics (r = 0.355, p < 0.01) and rigid-body dynamics (r = 0.351, p < 0.01). The research findings made from the present study imply that educational efforts should be focused on improving students' understanding of Level-Two dynamics concept pairs.

  9. Cytoplasmic and genomic effects on meiotic pairing in Brassica hybrids and allotetraploids from pair crosses of three cultivated diploids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-07-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and "fixed heterosis" in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids.

  10. Cytoplasmic and Genomic Effects on Meiotic Pairing in Brassica Hybrids and Allotetraploids from Pair Crosses of Three Cultivated Diploids

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and “fixed heterosis” in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids. PMID:22505621

  11. Cytoplasmic and genomic effects on meiotic pairing in Brassica hybrids and allotetraploids from pair crosses of three cultivated diploids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-07-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and "fixed heterosis" in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids. PMID:22505621

  12. Theory and simulation of anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.; Camp, Philip J.

    2012-05-01

    Anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids exposed to magnetic fields are studied using a combination of statistical-mechanical theory and computer simulations. A simple dipolar hard-sphere model of the magnetic colloidal particles is studied in detail. A virial-expansion theory is constructed for the pair distribution function (PDF) which depends not only on the length of the pair separation vector, but also on its orientation with respect to the field. A detailed comparison is made between the theoretical predictions and accurate simulation data, and it is found that the theory works well for realistic values of the dipolar coupling constant (λ = 1), volume fraction (φ ⩽ 0.1), and magnetic field strength. The structure factor is computed for wavevectors either parallel or perpendicular to the field. The comparison between theory and simulation is generally very good with realistic ferrofluid parameters. For both the PDF and the structure factor, there are some deviations between theory and simulation at uncommonly high dipolar coupling constants, and with very strong magnetic fields. In particular, the theory is less successful at predicting the behavior of the structure factors at very low wavevectors, and perpendicular Gaussian density fluctuations arising from strongly correlated pairs of magnetic particles. Overall, though, the theory provides reliable predictions for the nature and degree of pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields, and hence should be of use in the design of functional magnetic materials.

  13. Theory and simulation of anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Camp, Philip J

    2012-05-21

    Anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids exposed to magnetic fields are studied using a combination of statistical-mechanical theory and computer simulations. A simple dipolar hard-sphere model of the magnetic colloidal particles is studied in detail. A virial-expansion theory is constructed for the pair distribution function (PDF) which depends not only on the length of the pair separation vector, but also on its orientation with respect to the field. A detailed comparison is made between the theoretical predictions and accurate simulation data, and it is found that the theory works well for realistic values of the dipolar coupling constant (λ = 1), volume fraction (φ ≤ 0.1), and magnetic field strength. The structure factor is computed for wavevectors either parallel or perpendicular to the field. The comparison between theory and simulation is generally very good with realistic ferrofluid parameters. For both the PDF and the structure factor, there are some deviations between theory and simulation at uncommonly high dipolar coupling constants, and with very strong magnetic fields. In particular, the theory is less successful at predicting the behavior of the structure factors at very low wavevectors, and perpendicular Gaussian density fluctuations arising from strongly correlated pairs of magnetic particles. Overall, though, the theory provides reliable predictions for the nature and degree of pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields, and hence should be of use in the design of functional magnetic materials. PMID:22612098

  14. Nonlocal Young tests with Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-correlated particle pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gneiting, Clemens; Hornberger, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    We evaluate the nonlocal spatial interference displayed by Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled particle pairs after they pass through a double-grating arrangement. An entanglement criterion is derived which serves to certify the underlying entanglement only from the observed spatial correlations. We discuss the robustness of the scheme along with a number of possible realizations with matter waves.

  15. Dynamical correlations in Coulomb drag effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, B.; Davoudi, B.; Hu, B. Y.-K.

    2003-05-01

    Motivated by recent Coulomb drag experiments in pairs of low-density two-dimensional (2D) electron gases, we investigate the influence of correlation effects on the interlayer drag rate as a function of temperature. We use the self-consistent field method to calculate the intra and interlayer local-field factors Gij( q, T) which embody the short-range correlation effects. We calculate the transresistivity using the screened effective interlayer interactions that result from incorporating these local-field factors within various approximation schemes. Our results suggest that dynamic (frequency dependent) correlations play an important role in enhancing the Coulomb drag rate.

  16. Origin of Light-Induced Spin-Correlated Radical Pairs in Cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Stefan; Biskup, Till; Okafuji, Asako; Marino, Anthony R.; Berthold, Thomas; Link, Gerhard; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Schleicher, Erik; Norris, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Blue-light excitation of cryptochromes and homologs uniformly triggers electron transfer (ET) from the protein surface to the flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. A cascade of three conserved tryptophan residues has been considered to be critically involved in this photoreaction. If the FAD is initially in its fully oxidized (diamagnetic) redox state, light-induced ET via the tryptophan triad generates a series of short-lived spin-correlated radical pairs comprising an FAD radical and a tryptophan radical. Coupled doublet-pair species of this type have been proposed as the basis, e.g., of a biological magnetic compass in migratory birds, and were found critical for some cryptochrome functions in vivo. In this contribution, a cryptochrome-like protein (CRYD) derived from Xenopus laevis has been examined as a representative system. The terminal radical-pair state FAD•⋯W324• of X. laevis CRYD has been characterized in detail by time-resolved electron-paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) at X-band microwave frequency (9.68 GHz) and magnetic fields around 345 mT, and at Q-band (34.08 GHz) at around 1215 mT. Different precursor states – singlet versus triplet – of radical-pair formation have been considered in spectral simulations of the experimental electron-spin polarized TREPR signals. Conclusively, we present evidence for a singlet-state precursor of FAD•⋯W324• radical-pair generation because at both magnetic fields, where radical pairs were studied by TREPR, net-zero electron-spin polarization has been detected. Neither a spin-polarized triplet precursor nor a triplet at thermal equilibrium can explain such an electron-spin polarization. It turns out that a two-microwave-frequency TREPR approach is essential to draw conclusions on the nature of the precursor electronic states in light-induced spin-correlated radical pair formations. PMID:20684534

  17. Correlation of leptin and soluble leptin receptor levels with anthropometric parameters in mother-newborn pairs

    PubMed Central

    Marino-Ortega, Linda A; Molina-Bello, Adiel; Polanco-García, Julio C; Muñoz-Valle, José F; Salgado-Bernabé, Aralia B; Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris P; Parra-Rojas, Isela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if anthropometric parameters are associated with both leptin and soluble leptin receptor (sLEPR) levels in newborns and their mothers. This cross-sectional study was performed in 118 mother-newborn pairs. The venous blood sample of mothers was taken before delivery and immediately after delivery an umbilical cord blood sample was collected. Levels of leptin and sLEPR in maternal and umbilical cord sera were assessed by ELISA. Maternal serum concentration of leptin and sLEPR (6.2 and 25.7 ng/ml, respectively) were higher than in umbilical cord blood (2.4 and 14.2 ng/ml, respectively). However, the newborns and their mothers had higher sLEPR levels than leptin levels. In mothers was observed that leptin levels increase with weight gain in pregnancy and decreased sLEPR levels. Cord leptin levels correlated with neonatal birth weight and length, the body circumferences, placental weight and maternal leptin levels. Cord sLEPR levels correlated with maternal sLEPR and leptin levels. Maternal serum concentration of leptin correlated with pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, cord sLEPR and leptin levels. Maternal sLEPR concentration correlated with cord sLEPR levels. The leptin and sLEPR levels in mother-newborn pairs are related with anthropometric parameters and an inverse correlation between leptin levels and sLEPR was observed in pairs. PMID:26379933

  18. Pairing effects on neutrino transport in low-density stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrello, S.; Colonna, M.; Matera, F.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the impact of pairing correlations on neutrino transport in stellar matter. Our analysis is extended to nuclear matter conditions where large density fluctuations may develop, associated with the onset of the liquid-vapor phase transition, and where clustering phenomena occur. Within a thermodynamical treatment, we show that at moderate temperatures, where pairing effects are still active, the scattering of neutrinos in the nuclear medium is significantly affected by pairing correlations, which increase the neutrino trapping, thus modifying the cooling mechanism, by neutrino emission, of protoneutron stars.

  19. A compact, integrated silicon device for the generation of spectrally filtered, pair-correlated photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Momchil; Savona, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The third-order nonlinearity of silicon gives rise to a spontaneous four-wave mixing process in which correlated photon pairs are generated. Sources based on this effect can be used for quantum computation and cryptography, and can in principle be integrated with standard CMOS fabrication technology and components. However, one of the major challenges is the on-chip demultiplexing of the photons, and in particular the filtering of the pump power, which is many orders of magnitude larger than that of the signal and idler photons. Here, we propose a photonic crystal coupled-cavity system designed so that the coupling of the pump mode to the output channel is strictly zero due to symmetry. We further analyze this effect in the presence of fabrication disorder and find that, even then, a pump suppression of close to 40 dB can be achieved in state-of-the-art systems. Due to the small mode volumes and high quality factors, our system is also expected to have a generation efficiency much higher than in standard micro-ring systems. Those two considerations make a strong case for the integration of our proposed design in future on-chip quantum technologies.

  20. Bose-Einstein correlation of positive kaon pairs in E859--Extended results and model comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Cianciolo, V.

    1995-12-31

    Results are presented for multidimensional Bose-Einstein Correlation analyses of {pi}{sup +} and K{sup +} mid-rapidity pairs collected by BNL-AGS experiment E859 in 14.6 A{center_dot}GeV/c Si + Au central collisions. Comparisons are made to the cascade codes ARC (v. 1.9.5) and RQMD (v. 1.08). 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Improving the clinical correlation of multiple sclerosis black hole volume change by paired-scan analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Roger C; Traboulsee, Anthony; Riddehough, Andrew; Li, David K B

    2012-01-01

    The change in T 1-hypointense lesion ("black hole") volume is an important marker of pathological progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Black hole boundaries often have low contrast and are difficult to determine accurately and most (semi-)automated segmentation methods first compute the T 2-hyperintense lesions, which are a superset of the black holes and are typically more distinct, to form a search space for the T 1w lesions. Two main potential sources of measurement noise in longitudinal black hole volume computation are partial volume and variability in the T 2w lesion segmentation. A paired analysis approach is proposed herein that uses registration to equalize partial volume and lesion mask processing to combine T 2w lesion segmentations across time. The scans of 247 MS patients are used to compare a selected black hole computation method with an enhanced version incorporating paired analysis, using rank correlation to a clinical variable (MS functional composite) as the primary outcome measure. The comparison is done at nine different levels of intensity as a previous study suggests that darker black holes may yield stronger correlations. The results demonstrate that paired analysis can strongly improve longitudinal correlation (from -0.148 to -0.303 in this sample) and may produce segmentations that are more sensitive to clinically relevant changes.

  2. Study of quantum spin correlations of relativistic electron pairs - Testing nonlocality of relativistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, K.; Caban, P.; Ciborowski, J.; Enders, J.; Köhler, A.; Kozela, A.; Rembieliński, J.; Rozpedzik, D.; Włodarczyk, M.; Zejma, J.

    2013-11-01

    The Polish-German project QUEST aims at studying relativistic quantum spin correlations of the Einstein-Rosen-Podolsky-Bohm type, through measurement of the correlation function and the corresponding probabilities for relativistic electron pairs. The results will be compared to theoretical predictions obtained by us within the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics, based on assumptions regarding the form of the relativistic spin operator. Agreement or divergence will be interpreted in the context of non-uniqueness of the relativistic spin operator in quantum mechanics as well as dependence of the correlation function on the choice of observables representing the spin. Pairs of correlated electrons will originate from the Mo/ller scattering of polarized 15 MeV electrons provided by the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC, TU Darmstadt, incident on a Be target. Spin projections will be determined using the Mott polarimetry technique. Measurements (starting 2013) are planned for longitudinal and transverse beam polarizations and different orientations of the beam polarization vector w.r.t. the Mo/ller scattering plane. This is the first project to study relativistic spin correlations for particles with mass.

  3. Effect of speckle on lidar pulse-pair ratio statistics.

    PubMed

    Mackerrow, E P; Schmitt, M J; Thompson, D C

    1997-11-20

    The ratio of temporally adjacent lidar pulse returns is commonly used in differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to reduce correlated noise. These pulses typically are generated at different wavelengths with the assumption that the dominant noise is common to both. This is not the case when the mean number of laser speckle integrated per pulse by the lidar receiver is small (namely, less than 10 speckles at each wavelength). In this case a large increase in the standard deviation of the ratio data results. We demonstrate this effect both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical value for the expected standard deviation of the pulse-pair ratio data compares well with the measured values that used a dual CO(2) laser-based lidar with a hard target. Pulse averaging statistics of the pulse-pair data obey the expected varsigma(1)/ radicalN reduction in the standard deviation, varsigma(N), for N-pulse averages. We consider the ratio before average, average before ratio, and log of the ratio before average methods for noise reduction in the lidar equation. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of dual-laser versus single-laser lidar configurations.

  4. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    PubMed

    van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H2, and eliminates delocalization errors in H2(+) and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies--competitive with the ph-RPA--with the correct R(-6) asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  5. EPPUR SI MUOVE: POSITIONAL AND KINEMATIC CORRELATIONS OF SATELLITE PAIRS IN THE LOW Z UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Famaey, Benoit; Martin, Nicolas; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Neil G.

    2015-05-20

    We have recently shown that pairs of satellite galaxies located diametrically opposite to each other around their host possess predominantly anti-correlated velocities. This is consistent with a scenario in which ≳50% of satellite galaxies belong to kinematically coherent rotating planar structures. Here we extend this analysis, examining satellites of giant galaxies drawn from an SDSS photometric redshift catalog. We find that there is a ∼17% overabundance (>3σ significance) of candidate satellites at positions diametrically opposite to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite. We show that ΛCDM cosmological simulations do not possess this property when contamination is included. After subtracting contamination, we find ∼2 times more satellites diametrically opposed to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite than at 90° from it, at projected distances ranging from 100 to 150 kpc from the host. This independent analysis thus strongly supports our previous results on anti-correlated velocities. We also find that those satellite pairs with anti-correlated velocities have a strong preference (∼3:1) to align with the major axis of the host whereas those with correlated velocities display the opposite behavior. We finally show that repeating a similar analysis to Ibata et al. with same-side satellites is generally hard to interpret, but is not inconsistent with our previous results when strong quality cuts are applied on the sample. This addresses all of the concerns recently raised by Cautun et al., who did not uncover any flaw in our previous analysis, but may simply have hinted at the physical extent of planar satellite structures by pointing out that the anti-correlation signal weakens at radii >150 kpc. All these unexpected positional and kinematic correlations strongly suggest that a substantial fraction of satellite galaxies are causally linked in their formation and evolution.

  6. Bosonic pair creation and the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Q. Z.; Bauke, Heiko; Su, Q.; Keitel, C. H.; Grobe, R.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between different bound states in bosonic systems can lead to pair creation. We study this process in detail by solving the Klein-Gordon equation on space-time grids in the framework of time-dependent quantum field theory. By choosing specific external field configurations, two bound states can become pseudodegenerate, which is commonly referred to as the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect. These pseudodegenerate bound states, which have complex energy eigenvalues, are related to the pseudo-Hermiticity of the Klein-Gordon Hamiltonian. In this work, the influence of the Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect on pair production is studied. A generalized Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect, where several pairs of pseudodegenerate states appear, is found in combined electric and magnetic fields. The generalized Schiff-Snyder-Weinberg effect likewise triggers pair creation. The particle number in these situations obeys an exponential growth law in time enhancing the creation of bosons, which cannot be found in fermionic systems.

  7. Pollution detection by digital correlation of multispectral, stero-image pairs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, F. R.; Betz, H. T.; Lysobey, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Remote detection of air pollution circulation patterns is proposed to eventually predict the accumulation of hazardous surface concentrations in time for preventive emission control operations. Earth observations from space platforms will contain information on the height, mean velocity and lateral mixing scales of inversion layers and pollution plumes. Although this information is often not visible on photographs, it could conceivably be retrieved through a digital cross-correlation of multispectral stereo image pairs. Laboratory and field test results are used to illustrate the detection of non-visual inversion layers, the reduction of dominant signal interference, and the spectroscopic identification of combustion products.

  8. Contact pair correlation functions of binary mixtures of additive hard spheres from the virial expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    2003-08-01

    Density expansions of the contact pair correlation functions for binary mixtures of additive hard spheres are obtained from the virial expansion of the equation of state. The procedure is based on the use consistency conditions. The resulting expansions are exact up to first order in the density. This corresponds to the third virial coefficient which is exactly known for these mixtures. Analytical expressions for the second and third order terms are obtained on the basis of very accurate approximate analytical expressions for the fourth and fifth virial coefficients. It is found that the series converge slowly, but the convergency can be accelerated by means of a resummation procedure.

  9. Contact pair correlation functions and equation of state for additive hard disk fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    2001-10-01

    The contact pair correlation functions and the equation of state for a binary mixture of additive hard disks is obtained using a procedure similar to that leading to the Boublı´k-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state for mixtures of additive hard spheres. The results from the derived equations are tested against new Monte Carlo data obtained for several diameter ratios and mole fractions. The overall agreement is excellent. The equation of state reproduces exactly the second virial coefficient of the mixture and the third with great accuracy. Predicted values of the fourth and fifth virial coefficients are also in very good agreement with numerical data.

  10. Computing the correlation and other things directly from the raw pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A

    2007-08-16

    We want a faster and more robust way to compute the correlation, expanded in Spherical (or Cartesian) Harmonics. We also want to include the cross-{ell},m data covariance that are there, but currently ignored. We don't want to get bogged down in fancy binning in x-y-z or r-{theta}-{phi}, just r. Want to just look at C{sub {ell}m} to decide how many terms to keep--or better yet the pair distributions directly.

  11. Hyperdynamics for entropic systems: time-space compression and pair correlation function approximation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Jiang, Yi; Kremer, Kurt; Ziock, Hans; Rasmussen, Steen

    2006-09-01

    We develop a generalized hyperdynamics method that is able to simulate slow dynamics in atomistic general (both energy- and entropy-dominated) systems. We show that a few functionals of the pair correlation function, involving two-body entropy, form a low-dimensional collective space, which is a good approximation that is able to distinguish stable and transitional conformations. A bias potential, which raises the energy in stable regions, is constructed on the fly. We examine the slow nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones gas and show that our method can generate correct long-time dynamics without prior knowledge.

  12. The role of multiparticle correlations and Cooper pairing in the formation of molecules in an ultracold gas of Fermi atoms with a negative scattering length

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, V. S. Kagan, Yu.

    2012-11-15

    The influence of multiparticle correlation effects and Cooper pairing in an ultracold Fermi gas with a negative scattering length on the formation rate of molecules is investigated. Cooper pairing is shown to cause the formation rate of molecules to increase, as distinct from the influence of Bose-Einstein condensation in a Bose gas on this rate. This trend is retained in the entire range of temperatures below the critical one.

  13. The Correlated Dynamics of a Pair of Tethered Microcantilevers in a Viscous Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Brian; Radiom, Milad; Walz, John; Ducker, William; Paul, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of biomolecules or polymers in a fluid environment is an important challenge. One approach is to tether a molecule between the ends of two Brownian driven microcantilevers and to measure the change in their correlated dynamics. However, the cantilever dynamics is also correlated due to the motion of the intervening viscous fluid. An important question is whether the correlations due to a tethered molecule can be measured in the presence of the fluid coupling for configurations accessible to experiment. We present experimental measurements of the correlated motion of two microcantilevers in water without a tethered molecule. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem with deterministic finite-element simulations we compute the correlated dynamics for laboratory conditions. Our numerical results show very good agreement with experimental measurement. We next include a linear spring between the cantilever tips to model a tethered molecule and quantify the dynamics of the cantilever pair for a wide range of conditions. Our results provide physical insights into the signature of a tethered molecule and quantify the force, time, and length scales that are accessible to current technologies. NSF Award CBET-0959228.

  14. Effect of base pairing on the electrochemical oxidation of guanine.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Hajj, Viviane; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel; Tard, Cédric

    2010-07-28

    The effect of base pairing by cytosine on the electrochemical oxidation of guanine is examined by means of cyclic voltammetry on carefully purified reactants in a solvent, CHCl(3), which strongly favors the formation of an H-bonded pair. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the oxidation reaction are not strongly influenced by the formation of the pair. They are actually similar to those of the reaction in which 2,6-lutidine, an encumbered base that cannot form a pair with guanine, replaces cytosine. The reaction does not entail a concerted proton-electron mechanism, as attested by the absence of H/D isotope effect. It rather involves the rate-determining formation of the cation radical, followed by its deprotonation and dimerization of the resulting neutral radical in competition with its further oxidation.

  15. Quantifying the dynamics of the oligomeric transcription factor STAT3 by pair correlation of molecular brightness

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Pandžić, Elvis; Yang, Zhengmin; Ng, Ivan H. W.; Jans, David A.; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Gratton, Enrico; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of transcription factors controls their translocation into the nucleus and DNA-binding activity. Here we present a fluorescence microscopy analysis termed pCOMB (pair correlation of molecular brightness) that tracks the mobility of different oligomeric species within live cell nuclear architecture. pCOMB amplifies the signal from the brightest species present and filters the dynamics of the extracted oligomeric population based on arrival time between two locations. We use this method to demonstrate a dependence of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mobility on oligomeric state. We find that on entering the nucleus STAT3 dimers must first bind DNA to form STAT3 tetramers, which are also DNA-bound but exhibit a different mobility signature. Examining the dimer-to-tetramer transition by a cross-pair correlation analysis (cpCOMB) reveals that chromatin accessibility modulates STAT3 tetramer formation. Thus, the pCOMB approach is suitable for mapping the impact oligomerization on transcription factor dynamics. PMID:27009358

  16. Chromatographic and computational assessment of lipophilicity using sum of ranking differences and generalized pair-correlation.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Héberger, Károly

    2015-02-01

    Lipophilicity (logP) represents one of the most studied and most frequently used fundamental physicochemical properties. At present there are several possibilities for its quantitative expression and many of them stems from chromatographic experiments. Numerous attempts have been made to compare different computational methods, chromatographic methods vs. computational approaches, as well as chromatographic methods and direct shake-flask procedure without definite results or these findings are not accepted generally. In the present work numerous chromatographically derived lipophilicity measures in combination with diverse computational methods were ranked and clustered using the novel variable discrimination and ranking approaches based on the sum of ranking differences and the generalized pair correlation method. Available literature logP data measured on HILIC, and classical reversed-phase combining different classes of compounds have been compared with most frequently used multivariate data analysis techniques (principal component and hierarchical cluster analysis) as well as with the conclusions in the original sources. Chromatographic lipophilicity measures obtained under typical reversed-phase conditions outperform the majority of computationally estimated logPs. Oppositely, in the case of HILIC none of the many proposed chromatographic indices overcomes any of the computationally assessed logPs. Only two of them (logkmin and kmin) may be selected as recommended chromatographic lipophilicity measures. Both ranking approaches, sum of ranking differences and generalized pair correlation method, although based on different backgrounds, provides highly similar variable ordering and grouping leading to the same conclusions.

  17. Using the GVB Ansatz to develop ensemble DFT method for describing multiple strongly correlated electron pairs.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Martínez, Todd J; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-08-21

    Ensemble density functional theory (DFT) furnishes a rigorous theoretical framework for describing the non-dynamic electron correlation arising from (near) degeneracy of several electronic configurations. Ensemble DFT naturally leads to fractional occupation numbers (FONs) for several Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals, which thereby become variational parameters of the methodology. The currently available implementation of ensemble DFT in the form of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method was originally designed for systems with only two fractionally occupied KS orbitals, which was sufficient to accurately describe dissociation of a single chemical bond or the singlet ground state of biradicaloid species. To extend applicability of the method to systems with several dissociating bonds or to polyradical species, more fractionally occupied orbitals must be included in the ensemble description. Here we investigate a possibility of developing the extended REKS methodology with the help of the generalized valence bond (GVB) wavefunction theory. The use of GVB enables one to derive a simple and physically transparent energy expression depending explicitly on the FONs of several KS orbitals. In this way, a version of the REKS method with four electrons in four fractionally occupied orbitals is derived and its accuracy in the calculation of various types of strongly correlated molecules is investigated. We propose a possible scheme to ameliorate the partial size-inconsistency that results from perfect spin-pairing. We conjecture that perfect pairing natural orbital (NO) functionals of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT) should also display partial size-inconsistency. PMID:26947515

  18. Pair-correlation properties and momentum distribution of finite number of interacting trapped bosons in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Anindya; Das, Tapan Kumar; Chakrabarti, Barnali

    2010-09-14

    We study the ground state pair-correlation properties of a weakly interacting trapped Bose gas in three dimensions by using a correlated many-body method. The use of the van der Waals interaction potential and an external trapping potential shows realistic features. We also test the validity of shape-independent approximation in the calculation of correlation properties.

  19. Coulomb enhancement of superconducting pair-pair correlations in a 3/4 -filled model for κ -(BEDT-TTF)2X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, W. Wasanthi; Gomes, N.; Mazumdar, S.; Clay, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of precise correlated-electron calculations on the monomer lattices of the organic charge-transfer solids κ -(BEDT-TTF) 2X for 32 and 64 molecular sites. Our calculations are for band parameters corresponding to X =Cu[N (CN) 2]Cl and Cu2(CN) 3, which are semiconducting antiferromagnetic and quantum spin liquid, respectively, at ambient pressure. We have performed our calculations for variable electron densities ρ per BEDT-TTF molecule, with ρ ranging from 1 to 2. We find that d -wave superconducting pair-pair correlations are enhanced by electron-electron interactions only for a narrow carrier concentration about ρ =1.5 , which is precisely the carrier concentration where superconductivity in the charge-transfer solids occurs. Our results indicate that the enhancement in pair-pair correlations is not related to antiferromagnetic order, but to a proximate hidden spin-singlet state that manifests itself as a charge-ordered state in other charge-transfer solids. Long-range superconducting order does not appear to be present in the purely electronic model, suggesting that electron-phonon interactions also must play a role in a complete theory of superconductivity.

  20. Plasmon switching effect based on graphene nanoribbon pair arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Wu, Lingxi; Liu, Qiong; Zhou, Renlong; Xie, Suxia; Chen, Jiangjiamin; Wu, Mengxiong; Zeng, Lisan

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the existence of plasmon switching effect in graphene nanostructure. By using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the plasmon resonance modes are studied in graphene nanoribbon pair arrays with the change of Fermi level, graphene width, and carrier mobility. It is found that the Fermi level and graphene width play an important role in changing the distribution of electric energy on different graphene nanoribbons, resulting in a significant plasmon switching effect. Moreover, we study the characteristic of resonance mode of one graphene ribbon by using glass rod with different shape. The effect of kerr material sandwiched between graphene nanoribbon pair is also considered.

  1. Evaluation of the pair-culture effect in Ophryotrocha puerilis (Polychaeta: Dorvilleidae). I. Pair-culture effect and sex ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, B.; Pfannenstiel, H.-D.

    1983-06-01

    Pairs and larger groups of female Ophryotrocha puerilis puerilis were formed from formerly isolated specimens. Neither the diameter of the oocytes present in the coelomic fluid nor the number of setigerous segments (ss) of the partners of a newly formed pair allow us to predict which one of the two animals will exhibit sex reversal. Amputation of the palps showed that these ventrolateral appendages of the prostomium are not responsible for the transmission of the mutual influence which is exerted during the pair-culture effect. Isolated females do not produce egg masses but keep their oocytes in the body cavity until they are eventually resorbed. The shedding of oocytes in one of the females of a newly formed pair was formerly considered to be the first step in the pair-culture effect. The present results demonstrate that egg laying in these cases is unspecific and due rather to the end of isolation than to specific interactions with the partner. In groups consisting of up to 50 animals the sex ratio oscillates around 1:1. The presence of primary males does not influence the sex ratio of adult specimens, although these males are capable of fertilizing egg masses produced by adult females. As a result, a high percentage of both young and old males are found in densely populated bowls. The significance of the pair-culture effect in natural populations is discussed in the light of these findings.

  2. TREPR spectra of micelle-confined spin correlated radical pairs: II. Spectral decomposition and asymmetric line shapes.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Valery F; Jarocha, Lauren E; Forbes, Malcolm D E

    2014-02-01

    In the second paper, spectral decomposition is used to explain the origin of the asymmetry of the anti-phase structure (APS) and its temperature dependence in dynamic spin correlated radical pairs (SCRPs) created via the photoreduction of benzophenone (BP) in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. It is shown that the main parameters defining the spectral shape of the TREPR spectra are the effectiveness of the electron spin exchange in contact pairs, and the ratio of the frequency of enforced encounters (Z) to the frequency of singlet-triplet mixing (q) in the separated radical pairs. The Z/q ratio is particularly important for the creation of the APS asymmetry. The existence of different q values in the same TREPR spectrum in this system affords the observation of SCRPs in both regimes: exchange broadening (large |q|/Z) and exchange narrowing (small |q|/Z). An important observation, supported by the successful simulation of the TREPR spectra, is that the S-component of the APS can be shifted in a direction opposite to that predicted by the earlier Closs-Forbes-Norris (CFN) model. This result is naturally explained in terms of a spectral exchange approach. Dispersion-like components in the spectra further amplify the asymmetry of the APS.

  3. Pair correlation functions of two- and three-dimensional hard-core fluids confined into narrow pores: exact results from transfer-matrix method.

    PubMed

    Gurin, Péter; Varga, Szabolcs

    2013-12-28

    The effect of confinement is studied on the local structure of two- and three-dimensional hard-core fluids. The hard disks are confined between two parallel lines, while the hard spheres are in a cylindrical hard pore. In both cases only nearest neighbour interactions are allowed between the particles. The vertical and longitudinal pair correlation functions are determined by means of the exact transfer-matrix method. The vertical pair correlation function indicates that the wall induced packing constraint gives rise to a zigzag (up-down sequence) shaped close packing structure in both two- and three-dimensional systems. The longitudinal pair correlation function shows that both systems transform continuously from a one-dimensional gas-like behaviour to a zigzag solid-like structure with increasing density.

  4. Adaptive memory: animacy effects persist in paired-associate learning.

    PubMed

    VanArsdall, Joshua E; Nairne, James S; Pandeirada, Josefa N S; Cogdill, Mindi

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that animate stimuli are remembered better than matched inanimate stimuli. Two experiments tested whether this animacy effect persists in paired-associate learning of foreign words. Experiment 1 randomly paired Swahili words with matched animate and inanimate English words. Participants were told simply to learn the English "translations" for a later test. Replicating earlier findings using free recall, a strong animacy advantage was found in this cued-recall task. Concerned that the effect might be due to enhanced accessibility of the individual responses (e.g., animates represent a more accessible category), Experiment 2 selected animate and inanimate English words from two more constrained categories (four-legged animals and furniture). Once again, an advantage was found for pairs using animate targets. These results argue against organisational accounts of the animacy effect and potentially have implications for foreign language vocabulary learning. PMID:24813366

  5. Adaptive memory: animacy effects persist in paired-associate learning.

    PubMed

    VanArsdall, Joshua E; Nairne, James S; Pandeirada, Josefa N S; Cogdill, Mindi

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that animate stimuli are remembered better than matched inanimate stimuli. Two experiments tested whether this animacy effect persists in paired-associate learning of foreign words. Experiment 1 randomly paired Swahili words with matched animate and inanimate English words. Participants were told simply to learn the English "translations" for a later test. Replicating earlier findings using free recall, a strong animacy advantage was found in this cued-recall task. Concerned that the effect might be due to enhanced accessibility of the individual responses (e.g., animates represent a more accessible category), Experiment 2 selected animate and inanimate English words from two more constrained categories (four-legged animals and furniture). Once again, an advantage was found for pairs using animate targets. These results argue against organisational accounts of the animacy effect and potentially have implications for foreign language vocabulary learning.

  6. Heralding efficiency and correlated-mode coupling of near-IR fiber-coupled photon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Rosenberg, Danna; Stelmakh, Veronika; Grein, Matthew E.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Dauler, Eric A.; Kerman, Andrew J.; Molnar, Richard J.; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2014-10-06

    We report on a systematic experimental study of heralding efficiency and generation rate of telecom-band infrared photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and coupled to single mode optical fibers. We define the correlated-mode coupling efficiency--an inherent source efficiency--and explain its relation to heralding efficiency. For our experiment, we developed a reconfigurable computer controlled pump-beam and collection-mode optical apparatus which we used to measure the generation rate and correlated-mode coupling efficiency. The use of low-noise, high-efficiency superconducting-nanowire single-photon-detectors in this setup allowed us to explore focus configurations with low overall photon flux. The measured data agree well with theory and we demonstrated a correlated-mode coupling efficiency of 97%±2%, which is the highest efficiency yet achieved for this type of system. These results confirm theoretical treatments and demonstrate that very high overall heralding efficiencies can, in principle, be achieved in quantum optical systems. We expect that these results and techniques will be widely incorporated into future systems that require, or benefit from, a high heralding efficiency.

  7. Heralding efficiency and correlated-mode coupling of near-IR fiber-coupled photon pairs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dixon, P. Ben; Rosenberg, Danna; Stelmakh, Veronika; Grein, Matthew E.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Dauler, Eric A.; Kerman, Andrew J.; Molnar, Richard J.; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2014-10-06

    We report on a systematic experimental study of heralding efficiency and generation rate of telecom-band infrared photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and coupled to single mode optical fibers. We define the correlated-mode coupling efficiency--an inherent source efficiency--and explain its relation to heralding efficiency. For our experiment, we developed a reconfigurable computer controlled pump-beam and collection-mode optical apparatus which we used to measure the generation rate and correlated-mode coupling efficiency. The use of low-noise, high-efficiency superconducting-nanowire single-photon-detectors in this setup allowed us to explore focus configurations with low overall photon flux. The measured data agree well with theory andmore » we demonstrated a correlated-mode coupling efficiency of 97%±2%, which is the highest efficiency yet achieved for this type of system. These results confirm theoretical treatments and demonstrate that very high overall heralding efficiencies can, in principle, be achieved in quantum optical systems. We expect that these results and techniques will be widely incorporated into future systems that require, or benefit from, a high heralding efficiency.« less

  8. Theoretical Analysis of Spectral Correlations Between Photon Pairs Generated in Nanoscale Silicon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liang-Liang; Xu, Ping; Xu, Jian-Ning; He, Guang-Qiang; Zhu, Shi-Ning

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous four wave mixing in nonlinear waveguide is one of the excellent technique for generating photon pairs in well-defined guided modes. Here we present a comprehensive study of the frequency characteristic of correlated photon pairs generated in telecom C-band from a dispersion-engineered silicon wire waveguide. We have demonstrated that the waveguide configuration, shape of pump pulse, two-photon absorption as well as linear losses have significant influences on the biphoton spectral characteristics and the amount of frequency entanglement generated. The superior performance as well as the structural compactness and CMOS compatibility makes the silicon wire waveguide an ideal integrated platform for the implementation of on-chip quantum technologies. Supported by the State Key Program for Basic Research of China under Grant No. 2012CB921802, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 91321312, 91121001, 11321063, 11174121, and 61475099, and the Project Funded by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET), and a Foundation for the Author of National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation of People's Republic of China (FANEDD)

  9. Establishing conservation laws in pair-correlated many-body theories: T-matrix approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan; Levin, K.

    2014-01-01

    We address conservation laws associated with current, momentum, and energy and show how they can be satisfied within many body theories which focus on pair correlations. Of interest are two well known T-matrix theories which represent many body theories which incorporate pairing in the normal state. The first of these is associated with the Nozieres Schmitt-Rink theory, while the second involves the T matrix of a BCS-Leggett-like state as identified by Kadanoff and Martin. T-matrix theories begin with an ansatz for the single particle self energy and are to be distinguished from Φ-derivable theories which introduce an ansatz for a particular contribution to the thermodynamical potential. Conservation laws are equivalent to Ward identities which we address in some detail here. Although Φ-derivable theories are often referred to as "conserving theories," a consequence of this work is the demonstration that these two T-matrix approaches similarly can be made to obey all conservation laws. When simplifying approximations are made in Φ-derivable or other theories, one has to take care that the end results are not incompatible with conservation.

  10. Back-to-back correlations of boson-antiboson pairs for anisotropic expanding sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-09-01

    In the hot and dense hadronic sources formed in high energy heavy-ion collisions, the particle interactions in medium might lead to a measurable back-to-back correlation (BBC) of boson-antiboson pairs. We calculate the BBC functions of ϕϕ and K+K- for anisotropic expanding sources. The dependences of the BBC on the particle momentum and source expanding velocity are investigated. The results indicate that the BBC functions increase with the magnitude of particle momentum and exhibit an obvious dependence on the direction of the momentum for the anisotropic sources. As the source expanding velocity decreases, the BBC function decreases when the particle momentum is approximately perpendicular to the source velocity, and the BBC function increases when the particle momentum is approximately parallel to the source velocity.

  11. Magnetic correlations and pairing in the 1/5-depleted square lattice Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ehsan; Singh, Rajiv R P; Pickett, Warren E; Scalettar, Richard T

    2014-09-01

    We study the single-orbital Hubbard model on the 1/5-depleted square-lattice geometry, which arises in such diverse systems as the spin-gap magnetic insulator CaV4O9 and ordered-vacancy iron selenides, presenting new issues regarding the origin of both magnetic ordering and superconductivity in these materials. We find a rich phase diagram that includes a plaquette singlet phase, a dimer singlet phase, a Néel and a block-spin antiferromagnetic phase, and stripe phases. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations show that the dominant pairing correlations at half filling change character from d wave in the plaquette phase to extended s wave upon transition to the Néel phase. These findings have intriguing connections to iron-based superconductors, and suggest that some physics of multiorbital systems can be captured by a single-orbital model at different dopings. PMID:25238374

  12. Probing the Spatial Organization of Molecular Complexes Using Triple-Pair-Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yandong; Rothenberg, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy coupled with multiplexing techniques can resolve specific spatial arrangements of different components within molecular complexes. However, reliable quantification and analysis of such specific organization is extremely problematic because it is frequently obstructed by random co-localization incidents between crowded molecular species and the intrinsic heterogeneity of molecular complexes. To address this, we present a Triple-Pair-Correlation (TPC) analysis approach for unbiased interpretation of the spatial organization of molecular assemblies in crowded three-color super-resolution (SR) images. We validate this approach using simulated data, as well as SR images of DNA replication foci in human cells. This demonstrates the applicability of TPC in deciphering the specific spatial organization of molecular complexes hidden in dense multi-color super-resolution images. PMID:27545293

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) Datasets Using Pair-correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Pointillistic approach based super-resolution techniques, such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), involve multiple cycles of sequential activation, imaging and precise localization of single fluorescent molecules. A super-resolution image, having nanoscopic structural information, is then constructed by compiling all the image sequences. Because the final image resolution is determined by the localization precision of detected single molecules and their density, accurate image reconstruction requires imaging of biological structures labeled with fluorescent molecules at high density. In such image datasets, stochastic variations in photon emission and intervening dark states lead to uncertainties in identification of single molecules. This, in turn, prevents the proper utilization of the wealth of information on molecular distribution and quantity. A recent strategy for overcoming this problem is pair-correlation analysis applied to PALM. Using rigorous statistical algorithms to estimate the number of detected proteins, this approach allows the spatial organization of molecules to be quantitatively described. PMID:22447653

  14. Pair correlation function decay in models of simple fluids that contain dispersion interactions.

    PubMed

    Evans, R; Henderson, J R

    2009-11-25

    We investigate the intermediate-and longest-range decay of the total pair correlation function h(r) in model fluids where the inter-particle potential decays as -r(-6), as is appropriate to real fluids in which dispersion forces govern the attraction between particles. It is well-known that such interactions give rise to a term in q(3) in the expansion of [Formula: see text], the Fourier transform of the direct correlation function. Here we show that the presence of the r(-6) tail changes significantly the analytic structure of [Formula: see text] from that found in models where the inter-particle potential is short ranged. In particular the pure imaginary pole at q = iα(0), which generates monotonic-exponential decay of rh(r) in the short-ranged case, is replaced by a complex (pseudo-exponential) pole at q = iα(0)+α(1) whose real part α(1) is negative and generally very small in magnitude. Near the critical point α(1)∼-α(0)(2) and we show how classical Ornstein-Zernike behaviour of the pair correlation function is recovered on approaching the mean-field critical point. Explicit calculations, based on the random phase approximation, enable us to demonstrate the accuracy of asymptotic formulae for h(r) in all regions of the phase diagram and to determine a pseudo-Fisher-Widom (pFW) line. On the high density side of this line, intermediate-range decay of rh(r) is exponentially damped-oscillatory and the ultimate long-range decay is power-law, proportional to r(-6), whereas on the low density side this damped-oscillatory decay is sub-dominant to both monotonic-exponential and power-law decay. Earlier analyses did not identify the pseudo-exponential pole and therefore the existence of the pFW line. Our results enable us to write down the generic wetting potential for a 'real' fluid exhibiting both short-ranged and dispersion interactions. The monotonic-exponential decay of correlations associated with the pseudo-exponential pole introduces additional terms into

  15. Decoding the pair correlations and properties of equilibrium microscopic cluster phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Jonathan; Jadrich, Ryan; Truskett, Thomas

    Due to competing interactions acting between particles, dispersed colloidal suspensions can reversibly transition to phases comprising aggregate clusters. Cluster phases have been reported for both 'model' colloidal particles and complex monomers (e.g., proteins); however, many questions remain regarding how to detect and characterize cluster phases given only pair structural correlations (the information most accessible across diverse systems) and how to relate clustering susceptibility and behavior to underlying monomer-monomer interactions. Using molecular simulations and liquid-state theory across a wide survey of conditions, we decode the widely-observed intermediate range order pre-peak in the structure factor by: (1) validating a physically-intuitive rule for detecting clustering based on the pre-peak thermal correlation length; and (2) relating pre-peak position to cluster size and bulk monomer density. We further demonstrate how clustering transitions and resultant properties relate to monomer interactions along coordinates tunable in experiments. These trends are suitable for comparing against clustering systems that can be directly visualized (via, e.g., confocal microscopy), which should aid in assessing the realism of commonly-adopted monomer interaction potentials.

  16. Dynamic Paired-Behaviors in Effective Clinical Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Philip D.; Velasquez, Benito

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pedagogical strategies related to clinical instruction are needed to improve students' education in the clinical setting. Description: In this article, we use the relevant literature to identify and define "effective" clinical instructor behaviors in athletic training. In addition, we propose a pairing of behaviors as a cueing strategy…

  17. Towards pair production near threshold with unstable particle effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Kauer, N.; Signer, A.; Zanderighi, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate the use of effective theory techniques to describe processes involving unstable particles close to resonance. First, we present the main ideas in the context of a scalar resonance in an Abelian gauge-Yukawa model. We then outline the necessary modifications to describe W-pair production close to threshold in electron-positron collisions.

  18. Students' Perceptions of Dynamics Concept Pairs and Correlation with Their Problem-Solving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    A concept pair is a pair of concepts that are fundamentally different but closely related. To develop a solid conceptual understanding in dynamics (a foundational engineering science course) and physics, students must understand the fundamental difference and relationship between two concepts that are included in each concept pair. However, all…

  19. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    SciTech Connect

    L.B. Weinstein, E. Piasetzky, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

    2011-02-01

    This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate xB, 0.35≤xB≤0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at xB≥1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F2n/F2p, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  20. De-correlated combination of two low-low Satellite-to-Satellite tracking pairs according to temporal aliasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murböck, Michael; Pail, Roland

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of the temporal changes in the Earth's gravity field is of great scientific and societal importance. Within several days a homogeneous global coverage of gravity observations can be obtained with satellite missions. Temporal aliasing of background model errors into global gravity field models will be one of the largest restrictions in future satellite temporal gravity recovery. The largest errors are due to high-frequent tidal and non-tidal atmospheric and oceanic mass variations. Having a double pair low-low Satellite-to-Satellite tracking (SST) scenario on different inclined orbits reduces temporal aliasing errors significantly. In general temporal aliasing effects for a single (-pair) mission strongly depend on the basic orbital rates (Murböck et al. 2013). These are the rates of the argument of the latitude and of the longitude of the ascending node. This means that the revolution time and the length of one nodal day determine how large the temporal aliasing error effects are for each SH order. The combination of two low-low SST missions based on normal equations requires an adequate weighting of the two components. This weighting shall ensure the full de-correlation of each of the two parts. Therefore it is necessary to take the temporal aliasing errors into account. In this study it is analyzed how this can be done based on the resonance orders of the two orbits. Different levels of approximation are applied to the de-correlation approach. The results of several numerical closed-loop simulations are shown including stochastic modeling of realistic future instrument noise. It is shown that this de-correlation approach is important for maximizing the benefit of a double-pair low-low SST mission for temporal gravity recovery. Murböck M, Pail R, Daras I and Gruber T (2013) Optimal orbits for temporal gravity recovery regarding temporal aliasing. Journal of Geodesy, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, ISSN 0949-7714, DOI 10.1007/s00190-013-0671-y

  1. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing

    PubMed Central

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C.; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs. PMID:27032688

  2. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing.

    PubMed

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs. PMID:27032688

  3. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C.; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs.

  4. Investigation of the bistability in J aggregates upon resonant optical excitation with inclusion of pair correlations between molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, L. A.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2016-09-01

    A theory of resonant interaction with radiation of J aggregates based on chains of two-level molecules coupled by the retarded dipole‒dipole interaction has been developed. The effect of pair correlations between the chain molecules on the bistable response of this system under the influence of external resonant radiation has been investigated within the homogeneous chain model. Traditionally, these systems have been described using single-particle density matrices corresponding to each molecule. In this description, twoparticle interactions are represented in the factorized form and do not include correlations between the interacting molecules. In this study, the correlation corrections have been estimated taking into account the influence of only the nearest neighbors, while their values have found to be of the same order of magnitude as the factorized two-particle expectation values for which these corrections have been calculated. As a result, the dipole‒dipole interaction of a particular molecule with the nearest neighbors is so strong that the description of this interaction in the factorized form becomes inappropriate and can be used only for a qualitative analysis of the response of the chain. In order to obtain correct quantitative characteristics, it is necessary to abandon the factorization of the two-particle expectation values, at least for nearest neighbors.

