Science.gov

Sample records for palate helical ct

  1. Helical CT in emergency radiology.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Rao, P M; Stuk, J L

    1999-11-01

    Today, a wide range of traumatic and nontraumatic emergency conditions are quickly and accurately diagnosed with helical computed tomography (CT). Many traditional emergency imaging procedures have been replaced with newer helical CT techniques that can be performed in less time and with greater accuracy, less patient discomfort, and decreased cost. The speed of helical technology permits CT examination of seriously ill patients in the emergency department, as well as patients who might not have been taken to CT previously because of the length of the examinations of the past. Also, helical technology permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, a great advance for the multiple-trauma patient. Higher quality CT examinations result from decreased respiratory misregistration, enhanced intravenous contrast material opacification of vascular structures and parenchymal organs, greater flexibility in image reconstruction, and improved multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations. This report summarizes the role and recommended protocols for the helical CT diagnosis of thoracic aortic trauma; aortic dissection; pulmonary embolism; acute conditions of the neck soft tissues; abdominal trauma; urinary tract stones; appendicitis; diverticulitis; abdominal aortic aneurysm; fractures of the face, spine, and extremities; and acute stroke.

  2. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma: Helical CT Findings and Radiopathologic Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Marco de Lucas, Enrique Pagola, Miguel Angel; Fernandez, Fidel; Lastra, Pedro; Delgado, M. Luisa Ruiz; Sadaba, Pablo; Pinto, Jesus; Ballesteros, Ma Angeles; Ortiz, Antonio

    2004-03-15

    Primary tumors of the heart are extremely rare.Clinical manifestations are nondiagnostic and the patients are often misdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are standard in this diagnostic workup. We report a case of a man with acromegaly, dysphagia, chest pain and weight loss. An invasive cardiac mass was diagnosed by helical-CT. Autopsy demonstrated a B-cell aggressive lymphoma.

  3. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  4. A one year experience with the multislice helical CT.

    PubMed

    Rigauts, H

    1999-12-01

    New detector morphology and increased computer power have led to a second leap in CT technology. With multislice helical CT, four slices per rotation are reconstructed resulting in a 3 to 6 times reduction of the examination time. During our one-year experience with the multislice CT, we have learnt that the major advantage of the technique is the possibility to cover a large volume with thin slices. Combination of both makes it possible to scan an entire anatomic region during the optimal enhancement phase (after i.v. contrast injection) with a high spatial resolution. New diagnostic possibilities can be explored by CT together with improved and more detailed post-processing tools.

  5. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  6. Anti-aliasing weighting functions for multislice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Riviere, Patrick J.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2002-05-01

    We develop a new projection weighting function for interpolation and reconstruction of multi-slice helical computed tomography data with the hope of reducing longitudinal aliasing in reconstructed volumes. The weighting function is based on the application of the Papoulis generalized sampling theorem to the interlaced longitudinal samples acquired by the multi-slice scanner. We call the approach 180MAA, for multi-slice anti-aliasing. For pitch 3, the 180MAA approach yields high-quality images of the 3D Shepp-Logan phantom as well as a longitudinal MTF superior to that of the 180MLI approach, which is based on the use of linear interpolation. However, it is not as successful at mitigating aliasing as had been doped due to the presence of a significant and unexpected aliasing component that can be attributed to the small cone angle in multi-slice helical CT. The presence of this effect is interesting and significant in its own right, however.

  7. Helical mode lung 4D-CT reconstruction using Bayesian model.

    PubMed

    He, Tiancheng; Xue, Zhong; Nitsch, Paige L; Teh, Bin S; Wong, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    4D computed tomography (CT) has been widely used for treatment planning of thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. Current 4D-CT lung image reconstruction methods rely on respiratory gating to rearrange the large number of axial images into different phases, which may be subject to external surrogate errors due to poor reproducibility of breathing cycles. New image-matching-based reconstruction works better for the cine mode of 4D-CT acquisition than the helical mode because the table position of each axial image is different in helical mode and image matching might suffer from bigger errors. In helical mode, not only the phases but also the un-uniform table positions of images need to be considered. We propose a Bayesian method for automated 4D-CT lung image reconstruction in helical mode 4D scans. Each axial image is assigned to a respiratory phase based on the Bayesian framework that ensures spatial and temporal smoothness of surfaces of anatomical structures. Iterative optimization is used to reconstruct a series of 3D-CT images for subjects undergoing 4D scans. In experiments, we compared visually and quantitatively the results of the proposed Bayesian 4D-CT reconstruction algorithm with the respiratory surrogate and the image matching-based method. The results showed that the proposed algorithm yielded better 4D-CT for helical scans.

  8. New barium paste mixture for helical (slip-ring) CT evaluation of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Noda, Y; Nishioka, A; Inomata, T; Yoshida, S; Toki, T; Ogoshi, S; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method for complete opacification of the rectum using helical CT and a newly developed anal contrast agent. Rectal cancers were easily identified in all of the 21 patients examined, and diagnostic accuracy in detecting local invasion was 94%. Our method of rectal CT is easy to perform and well tolerated.

  9. Single-slice reconstruction method for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Chen, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) can provide the internal structure information of biomedical specimens with high-quality cross-section images and has become an invaluable analysis tool. Here a simple and fast reconstruction algorithm is reported for helical cone-beam differential PC-CT (DPC-CT), which is called the DPC-CB-SSRB algorithm. It combines the existing CB-SSRB method of helical cone-beam absorption-contrast CT with the differential nature of DPC imaging. The reconstruction can be performed using 2D fan-beam filtered back projection algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter. The quality of the results for large helical pitches is surprisingly good. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam DPC-CT data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using the traditional inter-row interpolation reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. This method will push the future medical helical cone-beam DPC-CT imaging applications.

  10. [Prognostic significance of helical CT in patients with destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, T V

    2000-01-01

    Spiral scanning computed tomography (CT) is able not only to image the pancreas and to evaluate its structure, but to interpret the status of the adjacent organs and tissues. CT symptoms of pancreatic necrotic changes and multiorgan failure were studied in the prospective follow-up of 47 patients with prior destructive pancreatitis (158 studies). CT differentially substantiated indications for choosing treatment policy for different forms of pancreatic lesions. The paper gives a quantitative assessment of necrotic pancreatic parencymatous areas and shows its prognostic value.

  11. [Ultra-low-dose spiral (helical) CT of the thorax: a filtering technique].

    PubMed

    Nitta, N; Takahashi, M; Murata, K; Mori, M; Shimoyama, K; Mishina, A; Matsuo, H; Morita, R; Sugii, K; Nomura, A

    1996-01-01

    To reduce the radiation dose from spiral (helical) CT, a custom-made aluminium filter was installed in the X-ray tube and a reduction of effective tube current was attempted. A pronounced reduction of effective tube current, namely, 6 and 3 mA, was achieved with 26 and 37 mm thick aluminium filters, respectively. Visualization of normal lung structure was accomplished with both 6 and 3 mA settings. However, images of 3 mA failed to delineate mediastinal structures because of marked beam hardening resulting from the bone structure of the thoracic inlet. Six mA was considered the lowest dose setting of spiral (helical) CT of the thorax that could be used for lung cancer screening.

  12. New barium paste mixture for helical (slip-ring) CT evaluation of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Noda, Y; Ogawa, Y; Nishioka, A; Inomata, T; Yoshida, S; Toki, T; Ogoshi, S; Ma, J

    1996-01-01

    Successful opacification of the lumen of the esophagus with cancer or paraesophageal diseases has not yet been fully achieved. Therefore, we have recently adopted a new method for complete and continuous opacification of the whole thoracic esophagus using our newly developed oral contrast agent with a helical (slip-ring) CT scanner. The agent consists of 3.6 (wt/vol)% carboxy-methyl cellulose sodium paste containing 2 (wt/vol)% barium sulfate. The results indicate that almost complete and continuous opacification of esophageal lumen was achieved. Our new method of esophageal CT is easy to perform and was well tolerated by patients, being therefore ideal for routine examinations.

  13. Objective performance evaluation methods adapted to helical and multislice CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbusch, David C.

    Since its introduction in the early 1970's, Computed Tomography (CT) has evolved into an important imaging tool for a continually increasing variety of clinical applications. This growth is due to dramatic improvements in image quality and acquisition speed over the last sixteen years. These improvements have come from important technical developments that include sub-second gantry rotation times, helical scanning, multislice acquisition, and tube current modulation. The procedures for performing CT scanner evaluations have been in existence since the 1970's, but most are based on single-slice, axial scan geometry. These procedures are not adequate for the evaluation of modern, helical multislice scanners that use fundamentally different acquisition geometries, have many types of acquisition modes available, and are capable of generating huge numbers of images in a short period of time. Properly evaluating the image quality of these scanners is usually too difficult and time-consuming using the more traditional test methods. Computer analysis methods are needed to analyze the large number of images generated during a CT scanner evaluation. Subjecting these images to objective image evaluation methods will provide a much more thorough evaluation of image quality compared to subjective methods, and can do so in a shorter amount of time. This dissertation describes the development of objective analysis methods and improved phantom designs that more accurately and efficiently evaluate the image quality in helical multislice CT scanners. The new tools are appropriate for routine quality assurance, for acceptance testing of new equipment, and for optimizing techniques for novel clinical applications. Furthermore, using these methods we have found deficiencies and errors in the design of specific CT scanner models and also significant problems in the performance of individual scanner.

  14. WE-G-18A-06: Sinogram Restoration in Helical Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Little, K; Riviere, P La

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend CT sinogram restoration, which has been shown in 2D to reduce noise and to correct for geometric effects and other degradations at a low computational cost, from 2D to a 3D helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: A method for calculating sinogram degradation coefficients for a helical cone-beam geometry was proposed. These values were used to perform penalized-likelihood sinogram restoration on simulated data that were generated from the FORBILD thorax phantom. Sinogram restorations were performed using both a quadratic penalty and the edge-preserving Huber penalty. After sinogram restoration, Fourier-based analytical methods were used to obtain reconstructions. Resolution-variance trade-offs were investigated for several locations within the reconstructions for the purpose of comparing sinogram restoration to no restoration. In order to compare potential differences, reconstructions were performed using different groups of neighbors in the penalty, two analytical reconstruction methods (Katsevich and single-slice rebinning), and differing helical pitches. Results: The resolution-variance properties of reconstructions restored using sinogram restoration with a Huber penalty outperformed those of reconstructions with no restoration. However, the use of a quadratic sinogram restoration penalty did not lead to an improvement over performing no restoration at the outer regions of the phantom. Application of the Huber penalty to neighbors both within a view and across views did not perform as well as only applying the penalty to neighbors within a view. General improvements in resolution-variance properties using sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty were not dependent on the reconstruction method used or the magnitude of the helical pitch. Conclusion: Sinogram restoration for noise and degradation effects for helical cone-beam CT is feasible and should be able to be applied to clinical data. When applied with the edge-preserving Huber penalty

  15. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system for chest diagnosis based on multi-helical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2006-03-01

    Multi-helical CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system. The results of this study indicate that our computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and safety of medical information.

  16. Limited-angle reverse helical cone-beam CT for pipeline with low rank decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dong; Zeng, Li

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, tomographic imaging of pipeline in service by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is studied. With the developed scanning strategy and image model, the quality of reconstructed image is improved. First, a limited-angle reverse helical scanning strategy based on C-arm computed tomography (C-arm CT) is developed for the projection data acquisition of pipeline in service. Then, an image model which considering the resemblance among slices of pipeline is developed. Finally, split Bregman method based algorithm is implemented in solving the model aforementioned. Preliminary results of simulation experiments show that the projection data acquisition strategy and reconstruction method are efficient and feasible, and our method is superior to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART).

  17. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  18. A motion-compensated scheme for helical cone-beam reconstruction in cardiac CT angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Stevendaal, U. van; Berg, J. von; Lorenz, C.; Grass, M.

    2008-07-15

    Since coronary heart disease is one of the main causes of death all over the world, cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging is an application of very high interest in order to verify indications timely. Due to the cardiac motion, electrocardiogram (ECG) gating has to be implemented into the reconstruction of the measured projection data. However, the temporal and spatial resolution is limited due to the mechanical movement of the gantry and due to the fact that a finite angular span of projections has to be acquired for the reconstruction of each voxel. In this article, a motion-compensated reconstruction method for cardiac CT is described, which can be used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio or to suppress motion blurring. Alternatively, it can be translated into an improvement of the temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied to the entire heart in common and to high contrast objects moving with the heart in particular, such as calcified plaques or devices like stents. The method is based on three subsequent steps: As a first step, the projection data acquired in low pitch helical acquisition mode together with the ECG are reconstructed at multiple phase points. As a second step, the motion-vector field is calculated from the reconstructed images in relation to the image in a reference phase. Finally, a motion-compensated reconstruction is carried out for the reference phase using those projections, which cover the cardiac phases for which the motion-vector field has been determined.

  19. Pearls and pitfalls in the diagnosis of ureterolithiasis with unenhanced helical CT.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, N C; Casford, B; Raiken, D P; Elsass, K D; Pagan, R A

    2000-01-01

    Several signs to assist interpretation of unenhanced helical computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained for suspected ureterolithiasis have been described. Because signs such as perinephric stranding are not always readily apparent, a methodical approach to interpretation of CT studies is important in determining the presence or absence of ureterolithiasis. Evaluation of the poles of the kidneys is helpful in detecting subtle stranding of the perinephric fat. Inspection of the intrarenal collecting system within the poles of the kidneys is helpful in identifying subtle collecting system dilatation and can help prevent mistaking an extrarenal pelvis for hydronephrosis. Careful inspection of the ureter throughout its course is the most reliable method of distinguishing between ureteral stones and phleboliths. However, when the ureter cannot be followed antegrade, the pelvic portion can often be identified in a retrograde fashion. When secondary signs of obstruction are present but no stone is present, differential diagnostic considerations include a recently passed stone, pyelonephritis, urinary tract obstruction unrelated to stone disease, and protease inhibitor deposition disease.

  20. Improvement of spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction for isotropic imaging in helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Ota, Takamasa; Fujii, Misako; Kazama, Masahiro; Okumura, Miwa; Johkoh, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to confirm the isotropic spatial resolution of multislice CT with a 0.5 mm slice thickness. Isotropic spatial resolution means that the spatial resolution in the transaxial plane (X-Y plane) and that in the longitudinal direction (Z direction) are equivalent. To obtain point spread function (PSF) values in the X-Y-Z directions, three-dimensional voxel data were obtained by helical scanning of a bead phantom. The modulation transfer function (MTF) values were then obtained by three-dimensional Fourier transform of the PSF. Evaluation of the spatial resolution in the X-Y-Z directions by the MTF values showed that the spatial resolution in the Z direction does not depend on the reconstruction kernel used. It was also found that the spatial resolution in the Z direction, as compared with that in the X-Y plane, is superior with the standard kernel for the abdomen and is inferior with the high-definition kernel for the ears/bones. By performing sharpening filter processing in the Z direction with a high-definition kernel, comparable spatial resolution could be obtained in the X-Y-Z directions. It was confirmed that adjusting the spatial resolution in the Z direction with the reconstruction kernel used is an effective method for isotropic imaging.

  1. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Alan J.; Vora, Nayana; Suh, Steve; Liu, An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V{sub 45} {sub Gy}, V{sub 30} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way.