  5. Pair correlation function of short-ranged square-well fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largo, J.; Solana, J. R.; Yuste, S. B.; Santos, A.

    2005-02-01

    We have performed extensive Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical (NVT) ensemble of the pair correlation function for square-well fluids with well widths λ -1 ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, in units of the diameter σ of the particles. For each one of these widths, several densities ρ and temperatures T in the ranges 0.1⩽ρσ3⩽0.8 and Tc(λ)≲T≲3Tc(λ), where Tc(λ) is the critical temperature, have been considered. The simulation data are used to examine the performance of two analytical theories in predicting the structure of these fluids: the perturbation theory proposed by Tang and Lu [Y. Tang and B. C.-Y. Lu, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 3079 (1994); 100, 6665 (1994)] and the nonperturbative model proposed by two of us [S. B. Yuste and A. Santos, J. Chem. Phys. 101 2355 (1994)]. It is observed that both theories complement each other, as the latter theory works well for short ranges and/or moderate densities, while the former theory works for long ranges and high densities.

  6. Measurement of transparency ratios for protons from short-range correlated pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, O.; Hakobyan, Hayk; Shneor, Ran; Piasetzky, Eliazer Israel; Weinstein, Lawrence B.

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear transparency, T{sub p}(A), is a measure of the average probability for a struck proton to escape the nucleus without significant re-interaction. Previously, nuclear transparencies were extructed for quasi-elastic A(e,e'p) knockout of protons with momentum below the Fermi momentum, where the spectral functions are well known. In this paper we extract a novel observable, the transparency ratio, T{sub p}(A)/T{sub p}({sup 12}C), for knockout of high-missing-momentum protons from the breakup of short range correlated pairs (2N-SRC) in Al, Fe and Pb nuclei relative to C. The ratios were measured at momentum transfer Q^2 > 1.5 (GeV/c)^2 and x_B > 1.2 where the reaction is expected to be dominated by electron scattering from 2N-SRC. The transparency ratios of the knocked-out protons coming from 2N-SRC breakup are 20 - 30% lower than those of previous results for low missing momentum. They agree with Glauber calculations and agree with renormalization of the previously published transparencies as proposed by recent theoretical investigations. The new transparencies scale as A^-1/3, which is consistent with dominance of scattering from nucleons at the nuclear surface.

  7. Study of the pair correlations between p-nitroaniline molecules in solution by depolarized hyper-Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. C.; Wong, K. Y.

    2012-05-01

    The concentration dependence of the hyper-Rayleigh scattering depolarization ratios of p-nitroaniline in solution was obtained and the results were compared with theory. It was found that the experimental data can be theoretically accounted for by using a pair distribution function that includes only direct correlation, with the molecules interact through a dipolar hard-sphere potential. The results show that short-range dipole-dipole interactions are responsible for the correlation between pairs of p-nitroaniline molecules in solution.

  8. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  9. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  10. Correlation-Enhanced Odd-Parity Interorbital Singlet Pairing in the Iron-Pnictide Superconductor LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourafkan, R.; Kotliar, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-09-01

    The rich variety of iron-based superconductors and their complex electronic structure lead to a wide range of possibilities for gap symmetry and pairing components. Here we solve in the two-Fe Brillouin zone the full frequency-dependent linearized Eliashberg equations to investigate spin-fluctuations mediated Cooper pairing for LiFeAs. The magnetic excitations are calculated with the random phase approximation on a correlated electronic structure obtained with density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory. The interaction between electrons through Hund's coupling promotes both the intraorbital dx z (y z ) and the interorbital magnetic susceptibility. As a consequence, the leading pairing channel, conventional s+- , acquires sizable interorbital dx y-dx z (y z ) singlet pairing with odd parity under glide-plane symmetry. The combination of intra- and interorbital components makes the results consistent with available experiments on the angular dependence of the gaps observed on the different Fermi surfaces.

  11. Bose-Einstein correlations in hadron-pairs from lepto-production on nuclei ranging from hydrogen to xenon. HERMES Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetisyan, E.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Borissov, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Etzelmüller, E.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garay García, J.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; López Ruiz, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, X.-G.; Ma, B.-Q.; Mahon, D.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Marukyan, H.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrosyan, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Stahl, M.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Taroian, S.; Terkulov, A.; Truty, R.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2015-08-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of like-sign charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic electron and positron scattering are studied in the HERMES experiment using nuclear targets of H, H, He, He, N, Ne, Kr, and Xe. A Gaussian approach is used to parametrize a two-particle correlation function determined from events with at least two charged hadrons of the same sign charge. This correlation function is compared to two different empirical distributions that do not include the Bose-Einstein correlations. One distribution is derived from unlike-sign hadron pairs, and the second is derived from mixing like-sign pairs from different events. The extraction procedure used simulations incorporating the experimental setup in order to correct the results for spectrometer acceptance effects, and was tested using the distribution of unlike-sign hadron pairs. Clear signals of Bose-Einstein correlations for all target nuclei without a significant variation with the nuclear target mass are found. Also, no evidence for a dependence on the invariant mass W of the photon-nucleon system is found when the results are compared to those of previous experiments.

  12. Multilevel Modeling with Correlated Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Frees, Edward W.

    2007-01-01

    When there exist omitted effects, measurement error, and/or simultaneity in multilevel models, explanatory variables may be correlated with random components, and standard estimation methods do not provide consistent estimates of model parameters. This paper introduces estimators that are consistent under such conditions. By employing generalized…

  13. Nuclear effects in Drell-Yan pair production in high-energy p A collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Eduardo; Goncalves, Victor P.; Krelina, Michal; Nemchik, Jan; Pasechnik, Roman

    2016-05-01

    The Drell-Yan (DY) process of dilepton pair production off nuclei is not affected by final state interactions, energy loss, or absorption. A detailed phenomenological study of this process is thus convenient for investigation of the onset of initial-state effects in proton-nucleus (p A ) collisions. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of the DY process in p A interactions at RHIC and LHC energies in the color dipole framework. We analyze several effects affecting the nuclear suppression, Rp A<1 , of dilepton pairs, such as the saturation effects, restrictions imposed by energy conservation (the initial-state effective energy loss), and the gluon shadowing, as a function of the rapidity, the invariant mass of the dileptons, and their transverse momenta pT. In this analysis, we take into account not only the γ* but also the Z0 contribution to the production cross section, thus extending the predictions to large dilepton invariant masses. Besides the nuclear attenuation of produced dileptons at large energies and forward rapidities emerging due to the onset of shadowing effects, we predict a strong suppression at large pT, dilepton invariant masses, and Feynman variable xF caused by the initial-state interaction effects in kinematic regions where no shadowing is expected. The manifestations of nuclear effects are also investigated in terms of the correlation function in the azimuthal angle between the dilepton pair and a forward pion Δ ϕ for different energies, dilepton rapidities, and invariant dilepton masses. We predict that the characteristic double-peak structure of the correlation function around Δ ϕ ≃π arises for very forward pions and large-mass dilepton pairs.

  14. Pair correlations as a signature of entanglement: A bosonic mixture in gauge field ring lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Molina, L.; Reyes, S. A.; Arévalo, E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the pair-superfluid phase and entanglement of a Bose-Bose mixture of ultracold atoms in a ring lattice in the presence of a synthetic gauge field. Special attention is given to a quantum phase transition region of the phase diagram observed in the parameter space that characterizes the intra- and inter- species interactions of the system. In the scenario of large interaction, it is shown that the ground and excited states of the lowest-energy band exhibit features of a pair-superfluid phase. We demonstrate that in the subspace associated with the lowest-energy band there is a maximally entangled eigenstate that is a perfect pair-superfluid. We suggest to use this connection between the bipartite entanglement and the pair-superfluidity as a signature of the presence of entanglement in the eigenstates associated with the lowest-energy band. Moreover, we find strong indications that the interference pattern of the pair-superfluid phase in momentum space can be used as a tool for the characterization of the entanglement in the ground state.

  15. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  16. Nonlocal Intuition: Replication and Paired-subjects Enhancement Effects.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Saeed; Mirzaei, Maryam; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study of repeat entrepreneurs in Tehran, Iran, in which nonlocal intuition was investigated in a replication and extension of experiment using measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Nonlocal intuition is the perception of information about a distant or future event by the body's psychophysiological systems, which is not based on reason or memories of prior experience. This study follows up on the McCraty, Radin, and Bradley studies, which found evidence of nonlocal intuition. We used Radin's experimental protocol, with the addition of HRV measures as in the McCraty studies involving computer administration of a random sequence of calm and emotional pictures as the stimulus, and conducted two experiments on mutually exclusive samples-the first on a group of single participants (N=15) and the second on a group of co-participant pairs (N=30)-to investigate the question of the "amplification" of intuition effects by social connection. Each experiment was conducted over 45 trials while heart rate rhythm activity was recorded continuously. Results, using random permutation analysis, a statistically conservative procedure, show significant pre-stimulus results-that is, for the period before the computer had randomly selected the picture stimulus-for both experiments. Moreover, while significant separation between the emotional and calm HRV curves was observed in the single-participant experiment, an even larger separation was apparent for the experiment on co-participant pairs; the difference between the two groups was also significant. Overall, the results of the single-participant experiment confirm previous finding: that electrophysiological measures, especially changes in the heart rhythm, can detect intuitive foreknowledge. This result is notable because it constitutes cross-cultural corroboration in a non-Western context-namely, Iran. In addition, the results for co-participant pairs offer new evidence on the amplification of

  17. Nonlocal Intuition: Replication and Paired-subjects Enhancement Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of repeat entrepreneurs in Tehran, Iran, in which nonlocal intuition was investigated in a replication and extension of experiment using measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Nonlocal intuition is the perception of information about a distant or future event by the body's psychophysiological systems, which is not based on reason or memories of prior experience. This study follows up on the McCraty, Radin, and Bradley studies, which found evidence of nonlocal intuition. We used Radin's experimental protocol, with the addition of HRV measures as in the McCraty studies involving computer administration of a random sequence of calm and emotional pictures as the stimulus, and conducted two experiments on mutually exclusive samples—the first on a group of single participants (N=15) and the second on a group of co-participant pairs (N=30)—to investigate the question of the “amplification” of intuition effects by social connection. Each experiment was conducted over 45 trials while heart rate rhythm activity was recorded continuously. Results, using random permutation analysis, a statistically conservative procedure, show significant pre-stimulus results—that is, for the period before the computer had randomly selected the picture stimulus—for both experiments. Moreover, while significant separation between the emotional and calm HRV curves was observed in the single-participant experiment, an even larger separation was apparent for the experiment on co-participant pairs; the difference between the two groups was also significant. Overall, the results of the single-participant experiment confirm previous finding: that electrophysiological measures, especially changes in the heart rhythm, can detect intuitive foreknowledge. This result is notable because it constitutes cross-cultural corroboration in a non-Western context—namely, Iran. In addition, the results for co-participant pairs offer new evidence on the

  18. Correlation and Consistency of WISC IQ in Sibling and Nonsibling Pairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockett, David; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Increased frequency and higher magnitude of correlations for siblings and the stability over time of the correlations among the data for siblings underscore the possibility of a genetic basis for the similarity of intellectual functioning among siblings. (Author)

  19. Measurements of Correlated Pair Momentum Distributions in {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}pp)n with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Rustam Niyazov

    2003-05-01

    We have measured the {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}pp)n reaction at 2.2 and 4.4 GeV over a wide kinematic range. The kinetic energy distribution for ''fast'' nucleons (p > 250 MeV/c) peaks where two nucleons each have 20% or less and the third or ''leading'' nucleon carries most of the transferred energy. These fast nucleon pairs (both pp and pn) are back-to-back and carry very little momentum along {rvec q}, indicating that they are spectators. Experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that we have measured NN correlations in {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}pp)n by striking the third nucleon and detecting the spectator correlated pair.

  20. Neural Correlates of Encoding Predict Infants' Memory in the Paired-Comparison Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to monitor infant brain activity during the initial encoding of a previously novel visual stimulus, and examined whether ERP measures of encoding predicted infants' subsequent performance on a visual memory task (i.e., the paired-comparison task). A late slow wave component of the ERP measured…

  1. Effects of ion pairing with calcium and magnesium on selenate availability to higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.R.; Tice, K.R.; Thomason, D.N.

    1997-03-01

    The effects of solution speciation on the bioavailability of trace metals are well documented, but the role of speciation in the bioavailability of oxyanionic trace elements that may form significant ion pairs with Ca and Mg in saline media has not been investigated. The authors assessed the effects of such ion pairing on the availability of selenate to representative monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous higher plants. Formation constants for the CaSO{sub 4}{sup 0} formation was confirmed, but the value of 10{sup 2.7} for CaSeO{sub 4}{sup 0} was found to be in error; a value of 10{sup 2.0} is proposed here as the correct formation constant. Five solution culture experiments were conducted using alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) or tall wheatgrass (Elytrigia pontica [Podp.] Holub) with treatments consisting of NaSeO{sub 4} levels in combination with various levels of MgCl{sub 2} or CaCl{sub 2}. Both shoot Se concentrations and whole-plant Se contents were highly correlated with the free SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} activity but were poorly correlated with the sum of the free ion plus Ca and Mg ion pair species. Thus, the authors have shown, for the first time, that the free ion model of trace metal bioavailability is also valid for oxyanions that form complexes with Ca and Mg in saline media but that this conclusion hinges critically on the accuracy of the pertinent formation constants.

  2. Investigating short-range magnetism in strongly correlated materials via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Benjamin; Page, Katharine; Brunelli, Michela; Staunton, Julie; Billinge, Simon

    Short-range magnetic correlations are known to exist in a variety of strongly correlated electron systems, but our understanding of the role they play is challenged by the difficulty of experimentally probing such correlations. Magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) analysis is a newly developed neutron total scattering method that can reveal short-range magnetic correlations directly in real space, and may therefore help ameliorate this difficulty. We present temperature-dependent mPDF measurements of the short-range magnetic correlations in the paramagnetic phase of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. We observe significant correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range-ordered spin arrangement. With no free parameters, ab initio calculations using the self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory quantitatively reproduce the magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. These results yield valuable insight into the magnetic exchange in MnO and showcase the utility of the mPDF technique for studying magnetic properties of strongly correlated electron systems.

  3. Finite Size Effects on the Real-Space Pair Distribution Function of Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The pair distribution function (PDF) method is a powerful approach for the analysis of the structure of nanoparticles. An important approximation used in nanoparticle PDF simulations is the incorporation of a form factor describing nanoparticle size and shape. The precise effect of the form factor on the PDF is determined by both particle shape and structure if these characteristics are both anisotropic and correlated. The correct incorporation of finite size effects is important for distinguishing and quantifying the structural consequences of small particle size in nanomaterials.

  4. An interpretation of staggering effects by correlation observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Morelli, L.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Raduta, Ad. R.

    2012-07-01

    The reactions 32S+58,64Ni are studied at 14.5 A MeV. Evidence is found for odd-even effects in isotopic observables of the decay of a projectile-like source. The influence of secondary decays on the staggering is studied with a correlation function technique, showing that odd-even effects are due to interplay between pairing effects in the nuclear masses and in the level densities.

  5. Dynamic pair correlations and superadiabatic forces in a dense Brownian liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Thomas; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    We study dynamic two-body correlation functions, i.e., the two-body density, the current-density correlator, or van Hove current, and the current-current correlator in Brownian dynamics computer simulations of a dense Lennard-Jones bulk liquid. The dynamic decay of the correlation shells of the two-body density is examined in detail. Inner correlation shells decay faster than outer correlation shells, whereas outer correlation shells remain stable for increasing times. Within a dynamic test particle picture the mechanism is assumed to be triggered by the dislocation of the self-particle, which releases the confinement of the surrounding correlation shells. We present a division of the van Hove current into an adiabatic and a superadiabatic contribution. The magnitude of the adiabatic van Hove current is found to exceed that of the total van Hove current, which is consistent with dynamic density functional theory overestimating the speed of the dynamics. The direction of the superadiabatic van Hove current opposes that of the total van Hove current. The current-current correlator reveals detailed insight in the collisions of the particles. We find a large static nearest-neighbor peak, which results from colliding particles and different dynamic peaks, that are attributed to consecutive collisions.

  6. Structural correlations in the generation of polaron pairs in low-bandgap polymers for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Raphael; da Como, Enrico; Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Egelhaaf, Hans-Joachim; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Lemaur, Vincent; Beljonne, David; Yilmaz, Seyfullah; Dumsch, Ines; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich

    2012-07-01

    Polymeric semiconductors are materials where unique optical and electronic properties often originate from a tailored chemical structure. This allows for synthesizing conjugated macromolecules with ad hoc functionalities for organic electronics. In photovoltaics, donor-acceptor co-polymers, with moieties of different electron affinity alternating on the chain, have attracted considerable interest. The low bandgap offers optimal light-harvesting characteristics and has inspired work towards record power conversion efficiencies. Here we show for the first time how the chemical structure of donor and acceptor moieties controls the photogeneration of polaron pairs. We show that co-polymers with strong acceptors show large yields of polaron pair formation up to 24% of the initial photoexcitations as compared with a homopolymer (η=8%). π-conjugated spacers, separating the donor and acceptor centre of masses, have the beneficial role of increasing the recombination time. The results provide useful input into the understanding of polaron pair photogeneration in low-bandgap co-polymers for photovoltaics.

  7. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs.

    PubMed

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t(2) domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t(1)) dimension. We employ experimental (23)Na and (27)Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl(2)O(5)), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations. PMID:20202872

  8. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t2 domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t1) dimension. We employ experimental 23Na and 27Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl2O5), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations.

  9. Attention can increase or decrease spike count correlations between pairs of neurons depending on their role in a task

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Douglas A.; Cohen, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention enhances the responses of visual neurons that encode the attended location. Several recent studies showed that attention also decreases correlations between fluctuations in the responses of pairs of neurons (termed spike count correlation or rSC). The previous results are consistent with two hypotheses. Attention–related changes in rate and rSC might be linked (perhaps through a common mechanism), so that attention always decreases rSC. Alternately, attention might either increase or decrease rSC, possibly depending on the role the neurons play in the behavioral task. We recorded simultaneously from dozens of neurons in area V4 while monkeys performed a discrimination task. We found strong evidence in favor of the second hypothesis, showing that attention can flexibly increase or decrease correlations, depending on whether the neurons provide evidence for the same or opposite perceptual decisions. These results place important constraints on models of the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive factors. PMID:25306550

  10. Expansion Effects on Back-to-Back Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Padula, S.S.; Krein, G.; Csoergo, T.; Hama, Y.; Panda, P.K.

    2004-12-02

    The back-to-back correlations (BBC) of particle-antiparticle pairs, signalling in-medium mass modification, are studied in a finite size thermalized medium. The width of BBC function is explicitly evaluated in the case of a nonrelativistic spherically symmetric expanding fireball. The effect of the flow is to reduce the BBC signal as compared to the case of non flow. Nevertheless, a significant signal survives finite-time emission plus expansion effects.

  11. Topological Dirac surface states and superconducting pairing correlations in PbTaSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tay-Rong; Chen, Peng-Jen; Bian, Guang; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zheng, Hao; Neupert, Titus; Sankar, Raman; Xu, Su-Yang; Belopolski, Ilya; Chang, Guoqing; Wang, BaoKai; Chou, Fangcheng; Bansil, Arun; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity in topological band structures is a platform for realizing Majorana bound states and other exotic physical phenomena such as emergent supersymmetry. This potential nourishes the search for topological materials with intrinsic superconducting instabilities, in which Cooper pairing is introduced to electrons with helical spin texture such as the Dirac surface states of topological insulators, forming a time-reversal symmetric topological superconductor on the surface. We employ first-principles calculations and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments to reveal that PbTaSe2, a noncentrosymmetric superconductor, possesses a nonzero Z2 topological invariant and fully spin-polarized Dirac surface states. Moreover, we analyze the phonon spectrum of PbTaSe2 to show how superconductivity emerges in this compound due to a stiffening of phonons by the Pb intercalation, which diminishes a competing charge-density-wave instability. By combining our findings on the topological band structure and the superconducting electron pairing, our work establishes PbTaSe2 as a stoichiometric superconductor with topological Dirac surface states. This type of intrinsic topological Dirac superconductors holds great promise for studying aspects of topological superconductors such as Majorana zero modes.

  12. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Ibscher, D.; Supsar, M. E-mail: ibscher@tp4.rub.de

    2012-10-20

    The interaction of TeV gamma rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon- photon annihilation process. The created pair beam distribution is unstable to linear two-stream instabilities of both electrostatic and electromagnetic nature in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM). The maximum electrostatic growth rate occurs at angles of 39.{sup 0}2 with respect to the pair beam direction, and is more than three orders of magnitude greater than the maximum Weibel growth rate, indicating that the linear oblique electrostatic instability operates much faster than the Weibel instability. The dissipation of the generated electrostatic turbulence is different for intense and weak gamma-ray blazars. For intense blazars, the normalized number of generated pairs n {sub 22} = n{sub b} /[10{sup -22} cm{sup -3}] exceeds the critical density n{sub c} (T) = 4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} T {sub 4} for given normalized IGM temperature T {sub 4} = T/[10{sup 4} K] necessary for the onset of the modulation instability, so that all free kinetic pair energy is dissipated in heating the IGM in cosmic voids. For weak blazars, half of the initial energy density of the beam particles is transferred to the electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations on timescales smaller than the inverse Compton energy loss timescale of the pairs. In both cases, this prevents the development of a full electromagnetic pair cascade as in vacuum. For weak blazars, the superluminal electrostatic fluctuations are dissipated by the inverse Compton scattering into transverse electromagnetic waves by the relaxed relativistic pair particles to optical frequencies, implying the occurrence of optical electrostatic bremsstrahlung pair halos from weak blazars with spectral flux densities below 50 {mu}Jy.

  13. Triplet Pair Correlations in s-Wave Superfluids as a Signature of the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, I.; Sols, F.; Demler, E.

    2012-10-01

    We show that antiparallel triplet pairing correlations are generated in superfluids with purely s-wave interactions whenever population imbalance enforces anisotropic Fulde-Ferrell (FF) or inhomogeneous Larkin-Ovchinikov (LO) states. These triplet correlations appear in the Cooper pair wave function, while the triplet part of the gap remains zero. The same set of quasiparticle states contributes to the triplet component and to the polarization, thus spatially correlating them. In the LO case, this set forms a narrow band of Andreev states centered on the nodes of the s-wave order parameter. This picture naturally provides a unifying explanation of previous findings that attractive p-wave interaction stabilizes FFLO states. We also study a similar triplet mixing which occurs when a balanced two-component system displays FFLO-type oscillations due to a spin-dependent optical lattice. We discuss how this triplet component can be measured in systems of ultracold atoms using a rapid ramp across a p-wave Feshbach resonance. This should provide a smoking gun signature of FFLO states.

  14. Long-lived spin-correlated pairs generated by photolysis of naphthalene occluded in non-Brønsted acidic ZSM-5 zeolites.

    PubMed

    Moissette, Alain; Marquis, Séverine; Cornu, David; Vezin, Hervé; Brémard, Claude

    2005-11-01

    Long-lived spin-correlated pairs were generated by laser irradiation of naphthalene (NAP) occluded as intact molecule within non-Brønsted acidic MnZSM-5 zeolites with MnSiO(2))(96-n)(AlO(2)n formula per unit cell. The laser UV photoionization generates primary NAP.+-electron pair as a fast phenomenon. These charge carriers exhibit lifetimes that extend over less than 1 h at room temperature and disappear according to two parallel competitive ways: direct charge recombination and electron transfer. This subsequent electron transfer takes place between the electron-deficient radical cation (NAP.+) and the electron-donor oxygen atom of zeolite framework. The aluminum rich MnZSM-5 zeolites (n = 3.4, 6.6) hinder efficiently the charge recombination and promote the electron transfer to generate a very long electron-hole pair which exceeds several weeks at room temperature in NAP@Li(6.6)ZSM-5. The electron-hole pair exhibits broad visible absorption bands at 482 and 525 nm. The electron-hole distance, 1.3 nm, was deduced from the dipolar interaction term (D) value. The spin density of trapped electron appears spread over (27)Al, (29)Si, (7)Li, and (1)H nuclei as deduced by two-dimensional approach of hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE). The very low recombination rate by tunneling effect was found to be in agreement with the very low value (J approximately 0) of the magnetic exchange. The combined effects of tight fit between NAP size and straight-channel dimension, the high aluminum content of the framework, and the highly polarizing cation Li(+) trapped efficiently the ejected electron in the conduction band and the hole in the valence band of the porous materials.

  15. Temperature effects on atomic pair distribution functions of melts

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J. Ma, E.; Xu, M.; Guan, P. F.; Deng, S. W.; Cheng, Y. Q.

    2014-02-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the temperature-dependent evolution of the first peak position/shape in pair distribution functions of liquids. For metallic liquids, the peak skews towards the left (shorter distance side) with increasing temperature, similar to the previously reported anomalous peak shift. Making use of constant-volume simulations in the absence of thermal expansion and change in inherent structure, we demonstrate that the apparent shift of the peak maximum can be a result of the asymmetric shape of the peak, as the asymmetry increases with temperature-induced spreading of neighboring atoms to shorter and longer distances due to the anharmonic nature of the interatomic interaction potential. These findings shed light on the first-shell expansion/contraction paradox for metallic liquids, aside from possible changes in local topological or chemical short-range ordering. The melts of covalent materials are found to exhibit an opposite trend of peak shift, which is attributed to an effect of the directionality of the interatomic bonds.

  16. The Mediating Effect of Instruction on Pair Composition in L2 Revision and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Steendam, Elke; Rijlaarsdam, G. C. W.; Van den Bergh, H. H.; Sercu, L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study tests the effect of ability pairing in two instructional methods in L2 collaborative revision. Two continuous indices determine a pair: individual proficiency level, distance in proficiency between pair members (heterogeneity), and the interaction between both indices. Instructional methods tested are modelling and practising.…

  17. Effects of Habitat Complexity on Pair-Housed Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Victoria A; Edgerton, Dale S; Hajizadeh, Susan; Swift, Larry L; Dupont, William D; Lawrence, Christian; Boyd, Kelli L

    2015-01-01

    Sexually mature zebrafish were housed as single male-female pairs with or without plastic vegetation for 1, 5, or 10 d for comparison of whole-body cortisol measured by radioimmunoassay. Individually housed male zebrafish were used as controls. In the fish that were pair-housed without vegetation (NVeg), one animal died in 5 of 24 pairs, and one animal was alive but wounded in an additional pair. No deaths or wounds occurred in the fish that were pair-housed with vegetation (Veg). Cortisol levels did not differ between the treatment groups on day 1. On day 5, cortisol values were higher in the Veg group than in the individually housed fish (P < 0.0005) and the NVeg fish (P = 0.004). On day 10, the relationships were inversed: cortisol levels had risen in the individually housed and NVeg groups and had fallen to baseline levels in the Veg group. Cortisol values on day 10 were lower in the Veg group than in the individually housed (P = 0.004) and NVeg (P = 0.05) groups. Cortisol levels in individually housed male zebrafish increased over time. Although this study did not demonstrate a reduction in cortisol levels associated with providing vegetation, this enrichment prevented injury and death from fighting. These findings show how commonly used housing situations may affect the wellbeing of laboratory zebrafish. PMID:26224437

  18. Effects of Habitat Complexity on Pair-Housed Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Keck, Victoria A; Edgerton, Dale S; Hajizadeh, Susan; Swift, Larry L; Dupont, William D; Lawrence, Christian; Boyd, Kelli L

    2015-07-01

    Sexually mature zebrafish were housed as single male-female pairs with or without plastic vegetation for 1, 5, or 10 d for comparison of whole-body cortisol measured by radioimmunoassay. Individually housed male zebrafish were used as controls. In the fish that were pair-housed without vegetation (NVeg), one animal died in 5 of 24 pairs, and one animal was alive but wounded in an additional pair. No deaths or wounds occurred in the fish that were pair-housed with vegetation (Veg). Cortisol levels did not differ between the treatment groups on day 1. On day 5, cortisol values were higher in the Veg group than in the individually housed fish (P < 0.0005) and the NVeg fish (P = 0.004). On day 10, the relationships were inversed: cortisol levels had risen in the individually housed and NVeg groups and had fallen to baseline levels in the Veg group. Cortisol values on day 10 were lower in the Veg group than in the individually housed (P = 0.004) and NVeg (P = 0.05) groups. Cortisol levels in individually housed male zebrafish increased over time. Although this study did not demonstrate a reduction in cortisol levels associated with providing vegetation, this enrichment prevented injury and death from fighting. These findings show how commonly used housing situations may affect the wellbeing of laboratory zebrafish. PMID:26224437

  19. The pairing correlation study in the {sup 40}Ar+{sup 208}Pb reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatović, T. Szilner, S.; Malenica, D. Jelavić; Prepolec, L.; Soić, N.; Tokić, V.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Goasduff, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Dobón, J. J. Valiente; Montanari, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C. A.; Pollarolo, G.

    2015-10-15

    The multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 40}Ar+{sup 208}Pb has been measured at E{sub lab} = 260 MeV with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. Mass and charge yields, differential and total cross sections, total kinetic energy loss distributions of different channels were simultaneously studied. Angular distributions were measured in a wide angular range by matching three different angular settings of the spectrometer. Absolute cross sections were obtained after the response function of the spectrometer was evaluated. These cross sections for different transfer channels allow the discussion of the role played by nucleon-nucleon correlations.

  20. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions. PMID:26705627

  1. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p↑+p at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p↑+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η >0.5 , and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p +p collisions.

  2. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions.

  3. Pair versus Individual Writing: Effects on Fluency, Complexity and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of oral language is now quite commonly done in pairs or groups, and there is a growing body of research which investigates the related issues (e.g. May, 2007). Writing generally tends to be thought of as an individual activity, although a small number of studies have documented the advantages of collaboration in writing in the…

  4. Pairing Courses across the Disciplines: Effects on Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Julie; Burnett, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    Writing performance of a complex recommendation report produced by student teams for an actual client during a 15-week semester was compared in a writing-intensive Agronomy 356 course and in paired Agronomy 356/English 309 courses. The longitudinal study investigated differences that existed between reports produced for each learning environment…

  5. Cavity enhanced detection methods for probing the dynamics of spin correlated radical pairs in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Simon R. T.; Maeda, Kiminori; Henbest, Kevin B.; Goez, Martin; Hemmens, Robert; Timmel, Christiane R.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2010-04-01

    Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) combined with phase-sensitive detection is employed to study the effects of static magnetic fields on radical recombination reactions. The chemical system comprises the photochemically generated thionine semiquinone radical and a 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) cationic radical in a micellar solution of sodium dodecyl sulphate. Data obtained using the modulated CEAS technique, describing the magnetic field effect (MFE) on reaction yields, are shown to be superior to those obtained using conventional transient absorption (TA) flash photolysis methods typically employed for these measurements. The high sensitivity afforded by modulated CEAS detection is discussed in terms of the new possibilities it offers such as the measurement of magnetic field effects in real biological systems which have hitherto been largely beyond the detection capabilities of existing techniques.

  6. Double binding energy differences: Mean-field or pairing effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chong

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter we present a systematic analysis on the average interaction between the last protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei, which can be extracted from the double differences of nuclear binding energies. The empirical average proton-neutron interaction Vpn thus derived from experimental data can be described in a very simple form as the interplay of the nuclear mean field and the pairing interaction. It is found that the smooth behavior as well as the local fluctuations of the Vpn in even-even nuclei with N ≠ Z are dominated by the contribution from the proton-neutron monopole interactions. A strong additional contribution from the isoscalar monopole interaction and isovector proton-neutron pairing interaction is seen in the Vpn for even-even N = Z nuclei and for the adjacent odd-A nuclei with one neutron or proton being subtracted.

  7. Entanglement transfer from two-mode anti-correlated continuous-variable systems to a pair of localized discrete systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Du; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2016-04-01

    We address the entanglement transfer from a bipartite continuous-variable(CV) system to a pair of localized discrete systems. The dynamics behavior can be implemented by two two-level atoms flying through spatially separated identical cavities where two quantized modes are injected. We assume each CV mode couples to one atom via the resonant Jaynes-Cummings interaction. The CV systems are initially prepared in a two-mode anti-correlated SU(2) coherent state, while with the initial atomic states of the cases: |g⟩1|g⟩2, |e⟩1|e⟩2 and |g⟩1|e⟩2, respectively. We find that the entanglement transfer for single-photon excitation case is more efficient than that for multi-photon excitation case. Under same conditions, we also note that the entanglement transfer is more efficient for SU(2) coherent state than for twin-bean (TWB) and pair-coherent (TMC) state. Besides, we show that, for a given total photon number of the initial SU(2) coherent state, the efficiency of entanglement transfer depends upon the distribution of photons in the two CV modes. We also consider the influences of the dissipation and the white noise on the entanglement transfer.

  8. Measuring spatial correlations of photon pairs by automated raster scanning with spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Paul, E. C.; Hor-Meyll, M.; Ribeiro, P. H. Souto; Walborn, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a phase-only spatial light modulator for the measurement of transverse spatial distributions of coincidence counts between twin photon beams, in a fully automated fashion. This is accomplished by means of the polarization dependence of the modulator, which allows the conversion of a phase pattern into an amplitude pattern. We also present a correction procedure, that accounts for unwanted coincidence counts due to polarization decoherence effects. PMID:24939691

  9. The effects of weak magnetic fields on radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Frank S; Greenebaum, Ben

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that radical concentrations can be modified by combinations of weak, steady and alternating magnetic fields that modify the population distribution of the nuclear and electronic spin state, the energy levels and the alignment of the magnetic moments of the components of the radical pairs. In low external magnetic fields, the electronic and nuclear angular momentum vectors are coupled by internal forces that outweigh the external fields' interactions and are characterized in the Hamiltonian by the total quantum number F. Radical pairs form with their unpaired electrons in singlet (S) or triplet (T) states with respect to each other. At frequencies corresponding to the energy separation between the various states in the external magnetic fields, transitions can occur that change the populations of both electron and nuclear states. In addition, the coupling between the nuclei, nuclei and electrons, and Zeeman shifts in the electron and nuclear energy levels can lead to transitions with resonances spanning frequencies from a few Hertz into the megahertz region. For nuclear energy levels with narrow absorption line widths, this can lead to amplitude and frequency windows. Changes in the pair recombination rates can change radical concentrations and modify biological processes. The overall conclusion is that the application of magnetic fields at frequencies ranging from a few Hertz to microwaves at the absorption frequencies observed in electron and nuclear resonance spectroscopy for radicals can lead to changes in free radical concentrations and have the potential to lead to biologically significant changes. PMID:25399679

  10. Competition between pairing correlations and deformation from the odd-even mass staggering of francium and radium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreim, S.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Cocolios, T. E.; Gottberg, A.; Herfurth, F.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Mendonca, T. M.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Stora, Th.; Wienholtz, F.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2014-08-01

    The masses of Fr222,224,226-233 and Ra233,234 have been determined with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN, including the previously unknown mass and half-life of Fr233. We study the evolution of the odd-even staggering of binding energies along the francium and radium isotopic chains and of its lowest-order estimator, Δ3(N). An enhancement of the staggering of Δ3(N) is observed towards neutron number N =146, which points to contributions beyond pairing correlations. These contributions are investigated in the Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approaches, emphasizing the connections to the single-particle level density and nuclear deformation.

  11. Sum Rules for the Pair-Correlation Functions of Inhomogeneous Fluids: Results for the Hard-Sphere-Hard-Wall System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D.; Plischke, M.

    1987-04-01

    Starting from well-known relations for the derivatives of the radial distribution functions of a mixture of fluids, and allowing the diameter of one particle to become exceedingly large, three sum rules for a fluid with density inhomogeneities are obtained. None of these sum rules are new. However, the relation between the Lovett-Mou-Buff-Wertheim and the Born-Green hierarchy of equations seems not well known. The accuracy of a recent parametrization of the pair correlation of hard spheres near a hard wall and of the solutions of the Percus-Yevick and hypernetted-chain equation for this same function are examined by determination of how well these functions satisfy these sum rules and the accuracy of their surface tension, calculated from the sum rule of Triezenberg and Zwanzig. Generally speaking, the Percus-Yevick theory gives the best results and the hypernetted-chain approximation gives the worst results with the parametrization being intermediate.

  12. Squeezed correlations of ϕ meson pairs for hydrodynamic sources in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-08-01

    In the hot and dense hadronic sources formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, the particle interactions in medium might lead to a squeezed back-to-back correlation (BBC) of boson-antiboson pairs. We calculate the BBC functions of ϕ ϕ for sources evolving hydrodynamically in (2 +1 ) dimensions and with longitudinal boost invariance. The BBC functions for hydrodynamic sources exhibit oscillations as a function of the particle momentum because the temporal distributions of hydrodynamic sources have sharp falls to 0 at large evolving times. The dependences of the BBC functions on the directions of the particle momentum are investigated. For transverse anisotropic sources, the BBC functions are minimum when the azimuthal angles of the particles reach 0. The BBC functions increase with decreasing absolute value of the particle pseudorapidity. The oscillations and the dependences on the particle azimuthal angle and pseudorapidity are the significant signatures for detecting the BBC in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Relational integrativity of prime-target pairs moderates congruity effects in evaluative priming.

    PubMed

    Ihmels, Max; Freytag, Peter; Fiedler, Klaus; Alexopoulos, Theodore

    2016-05-01

    In evaluative priming, positive or negative primes facilitate reactions to targets that share the same valence. While this effect is commonly explained as reflecting invariant structures in semantic long-term memory or in the sensorimotor system, the present research highlights the role of integrativity in evaluative priming. Integrativity refers to the ease of integrating two concepts into a new meaningful compound representation. In extended material tests using paired comparisons from two pools of positive and negative words, we show that evaluative congruity is highly correlated with integrativity. Therefore, in most priming studies, congruity and integrativity are strongly confounded. When both aspects are disentangled by manipulating congruity and integrativity orthogonally, three priming experiments show that evaluative-priming effects were confined to integrative prime-target pairs. No facilitation of prime-congruent targets was obtained for non-integrative stimuli. These findings are discussed from a broader perspective on priming conceived as flexible, context-dependent, and serving a generative adaptation function. PMID:26689705

  14. Relativistic and quantum electrodynamics effects in the helium pair potential.

    PubMed

    Przybytek, M; Cencek, W; Komasa, J; Łach, G; Jeziorski, B; Szalewicz, K

    2010-05-01

    The helium pair potential was computed including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics contributions as well as improved accuracy adiabatic ones. Accurate asymptotic expansions were used for large distances R. Error estimates show that the present potential is more accurate than any published to date. The computed dissociation energy and the average R for the (4)He(2) bound state are 1.62+/-0.03 mK and 47.1+/-0.5 A. These values can be compared with the measured ones: 1.1(-0.2)(+0.3) mK and 52+/-4 A [R. E. Grisenti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2284 (2000)].

  15. Pair correlations, short-range order, and dispersive excitations in the quasi-kagome quantum magnet volborthite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, G. J.; Coomer, F. C.; de Vries, M. A.; Stewart, J. R.; Deen, P. P.; Harrison, A.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2011-11-01

    We present spatial and dynamic information on the s=1/2 distorted kagome antiferromagnet volborthite, Cu3V2O7(OD)2·2D2O, obtained by polarized and inelastic neutron scattering. The instantaneous structure factor, S(Q), is dominated by nearest-neighbor pair correlations, with short-range order at wave vectors Q1=0.65(3) Å-1 and Q2=1.15(5) Å-1 emerging below 5 K. The excitation spectrum, S(Q,ω), reveals two steep branches dispersing from Q1 and Q2, and a flat mode at ωf=5.0(2) meV. The results allow us to identify the crossover at T*˜1 K in 51V NMR and specific-heat measurements as the buildup of correlations at Q1. We compare our data to theoretical models proposed for volborthite, and also demonstrate that the excitation spectrum can be explained by spin-wave-like excitations with anisotropic exchange parameters, as suggested by recent local-density calculations.

  16. Correlation effects in metallic cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2014-03-01

    The electronic contribution to the cohesive energy of a correlated metal is the sum of the transition energies for adding successive electrons at successive Fermi levels until the system reaches its final electron density. This can be computed as the integral of energy over the projected density of transitions for adding single electrons to localized orbitals. In the case of independent electrons, this reduces to the usual integral over the projected density of states. As an example, cohesive energies for some simple transition metal structures are calculated using the recursion method* with a Hubbard repulsion between electrons. * Phys. Rev. B 61, 7953-64 Work supported by the Richmond F. Snyder gift to the University of Oregon.

  17. Effect of speckle on lidar pulse{endash}pair ratio statistics

    SciTech Connect

    MacKerrow, Edward P.; Schmitt, Mark J. Thompson, David C.

    1997-11-01

    The ratio of temporally adjacent lidar pulse returns is commonly used in differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to reduce correlated noise. These pulses typically are generated at different wavelengths with the assumption that the dominant noise is common to both. This is not the case when the mean number of laser speckle integrated per pulse by the lidar receiver is small (namely, less than 10 speckles at each wavelength). In this case a large increase in the standard deviation of the ratio data results. We demonstrate this effect both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical value for the expected standard deviation of the pulse{endash}pair ratio data compares well with the measured values that used a dual CO{sub 2} laser-based lidar with a hard target. Pulse averaging statistics of the pulse{endash}pair data obey the expected {sigma}{sub 1}/{radical}(N) reduction in the standard deviation, {sigma}{sub N}, for N-pulse averages. We consider the ratio before average, average before ratio, and log of the ratio before average methods for noise reduction in the lidar equation. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of dual-laser versus single-laser lidar configurations. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  18. Neutron-Proton Pairing Effect on One-Proton and Two-Proton Separation Energies in Rare-Earth Proton-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammache, F.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.

    2012-12-01

    The one-proton and two-proton separation energies are studied for "ordinary" and rare-earth proton-rich nuclei by including the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing correlations using the BCS approximation. Even-even as well as odd nuclei are considered. In the latter case, the wave function is defined using the blocked-level technique. The single-particle energies used are those of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It is shown that the np isovector pairing effects on the one-proton and two-proton separation energies are non-negligible. However, the only isovector BCS approximation seems to be inadequate for a good description of these quantities when including the np pairing effects: either a particle-number projection or the inclusion of the isoscalar pairing effect seems to be necessary. Another possible improvement would be a more realistic choice of the pairing strengths.

  19. Proton affinities and photoelectron spectra of phenylalanine and N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylphenylalanine. Correlation of lone pair ionization energies with proton affinities and implications for N-methylation as a method to effect site specific protonation of peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Marzluff, E.M.; Rodgers, M.T.; Beauchamp, J.L. ); Rempe, M.E.; Schwinck, K.F.; Lichtenberger, D.L. )

    1994-06-15

    A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) technique for measuring gas-phase proton affinities is presented which utilizes collisional dissociation of proton-bound clusters by off-resonance translational excitation. A simplified RRKM analysis relates unimolecular dissociation rates to proton affinities. This technique is used to measure values for the proton affinities of phenylalanine and N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylphenylalanine of 220.3, 223.6, and 224.5 kcal/mol, respectively (relative to the proton affinity of NH[sub 3] = 204.0 kcal/mol). The proton affinity measured for phenylalanine is in excellent agreement with reported literature values. The photoelectron spectra of these three molecules are also presented and analyzed. Assignments of bands to specific ionization processes are aided by comparison with model compounds such as methyl-substituted amines and 2-phenylethylamines. These data are employed to examine the correlation of adiabatic nitrogen lone pair ionization energies with gas-phase proton affinities for phenylalanine, N-methylphenylalanine, and N,N-dimethylphenylalanine in comparison to correlations for other amino acids and selected aliphatic amines. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Magnetic-field-induced orientation of photosynthetic reaction centers as revealed by time-resolved W-band EPR of spin-correlated radical pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, T.; Bechtold, M.; Heinen, U.; Link, G.; Poluektov, O.; Utschig, L.; Tang, J.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Kothe, G.

    1999-12-09

    The spin-polarized W-band EPR spectra of the secondary radical pair in plant photosystem 1 indicate a magnetic-field-induced orientation of the photosynthetic reaction centers in the field of the EPR spectrometer. This orientation arises due to the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the reaction center protein. Analysis of the angular-dependent EPR spectra on the basis of the spin-correlated radical pair concept provides new information on the cofactor arrangement in plant photosystem 1.

  1. Pair Excitations in Fermi Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Helga M.; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Schörkhuber, Karl; Springer, Josef

    2006-09-01

    We present a theory of multi-pair excitations in strongly interacting Fermi systems. Based on an equations-of-motion approach for time-dependent pair correlations it leads to a qualitatively new structure of the density-density response function. Our theory reduces to both, i) the "correlated" random-phase approximation (RPA) for fermions if the two-pair excitations are ignored, and ii) the correlated Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory for bosons in the appropriate limit. The theory preserves the two first energy-weighted sum rules. A familiar problem of the standard RPA is that its zero-sound mode is energetically much higher than found in experiments. The popular cure of introducing an average effective mass in the Lindhard function violates sum rules and describes the physics incorrectly. We demonstrate that the inclusion of correlated pair excitations gives the correct dispersion. As in 4He, a modification of the effective mass is unnecessary also in 3He.

  2. Effects of age at first-pairing on the reproductive performance of Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Kai, O; Sakemi, K; Suzuki, Y; Sonoda, Y; Imai, K

    1995-10-01

    Effects of age at first-pairing on the reproductive performance of the gerbil were studied throughout the reproductive life. Six groups of 7-30 female gerbils were paired monogamously with males at different ages. Out of 101 pairs in 6 groups, 79 (78.2%) produced 1 or more litters. The mean litter size at birth and mean weaning rate of 846 litters were 4.4 (totally 3,733 pups) and 67.4% (2,517 pups), respectively. Reproduction was compared in the 6 age groups. The littering rate (No. of females with litters/No. of female paired) was significantly lower in two groups in which mature females were paired with age-matched males (Group 4) or the oldest females with younger, sexually mature males (Group 6). The interval from pairing to the first litter was shortest in two groups in which mature females were paired with one month older, sexually mature males (Groups 3 and 5). Although the oldest pairs (Group 6) produced about 7 litters, the pairs from the other 5 groups produced about 10 or more litters throughout their reproductive life. The weaning rate was significantly higher in Group 6 (the oldest pairs) than in the younger groups. The effects of parity on reproduction were estimated from the data for the 61 pairs which produced more than 8 litters in the 6 groups. The number of pups at birth and the weaning rate were decreased in last 20-30% of the total parity in all 6 groups, although the age at the last litter in all groups was significantly different. The data suggest that any decline in reproduction may be due to not age but parity in the Mongolian gerbil.

  3. Combining automatic table classification and relationship extraction in extracting anticancer drug-side effect pairs from full-text articles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-02-01

    Anticancer drug-associated side effect knowledge often exists in multiple heterogeneous and complementary data sources. A comprehensive anticancer drug-side effect (drug-SE) relationship knowledge base is important for computation-based drug target discovery, drug toxicity predication and drug repositioning. In this study, we present a two-step approach by combining table classification and relationship extraction to extract drug-SE pairs from a large number of high-profile oncological full-text articles. The data consists of 31,255 tables downloaded from the Journal of Oncology (JCO). We first trained a statistical classifier to classify tables into SE-related and -unrelated categories. We then extracted drug-SE pairs from SE-related tables. We compared drug side effect knowledge extracted from JCO tables to that derived from FDA drug labels. Finally, we systematically analyzed relationships between anti-cancer drug-associated side effects and drug-associated gene targets, metabolism genes, and disease indications. The statistical table classifier is effective in classifying tables into SE-related and -unrelated (precision: 0.711; recall: 0.941; F1: 0.810). We extracted a total of 26,918 drug-SE pairs from SE-related tables with a precision of 0.605, a recall of 0.460, and a F1 of 0.520. Drug-SE pairs extracted from JCO tables is largely complementary to those derived from FDA drug labels; as many as 84.7% of the pairs extracted from JCO tables have not been included a side effect database constructed from FDA drug labels. Side effects associated with anticancer drugs positively correlate with drug target genes, drug metabolism genes, and disease indications.

  4. Direct observation of f-pair magnetic field effects and time-dependence of radical pair composition using rapidly switched magnetic fields and time-resolved infrared methods.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Jonathan R; Foster, Timothy J; Salaoru, Adrian T; Vink, Claire B

    2008-07-21

    A rapidly switched (<10 ns) magnetic field was employed to directly observe magnetic fields from f-pair reactions of radical pairs in homogeneous solution. Geminate radical pairs from the photoabstraction reaction of benzophenone from cyclohexanol were observed directly using a pump-probe pulsed magnetic field method to determine their existence time. No magnetic field effects from geminate pairs were observed at times greater than 100 ns after initial photoexcitation. By measuring magnetic field effects for fields applied continuously only after this initial geminate period, f-pair effects could be directly observed. Measurement of the time-dependence of the field effect for the photolysis of 2-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-2-methylpropiophenone in cyclohexanol using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy revealed not only the presence of f-pair magnetic field effects but also the ability of the time dependence of the MARY spectra to observe the changing composition of the randomly encountering pairs throughout the second order reaction period.

  5. The effect of musical practice on gesture/sound pairing.

    PubMed

    Proverbio, Alice M; Attardo, Lapo; Cozzi, Matteo; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Learning to play a musical instrument is a demanding process requiring years of intense practice. Dramatic changes in brain connectivity, volume, and functionality have been shown in skilled musicians. It is thought that music learning involves the formation of novel audio visuomotor associations, but not much is known about the gradual acquisition of this ability. In the present study, we investigated whether formal music training enhances audiovisual multisensory processing. To this end, pupils at different stages of education were examined based on the hypothesis that the strength of audio/visuomotor associations would be augmented as a function of the number of years of conservatory study (expertise). The study participants were violin and clarinet students of pre-academic and academic levels and of different chronological ages, ages of acquisition, and academic levels. A violinist and a clarinetist each played the same score, and each participant viewed the video corresponding to his or her instrument. Pitch, intensity, rhythm, and sound duration were matched across instruments. In half of the trials, the soundtrack did not match (in pitch) the corresponding musical gestures. Data analysis indicated a correlation between the number of years of formal training (expertise) and the ability to detect an audiomotor incongruence in music performance (relative to the musical instrument practiced), thus suggesting a direct correlation between knowing how to play and perceptual sensitivity. PMID:25883580

  6. The effect of musical practice on gesture/sound pairing

    PubMed Central

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Attardo, Lapo; Cozzi, Matteo; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Learning to play a musical instrument is a demanding process requiring years of intense practice. Dramatic changes in brain connectivity, volume, and functionality have been shown in skilled musicians. It is thought that music learning involves the formation of novel audio visuomotor associations, but not much is known about the gradual acquisition of this ability. In the present study, we investigated whether formal music training enhances audiovisual multisensory processing. To this end, pupils at different stages of education were examined based on the hypothesis that the strength of audio/visuomotor associations would be augmented as a function of the number of years of conservatory study (expertise). The study participants were violin and clarinet students of pre-academic and academic levels and of different chronological ages, ages of acquisition, and academic levels. A violinist and a clarinetist each played the same score, and each participant viewed the video corresponding to his or her instrument. Pitch, intensity, rhythm, and sound duration were matched across instruments. In half of the trials, the soundtrack did not match (in pitch) the corresponding musical gestures. Data analysis indicated a correlation between the number of years of formal training (expertise) and the ability to detect an audiomotor incongruence in music performance (relative to the musical instrument practiced), thus suggesting a direct correlation between knowing how to play and perceptual sensitivity. PMID:25883580

  7. The effect of musical practice on gesture/sound pairing.

    PubMed

    Proverbio, Alice M; Attardo, Lapo; Cozzi, Matteo; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Learning to play a musical instrument is a demanding process requiring years of intense practice. Dramatic changes in brain connectivity, volume, and functionality have been shown in skilled musicians. It is thought that music learning involves the formation of novel audio visuomotor associations, but not much is known about the gradual acquisition of this ability. In the present study, we investigated whether formal music training enhances audiovisual multisensory processing. To this end, pupils at different stages of education were examined based on the hypothesis that the strength of audio/visuomotor associations would be augmented as a function of the number of years of conservatory study (expertise). The study participants were violin and clarinet students of pre-academic and academic levels and of different chronological ages, ages of acquisition, and academic levels. A violinist and a clarinetist each played the same score, and each participant viewed the video corresponding to his or her instrument. Pitch, intensity, rhythm, and sound duration were matched across instruments. In half of the trials, the soundtrack did not match (in pitch) the corresponding musical gestures. Data analysis indicated a correlation between the number of years of formal training (expertise) and the ability to detect an audiomotor incongruence in music performance (relative to the musical instrument practiced), thus suggesting a direct correlation between knowing how to play and perceptual sensitivity.

  8. Establishing and maintaining treatment effects with less intrusive consequences via a pairing procedure.

    PubMed

    Vorndran, Christina M; Lerman, Dorothea C

    2006-01-01

    The generality and long-term maintenance of a pairing procedure designed to improve the efficacy of less intrusive procedures were evaluated for the treatment of problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement exhibited by 2 individuals with developmental disabilities. Results suggested that a less intrusive procedure could be established as a conditioned punisher by pairing it with an effective punisher contingent on problem behavior. Generalization across multiple therapists was demonstrated for both participants. However, generalization to another setting was not achieved for 1 participant until pairing was conducted in the second setting. Long-term maintenance was observed with 1 participant in the absence of further pairing trials. Maintenance via intermittent pairing trials was successful for the other participant. PMID:16602384

  9. Establishing and maintaining treatment effects with less intrusive consequences via a pairing procedure.

    PubMed

    Vorndran, Christina M; Lerman, Dorothea C

    2006-01-01

    The generality and long-term maintenance of a pairing procedure designed to improve the efficacy of less intrusive procedures were evaluated for the treatment of problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement exhibited by 2 individuals with developmental disabilities. Results suggested that a less intrusive procedure could be established as a conditioned punisher by pairing it with an effective punisher contingent on problem behavior. Generalization across multiple therapists was demonstrated for both participants. However, generalization to another setting was not achieved for 1 participant until pairing was conducted in the second setting. Long-term maintenance was observed with 1 participant in the absence of further pairing trials. Maintenance via intermittent pairing trials was successful for the other participant.

  10. Evidence for a pairing anti-halo effect in the odd-even staggering in reaction cross sections of weakly bound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spatial extension of weakly bound Ne and C isotopes by taking into account the pairing correlation with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method and a three-body model, respectively. We show that the odd-even staggering in the reaction cross sections of {sup 30,31,32}Ne and {sup 14,15,16}C are successfully reproduced, and thus the staggering can be attributed to the pairing anti-halo effect. A correlation between a one-neutron separation energy and the anti-halo effect is demonstrated for s and p waves using the HFB wave functions.

  11. Redundant correlation effect on personalized recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Han, Teng-Yue; Zhong, Li-Xin; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Chen, Guang

    2014-02-01

    The high-order redundant correlation effect is investigated for a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion (HHM), through both heat conduction biased (HCB) and mass diffusion biased (MDB) correlation redundancy elimination processes. The HCB and MDB algorithms do not introduce any additional tunable parameters, but keep the simple character of the original HHM. Based on two empirical datasets, the Netflix and MovieLens, the HCB and MDB are found to show better recommendation accuracy for both the overall objects and the cold objects than the HHM algorithm. Our work suggests that properly eliminating the high-order redundant correlations can provide a simple and effective approach to accurate recommendation.

  12. Effect of single-particle splitting in the exact wave function of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma H, S.

    2010-07-15

    The structure of the exact wave function of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian with nondegenerate single-particle levels is discussed. The way that the single-particle splittings break the quartet condensate solution found for N=Z nuclei in a single degenerate level is established. After a brief review of the exact solution, the structure of the wave function is analyzed and some particular cases are considered where a clear interpretation of the wave function emerges. An expression for the exact wave function in terms of the isospin triplet of pair creators is given. The ground-state wave function is analyzed as a function of pairing strength, for a system of four protons and four neutrons. For small and large values of the pairing strength a dominance of two-pair (quartets) scalar couplings is found, whereas for intermediate values enhancements of the nonscalar couplings are obtained. A correlation of these enhancements with the creation of Cooper-like pairs is observed.

  13. Suppression of the noninvolved pair of the myeloma isotype correlates with poor survival in newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patients with myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Heinz; Milosavljevic, Dejan; Berlanga, Oscar; Zojer, Niklas; Hübl, Wolfgang; Fritz, Veronique; Harding, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Heavy light chain (HLC) assays allow precise measurement of the monoclonal and of the noninvolved polyclonal immunoglobulins of the same isotype as the M-protein (e.g., monoclonal IgAκ and polyclonal IgAλ in case of an IgAκ myeloma), which was not possible before. The noninvolved polyclonal immunoglobulin is termed 'HLC-matched pair'. We investigated the impact of the suppression of the HLC-matched pair on outcome in 203 patients with multiple myeloma, a phenomenon that likely reflects the host's attempt to control the myeloma clone. Severe (>50%) HLC-matched pair suppression was identified in 54.5% of the 156 newly diagnosed patients and was associated with significantly shorter survival (45.4 vs. 71.9 months, P = 0.019). This correlation was statistically significant in IgG patients (46.4 vs. 105.1 months, P = 0.017), but not in patients with IgA myelomas (32.9 vs. 54.1 months, P = 0.498). At best response, HLC-matched pair suppression improved only in patients with ≥VGPR, indicating partial or complete humoral immune reconstitution during remission in those with excellent response. Severe HLC-matched pair suppression retained its prognostic impact also during follow-up after first response. In the 47 pretreated patients with relapsed/refractory disease, a similar correlation between severe HLC suppression and survival was noted (22.8 vs. not reached, P = 0.028). Suppression of the polyclonal immunoglobulins of the other isotypes than the myeloma protein correlated neither with HLC-matched pair suppression, nor with outcome. Multivariate analysis identified severe HLC-matched pair suppression as independent risk factor for shorter survival, highlighting the impact of isotype specific immune dysregulation on outcome in multiple myeloma.

  14. Modulation of radical pairs dynamics immersed in an ELF-EMF: The effect on hepatocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Riquelme, G. O.; López-Sandoval, E.; Vera-Aguilar, E.; Godina-Nava, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The most suitable mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on biological systems is the effect on the radical pair (RP) recombination through the Zeeman effect and hyperfine interaction, which changes the rate of reactions or the product distribution. Enzyme reactions with RP intermediates can be altered by EMF, like those catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450), a heme-thiolate family protein that detoxifies xenobiotics and involved in chemical carcinogenesis. CYP450 activate chemical carcinogens producing an enormous amount of free radicals, which damage the DNA resulting in the malignant transformation of cells. During the activation, CYP450 produce spin-correlated RP intermediates that can either go to recombination or to continue the catalytic process. As CYP450 are electron carrier proteins, it is possible that RP intermediates may be affected by EMF. It was previously found that periodic treatment with extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) inhibits more than 50% the number and area of preneoplastic lesions in rats with chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis through reduction of cell proliferation. In this work, we developed a quantum mechanical model based on RP mechanism in order to explain the experimental effects of ELF-EMF on the free radicals produced in the early stages of chemical carcinogenesis.

  15. Intrinsic Josephson effect and single Cooper pair tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Tsutomu; Kim, Sang-Jae; Latyshev, Yuri; Nakajima, Kensuke

    2000-06-01

    We proposed a new, small and fast switching gate based on the intrinsic Josephson effect of single crystals of a cuprate superconductor. The switching time is of subpicosecond order, and the operating frequency is up to several terahertz. We used the focused-ion-beam (FIB) method for the fabrication of small Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8 (Bi-2212) stacked intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) with in-plane size down to the submicron level without the degradation of their Tc. We observed clear Fraunhofer patterns in Ic- B curves and flux-flow velocity of up to 10 6 m/s for the stack junctions with the size of several micrometer scale. For the submicron junction, the low-temperature behavior is governed by the Coulomb-charging effects. This is the first observation of the Coulomb-charging effects in layered high- Tc materials.

  16. Effective chromosome pairing requires chromatin remodeling at the onset of meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Colas, Isabelle; Shaw, Peter; Prieto, Pilar; Wanous, Michael; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang; Mago, Rohit; Moore, Graham

    2008-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes (homologues) recognize each other and then intimately associate. Studies exploiting species with large chromosomes reveal that chromatin is remodeled at the onset of meiosis before this intimate association. However, little is known about the effect the remodeling has on pairing. We show here in wheat that chromatin remodeling of homologues can only occur if they are identical or nearly identical. Moreover, a failure to undergo remodeling results in reduced pairing between the homologues. Thus, chromatin remodeling at the onset of meiosis enables the chromosomes to become competent to pair and recombine efficiently. PMID:18417451

  17. Synergistic Effects of Six Chronic Disease Pairs on Decreased Physical Activity: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Vos, Rein; Schepers, Jan; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how two chronic diseases interact with each other in modifying the risk of physical inactivity. The aim of the present study is to identify chronic disease pairs that are associated with compliance or noncompliance with the Dutch PA guideline recommendation and to study whether specific chronic disease pairs indicate an extra effect on top of the effects of the diseases individually. Cross-sectional data from 3,386 participants of cohort study SMILE were used and logistic regression analysis was performed to study the joint effect of the two diseases of each chronic disease pair for compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. For six chronic disease pairs, patients suffering from both diseases belonging to these disease pairs in question show a higher probability of noncompliance to the Dutch PA guideline, compared to what one would expect based on the effects of each of the two diseases alone. These six chronic disease pairs were chronic respiratory disease and severe back problems; migraine and inflammatory joint disease; chronic respiratory disease and severe kidney disease; chronic respiratory disease and inflammatory joint disease; inflammatory joint disease and rheumatoid arthritis; and rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the knees, hips, and hands. PMID:27274994

  18. Influence of subdiffusive motion on spin relaxation and spin effects in radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Shushin, A I

    2006-02-23

    Specific features of spin relaxation and the kinetics of spin effect generation in radical pairs (RPs) undergoing subdiffusive relative motion are studied in detail. Two types of processes are analyzed: (1) spin relaxation in biradicals, resulting from anomalously slow subdiffuisive reorientation (with the correlation function P(t) approximately (wt)(-alpha), where 0 < alpha < 1) and (2) spin effect generation in subdiffusion-assisted RP recombination. Analysis is made with the use of the non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) derived within the continuous time random walk approach. The SLE predicts anomalous (very slow and nonexponential) spin relaxation in biradicals which results in some peculiarities of the spectrum of the system. In RP recombination, the subdiffusive relative motion shows itself in slow dependence of the reaction yield Y(r)() on reactivity and parameters of the RP spin Hamiltonian and anomalous electron spin polarization of escaped radicals. The spectrum of the reaction yield detected magnetic resonance, that is, the Y(r)() dependence on the frequency omega of microwave field, is found to be strongly non-Lorenzian with the width determined by the field strength omega(1) and very broad wings depending on alpha. Analysis shows that the majority of interesting, specific features of the observables in both systems are controlled only by the parameter alpha.

  19. Ecological Correlates of Effective Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Daphne; Scannapieco, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Providing effective foster care is a major undertaking that continues to plague this country. The ultimate goal of substitute care is to provide child victims of maltreatment with a safe and nurturing home environment. The goal of this theory driven research project was to identify ecological factors correlated with effective non-kin family foster…

  20. Effect of charge delocalization on radical ion pair electronic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinks, Louise E.; Weiss, Emily A.; Giaimo, Jovan M.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2005-03-01

    Photoinduced charge separation and recombination were studied in a series of covalent donor-acceptor triads consisting of aniline, 1-aminonaphthalene, or 9-aminoanthracene donors (D) attached to a 4-aminonaphthalene-1,8-dicarboximide chromophore (ANI), which in turn is attached to a naphthalene-1,4:5,8-bis(dicarboximide) acceptor (NI) to give D-ANI-NI. The relationship between the molecular structure of D + rad and the magnitude of the electronic coupling between the radicals within D + rad -ANI-NI - rad was probed by direct measurements of the spin-spin exchange interaction, 2J, using magnetic field effects on the yield of the neutral triplet state resulting from charge recombination and by density functional theory calculations.

  1. Long-range superharmonic Josephson current and spin-triplet pairing correlations in a junction with ferromagnetic bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hao; Wu, Jiansheng; Wu, Xiuqiang; Ren, Mengyuan; Ren, Yajie

    2016-02-01

    The long-range spin-triplet supercurrent transport is an interesting phenomenon in the superconductor/ferromagnet () heterostructure containing noncollinear magnetic domains. Here we study the long-range superharmonic Josephson current in asymmetric junctions. It is demonstrated that this current is induced by spin-triplet pairs  -  or  +  in the thick layer. The magnetic rotation of the particularly thin layer will not only modulate the amplitude of the superharmonic current but also realise the conversion between  -  and  + . Moreover, the critical current shows an oscillatory dependence on thickness and exchange field in the layer. These effect can be used for engineering cryoelectronic devices manipulating the superharmonic current. In contrast, the critical current declines monotonically with increasing exchange field of the layer, and if the layer is converted into half-metal, the long-range supercurrent is prohibited but still exists within the entire region. This phenomenon contradicts the conventional wisdom and indicates the occurrence of spin and charge separation in present junction, which could lead to useful spintronics devices.

  2. Long-range superharmonic Josephson current and spin-triplet pairing correlations in a junction with ferromagnetic bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hao; Wu, Jiansheng; Wu, Xiuqiang; Ren, Mengyuan; Ren, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    The long-range spin-triplet supercurrent transport is an interesting phenomenon in the superconductor/ferromagnet () heterostructure containing noncollinear magnetic domains. Here we study the long-range superharmonic Josephson current in asymmetric junctions. It is demonstrated that this current is induced by spin-triplet pairs  −  or  +  in the thick layer. The magnetic rotation of the particularly thin layer will not only modulate the amplitude of the superharmonic current but also realise the conversion between  −  and  + . Moreover, the critical current shows an oscillatory dependence on thickness and exchange field in the layer. These effect can be used for engineering cryoelectronic devices manipulating the superharmonic current. In contrast, the critical current declines monotonically with increasing exchange field of the layer, and if the layer is converted into half-metal, the long-range supercurrent is prohibited but still exists within the entire region. This phenomenon contradicts the conventional wisdom and indicates the occurrence of spin and charge separation in present junction, which could lead to useful spintronics devices. PMID:26892755

  3. Long-range superharmonic Josephson current and spin-triplet pairing correlations in a junction with ferromagnetic bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hao; Wu, Jiansheng; Wu, Xiuqiang; Ren, Mengyuan; Ren, Yajie

    2016-02-01

    The long-range spin-triplet supercurrent transport is an interesting phenomenon in the superconductor/ferromagnet () heterostructure containing noncollinear magnetic domains. Here we study the long-range superharmonic Josephson current in asymmetric junctions. It is demonstrated that this current is induced by spin-triplet pairs  ‑  or  +  in the thick layer. The magnetic rotation of the particularly thin layer will not only modulate the amplitude of the superharmonic current but also realise the conversion between  ‑  and  + . Moreover, the critical current shows an oscillatory dependence on thickness and exchange field in the layer. These effect can be used for engineering cryoelectronic devices manipulating the superharmonic current. In contrast, the critical current declines monotonically with increasing exchange field of the layer, and if the layer is converted into half-metal, the long-range supercurrent is prohibited but still exists within the entire region. This phenomenon contradicts the conventional wisdom and indicates the occurrence of spin and charge separation in present junction, which could lead to useful spintronics devices.

  4. Behavioral effects of progesterone on pair bonding and partner preference in the female zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Smiley, Kristina O; Vahaba, Daniel M; Tomaszycki, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Progesterone is a sex steroid known to be involved in reproduction, but its role in pair relationships is not well understood. This study explored the effects of exogenous progesterone (P4) on courtship and pairing behaviors in female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in two separate experiments: the first focused on courtship and initial pair formation and the second examined the effects on pair maintenance. In these experiments, we tested the hypothesis that P4 increases pairing behaviors and consequently influences their partner preference. In Experiment 1, animals engaged in significantly more pairing behaviors when they were treated with P4 than when they received the vehicle. However, this effect was not partner-specific, since the association index (a marker for female partner preference) did not differ between treatment conditions. In Experiment 2, females were given two weeks to form a pair and then injected with P4 or vehicle. Pairs were observed that day and the subsequent day to determine if P4 caused a decrease in mate-directed behavior and an increase in extra pair behavior. P4 did not affect the quality of the pair relationship and did not increase extra pair behavior. These results suggest that P4 influences the overall quantity of initial pairing behaviors and may slightly increase the likelihood of partner preference formation over short time courses. However, P4 does not alter a previously established bond, suggesting there are likely separate mechanisms for initial pairing behaviors and pair maintenance.

  5. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ν(C≡N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of moleculesmore » to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.« less

  6. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ν(C≡N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  7. Effect of noise correlations on randomized benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Harrison; Stace, Thomas M.; Flammia, Steven T.; Biercuk, Michael J.

    2016-02-01

    Among the most popular and well-studied quantum characterization, verification, and validation techniques is randomized benchmarking (RB), an important statistical tool used to characterize the performance of physical logic operations useful in quantum information processing. In this work we provide a detailed mathematical treatment of the effect of temporal noise correlations on the outcomes of RB protocols. We provide a fully analytic framework capturing the accumulation of error in RB expressed in terms of a three-dimensional random walk in "Pauli space." Using this framework we derive the probability density function describing RB outcomes (averaged over noise) for both Markovian and correlated errors, which we show is generally described by a Γ distribution with shape and scale parameters depending on the correlation structure. Long temporal correlations impart large nonvanishing variance and skew in the distribution towards high-fidelity outcomes—consistent with existing experimental data—highlighting potential finite-sampling pitfalls and the divergence of the mean RB outcome from worst-case errors in the presence of noise correlations. We use the filter-transfer function formalism to reveal the underlying reason for these differences in terms of effective coherent averaging of correlated errors in certain random sequences. We conclude by commenting on the impact of these calculations on the utility of single-metric approaches to quantum characterization, verification, and validation.

  8. Light paired with serotonin mimics the effect of conditioning on phototactic behavior of Hermissenda.

    PubMed Central

    Crow, T; Forrester, J

    1986-01-01

    A conditioning procedure consisting of pairing-specific stimulation of the eyes and gravity-detecting statocysts in Hermissenda results in a long-term modification of normal positive phototactic behavior. The learning is expressed by a significant suppression of the initiation of locomotion in the presence of light. We now report that an analogue of the classical conditioning procedure, consisting of light paired with serotonin (5-HT) applied directly to the exposed circumesophageal nervous system of otherwise intact animals, mimics the effect of conditioning on long-term changes in phototactic behavior. The effect of the conditioning analogue on behavior shows some specificity with 5-HT since light paired with dopamine or octopamine does not significantly affect phototactic behavior. The conditioning analogue exhibits pairing specificity since unpaired light and 5-HT and 5-HT applied in the dark do not produce behavioral suppression. Animals that initially received unpaired light and 5-HT do show behavioral suppression after receiving paired light and 5-HT. These results indicate that light (the conditioned stimulus) paired with the putative transmitter of the unconditioned stimulus pathway (5-HT) is sufficient to produce long-term phototactic suppression. PMID:3464014

  9. Age of acquisition's effect on memory for semantically associated word pairs.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Juhasz, Barbara J

    2008-08-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of age of acquisition (AoA) in memory for associated word pairs in a cued recall task. Participants studied a list of frequency-controlled early- and late-acquired words in semantically related pairs and then were asked to recall the second word of the pair when cued with the first. Reaction time effects were found, showing that a late-acquired cue for an early-acquired target word was responded to significantly faster than other combinations. Additionally, late-acquired target words resulted in significantly more accurate responses. As significant differences were found even when frequency was controlled, the effects must therefore stem from the manipulations ofAoA. Given this evidence, the implications for AoA's effects on the organization of semantic memory are explored. PMID:18609409

  10. The Effect of Singing Paired with Signing on Receptive Vocabulary Skills ofElementary ESL Students.

    PubMed

    Schunk

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of singing paired with signing on receptive vocabulary skills of elementary English as a Second Language (ESL) students. Eighty children attended language sessions in one of the following rehearsal conditions: sung text paired with signs, spoken text paired with signs, sung text, and a control group of spoken text only. Pretest and posttest data were analyzed to determine gains in receptive vocabulary identification. Results from this study indicate that all four groups made significant pretest to posttest gains. Children in the sung text paired with sign and the spoken text paired with sign conditions, however, made significantly greater gains in vocabulary recognition than those in the control condition of spoken text only. These findings suggest the benefits of integrating signs into second language rehearsal to provide visual cues and to engage students in meaningful physical participation. The condition yielding the highest mean gain score was that in which signing was paired with singing, indicating there may be advantages to using a combination of the two for language acquisition.

  11. Identification of ion-pair structures in solution by vibrational stark effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hack, John; Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2016-01-25

    Here, ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N)more » infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.« less

  12. Identification of Ion-Pair Structures in Solution by Vibrational Stark Effects.

    PubMed

    Hack, John; Grills, David C; Miller, John R; Mani, Tomoyasu

    2016-02-18

    Ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent. PMID:26807492

  13. Identification of Ion-Pair Structures in Solution by Vibrational Stark Effects.

    PubMed

    Hack, John; Grills, David C; Miller, John R; Mani, Tomoyasu

    2016-02-18

    Ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.

  14. Interplay between pairing and tensor effects in the N = 82 even-even isotone chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguiano, M.; Bernard, R. N.; Lallena, A. M.; Co', G.; De Donno, V.

    2016-11-01

    The combined effects of the pairing and tensor terms of the nuclear interaction are investigated by analyzing the ground state properties of the nuclei belonging to the isotonic chain N = 82. The pairing effects have been taken into account by considering both Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and Hartree-Fock plus Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer approaches using the same finite-range nuclear interaction, specifically a force of Gogny type. Our results reproduce very well the available experimental data of binding energies and charge radii. The study of the particle number fluctuation indicates that the presence of the tensor terms in the interaction reduces the pairing effects and produces new shell closures in some isotopes. The experimental behavior of the energy difference between neutron single particle states up to A = 140 is properly described only if the tensor force is considered.

  15. Stimulant Drug Effects on Touchscreen Automated Paired-Associates Learning (PAL) in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschlau, Corinna; Votteler, Angeline; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Here we tested in rats effects of the procognitive drugs modafinil and methylphenidate on post-acquisition performance in an object-location paired-associates learning (PAL) task. Modafinil (32; 64 mg/kg) was without effect, while higher (9 mg/kg) but not lower (4.5 mg/kg) doses of methylphenidate impaired PAL performance. Likewise, higher but not…

  16. Effect of ion pairing on the fluorescence of berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megyesi, Mónika; Biczók, László

    2007-10-01

    Effect of association with chloride or perchlorate anions on the fluorescence properties of berberine, a cationic isoquinoline alkaloid, has been studied. Interaction with Cl - caused more efficient fluorescence quenching; it significantly accelerated the radiationless deactivation and slowed down the radiative transition. Combined analysis of spectrophotometric, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence results provided 1.5 × 10 5 M -1 for the equilibrium constant of ion pairing with Cl - in CH 2Cl 2. Both ion pairing and enrichment of the microenvironment of berberine in ions led to excited state quenching in solvents of medium polarity, but only the latter effect was observed in the presence of perchlorates in butyronitrile.

  17. The effect of pair-instability mass loss on black-hole mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, K.; Heger, A.; Gladysz, W.; Ruiter, A. J.; Woosley, S.; Wiktorowicz, G.; Chen, H.-Y.; Bulik, T.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Holz, D. E.; Fryer, C. L.; Berti, E.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Mergers of two stellar-origin black holes are a prime source of gravitational waves and are under intensive investigation. One crucial ingredient in their modeling has been neglected: pair-instability pulsation supernovae with associated severe mass loss may suppress the formation of massive black holes, decreasing black-hole-merger rates for the highest black-hole masses. Aims: We demonstrate the effects of pair-instability pulsation supernovae on merger rate and mass using populations of double black-hole binaries formed through the isolated binary classical evolution channel. Methods: The mass loss from pair-instability pulsation supernova is estimated based on existing hydrodynamical calculations. This mass loss is incorporated into the StarTrack population synthesis code. StarTrack is used to generate double black-hole populations with and without pair-instability pulsation supernova mass loss. Results: The mass loss associated with pair-instability pulsation supernovae limits the Population I/II stellar-origin black-hole mass to 50 M⊙, in tension with earlier predictions that the maximum black-hole mass could be as high as 100 M⊙. In our model, neutron stars form with mass 1-2 M⊙. We then encounter the first mass gap at 2-5 M⊙ with the compact object absence due to rapid supernova explosions, followed by the formation of black holes with mass 5-50 M⊙, with a second mass gap at 50-135 M⊙ created by pair-instability pulsation supernovae and by pair-instability supernovae. Finally, black holes with masses above 135 M⊙ may potentially form to arbitrarily high mass limited only by the extent of the initial mass function and the strength of stellar winds. Suppression of double black-hole-merger rates by pair-instability pulsation supernovae is negligible for our evolutionary channel. Our standard evolutionary model, with the inclusion of pair-instability pulsation supernovae and pair-instability supernovae, is fully consistent with the Laser

  18. Correlations of thermodynamic effects for developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billet, M. L.; Holl, J. W.; Weir, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    The net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements for a pump are determined by the combined effects of cavitation, fluid properties, pump geometry, and pump operating point. An important part of this determination is the temperature depression (Delta T). Correlations are presented of the temperature depression for various degrees of developed cavitation on venturis and ogives. These correlations, based on a semi-empirical entrainment theory, express Delta T in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, Weber, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length (L/D). The Delta T data were obtained in Freon 114, hydrogen and nitrogen for the venturis and in Freon 113 and water for the ogives.

  19. Hyper-Binding across Time: Age Differences in the Effect of Temporal Proximity on Paired-Associate Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Karen L.; Trelle, Alexandra; Hasher, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Older adults show hyper- (or excessive) binding effects for simultaneously and sequentially presented distraction. Here, we addressed the potential role of hyper-binding in paired-associate learning. Older and younger adults learned a list of word pairs and then received an associative recognition task in which rearranged pairs were formed from…

  20. Efficient and accurate local single reference correlation methods for high-spin open-shell molecules using pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Andreas; Liakos, Dimitrios G.; Neese, Frank

    2011-12-01

    A production level implementation of the high-spin open-shell (spin unrestricted) single reference coupled pair, quadratic configuration interaction and coupled cluster methods with up to doubly excited determinants in the framework of the local pair natural orbital (LPNO) concept is reported. This work is an extension of the closed-shell LPNO methods developed earlier [F. Neese, F. Wennmohs, and A. Hansen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114108 (2009), 10.1063/1.3086717; F. Neese, A. Hansen, and D. G. Liakos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 064103 (2009), 10.1063/1.3173827]. The internal space is spanned by localized orbitals, while the external space for each electron pair is represented by a truncated PNO expansion. The laborious integral transformation associated with the large number of PNOs becomes feasible through the extensive use of density fitting (resolution of the identity (RI)) techniques. Technical complications arising for the open-shell case and the use of quasi-restricted orbitals for the construction of the reference determinant are discussed in detail. As in the closed-shell case, only three cutoff parameters control the average number of PNOs per electron pair, the size of the significant pair list, and the number of contributing auxiliary basis functions per PNO. The chosen threshold default values ensure robustness and the results of the parent canonical methods are reproduced to high accuracy. Comprehensive numerical tests on absolute and relative energies as well as timings consistently show that the outstanding performance of the LPNO methods carries over to the open-shell case with minor modifications. Finally, hyperfine couplings calculated with the variational LPNO-CEPA/1 method, for which a well-defined expectation value type density exists, indicate the great potential of the LPNO approach for the efficient calculation of molecular properties.

  1. Correlated-Participating-Orbitals Pair-Density Functional Method and Application to Multiplet Energy Splittings of Main-Group Divalent Radicals.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Sand, Andrew; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-09-13

    Predicting the singlet-triplet splittings of divalent radicals is a challenging task for electronic structure theory. In the present work, we investigate the performance of multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT) for computing the singlet-triplet splitting for small main-group divalent radicals for which accurate experimental data are available. In order to define theoretical model chemistries that can be assessed consistently, we define three correlated participating orbitals (CPO) schemes (nominal, moderate, and extended, abbreviated as nom, mod, and ext) to define the constitution of complete active spaces, and we test them systematically. Broken-symmetry Kohn-Sham DFT calculations have also been carried out for comparison. We found that the extended CPO-PDFT scheme with translated on-top pair-density functionals have smaller mean unsigned errors than weighted-average broken-symmetry Kohn-Sham DFT with the corresponding exchange-correlation functional. The accuracy of the translated Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (tPBE) on-top pair-density functionals with ext-CPO active space is even better than some of the more accurately parametrized exchange-correlation density functionals that we tested; this is very encouraging for MC-PDFT theory. PMID:27438755

  2. Sensitivity analysis of sub-pixel correlation technique for measuring coseismic displacements using a pair of ASTER images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Muhammad; Anwar, Salma

    2013-01-01

    Coseismic displacements play a key role in understanding earthquake dynamics. To derive displacement fields from optical and microwave remote sensing datasets, various methods are available. This study evaluated in detail the offset tracking technique on optical ASTER data for 2005 Kashmir earthquake. This technique required input parameters like resampling methods, correlator types, window sizes and step sizes. For accurate displacement field calculation, careful selection of these parameters is imperative which depends on the study area and dataset characteristics. In the study, we made relative comparisons of coseismic displacement fields calculated by using different combinations of input parameters. The results were validated by field based displacement data of vertical separation. Validation was based on the hypothesis that horizontal displacement component may also have vertical component contribution depending upon local characteristics of the fault. Validation results showed that general trend of the measured displacements was in agreement with the field data. Field measurements were bounded within the uncertainty limits of the technique however at some locations significant deviations were also observed. All the coseismic displacement results obtained by using different input parameter were within the uncertainty limit ±1/10 of the pixel size, except for window size 4 × 4 and 8 × 8. The measured component of the fault rupture for northwest of Muzaffarabad is irregular. It may be due to rugged topography as compared to southeast part. The measured fault rupture also coincided to surface rupture mapped in the field. Analysis of the results showed that in comparison to standard parameter set, defined in the literature (Sinc resampling method, Frequential correlator with window size 32 × 32 and step size 8), selection of resampling method and correlator type had no significant effect on the calculated displacement field. However, window size and step size

  3. Dynamical memory effects in correlated quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addis, Carole; Karpat, Göktuǧ; Macchiavello, Chiara; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-09-01

    Memory effects play a fundamental role in the study of the dynamics of open quantum systems. There exist two conceptually distinct notions of memory discussed for quantum channels in the literature. In quantum information theory quantum channels with memory are characterized by the existence of correlations between successive applications of the channel on a sequence of quantum systems. In open quantum systems theory memory effects arise dynamically during the time evolution of quantum systems and define non-Markovian dynamics. Here we relate and combine these two different concepts of memory. In particular, we study the interplay between correlations between multiple uses of quantum channels and non-Markovianity as nondivisibility of the t -parametrized family of channels defining the dynamical map.

  4. Investigations of fission characteristics and correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundorin, N. A.; Zeinalov, Sh. S.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Popov, A. B.; Furman, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    We review the experimental results on the P-even and P-odd angular correlations of fission fragments in the fission of the 235U and 239Pu nuclei induced by unpolarized and polarized resonance neutrons, and on the TRI and ROT effects in the ternary and binary fission of actinides induced by polarized thermal neutrons. Also reported are the measured yields of prompt and delayed neutrons per fission event. The experimental data are analyzed within a novel theoretical framework developed by the JINR—RNC KI Collaboration, whereby the reduction of the multidimensional phase space of fission fragments to the JπK-channel space is consistently validated and the role of resonance interference in the observed correlation effects is revealed.

  5. Effects of the plasma profiles on photon and pair production in ultrahigh intensity laser solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Y. X.; Jin, X. L. Yan, W. Z.; Li, J. Q.; Li, B.; Yu, J. Q.

    2015-12-15

    The model of photon and pair production in strong field quantum electrodynamics is implemented into our 1D3V particle-in-cell code with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using this code, the evolution of the particles in ultrahigh intensity laser (∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction with aluminum foil target is observed. Four different initial plasma profiles are considered in the simulations. The effects of initial plasma profiles on photon and pair production, energy spectra, and energy evolution are analyzed. The results imply that one can set an optimal initial plasma profile to obtain the desired photon distributions.

  6. A Multifaceted Approach to Investigating Pre-Task Planning Effects on Paired Oral Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitta, Ryo; Nakatsuhara, Fumiyo

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of paired format speaking assessments, the effects of pre-task planning time on performance in these formats are not yet well understood. For example, some studies have revealed the benefits of planning but others have not. Using a multifaceted approach including analysis of the process of speaking performance, the…

  7. Juvenile social experience affects pairing success at adulthood: congruence with the loser effect?

    PubMed

    Mariette, Mylene M; Cathaud, Charlène; Chambon, Rémi; Vignal, Clémentine

    2013-09-22

    Social interactions with adults are often critical for the development of mating behaviours. However, the potential role of other primary social partners such as juvenile counterparts is rarely considered. Most interestingly, it is not known whether interactions with juvenile females improve males' courtship and whether, similar to the winner and loser effects in a fighting context--outcome of these interactions shapes males' behaviour in future encounters. We investigated the combined effects of male quality and juvenile social experience on pairing success at adulthood in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We manipulated brood size to alter male quality and then placed males in either same- or mixed-sex juvenile dyads until adulthood. We found that males from reduced broods obtained more copulations and males from mixed-sex dyads had more complete courtships. Furthermore, independent of their quality, males that failed to pair with juvenile females, but not juvenile males, had a lower pairing success at adulthood. Our study shows that negative social experience with peers during adolescence may be a potent determinant of pairing success that can override the effects of early environmental conditions on male attractiveness and thereby supports the occurrence of an analogous process to the loser effect in a mating context. PMID:23902911

  8. The Screening Effect in Electromagnetic Production of Electron Positron Pairs in Relativistic Nucleus-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jianshi; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Strayer, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the screening effects of the atomic electrons in the electromagnetic production of electron-positron pairs in relativistic nucleus-atom collisions for fixed target experiments. Our results are contrasted with those obtained in bare collisions, with particular attention given to its dependence on the beam energy and the target atom.

  9. Measuring the Effects of Virtual Pair Programming in an Introductory Programming Java Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharis, N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of virtual pair programming (VPP) on student performance and satisfaction in an introductory Java course. Students used online tools that integrated desktop sharing and real-time communication, and the metrics examined showed that VPP is an acceptable alternative to individual programming experience.…

  10. Synergistic effects of ion pairs on the dielectric properties of diblock copolymer melts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Issei

    2014-12-28

    We study the solvation of ion pairs in diblock copolymer melts. Our theory accounts for the size of the ions, the permanent dipole moment and the molecular polarizability of the monomers, the Kuhn length, the compressibility of the liquid mixtures, and the degrees of polymerization. We demonstrate that the electrostatic field near an ion pair causes marked, synergistic effects on the volume fractions of the two blocks and hence the dielectric function. In particular, we illustrate the oscillatory behavior of the dielectric function near an ion pair and the disparity of the dielectric functions between like and unlike charges. These results depend significantly on the chain length and Kuhn length of the diblock copolymers on the nanometer scale.

  11. Electronic excitations and correlation effects in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Eguiluz, A.G.; Schoene, W.D. |

    1997-07-01

    Theoretical descriptions of the spectrum of electronic excitations in real metals have not yet reached a fully predictive, first-principles stage. In this paper the authors begin by presenting brief highlights of recent progress made in the evaluation of dynamical electronic response in metals. A comparison between calculated and measured spectra--they use the loss spectra of Al and Cs as test cases--leads them to the conclusion that, even in weakly-correlated metals, correlation effects beyond mean-field theory play an important role. Furthermore, the effects of the underlying band structure turn out to be significant. Calculations which incorporate the effects of both dynamical correlations and band structure from first principles are not yet available. As a first step towards such goal, they outline a numerical algorithm for the self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation for the one-particle Green`s function. The self-energy is evaluated within the shielded-interaction approximation of Baym and Kadanoff. Their method, which is fully conserving, is a finite-temperature scheme which determines the Green`s function and the self-energy at the Matsubara frequencies on the imaginary axis. The analytical continuation to real frequencies is performed via Pade` approximant. They present results for the homogeneous electron gas which exemplify the importance of many-body self-consistency.

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Single and Paired Flash Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Strigaro, Gionata; Mayer, Isabella; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Cantello, Roberto; Rothwell, John C

    2015-07-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the occipital cortex has a controversial effect on the visual cortex excitability. Paired flash visual evoked potentials (paired F-VEPs) offer a unique method to express neural inhibition within the visual system. However, no studies have explored the effects of tDCS on F-VEPs in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of single- and paired-F-VEPs during and after tDCS in healthy humans. Twenty-six healthy volunteers participated. F-VEPs were recorded from occipital electrodes with closed eyes. Stimuli were single flashes, intermingled to flash pairs at the interstimulus interval of 125, 62.5, 50, 33.3, 16.6, and 11.1 ms (internal frequency of 8, 16, 20, 30, 60, and 90 Hz). The single F-VEP was split into a "main complex" and a "late response." As to paired stimuli, the "test" F-VEP emerged from electronic subtraction of the single-F-VEP to the paired-F-VEP. In experiment 1, the return electrode was located on the scalp and we studied changes in F-VEPs after anodal, cathodal (1 mA, 15 min) and sham stimulation. A second experiment was performed in which F-VEPs were recorded before, during and after tDCS stimulation (anodal and cathodal) with the return electrode on the neck. F-VEPs recorded in experiment 1 did not detect any significant change after tDCS. In experiment 2 anodal polarization significantly increased the P2 latency (P = .031) and reduced the amplitude of the "late response" of the single F-VEP (P = .008). As for the paired F-VEPs, no significant changes were detected. In conclusion, low-intensity anodal tDCS has weak inhibitory aftereffects on the single F-VEP and no effects on the paired F-VEPs. Further methodological studies are needed to improve polarization efficacy.

  13. Effect of Exposure to Lithium-Paired or Amphetamine-Paired Saccharin Solution on Open Arm Avoidance in an Elevated Plus Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rana, Shadna A.; Parker, Linda A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that drug-induced conditioned taste avoidance may be mediated by conditioned fear (e.g., Parker, 2003). The experiments reported here evaluated the effect of exposure to a drug-paired flavor on open arm exploration in an elevated plus maze (EPM), a measure of fear. When rats were tested on a familiar (trial 2) EPM, but not…

  14. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component experiences a different AMF depending on its internal state. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. In this Letter, we investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal effective charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual balanced charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics.

  15. Suppression of the noninvolved pair of the myeloma isotype correlates with poor survival in newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patients with myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Dejan; Berlanga, Oscar; Zojer, Niklas; Hübl, Wolfgang; Fritz, Veronique; Harding, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Heavy light chain (HLC) assays allow precise measurement of the monoclonal and of the noninvolved polyclonal immunoglobulins of the same isotype as the M‐protein (e.g., monoclonal IgAκ and polyclonal IgAλ in case of an IgAκ myeloma), which was not possible before. The noninvolved polyclonal immunoglobulin is termed ‘HLC‐matched pair’. We investigated the impact of the suppression of the HLC‐matched pair on outcome in 203 patients with multiple myeloma, a phenomenon that likely reflects the host's attempt to control the myeloma clone. Severe (>50%) HLC‐matched pair suppression was identified in 54.5% of the 156 newly diagnosed patients and was associated with significantly shorter survival (45.4 vs. 71.9 months, P = 0.019). This correlation was statistically significant in IgG patients (46.4 vs. 105.1 months, P = 0.017), but not in patients with IgA myelomas (32.9 vs. 54.1 months, P = 0.498). At best response, HLC‐matched pair suppression improved only in patients with ≥VGPR, indicating partial or complete humoral immune reconstitution during remission in those with excellent response. Severe HLC‐matched pair suppression retained its prognostic impact also during follow‐up after first response. In the 47 pretreated patients with relapsed/refractory disease, a similar correlation between severe HLC suppression and survival was noted (22.8 vs. not reached, P = 0.028). Suppression of the polyclonal immunoglobulins of the other isotypes than the myeloma protein correlated neither with HLC‐matched pair suppression, nor with outcome. Multivariate analysis identified severe HLC‐matched pair suppression as independent risk factor for shorter survival, highlighting the impact of isotype specific immune dysregulation on outcome in multiple myeloma. Am. J. Hematol. 91:295–301, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26662888

  16. Theory of correlation effects in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2015-03-15

    A theory of correlation effects in dusty plasmas based on a suitably augmented Debye Huckel approximation is proposed. A model which takes into account the confinement of the dust within the plasma (by external fields) is considered. The dispersion relation of compressional modes with correlation effects is obtained. Results show that strong coupling effects may be subdominant even when Γ ≫ 1. Thus, in the limit Γ→0 and/or κ → ∞, one obtains the weakly coupled dust thermal mode. In the range of values of Γ ≫ 1, the strong coupling effects scale with κ instead of Γ; increasing Γ increases the dust acoustic waves phase velocity C{sub DAW} in this regime. In the limit Γ≫1,κ≪1, one obtains the weakly coupled dust acoustic wave. Only in the limit Γ≫1,κ≥1, one obtains strong coupling effects, e.g., the dust lattice waves (κ=a/λ{sub d}, a is the mean particle distance and λ{sub d} is the Debye length). Observations from a number of experiments are explained.