  2. 4D-Imaging of the Lung: Reproducibility of Lesion Size and Displacement on Helical CT, MRI, and Cone Beam CT in a Ventilated Ex Vivo System

    SciTech Connect

    Biederer, Juergen Dinkel, Julien; Remmert, Gregor; Jetter, Siri; Nill, Simeon; Moser, Torsten; Bendl, Rolf; Thierfelder, Carsten; Fabel, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Bock, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata; Hartmann, Guenter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) imaging is a key to motion-adapted radiotherapy of lung tumors. We evaluated in a ventilated ex vivo system how size and displacement of artificial pulmonary nodules are reproduced with helical 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Four porcine lungs with 18 agarose nodules (mean diameters 1.3-1.9 cm), were ventilated inside a chest phantom at 8/min and subject to 4D-CT (collimation 24 x 1.2 mm, pitch 0.1, slice/increment 24x10{sup 2}/1.5/0.8 mm, pitch 0.1, temporal resolution 0.5 s), 4D-MRI (echo-shared dynamic three-dimensional-flash; repetition/echo time 2.13/0.72 ms, voxel size 2.7 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, temporal resolution 1.4 s) and linac-integrated 4D-CBCT (720 projections, 3-min rotation, temporal resolution {approx}1 s). Static CT without respiration served as control. Three observers recorded lesion size (RECIST-diameters x/y/z) and axial displacement. Interobserver- and interphase-variation coefficients (IO/IP VC) of measurements indicated reproducibility. Results: Mean x/y/z lesion diameters in cm were equal on static and dynamic CT (1.88/1.87; 1.30/1.39; 1.71/1.73; p > 0.05), but appeared larger on MRI and CBCT (2.06/1.95 [p < 0.05 vs. CT]; 1.47/1.28 [MRI vs. CT/CBCT p < 0.05]; 1.86/1.83 [CT vs. CBCT p < 0.05]). Interobserver-VC for lesion sizes were 2.54-4.47% (CT), 2.29-4.48% (4D-CT); 5.44-6.22% (MRI) and 4.86-6.97% (CBCT). Interphase-VC for lesion sizes ranged from 2.28% (4D-CT) to 10.0% (CBCT). Mean displacement in cm decreased from static CT (1.65) to 4D-CT (1.40), CBCT (1.23) and MRI (1.16). Conclusions: Lesion sizes are exactly reproduced with 4D-CT but overestimated on 4D-MRI and CBCT with a larger variability due to limited temporal and spatial resolution. All 4D-modalities underestimate lesion displacement.

  3. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  4. Technical Note: FreeCT_wFBP: A robust, efficient, open-source implementation of weighted filtered backprojection for helical, fan-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, John; Young, Stefano; Noo, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With growing interest in quantitative imaging, radiomics, and CAD using CT imaging, the need to explore the impacts of acquisition and reconstruction parameters has grown. This usually requires extensive access to the scanner on which the data were acquired and its workflow is not designed for large-scale reconstruction projects. Therefore, the authors have developed a freely available, open-source software package implementing a common reconstruction method, weighted filtered backprojection (wFBP), for helical fan-beam CT applications. Methods: FreeCT_wFBP is a low-dependency, GPU-based reconstruction program utilizing c for the host code and Nvidia CUDA C for GPU code. The software is capable of reconstructing helical scans acquired with arbitrary pitch-values, and sampling techniques such as flying focal spots and a quarter-detector offset. In this work, the software has been described and evaluated for reconstruction speed, image quality, and accuracy. Speed was evaluated based on acquisitions of the ACR CT accreditation phantom under four different flying focal spot configurations. Image quality was assessed using the same phantom by evaluating CT number accuracy, uniformity, and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Finally, reconstructed mass-attenuation coefficient accuracy was evaluated using a simulated scan of a FORBILD thorax phantom and comparing reconstructed values to the known phantom values. Results: The average reconstruction time evaluated under all flying focal spot configurations was found to be 17.4 ± 1.0 s for a 512 row × 512 column × 32 slice volume. Reconstructions of the ACR phantom were found to meet all CT Accreditation Program criteria including CT number, CNR, and uniformity tests. Finally, reconstructed mass-attenuation coefficient values of water within the FORBILD thorax phantom agreed with original phantom values to within 0.0001 mm2/g (0.01%). Conclusions: FreeCT_wFBP is a fast, highly configurable reconstruction package for

  5. [The effect of the severity of congenital pectus excavatum on the cardiac morphology in children: evaluation with multislice helical CT].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Deng, Kaihong

    2013-12-01

    This paper is aimed to evaluate the CT manifestation of congenital pectus excavatum and its effect on the cardiac morphology. CT features of 34 children with pectus excavatum were retrospectively reviewed. The Haller index (HI), CT depression index (CTDI), cardiac rotation angle (CRA), pulmonary vein angle (PVA), cardiac compression index (CCI) and cardiac asymmetry index (CAI) were measured from the images on the PACS system. The relationships among these indexes were evaluated. The HI was 4.12 +/- 1.48, the CTDI was 2.39+/- 0.70, CRA was (53.52 +/- 7.68) degrees, PVA was (66.51 +/- 11.02) degrees, CCI was 2.43 +/- 0.95, and CAI was 1.55 +/- 0.56. There was statistical significance of CCI and CAI between children with severe or slight pectus excavatum. The HI and CTDI were positively related with CCI and CAI respectively, whereas there was no statistical significance of CRA and PVA between children with severe or slight pectus excavatum. There was no statistical significance of HI, CTDI, CRA, PVA, CCI and CAI among different age groups. The morphological change of the heart compressed in children with pectus excavatum can be accurately evaluated by multislice helical CT.

  6. Using Helical CT to Predict Stone Fragility in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, James C. Jr.; Zarse, Chad A.; Jackson, Molly E.; McAteer, James A.; Lingeman, James E.

    2007-04-05

    Great variability exists in the response of urinary stones to SWL, and this is true even for stones composed of the same mineral. Efforts have been made to predict stone fragility to shock waves using computed tomography (CT) patient images, but most work to date has focused on the use of stone CT number (i.e., Hounsfield units). This is an easy number to measure on a patient stone, but its value depends on a number of factors, including the relationship of the size of the stone to me resolution (i.e., the slicewidth) of the CT scan. Studies that have shown a relationship between stone CT number and failure in SWL are reviewed, and all are shown to suffer from error due to stone size, which was not accounted for in the use of Hounsfield unit values. Preliminary data are then presented for a study of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, in which stone structure-rather than simple CT number values-is shown to correlate with fragility to shock waves. COM stones that were observed to have structure by micro CT (e.g., voids, apatite regions, unusual shapes) broke to completion in about half the number of shock waves required for COM stones that were observed to be homogeneous in structure by CT. This result suggests another direction for the use of CT in predicting success of SWL: the use of CT to view stone structure, rather than simply measuring stone CT number. Viewing stone structure by CT requires the use of different viewing windows than those typically used for examining patient scans, but much research to date indicates that stone structure can be observed in the clinical setting. Future clinical studies will need to be done to verify the relationship between stone structure observed by CT and stone fragility in SWL.

  7. Is there an ideal set of prospective scan acquisition phases for fast-helical based 4D-CT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. H.; Ruan, D.; Williams, P.; Lamb, J.; White, B. M.; Dou, T.; O'Connell, D.; Lee, P.; Low, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    The article aims to determine if a prospective acquisition algorithm can be used to find the ideal set of free-breathing phases for fast-helical model-based 4D-CT. A retrospective five-patient dataset that consisted of 25 repeated free breathing CT scans per patient was used. The sum of the square root amplitude difference between all the breathing phases was defined as an objective function to determine the optimality of sets of breathing phases. The objective function was intended to determine if a specific set of breathing phases would yield a motion model that could accurately predict the motion in all 25 CT scans. Voxel specific motion models were calculated using all combinations of N scans from 25 breathing trajectories, (3  ⩽  N  ⩽  25), and the minimum number of scans required to absolutely characterize the motion model was analyzed. This analysis suggests that the number of scans could potentially be reduced to as few as five scans. When the objective function was large, the resulting motion model provided an excellent approximation to the motion model created using all 25 scans.