  17. Data for behavioral results and brain regions showing a time effect during pair-association retrieval.

    PubMed

    Jimura, Koji; Hirose, Satoshi; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Akahane, Masaaki; Machida, Toru; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Koike, Yasuharu; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-09-01

    The current data article provides behavioral and neuroimaging data for the research article "Relatedness-dependent rapid development of brain activity in anterior temporal cortex during pair-association retrieval" (Jimura et al., 2016) [1]. Behavioral performance is provided in a table. Fig. 2 of the article is based on this table. Brain regions showing time effect are provided in a table. A statistical activation map for the time effect is shown in Fig. 3C of the article. PMID:27508239

  18. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, Nur; Oktel, M. O.

    2016-05-01

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component couples to the AMF with a different charge. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. We investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of the field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual equal charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics.

  19. Correlation effects in the iron pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jian-xin; Si, Qimiao; Abrahams, Elihu; Dai, Jianhui

    2009-01-01

    One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared to the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately-coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V{sub 2}O{sub 3} a or Se-doped NiS{sub 2} , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analyses, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multi band matrix t-J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

  20. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  1. Flexibility of short DNA helices with finite-length effect: From base pairs to tens of base pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-03-28

    Flexibility of short DNA helices is important for the biological functions such as nucleosome formation and DNA-protein recognition. Recent experiments suggest that short DNAs of tens of base pairs (bps) may have apparently higher flexibility than those of kilo bps, while there is still the debate on such high flexibility. In the present work, we have studied the flexibility of short DNAs with finite-length of 5–50 bps by the all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo simulations with the worm-like chain model. Our microscopic analyses reveal that short DNAs have apparently high flexibility which is attributed to the significantly strong bending and stretching flexibilities of ∼6 bps at each helix end. Correspondingly, the apparent persistence length l{sub p} of short DNAs increases gradually from ∼29 nm to ∼45 nm as DNA length increases from 10 to 50 bps, in accordance with the available experimental data. Our further analyses show that the short DNAs with excluding ∼6 bps at each helix end have the similar flexibility with those of kilo bps and can be described by the worm-like chain model with l{sub p} ∼ 50 nm.

  2. Electron-hole pair effects in methane dissociative chemisorption on Ni(111).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuan; Jiang, Bin; Juaristi, J Iñaki; Alducin, Maite; Guo, Hua

    2016-07-28

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces has attracted much attention in recent years as a prototype of gas-surface reactions in understanding the mode specific and bond selective chemistry. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of electron-hole pair excitations on the dissociative chemisorption of CH4/CH3D/CHD3 on Ni(111). The energy dissipation induced by surface electron-hole pair excitations is modeled as a friction force introduced in the generalized Langevin equation, in which the independent atomic friction coefficients are determined within the local-density friction approximation. Quasi-classical trajectory calculations for CH4/CH3D/CHD3 have been carried out on a recently developed twelve-dimensional potential energy surface. Comparing the dissociation probabilities obtained with and without friction, our results clearly indicate that the electron-hole pair effects are generally small, both on absolute reactivity of each vibrational state and on the mode specificity and bond selectivity. Given similar observations in both water and methane dissociation processes, we conclude that electron-hole pair excitations would not play an important role as long as the reaction is direct and the interaction time between the molecule and metal electrons is relatively short. PMID:27475383

  3. Electron-hole pair effects in methane dissociative chemisorption on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuan; Jiang, Bin; Juaristi, J. Iñaki; Alducin, Maite; Guo, Hua

    2016-07-01

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces has attracted much attention in recent years as a prototype of gas-surface reactions in understanding the mode specific and bond selective chemistry. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of electron-hole pair excitations on the dissociative chemisorption of CH4/CH3D/CHD3 on Ni(111). The energy dissipation induced by surface electron-hole pair excitations is modeled as a friction force introduced in the generalized Langevin equation, in which the independent atomic friction coefficients are determined within the local-density friction approximation. Quasi-classical trajectory calculations for CH4/CH3D/CHD3 have been carried out on a recently developed twelve-dimensional potential energy surface. Comparing the dissociation probabilities obtained with and without friction, our results clearly indicate that the electron-hole pair effects are generally small, both on absolute reactivity of each vibrational state and on the mode specificity and bond selectivity. Given similar observations in both water and methane dissociation processes, we conclude that electron-hole pair excitations would not play an important role as long as the reaction is direct and the interaction time between the molecule and metal electrons is relatively short.

  4. Effects of strong magnetic fields on pairing fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschrig, M.; Rainer, D.; Sauls, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    We present the theory for the effects of superconducting pairing fluctuations on the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and the NMR Knight shift for layered superconductors in high magnetic fields. These results can be used to clarify the origin of the pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates, which has been attributed to spin fluctuations as well as pairing fluctuations. We present theoretical results for s-wave and d-wave pairing fluctuations and show that recent experiments in optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ are described by d-wave pairing fluctuations [V. F. Mitrović et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2784 (1999); H. N. Bachman et al. (unpublished)]. In addition, we show that the orthorhombic distortion in YBa2Cu3O7-δ accounts for an experimentally observed discrepancy between 1/T1 obtained by nuclear quadrupole resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance at low field. We propose an NMR experiment to distinguish a fluctuating s-wave order parameter from a fluctuating strongly anisotropic order parameter, which may be applied to the system Nd2-xCexCuO4-δ and possibly other layered superconductors.

  5. Allowing for Correlations between Correlations in Random-Effects Meta-Analysis of Correlation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevost, A. Toby; Mason, Dan; Griffin, Simon; Kinmonth, Ann-Louise; Sutton, Stephen; Spiegelhalter, David

    2007-01-01

    Practical meta-analysis of correlation matrices generally ignores covariances (and hence correlations) between correlation estimates. The authors consider various methods for allowing for covariances, including generalized least squares, maximum marginal likelihood, and Bayesian approaches, illustrated using a 6-dimensional response in a series of…

  6. Effects of electrostatic correlations on electrokinetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Storey, Brian D; Bazant, Martin Z

    2012-11-01

    The classical theory of electrokinetic phenomena is based on the mean-field approximation that the electric field acting on an individual ion is self-consistently determined by the local mean charge density. This paper considers situations, such as concentrated electrolytes, multivalent electrolytes, or solvent-free ionic liquids, where the mean-field approximation breaks down. A fourth-order modified Poisson equation is developed that captures the essential features in a simple continuum framework. The model is derived as a gradient approximation for nonlocal electrostatics of interacting effective charges, where the permittivity becomes a differential operator, scaled by a correlation length. The theory is able to capture subtle aspects of molecular simulations and allows for simple calculations of electrokinetic flows in correlated ionic fluids. Charge-density oscillations tend to reduce electro-osmotic flow and streaming current, and overscreening of surface charge can lead to flow reversal. These effects also help to explain the suppression of induced-charge electrokinetic phenomena at high salt concentrations. PMID:23214872

  7. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized.

  8. Stimulant drug effects on touchscreen automated paired-associates learning (PAL) in rats.

    PubMed

    Roschlau, Corinna; Votteler, Angeline; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Here we tested in rats effects of the procognitive drugs modafinil and methylphenidate on post-acquisition performance in an object-location paired-associates learning (PAL) task. Modafinil (32; 64 mg/kg) was without effect, while higher (9 mg/kg) but not lower (4.5 mg/kg) doses of methylphenidate impaired PAL performance. Likewise, higher but not lower doses of amphetamine (0.4; 0.8 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.08; 0.12 mg/kg) decreased PAL performance. Impaired PAL performance induced by methylphenidate, amphetamine, and MK801 most likely reflects compromised cognitive function, e.g., retrieval of learned paired associates. Our data suggest that stimulant drugs such as methylphenidate and modafinil might not facilitate performance in hippocampus-related cognitive tasks. PMID:27421894

  9. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal's method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth's ionosphere.

  10. Effects of halogen substitution on Watson-Crick base pairing: a possible mechanism for radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Heshmati, Emran; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mozdarani, Hossein; Sarvestani, Amir Sabet

    2009-09-01

    The halogen substituent effect on geometries and charge distributions of the A-T base pair derivatives was evaluated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-31G* level. The results indicate that all of the substitutions affect geometries and charge distributions of the atoms contributing hydrogen bonds. These changes would be the reason of the radiosensitization of these compounds incorporating DNA. PMID:19643605

  11. Effect of PEG pairing on the efficiency of cancer-targeting liposomes.

    PubMed

    Saw, Phei Er; Park, Jinho; Lee, Eunbeol; Ahn, Sukyung; Lee, Jinju; Kim, Hyungjun; Kim, Jinjoo; Choi, Minsuk; Farokhzad, Omid C; Jon, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    Standardized poly(ethylene glycol)-modified (PEGylated) liposomes, which have been widely used in research as well as in pre-clinical and clinical studies, are typically constructed using PEG with a molecular weight of 2000 Da (PEG(2000)). Targeting ligands are also generally conjugated using various functionalized PEG(2000)). However, although standardized protocols have routinely used PEG(2000), it is not because this molecular weight PEG has been optimized to enhance tumor uptake of nanoparticles. Herein, we investigated the effect of various PEG lipid pairings--that is, PEG lipids for targeting-ligand conjugation and PEG lipids for achieving 'stealth' function--on in vitro cancer cell- and in vivo tumor-targeting efficacy. A class of high-affinity peptides (aptides) specific to extra domain B of fibronectin (APT(EDB)) was used as a representative model for a cancer-targeting ligand. We synthesized a set of aptide-conjugated PEGylated phospholipids (APT(EDB)‑PEG(2000))‑DSPE and APT(EDB)‑PEG(2000))‑DSPE) and then paired them with methoxy-capped PEGylated phospholipids with diverse molecular weights (PEG(2000)), PEG(2000)), PEG(2000)), and PEG(2000))) to construct various aptide-conjugated PEGylated liposomes. The liposomes with APT(EDB)‑PEG(2000))/PEG(2000)) and APT(EDB)‑PEG(2000))/PEG(2000)) pairings had the highest uptake in EDB-positive cancer cells. Furthermore, in a U87MG xenograft model, APT(EDB)‑PEG(2000))/PEG(2000)) liposomes retarded tumor growth to the greatest extent, followed closely by APT(EDB)‑PEG(2000))/PEG(2000)) liposomes. Among the PEGylated liposomes tested, pairs in which the methoxy-capped PEG length was about half that of the targeting ligand-displaying PEG exhibited the best performance, suggesting that PEG pairing is a key consideration in the design of drug-delivery vehicles. PMID:25897339

  12. Cooper pair transfer in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, G.; Idini, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2013-10-01

    The second-order distorted wave Born approximation implementation of two-particle transfer direct reactions which includes simultaneous and successive transfer, properly corrected by non-orthogonality effects, is tested with the help of controlled nuclear structure and reaction inputs against data spanning the whole mass table, and showed to constitute a quantitative probe of nuclear pairing correlations.

  13. The cuprate superconductors: Narrow correlated-electron bands and interlayer pairing via plane-chain charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazi, J.; Kuper, C. G.

    1989-12-01

    The cuprate superconductors are modelled by two metallic CuO 2planes, separated by insulating layers, in an extended Hubbard Hamiltonian. Hybridization of O(2 p) and Cu( d) orbitals splits the wide bands of LDA theory, yielding a narrow conduction band of antibonding holes. Holes on the two CuO 2 planes are correlated via interplane hopping, giving a non-magnetic normal Fermi liquid. Charge exchange between the planes and the intervening layers generates attraction and a BCS condensation.

  14. An Intriguing Correlation Based on the Superimposition of Residue Pairs with Inhibitors that Target Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakadai, Masakazu; Tomida, Shuta; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Druggable sites on protein-protein interfaces are difficult to predict. To survey inhibitor-binding sites onto which residues are superimposed at protein-protein interfaces, we analyzed publicly available information for 39 inhibitors that target the protein-protein interfaces of 8 drug targets. By focusing on the differences between residues that were superimposed with inhibitors and non-superimposed residues, we observed clear differences in the distances and changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas (∆SASA). Based on the observation that two or more residues were superimposed onto inhibitors in 37 (95%) of 39 protein-inhibitor complexes, we focused on the two-residue relationships. Application of a cross-validation procedure confirmed a linear negative correlation between the absolute value of the dihedral angle and the sum of the ∆SASAs of the residues. Finally, we applied the regression equation of this correlation to four inhibitors that bind to new sites not bound by the 39 inhibitors as well as additional inhibitors of different targets. Our results shed light on the two-residue correlation between the absolute value of the dihedral angle and the sum of the ∆SASA, which may be a useful relationship for identifying the key two-residues as potential targets of protein-protein interfaces. PMID:26730437

  15. A critical base pair in k-turns determines the conformational class adopted, and correlates with biological function

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Wang, Jia; Lilley, David M. J.

    2016-01-01

    k-turns are commonly-occurring motifs that introduce sharp kinks into duplex RNA, thereby facilitating tertiary contacts. Both the folding and conformation of k-turns are determined by their local sequence. k-turns fall into two conformational classes, called N3 and N1, that differ in the pattern of hydrogen bonding in the core. We show here that this is determined by the basepair adjacent to the critical G•A pairs. We determined crystal structures of a series of Kt-7 variants in which this 3b,3n position has been systematically varied, showing that this leads to a switch in the conformation. We have previously shown that the 3b,3n position also determines the folding characteristics of the k-turn, i.e. whether or not the k-turn can fold in the presence of metal ions alone. We have analyzed the distribution of 3b,3n sequences from four classes of k-turns from ribosomes, riboswitches and U4 snRNA, finding a strong conservation of properties for a given k-turn type. We thus demonstrate a strong association between biological function, 3b,3n sequence and k-turn folding and conformation. This has strong predictive power, and can be applied to the modeling of large RNA architectures. PMID:27016741

  16. A critical base pair in k-turns determines the conformational class adopted, and correlates with biological function.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Wang, Jia; Lilley, David M J

    2016-06-20

    k-turns are commonly-occurring motifs that introduce sharp kinks into duplex RNA, thereby facilitating tertiary contacts. Both the folding and conformation of k-turns are determined by their local sequence. k-turns fall into two conformational classes, called N3 and N1, that differ in the pattern of hydrogen bonding in the core. We show here that this is determined by the basepair adjacent to the critical G•A pairs. We determined crystal structures of a series of Kt-7 variants in which this 3b,3n position has been systematically varied, showing that this leads to a switch in the conformation. We have previously shown that the 3b,3n position also determines the folding characteristics of the k-turn, i.e. whether or not the k-turn can fold in the presence of metal ions alone. We have analyzed the distribution of 3b,3n sequences from four classes of k-turns from ribosomes, riboswitches and U4 snRNA, finding a strong conservation of properties for a given k-turn type. We thus demonstrate a strong association between biological function, 3b,3n sequence and k-turn folding and conformation. This has strong predictive power, and can be applied to the modeling of large RNA architectures. PMID:27016741

  17. Correlates of Baclofen Effectiveness in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Shukla, Tulika; Bokka, Spandana; Kandasamy, Arun; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima; Chand, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a global concern. Baclofen has shown promise as an anti-craving agent but its efficiency remains to be settled. We reviewed 549 male cases diagnosed with alcohol dependence who received Acamprosate (201) or Baclofen (348). ‘Time to first drink’ was compared between two groups and multiple regression analysis was done in baclofen group to identify correlates of effectiveness. There was a significant difference in outcome measure between Baclofen (M = 4.44, SD = 3.75) and Acamprosate group (M = 3.73, SD = 2.19); t (547) = 2.45, P = 0.01. Initial regression analysis with six predictor variables (average daily alcohol units, current age, age at onset of dependence, family history, duration of dependence and dose of baclofen in mg/day) showed significant correlation of outcome variable with only two predictor variables — dose of baclofen and average daily intake. Using the hierarchical method it was found that ‘dose of baclofen’ and ‘average alcohol intake’ explain a significant amount of variance in ‘time to first drink’. [F (1, 345) = 182.8, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.52, R2adjusted = 0.51]. This information can be used to select patients in long term longitudinal studies and may explain variable results seen in clinical trials of baclofen done earlier. PMID:26664095

  18. Spin Susceptibility and Effects of Inhomogeneous Strong Pairing Fluctuations in a Trapped Ultracold Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, H.; Hanai, R.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate magnetic properties of a unitary Fermi gas in a harmonic trap. Including strong pairing fluctuations within the framework of an extended T-matrix approximation, as well as effects of a trap potential within the local density approximation, we calculate the local spin susceptibility χ (T,r) above the superfluid phase transition temperature T_c. We show that the formation of preformed singlet Cooper pairs anomalously suppresses χ (T,r) in the trap center near T_c. We also point out that, in the unitarity limit, the spin-gap temperature in a uniform Fermi gas can be evaluated from the observation of the spatial variation of χ (T,r). Since a real ultracold Fermi gas is always in a trap potential, our results would be useful for the study of how this spatial inhomogeneity affects thermodynamic properties of an ultracold Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover region.

  19. Spectroscopic Evidence of the Aharonov-Casher Effect in a Cooper Pair Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. T.; Zhang, W.; Ioffe, L. B.; Gershenson, M. E.

    2016-03-01

    We observe the effect of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) interference on the spectrum of a superconducting system containing a symmetric Cooper pair box (CPB) and a large inductance. By varying the charge ng induced on the CPB island, we observe oscillations of the device spectrum with the period Δ ng=2 e . These oscillations are attributed to the charge-controlled AC interference between the fluxon tunneling processes in the CPB Josephson junctions. The measured phase and charge dependences of the frequencies of the |0 ⟩→|1 ⟩ and |0 ⟩→|2 ⟩ transitions are in good agreement with our numerical simulations. Almost complete suppression of the single fluxon tunneling due to destructive interference is observed for the charge ng=e (2 n +1 ). The CPB in this regime enables fluxon pairing, which can be used for the development of parity-protected superconducting qubits.

  20. Strong-field Breit-Wheeler pair production in short laser pulses: Relevance of spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M. J. A.; Kamiński, J. Z.; Krajewska, K.; Müller, C.

    2016-07-01

    Production of electron-positron pairs in the collision of a high-energy photon with a high-intensity few-cycle laser pulse is studied. By utilizing the frameworks of laser-dressed spinor and scalar quantum electrodynamics, a comparison between the production of pairs of Dirac and Klein-Gordon particles is drawn. Positron energy spectra and angular distributions are presented for various laser parameters. We identify conditions under which predictions from Klein-Gordon theory either closely resemble or largely differ from those of the proper Dirac theory. In particular, we address the question to which extent the relevance of spin effects is influenced by the short duration of the laser pulse.

  1. Effect of the stability of hydrogen-bonded ion pairs with organic amines on transdermal penetration of teriflunomide.

    PubMed

    Xi, Honglei; Cun, Dongmei; Wang, Zhongyan; Shang, Lei; Song, Wenting; Mu, Liwei; Fang, Liang

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the stability of hydrogen-bonded ion pairs with organic amines on transdermal penetration of teriflunomide (TEF). Five organic amines, diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA), and N-(2'-hydroxyethanol)-piperdine (NP), were chosen to form ion pairs with TEF separately, and the passage of each TEF ion pair through the rabbit skin was evaluated in vitro. FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were performed to confirm the formation of ion pairs between TEF and organic amines in solution. The stability parameter of ion pairs in terms of ion-pair lifetimes (T(life)) was calculated from the NMR data. TEF could form ion pairs with these amines via hydrogen bond. The formation of ion pairs enhanced the percutaneous absorption of TEF except TEF-DEA. It was found that, for most studied organic amines, the longer the ion-pair lifetime, the higher the flux of skin permeation. The stability of TEF ion pairs was a pivotal factor influencing the skin permeation of TEF. PMID:22796174

  2. Saturation effects in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Shen, Guoqing; Ball, David A.

    2005-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) could provide a more useful tool for intracellular studies and biological sample characterization if measurement times could be reduced. While an increase in laser power can enable an autocorrelation function (ACF) with adequate signal-to-noise to be acquired within a shorter measurement time, excitation saturation then leads to distortion of the ACF and systematic errors in the measurement results. An empirical method for achieving reduced systematic errors by employing a fitting function with an additional adjustable parameter has been previously introduced for two-photon FCS. Here we provide a unified physical explanation of excitation saturation effects for the three cases of continuous-wave, pulsed one-photon excitation, and two-photon excitation FCS. When the time between laser pulses is longer than the fluorescence lifetime, the signal rate at which excitation saturation occurs is lower for pulsed excitation than for cw excitation, and due to the disparate timescales of the photophysical processes following excitation, it is lower still for two-photon excitation. We use a single-molecule description of FCS to obtain improved analytical ACF fitting functions for the three cases. The fitting functions more accurately account for saturation effects than those previously employed without the need for an additional empirical parameter. Use of these fitting functions removes systematic errors and enables measurements to be acquired more quickly by use of higher laser powers. Increase of background, triplet photophysics, and the cases of scanning FCS and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy are also discussed. Experimental results acquired with a custom built apparatus are presented.

  3. Multifrequency sources of quantum correlated photon pairs on-chip: a path toward integrated Quantum Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspani, Lucia; Reimer, Christian; Kues, Michael; Roztocki, Piotr; Clerici, Matteo; Wetzel, Benjamin; Jestin, Yoann; Ferrera, Marcello; Peccianti, Marco; Pasquazi, Alessia; Razzari, Luca; Little, Brent E.; Chu, Sai T.; Moss, David J.; Morandotti, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in quantum photonics have initiated the process of bringing photonic-quantumbased systems out-of-the-lab and into real-world applications. As an example, devices to enable the exchange of a cryptographic key secured by the laws of quantum mechanics are already commercially available. In order to further boost this process, the next step is to transfer the results achieved by means of bulky and expensive setups into miniaturized and affordable devices. Integrated quantum photonics is exactly addressing this issue. In this paper, we briefly review the most recent advancements in the generation of quantum states of light on-chip. In particular, we focus on optical microcavities, as they can offer a solution to the problem of low efficiency that is characteristic of the materials typically used in integrated platforms. In addition, we show that specifically designed microcavities can also offer further advantages, such as compatibility with telecom standards (for exploiting existing fibre networks) and quantum memories (necessary to extend the communication distance), as well as giving a longitudinal multimode character for larger information transfer and processing. This last property (i.e., the increased dimensionality of the photon quantum state) is achieved through the ability to generate multiple photon pairs on a frequency comb, corresponding to the microcavity resonances. Further achievements include the possibility of fully exploiting the polarization degree of freedom, even for integrated devices. These results pave the way for the generation of integrated quantum frequency combs that, in turn, may find important applications toward the realization of a compact quantum-computing platform.

  4. Pairing Learners by Companionship: Effects on Motor Skill Performance and Comfort Levels in the Reciprocal Style of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatoupis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Mosston and Ashworth's (2008) reciprocal style of teaching gives learners the opportunity to work in pairs to support each other's learning (one practices a task and the other gives feedback). The effects of pairing learners by companionship (friend and nonacquaintance) on 8-year-old children's motor skill performance and comfort levels were…

  5. The Effects of Answer Copying on the Ability Level Estimates of Cheater Examinees in Answer Copying Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zopluoglu, Cengiz; Davenport, Ernest C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of answer copying on the ability level estimates of cheater examinees in answer copying pairs. The study generated answer copying pairs for each of 1440 conditions, source ability (12) x cheater ability (12) x amount of copying (10). The average difference between the ability level estimates…

  6. Integer quantum Hall effect and correlated disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Greshnov, A. A. Zegrya, G. G.

    2007-11-15

    The effect of the form of the random potential of impurities and defects on the longitudinal {sigma}{sub xx} and Hall {sigma}{sub xy} components of conductivity in the mode of the integer quantum Hall effect is theoretically investigated. It is shown that the width of the Hall conductivity plateau as well as the peak values of the longitudinal conductivity heavily depend on the ratio {lambda}/a{sub H} between the random potential correlation length and the magnetic length. For the first time, it is established that in the case of the short-wavelength potential {lambda} << a{sub H}, the peak values of {sigma}{sub xx}{sup (N)} are directly proportional to the Landau level number N {>=} 1, {sigma}{sub xx} = 0.5Ne{sup 2}/h, whereas the peak values of {sigma}{sub xx}{sup (N)} are independent of the Landau level number in the case of the long-wavelength potential {lambda} >> a{sub H}, and their magnitude is much lower than 0.5e{sup 2}/h. The obtained results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  7. Effect of BCS pairing on entrainment in neutron superfluid current in neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Brandon; Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2005-09-01

    The relative current density n of “conduction” neutrons in a neutron star crust beyond the neutron drip threshold can be expected to be related to the corresponding particle momentum covector p by a linear relation of the form n=Kp in terms of a physically well-defined mobility tensor K. This result is describable as an “entrainment” whose effect—wherever the crust lattice is isotropic—will simply be to change the ordinary neutron mass m to a “macroscopic” effective mass m such that in terms of the relevant number density n of unconfined neutrons we shall have K=(n/m)γ. In a preceding work based on a independent particle treatment beyond the Wigner Seitz approximation, using Bloch type boundary conditions to obtain the distribution of energy E and associated group velocity vki=∂E/∂ℏk as a function of wave vector k, it was shown that the mobility tensor would be proportional to a phase space volume integral K∝∫dkvkivkjδ{E-μ}, where μ is the Fermi energy. Using the approach due to Bogoliubov, it is shown here that the effect of BCS pairing with a superfluid energy gap Δ and corresponding quasiparticle energy function €=E+ΔF2 will just be to replace the Dirac distributional integrand by the smoother distribution in the formula K∝∫dkvkivkjΔF2/€k3. It is also shown how the pairing condensation gives rise to superfluidity in the technical sense of providing (meta) stability against resistive perturbations for a current that is not too strong (its momentum p must be small enough to give 2|pvki|<€k2/|E-μ| for all modes). It is concluded that the prediction of a very large effective mass enhancement in the middle layers of the star crust will not be significantly effected by the pairing mechanism.

  8. Neutron-Proton Pairing Correlation for the Rotational Motion of N = Z 72Kr, 76Sr, and 80Zr Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prianka; Dhiman, Shashi K.

    The high-spin state properties of the neutron-proton (np) residual effective interaction are analyzed in N = Z 72Kr, 76Sr, and 80Zr nuclei. The self-consistent microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) equations have been solved by employing monopole corrected two-body effective interaction. A band crossing is observed in 72Kr nucleus at J = 14ℏ state with monopole corrected "HPU1" and "HPU2" effective interactions. The VAP-HFB theory suggests that the "4p-4h" excitations by np residual interaction are the essential ingredients of the mean-field description of the occurence of backbending in 72Kr nucleus.

  9. Imaging the pair-correlated HNCO photodissociation: the NH(a1Δ) + CO(X1Σ+) channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Zhichao; Huang, Cunshun; Chen, Yang; Dai, Dongxu; Parker, David H; Yang, Xueming

    2014-04-01

    The NH(a(1)Δ) + CO(X(1)Σ(+)) product channel for the photodissociation of HNCO at 201 nm was investigated using the sliced velocity map ion imaging technique with the detection of NH(a(1)Δ) products via (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Images were measured for the NH(a(1)Δ) rotational states in the ground and vibrational excited states (v = 0 and 1). Correlation between the NH(a(1)Δ) and CO rovibrational state distributions were determined from these images. Experimental results show that the vibrational distribution of the CO fragment in the NH(a(1)Δ) + CO(X(1)Σ(+)) channel peaks at v = 1. The negative anisotropy parameter measured for the NH(a(1)Δ) (v = 0 and 1|j) products indicates a direct dissociation process for the N-C bond cleavage in the S1 state. A bimodal CO rotational distribution was observed, suggesting that HNCO dissociates in the S1 state in two distinctive pathways. PMID:24611876

  10. Effects of ionic strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Volcke, Eveline I P; Tait, Stephan; Batstone, Damien; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Plant-wide models of wastewater treatment (such as the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 or BSM2) are gaining popularity for use in holistic virtual studies of treatment plant control and operations. The objective of this study is to show the influence of ionic strength (as activity corrections) and ion pairing on modelling of anaerobic digestion processes in such plant-wide models of wastewater treatment. Using the BSM2 as a case study with a number of model variants and cationic load scenarios, this paper presents the effects of an improved physico-chemical description on model predictions and overall plant performance indicators, namely effluent quality index (EQI) and operational cost index (OCI). The acid-base equilibria implemented in the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) are modified to account for non-ideal aqueous-phase chemistry. The model corrects for ionic strength via the Davies approach to consider chemical activities instead of molar concentrations. A speciation sub-routine based on a multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson (NR) iteration method is developed to address algebraic interdependencies. The model also includes ion pairs that play an important role in wastewater treatment. The paper describes: 1) how the anaerobic digester performance is affected by physico-chemical corrections; 2) the effect on pH and the anaerobic digestion products (CO2, CH4 and H2); and, 3) how these variations are propagated from the sludge treatment to the water line. Results at high ionic strength demonstrate that corrections to account for non-ideal conditions lead to significant differences in predicted process performance (up to 18% for effluent quality and 7% for operational cost) but that for pH prediction, activity corrections are more important than ion pairing effects. Both are likely to be required when precipitation is to be modelled.

  11. Enol tautomers of Watson-Crick base pair models are metastable because of nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alejandro; Tuckerman, Mark E; Hjalmarson, Harold P; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2010-08-25

    Intermolecular enol tautomers of Watson-Crick base pairs could emerge spontaneously via interbase double proton transfer. It has been hypothesized that their formation could be facilitated by thermal fluctuations and proton tunneling, and possibly be relevant to DNA damage. Theoretical and computational studies, assuming classical nuclei, have confirmed the dynamic stability of these rare tautomers. However, by accounting for nuclear quantum effects explicitly through Car-Parrinello path integral molecular dynamics calculations, we find the tautomeric enol form to be dynamically metastable, with lifetimes too insignificant to be implicated in DNA damage. PMID:20681591

  12. Electron-Hole Pair Effects in Polyatomic Dissociative Chemisorption: Water on Ni(111).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Alducin, Maite; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-21

    The influence of electron-hole pairs in dissociative chemisorption of a polyatomic molecule (water) on metal surfaces is assessed for the first time using a friction approach. The atomic local density dependent friction coefficients computed based on a free electron gas embedding model are employed in classical molecular dynamics simulations of the water dissociation dynamics on rigid Ni(111) using a recently developed nine dimensional interaction potential energy surface for the system. The results indicate that nonadiabatic effects are relatively small and they do not qualitatively alter the mode specificity in the dissociation. PMID:26732612

  13. Marijuana effects on visual imagery in a paired-associate task.

    PubMed

    Block, R I; Wittenborn, J R

    1984-06-01

    Marijuana effects on visual imagery, examined using a paired-associate learning task, differed from expectations based on previous subjective reports that marijuana enhances visual imagery. Subjects (48 men, mean age 22.4 yr.) were assigned to four groups (12 subjects per group) differing in (a) whether or not they received specific instructions to use imagery to facilitate learning and (b) whether they received marijuana or placebo. Imagery instructions improved recall, but marijuana did not influence the amount of this improvement. After the memory tests, subjects instructed to use imagery described their images. Marijuana decreased the rated vividness of these imagery descriptions.

  14. Approaching magnetic field effects in biology using the radical pair mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jeffrey Michael

    1997-11-01

    The overall goal of this thesis has been to explain any of the reported magnetic field effects in biology (magnetic orientation of many species and/or health effects, such as cancer, due to man-made electromagnetic fields) using the radical pair mechanism, a quantum mechanical mechanism known for over 20 years that lets singlet-to-triplet yields (which can be related to reaction rates) of radical pair reactions depend on applied magnetic fields. This goal seems reasonable considering the known roles of many biological free radicals in cancer, disease, aging, development, and cellular signaling, the constant reminders in the media to take anti-oxidant vitamins to protect against certain deleterious free radicals, and the success of the radical pair mechanism in explaining magnetic field effects in photosynthetic reaction centers. To approach the above goal, this thesis develops several methods (using perturbation theory and other techniques in the Schrodinger and Liouville formalisms) for calculating singlet-to-triplet yields in combinations of steady and oscillating fields (some of these algorithms are more versatile or efficient while others give more insight, and all serve as cross-checks on each other) and uses these tools to explore and explain a number of interesting phenomena such as yields sensitive to the magnitude and orientation of earth-strength (0.5 G) steady fields as well as the magnitude, orientation, and frequency of very weak (7 mG or less) oscillating fields. In particular, this thesis examines such effects in several coenzyme B12 systems, systems long studied by EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, the chief method for determining the spin Hamiltonians, spin relaxation rates, and other parameters needed for calculations) in which organometallic cobalt-carbon bonds are often cleaved homolytically to form radical pairs. Among the B12-dependent enzymes are ribonucleotide reductase (which converts RNA to DNA nucleotides), methyl malonyl CoA mutase

  15. Bidirectional electron transfer in photosystem I: determination of two distances between P700+ and A1- in spin-correlated radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Kuprov, Ilya; Fairclough, Wendy V; Purton, Saul; Hore, Peter J; Heathcote, Peter; Evans, Mike C W

    2005-02-15

    The spin-correlated radical pair [P(700)(+)A(1)(-)] gives rise to a characteristic "out-of-phase" electron spin-echo signal. The electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) of these signals has been studied in thylakoids prepared from the wild-type strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in two site-directed mutants, in which the methionine residue which acts as the axial ligand to the chlorin electron acceptor A(0) has been substituted with a histidine either on the PsaA (PsaA-M684H) or the PsaB (PsaB-M664H) reaction center subunits. The analysis of the time domain ESEEM provides information about the spin-spin interaction in the [P(700)(+)A(1)(-)] radical pair, and the values of the dipolar (D) and the exchange (J) interaction can be extracted. From the distance dependence of the dipolar coupling term, the distance between the unpaired electron spin density clouds of the primary donor P(700)(+) and the phyllosemiquinone A(1)(-) can be determined. The [P(700)(+)A(1)(-)] ESEEM spectrum obtained in wild-type thylakoids can be reconstructed using a linear combination of the spectra measured in the PsaA and PsaB A(0) mutants, demonstrating that electron transfer resulting in charge separation is occurring on both the PsaA and PsaB branches. The [P(700)(+)A(1B)(-)] distance in the point dipole approximation in the PsaA-M684H mutant is 24.27 +/- 0.02 A, and the [P(700)(+)A(1A)(-)] distance in the PsaB-M664H mutant is 25.43 +/- 0.01 A. An intermediate value of 25.01 +/- 0.02 A is obtained in the wild-type membranes which exhibit both spin-polarized pairs.

  16. Dynamics of the cage effect in recombination of radical pairs originating in the triplet state. Effect of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, P.P.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1986-11-01

    The kinetics of recombination of radical pairs formed in transfer of a hydrogen atom from p-cresol and aniline to the triplet of benzophenone were studied in a pulsed laser photolysis system based on a nitrogen laser with a recording system resolving time of 10 nanoseconds. The dynamics of the cage effect in recombination of the radical pairs arising in the triplet state were recorded. The magnitude of the cage effect was found to increase with a decrease in the solution temperature. It was found necessary to consider the effects of proximity for a quantitative theoretical description of geminal recombination. Application of an external magnetic field was found to retard recombination. The magnetic effects should apparently be considered within the framework of a relaxation mechanism of spin dynamics.

  17. Fluctuation-driven anisotropy in effective pair interactions between nanoparticles: Thiolated gold nanoparticles in ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Jabes, B. Shadrack; Yadav, Hari O. S.; Chakravarty, Charusita; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-10-21

    Fluctuations within the ligand shell of a nanoparticle give rise to a significant degree of anisotropy in effective pair interactions for low grafting densities [B. Bozorgui, D. Meng, S. K. Kumar, C. Chakravarty, and A. Cacciuto, Nano Lett. 13, 2732 (2013)]. Here, we examine the corresponding fluctuation-driven anisotropy for gold nanocrystals densely passivated with short ligands. In particular, we consider gold nanocrystals capped by alkylthiols, both in vacuum and in ethane solvent at high density. As in the preceding study, we show that the anisotropy in the nanoparticle pair potential can be quantified by an angle-dependent correction term to the isotropic potential of mean force (PMF). We find that the anisotropy of the ligand shells is distance dependent, and strongly influenced by ligand interdigitation effects as well as expulsion of ligand chains from the interparticle region at short distances. Such fluctuation-driven anisotropy can be significant for alkylthiol-coated gold nanoparticles, specially for longer chain lengths, under good solvent conditions. The consequences of such anisotropy for self-assembly, specially as a function of grafting density, solvent quality and at interfaces, should provide some interesting insights in future work. Our results clearly show that an isotropic two-body PMF cannot adequately describe the thermodynamics and assembly behavior of nanoparticles in this dense grafting regime and inclusion of anisotropic effects, as well as possibly many-body interactions, is necessary. Extensions of this approach to other passivated nanoparticle systems and implications for self-assembly are considered.

  18. When mothers make sons sexy: maternal effects contribute to the increased sexual attractiveness of extra-pair offspring

    PubMed Central

    Tschirren, Barbara; Postma, Erik; Rutstein, Alison N.; Griffith, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Quality differences between offspring sired by the social and by an extra-pair partner are usually assumed to have a genetic basis, reflecting genetic benefits of female extra-pair mate choice. In the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), we identified a colour ornament that is under sexual selection and appears to have a heritable basis. Hence, by engaging in extra-pair copulations with highly ornamented males, females could, in theory, obtain genes for increased offspring attractiveness. Indeed, sons sired by extra-pair partners had larger ornaments, seemingly supporting the genetic benefit hypothesis. Yet, when comparing ornament size of the social and extra-pair partners, there was no difference. Hence, the observed differences most likely had an environmental basis, mediated, for example, via differential maternal investment of resources into the eggs fertilized by extra-pair and social partners. Such maternal effects may (at least partly) be mediated by egg size, which we found to be associated with mean ornament expression in sons. Our results are consistent with the idea that maternal effects can shape sexual selection by altering the genotype–phenotype relationship for ornamentation. They also caution against automatically attributing greater offspring attractiveness or viability to an extra-pair mate's superior genetic quality, as without controlling for differential maternal investment we may significantly overestimate the role of genetic benefits in the evolution of extra-pair mating behaviour. PMID:21957136

  19. When mothers make sons sexy: maternal effects contribute to the increased sexual attractiveness of extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Tschirren, Barbara; Postma, Erik; Rutstein, Alison N; Griffith, Simon C

    2012-03-22

    Quality differences between offspring sired by the social and by an extra-pair partner are usually assumed to have a genetic basis, reflecting genetic benefits of female extra-pair mate choice. In the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), we identified a colour ornament that is under sexual selection and appears to have a heritable basis. Hence, by engaging in extra-pair copulations with highly ornamented males, females could, in theory, obtain genes for increased offspring attractiveness. Indeed, sons sired by extra-pair partners had larger ornaments, seemingly supporting the genetic benefit hypothesis. Yet, when comparing ornament size of the social and extra-pair partners, there was no difference. Hence, the observed differences most likely had an environmental basis, mediated, for example, via differential maternal investment of resources into the eggs fertilized by extra-pair and social partners. Such maternal effects may (at least partly) be mediated by egg size, which we found to be associated with mean ornament expression in sons. Our results are consistent with the idea that maternal effects can shape sexual selection by altering the genotype-phenotype relationship for ornamentation. They also caution against automatically attributing greater offspring attractiveness or viability to an extra-pair mate's superior genetic quality, as without controlling for differential maternal investment we may significantly overestimate the role of genetic benefits in the evolution of extra-pair mating behaviour.

  20. When mothers make sons sexy: maternal effects contribute to the increased sexual attractiveness of extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Tschirren, Barbara; Postma, Erik; Rutstein, Alison N; Griffith, Simon C

    2012-03-22

    Quality differences between offspring sired by the social and by an extra-pair partner are usually assumed to have a genetic basis, reflecting genetic benefits of female extra-pair mate choice. In the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), we identified a colour ornament that is under sexual selection and appears to have a heritable basis. Hence, by engaging in extra-pair copulations with highly ornamented males, females could, in theory, obtain genes for increased offspring attractiveness. Indeed, sons sired by extra-pair partners had larger ornaments, seemingly supporting the genetic benefit hypothesis. Yet, when comparing ornament size of the social and extra-pair partners, there was no difference. Hence, the observed differences most likely had an environmental basis, mediated, for example, via differential maternal investment of resources into the eggs fertilized by extra-pair and social partners. Such maternal effects may (at least partly) be mediated by egg size, which we found to be associated with mean ornament expression in sons. Our results are consistent with the idea that maternal effects can shape sexual selection by altering the genotype-phenotype relationship for ornamentation. They also caution against automatically attributing greater offspring attractiveness or viability to an extra-pair mate's superior genetic quality, as without controlling for differential maternal investment we may significantly overestimate the role of genetic benefits in the evolution of extra-pair mating behaviour. PMID:21957136

  1. Effects of paired-object affordance in search tasks across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Melanie; Stainton, Alexandra; Rotshtein, Pia

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated the processes underlying the retrieval of action information about functional object pairs, focusing on the contribution of procedural and semantic knowledge. We further assessed whether the retrieval of action knowledge is affected by task demands and age. The contribution of procedural knowledge was examined by the way objects were selected, specifically whether active objects were selected before passive objects. The contribution of semantic knowledge was examined by manipulating the relation between targets and distracters. A touchscreen-based search task was used testing young, middle-aged, and elderly participants. Participants had to select by touching two targets among distracters using two search tasks. In an explicit action search task, participants had to select two objects which afforded a mutual action (e.g., functional pair: hammer-nail). Implicit affordance perception was tested using a visual color-matching search task; participants had to select two objects with the same colored frame. In both tasks, half of the colored targets also afforded an action. Overall, middle-aged participants performed better than young and elderly participants, specifically in the action task. Across participants in the action task, accuracy was increased when the distracters were semantically unrelated to the functional pair, while the opposite pattern was observed in the color task. This effect was enhanced with increased age. In the action task all participants utilized procedural knowledge, i.e., selected the active object before the passive object. This result supports the dual-route account from vision to action. Semantic knowledge contributed to both the action and the color task, but procedural knowledge associated with the direct route was primarily retrieved when the task was action-relevant. Across the adulthood lifespan, the data show inverted U-shaped effects of age on the retrieval of action knowledge. Age also linearly increased the

  2. Paired stable isotopologues in precipitation and vapor: A case study of the amount effect within western tropical Pacific storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Jessica L.; Noone, David; Cobb, Kim M.; Moerman, Jessica W.; Konecky, Bronwen L.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding controls on the stable isotopic composition of precipitation and vapor in the West Pacific Warm Pool is vital for accurate representation of convective processes in models and correct interpretation of isotope-based paleoclimate proxies, yet a lack of direct observational evidence precludes the utility of these isotopic tracers. Results from a measurement campaign at Manus Island, Papua New Guinea from 28 April to 8 May 2013 demonstrate variability in the stable isotopic composition (δD and δ18O) of precipitation and vapor in individual precipitation events and over a 10 day period. Isotope ratios in water vapor and precipitation progressively increased throughout the period of measurement, coincident with a transition from high to low regional convective activity. Vapor isotope ratios approached equilibrium with seawater during the quiescent period and likely reflected downwind advection of distilled vapor and re-evaporation of rainfall during the period of regional convection. On a 5 min timescale across individual storms, isotope ratios in precipitation were strongly correlated with isotope ratios in surface vapor. However, individual precipitation isotope ratios were not strongly correlated with surface meteorological data, including precipitation rate, in all storms. Yet across all events, precipitation deuterium excess was negatively correlated with surface temperature, sea level pressure, and cloud base height and positively correlated with precipitation rate and relative humidity. Paired surface precipitation and vapor isotope ratios indicate condensation at boundary layer temperatures. The ratio of these paired values decreased with increasing precipitation rate during some precipitation events, suggesting rain re-evaporation and precipitation in equilibrium with an isotopically distinct upper level moisture source. Results from the short campaign support the interpretation that isotope ratios in precipitation and vapor in the western

  3. Using full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo in a seniority zero space to investigate the correlation energy equivalence of pair coupled cluster doubles and doubly occupied configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has shown promise for the description of strong correlation. This promise is related to its apparent ability to match results from doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), even though the latter method has exponential computational cost. Here, by modifying the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to sample only the seniority zero sector of Hilbert space, we show that the DOCI and pCCD energies are in agreement for a variety of 2D Hubbard models, including for systems well out of reach for conventional configuration interaction algorithms. Our calculations are aided by the sign problem being much reduced in the seniority zero space compared with the full space. We present evidence for this and then discuss the sign problem in terms of the wave function of the system which appears to have a simplified sign structure.

  4. Pressure Dependence of Anharmonic Effective Pair Potentials in Rock Salt Type AgI

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiasa, Akira; Sugahara, Masahiko; Fukui, Hiroshi; Arima, Hiroshi; Ohtaka, Osamu; Okube, Maki; Katayama, Yoshinori; Murai, Kei-ichiro

    2007-02-02

    Pressure dependence of anharmonic effective pair potentials V(u)=au2/2+bu3/3{exclamation_point} for the I-Ag bond in rock salt type AgI has been investigated by EXAFS Debye-Waller factors. EXAFS measurements near the I K-edge were performed under pressure up to 6.0 GPa using a multi-anvil high-pressure device and synchrotron radiation from SPring-8, Hyogo. The potential parameter a for rock-salt type is 1.66(5) eV/A2 at 1.0 GPa and increases to 1.88(6) eV/A2 at 6.0 GPa. The phonon energies in rock salt type AgI under pressure have been estimated using the potential parameter a by calculating the dynamical matrix. The anharmonic effective pair potential for each phase is influenced by pressure and becomes steeper with increasing pressure while the extent of anharmonicity decreases with pressure.

  5. Interaction effects on the tunneling of electron-hole pairs in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Hector M.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2001-03-01

    The transit time of carriers is beginning to be an important parameter in the physical operation of semiconductor quantum dot `devices'. In the present work, we study the coherent propagation of electron-hole pairs in coupled self-assembled quantum dots in close proximity. These systems, achieved experimentally in a number of different geometries, have been recently implemented as a novel storage of optical information that may give rise to smart pixel technology in the near future [1]. Here, we apply an effective mass hamiltonian approach and solve numerically the time dependent Schroedinger equation of a system of photo-created electron-hole pairs in the dots. Our approach takes into account both Coulomb interactions and confinement effects. The time evolution is investigated in terms of the structural parameters for typical InAs-GaAs dots. Different initial conditions are considered, reflecting the basic processes that would take place in these experiments. We study the probabilities of finding the electron and hole in either the same or adjacent quantum dot, and study carefully the role of interactions in this behavior. [1] T. Lundstrom, W. Schoenfeld, H. Lee, and P. M. Petroff, Science 286, 2312 (1999).

  6. Effects of junctional correlations in the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process on random regular networks.

    PubMed

    Baek, Yongjoo; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process on closed and directed random regular networks, which is a simple model of active transport in the one-dimensional segments coupled by junctions. By a pair mean-field theory and detailed numerical analyses, it is found that the correlations at junctions induce two notable deviations from the simple mean-field theory, which neglects these correlations: (1) the narrower range of particle density for phase coexistence and (2) the algebraic decay of density profile with exponent 1/2 even outside the maximal-current phase. We show that these anomalies are attributable to the effective slow bonds formed by the network junctions.

  7. Resonance effects indicate a radical-pair mechanism for avian magnetic compass.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thorsten; Thalau, Peter; Phillips, John B; Wiltschko, Roswitha; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2004-05-13

    Migratory birds are known to use the geomagnetic field as a source of compass information. There are two competing hypotheses for the primary process underlying the avian magnetic compass, one involving magnetite, the other a magnetically sensitive chemical reaction. Here we show that oscillating magnetic fields disrupt the magnetic orientation behaviour of migratory birds. Robins were disoriented when exposed to a vertically aligned broadband (0.1-10 MHz) or a single-frequency (7-MHz) field in addition to the geomagnetic field. Moreover, in the 7-MHz oscillating field, this effect depended on the angle between the oscillating and the geomagnetic fields. The birds exhibited seasonally appropriate migratory orientation when the oscillating field was parallel to the geomagnetic field, but were disoriented when it was presented at a 24 degrees or 48 degrees angle. These results are consistent with a resonance effect on singlet-triplet transitions and suggest a magnetic compass based on a radical-pair mechanism.

  8. Electroweakino pair production at the LHC: NLO SUSY-QCD corrections and parton-shower effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, Julien; Jäger, Barbara; Kesenheimer, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We present a set of NLO SUSY-QCD calculations for the pair production of neutralinos and charginos at the LHC, and their matching to parton-shower programs in the framework of the POWHEG-BOX program package. The code we have developed provides a SUSY Les Houches Accord interface for setting supersymmetric input parameters. Decays of the neutralinos and charginos and parton-shower effects can be simulated with PYTHIA. To illustrate the capabilities of our program, we present phenomenological results for a representative SUSY parameter point. We find that NLO-QCD corrections increase the production rates for neutralinos and charginos significantly. The impact of parton-shower effects on distributions of the weakinos is small, but non-negligible for jet distributions.

  9. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. Several key features of the flow are observed. Strong axial flows cause fluid containing vorticity to move from the ``troughs'' of the initially wavy vortex tube to the ``peaks.'' This process is associated with distinct differences in vortex concentration at the peak and the trough, which lead to the establishment of an axial pressure gradient. Furthermore, the primary and secondary vortices interact to form additional small-scale vortex rings. The exact number and orientation of these small-scale rings is highly dependent on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the ground. Finally, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation, core size, and topology, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  10. Static Analysis of Double Effect Adsorption Refrigeration Cycle Using Silica gel/Water Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlinda; Miyazaki, Takahiko; Ueda, Yuki; Akisawa, Atsushi

    In this paper,a static analysis of double effect adsorption refrigeration cycle utilizing condensation heat is discussed. Double effect adsorption refrigeration cycle consists of two cycles, High Temperature Cycle (HTC) which is driven from external heat sources, and Low Temperature Cycle (LTC) which is driven by condensation heat from HTC. Both of HTC and LTC are using silica gel and water as working pairs. The effect of heat source temperature on cycle performance was investigated in terms of coefficient of performance (COP) and specific cooling energy (SCE). Results showed that double effect cycle would produce higher COP than single effect cycle for driving temperature observed between 80-150°C with the same operating condition. However, the value of SCE is lower than single effect, despite that the SCE of double effect cycle is improved with heat source temperature higher than 100°C. Further, it was also observed that adsorbent mass ratio of HTC and LTC affected performance of chiller. When adsorbent mass ratio of HTC and LTC was unity, it was found that SCE and COP took the maximum.

  11. Effect of base-pair stability of nearest-neighbor nucleotides on the fidelity of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Patten, J E; So, A G; Downey, K M

    1984-04-10

    The influence of the stability of base pairs formed by nearest-neighbor nucleotides on misincorporation frequency has been studied with the large fragment of DNA polymerase I, the alternating DNA copolymers, poly(dI-dC) and poly-(dG-dC), as template-primers, and dGTP, dITP, and dCTP as substrates. We have utilized the difference in thermodynamic stability between the doubly H-bonded I X C base pair and triply H-bonded G X C base pair to examine the effects of base-pair stability of both the "preceding" and the "following" nucleotides on the frequency of insertion of a mismatched nucleotide, as well as on its stable incorporation into polynucleotide. The present studies demonstrate that the stability of the base pairs formed by nearest-neighbor nucleotides affects the frequency of incorporation of noncomplementary nucleotides. Misincorporation frequency is increased when the nearest-neighbor nucleotides form more stable base pairs with the corresponding nucleotides in the template and is decreased when they form less stable base pairs. The stability of the base pair formed by a nucleotide either preceding (5' to) or following (3' to) a misincorporated nucleotide influences misincorporation frequency, but by different mechanisms. The stability of base pairs formed by preceding nucleotides affects the rate of insertion of mismatched nucleotide but does not protect the mismatched nucleotide from removal by the 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. In contrast, the stability of a base pair formed by a following nucleotide determines whether a misincorporated nucleotide is extended or excised by affecting the ability of the enzyme to edit errors of incorporation. PMID:6722115

  12. A model study of np tensor correlation effects on the electron scattering response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidemann, W.; Orlandini, G.

    1990-01-01

    The role played by np tensor correlations in the longitudinal and transverse response functions is investigated in the quasi-free region. A model is proposed where the response in plane-wave impulse approximation is modified by introducing responses of strongly correlated deuteron-like pairs. Various pair correlations are studied. The introduction of the pair responses does not lead to a violation of the Coulomb- and the f-sum rules. The results show that tensor correlations shift the strength from the quasi-elastic peak towards higher energy. The additional contributions of meson exchange and isobar currents in the transverse channel can compensate the quenching due to correlations.

  13. EFFECTS OF PRAMIPEXOLE ON THE REINFORCING EFFECTIVENESS OF STIMULI THAT WERE PREVIOUSLY PAIRED WITH COCAINE REINFORCEMENT IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Alyssa R.; Chen, Jianyong; Wang, Shaomeng; Newman, Amy H.; Woods, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Dopamine D2-like agonists maintain responding when substituted for cocaine in laboratory animals. However, these effects appear to be mediated by an interaction with stimuli that were previously paired with cocaine reinforcement (CS). Objectives To evaluate the extent to which the pramipexole-maintained and -induced responding are influenced by cocaine-paired stimuli. Methods Rats were trained to nosepoke for cocaine under fixed ratio 1 (FR1) or progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In FR1-trained rats, pramipexole was substituted for cocaine with injections either paired with CSs, or delivered in their absence. The capacity of experimenter-administered pramipexole to induce FR1 and PR responding for CS presentation was evaluated. The effects of altering stimulus conditions, as well as pretreatments with D2- (L-741,626) and D3-preferring (PG01037) antagonists on pramipexole-induced PR responding were also evaluated. Results When substituted for cocaine, pramipexole maintained responding at high rates when injections were paired with CSs, but low rates when CSs were omitted. Similarly, experimenter-administered pramipexole induced dose-dependent increases in FR1 or PR responding, with high rates of responding observed when the CS was presented, and low rates of responding when CS presentation was omitted. D2 and D3 antagonists differentially affected pramipexole-induced PR responding, with L-741,626 and PG01037 producing rightward, and downward shifts in the dose-response curve for CS-maintained responding, respectively. Conclusions These data indicate that pramipexole is capable of enhancing the reinforcing effectiveness of conditioned stimuli, and raise the possibility that similar mechanisms are responsible for the increased occurrence of impulse control disorders in patients being treated with pramipexole. PMID:21701814

  14. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    PubMed

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. PMID:25877865

  15. Inverse Temperature Dependence of Nuclear Quantum Effects in DNA Base Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inherently quantum mechanical nature of hydrogen bonding, it is unclear how nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) alter the strengths of hydrogen bonds. With this in mind, we use ab initio path integral molecular dynamics to determine the absolute contribution of NQEs to the binding in DNA base pair complexes, arguably the most important hydrogen-bonded systems of all. We find that depending on the temperature, NQEs can either strengthen or weaken the binding within the hydrogen-bonded complexes. As a somewhat counterintuitive consequence, NQEs can have a smaller impact on hydrogen bond strengths at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. We rationalize this in terms of a competition of NQEs between low-frequency and high-frequency vibrational modes. Extending this idea, we also propose a simple model to predict the temperature dependence of NQEs on hydrogen bond strengths in general. PMID:27195654

  16. Toward Accurate Modeling of the Effect of Ion-Pair Formation on Solute Redox Potential.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaohui; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-09-13

    A scheme to model the dependence of a solute redox potential on the supporting electrolyte is proposed, and the results are compared to experimental observations and other reported theoretical models. An improved agreement with experiment is exhibited if the effect of the supporting electrolyte on the redox potential is modeled through a concentration change induced via ion pair formation with the salt, rather than by only considering the direct impact on the redox potential of the solute itself. To exemplify the approach, the scheme is applied to the concentration-dependent redox potential of select molecules proposed for nonaqueous flow batteries. However, the methodology is general and enables rational computational electrolyte design through tuning of the operating window of electrochemical systems by shifting the redox potential of its solutes; including potentially both salts as well as redox active molecules. PMID:27500744

  17. The Moderating Impact of Distal Regularities on the Effect of Stimulus Pairings.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sean; De Houwer, Jan; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Throughout much of the past century psychologists have focused their attention on a seemingly simple question: How do people come to like or dislike stimuli in the environment? Evaluative Conditioning (EC) - a change in liking due to the pairing of stimuli - has been offered as one avenue through which novel preferences may be formed and existing ones altered. In the current article, we offer a new look at EC from the perspective of Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS) and, more specifically, Relational Frame Theory (RFT). We briefly review the EC literature, introduce Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS), Relational Frame Theory (RFT), and then describe a behavioral phenomenon known as arbitrarily applicable relational responding (AARR). Afterwards, we examine the relationship between EC and AARR. This novel perspective offers ways to organize existing as well as predict new EC effects, contributes to debates on "genuine" EC, human versus nonhuman EC, and further facilitates the development and refinement of cognitive theories of EC. PMID:27025533

  18. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    PubMed

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect.

  19. Charge-pairing mechanism of phosphorylation effect upon amyloid fibrillation of human tau core peptide.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masafumi; Hirata, Akiyoshi; Tainaka, Kazuki; Morii, Takashi; Konno, Takashi

    2008-11-11

    Phosphorylation of a fibrillogenic protein, human tau, is believed to play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. For elucidating molecular mechanisms of the phosphorylation effect on tau fibrillation, we synthesized a peptide, VQIVY 310K (PHF6) and its phosphorylated derivative (PHF6pY). PHF6 is a partial peptide surrounding a plausible in vivo phosphorylation site Tyr310 and forms amyloid-type fibrils similar to those generated by full-length tau. Fibrillation of PHF6 and PHF6pY were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the critical concentration of the fibrillation was determined for comparing the fibril stability. The results showed that the phosphorylation strongly influenced the fibrillation propensity of PHF6 by changing its dependency on pH and ionic strength. On the basis of the observations, we suggested that charged sites on the phosphate group and its electrostatic pairing with the neighboring charged residues were physical origins of the phosphorylation effect. To verify this charge-pairing mechanism, we conducted experiments using a series of PHF6 derivatives with non-native charge distributions. The electrostatic interaction in an intermolecular mode was also demonstrated by the system composed of two different peptide species, which found that fibrillation of nonphosphorylated PHF6 was drastically enhanced when a trace amount of phosphorylated PHF6 molecules coexisted. A simulation analysis utilizing crystal coordinates of the PHF6 fibril was also performed for interpreting the experimental results in a molecular level. The present study using the model peptide system gave us a microscopically insightful view on the roles of tau phosphorylation in amyloid-related diseases.

  20. Is pair programming more effective than other forms of collaboration for young students?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Colleen M.

    2011-06-01

    This study investigates differences between collaboration methods in two summer enrichment classes for students entering the sixth grade. In one treatment, students used pair programming. In the other treatment, students engaged in frequent collaboration, but worked ontheir own computer. Students in the two treatments did not differ significantly in their performance on daily quizzes or responses to attitudinal survey questions. However, the students who worked on their own computer completed exercises more quickly than those using pair programming. This study compares two learning environments with high levels of collaboration to isolate aspects of pair programming that are and are not responsible for the reported success of educational research focused on pair programming. This study expands our understanding of pair programming by moving beyond simplistic comparisons of learning environments with and without collaboration and by extending pair programming research to elementary school students.

  1. Examining Estimates of Effect Using Non-Overlap of All Pairs in Multiple Baseline Studies of Academic Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen-Brown, Shawna; Karich, Abbey C.; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of single-case design (SCD) studies in meta-analytic research is an important consideration in identifying effective evidence-based practices. Various SCD effect sizes have been previously suggested; non-overlap of all pairs (NAP) is a recently introduced effect size. Preliminary field tests investigating the adequacy of NAP are…

  2. Unusual isotope effects on the pseudogap in high-Tc cuprate superconductors as support for the BCS-like pairing theory of large polarons above Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Baimatov, P. J.; Djumanov, Sh. S.

    2015-06-01

    The BCS-like pairing theory is extended to the intermediate coupling regime and to the cases of exotic cuprate superconductors with large and small Fermi surfaces, so as to describe the pairing correlations above Tc , the opening of a pseudogap (PG) at a mean-field temperature T∗ >Tc and the unusual isotope effects on the PG in these materials within the large polaron model and two different BCS-like approaches. We argue that unconventional electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the polaron formation and the separation between temperatures T∗ (the onset of precursor Cooper pairing) and Tc (the onset of the superconducting transition) in exotic cuprate superconductors. Using the extended BCS-like approaches, we calculate the PG formation temperature T∗ , isotope shifts ΔT∗ , oxygen and copper isotope exponents and show that isotope effects on the PG basically depend on strengths of Coulomb and electron-phonon interactions, doping levels and dielectric constants of the cuprates. The new BCS-like pairing theory of polaronic carriers predicts the existence of small and sizable positive oxygen isotope effect and very large negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on the PG in the cuprates with large Fermi surfaces. The calculated results for T∗ , isotope shifts and exponents are compared with experimental data on various cuprate superconductors. For all the considered cases, a good quantitative agreement was found between theory and experimental data. We also predict the existence of small and sizable negative isotope effects on T∗ in deeply underdoped cuprates with small Fermi surfaces. Further, we find that the isotope effects on T∗ (=Tc) in heavily overdoped cuprates just like in some metals are relatively small positive or become even negative.

  3. Highly effective sequencing whole chloroplast genomes of angiosperms by nine novel universal primer pairs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Bo; Li, De-Zhu; Li, Hong-Tao

    2014-09-01

    Chloroplast genomes supply indispensable information that helps improve the phylogenetic resolution and even as organelle-scale barcodes. Next-generation sequencing technologies have helped promote sequencing of complete chloroplast genomes, but compared with the number of angiosperms, relatively few chloroplast genomes have been sequenced. There are two major reasons for the paucity of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes: (i) massive amounts of fresh leaves are needed for chloroplast sequencing and (ii) there are considerable gaps in the sequenced chloroplast genomes of many plants because of the difficulty of isolating high-quality chloroplast DNA, preventing complete chloroplast genomes from being assembled. To overcome these obstacles, all known angiosperm chloroplast genomes available to date were analysed, and then we designed nine universal primer pairs corresponding to the highly conserved regions. Using these primers, angiosperm whole chloroplast genomes can be amplified using long-range PCR and sequenced using next-generation sequencing methods. The primers showed high universality, which was tested using 24 species representing major clades of angiosperms. To validate the functionality of the primers, eight species representing major groups of angiosperms, that is, early-diverging angiosperms, magnoliids, monocots, Saxifragales, fabids, malvids and asterids, were sequenced and assembled their complete chloroplast genomes. In our trials, only 100 mg of fresh leaves was used. The results show that the universal primer set provided an easy, effective and feasible approach for sequencing whole chloroplast genomes in angiosperms. The designed universal primer pairs provide a possibility to accelerate genome-scale data acquisition and will therefore magnify the phylogenetic resolution and species identification in angiosperms.

  4. Effect of Paired-Pulse Electrical Stimulation on the Activity of Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kei; Onishi, Hideaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the transient effect of short-duration paired-pulse electrical stimulation (ppES) on corticospinal excitability and the after-effect of long-duration ppES on excitability, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), and afferent facilitation (AF). Methods: A total of 28 healthy subjects participated in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles before and immediately after short-duration ppES (5 s) at various inter-pulse intervals (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 30 ms). In Experiment 2, MEPs, SAI, and AF were measured before, immediately, and 20 and 40 min after long-duration ppES (20 min, inter-pulse interval of 5 and 15 ms) and peripheral electrical stimulation (20 min, 10 and 20 Hz). Results: Short-duration ppES with inter-pulse intervals of 5 and 20 ms significantly increased MEP measured in APB but not in ADM. Long-duration ppES with an inter-pulse interval of 5 ms significantly decreased SAI but not MEPs in APB. In contrast, long-duration ppES did not affect ADM. Conclusion: The afferent inputs induced by ppES-5 ms were effective for transiently increasing MEP and sustaining SAI reduction. PMID:26733847

  5. Interference effects for Higgs boson mediated Z-pair plus jet production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Furlan, Elisabetta; Rontsch, Raoul

    2014-11-25

    Here, we study interference effects in the production channel ZZ + jet, in particular focusing on the role of the Higgs boson. This production channel receives contributions both from Higgs boson mediated diagrams via the decay H → ZZ (signal diagrams), as well as from diagrams where the Z bosons couple directly to a quark loop (background diagrams). We consider the partonic processes gggZZ and gqmore » $$\\bar{q}$$ZZ in which interference between signal and background diagrams first occurs. Since interference is primarily an off-resonant effect for the Higgs boson, we treat the Z bosons as on shell. Thus our analysis is limited to the region above threshold, where the invariant mass of the Z-pair mZZ satisfies the condition mZZ>2mZ. In the region mZZ > 300 GeV we find that the interference in the ZZ + jet channel is qualitatively similar to interference in the inclusive ZZ channel. Moreover, the rates are sufficient to study these effects at the LHC once jet-binned data become available.« less

  6. The Utility of a Paired-Choice Preference Assessment in Predicting Reinforcer Effectiveness for an Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Karena S.; Kurtz, Patricia F.; Lieblein, Tara L.; Chin, Michelle D.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the utility of a paired-choice preference assessment in predicting reinforcer efficacy for a 13-month old with a history of prenatal drug exposure. First, two paired-choice assessments were conducted one week apart, using the same items. A high level of correspondence between the two assessments was observed. Next, a reinforcer…

  7. Ionization Energies and Aqueous Redox Potentials of Organic Molecules: Comparison of DFT, Correlated ab Initio Theory and Pair Natural Orbital Approaches.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-05-10

    The calculation of redox potentials involves large energetic terms arising from gas phase ionization energies, thermodynamic contributions, and solvation energies of the reduced and oxidized species. In this work we study the performance of a wide range of wave function and density functional theory methods for the prediction of ionization energies and aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials of a set of 19 organic molecules. Emphasis is placed on evaluating methods that employ the computationally efficient local pair natural orbital (LPNO) approach, as well as several implementations of coupled cluster theory and explicitly correlated F12 methods. The electronic energies are combined with implicit solvation models for the solvation energies. With the exception of MP2 and its variants, which suffer from enormous errors arising at least partially from the poor Hartree-Fock reference, ionization energies can be systematically predicted with average errors below 0.1 eV for most of the correlated wave function based methods studies here, provided basis set extrapolation is performed. LPNO methods are the most efficient way to achieve this type of accuracy. DFT methods show in general larger errors and suffer from inconsistent behavior. The only exception is the M06-2X functional which is found to be competitive with the best LPNO-based approaches for ionization energies. Importantly, the limiting factor for the calculation of accurate redox potentials is the solvation energy. The errors in the predicted solvation energies by all continuum solvation models tested in this work dominate the final computed reduction potential, resulting in average errors typically in excess of 0.3 V and hence obscuring the gains that arise from choosing a more accurate electronic structure method.

  8. Neural Correlates of Acquired Color Category Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Alexandra; Franklin, Anna; Holmes, Amanda; Drivonikou, Vicky G.; Ozgen, Emre; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Category training can induce category effects, whereby color discrimination of stimuli spanning a newly learned category boundary is enhanced relative to equivalently spaced stimuli from within the newly learned category (e.g., categorical perception). However, the underlying mechanisms of these acquired category effects are not fully understood.…

  9. Joint Action of a Pair of Rowers in a Race: Shared Experiences of Effectiveness Are Shaped by Interpersonal Mechanical States

    PubMed Central

    R’Kiouak, Mehdi; Saury, Jacques; Durand, Marc; Bourbousson, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (inter)subjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy) of individuals’ shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat’s glide). Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles), experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels). The results indicated that (a) the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b) some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n = 15 cycles) or an effective (n = 18 cycles) joint action, and (c) the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force). Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further challenged

  10. Joint Action of a Pair of Rowers in a Race: Shared Experiences of Effectiveness Are Shaped by Interpersonal Mechanical States.

    PubMed

    R'Kiouak, Mehdi; Saury, Jacques; Durand, Marc; Bourbousson, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (inter)subjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy) of individuals' shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat's glide). Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles), experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels). The results indicated that (a) the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b) some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n = 15 cycles) or an effective (n = 18 cycles) joint action, and (c) the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force). Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further challenged and

  11. Correlation and relativistic effects in actinide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.

    2011-11-15

    Wavelengths, line strengths, and transition rates are calculated for the multipole (E1, M1, E2, M2, E3, and M3) transitions between the excited 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 5}nl and 6s6p{sup 6}nl states and the ground 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 6} state in Ac{sup 3+}, Th{sup 4+}, and U{sup 6+} Rn-like ions. Relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT), including the Breit interaction, is used to evaluate energies and transition rates for multipole transitions in these hole-particle systems. The RMBPT method agrees with multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations in lowest order, includes all second-order correlation corrections, and includes corrections from negative-energy states. The calculations start from a [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}6s{sup 2}6p{sup 6} Dirac-Fock potential. First-order perturbation theory is used to obtain intermediate-coupling coefficients, and second-order RMBPT is used to determine the matrix elements. Evaluated multipole matrix elements for transitions from excited states to the ground states are used to determine the line strengths, transition rates, and multipole polarizabilities. This work provides a number of yet unmeasured properties of these actinide ions for various applications and for benchmark tests of theory and experiment.

  12. Meissner effect probing of odd-frequency triplet pairing in superconducting spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Halterman, Klaus; Linder, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting correlations which are long ranged in magnetic systems have attracted much attention due to their spin-polarization properties and potential use in spintronic devices. Whereas experiments have demonstrated the slow decay of such correlations, it has proven more difficult to obtain a smoking gun signature of their odd-frequency character which is responsible, e.g., for their gapless behavior. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic susceptibility response of a normal metal in contact with a superconducting spin valve provides precisely this signature, namely, in the form of an anomalous positive Meissner effect, which may be tuned back to a conventional negative Meissner response simply by altering the magnetization configuration of the spin valve.

  13. Nucleon-pair states of even-even Sn isotopes based on realistic effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. Y.; Qi, C.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study yrast states of 128,126,124Sn and 104,106,108Sn by using the monopole-optimized realistic interactions in terms of both the shell model (SM) and the nucleon-pair approximation (NPA). For yrast states of 128,126Sn and 104,106Sn, we calculate the overlaps between the wave functions obtained in the full SM space and those obtained in the truncated NPA space, and find that most of these overlaps are very close to 1. Very interestingly, for most of these states with positive parity and even spin or with negative parity and odd spin, the SM wave function is found to be well represented by one nucleon-pair basis state, viz., a simple picture of "nucleon-pair states" (nucleon-pair configuration without mixings) emerges. In 128,126Sn, the positive-parity (or negative-parity) yrast states with spin J >10 (or J >7 ) are found to be well described by breaking one or two S pairs in the 101+ (or 71-) state, i.e., the yrast state of seniority-two, spin-maximum, and positive-parity (or negative-parity), into non-S pair(s). Similar regularity is also pointed out for 104,106Sn. The evolution of E 2 transition rates between low-lying states in 128,126,124Sn is discussed in terms of the seniority scheme.

  14. The effect of paired pitch, rhythm, and speech on working memory as measured by sequential digit recall.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Educational and therapeutic objectives are often paired with music to facilitate the recall of information. The purpose of this study was to isolate and determine the effect of paired pitch, rhythm, and speech on undergraduate's memory as measured by sequential digit recall performance. Participants (N = 120) listened to 4 completely counterbalanced treatment conditions each consisting of 9 randomized monosyllabic digits paired with speech, pitch, rhythm, and the combination of pitch and rhythm. No statistically significant learning or order effects were found across the 4 trials. A 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a statistically significant difference in digit recall performance across treatment conditions, positions, groups, and treatment by position. No other comparisons resulted in statistically significant differences. Participants were able to recall digits from the rhythm condition most accurately while recalling digits from the speech and pitch only conditions the least accurately. Consistent with previous research, the music major participants scored significantly higher than non-music major participants and the main effect associated with serial position indicated that recall performance was best during primacy and recency positions. Analyses indicated an interaction between serial position and treatment condition, also a result consistent with previous research. The results of this study suggest that pairing information with rhythm can facilitate recall but pairing information with pitch or the combination of pitch and rhythm may not enhance recall more than speech when participants listen to an unfamiliar musical selection only once. Implications for practice in therapy and education are made as well as suggestions for future research.

  15. Effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite nuclear matter in the Brueckner approach: Model {delta}-shaped NN interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Lombardo, U.; Saperstein, E.E.; Zverev, M.V.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of pairing in semi-infinite nuclear matter is considered in the Brueckner approach. Equations for effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite matter are derived for the case of the separable representation of realistic NN interaction. The propagator of two noninteracting particles in a semi-infinite potential well is calculated numerically. The equation for effective interaction is solved for a model 8-shaped NN interaction, which correctly reproduces NN scattering in the low-energy limit. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  16. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS ON OIL SPILLS - EMPIRICAL CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a dispersant is applied to an oil slick, its effectiveness in dispersing the spilled oil depends on various factors such as oil properties, wave mixing energy, temperature of both oil and water, and salinity of the water. Estuaries represent water with varying salinities. In...

  17. The influence of anharmonic and solvent effects on the theoretical vibrational spectra of the guanine-cytosine base pairs in Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations.

    PubMed

    Bende, Attila; Muntean, Cristina M

    2014-03-01

    The theoretical IR and Raman spectra of the guanine-cytosine DNA base pairs in Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations were computed using DFT method with M06-2X meta-hybrid GGA exchange-correlation functional, including the anharmonic corrections and solvent effects. The results for harmonic frequencies and their anharmonic corrections were compared with our previously calculated values obtained with the B3PW91 hybrid GGA functional. Significant differences were obtained for the anharmonic corrections calculated with the two different DFT functionals, especially for the stretching modes, while the corresponding harmonic frequencies did not differ considerable. For the Hoogtseen case the H⁺ vibration between the G-C base pair can be characterized as an asymmetric Duffing oscillator and therefore unrealistic anharmonic corrections for normal modes where this proton vibration is involved have been obtained. The spectral modification due to the anharmonic corrections, solvent effects and the influence of sugar-phosphate group for the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pair configurations, respectively, were also discussed. For the Watson-Crick case also the influence of the stacking interaction on the theoretical IR and Raman spectra was analyzed. Including the anharmonic correction in our normal mode analysis is essential if one wants to obtain correct assignments of the theoretical frequency values as compared with the experimental spectra. PMID:24567152

  18. Effect of simple solutes on the long range dipolar correlations in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baul, Upayan; Kanth, J. Maruthi Pradeep; Anishetty, Ramesh; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular correlations in liquid water at ambient conditions have generally been characterized through short range density fluctuations described through the atomic pair distribution functions. Recent numerical and experimental results have suggested that such a description of order or structure in liquid water is incomplete and there exist considerably longer ranged orientational correlations in water that can be studied through dipolar correlations. In this study, using large scale classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations using TIP4P-Ew and TIP3P models of water, we show that salts such as sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), caesium chloride (CsCl), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) have a long range effect on the dipolar correlations, which cannot be explained by the notion of structure making and breaking by dissolved ions. Observed effects are explained through orientational stratification of water molecules around ions and their long range coupling to the global hydrogen bond network by virtue of the sum rule for water. The observations for single hydrophilic solutes are contrasted with the same for a single methane (CH4) molecule. We observe that even a single small hydrophobe can result in enhancement of long range orientational correlations in liquid water, contrary to the case of dissolved ions, which have been observed to have a reducing effect. The observations from this study are discussed in the context of hydrophobic effect.

  19. Steric Effects in Ionic Pairing and Polyelectrolyte Interdiffusion within Multilayered Films: A Neutron Reflectometry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Li; Ankner, John Francis; Sukhishvili, Prof. Svetlana A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a series of polycations synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), we investigate the effects of the polymer charge density and hydrophobicity on salt-induced interdiffusion of polymer layers within polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films. Polycations with two distinct hydrophobicities and various quaternization degrees (QPDMA and QPDEA) were derived from parent polymers of matched molecular weights poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) and poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by quaternization with either methyl or ethyl sulfate. Multilayers of these polycations with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) were assembled in low-salt conditions, and annealed in NaCl solutions to induce layer intermixing. As revealed by neutron reflectometry (NR), polycations with lower charge density resulted in a faster decay of film structure with distance from the substrate. Interestingly, when comparing polymer mobility in QPDEA/PSS and QPDMA/PSS films, layer intermixing was faster in the case of more hydrophobic QPDEA as compared to QPDMA, because of the weaker ionic pairing (due to the presence of a bulky ethyl spacer) between QPDEA and PSS.

  20. Effect of ionophores on the rate of intramolecular cation exchange in durosemiquinone ion pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Mcguyer, C. A.; Gutierrez, A. R.; Shannon, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the ionophores 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and cryptand 222 (C222) on intramolecular cation exchange in ion pairs of the sodium salt of the durosemiquinone anion in benzene solution are investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the 18C6 and 15C5 complexes with durosemiquinone reduced by contact with a sodium mirror show an alternating line width which indicates that the sodium ion is being exchanged between equivalent sites near the oxygens of the semiquinone with activation energies of 8.7 and 6.0 kcal/mole and Arrhenius preexponential factors of 9 x 10 to the 12th/sec and 10 to the 12th/sec, respectively. Spectra obtained for the DBC complexes show no evidence of exchange, while those of C222 indicate rapid exchange. It is also noted that the hyperfine splitting constants measured do not change over the 50-K temperature interval studied.

  1. The effect of texture differences on satiation in 3 pairs of solid foods.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Nicolien; Mars, Monica; Stafleu, Annette; de Graaf, Cees

    2010-12-01

    This study explored the effect of texture differences on satiation (ad libitum food intake) in 3 pairs of solid foods. Test products were specially developed luncheon meat, meat replacers and sweets. Each food consisted of a "hard" and "soft" version, expected to lead to different eating rates and consequently to differences in oral sensory exposure time. One hundred and six subjects participated in 7 sessions. During the first sessions, subjects consumed the products ad libitum while watching a movie in a cinema. During the last session, eating rate of all products was measured. Mean intake did not differ significantly between the hard and soft version for any of the products, but subjects who ate more of the soft luncheon meat significantly outnumbered subjects who ate more of the hard version. Eating rate was significantly slower for the hard than for the soft luncheon meat (21 ± 10 vs. 25 ± 13 g/min); no differences were found for the other food types. Ad libitum intake was twice as high in the highest versus the lowest quartile of eating rate (p < 0.001). Texture differences between the hard and soft versions may have been too subtle to lead to differences in eating rate for meat replacers and sweets and consequently to differences in food intake.

  2. Marine reservoir effect on the Southeastern coast of Brazil: results from the Tarioba shellmound paired samples.

    PubMed

    Macario, K D; Souza, R C C L; Aguilera, O A; Carvalho, C; Oliveira, F M; Alves, E Q; Chanca, I S; Silva, E P; Douka, K; Decco, J; Trindade, D C; Marques, A N; Anjos, R M; Pamplona, F C

    2015-05-01

    On the Southeastern coast of Brazil the presence of many archaeological shellmounds offers a great potential for studying the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect (MRE). However, very few such studies are available for this region. These archaeological settlements, mostly dating from 5 to 2 kyr cal BP, include both terrestrial and marine remains in good stratigraphic context and secure association, enabling the comparison of different carbon reservoirs. In a previous study the chronology of the Sambaqui da Tarioba, located in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, was established based on marine mollusc shells and charcoal samples from hearths, from several layers in two excavated sectors. We now compare the different materials with the aim of studying the MRE in this region. Calibration was performed with Oxford software OxCal v4.2.3 using the marine curve Marine13 with an undetermined offset to account for local corrections for shell samples, and the atmospheric curve SHCal13 for charcoal samples. The distribution of results considering a phase model indicates a ΔR value of -127 ± 67 (14)C yr in the 1 sigma range and the multi-paired approach leads to a mean value of -110 ± 94 (14)C yr.

  3. Effect of dilution on the spin pairing transition in rhombohedral carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Downs, Robert T.; Tschaunera, Oliver; Yange, Wenge; Shebanova, Olga; Shen, Guoyin

    2010-11-12

    The compressibility of an iron-bearing magnesite (Mg{sub 0.87}Fe{sub 0.12}{sup 2+}Ca{sub 0.01}) CO{sub 3} was determined by means of single crystal diffraction up to 64 GPa. Up to 49 GPa the pressure-evolution of the unit cell volume of the solid solution with 12% of Fe{sup 2+} can be described by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with parameters V{sub 0} = 281.0(5) {angstrom}{sup 3}, K{sub 0} = 102.8(3) GPa, K{prime}{sub 0} = 5.44. The spin pairing of the Fe{sup 2+} d-electrons occurs between 49 and 52 GPa, as evidenced by a discontinuous volume change. The transition pressure is increased by about 5 GPa compared with the iron end-member; an effect consistent with a cooperative contribution of adjacent clusters to the spin transition. The trend is, however, opposite in the periclase-wustite solid solution. Differences among the two structures, in particular in the Fe-Fe interactions, that might explain the different behavior are discussed.

  4. Hot accretion disks with pairs: Effects of magnetic field and thermal cyclocsynchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1994-02-01

    We show the effects of thermal cyclosynchrotron radiation and magnetic viscosity on the structure of hot, two-temperature accretion disks. Magnetic field, B, is assumed to be randomly oriented and the ratio of magnetic pressure to either gas pressure, alpha = Pmag/Pgas, or the sum of the gas and radiation pressures, alpha = (Pmag/Pgas + Prad), is fixed. We find those effects do not change the qualitative properties of the disks, i.e., there are still two critical accretion rates related to production of e+/- pairs, (M dot)(Ucr) and (M dot)(Lcr), that affect the number of local and global disk solutions, as recently found by Bjoernsson and Svensson for the case with B = 0. However, a critical value of the alpha-viscosity parameter above which those critical accretion rates disappear becomes smaller than alphacr = 1 found in the case of B = 0, for Pmag = alpha(Pgas + Prad). If Pmag = alpha Pgas, on the other hand, alphacr is still about unity. Moreover, when Comptonized cyclosynchrotron radiation dominates Comptonized bremsstrahlung, radiation from the disk obeys a power law with the energy spectral index of approximately 0.5, in a qualitative agreement with X-ray observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and Galactic black hole candidates. We also extend the hot disk solutions for Pmag = alpha(Pgas + Prad) to the effectively optically thick region, where they merge with the standard cold disk solutions. We find that the mapping method by Bjoernsson and Svensson gives a good approximation to the disk structure in the hot region and show where it breaks in the transition region. Finally, we find a region in the disk parameter space with no solutions due to the inability of Coulomb heating to supply enough energy to electrons.

  5. Pairing Beyond BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We concentrate on the specifics of the nuclear pairing problem from the standpoint of the BCS approach. We consider the properties of nuclear pairing which usually are not discussed in standard texts: how good is the BCS theory in nuclear context compared to the exact large-scale diagonalization, whether it can be improved by the particle number conservation, how to mark the phase transition regions in a mesoscopic system like a nucleus, how may effective many-body forces influence the formation and structure of the pairing condensate, what effect the decay instability has on the paired nuclear structure, etc.

  6. Supersymmetric QCD one-loop effects in (un)polarized top-pair production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, Stefan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mosle, Wolf M.; Wackeroth, Doreen

    2007-08-01

    We study the effects of O({alpha}{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD (SQCD) corrections on the total production rate and kinematic distributions of polarized and unpolarized top-pair production in pp and pp collisions. At the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider, top-quark pairs are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilation, qq{yields}tt, while at the CERN LHC pp collider gluon-gluon scattering, gg{yields}tt, dominates. We compute the complete set of O({alpha}{sub s}) SQCD corrections to both production channels and study their dependence on the parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In particular, we discuss the prospects for observing strong, loop-induced SUSY effects in top-pair production at the Tevatron run II and the LHC.

  7. Effect of correlated observation error on parameters, predictions, and uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, Claire R.; Green, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Correlations among observation errors are typically omitted when calculating observation weights for model calibration by inverse methods. We explore the effects of omitting these correlations on estimates of parameters, predictions, and uncertainties. First, we develop a new analytical expression for the difference in parameter variance estimated with and without error correlations for a simple one-parameter two-observation inverse model. Results indicate that omitting error correlations from both the weight matrix and the variance calculation can either increase or decrease the parameter variance, depending on the values of error correlation (ρ) and the ratio of dimensionless scaled sensitivities (rdss). For small ρ, the difference in variance is always small, but for large ρ, the difference varies widely depending on the sign and magnitude of rdss. Next, we consider a groundwater reactive transport model of denitrification with four parameters and correlated geochemical observation errors that are computed by an error-propagation approach that is new for hydrogeologic studies. We compare parameter estimates, predictions, and uncertainties obtained with and without the error correlations. Omitting the correlations modestly to substantially changes parameter estimates, and causes both increases and decreases of parameter variances, consistent with the analytical expression. Differences in predictions for the models calibrated with and without error correlations can be greater than parameter differences when both are considered relative to their respective confidence intervals. These results indicate that including observation error correlations in weighting for nonlinear regression can have important effects on parameter estimates, predictions, and their respective uncertainties.

  8. On the effect of ion pairing of Keggin type polyanions with quaternary ammonium cations on redox potentials in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Neumann, Ronny

    2016-08-10

    The electrochemical properties of Keggin type polyoxometalates Qn[XW12O40] (X = P, Si, B; Q = n-tetraoctylammonium and n-trioctylmethylammonium) in organic solvents were investigated in order to understand the interrelation between the redox potentials, solvents and ion pairing. A logarithmic correlation between the dielectric constant of the solvent (ε ranged from 4.8 to 46.6) and the reduction potential of the [PW12O4](3-)/[PW12O4](4-) couple was found. This reduction potential increased significantly when the surface charge of the polyoxometalate went from 3- to 5-. The investigation of the ion pairing properties by diffusion NMR revealed the presence of intimate ion pairs in less polar solvents (e.g. dichloromethane) and less compact ion pairs in more polar solvents (e.g. DMSO). Using a V atom within the polyoxometalate an NMR experiment showed that a n-trioctylmethyl ammonium cation bonded to the polyoxometalate anion more intimately than a n-tetraoctyl ammonium cation. PMID:27465599

  9. Urca Cooling Pairs in the Neutron Star Ocean and Their Effect on Superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex; Meisel, Zach; Schatz, Hendrik; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    An accretion outburst onto a neutron star deposits hydrogen-rich and/or helium-rich material into the neutron star’s envelope. Thermonuclear burning of accreted material robustly produces Urca pairs—pairs of nuclei that undergo cycles of {e}--capture and {β }--decay. The strong T 5 dependence of the Urca cooling neutrino luminosity means that Urca pairs in the neutron star interior potentially remove heat from accretion-driven nuclear reactions. In this study, we identify Urca pairs in the neutron star’s ocean—a plasma of ions and electrons overlaying the neutron star crust—and demonstrate that Urca cooling occurs at all depths in the ocean. We find that Urca pairs in the ocean and crust lower the ocean’s steady-state temperature during an accretion outburst and that unstable carbon ignition, which is thought to trigger superbursts, occurs deeper than it would otherwise. Cooling superburst light curves, however, are only marginally impacted by cooling from Urca pairs because the superburst peak radiative luminosity {L}{peak} is always much greater than the Urca pair neutrino luminosity {L}ν in the hot post-superburst ocean.

  10. Paired carbon stable-isotope records for the Cenomanian Stage (100.5 -93.9 Ma): correlation tool and Late Cretaceous pCO2 record?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Ian; Gröcke, Darren; Laurin, Jiří; Selby, David; Roest-Ellis, Sascha; Miles, Andrew; Lignum, John; Gale, Andrew; Kennedy, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Carbon stable-isotope stratigraphy of marine carbonates (δ13Ccarb) provides remarkable insights into past variation in the global carbon cycle, and has become firmly established as a powerful global correlation tool. Continuous δ13Ccarb time series are becoming increasingly available for much of the geological record, including the Upper Cretaceous. However, our knowledge of stratigraphic variation in the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary organic matter (δ13Corg) is much poorer, and is generally restricted to organic-rich sedimentary successions and/or key boundary intervals. Close coupling exists between the global isotopic composition of the reduced and oxidised carbon reservoirs on geological time scales, but the stratigraphic resolution of most long-term δ13Corg Mesozoic records is inadequate to identify leads and lags in the responses of the two reservoirs to carbon cycle perturbations. Cenomanian times (100.5-93.9 Ma) represent perhaps the best documented episode of eustatic rise in sea level in Earth history and the beginning of the Late Mesozoic thermal maximum, driving global expansion of epicontinental seas and the onset of widespread pelagic and hemipelagic carbonate deposition. Significant changes occurred in global stable-isotope records, including two prominent perturbations of the carbon cycle - the Mid-Cenomanian Event I (MCEI; ~96.5-96.2 Ma) and Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2; ~94.5-93.8 Ma). OAE2, one of two truly global Cretaceous OAEs, was marked by the widespread deposition of black shales, and a global positive carbon stable-isotope excursion of 2.0 - 2.5‰ δ13Ccarb, and up to 7‰ in the sulphur-bound phytane biomarker. MCEI, by contrast, shows a <1‰ δ13Ccarb excursion and no associated black shales in most areas. Here, we present detailed paired δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg stable-isotope records for the entire Cenomanian Stage, based on an Upper Albian - Lower Turonian composite reference section from the Vocontian Basin of SE

  11. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  12. Strong electronic correlation effects in coherent multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karadimitriou, M E; Kavousanaki, E G; Dani, K M; Fromer, N A; Perakis, I E

    2011-05-12

    We discuss a many-body theory of the coherent ultrafast nonlinear optical response of systems with a strongly correlated electronic ground state that responds unadiabatically to photoexcitation. We introduce a truncation of quantum kinetic density matrix equations of motion that does not rely on an expansion in terms of the interactions and thus applies to strongly correlated systems. For this we expand in terms of the optical field, separate out contributions to the time-evolved many-body state due to correlated and uncorrelated multiple optical transitions, and use "Hubbard operator" density matrices to describe the exact dynamics of the individual contributions within a subspace of strongly coupled states, including "pure dephasing". Our purpose is to develop a quantum mechanical tool capable of exploring how, by coherently photoexciting selected modes, one can trigger nonlinear dynamics of strongly coupled degrees of freedom. Such dynamics could lead to photoinduced phase transitions. We apply our theory to the nonlinear response of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field. We coherently photoexcite the two lowest Landau level (LL) excitations using three time-delayed optical pulses. We identify some striking temporal and spectral features due to dynamical coupling of the two LLs facilitated by inter-Landau-level magnetoplasmon and magnetoroton excitations and compare to three-pulse four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments. We show that these features depend sensitively on the dynamics of four-particle correlations between an electron-hole pair and a magnetoplasmon/magnetoroton, reminiscent of exciton-exciton correlations in undoped semiconductors. Our results shed light into unexplored coherent dynamics and relaxation of the quantum Hall system (QHS) and can provide new insight into non-equilibrium co-operative phenomena in strongly correlated systems.