  8. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  9. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, H; Guo, M; Lee, K; Li, R; Xing, L; Gao, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

  10. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  11. Fuzzy Clustering Applied to ROI Detection in Helical Thoracic CT Scans with a New Proposal and Variants

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Alfonso; Boveda, Carmen; Arcay, Bernardino; Sanjurjo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The detection of pulmonary nodules is one of the most studied problems in the field of medical image analysis due to the great difficulty in the early detection of such nodules and their social impact. The traditional approach involves the development of a multistage CAD system capable of informing the radiologist of the presence or absence of nodules. One stage in such systems is the detection of ROI (regions of interest) that may be nodules in order to reduce the space of the problem. This paper evaluates fuzzy clustering algorithms that employ different classification strategies to achieve this goal. After characterising these algorithms, the authors propose a new algorithm and different variations to improve the results obtained initially. Finally it is shown as the most recent developments in fuzzy clustering are able to detect regions that may be nodules in CT studies. The algorithms were evaluated using helical thoracic CT scans obtained from the database of the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium). PMID:27517049

  12. TH-C-18A-11: Investigating the Minimum Scan Parameters Required to Generate Free-Breathing Fast-Helical CT Scans Without Motion-Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; Neylon, J; Dou, T; Jani, S; Lamb, J; Low, D; Tan, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A recently proposed 4D-CT protocol uses deformable registration of free-breathing fast-helical CT scans to generate a breathing motion model. In order to allow accurate registration, free-breathing images are required to be free of doubling-artifacts, which arise when tissue motion is greater than scan speed. This work identifies the minimum scanner parameters required to successfully generate free-breathing fast-helical scans without doubling-artifacts. Methods: 10 patients were imaged under free breathing conditions 25 times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low dose fast helical protocol. A high temporal resolution (0.1s) 4D-CT was generated using a patient specific motion model and patient breathing waveforms, and used as the input for a scanner simulation. Forward projections were calculated using helical cone-beam geometry (800 projections per rotation) and a GPU accelerated reconstruction algorithm was implemented. Various CT scanner detector widths and rotation times were simulated, and verified using a motion phantom. Doubling-artifacts were quantified in patient images using structural similarity maps to determine the similarity between axial slices. Results: Increasing amounts of doubling-artifacts were observed with increasing rotation times > 0.2s for 16×1mm slice scan geometry. No significant increase in doubling artifacts was observed for 64×1mm slice scan geometry up to 1.0s rotation time although blurring artifacts were observed >0.6s. Using a 16×1mm slice scan geometry, a rotation time of less than 0.3s (53mm/s scan speed) would be required to produce images of similar quality to a 64×1mm slice scan geometry. Conclusion: The current generation of 16 slice CT scanners, which are present in most Radiation Oncology departments, are not capable of generating free-breathing sorting-artifact-free images in the majority of patients. The next generation of CT scanners should be capable of at least 53mm/s scan speed

  13. Optimization of multiplanar reformations from isotropic data sets acquired with 16-detector row helical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Tracy A; Nelson, Rendon C; Johnson, G Allan; Lee, Ellie R; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lowry, Carolyn R; Bullard, Anthony B; DeLong, David M; Paulson, Erik K

    2006-01-01

    Institutional review board approval and waiver of consent were obtained for the patient component of this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. By using an anthropomorphic phantom and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors, radiation dose was determined for one eight-detector row and two 16-detector row computed tomographic (CT) protocols. A custom phantom was scanned by using the three protocols to identify isotropy. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were determined for the same protocols by using a third phantom. Seven patients had undergone isotropic 16-detector row CT of the abdomen and pelvis. Anonymized coronal reformations at various thicknesses were ranked qualitatively by three radiologists. Effective dose equivalents were similar for the eight- and 16-detector row protocols. When transverse and coronal reformations of data acquired in the custom phantom were compared, coronal reformations obtained with the 16-detector row and 0.625-mm section thickness protocol were found to be nearly identical to the transverse image for all sets of line pairs. CNRs were consistently highest on 5-mm-thick coronal reformations (CNR range, 1.2-3.3). For qualitative assessment, 2- and 3-mm-thick coronal reformations were consistently preferred.

  14. Noise reduction for low-dose helical CT by 3D penalized weighted least-squares sinogram smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) has several advantages over conventional step-and-shoot CT for imaging a relatively large object, especially for dynamic studies. However, HCT may increase X-ray exposure significantly to the patient. This work aims to reduce the radiation by lowering the X-ray tube current (mA) and filtering the low-mA (or dose) sinogram noise. Based on the noise properties of HCT sinogram, a three-dimensional (3D) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed and an optimal sinogram was estimated by minimizing the objective function. To consider the difference of signal correlation among different direction of the HCT sinogram, an anisotropic Markov random filed (MRF) Gibbs function was designed as the penalty. The minimization of the objection function was performed by iterative Gauss-Seidel updating strategy. The effectiveness of the 3D-PWLS sinogram smoothing for low-dose HCT was demonstrated by a 3D Shepp-Logan head phantom study. Comparison studies with our previously developed KL domain PWLS sinogram smoothing algorithm indicate that the KL+2D-PWLS algorithm shows better performance on in-plane noise-resolution trade-off while the 3D-PLWS shows better performance on z-axis noise-resolution trade-off. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies by using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) shows that 3D-PWLS and KL+2DPWLS algorithms have similar performance on detectability in low-contrast environment.

  15. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  16. Comparison of the effectiveness of different immobilization systems in different body regions using daily megavoltage CT in helical tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K-F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Effective immobilization is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiotherapy. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the commonly used immobilization systems for different body regions using megavoltage CT (MVCT). Methods: Daily treatment set-up data from 212 patients treated by helical tomotherapy (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) in 6 body regions (52 head and neck, 41 chest, 38 abdomen, 36 pelvis, 18 breast and 27 cranium) were obtained. Based on a verification tool using the pre-treatment MVCT, set-up corrections for each patient were recorded. Mean systematic and random errors of lateral, longitudinal, vertical and roll directions and three-dimensional vectors were compared between immobilization systems of each region. Results: Smaller set-up deviations were observed in the Orfit system (Orfit Industries NV, Wijnegem, Belgium) of the head and neck region, while the performance of immobilization systems for the chest, abdomen and pelvis regions was similar. Larger differences were noted in the breast group, where the prone BodyFIX® system (Medical Intelligence, Medizintechnik GmbH, Schwabmünchen, Germany) was less stable than the supine VacLok® system (CIVCO Medical Solutions, Orange City, IA). Conclusion: Differences were found between the immobilization systems in the head and neck region, in which the Orfit system was relatively more effective, whereas the VacLok and BodyFIX systems performed similarly in the chest, abdomen and pelvis regions. For the breast case, the supine position with VacLok was much more stable than the prone breast technique. The results provided references for the estimation of clinical target volume–planning target volume margins. Advances in knowledge: This is the first article on comprehensive comparisons performed in immobilization systems for main body regions that provides some practical recommendations. PMID:24398111

  17. Novel homozygous mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*), in the PVRL1 gene underlies cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome in an Asian patient.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazue; Hayashi, Ryota; Fujita, Hideki; Kubota, Masaya; Kondo, Mai; Shimomura, Yutaka; Niizeki, Hironori

    2015-07-01

    Cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations of the poliovirus receptor-like 1 (PVRL1) gene encoding nectin-1. Nectin-1 is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that is important for the initial step in the formation of adherens junctions and tight junctions; it is expressed in keratinocytes, neurons, and the developing face and palate. Clinical manifestations comprise a unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, ectodermal dysplasia, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and/or toes, and in some cases, mental retardation. We present the first report, to our knowledge, of an Asian individual with cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with a novel PVRL1 mutation. A 7-year-old Japanese boy, the first child of a consanguineous marriage, showed hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with sparse, brittle, fine, dry hair and hypodontia, the unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and mild mental retardation. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the hair demonstrated pili torti and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Mutation analysis of exon 2 of PVRL1 revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*). His parents were heterozygous for the mutant alleles. All four PVRL1 mutations identified in cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome to date, including this study, resulted in truncated proteins that lack the transmembrane domain and intracellular domain of nectin-1, which is necessary to initiate the cell-cell adhesion process.

  18. Palatal myoclonus

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing Alternative Names Palatal tremor References Jankovic J. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, eds. ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Mouth Disorders Movement Disorders Multiple Sclerosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  19. Role and pitfalls of hepatic helical multi-phase CT scanning in differential diagnosis of small hemangioma and small hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fu-Hua; Zeng, Meng-Su; Zhou, Kang-Rong

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To compare and analyze the contrast enhancement appearance of small hemangioma (SHHE) and small hepatocellular carcinoma (SHCC) with helical multi-phase CT scanning so as to determine their roles and pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of SHHE and SHCC. METHODS: The pre and postcontrast CT scanning of the liver in 73 cases (38 SHHE, 35 SHCC) were carried out. The first phase scan of the entire liver began at 30s after the injection of contrast medium, the second and third phases began at 70s, and 4 min respectively. The contrast enhancement patterns and characteristics of all lesions were observed and compared. RESULTS: In SHHE, 64.29% (27/42) had typical manifestations in two-phase dynamic scanning, such as peripheral dramatic high-density enhancement of the lesions with progressive opacification from the periphery toward the center, 30.95% (13/42) were hyperdense in both phases and 4.76% (2/42) were hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 96.67% (28/30) of SHHE were hyperdense and isodense. In SHCC 59.52% (25/42) presented typical appearances, such as hyperdense in the first phase and hypodense in the second phase, 23.81% (10/42) were hyperdense in the first phase and isodense in the second phase with 4.76% (2/42) of hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 85.71% (24/28) of SHCC were hypodense. CONCLUSION: According to the contrast enhancement patterns of SHHE and SHCC in the two-phase or multi-phase scanning by helical CT, diagnosis can be established in the majority of lesions, while some atypical cases needed MRI for further investigation. PMID:11819317