  13. Phase space matching and finite lifetime effects for top-pair production close to threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.; Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro

    2010-07-01

    The top-pair tt production cross section close to threshold in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions is strongly affected by the small lifetime of the top quark. Since the cross section is defined through final states containing the top decay products, a consistent definition of the cross section depends on prescriptions of how these final states are accounted for the cross section. Experimentally, these prescriptions are implemented, for example, through cuts on kinematic quantities such as the reconstructed top quark invariant masses. As long as these cuts do not reject final states that can arise from the decay of a top and an antitop quark with a small off-shellness compatible with the nonrelativistic power counting, they can be implemented through imaginary phase space matching conditions in nonrelativistic QCD. The prescription-dependent cross section can then be determined from the optical theorem using the e{sup +}e{sup -} forward scattering amplitude. We compute the phase space matching conditions associated to cuts on the top and antitop invariant masses at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order and partially at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order in the nonrelativistic expansion accounting also for higher order QCD effects. Together with finite lifetime and electroweak effects known from previous work, we analyze their numerical impact on the tt cross section. We show that the phase space matching contributions are essential to make reliable nonrelativistic QCD predictions, particularly for energies below the peak region, where the cross section is small. We find that irreducible background contributions associated to final states that do not come from top decays are strongly suppressed and can be neglected for the theoretical predictions.

  14. Strong enhancement of Penning ionization for asymmetric atom pairs in cold Rydberg gases: the Tom and Jerry effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, D. K.; Miculis, K.; Bezuglov, N. N.; Ekers, A.

    2016-06-01

    We consider Penning ionization of Rydberg atom pairs as an Auger-type process induced by the dipole-dipole interaction and employ semiclassical formulae for dipole transitions to calculate the autoionization width as a function of the principal quantum numbers, n d , n i , of both atoms. While for symmetric atom pairs with {n}d={n}i={n}0 the well-known increase of the autoionization width with increasing n 0 is obtained, the result for asymmetric pairs is counterintuitive—for a fixed n i of the ionizing atom of the pair, the autoionization width strongly increases with decreasing n d of the de-excited atom. For H Rydberg atoms this increase reaches two orders of magnitude at the maximum of the n d dependence, and the same type of counterintuitive behavior is exhibited also by Na, Rb and Cs atoms. This is a purely quantum-mechanical effect, which points towards existence of optimal (we call them ‘Tom’ and ‘Jerry’ for ‘big’ and ‘small’) pairs of Rydberg atoms with respect to autoionization efficiency. Building on the model of population redistribution in cold Rydberg gases proposed in [1], we demonstrate that population evolution following the initial laser excitation of Rydberg atoms in state n 0 would eventually lead to the formation of such Tom-Jerry pairs with {n}i\\gt {n}0\\gt {n}d which feature autoionization widths that are enhanced by several orders of magnitude compared to that of two atoms in the initial laser-excited state n 0. We also show that in the high-density regime of cold Rydberg gas experiments the ionization rate of Tom-Jerry pairs can be substantially larger than the blackbody radiation-induced photoionization rate.

  15. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS. II. REACTIVE VERSUS KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.; Supsar, M. E-mail: steffen.krakau@rub.de

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of TeV gamma-rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon-photon annihilation process. Using the linear instability analysis in the kinetic limit, which properly accounts for the longitudinal and the small but finite perpendicular momentum spread in the pair momentum distribution function, the growth rate of parallel propagating electrostatic oscillations in the intergalactic medium is calculated. Contrary to the claims of Miniati and Elyiv, we find that neither the longitudinal nor the perpendicular spread in the relativistic pair distribution function significantly affect the electrostatic growth rates. The maximum kinetic growth rate for no perpendicular spread is even about an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding reactive maximum growth rate. The reduction factors in the maximum growth rate due to the finite perpendicular spread in the pair distribution function are tiny and always less than 10{sup –4}. We confirm earlier conclusions by Broderick et al. and our group that the created pair beam distribution function is quickly unstable in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium. Therefore, there is no need to require the existence of small intergalactic magnetic fields to scatter the produced pairs, so that the explanation (made by several authors) for the Fermi non-detection of the inverse Compton scattered GeV gamma-rays by a finite deflecting intergalactic magnetic field is not necessary. In particular, the various derived lower bounds for the intergalactic magnetic fields are invalid due to the pair beam instability argument.

  16. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    PubMed Central

    Hennemuth, Brad; Marx, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    sequence and the 3 associated alternate base mutants at each binding site position. These position specific slope magnitudes, or sensitivities, correlated with and reflected the underlying position symmetry of the DNA binding sequences. Conclusion These results suggest the utility of correlating quantitative aspects of sequence specific protein-DNA complex single base mutants with changes in the easily calculated PD-deformability scale of the individual DNA sequence mutants. Using this PD approach, it may be possible in the future to understand the magnitude of biological or energetic functional effects of specific DNA sequence mutants within DNA-protein complexes in terms of their effect on DNA deformability. PMID:16542422

  17. A correlation study applied to biomarkers of internal and effective dose for acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Gerhard; Newland, Kirk; Papadopoulou, Ermioni

    2014-01-01

    The urinary metabolites 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid and 4-aminobiphenyl have been correlated with tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, 2-cyanoethylvaline and 4-aminobiphenyl haemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of effective dose for the exposure to acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl, respectively. Each pair of biomarkers is derived from the same parent chemical; however, the correlation between the urinary and the haemoglobin biomarkers has not been investigated. Using clinical study samples, we report a weak correlation between urinary and haemoglobin biomarkers due to different accumulation and elimination rates. Time course analysis showed that a reduction in exposure was paralleled by a delayed reduction in haemoglobin adducts. PMID:24754403

  18. The effect of correlations on the population dynamics of lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wellard, C; Markham, J; Hawkins, E D; Hodgkin, P D

    2010-05-21

    Recent studies of the population dynamics of a system of lymphocytes in an in vitro immune response have reported strong correlations in cell division times, both between parents and their progeny, and between those of sibling cells. The data also show a high level of correlation in the ultimate number of divisions achieved by cells within the same clone. Such correlations are often ignored in mathematical models of cell dynamics as they violate a standard assumption in the theory of branching processes, that of the statistical independence of cells. In this article we present a model in which these correlations can be incorporated, and have used this model to study the effect of these correlations on the population dynamics of a system of cells. We found that correlation in the division times between parents and their progeny can alter the mean population size of clones within the system, while all of the correlations can affect the variance in the sizes of different clones. The model was then applied to experimental data obtained from time-lapse video microscopy of a system of CpG stimulated B lymphocytes and it was found that inclusion of the correct correlation structure is necessary to accurately reproduce the observed population dynamics. We conclude that correlations in the dynamics of cells within an ensemble will affect the population dynamics of the system, and the effects will become more pronounced as the number of divisions increases.

  19. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  20. Effect of correlation of local fluctuations on exciton coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin; Silbey, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown both oscillations of exciton populations and long lasting coherence in multichromophoric systems such as photosynthetic light harvesting systems and conjugated polymers. It has been suggested that this quantum effect is due to correlations of the fluctuations of site energies among the closely packed chromophores in the protein environment. In addition to these, there is the strong possibility of correlations between site energies and transfer matrix elements. In order to understand the role of such correlations we generalize the Haken–Strobl–Reineker (HSR) model to include the energetic correlations and the site diagonal-off-diagonal correlations in a systematic way. The extended HSR model in the exciton basis is also constructed and allows us to study the dynamics of the exciton populations and coherences. With the extended model, we can provide insight into how these correlations affect the evolution of the populations and coherences of excitons by comparing to the original HSR model with uncorrelated fluctuating environments.

  1. Effects of Think-Aloud Pair Problem Solving on Secondary-Level Students' Performance in Career and Technical Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Michael L.; Miller, Greg

    2011-01-01

    A randomized posttest-only control group experimental design was used to determine the effects of think-aloud pair problem solving (TAPPS) on the troubleshooting performance of 34 secondary-level career and technical education students. There was no significant difference in success rate between TAPPS students and students who worked alone…

  2. Effects of dialect on merger perception: ERP and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Brianna; Potts, Geoffrey F; Niedzielski, Nancy A

    2005-12-01

    Native speakers of a language are often unable to consciously perceive, and have altered neural responses to, phonemic contrasts not present in their language. This study examined whether speakers of dialects of the same language with different phoneme inventories also show measurably different neural responses to contrasts not present in their dialect. Speakers with (n=11) and without (n=11) an American English I/E (pin/pen) vowel merger in speech production were asked to discriminate perceptually between minimal pairs of words that contrasted in the critical vowel merger and minimal pairs of control words while their event-related potential (ERPs) were recorded. Compared with unmerged dialect speakers, merged dialect speakers were less able to make behavioral discriminations and exhibited a reduced late positive ERP component (LPC) effect to incongruent merger vowel stimuli. These results indicate that between dialects of a single language, the behavioral response differences may reflect neural differences related to conscious phonological decision processes.

  3. Effects of body weight and age on the time and pairing of American black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hepp, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    I used captive young and adult American Black Ducks (Anas rubripes) during October-February 1984-1985 to test whether body weight and age affected time of pair-bond formation. Eighty ducks were marked individually, and 10 ducks (6 males and 4 females, half of each age class) were assigned to each of 8 experimental pens. Ducks in 4 pens received an ad libitum diet of commercial duck food, and ducks in the other 4 pens received a restricted ration of the same food. During early winter ducks in both groups gained weight, but ducks on the restricted diet gained less than birds on the ad libitum diet; peak winter weight of ducks on the ad libitum diet averaged 22% greater than initial body weight compared with 6.5% for ducks on the restricted diet. In late winter ducks on the restricted diet lost 28.7% of peak winter weight, and ducks on the ad libitum diet lost 19.3%. Weight loss of ducks on the ad libitum diet began before weather conditions became severe and coincided with a reduction in food consumption. This result supports the idea that weight loss of waterfowl in late winter is controlled endogenously. Individuals on the ad libitum diet paired earlier than those on the restricted diet, and pair bonds were stronger. Adults of both sexes paired earlier than young ducks, but differences for females were not significant statistically. Age and energy constraints are factors that can affect intraspecific variation in pairing chronology.

  4. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  5. Higgs pair production at the LHC with NLO and parton-shower effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Hirschi, V.; Maltoni, F.; Mattelaer, O.; Torrielli, P.; Vryonidou, E.; Zaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present predictions for the SM-Higgs-pair production channels of relevance at the LHC: gluon-gluon fusion, VBF, and top-pair, W, Z and single-top associated production. All these results are at the NLO accuracy in QCD, and matched to parton showers by means of the MC@NLO method; hence, they are fully differential. With the exception of the gluon-gluon fusion process, for which a special treatment is needed in order to improve upon the infinite-top-mass limit, our predictions are obtained in a fully automatic way within the publicly available MADGRAPH5_AMC@NLO framework. We show that for all channels in general, and for gluon-gluon fusion and top-pair associated production in particular, NLO corrections reduce the theoretical uncertainties, and are needed in order to arrive at reliable predictions for total rates as well as for distributions.

  6. Cartridge case image matching using effective correlation area based method.

    PubMed

    Yammen, S; Muneesawang, P

    2013-06-10

    A firearm leaves a unique impression on fired cartridge cases. The cross-correlation function plays an important role in matching the characteristic features on the cartridge case found at the crime scene with a specific firearm, for accurate firearm identification. This paper proposes that the computational forensic techniques of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches to image matching are essential to firearm identification. Specifically, the reference and the corresponding cartridge cases are aligned according to the phase-correlation criterion on the transform domain. The informative segments of the breech face marks are identified by a cross-covariance coefficient using the coefficient value in a window located locally in the image space. The segments are then passed to the measurement of edge density for computing effective correlation areas. Experimental results on a new dataset show that the correlation system can make use of the best properties of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches, and can attain significant improvement of image-correlation results, compared with the traditional image-matching methods for firearm identification, which employ cartridge-case samples. An analysis of image-alignment score matrices suggests that all translation and scaling parameters are estimated correctly, and contribute to the successful extraction of effective correlation areas. It was found that the proposed method has a high discriminant power, compared with the conventional correlator. This paper advocates that this method will enable forensic science to compile a large-scale image database to perform correlation of cartridge case bases, in order to identify firearms that involve pairwise alignments and comparisons.

  7. Correlation effects in two-dimensional topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Hohenadler, M; Assaad, F F

    2013-04-10

    Topological insulators have become one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. This article reviews progress on the topic of electronic correlation effects in the two-dimensional case, with a focus on systems with intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and numerical results. Topics addressed include an introduction to the noninteracting case, an overview of theoretical models, correlated topological band insulators, interaction-driven phase transitions, topological Mott insulators and fractional topological states, correlation effects on helical edge states, and topological invariants of interacting systems.

  8. Effect of Correlation on Multi-Engine Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. R.; Breneman, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    A matter of great concern in the design and operation of multi-engine rocket propulsion systems is the effect of the premature shutdown of one engine on the vehicle. This probability that a premature shutdown will cause a vehicle loss is termed correlation. Based on airbreathing experiences as well as rocket engine data the best estimate of this correlation is made and then applied to the overall multi-engine reliability problem to demonstrate its potential effect. At this point, follow-on analyses are pointed out that illustrate how any potential failures that may cause a correlatable event can be eliminated; thus bringing this correlation to almost 0.

  9. Hot accretion disks with pairs: Effects of magnetic field and thermal cyclocsynchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1994-01-01

    We show the effects of thermal cyclosynchrotron radiation and magnetic viscosity on the structure of hot, two-temperature accretion disks. Magnetic field, B, is assumed to be randomly oriented and the ratio of magnetic pressure to either gas pressure, alpha = P(sub mag)/P(sub gas), or the sum of the gas and radiation pressures, alpha = (P(sub mag)/P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)), is fixed. We find those effects do not change the qualitative properties of the disks, i.e., there are still two critical accretion rates related to production of e(sup +/-) pairs, (M dot)((sup U)(sub cr)) and (M dot)((sup L)(sub cr)), that affect the number of local and global disk solutions, as recently found by Bjoernsson and Svensson for the case with B = 0. However, a critical value of the alpha-viscosity parameter above which those critical accretion rates disappear becomes smaller than alpha(sub cr) = 1 found in the case of B = 0, for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)). If P(sub mag) = alpha P(sub gas), on the other hand, alpha(sub cr) is still about unity. Moreover, when Comptonized cyclosynchrotron radiation dominates Comptonized bremsstrahlung, radiation from the disk obeys a power law with the energy spectral index of approximately 0.5, in a qualitative agreement with X-ray observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and Galactic black hole candidates. We also extend the hot disk solutions for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)) to the effectively optically thick region, where they merge with the standard cold disk solutions. We find that the mapping method by Bjoernsson and Svensson gives a good approximation to the disk structure in the hot region and show where it breaks in the transition region. Finally, we find a region in the disk parameter space with no solutions due to the inability of Coulomb heating to supply enough energy to electrons.

  10. Shape and pairing fluctuation effects on neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    López Vaquero, Nuria; Rodríguez, Tomás R; Egido, J Luis

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear matrix elements (NME) for the most promising candidates to detect neutrinoless double beta decay have been computed with energy density functional methods including deformation and pairing fluctuations explicitly on the same footing. The method preserves particle number and angular momentum symmetries and can be applied to any decay without additional fine tunings. The finite range density dependent Gogny force is used in the calculations. An increase of 10%-40% in the NME with respect to the ones found without the inclusion of pairing fluctuations is obtained, reducing the predicted half-lives of these isotopes.

  11. Correlated mutations in protein sequences: Phylogenetic and structural effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A.S. |; Giraud, B.G.; Stormo, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for RNA molecules is relatively successful in elucidating RNA secondary structure, as well as some aspects of tertiary structure. Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for protein molecules is successful in certain instances in elucidating certain structural and functional links, but in general, pairs of sites displaying highly covarying mutations in protein sequences do not necessarily correspond to sites that are spatially close in the protein structure. In this paper the authors identify two reasons why naive use of covariation analysis for protein sequences fails to reliably indicate sequence positions that are spatially proximate. The first reason involves the bias introduced in calculation of covariation measures due to the fact that biological sequences are generally related by a non-trivial phylogenetic tree. The authors present a null-model approach to solve this problem. The second reason involves linked chains of covariation which can result in pairs of sites displaying significant covariation even though they are not spatially proximate. They present a maximum entropy solution to this classic problem of causation versus correlation. The methodologies are validated in simulation.

  12. Effect of the pair-structure factor of a particulate medium on scalar wave scattering in the first Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan; Korotkova, Olga

    2009-06-15

    Using scattering matrices and the angular spectrum representation of waves, we develop the analytical theory of scattering of random scalar waves from random collections of particles, valid under the first Born approximation. We demonstrate that in the calculation of far-field statistics, such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence, the knowledge of the pair-structure factor of the collection is crucial. We illustrate our analytical approach by considering a numerical example involving scattering of two partially correlated plane waves from a random distribution of spheres. PMID:19529695

  13. Effect of the pair-structure factor of a particulate medium on scalar wave scattering in the first Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan; Korotkova, Olga

    2009-06-15

    Using scattering matrices and the angular spectrum representation of waves, we develop the analytical theory of scattering of random scalar waves from random collections of particles, valid under the first Born approximation. We demonstrate that in the calculation of far-field statistics, such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence, the knowledge of the pair-structure factor of the collection is crucial. We illustrate our analytical approach by considering a numerical example involving scattering of two partially correlated plane waves from a random distribution of spheres.

  14. Magnetic field effects as a result of the radical pair mechanism are unlikely in redox enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Messiha, Hanan L.; Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Jones, Alex R.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposure to electromagnetic fields is potentially carcinogenic. The radical pair mechanism is considered the most feasible mechanism of interaction between weak magnetic fields encountered in our environment and biochemical systems. Radicals are abundant in biology, both as free radicals and reaction intermediates in enzyme mechanisms. The catalytic cycles of some flavin-dependent enzymes are either known or potentially involve radical pairs. Here, we have investigated the magnetic field sensitivity of a number of flavoenzymes with important cellular roles. We also investigated the magnetic field sensitivity of a model system involving stepwise reduction of a flavin analogue by a nicotinamide analogue—a reaction known to proceed via a radical pair. Under the experimental conditions used, magnetic field sensitivity was not observed in the reaction kinetics from stopped-flow measurements in any of the systems studied. Although widely implicated in radical pair chemistry, we conclude that thermally driven, flavoenzyme-catalysed reactions are unlikely to be influenced by exposure to external magnetic fields. PMID:25505136

  15. Manipulability impairs association-memory: revisiting effects of incidental motor processing on verbal paired-associates.

    PubMed

    Madan, Christopher R

    2014-06-01

    Imageability is known to enhance association-memory for verbal paired-associates. High-imageability words can be further subdivided by manipulability, the ease by which the named object can be functionally interacted with. Prior studies suggest that motor processing enhances item-memory, but impairs association-memory. However, these studies used action verbs and concrete nouns as the high- and low-manipulability words, respectively, confounding manipulability with word class. Recent findings demonstrated that nouns can serve as both high- and low-manipulability words (e.g., CAMERA and TABLE, respectively), allowing us to avoid this confound. Here participants studied pairs of words that consisted of all possible pairings of high- and low-manipulability words and were tested with immediate cued recall. Recall was worse for pairs that contained high-manipulability words. In free recall, participants recalled more high- than low-manipulability words. Our results provide further evidence that manipulability influences memory, likely occurring through automatic motor imagery. PMID:24686239

  16. Finite pulse effects on fermion pair creation from strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, Hidetoshi; Fujii, Hirotsugu; Itakura, Kazunori

    2014-09-01

    In the early stage of heavy ion collisions, there appear extraordinarily strong (color) EM fields. In the presence of such strong fields, we encounter essentially new phenomena that are not observed in the vacuum: Among those is fermion pair creation from the vacuum. In this talk, we consider fermion pair creation from the vacuum in a strong electric field with finite duration. Employing the Sauter-type pulsed electric field with height E0 and width τ, we demonstrate explicitly the interplay between the non-perturbative and perturbative aspects of the pair creation in a strong field with finite duration. We identify that two dimensionless parameters ν = | g E0 | τ2 and γ = | g E0 | τ / m characterize the importance of multiple interactions with the field and the transition from the perturbative to the non-perturbative regime. We also show that the pair creation is enhanced compared to Schwinger's formula when the field strength is relativity weak | g E0 | / m2 < 1 and the pulse duration is relatively short mτ < 1 , and reveal that the enhancement is predominantly described by the lowest order perturbation with a single photon. We also discuss some recent developments and applications.

  17. Finite pulse effects on e+e- pair creation from strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, H.; Fujii, H.; Itakura, K.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate electron-positron pair creation from the vacuum in a pulsed electric background field. Employing the Sauter-type pulsed field E(t)=E0sech2(t/τ) with height E0 and width τ, we demonstrate explicitly the interplay between the nonperturbative and perturbative aspects of pair creation in the background field. We analytically compute the number of produced pairs from the vacuum in the Sauter-type field, and the result reproduces Schwinger's nonperturbative formula in the long pulse limit (the constant field limit), while in the short pulse limit it coincides with the leading-order perturbative result. We show that two dimensionless parameters ν =|eE0|τ2 and γ =|eE0|τ/me characterize the importance of multiple interactions with the fields and the transition from the perturbative to the nonperturbative regime. We also find that pair creation is enhanced compared to Schwinger's formula when the field strength is relativity weak |eE0|/me2≲1 and the pulse duration is relatively short meτ ≲1, and reveal that the enhancement is predominantly described by the lowest order perturbation with a single photon.

  18. Establishing and Maintaining Treatment Effects with Less Intrusive Consequences via a Pairing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorndran, Christina M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.

    2006-01-01

    The generality and long-term maintenance of a pairing procedure designed to improve the efficacy of less intrusive procedures were evaluated for the treatment of problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement exhibited by 2 individuals with developmental disabilities. Results suggested that a less intrusive procedure could be established…

  19. The Effects of Receptive and Productive Learning of Word Pairs on Vocabulary Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    English as a foreign language students in Japan learned target words in word pairs receptively and productively. Five aspects of vocabulary knowledge--orthography, association, syntax, grammatical functions, and meaning and form--were each measured by receptive and productive tests. The study uses an innovative methodology in that each target word…

  20. Is Pair Programming More Effective than Other Forms of Collaboration for Young Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Colleen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates differences between collaboration methods in two summer enrichment classes for students entering the sixth grade. In one treatment, students used pair programming. In the other treatment, students engaged in frequent collaboration, but worked on their own computer. Students in the two treatments did not differ significantly…

  1. The Effect of the Temporal Structure of Spoken Words on Paired-Associate Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Sarah C.; Dahan, Delphine

    2010-01-01

    In a series of experiments, participants learned to associate black-and-white shapes with nonsense spoken labels (e.g., "joop"). When tested on their recognition memory, participants falsely recognized as correct a shape paired with a label that began with the same sounds as the shape's original label (onset-overlapping lure; e.g., "joob") more…

  2. On the analysis of phylogenetically paired designs

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L; Rakovski, Cyril S; Macpherson, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As phylogenetically controlled experimental designs become increasingly common in ecology, the need arises for a standardized statistical treatment of these datasets. Phylogenetically paired designs circumvent the need for resolved phylogenies and have been used to compare species groups, particularly in the areas of invasion biology and adaptation. Despite the widespread use of this approach, the statistical analysis of paired designs has not been critically evaluated. We propose a mixed model approach that includes random effects for pair and species. These random effects introduce a “two-layer” compound symmetry variance structure that captures both the correlations between observations on related species within a pair as well as the correlations between the repeated measurements within species. We conducted a simulation study to assess the effect of model misspecification on Type I and II error rates. We also provide an illustrative example with data containing taxonomically similar species and several outcome variables of interest. We found that a mixed model with species and pair as random effects performed better in these phylogenetically explicit simulations than two commonly used reference models (no or single random effect) by optimizing Type I error rates and power. The proposed mixed model produces acceptable Type I and II error rates despite the absence of a phylogenetic tree. This design can be generalized to a variety of datasets to analyze repeated measurements in clusters of related subjects/species. PMID:25750719

  3. Paired-associate learning in institutionalized and noninstitutionalized old people: an analysis of interference and context effects.

    PubMed

    Winocur, G; Moscovitch, M

    1983-07-01

    Groups of old people were impaired, relative to young adults, on a test of negative transfer involving lists of paired-associate words. Susceptibility to interference effects were greater in old people living in institutions than in old people living in their own homes. The effects of varying contextual cues on performance on this task were also assessed. All participants, regardless of age, benefitted from manipulations that were intrinsic to the task (e.g., relatedness of paired associates), but only the institutionalized aged responded to extrinsic contextual manipulations (e.g., environmental changes). In general, the performance of institutionalized old people resembled that of brain-damaged amnesic patients tested under similar conditions; old people living at home generally behaved more like normal, young people. The results were discussed in terms of specific age differences in cognitive function, declining brain function, and possible selective effects of institutionalization.

  4. Size effects on thermoelectricity in a strongly correlated oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Siemons, Wolter; McGuire, Michael A; Ramesh, R.; Yadav, A.K.; Wu, Vincent; Vailionis, Arturas; Majumdar, Arunava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated size effects on thermoelectricity in thin films of a strongly correlated layered cobaltate. At room temperature, the thermopower is independent of thickness down to 6 nm. This unusual behavior is inconsistent with the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory, which is used to describe conventional metals and semiconductors, and is attributed to the strong electron correlations in this material. On the other hand, the resistivity increases below a critical thickness of {approx}30 nm, as expected. The temperature-dependent thermopower is similar for different thicknesses but the resistivity shows systematic changes with thickness. Our experiments highlight the differences in thermoelectric behavior of strongly correlated and uncorrelated systems when subjected to finite-size effects. We use the atomic-limit Hubbard model at the high-temperature limit to explain our observations. These findings provide new insights into decoupling electrical conductivity and thermopower in correlated systems.

  5. The Index cohesive effect on stock market correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Y.; Kenett, D. Y.; Ben-Jacob, E.

    2009-12-01

    We present empirical examination and reassessment of the functional role of the market Index, using datasets of stock returns for eight years, by analyzing and comparing the results for two very different markets: 1) the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), representing a large, mature market, and 2) the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE), representing a small, young market. Our method includes special collective (holographic) analysis of stock-Index correlations, of nested stock correlations (including the Index as an additional ghost stock) and of bare stock correlations (after subtraction of the Index return from the stocks returns). Our findings verify and strongly substantiate the assumed functional role of the index in the financial system as a cohesive force between stocks, i.e., the correlations between stocks are largely due to the strong correlation between each stock and the Index (the adhesive effect), rather than inter-stock dependencies. The Index adhesive and cohesive effects on the market correlations in the two markets are presented and compared in a reduced 3-D principal component space of the correlation matrices (holographic presentation). The results provide new insights into the interplay between an index and its constituent stocks in TASE-like versus NYSE-like markets.

  6. Correlation effects in hydrogen-bonded polymer blends

    SciTech Connect

    Veytsman, B.; Painter, P. )

    1993-12-01

    In hydrogen-bonded polymer blends there are long range correlations that are a result of the combined covalent and hydrogen-bond connections. A mean field description of these mixtures is presented which indicates that there should be an infinite correlation length above some percolation threshold. There are various consequences of the compositional heterogeneities or clustering that results from these effects and these are discussed in this paper.

  7. Ion pair stabilization effects on a series of procaine structural analogs.

    PubMed

    Malvezzi, Alberto; do Amaral, Antonia T

    2010-12-23

    In this work, a series of 10 structural procaine analogs have been synthesized in order to investigate the structural features affecting the stability of ion pair formation and its influence on the lipophilicity of ionizable compounds. The structural variation within this series was focused on the terminal nitrogen substituents and on the intermediate chain linkage nature. The hydrophobic parameters logP(n) and logP(i) (partition coefficient of the neutral and ionic species, respectively), as well as the ionization constants pK(a) and pK(a)(oct), were obtained from logD-pH profiles measured at pH values ranging from 2 to 12. The difference between logP(i) and logP(n) values (i.e. difflogP) of each prepared compound was considered a measure of the stability of ion pair formation. In this set, the difflogP values varied nearly over one log unit, ranging from -2.40 to -3.37. It has been observed that the presence of hydrogen bonding groups (especially donor) and low steric hindrance around the terminal amine ionizable group increases the relative lipophilicity of the ionic species as compared to the corresponding neutral species. These results were interpreted as due to the increased stability of ion pairs of the compounds bearing these structural features.

  8. Frequency Shift and Sub-band Effect in Pair-Production Process Under Adiabatic Closing the External Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinfang; Wang, Wenyuan; Fu, Libin

    2016-09-01

    Oscillating electric field is chosen to investigate the electron-positron pair production process by using a quantum kinetic theory and the effective mass model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 050402 (2014)]. The particle yield exhibits a characteristic oscillatory structure which is related to the multi-photon thresholds. The true peak positions are typically slightly above the naive threshold estimate, which is defined as frequency shift. During the numerical calculations, we find the frequency shift can be affected by the system parameters under adiabatic closing the external field, it is worthwhile to study in detail. In this paper, we investigate the frequency shift and the sub-band effect in electron-positron pair production with oscillating electric field. First, a quantum kinetic theory and the effective mass are presented to obtain the frequency shift, the results are fitted very well. And we find the frequency shift and the sub-band effect can be influenced by pulse duration, photon number, and strength of the external field. The frequency shift becomes evident as increases of photon number and the external field strength. The sub-band width is relatively lower at longer pulse duration, higher photon number region, and weaker external field. The results shown in the paper are helpful for understanding multi-photon pair production process in the strong field.

  9. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  10. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  11. Dynamics of a hypoid gear pair considering the effects of time-varying mesh parameters and backlash nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lim, Teik C.; Li, Mingfeng

    2007-11-01

    A generalized nonlinear time-varying (NLTV) dynamic model of a hypoid gear pair with backlash nonlinearity is formulated which is also applicable to spur, helical, spiral bevel and worm gears. Firstly, the fundamental harmonic form of time-varying mesh parameters is used to study the effects of mesh parameter variations on the dynamic response, and the interactions between them and backlash nonlinearity. The analysis also examines the effects of mean load and mesh damping. Secondly, based on a three-dimensional quasi-static tooth contact analysis, a new significantly more exact time-varying mesh model is proposed, which describes the true mesh characteristics of hypoid gear pairs. The enhanced time-varying mesh model is applied to perform further dynamic analysis. Computational results reveal numerous interesting nonlinear characteristics, such as jump discontinuities, sub-harmonic and chaotic behaviors, especially for lightly loaded and lightly damped cases.

  12. Effect of Pair Interactions on Transition Probabilities between Inactive and Active States — Achieving Collective Behaviour via Pair Interactions in Social Insects —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Yuki, Mai; Kikuchi, Tomonori; Tsuji, Kazuki; Sugawara, Ken

    2015-10-01

    To understand the evolution of well-organized social behaviour, we must first understand the mechanism by which collective behaviour is established. In this study, the mechanisms of collective behaviour in a colony of social insects were studied in terms of the transition probability between active and inactive states, which is linked to mutual interactions. The active and inactive states of the social insects were statistically extracted from the velocity profiles. From the duration distributions of the two states, we found that (1) the durations of active and inactive states follow an exponential law, and (2) pair interactions increase the transition probability from inactive to active states. The regulation of the transition probability by pair interactions suggests that such interactions control the populations of active and inactive workers in the colony.

  13. Effects of adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics interactions on the pair potential and thermophysical properties of helium.

    PubMed

    Cencek, Wojciech; Przybytek, Michał; Komasa, Jacek; Mehl, James B; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-14

    The adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) contributions to the pair potential of helium were computed, fitted separately, and applied, together with the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential, in calculations of thermophysical properties of helium and of the properties of the helium dimer. An analysis of the convergence patterns of the calculations with increasing basis set sizes allowed us to estimate the uncertainties of the total interaction energy to be below 50 ppm for interatomic separations R smaller than 4 bohrs and for the distance R = 5.6 bohrs. For other separations, the relative uncertainties are up to an order of magnitude larger (and obviously still larger near R = 4.8 bohrs where the potential crosses zero) and are dominated by the uncertainties of the nonrelativistic BO component. These estimates also include the contributions from the neglected relativistic and QED terms proportional to the fourth and higher powers of the fine-structure constant α. To obtain such high accuracy, it was necessary to employ explicitly correlated Gaussian expansions containing up to 2400 terms for smaller R (all R in the case of a QED component) and optimized orbital bases up to the cardinal number X = 7 for larger R. Near-exact asymptotic constants were used to describe the large-R behavior of all components. The fitted potential, exhibiting the minimum of -10.996 ± 0.004 K at R = 5.608 0 ± 0.000 1 bohr, was used to determine properties of the very weakly bound (4)He(2) dimer and thermophysical properties of gaseous helium. It is shown that the Casimir-Polder retardation effect, increasing the dimer size by about 2 Å relative to the nonrelativistic BO value, is almost completely accounted for by the inclusion of the Breit-interaction and the Araki-Sucher contributions to the potential, of the order α(2) and α(3), respectively. The remaining retardation effect, of the order of α(4) and higher, is practically negligible for the bound

  14. Correlation effects during liquid infiltration into hydrophobic nanoporous media

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, V. D. Belogorlov, A. A.; Byrkin, V. A.; Lisichkin, G. V.; Tronin, V. N.; Troyan, V. I.

    2011-03-15

    To explain the thermal effects observed during the infiltration of a nonwetting liquid into a disordered nanoporous medium, we have constructed a model that includes correlation effects in a disordered medium. It is based on analytical methods of the percolation theory. The infiltration of a porous medium is considered as the infiltration of pores in an infinite cluster of interconnected pores. Using the model of randomly situated spheres (RSS), we have been able to take into account the correlation effect of the spatial arrangement and connectivity of pores in the medium. The other correlation effect of the mutual arrangement of filled and empty pores on the shell of an infinite percolation cluster of filled pores determines the infiltration fluctuation probability. This probability has been calculated analytically. Allowance for these correlation effects during infiltration and defiltration makes it possible to suggest a physical mechanism of the contact angle hysteresis and to calculate the dependences of the contact angles on the degree of infiltration, porosity of the medium, and temperature. Based on the suggested model, we have managed to describe the temperature dependences of the infiltration and defiltration pressures and the thermal effects that accompany the absorption of energy by disordered porous medium-nonwetting liquid systems with various porosities in a unified way.

  15. How to assess and compare inter-rater reliability, agreement and correlation of ratings: an exemplary analysis of mother-father and parent-teacher expressive vocabulary rating pairs

    PubMed Central

    Stolarova, Margarita; Wolf, Corinna; Rinker, Tanja; Brielmann, Aenne

    2014-01-01

    This report has two main purposes. First, we combine well-known analytical approaches to conduct a comprehensive assessment of agreement and correlation of rating-pairs and to dis-entangle these often confused concepts, providing a best-practice example on concrete data and a tutorial for future reference. Second, we explore whether a screening questionnaire developed for use with parents can be reliably employed with daycare teachers when assessing early expressive vocabulary. A total of 53 vocabulary rating pairs (34 parent–teacher and 19 mother–father pairs) collected for two-year-old children (12 bilingual) are evaluated. First, inter-rater reliability both within and across subgroups is assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Next, based on this analysis of reliability and on the test-retest reliability of the employed tool, inter-rater agreement is analyzed, magnitude and direction of rating differences are considered. Finally, Pearson correlation coefficients of standardized vocabulary scores are calculated and compared across subgroups. The results underline the necessity to distinguish between reliability measures, agreement and correlation. They also demonstrate the impact of the employed reliability on agreement evaluations. This study provides evidence that parent–teacher ratings of children's early vocabulary can achieve agreement and correlation comparable to those of mother–father ratings on the assessed vocabulary scale. Bilingualism of the evaluated child decreased the likelihood of raters' agreement. We conclude that future reports of agreement, correlation and reliability of ratings will benefit from better definition of terms and stricter methodological approaches. The methodological tutorial provided here holds the potential to increase comparability across empirical reports and can help improve research practices and knowledge transfer to educational and therapeutic settings. PMID:24994985

  16. How to assess and compare inter-rater reliability, agreement and correlation of ratings: an exemplary analysis of mother-father and parent-teacher expressive vocabulary rating pairs.

    PubMed

    Stolarova, Margarita; Wolf, Corinna; Rinker, Tanja; Brielmann, Aenne

    2014-01-01

    This report has two main purposes. First, we combine well-known analytical approaches to conduct a comprehensive assessment of agreement and correlation of rating-pairs and to dis-entangle these often confused concepts, providing a best-practice example on concrete data and a tutorial for future reference. Second, we explore whether a screening questionnaire developed for use with parents can be reliably employed with daycare teachers when assessing early expressive vocabulary. A total of 53 vocabulary rating pairs (34 parent-teacher and 19 mother-father pairs) collected for two-year-old children (12 bilingual) are evaluated. First, inter-rater reliability both within and across subgroups is assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Next, based on this analysis of reliability and on the test-retest reliability of the employed tool, inter-rater agreement is analyzed, magnitude and direction of rating differences are considered. Finally, Pearson correlation coefficients of standardized vocabulary scores are calculated and compared across subgroups. The results underline the necessity to distinguish between reliability measures, agreement and correlation. They also demonstrate the impact of the employed reliability on agreement evaluations. This study provides evidence that parent-teacher ratings of children's early vocabulary can achieve agreement and correlation comparable to those of mother-father ratings on the assessed vocabulary scale. Bilingualism of the evaluated child decreased the likelihood of raters' agreement. We conclude that future reports of agreement, correlation and reliability of ratings will benefit from better definition of terms and stricter methodological approaches. The methodological tutorial provided here holds the potential to increase comparability across empirical reports and can help improve research practices and knowledge transfer to educational and therapeutic settings.

  17. Cooperative Effect of Monopodal Silica-Supported Niobium Complex Pairs Enhancing Catalytic Cyclic Carbonate Production.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Valerio; Dong, Hailin; Rossini, Aaron J; Widdifield, Cory M; Vummaleti, Sai V C; Minenkov, Yury; Poater, Albert; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Cavallo, Luigi; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-24

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica-supported Nb species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor, [NbCl5·OEt2], with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO(2-700)) or at 200 °C (SiO(2-200)) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO(2-700) and [NbCl5·OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species, [≡SiONbCl4·OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO(2-200) with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a, presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3·OEt2]. (93)Nb solid-state NMR spectra of 1a-3a and (31)P solid-state NMR on their PMe3 derivatives 1b-3b led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single-site monopodal Nb species, while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4·OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3·OEt2]. A double-quantum/single-quantum (31)P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprecedented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of NbCl5-catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase. PMID:25950495

  18. Inversion of the Odd-Even Effect in Cold Fission from the Time-Dependent Pairing Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-06-01

    A peculiar phenomenon was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd partition yields are favored over the even ones for excitations energies of the fragments smaller than 4 MeV. In this contribution, a microscopic model is proposed for the explanation of this odd-even effect in cold fission. This explanation is based on a mixing configuration mechanism that is produced during the fission process. This configuration mixing mechanism is obtained dynamically by solving a the generalized system of time-dependent pairing equations, which include a pair-breaking effect. The time dependent equations of motion for the pair breaking effect were corroborated with a condition that fixes dynamically the number of particles on the two fission fragment. The single particle level scheme was calculated with the Woods-Saxon superasymmetric two center shell model, providing a continuous variation of the single particle energies and of the wave functions from one nucleus up to two separated fragments. A first rule can be extracted from this model. The even-even fission products cannot be obtained at zero excitation energies because of the existence of dynamical excitations produced in the avoided- level-crossing regions when the nuclear system deforms slowly.

  19. Optical emission of a molecular nanoantenna pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, E. M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    The optical emission from a pair of nanoantennas is investigated within the theoretical framework of quantum electrodynamics. The analysis of fluorescent emission from a pair of molecular antenna species in close proximity is prompted by experimental work on oriented semiconductor polymer nanostructures. Each physically different possibility for separation-dependent features in photon emission by any such pair is explored in detail, leading to the identification of three distinct mechanisms: emission from a pair-delocalized exciton state, emission that engages electrodynamic coupling through quantum interference, and correlated photon emission from the two components of the pair. Although each mechanism produces a damped oscillatory dependence on the pair separation, each of the corresponding results exhibits an analytically different form. Significant differences in the associated spatial frequencies enable an apparent ambiguity in the interpretation of experiments to be resolved. Other major differences are found in the requisite conditions, the associated selection rules, and the variation with angular disposition of the emitters, together offering grounds for experimental discrimination between the coupling mechanisms. The analysis paves the way for investigations of pair-wise coupling effects in the emission from nanoantenna arrays.

  20. Nonlinear optical effects and third-harmonic generation in superconductors: Cooper pairs versus Higgs mode contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, T.; Castellani, C.; Benfatto, L.

    2016-05-01

    The recent observation of a transmitted THz pulse oscillating at three times the frequency of the incident light paves the way to a powerful protocol to access resonant excitations in a superconductor. Here we show that this nonlinear optical process is dominated by light-induced excitation of Cooper pairs, while the collective amplitude (Higgs) fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter give in general a negligible contribution. We also predict a nontrivial dependence of the signal on the direction of the light polarization with respect to the lattice symmetry, which can be tested in systems such as, e.g., cuprate superconductors.

  1. Modeling Correlation Effects in Nickelates with Slave Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru Bogdan; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Nickelate interfaces display interesting electronic properties including orbital ordering similar to that of cuprate superconductors and thickness dependent metal-insulator transitions. One-particle band theory calculations do not include dynamic localized correlation effects on the nickel sites and thus often incorrectly predict metallic systems or incorrect ARPES spectra. Building on two previous successful slave-particle treatments of local correlations, we present a generalized slave-particle method that includes prior models and allows us to produce new intermediate models. The computational efficiency of these slave-boson methods means that one can readily study correlation effects in complex heterostructures. We show some predictions of these methods for the electronic structure of bulk and thin film nickelates. Work supported by NSF Grant MRSEC DMR-1119826.

  2. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate. PMID:27573684

  3. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate.

  4. The effects of correlation on goodness of fit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Autocorrelated normal random variates were generated via computer and the effects of various levels of correlation on goodness of fit problems were studied. The results are useful in determining the distribution or estimating the parameters of populations that correlate observations such as wind speeds and temperature. The model used to generate the autocorrelated data is an autoregressive process of order 1. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and chi-square statistics are used in the analysis. It was observed in the simulation that high positive correlations tend to shift the sample mean away from the population mean and negative correlations tend to shift the sample mean towards the population mean. In many cases, it was observed that positive and negative correlations tend to decrease the standard deviation. However, since this did not occur in all cases, no definite conclusion can be made regarding the standard deviation. Since the autoregressive process is a linear transformation, it is not surprising that normality was preserved. However, a possible extension of this problem could be to generate non-normal data and observe how the distribution is affected by correlation. Another extension might utilize another model such as autoregressive of order k or a moving average process of order k.

  5. Effects of varying the percentage of key illuminations paired with food in a positive automaintenance procedure1

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Fernando A.

    1974-01-01

    Three pigeons were exposed to a positive automaintenance procedure in which each trial began with a brief tone followed by the transillumination of a small central area of the response key for 10 sec. Key illumination was followed by food on 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 0% of the trials. The effects depended on the dependent variable observed. The mean rate of responding during key illumination rapidly increased and then decreased slightly as the percentage of key illuminations paired with food increased. The number of key illuminations during which at least one response occurred increased as a negatively accelerating function of the percentage of key illuminations paired with food, and the mean latency to the first response during the key illuminations decreased as a negatively decelerating function of the percentage condition. The mean rate of sustained responding during key illumination was not systematically affected by changes in the percentage conditions. PMID:16811811

  6. Effect of entanglement on the decay dynamics of a pair of H(2p) atoms due to spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Takehiko; Odagiri, Takeshi; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Isao H.

    2010-10-15

    We have measured the coincidence time spectra of two Lyman-{alpha} photons emitted by a pair of H(2p) atoms in the photodissociation of H{sub 2} at the incident photon energy of 33.66 eV and at the hydrogen gas pressures of 0.40 and 0.02 Pa. The decay time constant at 0.02 Pa is approximately half the lifetime of a single H(2p) atom, 1.60 ns, while the decay time constant at 0.40 Pa is in agreement with the lifetime of a single H(2p) atom. It turns out that the decay faster than the lifetime of a single H(2p) atom originates from the entanglement in the pair of H(2p) atoms. We have demonstrated an effect of entanglement on atomic decay.

  7. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  8. Ion pair formation and its effect in PEO:Mg solid polymer electrolyte system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaipal Reddy, M.; Chu, Peter P.

    In poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) based solid polymer electrolytes, the interaction between cations and the ether oxygen plays a major role in ion conductivity. Measurements with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) illustrated clearly the modification of the PEO crystalline structure with increasing content of magnesium salt. FTIR spectral studies suggest interaction of Mg 2+ cations with the ether oxygen of PEO, where a 1100 cm -1 broad band corresponds to COC stretching and severe deformation occurs. A spectral band at ˜623 cm -1 corresponds to the ClO 4- anion and shows the growth of a shoulder at a higher wave number with increasing salt content. The apparent new envelope at ˜634.5 cm -1 clearly indicates ClO 4--Mg 2+ ion pairing. Ionic conductivity increases with salt content, and is optimized at 15 wt.% Mg salt (O:Mg ratio 28:1). The decrease in ion conductivity at higher salt contents is due to ion-ion association, which leads to ion pair formation (i.e. aggregation of ionic salt) and retards the motion of ions.

  9. Effect of leg support on muscle cross-correlation of bilateral erector spinae during trunk flexion-extension performance.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xinhai; Wei, Yugang; Chen, Zhentao; Fan, Lixia; Shi, Weifei; Yang, Shulong

    2014-01-01

    Investigations corresponding to the affected factors of the cross-correlation of pair muscles are limited though muscle activation patterns of bilateral erector spinae (ES) during trunk flexion-extension performance in standing have been utilized as an indicator in the evaluation of low back pain condition. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of leg support on the cross-correlation of bilateral ES, and to test if the average of bilateral ES could weaken this effect. Twenty male university students volunteered for this study. Each performed the trunk flexion-extension in three leg support conditions randomly with the condition of single left leg support, double leg support and single right leg support, respectively. Each condition included three trials of trunk flexion-extension with the cycle of 5s flexion and 5s extension in standing. Surface electromyography from the right ES muscle as well as from the left one was recorded. The cross-correlation both in pair muscle of right-left ES and in pair muscle of right-average of bilateral ES was calculated in the flexion as well as extension period. A one-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used. The results showed that leg support has some effect on cross-correlation of bilateral ES, which causes the absolute value of phase lag to be significantly larger in flexion period. It is suggested that this effect could be weakened by the average of bilateral ES through significantly increasing the cross-correlation coefficient, and decreasing the absolute value of phase lag.