  20. Role and pitfalls of hepatic helical multi-phase CT scanning in differential diagnosis of small hemangioma and small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fu-Hua; Zeng, Meng-Su; Zhou, Kang-Rong

    1998-08-01

    AIM:To compare and analyze the contrast enhancement appearance of small hemangioma (SHHE) and small hepatocellular carcinoma (SHCC) with helical multi-phase CT scanning so as to determine their roles and pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of SHHE and SHCC.METHODS:The pre and postcontrast CT scanning of the liver in 73 cases (38 SHHE, 35 SHCC) were carried out. The first phase scan of the entire liver began at 30s after the injection of contrast medium, the second and third phases began at 70s, and 4min respectively. The contrast enhancement patterns and characteristics of all lesions were observed and compared.RESULTS In SHHE, 64.29% (27/42) had typical manifestations in two-phase dynamic scanning, such as peripheral dramatic high-density enhancement of the lesions with progressive opacification from the periphery toward the center, 30.95% (13/42) were hyperdense in both phases and 4.76% (2/42) were hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 96.67% (28/30) of SHHE were hyperdense and isodense.In SHCC 59.52% (25/42) presented typical appearances, such as hyperdense in the first phase and hypodense in the second phase, 23.81% (10/42) were hyperdense in the first phase and isodense in the second phase with 4.76% (2/42) of hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 85.71% (24/28) of SHCC were hypodense.CONCLUSION:According to the contrast enhancement patterns of SHHE and SHCC in the two-phase or multi-phase scanning by helical CT, diagnosis can be established in the majority of lesions, while some atypical cases needed MRI for further investigation.

  1. Computerized lung nodule detection: comparison of performance for low-dose and standard-dose helical CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armato, Samuel G., III; Giger, Maryellen L.; Doi, Kunio; Bick, Ulrich; MacMahon, Heber

    2001-07-01

    The vast amount of image data acquired during a computed tomography (CT) scan makes lung nodule detection a burdensome task. Moreover, the growing acceptance of low-dose CT for lung cancer screening promises to further impact radiologists' workloads. Therefore, we have developed a computerized method to automatically analyze structures within a CT scan and identify those structures that represent lung nodules. Gray-level thresholding is performed to segment the lungs in each section to produce a segmented lung volume, which is then iteratively thresholded. At each iteration, remaining voxels are grouped into contiguous three-dimensional structures. Structures that satisfy a volume criterion then become nodule candidates. The set of nodule candidates is subjected to feature analysis. To distinguish candidates representing nodule and non-nodule structures, a rule-based approach is combined with an automated classifier. This method was applied to 43 standard-dose (diagnostic) CT scans and 13 low-dose CT scans. The method achieved an overall detection sensitivity of 71% with 1.5 false-positive detections per section on the standard-dose database and 71% sensitivity with 1.2 false-positive detections per section on the low-dose database. This automated method demonstrates promising performance in its ability to accurately detect lung nodules in standard-dose and low-dose CT images.

  2. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.

  3. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  4. Cleft palate - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cleft palate ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cleft palate : Cleft Palate Foundation -- www.cleftline.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1210.asp ...

  5. Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom

  6. Generation of hybrid sinograms for the recovery of kV-CT images with metal artifacts for helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dongwon; Youn, Hanbean; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this study is to restore kilovoltage computed tomography (kV-CT) images which are disfigured by patients’ metal prostheses. By generating a hybrid sinogram that is a combination of kV and megavoltage (MV) projection data, the authors suggest a novel metal artifact-reduction (MAR) method that retains the image quality to match that of kV-CT and simultaneously restores the information of metal prostheses lost due to photon starvation. Methods: CT projection data contain information about attenuation coefficients and the total length of the attenuation. By normalizing raw kV projections with their own total lengths of attenuation, mean attenuation projections were obtained. In the same manner, mean density projections of MV-CT were obtained by the normalization of MV projections resulting from the forward projection of density-calibrated MV-CT images with the geometric parameters of the kV-CT device. To generate the hybrid sinogram, metal-affected signals of the kV sinogram were identified and replaced by the corresponding signals of the MV sinogram following a density calibration step with kV data. Filtered backprojection was implemented to reconstruct the hybrid CT image. To validate the authors’ approach, they simulated four different scenarios for three heads and one pelvis using metallic rod inserts within a cylindrical phantom. Five inserts describing human body elements were also included in the phantom. The authors compared the image qualities among the kV, MV, and hybrid CT images by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the densities of all inserts, and the spatial resolution. In addition, the MAR performance was compared among three existing MAR methods and the authors’ hybrid method. Finally, for clinical trials, the authors produced hybrid images of three patients having dental metal prostheses to compare their MAR performances with those of the kV, MV, and three existing MAR

  7. Lung cancer screening with low-dose helical CT in Korea: experiences at the Samsung Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Rhee, Chong H

    2005-06-01

    To determine overall detection rates of lung cancer by low-dose CT (LDCT) screening and to compare histopathologic and imaging differences of detected cancers between high- and low-risk groups, this study included 6,406 asymptomatic Korean adults with >or=45 yr of age who underwent LDCT for lung cancer screening. All were classified into high- (>or=20 pack-year smoking; 3,353) and low-risk (3,053; <20 pack-yr smoking and non-smokers) groups. We compared CT findings of detected cancers and detection rates between high- and low-risk. At initial CT, 35% (2,255 of 6,406) had at least one or more non-calcified nodule. Lung cancer detection rates were 0.36% (23 of 6,406). Twenty-one non-small cell lung cancers appeared as solid (n=14) or ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n=7) nodules. Cancer likelihood was higher in GGO nodules than in solid nodules (p<0.01). Fifteen of 23 cancers occurred in high-risk group and 8 in low-risk group (p=0.215). Therefore, LDCT screening help detect early stage of lung cancer in asymptomatic Korean population with detection rate of 0.36% on a population basis and may be useful for discovering early lung cancer in low-risk group as well as in high-risk group.

  8. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    PubMed

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  9. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cleft Lip and Palate KidsHealth > For Teens > Cleft Lip and Palate Print ... slight scar on her upper lip. What Are Cleft Lip and Palate? Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that ...

  10. Cardiac helical CT involving a low-radiation-dose protocol with a 100-kVp setting

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Yuji; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Koichi; Kidoh, Masafumi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the radiation dose and image quality of retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) between a 100-kVp protocol, hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR), and display preset optimization and the 120-kVp protocol. We prospectively enrolled 100 patients with tachycardia or atrial fibrillation scanned retrospective ECG-gated cardiac CT. We randomly assigned 50 patients to the 120-kVp protocol and 50 patients to the 100-kVp protocol. We compared effective doses (EDs) between the two protocols. The 120-kVp images were post-processed using filtered back projection (FBP). The 100-kVp images were post-processed using FBP (100-kVp protocol) and HIR (i-100-kVp protocol). We compared attenuation of the ascending aorta, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image noise between the 120-kVp, 100-kVp, and i-100-kVp protocols. We performed qualitative image analysis for the 120-kVp and i-100-kVp protocols. ED of the 100-kVp protocol (4.4 ± 0.4 mSv) was 76% lower than that of the 120-kVp protocol (18.4 ± 0.6 mSv). Attenuations of the 100-kVp (549.1 ± 73.8 HU) and i-100-kVp (550.5 ± 73.7 HU) protocols were higher than that of the120-kVp protocol (437.3 ± 55.7 HU). Image noise of the 100-kVp (53.6 ± 18.5 HU) and i-100-kVp (30.9 ± 8.6 HU) protocols were higher than that of the120-kVp protocol (23.8 ± 5.7 HU). There was no significant difference in SNR and the result of qualitative image analysis between the 120-kVp and i-100-kVp protocols. The 100-kVp protocol with HIR reduced the 76% radiation dose while preserving the image quality compared with the conventional 120-kVp protocol on retrospective ECG-gated cardiac CT. PMID:27861400

  11. Automatic registration of megavoltage to kilovoltage CT images in helical tomotherapy: An evaluation of the setup verification process for the special case of a rigid head phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, Sarah; Tome, Wolfgang; Jeraj, Robert; Jaradat, Hazim; Mackie, T. Rock

    2006-11-15

    Precise daily target localization is necessary to achieve highly conformal radiation delivery. In helical tomotherapy, setup verification may be accomplished just prior to delivering each fraction by acquiring a megavoltage CT scan of the patient in the treatment position. This daily image set may be manually or automatically registered to the image set on which the treatment plan was calculated, in order to determine any needed adjustments. The system was tested by acquiring 104 MVCT scans of an anthropomorphic head phantom to which translational displacements had been introduced with respect to the planning image set. Registration results were compared against an independent, optically guided positioning system. The total experimental uncertainty was within approximately 1 mm. Although the registration of phantom images is not fully analogous to the registration of patient images, this study confirms that the system is capable of phantom localization with sub-voxel accuracy. In seven registration problems considered, expert human observers were able to perform manual registrations with comparable or inferior accuracy to automatic registration by mutual information. The time to compute an automatic registration is considerably shorter than the time required for manual registration. However, human evaluation of automatic results is necessary in order to identify occasional outliers, and to ensure that the registration is clinically acceptable, especially in the case of deformable patient anatomy.

  12. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Support Resources Books for Kids and Adults Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area FAQs for Parents ... cleft palate, or both cleft lip and cleft palate. Cleft lip and cleft palate are congenital defects, or birth ...

  13. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001051.htm Cleft lip and palate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that affect the upper lip ...

  14. A Novel Fast Helical 4D-CT Acquisition Technique to Generate Low-Noise Sorting Artifact–Free Images at User-Selected Breathing Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, David; Lamb, James; White, Benjamin; Jani, Shyam; Gaudio, Sergio; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Low, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) technique that exploits standard fast helical acquisition, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a breathing motion model to remove sorting artifacts. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were imaged under free-breathing conditions 25 successive times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low-dose fast helical protocol. An abdominal bellows was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformable registration was used to register the first image (defined as the reference image) to the subsequent 24 segmented images. Voxel-specific motion model parameters were determined using a breathing motion model. The tissue locations predicted by the motion model in the 25 images were compared against the deformably registered tissue locations, allowing a model prediction error to be evaluated. A low-noise image was created by averaging the 25 images deformed to the first image geometry, reducing statistical image noise by a factor of 5. The motion model was used to deform the low-noise reference image to any user-selected breathing phase. A voxel-specific correction was applied to correct the Hounsfield units for lung parenchyma density as a function of lung air filling. Results: Images produced using the model at user-selected breathing phases did not suffer from sorting artifacts common to conventional 4D-CT protocols. The mean prediction error across all patients between the breathing motion model predictions and the measured lung tissue positions was determined to be 1.19 ± 0.37 mm. Conclusions: The proposed technique can be used as a clinical 4D-CT technique. It is robust in the presence of irregular breathing and allows the entire imaging dose to contribute to the resulting image quality, providing sorting artifact–free images at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4D-CT techniques.

  15. Comparison of thoracic radiographs and single breath-hold helical CT for detection of pulmonary nodules in dogs with metastatic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nemanic, Sarah; London, Cheryl A; Wisner, Erik R

    2006-01-01

    Imaging studies in people indicate that x-ray computed tomography (CT) is a more sensitive technique than thoracic radiography for the detection of pulmonary metastasic neoplasia. Systematic studies comparing CT and thoracic radiographic techniques in veterinary patients have not been performed. The present retrospective study was designed to directly compare the efficacy of these 2 techniques in detecting pulmonary nodules in dogs. Eighteen dogs with histologically confirmed pulmonary metastatic neoplasia had contemporaneous thoracic radiographs and pulmonary CT scans compared. Quantitative analyses included estimation of pulmonary nodule size, number, and lobar distribution on thoracic radiographs and CT images. Only 9% of CT-detected pulmonary nodules were identified on thoracic radiographs (P < .003). The lower size threshold was approximately 1 mm to detect pulmonary nodules on CT images and 7-9 mm to reliably detect nodules on radiographs (P < .0001). Additionally, pulmonary nodules were detected in a significantly greater number of lung lobes using CT as compared with thoracic radiographs (P < .0001). These data indicate that CT is significantly more sensitive than thoracic radiography for detecting soft-tissue nodules in dogs. As such, thoracic CT should be considered in any patient with neoplasia that has potential for pulmonary metastasis to more reliably stage the disease, particularly when accurate characterization of the extent and distribution of pulmonary metastatic disease affects therapeutic planning.

  16. Isolated congenital palatal fistula without submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet; Olgun, Haşim; Tan, Onder; Caner, Ibrahim

    2009-09-01

    Congenital fistula of the palate is a rare deformity. It has been generally associated with cleft palate. Treatment of cleft palate is surgical intervention. We present a child with congenital fistula of palate that was not associated with submucous cleft and closed spontaneously at 18 months.

  17. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tayyeb S; Ajaz, Tarannum; Agarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Fibroma is one of the most common soft tissue benign tumors of the oral cavity. These masses represent hyperplasias instead of true neoplasm, which develop due to irritation to the mucosal tissue resulting in proliferation of the cells. Although so common in the oral cavity, its occurrence on the palate is rare, mainly due to fewer chances of trauma. Here, we report a case of palatal fibroma in a child diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological, and histological features. The case represents an extremely rare occurrence as unusual trauma due to thumb sucking seemed to be the only apparent traumatic factor in the palatal region. How to cite this article Mishra R, Khan TS, Ajaz T, Agarwal M. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017; 10(1):96-98. PMID:28377663

  18. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... that include feeding problems, middle ear fluid and hearing loss, dental problems, and speech problems. Feeding problems Have ... hearing problems Kids with cleft palate can have hearing loss . This may be caused by fluid building up ...

  19. Helical (spiral) CT in the evaluation of emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, S; Stuk, J L; Kaufman, J A

    1999-05-01

    For the near future, CT will play the critical and dominant role in the evaluation of patients presenting with emergent aortic syndromes. Its convenience, accuracy, and utility in the rapid evaluation of not just the aorta, but the entire thorax, make it ideally suited for use in emergency settings. Further benefits are likely to be realized in speed and resolution with multislice CT, although it is as yet not widely available.

  20. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro.

  1. Rigid-fixation palatal appliances.

    PubMed

    Staggers, J

    1996-09-01

    Palatal appliances can offer an alternative to the traditional treatment approach of cleft lip and palate. The goal of these appliances is to position the maxillary segments more ideally and then maintain their position while allowing growth to occur. Use of palatal appliances can minimize the iatrogenic growth restriction usually associated with cleft palate repair. This article presents the findings of clinical treatment at the Medical College of Georgia.

  2. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  3. Shifted helical computed tomography to optimize cardiac positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration: quantitative improvement and limitations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nils P; Pan, Tinsu; Gould, K Lance

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) uses CT attenuation correction but suffers from misregistration artifacts. However, the quantitative accuracy of helical versus cine CT in the same patient after optimized coregistration by shifting both CT data as needed for each patient is unknown. We studied 293 patients undergoing cardiac perfusion PET-CT using helical CT attenuation correction for comparison to cine CT. Objective, quantitative criteria identified perfusion abnormalities that were associated visually with PET-CT misregistration. Custom software shifted CT data to optimize coregistration with quantitative artifact improvement. The majority (58.1%) of cases with both helical and shifted helical CT data (n  = 93) had artifacts that improved or resolved by software shifting helical CT data. Translation of shifted helical CT was greatest in the x-direction (8.8 ± 3.3 mm) and less in the y- and z-directions (approximately 3.5 mm). The magnitude of differences in quantitative end points was greatest for helical (p  =  .0001, n  =  177 studies), less for shifted helical but significant (p  =  .0001, n  =  93 studies), and least for cine (not significant, n  =  161 studies) CT compared to optimal attenuation correction for each patient. Frequent artifacts owing to attenuation-emission misregistration are substantially corrected by software shifting helical CT scans to achieve proper coregistration that, however, remains on average significantly inferior to cine CT attenuation quantitatively.