  10. Cancellation of the N -composite-boson correlation energy under a BCS-like potential: A dimensionality-dependent effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2016-09-01

    We use Richardson-Gaudin exact equations to derive the ground-state energy of N composite bosons (cobosons) interacting via a potential which acts between fermion pairs having zero center-of-mass momentum, that is, a potential similar to the reduced BCS potential used in conventional superconductivity. Through a density expansion, we show that while for two-dimensional (2D) systems, the N -coboson correlation energy undergoes a surprising cancellation which leaves the interaction part with an N (N -1 ) dependence only, such a cancellation does not exist in 1D, 3D, or 4D systems (which correspond to 2D parabolic traps) nor when the cobosons interact via a similar short-range potential but between pairs having an arbitrary center-of-mass momentum. This shows that the previously found cancellation which exists for the Cooper-pair correlation energy results not only from the very peculiar form of the reduced BCS potential, but also from a quite mysterious dimensionality effect, the density of states for Cooper pairs feeling the BCS potential being essentially constant, as for 2D systems.

  11. Segmentation and the pairing hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bragason, Orn

    2004-09-30

    The effect of stimulus contiguity and response contingency on responding in chain schedules was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, four pigeons were trained on two simple three-link chain schedules that alternated within sessions. Initial links were correlated with a variable-interval 30s schedule, and middle and terminal links were correlated with interdependent variable-interval 30s variable-interval 30s schedules. The combined duration of the interdependent schedules summed to 60s. The two chains differed with respect to signaling of the schedule components: a two-stimulus chain had one stimulus paired with the initial link and one stimulus paired with both the middle and the terminal link, while a three-stimulus chain had a different stimulus paired with the each of the three links. The results showed that the two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain. In Experiment 2, four pigeons were exposed to three separate conditions, the two- and three-stimulus chains of Experiment 1 and a three-stimulus chain that had a 3s delay to terminal-link entry from the middle-link response that produced it. The two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain, as in Experiment 1, and a similar initial-link responding was maintained by the two-stimulus chain and the three-stimulus chain with the delay contingency. The results demonstrate that a stimulus noncontiguous with food can maintain responding that is sometimes greater than a stimulus contiguous with food, depending on the response contingency for terminal-link entry. The results are contrary to the pairing hypothesis of conditioned reinforcement.

  12. High-momentum components of the nuclear wave function: Short range correlations, EMC effect, and the tensor parts of the N-N interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Eli Piasetzky

    2012-09-01

    The combination of inclusive and exclusive electron scattering data from JLab in kinematic regimes that were not reachable before, together with the analysis and interpretation of older data from hadronic reactions at BNL is finally revealing the details of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. The most significant result is the demonstration of the dominance of correlated np pairs over pp and nn pairs. I will review these results, discuss them in terms of short-range tensor-force dominance and also discuss the connection to the EMC effect.

  13. Neutron scattering studies of short-range order, atomic displacements, and effective pair interactions in a null-matrix Ni0.5262Pt0.48 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. A.; Moss, S. C.; Robertson, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Neumann, D. A.; Major, J.

    2006-09-01

    The best known exception to the Heine-Sampson and Bieber-Gauthier arguments for ordering effects in transition metal alloys (similar to the Hume-Rothery rules) is a NiPt alloy, whose phase diagram is similar to that of the CuAu system. Using neutron scattering we have investigated the local atomic order in a null-matrix Ni0.5262Pt0.48 single crystal. In a null-matrix alloy, the isotopic composition is adjusted so that the average neutron scattering length vanishes ( Ni62 has a negative scattering length nearly equal in magnitude to that of Pt). Consequently, all contributions to the total scattering depending on the average lattice are suppressed. The only remaining components of the elastic scattering are the short-range order (SRO) and size effect terms. These data permit the extraction of the SRO parameters (concentration-concentration correlations) as well as the displacement parameters (concentration-displacement correlations). Using the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss theory, we obtain the effective pair interactions (EPIs) between near neighbors in the alloy. The results can be used by theorists to model the alloy in the context of the electronic theory of alloy phase stability, including a preliminary evaluation of the local species-dependent displacements. Our maps of V(q) , the Fourier transform of the EPIs, show very similar shapes in the experimental and reconstructed data. This is of importance when comparing to electronic structure calculations.

  14. Effect of radio frequency fields on the radical pair magnetoreception model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Ming; Zou, Jian; Li, Hai; Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Although the radical pair (RP) model is widely accepted for birds' orientation, the physical mechanism of it is still not fully understood. In this paper we consider the RP model in the total angular-momentum representation and clearly show a detailed mechanism for orientation. When only the vertical hyperfine (HF) coupling component is considered, analytical expressions of singlet yield angular profiles are obtained with and without considering the radio frequency field, and when the horizontal HF coupling components are considered, a numerical calculation of the singlet yield is given. Based on these analytical and numerical results we present a detailed account of the following issues: how the HF coupling induces the singlet-triplet conversion; why the vertical radio frequency field can disorient the birds, while the parallel one cannot; and why the birds are able to "train" to different field strengths. Finally, we consider a multinuclei RP model.

  15. Effect of radio frequency fields on the radical pair magnetoreception model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bao-Ming; Zou, Jian; Li, Hai; Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Although the radical pair (RP) model is widely accepted for birds' orientation, the physical mechanism of it is still not fully understood. In this paper we consider the RP model in the total angular-momentum representation and clearly show a detailed mechanism for orientation. When only the vertical hyperfine (HF) coupling component is considered, analytical expressions of singlet yield angular profiles are obtained with and without considering the radio frequency field, and when the horizontal HF coupling components are considered, a numerical calculation of the singlet yield is given. Based on these analytical and numerical results we present a detailed account of the following issues: how the HF coupling induces the singlet-triplet conversion; why the vertical radio frequency field can disorient the birds, while the parallel one cannot; and why the birds are able to "train" to different field strengths. Finally, we consider a multinuclei RP model.

  16. Quantum coherence rather than quantum correlations reflect the effects of a reservoir on a system's work capability.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Zou, Jian; Yu, Wen-Li; Xu, Bao-Ming; Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    We consider a model of an optical cavity with a nonequilibrium reservoir consisting of a beam of identical two-level atom pairs (TLAPs) in the general X state. We find that coherence of multiparticle nonequilibrium reservoir plays a central role on the potential work capability of the cavity. We show that no matter whether there are quantum correlations in each TLAP (including quantum entanglement and quantum discord) or not, the coherence of the TLAPs has an effect on the work capability of the cavity. Additionally, constructive and destructive interferences could be induced to influence the work capability of the cavity by adjusting only the relative phase, with which quantum correlations have nothing to do. In this paper, the coherence of the reservoir, rather than the quantum correlations, effectively reflecting the effects of the reservoir on the system's work capability is demonstrated clearly. PMID:25353764

  17. Interaction effects on galaxy pairs with Gemini/GMOS - II: oxygen abundance gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, D. A.; Dors, O. L.; Krabbe, A. C.; Hägele, G. F.; Cardaci, M. V.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Rodrigues, I.; Winge, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we derive oxygen abundance gradients from H II regions located in 11 galaxies in eight systems of close pairs. Long-slit spectra in the range 4400-7300 Å were obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at Gemini South (GMOS-S). Spatial profiles of oxygen abundance in the gaseous phase along galaxy discs were obtained using calibrations based on strong emission lines (N2 and O3N2). We found oxygen gradients to be significantly flatter for all the studied galaxies than those in typical isolated spiral galaxies. Four objects in our sample, AM 1219A, AM 1256B, AM 2030A and AM 2030B, show a clear break in the oxygen abundance at galactocentric radius R/R25 between 0.2 and 0.5. For AM 1219A and AM 1256B, we found negative slopes for the inner gradients, and for AM 2030B, we found a positive slope. All three cases show a flatter behaviour to the outskirts of the galaxies. For AM 2030A, we found a positive slope for the outer gradient, while the inner gradient is almost compatible with a flat behaviour. We found a decrease of star formation efficiency in the zone that corresponds to the oxygen abundance gradient break for AM 1219A and AM 2030B. For the former, a minimum in the estimated metallicities was found very close to the break zone, which could be associated with a corotation radius. However, AM 1256B and AM 2030A, present a star formation rate maximum but not an extreme oxygen abundance value. All four interacting systems that show oxygen gradient breaks have extreme SFR values located very close to break zones.The H II regions located in close pairs of galaxies follow the same relation between the ionization parameter and the oxygen abundance as those regions in isolated galaxies.

  18. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin. PMID:27105312

  19. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin.

  20. Correlated Noise and Memory Effects in Neural Firing Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, J. W.; Chacron, M. J.; Lindner, B.; Longtin, A.

    2003-05-01

    This paper discusses two problems at the forefront of neurobiology and of noise research. They arise from non-renewal firing processes in nerve cells, due to various forms of memory. The combination of short and long-term correlations between firing intervals has been shown to enhance information transfer, namely by causing a minimal variability in the spike count distribution at a specific counting time. The first problem concerns first passage time calculations in a model that combines these two forms of correlations. It is a two-dimensional leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model in which the threshold is also a dynamical variable. The second problem concerns the effect of long-range correlations on neuron firing statistics. We show new results on the interspike interval densities as well as the spike count Fano factor for the perfect integrate-and-fire (PIF) model forced by a slow (long-correlation time) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, which is a simplification of the previous model. These theoretical results are obtained using a quasi-static noise approximation. There remain, however, many exciting challenges in relating correlations with signal detection in neurobiological systems, some of which are highlighted in our paper.

  1. Kinetics and characterization of photoinduced long-lived electron-hole pair of p-terphenyl occluded in ZSM-5 zeolites. Effects of aluminium content and extraframework cation.

    PubMed

    Moissette, Alain; Belhadj, Fatima; Brémard, Claude; Vezin, Hervé

    2009-12-14

    Diffuse reflectance UV-visible in combination with FT-Raman spectroscopies demonstrate the total incorporation without any solvent of p-terphenyl (p-TP) as an intact molecule in the medium size channel of non-acidic M(n)ZSM-5 (M = Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+) and n = 0, 3.4, 6.6) zeolites. The combined effects of confinement and electrostatic field induced by alkaline ions in the M(n)ZSM-5 zeolites lead only to weak conformational changes in the occluded p-TP after very long organization periods. The interaction between the counterbalancing cation and p-TP occurs through one phenyl group facially coordinated to the cation near the O atoms binding Al atoms. The laser UV photolysis of p-terphenyl occluded as intact molecules in non-acidic M(n)ZSM-5 zeolites generates long-lived charge separated states. The photoionization induces a p-TP*(+)-electron pair as a primary phenomenon. The recombination of the p-TP*(+)@M(n)ZSM-5*(-) radical cation moiety occurs mainly through unusual electron abstraction from the zeolite framework and p-TP@M(n)ZSM-5*(-)*(+) electron-hole pair formation which exceeds several days at room temperature in Li(6.6)ZSM-5. The very long-lived radical pairs are characterized by conventional DRUVv, FT-Raman and CW-EPR spectroscopy. Two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (2D-HYSCORE) experiments reveal the structural surroundings of the unpaired electrons through the proper assignment of unpaired electron couplings. The subsequent hole transfer from the radical cation of the channels as well as the final electron-hole pair recombination appear to be largely controlled by the aluminium content, the size of the extra framework cation and the associated local electrostatic field. The effects of the counterbalancing cations have been investigated and because the zeolite electron affinity increases on going from Li(+) to Cs(+), the electron transfer rates increase according to the following order Li(+) < Na(+) < K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+).

  2. Hadronic production of massive lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    A review is presented of recent experimental and theoretical progress in studies of the production of massive lepton pairs in hadronic collisions. I begin with the classical Drell-Yan annihilation model and its predictions. Subsequently, I discuss deviations from scaling, the status of the proofs of factorization in the parton model, higher-order terms in the perturbative QCD expansion, the discrepancy between measured and predicted yields (K factor), high-twist terms, soft gluon effects, transverse-momentum distributions, implications for weak vector boson (W/sup + -/ and Z/sup 0/) yields and production properties, nuclear A dependence effects, correlations of the lepton pair with hadrons in the final state, and angular distributions in the lepton-pair rest frame.

  3. Protection of Quantum Correlation Through the Quantum Erasing Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui-Yun; Yang, Guo-Hui

    2016-05-01

    By taking into account the quantum erasing effect(QEE), the quantum discord (QD) behavior of a two-qubit system with different initial states are investigated in detail. We find that the quantum correlation can be saved under a scheme of two spatially separated atoms, each located in a leaky cavity through the quantum erasing method. It is shown that QEE can weaken the effects of decoherence, and preserve the maximum information of the coherent item. No matter whether the two atoms are in the mixted or pure state, one can robusty save their initial quantum correlation even the number of erasing events is finite. If one limit the erasing events N → ∞, the QEE can be used to protect the initial quantum correlation independently of the state in which it is stored, the values of QD is always nearly equal to the initial QD values, and it is nearly independent of the decoherence, which imply us more encourage strategy for protecting the quantum correlation properties in some quantum systems.

  4. DNA-based nanobiostructured devices: The role of quasiperiodicity and correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Lyra, M. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the main physical properties of DNA-based nanobiostructured devices, stressing the role played by their quasi-periodicity arrangement and correlation effects. Although the DNA-like molecule is usually described as a short-ranged correlated random ladder, artificial segments can be grown following quasiperiodic sequences as, for instance, the Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro ones. They have interesting properties like a complex fractal spectra of energy, which can be considered as their indelible mark, and collective properties that are not shared by their constituents. These collective properties are due to the presence of long-range correlations, which are expected to be reflected somehow in their various spectra (electronic transmission, density of states, etc.) defining another description of disorder. Although long-range correlations are responsible for the effective electronic transport at specific resonant energies of finite DNA segments, much of the anomalous spread of an initially localized electron wave-packet can be accounted by short-range pair correlations, suggesting that an approach based on the inclusion of further short-range correlations on the nucleotide distribution leads to an adequate description of the electronic properties of DNA segments. The introduction of defects may generate states within the gap, and substantially improves the conductance, specially of finite branches. They usually become exponentially localized for any amount of disorder, and have the property to tailor the electronic transport properties of DNA-based nanoelectronic devices. In particular, symmetric and antisymmetric correlations have quite distinct influence on the nature of the electronic states, and a diluted distribution of defects lead to an anomalous diffusion of the electronic wave-packet. Nonlinear contributions, arising from the coupling between electrons and the molecular vibrations

  5. ATP binds to proteasomal ATPases in pairs with distinct functional effects implying an ordered reaction cycle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David M.; Fraga, Hugo; Reis, Christian; Kafri, Galit; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2011-01-01

    In the eukaryotic 26S proteasome, the 20S particle is regulated by six AAA ATPase subunits, and in archaea by a homologous ring complex, PAN. To clarify the role of ATP in proteolysis, we studied how nucleotides bind to PAN. Although PAN has six identical subunits it binds ATPs in pairs, and its subunits exhibit three conformational states with high, low, or no affinity for ATP. When PAN binds two ATPγS molecules, or two ATPγS plus two ADP molecules it is maximally active in binding protein substrates, associating with the 20S particle, and promoting 20S gate-opening. However, binding of four ATPγS molecules reduces these functions. The 26S proteasome shows similar nucleotide dependence. These findings imply an ordered cyclical mechanism in which two ATPase subunits bind ATP simultaneously and dock into the 20S. These results can explain how these hexameric ATPases interact with and “wobble” on top of the heptameric 20S proteasome. PMID:21335235

  6. Effect of dipolar nanoparticle interaction on transverse magnetic susceptibility: particle pair model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Elizabeth; Hovorka, Ondrej; Friedman, Gennady

    2014-03-01

    Determining nanoparticle dipolar interactions from experimental measurement of magnetic moments is a classical inverse problem in magnetism. It is important in a variety of applications including magnetic information storage and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI). Historically, magnetic moment relaxation has been used to characterize system parameters including dipolar interactions. However, the results are sensitive to particle size distribution. We demonstrate that dipolar coupling strength in a nanoparticle-pair can be determined from transverse magnetic susceptibility, a readily measured parameter. Moreover, we demonstrate that this method is insensitive to particle size, rendering it more robust for real-world experiments. We present both analytical and numerical models for transient and steady-state transverse magnetic susceptibility and resulting interaction strength of our two-particle system. In the analytical model master equation is employed. The particles are assumed to be immobile and the set of possible states is discrete. In the numerical models both master equation and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics are employed. In these models random particle anisotropy directions are taken into account. The results of each model are compared. National Science Foundation GRFP.

  7. A Paired watershed Evaluation of Agroforestry effects on Water Quality on a Corn/Soybean Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udawatta, Ranjith; Jose, Shibu; Garrett, Harold

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous long-term scientific studies confirming environmental benefits from the use of agroforestry practices are limited and thus limit the adoption of agroforestry practices throughout the world. The objective of the study was to examine non point source pollution (NPSP) reduction by agroforestry buffers in row-crop watersheds. The study consists of three watersheds in a paired watershed design in Knox County, Missouri, USA. Watersheds were established in 1991 and treatments of agroforestry (trees+grass) and grass buffers were established on two watersheds in 1997 after a 7-year calibration period. Runoff water samples were analyzed for sediment, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) for the 2009 to 2010 period. Results indicated that agroforestry and grass buffers on row crop watersheds significantly reduce runoff, sediment, TN, and TP losses to streams. Buffers in association with row crop management reduced runoff by 26% during the study period as compared to the control treatments. Average sediment loss for row crop management and buffer watersheds was 14.8 and 9.7 kg ha-1 yr-1 respectively. On average, grass and agroforestry buffers reduced sediment, TN, and TP losses by 32, 42, and 46% compared to the control treatments. These differences could in part be attributed to the differences in management, soils, and landscape features. Results from this study strongly indicate that agroforestry and grass buffers can be implemented to reduce NPSP to water bodies while improving land value and environmental quality.

  8. Effect of critical dimension variation on SAW correlator energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.

    2005-04-01

    The effect of critical dimension (CD) variation and metallization ratio on the efficiency of energy conversion of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator is examined. We find that a 10% variation in the width of finger electrodes predicts only a 1% decrease in the efficiency of energy conversion. Furthermore, our model predicts that a metallization ratio of 0.74 represents an optimum value for energy extraction from the SAW by the interdigitated transducer (IDT).

  9. Quantum dust magnetosonic waves with spin and exchange correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroof, R.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Dust magnetosonic waves are studied in degenerate dusty plasmas with spin and exchange correlation effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, spin magnetization energy, and exchange correlation, a generalized dispersion relation is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The exchange-correlation potentials are used, based on the adiabatic local-density approximation, and can be described as a function of the electron density. For three different values of angle, the dispersion relation is reduced to three different modes under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effects of quantum corrections in the presence of dust concentration significantly modify the dispersive properties of these modes. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets) and in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, etc.).

  10. Competition between BCS-pairing and “moth-eaten effect” in BEC-BCS crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guojun; Combescot, Monique

    2012-01-01

    We study the change in condensation energy from a single pair of fermionic atoms to a large number of pairs interacting via the reduced BCS potential. We find that the energy-saving due to correlations decreases when the pair number increases because the number of empty states available for pairing gets smaller ("moth-eaten effect"). However, this decrease dominates the 3D kinetic energy increase of the same amount of noninteracting atoms only when the pair number is a sizable fraction of the number of states available for pairing. As a result, in BEC-BCS crossover of 3D systems, the condensation energy per pair first increases and then decreases with pair number while in 2D, it always is controlled by the "moth-eaten effect" and thus simply decreases.

  11. Narrowing the error in electron correlation calculations by basis set re-hierarchization and use of the unified singlet and triplet electron-pair extrapolation scheme: Application to a test set of 106 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Varandas, A. J. C.; Pansini, F. N. N.

    2014-12-14

    A method previously suggested to calculate the correlation energy at the complete one-electron basis set limit by reassignment of the basis hierarchical numbers and use of the unified singlet- and triplet-pair extrapolation scheme is applied to a test set of 106 systems, some with up to 48 electrons. The approach is utilized to obtain extrapolated correlation energies from raw values calculated with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and the coupled-cluster singles and doubles excitations method, some of the latter also with the perturbative triples corrections. The calculated correlation energies have also been used to predict atomization energies within an additive scheme. Good agreement is obtained with the best available estimates even when the (d, t) pair of hierarchical numbers is utilized to perform the extrapolations. This conceivably justifies that there is no strong reason to exclude double-zeta energies in extrapolations, especially if the basis is calibrated to comply with the theoretical model.

  12. The effects of paired associative stimulation on knee extensor motor excitability of individuals post-stroke: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Lynn M.; Brown, David A.; Stinear, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Paired associative stimulation (PAS) modulates bilateral distal lower limb motor pathways during walking. We assessed the effects of inhibitory PAS applied to the vastus medialis (VM) motor pathways of chronic stroke patients. Methods PAS consisted of 120 electrical stimuli applied to the femoral nerve paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the lower limb primary motor cortex so that the estimated arrival of the afferent volley occurred 8 ms after delivery of the magnetic stimulus. Stimulus pairs were delivered to the non-paretic VM motor system of 11 chronic stroke patients and the right limb motor system of 11 non-impaired subjects at 0.19 Hz. The effects of PAS on VM motor pathway excitability and muscle activity were assessed during pedaling. TMS-induced motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and the percent of VM activity in the flexion phase of active pedaling (%FLEXVM) was examined before and after PAS. Results Inhibitory PAS reduced VM MEP amplitudes in the target limb (p < 0.05) of both groups, while post-PAS paretic VM MEP amplitudes increased for some patients and decreased for others. Group mean paretic limb %FLEXVM was not altered by inhibitory PAS. Conclusions These results indicate PAS can be used to manipulate motor cortical excitability in proximal lower limb representations, however the sign of induced modulation was unpredictable and cyclic muscle activity was not modified. Significance The study has important implications for the development of therapies involving non-invasive brain stimulation to modify abnormal motor behavior following stroke. PMID:21130032

  13. Orbital-dependent electron correlation effects in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ming

    The iron chalcogenide superconductors constitute arguably one of the most intriguing families of the iron-based high temperature superconductors given their ability to superconduct at comparable temperatures as the iron pnictides, despite the lack of similarities in their magnetic structures and Fermi surface topologies. In particular, the lack of hole Fermi pockets at the Brillouin zone center posts a challenge to the previous proposal of spin fluctuation mediated pairing via Fermi surface nesting. In this talk, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, I will present evidence that show that instead of Fermi surface topology, strong electron correlation observed in electron bandwidth is an important ingredient for superconductivity in the iron chalcogenides. Specifically, I will show i) there exists universal strong orbital-selective renormalization effects and proximity to an orbital-selective Mott phase in Fe1+yTe1-xSex, AxFe2-ySe2, and monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3, and ii) in RbxFe2(Se1-zSz)2 , where sulfur substitution for selenium continuously suppresses superconductivity down to zero, little change occurs in the Fermi surface topology while a substantial reduction of electron correlation is observed in an expansion of the overall bandwidth, implying that electron correlation is one of the key tuning parameters for superconductivity in these materials.

  14. Increased New lncRNA-mRNA Gene Pair Levels in Human Cumulus Cells Correlate With Oocyte Maturation and Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Cao, Yunxia; Xu, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Huifen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Beili; Hao, Yan; Wei, Zhaolian; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Dawei

    2015-08-01

    The close relationship between cumulus cells and oocyte indicates that the analysis of cumulus gene expression is a potential noninvasive method to aid embryo selection and in vitro fertilization outcome. Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) could regulate essential pathways that contribute to human oocyte maturation, fertilization, and embryo development, which indicates that lncRNA would be valuable biomarkers. In our previous study, AK124742 is a newly detected lncRNA that was identified as being natural antisense to PSMD6, but its role in oocyte and embryo development is still not elucidated and needs to be investigated. Here, the expression of AK124742 and PSMD6 was measured in 40 pairs of cumulus cells from oocytes that result in high-quality embryos (HCCs) and from oocytes that result in poor-quality embryos (PCCs) by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The predictive value of AK124742 and PSMD6 was evaluated using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Notably, elevated expression levels of AK124742 and PSMD6 were observed in HCCs compared to PCCs (72.5% and 62.5%, respectively; P < .01). Expression of AK124742 was potentially positively associated with the PSMD6 levels. The relative expression levels of AK124742 and PSMD6 in the pregnancy group were significantly higher than those in the nonpregnancy group (P < .01).The area under the ROC curve of AK124742 was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.64-0.93). In conclusion, AK124742 and PSMD6 as a new lncRNA-messenger RNA gene pair in human cumulus cells may be considered as potential biomarkers to aid embryo selection.

  15. The effects of item familiarity on the neural correlates of successful associative memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Nancy A; Turney, Indira C; Webb, Christina E; Overman, Amy A

    2015-12-01

    Associative memory is considered to be resource-demanding, requiring individuals to learn individual items and the specific relationships between those items. Previous research has shown that prior studying of items aids in associative memory for pairs composed of those same items, as compared to pairs of items that have not been prelearned (e.g., Kilb & Naveh-Benjamin, 2011). In the present study, we sought to elucidate the neural correlates mediating this memory facilitation. After being trained on individual items, participants were scanned while encoding item pairs composed of items from the pretrained phase (familiarized-item pairs) and pairs whose items had not been previously learned (unfamiliarized-item pairs). Consistent with previous findings, the overall subsequent recollection showed the engagement of bilateral parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and hippocampus, when compared to subsequent forgetting. However, a direct comparison between familiarized- and unfamiliarized-item pairs showed that subsequently recollected familiarized-item pairs were associated with decreased activity across much of the encoding network, including bilateral PHG, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and regions associated with item-specific processing within occipital cortex. Increased activity for familiarized-item pairs was found in a more limited set of regions, including bilateral parietal cortex, which has been associated with the formation of novel associations. Additionally, activity in the right parietal cortex correlated with associative memory success in the familiarized condition. Taken together, these results suggest that prior exposure to items can reduce the demands incurred on neural processing throughout the associative encoding network and can enhance associative memory performance by focusing resources within regions supporting the formation of associative links.

  16. Squeezed Particle-Antiparticle Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, S. S.; Dudek, D. M.; Socolowski, O., Jr.

    2009-04-01

    A novel type of correlation involving particle-antiparticle pairs was found out in the 1990's. Currently known as squeezed or Back-to-Back Correlations (BBC), they should be present if the hadronic masses are modified in the hot and dense medium formed in high energy heavy ion collisions. Although well-established theoretically, such hadronic correlations have not yet been observed experimentally. In this phenomenological study we suggest a promising way to search for the BBC signal, by looking into the squeezed correlation function of phi phi and K+ K- pairs at RHIC energies, as function of the pair average momentum, K12=(@BOLD@ k1+@BOLD@ k2)/2. The effects of in-medium mass-shift on the identical particle correlations (Hanbury-Brown and Twiss effect) are also discussed.

  17. Effects of Guided Care on Providers' Satisfaction with Care: A Three-Year Matched-Pair Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yea-Jen; Wen, Mei; Wolff, Jennifer; Frick, Kevin; Reider, Lisa; Scharfstein, Daniel; Boyd, Cynthia; Leff, Bruce; Schwartz, Lindsay; Karm, Lya; Boult, Chad

    2013-01-01

    Abstract It is important to understand the effects of a new care model on health professionals' satisfaction, which may help inform organizations' decisions regarding the adoption of the model. This study evaluates the effect of the Guided Care model of primary care on physicians', Guided Care Nurses' and practice staff satisfaction with processes of care for chronically ill older patients. In Guided Care, a specially educated registered nurse works with 2–5 primary care physicians, performing 8 clinical activities for 50–60 chronically ill older patients. This model was tested in a 3-year matched-pair cluster-randomized controlled trial with 14 pods (teams of physicians and staff) randomly assigned, within pairs, to provide Guided Care or usual care. Physicians and Guided Care Nurses were surveyed at baseline and annually for 3 years. Staff were surveyed at baseline and 2 years later. Physicians' satisfaction with chronic care processes, knowledge of patients, and care coordination were measured, as well as Guided Care Nurses' satisfaction with chronic care processes and staff perceptions of quality of care. Findings suggest that Guided Care improved physician satisfaction with patient/family communication and management of chronic care, and it may bolster staff beliefs that care is patient oriented. Differences in other aspects of care were not statistically significant. (Population Health Management 2013;16:317–325) PMID:23560515

  18. Targeted estimation and inference for the sample average treatment effect in trials with and without pair-matching.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Laura B; Petersen, Maya L; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-09-20

    In cluster randomized trials, the study units usually are not a simple random sample from some clearly defined target population. Instead, the target population tends to be hypothetical or ill-defined, and the selection of study units tends to be systematic, driven by logistical and practical considerations. As a result, the population average treatment effect (PATE) may be neither well defined nor easily interpretable. In contrast, the sample average treatment effect (SATE) is the mean difference in the counterfactual outcomes for the study units. The sample parameter is easily interpretable and arguably the most relevant when the study units are not sampled from some specific super-population of interest. Furthermore, in most settings, the sample parameter will be estimated more efficiently than the population parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to propose using targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE) for estimation and inference of the sample effect in trials with and without pair-matching. We study the asymptotic and finite sample properties of the TMLE for the sample effect and provide a conservative variance estimator. Finite sample simulations illustrate the potential gains in precision and power from selecting the sample effect as the target of inference. This work is motivated by the Sustainable East Africa Research in Community Health (SEARCH) study, a pair-matched, community randomized trial to estimate the effect of population-based HIV testing and streamlined ART on the 5-year cumulative HIV incidence (NCT01864603). The proposed methodology will be used in the primary analysis for the SEARCH trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Targeted estimation and inference for the sample average treatment effect in trials with and without pair-matching.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Laura B; Petersen, Maya L; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-09-20

    In cluster randomized trials, the study units usually are not a simple random sample from some clearly defined target population. Instead, the target population tends to be hypothetical or ill-defined, and the selection of study units tends to be systematic, driven by logistical and practical considerations. As a result, the population average treatment effect (PATE) may be neither well defined nor easily interpretable. In contrast, the sample average treatment effect (SATE) is the mean difference in the counterfactual outcomes for the study units. The sample parameter is easily interpretable and arguably the most relevant when the study units are not sampled from some specific super-population of interest. Furthermore, in most settings, the sample parameter will be estimated more efficiently than the population parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to propose using targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE) for estimation and inference of the sample effect in trials with and without pair-matching. We study the asymptotic and finite sample properties of the TMLE for the sample effect and provide a conservative variance estimator. Finite sample simulations illustrate the potential gains in precision and power from selecting the sample effect as the target of inference. This work is motivated by the Sustainable East Africa Research in Community Health (SEARCH) study, a pair-matched, community randomized trial to estimate the effect of population-based HIV testing and streamlined ART on the 5-year cumulative HIV incidence (NCT01864603). The proposed methodology will be used in the primary analysis for the SEARCH trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27087478

  20. No correlation, no evidence for attention shift in category learning: different mechanisms behind illusory correlations and the inverse base-rate effect.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Florian L; Fiedler, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    When common and rare attributes are equally prevalent for frequent and infrequent categories, the frequent categories (e.g., majority groups) are associated more strongly with the common attributes (e.g., positive valence) than infrequent categories (e.g., minority groups). Such a frequency-based illusory correlation (IC) effect has been shown to arise through unbiased learning, which is less complete for infrequent than for frequent categories. On the other hand, when frequent categories are always paired with corresponding common attributes and infrequent categories with corresponding rare attributes, an inverse base-rate effect (IBRE) arises. The association of the infrequent categories with the rare attributes is stronger than the association of the frequent categories with the common attributes. Recently, it has been proposed that the attention shift mechanism that produces the IBRE is also essential to explaining IC effects (Sherman, Kruschke, Sherman, Percy, Petrocelli, & Conrey, 2009). No evidence was found for this explanation of standard IC effects across 4 experiments and related computational modeling of attention shift (using a model called EXIT, derived from "extended ADIT" model, where the name ADIT is an acronym for "attention to distinctive input"). In a fifth experiment, evidence for attention shift was found for perfect category-attribute correlations. In sum, incomplete learning continues to offer a sufficient and parsimonious account of IC effects. PMID:25485605

  1. Uncontrolled disorder effects in fabricating photonic quantum simulators on a kagome geometry: A projected-entangled-pair-state versus exact-diagonalization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, Amin; Dezfouli, Bahareh Ghannad; Ghasemipour, Fatemeh; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Saberi, Hamed

    2014-06-01

    We propose a flexible numerical framework for extracting the energy spectra and photon transfer dynamics of a unit kagome cell with disordered cavity-cavity couplings under realistic experimental conditions. A projected-entangled pair state (PEPS) Ansatz to the many-photon wave function allows us to gain a detailed understanding of the effects of undesirable disorder in fabricating well-controlled and scalable photonic quantum simulators. The correlation functions associated with the propagation of two-photon excitations reveal intriguing interference patterns peculiar to the kagome geometry and promise at the same time a highly tunable quantum interferometry device with a signature for the formation of resonant or Fabry-Peŕot-like transmission of photons. Our results justify the use of the proposed PEPS technique for addressing the role of disorder in such quantum simulators in the microwave regime and promises sophisticated numerical machinery for yet further explorations of the scalability of the resulting kagome arrays. The introduced methodology and the physical results may also pave the way for unraveling exotic phases of correlated light on a kagome geometry.

  2. The neural correlates of endowment effect without economic transaction.

    PubMed

    Votinov, Mikhail; Mima, Tatsuya; Aso, Toshihiko; Abe, Mitsunari; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Shinozaki, Jun; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2010-09-01

    People always concern about what they have and what they might lose even it is just imaginary property. According to Prospect Theory, the losses might be weighted by subjects higher than gain, which would cause the disparity between the willingness to accept (WTA) and willingness to pay (WTP) compensation in economic valuation. Using functional MRI, we investigated neural correlates of this inconsistent value estimation, known as the endowment effect, during a simple pricing task without economic transaction. Brain activation associated with this price discrepancy was observed in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), where voxel-based morphometry of MRI revealed the positive correlation between gray matter concentration and WTA/WTP ratio. These findings suggest the functional relevance of IFG in WTA/WTP discrepancy for pricing without any actual gain and loss, where an integration of loss aversion-related signals from insula and expected value signals may occur.

  3. Effects of receptor correlations on molecular information transmission.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2016-08-01

    Cells measure concentrations of external ligands by capturing ligand molecules with cell surface receptors. The numbers of molecules captured by different receptors co-vary because they depend on the same extrinsic ligand fluctuations. However, these numbers also counter-vary due to the intrinsic stochasticity of chemical processes because a single molecule randomly captured by a receptor cannot be captured by another. Such structure of receptor correlations is generally believed to lead to an increase in information about the external signal compared to the case of independent receptors. We analyze a solvable model of two molecular receptors and show that, contrary to this widespread expectation, the correlations have a small and negative effect on the information about the ligand concentration. Further, we show that measurements that average over multiple receptors are almost as informative as those that track the states of every individual one. PMID:27627350

  4. Effects of receptor correlations on molecular information transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2016-08-01

    Cells measure concentrations of external ligands by capturing ligand molecules with cell surface receptors. The numbers of molecules captured by different receptors co-vary because they depend on the same extrinsic ligand fluctuations. However, these numbers also counter-vary due to the intrinsic stochasticity of chemical processes because a single molecule randomly captured by a receptor cannot be captured by another. Such structure of receptor correlations is generally believed to lead to an increase in information about the external signal compared to the case of independent receptors. We analyze a solvable model of two molecular receptors and show that, contrary to this widespread expectation, the correlations have a small and negative effect on the information about the ligand concentration. Further, we show that measurements that average over multiple receptors are almost as informative as those that track the states of every individual one.

  5. Nonlinear effects in the correlation of tracks and covariance propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabol, C.; Hill, K.; Alfriend, K.; Sukut, T.

    2013-03-01

    Even though there are methods for the nonlinear propagation of the covariance the propagation of the covariance in current operational programs is based on the state transition matrix of the 1st variational equations, thus it is a linear propagation. If the measurement errors are zero mean Gaussian, the orbit errors, statistically represented by the covariance, are Gaussian. When the orbit errors become too large they are no longer Gaussian and not represented by the covariance. One use of the covariance is the association of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs). A UCT is an object tracked by a space surveillance system that does not correlate to another object in the space object data base. For an object to be entered into the data base three or more tracks must be correlated. Associating UCTs is a major challenge for a space surveillance system since every object entered into the space object catalog begins as a UCT. It has been proved that if the orbit errors are Gaussian, the error ellipsoid represented by the covariance is the optimum association volume. When the time between tracks becomes large, hours or even days, the orbit errors can become large and are no longer Gaussian, and this has a negative effect on the association of UCTs. This paper further investigates the nonlinear effects on the accuracy of the covariance for use in correlation. The use of the best coordinate system and the unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) for providing a more accurate covariance are investigated along with assessing how these approaches would result in the ability to correlate tracks that are further separated in time.

  6. Can density cumulant functional theory describe static correlation effects?

    PubMed

    Mullinax, J Wayne; Sokolov, Alexander Yu; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the performance of density cumulant functional theory (DCT) for capturing static correlation effects. In particular, we examine systems with significant multideterminant character of the electronic wave function, such as the beryllium dimer, diatomic carbon, m-benzyne, 2,6-pyridyne, twisted ethylene, as well as the barrier for double-bond migration in cyclobutadiene. We compute molecular properties of these systems using the ODC-12 and DC-12 variants of DCT and compare these results to multireference configuration interaction and multireference coupled-cluster theories, as well as single-reference coupled-cluster theory with single, double (CCSD), and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. For all systems the DCT methods show intermediate performance between that of CCSD and CCSD(T), with significant improvement over the former method. In particular, for the beryllium dimer, m-benzyne, and 2,6-pyridyne, the ODC-12 method along with CCSD(T) correctly predict the global minimum structures, while CCSD predictions fail qualitatively, underestimating the multireference effects. Our results suggest that the DC-12 and ODC-12 methods are capable of describing emerging static correlation effects but should be used cautiously when highly accurate results are required. Conveniently, the appearance of multireference effects in DCT can be diagnosed by analyzing the DCT natural orbital occupations, which are readily available at the end of the energy computation.

  7. Can density cumulant functional theory describe static correlation effects?

    PubMed

    Mullinax, J Wayne; Sokolov, Alexander Yu; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the performance of density cumulant functional theory (DCT) for capturing static correlation effects. In particular, we examine systems with significant multideterminant character of the electronic wave function, such as the beryllium dimer, diatomic carbon, m-benzyne, 2,6-pyridyne, twisted ethylene, as well as the barrier for double-bond migration in cyclobutadiene. We compute molecular properties of these systems using the ODC-12 and DC-12 variants of DCT and compare these results to multireference configuration interaction and multireference coupled-cluster theories, as well as single-reference coupled-cluster theory with single, double (CCSD), and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. For all systems the DCT methods show intermediate performance between that of CCSD and CCSD(T), with significant improvement over the former method. In particular, for the beryllium dimer, m-benzyne, and 2,6-pyridyne, the ODC-12 method along with CCSD(T) correctly predict the global minimum structures, while CCSD predictions fail qualitatively, underestimating the multireference effects. Our results suggest that the DC-12 and ODC-12 methods are capable of describing emerging static correlation effects but should be used cautiously when highly accurate results are required. Conveniently, the appearance of multireference effects in DCT can be diagnosed by analyzing the DCT natural orbital occupations, which are readily available at the end of the energy computation. PMID:26575548

  8. Pair correlation functions and the wavevector-dependent surface tension in a simple density functional treatment of the liquid-vapour interface.

    PubMed

    Parry, A O; Rascón, C; Willis, G; Evans, R

    2014-09-01

    We study the density-density correlation function G(r, r') in the interfacial region of a fluid (or Ising-like magnet) with short-ranged interactions using square gradient density functional theory. Adopting a simple double parabola approximation for the bulk free-energy density, we first show that the parallel Fourier transform G(z, z'; q) and local structure factor S(z; q) separate into bulk and excess contributions. We attempt to account for both contributions by deriving an interfacial Hamiltonian, characterised by a wavevector dependent surface tension σ(q), and then reconstructing density correlations from correlations in the interface position. We show that the standard crossing criterion identification of the interface, as a surface of fixed density (or magnetization), does not explain the separation of G(z, z'; q) and the form of the excess contribution. We propose an alternative definition of the interface position based on the properties of correlations between points that 'float' with the surface and show that this describes the full q and z dependence of the excess contributions to both G and S. However, neither the 'crossing-criterion' nor the new 'floating interface' definition of σ(q) are quantities directly measurable from the total structure factor S(tot)(q) which contains additional q dependence arising from the non-local relation between fluctuations in the interfacial position and local density. Since it is the total structure factor that is measured experimentally or in simulations, our results have repercussions for earlier attempts to extract and interpret σ(q).

  9. Pair-collision between heterogeneous capsules in simple shear: Effect of membrane stiffness and membrane constitutive laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Sarkar, Kausik

    2012-11-01

    Deformability of red blood cells affects hydrodynamic properties of blood and thereby physiological functions in many cardiovascular diseases, e.g. in sickle cell anemia and malaria, the cell membrane becomes stiff affecting their circulation through microvessels. Here, we numerically simulate the hydrodynamic interaction between a pair of cell-like capsules in a free shear flow, using a front-tracking method. The membrane is modeled using various constitutive equations. By varying the stiffness of one capsule (C2) and keeping all other parameters constant, we find a significant effect on the deformation and trajectory of the other (C1) . Increasing the stiffness of C2 surprisingly increases the peak deformation of C1 while decreasing the cross-stream shift in its trajectory However, the relative trajectory between capsules remains the same. Effects of constitutive laws and difference in behaviors between capsules and drops are investigated explaining underlying physics. partial support from NSF.

  10. Binaural comodulation masking release: Effects of masker interaural correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Joseph W.; Buss, Emily; Grose, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Binaural detection was examined for a signal presented in a narrow band of noise centered on the on-signal masking band (OSB) or in the presence of flanking noise bands that were random or comodulated with respect to the OSB. The noise had an interaural correlation of 1.0 (No), 0.99 or 0.95. In No noise, random flanking bands worsened Sπ detection and comodulated bands improved Sπ detection for some listeners but had no effect for other listeners. For the 0.99 or 0.95 interaural correlation conditions, random flanking bands were less detrimental to Sπ detection and comodulated flanking bands improved Sπ detection for all listeners. Analyses based on signal detection theory indicated that the improvement in Sπ thresholds obtained with comodulated bands was not compatible with an optimal combination of monaural and binaural cues or to across-frequency analyses of dynamic interaural phase differences. Two accounts consistent with the improvement in Sπ thresholds in comodulated noise were (1) envelope information carried by the flanking bands improves the weighting of binaural cues associated with the signal; (2) the auditory system is sensitive to across-frequency differences in ongoing interaural correlation. PMID:17225415

  11. Binaural comodulation masking release: effects of masker interaural correlation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joseph W; Buss, Emily; Grose, John H

    2006-12-01

    Binaural detection was examined for a signal presented in a narrow band of noise centered on the on-signal masking band (OSB) or in the presence of flanking noise bands that were random or comodulated with respect to the OSB. The noise had an interaural correlation of 1.0 (No), 0.99 or 0.95. In No noise, random flanking bands worsened Spi detection and comodulated bands improved Spi detection for some listeners but had no effect for other listeners. For the 0.99 or 0.95 interaural correlation conditions, random flanking bands were less detrimental to Spi detection and comodulated flanking bands improved Spi detection for all listeners. Analyses based on signal detection theory indicated that the improvement in Spi thresholds obtained with comodulated bands was not compatible with an optimal combination of monaural and binaural cues or to across-frequency analyses of dynamic interaural phase differences. Two accounts consistent with the improvement in Spi thresholds in comodulated noise were (1) envelope information carried by the flanking bands improves the weighting of binaural cues associated with the signal; (2) the auditory system is sensitive to across-frequency differences in ongoing interaural correlation.

  12. Optical lattice quantum simulator for quantum electrodynamics in strong external fields: spontaneous pair creation and the Sauter-Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpak, N.; Schützhold, R.

    2012-03-01

    The spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs out of the vacuum due to a strong electric field is a spectacular manifestation of the relativistic energy-momentum relation for the Dirac fermions. This fundamental prediction of quantum electrodynamics has not yet been confirmed experimentally, as the generation of a sufficiently strong electric field extending over a large enough space-time volume still presents a challenge. Surprisingly, distant areas of physics may help us to circumvent this difficulty. In condensed matter and solid state physics (areas commonly considered as low-energy physics), one usually deals with quasi-particles instead of real electrons and positrons. Since their mass gap can often be freely tuned, it is much easier to create these light quasi-particles by an analogue of the Sauter-Schwinger effect. This motivates our proposal for a quantum simulator in which excitations of ultra-cold atoms moving in a bichromatic optical lattice represent particles and antiparticles (holes) satisfying a discretized version of the Dirac equation together with fermionic anti-commutation relations. Using the language of second quantization, we are able to construct an analogue of the spontaneous pair creation which can be realized in an (almost) table-top experiment.

  13. Incorporation of anthracene into zeolites: confinement effect on the recombination rate of photoinduced radical cation-electron pair.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Séverine; Moissette, Alain; Brémard, Claude

    2006-07-17

    FT-Raman spectrometry in combination with diffuse reflectance UV/Vis absorption (DRUVv) and fluorescence emission indicate that complete anthracene (ANT) sorption as intact molecules takes place over 6 months in the medium pores of non-Brønsted acidic M(n)ZSM-5 zeolites (n=0.0, 3.4, 6.6; M=Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) with 1 ANT per unit cell loading. The combined effect of confinement and electrostatic field induced by bulky cations (Rb+, Cs+) leads to specific changes in the occluded ANT Raman spectra after very long organization periods (one year). The laser photolysis (266 nm, 355 nm) of ANT@M(n)ZSM-5 equilibrated samples generates long-lived charge separated species in aluminum rich zeolites (n=3.4, 6.6). The very long-lived radical pairs are characterized by conventional DRUVv and CW-EPR spectroscopy. The direct charge recombination rates of ANT.+-electron pairs are dispersive, extending over a broad range of timescales. The kinetic constant values are found to increase dramatically with the aluminum content and increase markedly with M+ according to the following order Na+ < K+ < Rb+ < Cs+. The small reorganization energy (lambda) of ZSM-5 zeolite pores coupled with large negative free energy changes (-DeltaG degrees ) between the ground state ANT oxidation potential and Fermi level of aluminum rich M(n)ZSM-5 explain the observed trends of the ANT.+@M(n)ZSM-5.- charge recombination rates.