  4. Ephrin regulation of palate development

    PubMed Central

    Benson, M. Douglas; Serrano, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of palate development are motivated by the all too common incidence of cleft palate, a birth defect that imposes a tremendous health burden and can leave lasting disfigurement. Although, mechanistic studies of palate growth and fusion have focused on growth factors such as Transforming Growth Factor ß-3 (Tgfß3), recent studies have revealed that the ephrin family of membrane bound ligands and their receptors, the Ephs, play central roles in palatal morphogenesis, growth, and fusion. In this mini-review, we will discuss the recent findings by our group and others on the functions of ephrins in palatal development. PMID:23055980

  5. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT.

  6. Accommodating Picky Palates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    Healthy gourmet offerings are fast becoming the norm at college dining halls around the country. At a time when the children of Baby Boomers are hitting higher education in record numbers, college officials have scrambled to accommodate their picky palates and their insistence for healthier meals than were served to past generations. At the same…

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  8. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pradyumna Kumar; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Ghosh, Saradindu

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa. PMID:25298716

  9. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch.

  10. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  11. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... can breast-feed, a cleft palate may make sucking difficult. Ear infections and hearing loss. Babies with cleft palate are especially at risk of developing middle ear fluid and hearing loss. Dental problems. If the cleft extends through the upper gum, ...

  12. Radiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: Imaging for the Prenatal Period and throughout Life.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Zachary R; Peacock, Zachary S; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in prenatal imaging have made possible the in utero diagnosis of cleft lip and palate and associated deformities. Postnatal diagnosis of cleft lip is made clinically, but imaging still plays a role in detection of associated abnormalities, surgical treatment planning, and screening for or surveillance of secondary deformities. This article describes the clinical entities of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate and documents their prenatal and postnatal appearances at radiography, ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and computed tomography (CT). Imaging protocols and findings for prenatal screening, detection of associated anomalies, and evaluation of secondary deformities throughout life are described and illustrated. CLP and isolated cleft palate are distinct entities with shared radiologic appearances. Prenatal US and MR imaging can depict clefting of the lip or palate and associated anomalies. While two- and three-dimensional US often can depict cleft lip, visualization of cleft palate is more difficult, and repeat US or fetal MR imaging should be performed if cleft palate is suspected. Postnatal imaging can assist in identifying associated abnormalities and dentofacial deformities. Dentofacial sequelae of cleft lip and palate include missing and supernumerary teeth, oronasal fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hearing loss, maxillary growth restriction, and airway abnormalities. Secondary deformities can often be found incidentally at imaging performed for other purposes, but detection is necessary because they may have considerable implications for the patient.

  13. Palatalization in Romanian: Experimental and Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinu, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Within the larger context of the Romance languages, Romanian stands alone in exhibiting a surface contrast between plain and palatalized consonants (that is, consonants with a secondary palatal articulation). While the properties of secondary palatalization are well known for language families in which the set of palatalized consonants is…

  14. Cleft palate in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Joan M; Rosen, Heather; Desai, Urmen; Mulliken, John B; Meara, John G; Rogers, Gary F

    2009-09-01

    The frequency of associated cleft palate is known to be high in some fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Apert syndrome. However, there is little information on the frequency of palatal clefts in the FGFR2-mediated disorder, that is, Pfeiffer syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of palatal clefts in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome. The records of patients with Pfeiffer syndrome managed in our craniofacial unit were reviewed. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome were included. Diagnostic criteria were as follows: characteristic mutations in FGFR1 or FGFR2 or, in the absence of genetic testing, clinical findings consistent with Pfeiffer syndrome as determined by a clinical geneticist or our most experienced surgeon (J.B.M.). Only 2 clefts were noted in 25 patients (8%), including 1 with a submucous cleft and 1 with an overt palatal cleft. Many patients (87%) were described as having a high-arched and narrow palate, and 1 had a low, broad palate. Nine patients were noted to have choanal atresia or stenosis. Clefting of the palate does occur in Pfeiffer syndrome but at a low frequency.

  15. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  16. Helicity content and tokamak applications of helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is approximately conserved by the turbulence associated with resistive instabilities of plasmas. To generalize the application of the concept of helicity, the helicity content of an arbitrary bounded region of space will be defined. The definition has the virtues that both the helicity content and its time derivative have simple expressions in terms of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes, the average toroidal loop voltage and the electric potential on the bounding surface, and the volume integral of E-B. The application of the helicity concept to tokamak plasmas is illustrated by a discussion of so-called MHD current drive, an example of a stable tokamak q profile with q less than one in the center, and a discussion of the possibility of a natural steady-state tokamak due to the bootstrap current coupling to tearing instabilities.

  17. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... and advocacy priorities National Network of Perinatal Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? ... how the body develops or how the body works. Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth ...

  18. Space Technology for Palate Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    University of Miami utilized NASA's spacecraft viewing technology to develop the optical profilometer provides more accurate measurements of cleft palate casts than has heretofore been possible, enabling better planning of corrective surgery. Lens like instrument electronically scans a palate cast precisely measuring its irregular contours by detecting minute differences in the intensity of a light beam reflected off the cast. Readings are computer processed and delivered to the surgeon by a teleprinter.

  19. Cleft palate repair and variations

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon

    2009-01-01

    Cleft palate affects almost every function of the face except vision. Today a child born with cleft palate with or without cleft lip should not be considered as unfortunate, because surgical repair of cleft palate has reached a highly satisfactory level. However for an average cleft surgeon palatoplasty remains an enigma. The surgery differs from centre to centre and surgeon to surgeon. However there is general agreement that palatoplasty (soft palate at least) should be performed between 6-12 months of age. Basically there are three groups of palatoplasty techniques. One is for hard palate repair, second for soft palate repair and the third based on the surgical schedule. Hard palate repair techniques are Veau-Wardill-Kilner V-Y, von Langenbeck, two-flap, Aleveolar extension palatoplasty, vomer flap, raw area free palatoplasty etc. The soft palate techniques are intravelar veloplasty, double opposing Z-plasty, radical muscle dissection, primary pharyngeal flap etc. And the protocol based techniques are Schweckendiek's, Malek's, whole in one, modified schedule with palatoplasty before lip repair etc. One should also know the effect of each technique on maxillofacial growth and speech. The ideal technique of palatoplasty is the one which gives perfect speech without affecting the maxillofacial growth and hearing. The techniques are still evolving because we are yet to design an ideal one. It is always good to know all the techniques and variations so that one can choose whichever gives the best result in one's hands. A large number of techniques are available in literature, and also every surgeon incorporates his own modification to make it a variation. However there are some basic techniques, which are described in details which are used in various centres. Some of the important variations are also described. PMID:19884664

  20. Molecular Anatomy of Palate Development.

    PubMed

    Potter, Andrew S; Potter, S Steven

    2015-01-01

    The NIH FACEBASE consortium was established in part to create a central resource for craniofacial researchers. One purpose is to provide a molecular anatomy of craniofacial development. To this end we have used a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA-Seq to define the gene expression programs driving development of the murine palate. We focused on the E14.5 palate, soon after medial fusion of the two palatal shelves. The palate was divided into multiple compartments, including both medial and lateral, as well as oral and nasal, for both the anterior and posterior domains. A total of 25 RNA-Seq datasets were generated. The results provide a comprehensive view of the region specific expression of all transcription factors, growth factors and receptors. Paracrine interactions can be inferred from flanking compartment growth factor/receptor expression patterns. The results are validated primarily through very high concordance with extensive previously published gene expression data for the developing palate. In addition selected immunostain validations were carried out. In conclusion, this report provides an RNA-Seq based atlas of gene expression patterns driving palate development at microanatomic resolution. This FACEBASE resource is designed to promote discovery by the craniofacial research community.

  1. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lip and palate Cleft lip and palate repair Review Date 5/9/2016 Updated by: David A. ... and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  2. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  3. Emerging double helical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-08-21

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  4. A Helical Stairway Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We answer a geometric question that was raised by the carpenter in charge of erecting helical stairs in a 10-story hospital. The explanation involves the equations of lines, planes, and helices in three-dimensional space. A brief version of the question is this: If A and B are points on a cylinder and the line segment AB is projected radially onto…

  5. Orthodontic palatal implants: clinical technique.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, D; O'Dwyer, J J; Benson, P E; Doyle, P T; Sandler, J

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to familiarize the readers with some of the clinical considerations necessary to ensure successful use of mid-palatal implants. Both surgical and technical aspects will be discussed along with a description of impression techniques used.