  14. Mutagenic effects induced by the attack of NO2 radical to the guanine-cytosine base pair

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO•2) to the guanine—cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO•2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC–NO•2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis. PMID:25798437

  15. Influence of correlation effects on radiation damage in solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, P. V.; Kulish, N. P.; Mel'nikova, N. A.; Grabovskii, Yu. E.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of correlation effects due to thermodynamic interaction of alloy components on segregation processes upon radiation treatment has been analyzed. The analysis has been performed for 53 metallic solid solutions. It has been shown that the short-range order in alloys causes a redistribution of flows of radiation defects and changes the mechanism of their annihilation, which in a certain temperature range is responsible for the high resistance of alloys to radiation swelling. The presence of two maxima in the curve of the temperature dependence of swelling for austenitic nickel-chromium alloys is associated with the existence therein of different types of short-range order at different temperatures.

  16. A QCD calculation of the transverse momentum distribution of Drell-Yan pairs including soft emission and non-abelian effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odorico, R.

    1982-05-01

    The well-known Parisi and Petronzio LLA result for the QCD transverse momentum distribution of Drell-Yan pairs at pT≪ Q takes into account the non-singlet contribution only and totally neglects non-abelian effects due to the singlet contribution. The latter becomes substantial and sometimes dominant at pp and overlinepp collider energies, and thus any comparison with data from these machines will require computation of its effects. We present a QCD Monte Carlo procedure which allows one to calculate the transverse momentum distribution with both non-singlet and singlet contributions included. At the same time it computes the evolution of parton density functions and the correlations between transverse and longitudinal distributions. Phase-space effects are duly taken into account. It is found that, at collider energies, the singlet contribution completely alters QCD predictions for dimuon transverse momenta giving at times < pT> ˜ 4 times larger than the non-singlet contribution. Quantitative results are presented and a comparison with existing data is made, showing satisfactory agreement with the experimentally observed behaviours.

  17. FEMALE AND MALE GENETIC EFFECTS ON OFFSPRING PATERNITY: ADDITIVE GENETIC (CO)VARIANCES IN FEMALE EXTRA-PAIR REPRODUCTION AND MALE PATERNITY SUCCESS IN SONG SPARROWS (MELOSPIZA MELODIA)

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically. PMID:24724612

  18. Female and male genetic effects on offspring paternity: additive genetic (co)variances in female extra-pair reproduction and male paternity success in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia).

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-08-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically.

  19. Pairing Learners in Pair Work Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Neomy; Aldosari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in…

  20. Using Pair Counseling to Improve the Cost-Effectiveness of College Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Mary-Catherine; Sampson, James P.

    2013-01-01

    As the demand for career counseling services grows, the need for accountability rises, and the availability of funding decreases, it becomes more critical that practitioners utilize cost-effective interventions and alternative forms of treatment. One option for improving access to all clients while concurrently reducing costs involves using…

  1. Effect of integral yoga on psychological and health variables and their correlations

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Sushil S; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra; Hankey, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Certain psychological and health variables are commonly measured in India. This study evaluates the effects of integral yoga practices on these variables and also the consistency of correlations observed between them. Materials and Methods: The study was a pre-post intervention study. The variables were measured at the beginning and the end of a one-month yoga course. There was no control group.The study was carried out at Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana (S-VYASA) University, in its rural campus south of Bangalore. Based on health criteria, 108 subjects were selected out of 198 volunteers to form the experimental yoga group. Ages ranged from 17 to 63 years. The yogasanas (postures), pranayama (breathing exercises), relaxation techniques, meditation, chanting and lectures were the components of yoga intervention. The variables measured were sustained attention, emotional intelligence – EQ, general health – GHQ, guna personality – sattva, rajas and tamas. Results: Significant pre-post changes were found in all variables. Significant correlations were found between the following pairs: The two sustained attention variables; emotional intelligence and general health; GHQ and tamas; sattva and tamas; and rajas and tamas. Conclusion: The study shows that there were significant changes in all variables (P< 0.001) except in sattva. It also confirms that EQ and general health variables correlate significantly with each other and negatively with tamas. EQ and tamas form positive and negative predictors of health respectively. Sattva correlates positively with EQ suggesting that a sattvic personality indicates better self-control. This suggests that, by improving guna personality, long-term yoga practice may stabilize EQ. PMID:22022128

  2. Enhanced wavelength conversion and photon pair generation using slow light effects and electronic carrier sweepout in silicon photonics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanier, Marc; Kumar, Ranjeet; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2015-03-01

    Silicon photonics has drawn a lot of attention over the last decades, mainly in telecom-related application fields where the nonlinear optical properties of silicon are ignored or minimized. However, silicon's high χ(3) Kerr optical nonlinearity in sub-micron-scale high-confinement waveguides can enable significant improvements in traditional nonlinear devices, such as for wavelength conversion, and also enable some device applications in quantum optics or for quantum key distribution. In order to establish the viability of silicon photonics in practical applications, some big challenges are to improve the optical performance (e.g., optimize nonlinearity or minimize loss) and integration of optics with microelectronics. In this context, we discuss how electronic PIN diodes improve the performance of wavelength conversion in a microring resonator based four-wave mixing device, which achieves a continuous-wave four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of -21.3 dB at 100 mW pump power, with enough bandwidth for the wavelength conversion of a 10 Gbps signal. In the regime of quantum optics, we describe a coupled microring device that can serve as a tunable source of entangled photon pairs at telecommunications wavelengths, operating at room temperature with a low pump power requirement. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the chip temperature, we show that the output bi-photon spectrum can be varied, with implications on the degree of frequency correlation of the generated quantum state.

  3. Correlations and effects of pressure in Fe-pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, Roser

    2014-03-01

    In this talk we will explore the effects of correlations and pressure in Fe-based superconductors by considering a combination of density functional theory calculations and dynamical mean field theory and compare our results with recent ARPES and de Haas van Alphen experiments. We will discuss the importance of orbital-selective correlations in the 111 (LiFeAs, LiFeP) and 122 families (BaFe2As2,CaFe2As2, KFe2As2) and indicate how the topology of the Fermi surface, specially in KFe2As2, is influenced by these effects. In this context, we will show why MgFeGe, an isostructural and isoelectronic system to LiFeAs, doesn't superconduct. In the case of the 122 systems, we will predict and analyze changes in the electronic and magnetic properties under hydrostatic, tensile and compressive pressure and will discuss our results in relation to (i) superconductivity, (ii) magnetism and (iii) the mechanisms involved in the detwinning process of an orthorhombic iron-pnictide crystal a. Funding has been provided by the German Science Foundation (DFG).

  4. Correlation and symmetry effects in transport through an artificial molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, F.; Cota, E.; Ulloa, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    Spectral weights and current-voltage characteristics of an artificial diatomic molecule are calculated, considering cases where the dots connected in series are in general different. The spectral weights allow us to understand the effects of correlations, their connection with selection rules for transport, and the role of excited states in the experimental conductance spectra of these coupled double dot systems (DDS). An extended Hubbard Hamiltonian with varying interdot tunneling strength is used as a model, incorporating quantum confinement in the DDS, interdot tunneling as well as intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions. We find that interdot tunneling values determine to a great extent the resulting eigenstates and corresponding spectral weights. Details of the state correlations strongly suppress most of the possible conduction channels, giving rise to effective selection rules for conductance through the molecule. Most states are found to make insignificant contributions to the total current for finite biases. We find also that the symmetry of the structure is reflected in the I-V characteristics, and is in qualitative agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. The correlation-based law of effect1

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M.

    1973-01-01

    It is commonly understood that the interactions between an organism and its environment constitute a feedback system. This implies that instrumental behavior should be viewed as a continuous exchange between the organism and the environment. It follows that orderly relations between behavior and environment should emerge at the level of aggregate flow in time, rather than momentary events. These notions require a simple, but fundamental, change in the law of effect: from a law based on contiguity of events to a law based on correlation between events. Much recent research and argument favors such a change. If the correlation-based law of effect is accepted, it favors measures and units of analysis that transcend momentary events, extending through time. One can measure all consequences on a common scale, called value. One can define a unit of analysis called the behavioral situation, which circumscribes a set of values. These concepts allow redefinition of reinforcement and punishment, and clarification of their relation to discriminative stimuli. PMID:16811687

  6. Coherence factor effects in the antisymmetrized LDOS correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Marianna; Coleman, P.

    2009-03-01

    Recent scanning tunneling experiments on underdoped cuprates by Hanaguri et al [1] show the appearance of coherence factor effects. Unlike conventional observables, we show that the tunneling density of states in a superconductor does not have a well defined coherence factor. However, by extracting the component that is either even, or odd in the bias voltage, we show that these separate components have well-defined coherence factors. These results are used to understand the appearance of coherence factor effects in the antisymmetrized local density of states correlators in recent scanning tunneling experiments. [3pt] [1] T. Hanaguri, Y. Kohsaka, M. Ono, M. Maltseva, P. Coleman, I. Yamada, M. Azuma, M. Takano, K. Ohishi and H. Takagi, to be published (2009).

  7. Prospective very young asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galád, A.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Zizka, J.

    2014-07-01

    Several tens of asteroid pairs can be discerned from the background main-belt asteroids. The majority of them are thought to have formed within only the last few 10^6 yr. The youngest recognized pairs have formed more than ≈ 10 kyr ago. As some details of pair formation are still not understood well, the study of young pairs is of great importance. It is mainly because the conditions at the time of the pair formation could be deduced much more reliably for young pairs. For example, space weathering on the surfaces of the components, or changes in their rotational properties (in spin rates, tumbling, coordinates of rotational pole) could be negligible since the formation of young pairs. Also, possible strong perturbations by main-belt bodies on pair formation can be reliably studied only for extremely young pairs. Some pairs can quickly blend in with the background asteroids, so even the frequency of asteroid pair formation could be determined more reliably based on young pairs (though only after a statistically significant sample is at disposal). In our regular search for young pairs in the growing asteroid database, only multiopposition asteroids with very similar orbital and proper elements are investigated. Every pair component is represented by a number of clones within orbital uncertainties and drifting in semimajor axis due to the Yarkovsky effect. We found that, if the previously unrecognized pairs (87887) 2000 SS_{286} - 2002 AT_{49} and (355258) 2007 LY_{4} - 2013AF_{40} formed at the recent very close approach of their components, they could become the youngest known pairs. In both cases, the relative encounter velocities of the components were only ˜ 0.1 m s^{-1}. However, the minimum distances between some clones are too large and a few clones of the latter pair did not encounter recently (within ≈ 10 kyr). The age of some prospective young pairs cannot be determined reliably without improved orbital properties (e.g., the second component of a pair

  8. Effect of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated colored noises with colored cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Ibrahim Mu'awiyya; Abu Bakar, Mohd Rizam

    2016-07-01

    The effect of non-immunogenic tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated additive and multiplicative colored noises is investigated. Using the Novikov theorem, Fox approach and Ansatz of Hanggi, an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the system is obtained and analytic expression for the steady state distribution Pst(x) is derived. Based on the numerical results, we find that fluctuations of microenvironmental factors within the tumor site with parameter θ have a diffusive effect on the tumor growth dynamics, and the tumor response to the microenvironmental factors with parameter α inhibits growth at weak correlation time τ. Moreover, at increasing correlation time τ the inhibitive effect of tumor response α is suppressed and instead a systematic growth promotion is noticed. The result also reveals that the strength of the correlation time τ has a strong influence on the growth effects exerted by the non-immunogenic component of tumor microenvironment on tumor growth.

  9. A model study on a pair of trapped particles interacting with an arbitrary effective range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of the effective range of interaction on the eigenvalues and eigenstates of two particles confined in a three-dimensional (3D) isotropic as well as one- or quasi-one dimensional harmonic (1D) traps. For this we employ model potentials which mimic finite-range s-wave interactions over a wide range of s-wave scattering length a s including the unitarity limits {a}s\\to +/- ∞ . Our results show that when the range is larger than the 3D or 1D harmonic oscillator length scale, the eigenvalues and eigenstates are nearly similar to those of noninteracting two particles in the 3D or 1D trap, respectively. In case of 3D, we find that when the range goes to zero, the results of contact potential as derived by Busch et al (1998 Foundations of Physics 28 549) are reproduced. However, in the case of 1D, such reproducibility does not occur as the range goes to zero. We have calculated the eigenvalues and eigenstates in a 1D harmonic trap taking one dimensional finite-range model potential. We have also calculated the bound state properties of two particles confined in a highly anisotropic quasi-1D trap taking three-dimensional finite-range model potential, and examined whether these quasi-1D results approach towards 1D ones as the aspect ratio η of the radial to axial frequency of the trap increases. We find that if the range is very small compared to the axial size of the trap, then one can reach 1D regime for η ≥slant 10000. However, for a large range, one can almost get 1D results for smaller values of η. This study will be important for the exploration of two-body or many body physics of trapped ultracold atoms interacting with narrow Feshbach resonance for which the effective range can be large.

  10. A comparison of crossbred and straightbred cow-calf pairs. I. Heterosis effects on total feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Urick, J J; Pahnish, O F; Richardson, G V; Blackwell, R L

    1984-05-01

    Records of 104 crossbred and 33 straightbred individually fed cow-calf units were used to study the effects of heterosis on total cow-calf feed efficiency in the production of weight of calf at weaning, 168 d postweaning, slaughter and in the carcass. The cows were Angus, Hereford, Charolais and reciprocal crosses of these breeds. The calves were straightbred and all possible two-breed backcrosses and three-breed crosses produced from first cross cows. The efficiency of the cow-calf unit was defined as kg of calf produced per kg of total TDN (total digestible nutrients) consumed by the cow-calf pair. Total feed consumed by the cows was for an average period of 315 d, from approximately November 21 to October 2. Total calf TDN consisted of creep to weaning and feed during the postweaning fattening period to slaughter. For all measures of cow-calf unit efficiency studied, the heterosis estimates were small but generally positive, ranging from -.8 to 2.1%. The average advantage of all crosses over the straightbred parents for the conversion of total feed consumed by cow-calf pair to calf weight at weaning was 2%. Heterosis effects, individual and maternal combined, on the average, among two-breed backcrosses and the three-breed crosses were essentially the same. Among the three groups of first-cross cows compared, the study indicated that a slight advantage in total cow-calf efficiency was exhibited by the Angus X Hereford cross.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Signal background interference effects in heavy scalar production and decay to a top-anti-top pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespel, B.; Maltoni, F.; Vryonidou, E.

    2016-10-01

    We analyse the production of a top quark pair through a heavy scalar at the LHC. We first review the main features of the signal as well as the interference with the top-anti-top background at leading order in QCD. We then study higher order QCD effects. While the background and the signal can be obtained at NNLO and NLO in QCD respectively, that is not the case for their interference, which is currently only approximately known at NLO. In order to improve the accuracy of the prediction for the interference term, we consider the effects of extra QCD radiation, i.e. the 2 → 3 (loop-induced) processes and obtain an estimate of the NLO corrections. As a result, we find that the contribution of the interference is important both at the total cross-section level and, most importantly, for the line-shape of the heavy scalar. In particular for resonances with widths larger than a couple of percent of the resonance mass, the interference term distorts the invariant mass distribution and generically leads to a non-trivial peak-dip structure. We study this process in a simplified model involving an additional scalar or pseudoscalar resonance as well as in the Two-Higgs-Doublet-Model for a set of representative benchmarks. We present the constraints on simplified models featuring an extra scalar as set by the LHC searches for top-anti-top resonances, and the implications of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by CMS and ATLAS for the top pair production assuming a scalar or a pseudoscalar resonance.

  12. Suspensions of polymer-grafted nanoparticles with added polymers-Structure and effective pair-interactions.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sivasurender; Saw, Shibu; Kandar, A K; Dasgupta, C; Sprung, M; Basu, J K

    2015-08-28

    We present the results of combined experimental and theoretical (molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory) studies of the structure and effective interactions of suspensions of polymer grafted nanoparticles (PGNPs) in the presence of linear polymers. Due to the absence of systematic experimental and theoretical studies of PGNPs, it is widely believed that the structure and effective interactions in such binary mixtures would be very similar to those of an analogous soft colloidal material-star polymers. In our study, polystyrene-grafted gold nanoparticles with functionality f = 70 were mixed with linear polystyrene (PS) of two different molecular weights for obtaining two PGNP:PS size ratios, ξ = 0.14 and 2.76 (where, ξ = Mg/Mm, Mg and Mm being the molecular weights of grafting and matrix polymers, respectively). The experimental structure factor of PGNPs could be modeled with an effective potential (Model-X), which has been found to be widely applicable for star polymers. Similarly, the structure factor of the blends with ξ = 0.14 could be modeled reasonably well, while the structure of blends with ξ = 2.76 could not be captured, especially for high density of added polymers. A model (Model-Y) for effective interactions between PGNPs in a melt of matrix polymers also failed to provide good agreement with the experimental data for samples with ξ = 2.76 and high density of added polymers. We tentatively attribute this anomaly in modeling the structure factor of blends with ξ = 2.76 to the questionable assumption of Model-X in describing the added polymers as star polymers with functionality 2, which gets manifested in both polymer-polymer and polymer-PGNP interactions especially at higher fractions of added polymers. The failure of Model-Y may be due to the neglect of possible many-body interactions among PGNPs mediated by matrix polymers when the fraction of added polymers is high. These observations point to the need for a new framework to

  13. Evaluation of effects of pharmaceutical processing on structural disorders of active pharmaceutical ingredient crystals using nanoindentation and high-resolution total scattering pair distribution function analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Ho, Raimundo

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical unit operations such as milling and compaction can often generate disordered regions in crystals of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). This may lead to changes in a number of important pharmaceutical properties including dissolution, stability, hygroscopicity, and so on. It is therefore important for pharmaceutical industry to evaluate the effects of pharmaceutical processing on API structural orders, and to investigate and develop analytical tools that are capable of accurately detecting and assessing subtle process-induced structural disorders in pharmaceutical crystals. In this study, nanoindentation was first used to determine the intrinsic mechanical properties including hardness and Young's modulus of two API crystals, compounds 1 and 2. These crystals of different mechanical properties were then milled and compacted under various conditions. The resulting structural disorders in these crystals were subsequently evaluated using synchrotron-based high-resolution total scattering pair distribution function (TS-PDF) analysis. Furthermore, principal component analysis was applied to the PDF data to assess the relative extents of disorders in the API crystals, which showed a good correlation with the process conditions. The study demonstrates that high-resolution TS-PDF analysis coupled with nanoindentation measurement is a valuable and effective tool for detecting and assessing process-induced subtle structural disorders in API crystals.

  14. COSMO-RSC: Second-Order Quasi-Chemical Theory Recovering Local Surface Correlation Effects.

    PubMed

    Klamt, A

    2016-03-31

    The conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) was introduced 20 years ago and meanwhile has become an important tool for the prediction of fluid phase equilibrium properties. Starting from quantum chemical information about the surface polarity of solutes and solvents, it solves the statistical thermodynamics of molecules in liquid phases by the very efficient approximation of independently pairwise interacting surfaces, which meanwhile was shown to be equivalent to Guggenheim's quasi-chemical theory. One of the basic limitations of COSMO-RS, as of any quasi-chemical model, is the neglect of neighbor information, i.e., of local correlations of surface types on the molecular surface. In this paper we present the completely novel concept of using the first-order COSMO-RS contact probabilities for the construction of local surface correlation functions. These are fed as an entropic correction for the pair interactions into a second COSMO-RS self-consistency loop, which yields new contact probabilities, enthalpies, free energies and activity coefficients recovering much of the originally lost neighbor effects. By a novel analytic correction for concentration dependent interactions, the resulting activity coefficients remain exactly Gibbs-Duhem consistent. The theory is demonstrated on the example of a lattice Monte Carlo fluid of dimerizing pseudomolecules. In this showcase the strong deviations of the lattice Monte Carlo fluid from quasi-chemical theory are almost perfectly reproduced by COSMO-RSC.

  15. COSMO-RSC: Second-Order Quasi-Chemical Theory Recovering Local Surface Correlation Effects.

    PubMed

    Klamt, A

    2016-03-31

    The conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) was introduced 20 years ago and meanwhile has become an important tool for the prediction of fluid phase equilibrium properties. Starting from quantum chemical information about the surface polarity of solutes and solvents, it solves the statistical thermodynamics of molecules in liquid phases by the very efficient approximation of independently pairwise interacting surfaces, which meanwhile was shown to be equivalent to Guggenheim's quasi-chemical theory. One of the basic limitations of COSMO-RS, as of any quasi-chemical model, is the neglect of neighbor information, i.e., of local correlations of surface types on the molecular surface. In this paper we present the completely novel concept of using the first-order COSMO-RS contact probabilities for the construction of local surface correlation functions. These are fed as an entropic correction for the pair interactions into a second COSMO-RS self-consistency loop, which yields new contact probabilities, enthalpies, free energies and activity coefficients recovering much of the originally lost neighbor effects. By a novel analytic correction for concentration dependent interactions, the resulting activity coefficients remain exactly Gibbs-Duhem consistent. The theory is demonstrated on the example of a lattice Monte Carlo fluid of dimerizing pseudomolecules. In this showcase the strong deviations of the lattice Monte Carlo fluid from quasi-chemical theory are almost perfectly reproduced by COSMO-RSC. PMID:26963690

  16. Nuclear effects in J//psi/ and lepton-pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    High-energy processes in nuclear media provide important tests of quantum chromodynamics, since in principle one can use the nuclear environment to perturb and study the mechanisms involved in confinement and hadronization. In this talk several examples of nuclear effects in QCD will be discussed that affect the propagation and hadronization of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter. The issues include: possible signatures for quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy ion collisions, particularly J//psi/ production; hadronization due to jet coalescence; the limits of validity of QCD factorization formulae due to initial- and final-state interactions; formation zone physics; shadowing of the quark and gluon structure functions of nuclei; and color transparency in hard quasielastic reactions inside of nuclei. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Effects of Different Analysis Strategies on Paired Associative Stimulation. A Pooled Data Analysis from Three Research Labs.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Jacob; Paßmann, Sven; List, Jonathan; Vach, Werner; Flöel, Agnes; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a widely used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm to non-invasively induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain in vivo. Altered PAS-induced plasticity has been demonstrated for several diseases. However, researchers are faced with a high inter- and intra-subject variability of the PAS response. Here, we pooled original data from nine PAS studies from three centers and analyzed the combined dataset of 190 healthy subjects with regard to age dependency, the role of stimulation parameters and the effect of different statistical methods. We observed no main effect of the PAS intervention over all studies (F(2;362) = 0.44; p = 0.644). The rate of subjects showing the expected increase of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes was 53%. The PAS effect differed significantly between studies as shown by a significant interaction effect (F(16;362) = 1.77; p = 0.034) but post-hoc testing did not reveal significant effects after correction for multiple tests. There was a trend toward increased variability of the PAS effect in older subjects. Acquisition parameters differed across studies but without systematically influencing changes in MEP-size. The use of post/baseline quotients systematically indicated stronger PAS effects than post/baseline difference or the logarithm of the post/baseline quotient. The non-significant PAS effects across studies and a wide range of responder rates between studies indicate a high variability of this method. We were thus not able to replicate findings from a previous meta-analysis showing robust effects of PAS. No pattern emerged regarding acquisition parameters that at this point could guide future studies to reduce variability and help increase response rate. For future studies, we propose to report the responder rate and recommend the use of the logarithmized post/baseline quotient for further analyses to better address the possibility that results are driven by few extreme cases

  18. Effects of Different Analysis Strategies on Paired Associative Stimulation. A Pooled Data Analysis from Three Research Labs

    PubMed Central

    List, Jonathan; Vach, Werner; Flöel, Agnes; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a widely used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm to non-invasively induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain in vivo. Altered PAS-induced plasticity has been demonstrated for several diseases. However, researchers are faced with a high inter- and intra-subject variability of the PAS response. Here, we pooled original data from nine PAS studies from three centers and analyzed the combined dataset of 190 healthy subjects with regard to age dependency, the role of stimulation parameters and the effect of different statistical methods. We observed no main effect of the PAS intervention over all studies (F(2;362) = 0.44; p = 0.644). The rate of subjects showing the expected increase of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes was 53%. The PAS effect differed significantly between studies as shown by a significant interaction effect (F(16;362) = 1.77; p = 0.034) but post-hoc testing did not reveal significant effects after correction for multiple tests. There was a trend toward increased variability of the PAS effect in older subjects. Acquisition parameters differed across studies but without systematically influencing changes in MEP-size. The use of post/baseline quotients systematically indicated stronger PAS effects than post/baseline difference or the logarithm of the post/baseline quotient. The non-significant PAS effects across studies and a wide range of responder rates between studies indicate a high variability of this method. We were thus not able to replicate findings from a previous meta-analysis showing robust effects of PAS. No pattern emerged regarding acquisition parameters that at this point could guide future studies to reduce variability and help increase response rate. For future studies, we propose to report the responder rate and recommend the use of the logarithmized post/baseline quotient for further analyses to better address the possibility that results are driven by few extreme cases

  19. Engineering a factorable photon pair source

    SciTech Connect

    Zielnicki, Kevin; Kwiat, Paul

    2014-12-04

    Spontaneous parametric downconversion is an important process for producing pairs of photons for quantum optics. We discuss a scheme for eliminating undesired inter-photon correlations inherent in this process, and an efficient characterization of spectral correlations.

  20. Matching-to-Sample and Stimulus-Pairing-Observation Procedures in Stimulus Equivalence: The Effects of Number of Trials and Stimulus Arrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinloch, Jennifer May; McEwan, James Stewart Anderson; Foster, T. Mary

    2013-01-01

    Studies comparing the effectiveness of the stimulus-pairing-observation and matching-to-sample procedures in facilitating equivalence relations have reported conflicting findings. This study compared the effectiveness of these procedures and examined the effect of stimulus arrangement and the number of training trials completed prior to each…

  1. Pair bond characteristics and maintenance in free-flying jackdaws Corvus monedula: effects of social context and season

    PubMed Central

    Kubitza, Robin J.; Bugnyar, Thomas; Schwab, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Most birds rely on cooperation between pair partners for breeding. In long-term monogamous species, pair bonds are considered the basic units of social organization, albeit these birds often form foraging, roosting or breeding groups in which they repeatedly interact with numerous conspecifics. Focusing on jackdaws Corvus monedula, we here investigated 1) the interplay between pair bond and group dynamics in several social contexts and 2) how pair partners differ in individual effort of pair bond maintenance. Based on long-term data on free-flying birds, we quantified social interactions between group members within three positive contexts (spatial proximity, feeding and sociopositive interactions) for different periods of the year (non-breeding, pre-breeding, parental care). On the group level, we found that the number of interaction partners was highest in the spatial proximity context while in the feeding and sociopositive contexts the number of interaction partners was low and moderately low, respectively. Interactions were reciprocated within almost all contexts and periods. Investigating subgrouping within the flock, results showed that interactions were preferentially directed towards the respective pair partner compared to unmated adults. When determining pair partner effort, both sexes similarly invested most into mutual proximity during late winter, thereby refreshing their bond before the onset of breeding. Paired males fed their mates over the entire year at similar rates while paired females hardly fed their mates at all but engaged in sociopositive behaviors instead. We conclude that jackdaws actively seek out positive social ties to flock members (close proximity, sociopositive behavior), at certain times of the year. Thus, the group functions as a dynamic social unit, nested within are highly cooperative pair bonds. Both sexes invested into the bond with different social behaviors and different levels of effort, yet these are likely male and female

  2. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XVI. Inclusion of self-energy effects in pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Extending our earlier work, a new family of three Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-30, HFB-31, and HFB-32, is presented, along with their underlying interactions, BSk30, BSk31, and BSk32, respectively. The principle new feature is a purely phenomenological pairing term that depends on the density gradient. This enables us to have a bulk pairing term that is fitted to realistic nuclear-matter calculations in which for the first time the self-energy corrections are included, while the behavior of the nucleon effective masses in asymmetric homogeneous nuclear matter is significantly improved. Furthermore, in the particle-hole channel all the highly realistic constraints of our earlier work are retained. In particular, the unconventional Skyrme forces containing t4 and t5 terms are still constrained to fit realistic equations of state of neutron matter stiff enough to support the massive neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432. All unphysical long-wavelength spin and spin-isospin instabilities of nuclear matter, including the unphysical transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated. Our three interactions are characterized by values of the symmetry coefficient J of 30, 31, and 32 MeV, respectively. The best fit to the database of 2353 nuclear masses is found for model HFB-31 (J =31 MeV ) with a model error of 0.561 MeV. This model also fits the charge-radius data with an root-mean-square error of 0.027 fm.

  3. EFFECTS OF CORRELATED PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE MODEL INPUTS ON SIMULATED RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, more probabilistic models have been developed to quantify aggregate human exposures to environmental pollutants. The impact of correlation among inputs in these models is an important issue, which has not been resolved. Obtaining correlated data and implementi...

  4. Additive effects of flavour-caffeine and flavour-flavour pairings on liking for the smell and flavour of a novel drink.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Martin R; Mobini, Sirous; Chambers, Lucy

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has established that caffeine consumption can reinforce changes in liking for caffeine-paired flavours, while pairing a novel flavour with a liked or dislike taste can also result in enduring changes in liking for the flavour. The present study examined how these two forms of flavour-learning interact. 72 habitual caffeine consumers who liked sweet tastes rated the odour and flavour of a novel tea drink before and after four training sessions where the flavour was paired with either 100 mg caffeine or placebo in one of three flavour contexts: added sweetness (aspartame), bitterness (quinine) or control. The liking for both the odour and flavour of the tea increased after pairing with caffeine regardless of flavour context, while pairing with bitterness reduced flavour liking regardless of the presence of caffeine. Pairing with quinine increased the rated bitterness of the tea odour, and reduced the rated sweetness of the tea flavour, post-training, independent of effects of caffeine. These data suggest that flavour-caffeine and flavour-flavour associations have additive effects on drink liking, while confirming that flavour-flavour associations can alter the immediate sensory experience of a flavour alone.

  5. Non-Stationary Effects and Cross Correlations in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    In this paper within the framework of the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) we consider the dynamic properties of the solar activity by analyzing the Zurich sunspot numbers. As is well-known astrophysics objects are the non-stationary open systems, whose evolution are the quite individual and have the alternation effects. The main difference of FNS compared to other related methods is the separation of the original signal reflecting the dynamics of solar activity into three frequency bands: system-specific "resonances" and their interferential contributions at lower frequencies, chaotic "random walk" ("irregularity-jump") components at larger frequencies, and chaotic "irregularity-spike" (inertial) components in the highest frequency range. Specific parameters corresponding to each of the bands are introduced and calculated. These irregularities as well as specific resonance frequencies are considered as the information carriers on every hierarchical level of the evolution of a complex natural system with intermittent behavior, consecutive alternation of rapid chaotic changes in the values of dynamic variables on small time intervals with small variations of the values on longer time intervals ("laminar" phases). The jump and spike irregularities are described by power spectra and difference moments (transient structural functions) of the second order. FNS allows revealing the most crucial points of the solar activity dynamics by means of "spikiness" factor. It is shown that this variable behaves as the predictor of crucial changes of the sunspot number dynamics, particularly when the number comes up to maximum value. The change of averaging interval allows revealing the non-stationary effects depending by 11-year cycle and by inside processes in a cycle. To consider the cross correlations between the different variables of solar activity we use the Zurich sunspot numbers and the sequence of corona's radiation energy. The FNS-approach allows extracting the

  6. Interference effects for Higgs boson mediated Z-pair plus jet production

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Furlan, Elisabetta; Rontsch, Raoul

    2014-11-25

    Here, we study interference effects in the production channel ZZ + jet, in particular focusing on the role of the Higgs boson. This production channel receives contributions both from Higgs boson mediated diagrams via the decay H → ZZ (signal diagrams), as well as from diagrams where the Z bosons couple directly to a quark loop (background diagrams). We consider the partonic processes gggZZ and gq$\\bar{q}$ZZ in which interference between signal and background diagrams first occurs. Since interference is primarily an off-resonant effect for the Higgs boson, we treat the Z bosons as on shell. Thus our analysis is limited to the region above threshold, where the invariant mass of the Z-pair mZZ satisfies the condition mZZ>2mZ. In the region mZZ > 300 GeV we find that the interference in the ZZ + jet channel is qualitatively similar to interference in the inclusive ZZ channel. Moreover, the rates are sufficient to study these effects at the LHC once jet-binned data become available.

  7. Time- and Space-Order Effects in Timed Discrimination of Brightness and Size of Paired Visual Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patching, Geoffrey R.; Englund, Mats P.; Hellstrom, Ake

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of both response probability and response time for testing models of choice, there is a dearth of chronometric studies examining systematic asymmetries that occur over time- and space-orders in the method of paired comparisons. In this study, systematic asymmetries in discriminating the magnitude of paired visual stimuli are…

  8. Specific heat and effects of pairing fluctuations in the BCS-BEC-crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Pieter; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hanai, Ryo; Ohashi, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the specific heat at constant volume CV in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-Bose-Einstein-condensate (BCS-BEC)-crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas above the superfluid phase transition temperature Tc. Within the framework of the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink, we show that this thermodynamic quantity is sensitive to the stability of preformed Cooper pairs. That is, while CV(T ≳Tc) in the unitary regime is remarkably enhanced by metastable preformed Cooper pairs or pairing fluctuations, it is well described by that of an ideal Bose gas of long-lived stable molecules in the strong-coupling BEC regime. Using these results, we identify the region where the system may be viewed as an almost ideal Bose gas of stable pairs, as well as the pseudogap regime where the system is dominated by metastable preformed Cooper pairs, in the phase diagram of an ultracold Fermi gas with respect to the strength of a pairing interaction and the temperature. We also show that the calculated specific heat agrees with the recent experiment on a 6Li unitary Fermi gas. Since the formation of preformed Cooper pairs is a crucial key in the BCS-BEC-crossover phenomenon, our results would be helpful in considering how fluctuating preformed Cooper pairs appear in a Fermi gas to eventually become stable as one passes through the BCS-BEC-crossover region.

  9. Measurement of spin correlation in top-antitop quark events and search for top squark pair production in pp collisions at √s=8  TeV using the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bartsch, V; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, T T; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; 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    2015-04-10

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt[over ¯] production is presented using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3  fb^{-1}. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton tt[over ¯] events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to A_{helicity}=0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair production of top squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in p p Collisions at √{s }=8 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. 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A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A measurement of spin correlation in t t ¯ production is presented using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 . The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton t t ¯ events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.38 ±0.04 , in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair production of top squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  11. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-08

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is presented using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton tt¯ events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair production of topmore » squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  12. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in pp Collisions at s=8  TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-08

    We present a measurement of spin correlation in t¯t production using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb₋1. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton t¯t events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity = 0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair productionmore » of top squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Lastly, top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  13. Population of the giant pairing vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, M.; Casten, R. F.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Clark, R. M.; Bucurescu, D.

    2016-03-01

    Background: The giant pairing vibration (GPV), a correlated two-nucleon mode in the second shell above the Fermi surface, has long been predicted and expected to be strongly populated in two-nucleon transfer cross sections similar to those of the normal pairing vibration. Recent experiments have provided evidence for this mode in ,15C14 but, despite sensitive studies, it has not been definitively identified in either Sn or Pb nuclei where pairing correlations are known to play a crucial role. Purpose: Our aim is to test whether features inherent to the mixing of bound and unbound levels might account for this and to study the effect in a simple and intuitively clear approach. Method: We study the mixing of unbound levels in a set of toy models that capture the essential physics of the GPV, along with a more realistic calculation including distorted-wave Born approximation transfer amplitudes. Results: The calculated (relative) cross section to populate a simulated GPV state is effectively low, compared to the case of bound levels with no widths Conclusions: The mixing turns out to be only a minor contributor to the weak population. Rather, the main reason is the melting of the GPV peak due to the width it acquires from the low orbital angular momentum single-particle states playing a dominant role in two-nucleon transfer amplitudes. This effect, in addition to a severe Q -value mismatch, may account for the elusive nature of this mode in (t ,p ) and (p ,t ) reactions.

  14. Emergent gauge fields and their nonperturbative effects in correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Seok; Tanaka, Akihiro

    2015-06-01

    The history of modern condensed matter physics may be regarded as the competition and reconciliation between Stoner’s and Anderson’s physical pictures, where the former is based on momentum-space descriptions focusing on long wave-length fluctuations while the latter is based on real-space physics emphasizing emergent localized excitations. In particular, these two view points compete with each other in various nonperturbative phenomena, which range from the problem of high Tc superconductivity, quantum spin liquids in organic materials and frustrated spin systems, heavy-fermion quantum criticality, metal-insulator transitions in correlated electron systems such as doped silicons and two-dimensional electron systems, the fractional quantum Hall effect, to the recently discussed Fe-based superconductors. An approach to reconcile these competing frameworks is to introduce topologically nontrivial excitations into the Stoner’s description, which appear to be localized in either space or time and sometimes both, where scattering between itinerant electrons and topological excitations such as skyrmions, vortices, various forms of instantons, emergent magnetic monopoles, and etc. may catch nonperturbative local physics beyond the Stoner’s paradigm. In this review paper, we discuss nonperturbative effects of topological excitations on dynamics of correlated electrons. First, we focus on the problem of scattering between itinerant fermions and topological excitations in antiferromagnetic doped Mott insulators, expected to be relevant for the pseudogap phase of high Tc cuprates. We propose that nonperturbative effects of topological excitations can be incorporated within the perturbative framework, where an enhanced global symmetry with a topological term plays an essential role. In the second part, we go on to discuss the subject of symmetry protected topological states in a largely similar light. While we do not introduce itinerant fermions here, the

  15. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  16. Multivariate analysis of paired watershed data to evaluate agricultural best management practice effects on stream water phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Patricia L; Hively, W Dean; Stedinger, Jery R; Rafferty, Michael R; Lojpersberger, Jeffrey L; Bloomfield, Jay A

    2005-01-01

    Quantification of the effects of management programs on water quality is critical to agencies responsible for water resource protection. This research documents reductions in stream water phosphorus (P) loads resulting from agricultural best management practices (BMPs) implemented as part of an effort to control eutrophication of Cannonsville Reservoir, a drinking water supply for New York City. Dairy farms in the upstate New York reservoir basin were the target of BMPs designed to reduce P losses. A paired watershed study was established on one of these farms in 1993 to evaluate changes in P loading attributable to implementation of BMPs that included manure management, rotational grazing, and improved infrastructure. Intensive stream water monitoring provided data to calculate P loads from the 160-ha farm watershed for all runoff events during a two-year pre-treatment period and a four-year post-treatment period. Statistical control for inter-annual climatic variability was provided by matched P loads from a nearby 86-ha forested watershed, and by several event flow variables measured at the farm. A sophisticated multivariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) provided estimates of both seasonal and overall load reductions. Statistical power and the minimum detectable treatment effect (MDTE) were also calculated. The results demonstrated overall event load reductions of 43% for total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and 29% for particulate phosphorus (PP). Changes in farm management practices and physical infrastructure clearly produced decreases in event P losses measurable at the small watershed scale.

  17. Effect of single interstitial impurity in iron-based superconductors with sign-changed s-wave pairing symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang-Long; Liu, Da-Yong; Quan, Ya-Min; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Zou, Liang-Jian

    2015-12-01

    We employ the self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) formulation to investigate the effect of single interstitial nonmagnetic/magnetic impurity in iron-based superconductors with s ± -wave pairing symmetry. We find that both the nonmagnetic and magnetic impurities can induce bound states within the superconducting (SC) gap and a π phase shift of SC order parameter at the impurity site. However, different from the interstitial-nonmagnetic-impurity case characterized by two symmetric peaks with respect to zero energy, the interstitial magnetic one only induces single bound-state peak. In the strong scattering regime this peak can appear at the Fermi level, which has been observed in the recent scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiment of Fe(Te,Se) superconductor with interstitial Fe impurities (Yin et al. 2015 [44]). This novel single in-gap peak feature also distinguishes the interstitial case from the substitutional one with two peaks. These results provide important information for comparing the different impurity effects in the iron-based superconductors.

  18. Adding disk effects to N-body simulations with REBOUNDx: Application to overstability of resonances in exoplanet pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Rein, Hanno; Chen, Alice; bennett, morgan

    2015-12-01

    Mean-motion resonances (MMRs) are typically stable configurations for pairs of planets. Given that planets should migrate relative to one another in their natal disk, one might expect to have found most planets locked in such MMRs. The fact that most Kepler planets are not observed in MMRs therefore requires an explanation. Goldreich and Schlichting (2014) recently argued that, in fact, due to interactions with the protoplanetary disk, planets below a threshold mass should break out of the strongest MMRs, i.e., the MMRs become overstable.While follow-up work has studied the robustness of this result to varying orbital architectures, we focus on the specific numerical implementation of the disk effects, which translates into differing physical interpretations of the planet-disk interactions. We will present how these physical choices affect the parameter space in which overstability sets in, and how certain choices can generate spurious results. We will then extend our results to general cases of broad applicability, and summarize the merits and pitfalls of these different numerical implementations of perturbations from the protoplanetary disk, particularly in tightly packed systems.We have packaged these numerical implementations into REBOUNDx, an open-source C and Python package for incorporating planet-disk interactions, as well as additional effects (like post-newtonian corrections), into N-body simulations using REBOUND. We will give a brief demo that highlights its ease of installation and use, as well as its synergy with Python's powerful plotting and scientific analysis libraries.

  19. Impurity effects on the d-wave state of the pair tunneling mechanism for high-T{sub c} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Y.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the impurity effects on the d-wave state in Anderson{close_quote}s interlayer pair tunneling (IPT) mechanism for high-T{sub c} superconductors. We found that the change of density of states and the T{sub c} suppression with impurities are qualitatively the same as the conventional BCS-type d-wave theory despite different gap equations. In particular, for the T{sub c} suppression with the in-plane impurities we solve the T{sub c} equation of the IPT mechanism explicitly including strong inelastic scattering [{Sigma}{sup {double_prime}}{approximately}{alpha}({h_bar}w+{pi}k{sub B}T)]. As expected, the effect of impurities for the T{sub c} suppression is strongly reduced by inelastic scattering and the results can fit most of the experimental data by varying the impurity scattering strength. The insensitivity of T{sub c} with the out-of-plane rare-earth impurities is shown to be consistent with the IPT mechanism. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Multivariate analysis of paired watershed data to evaluate agricultural best management practice effects on stream water phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Patricia L; Hively, W Dean; Stedinger, Jery R; Rafferty, Michael R; Lojpersberger, Jeffrey L; Bloomfield, Jay A

    2005-01-01

    Quantification of the effects of management programs on water quality is critical to agencies responsible for water resource protection. This research documents reductions in stream water phosphorus (P) loads resulting from agricultural best management practices (BMPs) implemented as part of an effort to control eutrophication of Cannonsville Reservoir, a drinking water supply for New York City. Dairy farms in the upstate New York reservoir basin were the target of BMPs designed to reduce P losses. A paired watershed study was established on one of these farms in 1993 to evaluate changes in P loading attributable to implementation of BMPs that included manure management, rotational grazing, and improved infrastructure. Intensive stream water monitoring provided data to calculate P loads from the 160-ha farm watershed for all runoff events during a two-year pre-treatment period and a four-year post-treatment period. Statistical control for inter-annual climatic variability was provided by matched P loads from a nearby 86-ha forested watershed, and by several event flow variables measured at the farm. A sophisticated multivariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) provided estimates of both seasonal and overall load reductions. Statistical power and the minimum detectable treatment effect (MDTE) were also calculated. The results demonstrated overall event load reductions of 43% for total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and 29% for particulate phosphorus (PP). Changes in farm management practices and physical infrastructure clearly produced decreases in event P losses measurable at the small watershed scale. PMID:15888895

  1. Stimulus Effects on Local Preference: Stimulus-Response Contingencies, Stimulus-Food Pairing, and Stimulus-Food Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Four pigeons were trained in a procedure in which concurrent-schedule food ratios changed unpredictably across seven unsignaled components after 10 food deliveries. Additional green-key stimulus presentations also occurred on the two alternatives, sometimes in the same ratio as the component food ratio, and sometimes in the inverse ratio. In eight…

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Stimulus Pairing Observation Procedure and Multiple Exemplar Instruction on Tact and Listener Responses in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brittany L.; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Aguirre, Angelica A.

    2014-01-01

    The stimulus pairing observation procedure (SPOP) combined with multiple exemplar instruction (MEI) has been shown to be effective with typically developing preschoolers in establishing the joint stimulus control required for the development of naming. The purpose of the current investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the…

  3. Correlation effects in elastic e-N2 scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Lima, Marco A. P.; Gibson, Thomas L.; Mckoy, Vincent

    1987-01-01

    The Schwinger multichannel formulation has been applied to study the role of electron correlation in low-energy e-N2 scattering. For the five nonresonant partial-wave channels studied here, angular correlation is found to be much more important than radial correlation. The calculated total and differential cross sections agree well with experiment except for the differential cross sections at 1.5 eV.

  4. Electron pair escape from fullerene cage via collective modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Michael; Pavlyukh, Yaroslav; Bolognesi, Paolo; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Berakdar, Jamal

    2016-04-01

    Experiment and theory evidence a new pathway for correlated two-electron release from many-body compounds following collective excitation by a single photon. Using nonequilibrium Green’s function approach we trace plasmon oscillations as the key ingredient of the effective electron-electron interaction that governs the correlated pair emission in a dynamic many-body environment. Results from a full ab initio implementation for C60 fullerene are in line with experimental observations. The findings endorse the correlated two-electron photoemission as a powerful tool to access electronic correlation in complex systems.

  5. Electron pair escape from fullerene cage via collective modes

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Michael; Pavlyukh, Yaroslav; Bolognesi, Paolo; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Berakdar, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Experiment and theory evidence a new pathway for correlated two-electron release from many-body compounds following collective excitation by a single photon. Using nonequilibrium Green’s function approach we trace plasmon oscillations as the key ingredient of the effective electron-electron interaction that governs the correlated pair emission in a dynamic many-body environment. Results from a full ab initio implementation for C60 fullerene are in line with experimental observations. The findings endorse the correlated two-electron photoemission as a powerful tool to access electronic correlation in complex systems. PMID:27086559

  6. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations.

  7. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations. PMID:24329463

  8. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The