  6. Palate size and shape in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Delice, Mehtap; Gurbuz, Ozlem; Oflezer, Ceyhan; Kurt, Erhan; Mandali, Gamze

    2016-10-30

    The palate is considered typical of the structures in which schizophrenia-related minor physical anomalies may occur. In this study, we aimed to compare the dimensions and form of palate in patients with schizophrenia with nonpsychiatric controls in a blinded manner. Dental stone casts of 127 patients with schizophrenia and 127 controls were prepared from impressions of the maxillary dental arch. Palate dimensions were measured on the stone casts using a digital caliper and palatometer. Palate length did not differ significantly between the groups, but there was a significant difference in palate width and depth, which were significantly higher in the schizophrenia group. As a result of using multivariate analysis for assessing independent risk factors affecting patients with schizophrenia, furrowed palate shape, palate width, and ellipsoid maxillary dental arch shape were found to be significant. This study also revealed that patients with schizophrenia demonstrate certain gender-related predilections in the differences of palate parameters compared to same-sex controls. As the palate develops in conjunction with both the face and brain, our study findings can significantly contribute to the assumption that there might be structural abnormalities of the palate that could represent specific markers of embryological dysmorphogenesis underlying schizophrenia.

  7. Pleomorphic adenoma of the palate.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Y

    2005-01-01

    An 82-year-old female with a history of high blood pressure and anorexia. She was referred for a long-evolving, asymptomatic large tumor (3x3 cm) on the right side of the palate (fig 1). The patient was wearing total dentures. Intraoral examination revealed a pediculate tumor of the same color as the adjacent mucosa and presenting a firm consistency. An MRI study (fig 2-3) and biopsy were carried out (fig 4-6).

  8. Indolent palatal swelling: Catch 22

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Preeti; Wadhwan, Vijay; Kumar, K. V. Arun; Venkatesh, Arvind; Thapa, Timsy

    2016-01-01

    We present an interesting but intriguing case of an indolent palatal swelling. The lesion was asymptomatic causing little discomfort to the patient and thus was an incidental clinical finding. Provisional diagnosis was a benign, minor salivary gland tumor. Clinical differential diagnoses included benign lymphoepithelial lesion or mucus extravasation phenomenon. Nevertheless, we also considered malignancies such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, lymphoma, and neoplasm of the maxillary sinus. However, the histopathology revealed a rare clinicopathologic entity prompting immediate treatment of the lesion. PMID:28356700

  9. Primary tuberculosis of the palate

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Pablo; Fuente, Eduardo; Gallego, Lorena; Calvo, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infectious disease with a high world incidence. However, TB with oral expression is considered rare. The importance of recognising this entity lies in its early diagnosis and treatment, as it can be easily confused with neoplastic or traumatic ulcers. We present a case of a primary TB located in the hard palate and gingiva in an 88-year-old woman. PMID:24925532

  10. Primary tuberculosis of the palate.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo; Fuente, Eduardo; Gallego, Lorena; Calvo, Nicolás

    2014-06-12

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infectious disease with a high world incidence. However, TB with oral expression is considered rare. The importance of recognising this entity lies in its early diagnosis and treatment, as it can be easily confused with neoplastic or traumatic ulcers. We present a case of a primary TB located in the hard palate and gingiva in an 88-year-old woman.

  11. Squeezed helical elastica.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael; Gosselin, Pierre; Kulić, Igor M; Mohrbach, Hervé

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically study the conformations of a helical semi-flexible filament confined to a flat surface. This squeezed helix exhibits a variety of unexpected shapes resembling circles, waves or spirals depending on the material parameters. We explore the conformation space in detail and show that the shapes can be understood as the mutual elastic interaction of conformational quasi-particles. Our theoretical results are potentially useful to determine the material parameters of such helical filaments in an experimental setting.

  12. 3-D shape analysis of palatal surface in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Rusková, Hana; Bejdová, Sárka; Peterka, Miroslav; Krajíček, Václav; Velemínská, Jana

    2014-07-01

    Facial development of patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) is associated with many problems including deformity of the palate. The aim of this study was to evaluate palatal morphology and variability in patients with UCLP compared with Czech norms using methods of geometric morphometrics. The study was based on virtual dental cast analysis of 29 UCLP patients and 29 control individuals at the age of 15 years. The variability of palatal shape in UCLP patients was greater than that in nonclefted palates. Only 24% of clefted palates fell within the variability of controls. The palatal form of UCLP patients (range from 11.8 to 17.2 years) was not correlated with age. Compared with control palates, palates of UCLP patients were narrower, more anteriorly than posteriorly. Apart from the praemaxilla region, they were also shallower, and the difference increased posteriorly. The UCLP palate was characterised by the asymmetry of its vault. The maximum height of the palatal vault was anterior on the clefted side, whereas it was posterior on the nonclefted side. The slope of the UCLP palate was more inclined compared with the control group. The praemaxilla was therefore situated more inferiorly.

  13. Cranial strains and malocclusion VIII: palatal expansion.

    PubMed

    James, Gavin; Strokon, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Current techniques for palatal expansion are reviewed. Pre-treatment asymmetry of the palate and maxillary arch is shown to be almost universal and is not randomly distributed. The use of a symmetrical expansion appliance does not necessarily result in a symmetrical arch. ALF appliances provide a means of achieving orthopedic, symmetrical expansion of the palate by using very light force. This is demonstrated in seven subjects. It is argued that rapid palatal expansion is an inappropriate, potentially iatrogenic procedure which no longer has a place in the orthodontic armamentarium.

  14. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstructions and Crohn’s disease. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. CT enterography is better able ... the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT ...

  15. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  16. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  17. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  18. Strategies to improve regeneration of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2012-12-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented.

  19. Palatal Mucormycosis in An Infant.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nikhil; Bansal, Vishal; Kantoor, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    The maxilla rarely undergoes necrosis due to its rich vascularity. Maxillary necrosis can occur due to bacterial infections, viral infections, or fungal infections. Mucormycosis is an opportunistic fulminant fungal infection that mainly infects immunocompromised patients. The fungus invades the arteries, leading to thrombosis that subsequently causes necrosis of hard and soft tissues. The occurrence of mucormycosis is not considered rare in the jaws of adults, but involvement of the maxilla in infants is not usually seen. The purpose of this report is to discuss the diagnosis and management of a rare case of mucormycosis in the palate of a two-month-old boy.

  20. Palatability, Familiarity, and Underage, Immoderate Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Jim; Stevenson, Richard; Gates, Peter; Copeland, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Data gathered in a study of palatability ("liking") and familiarity ratings of alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages by 350 subjects from 12 to 30 years of age included the usual number of drinks consumed. Blind ratings of palatability and familiarity for the beverages were tested for association with immoderate drinking (more than four for males,…

  1. Helical spring holder assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Wyatt S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helically-threaded spring holder on which a helically wound spring is mounted has a groove formed in one side of the thread at the end where the spring engages the spring holder. The groove relieves the portion of the side in which it is formed from restricting the spring against axial movement during deflection of the spring. The circumferential length of this groove is chosen to establish the number of spring coils which can be deflected without contacting the side of the thread. The end of the thread is also made rigid to prevent flexing thereof during maximal elongation of the spring.

  2. Helical-D pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The {open_quotes}helical-D{close_quotes} geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a {open_quotes}dynamo{close_quotes} process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1.

  3. The Helicity of Vortex Filaments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrich, Dean; Tao, Louis

    1996-03-01

    The helicity, defined by H = int dV v \\cdot nabla × v, is a conserved quantity of the three-dimensional Euler equations. Traditionally the helicity has been viewed as a measure of the topology of vortex lines, but it is shown that the helicity measures their geometry as well as their topology (J.D. Bekenstein, Physics Letters B), 282 (1992) 44-49.. The existence of helicity-preserving reconnection events is discussed.

  4. Helicity and celestial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, H. K.

    2016-06-01

    This informal article discusses the central role of magnetic and kinetic helicity in relation to the evolution of magnetic fields in geophysical and astrophysical contexts. It is argued that the very existence of magnetic fields of the intensity and scale observed is attributable in large part to the chirality of the background turbulence or random-wave field of flow, the simplest measure of this chirality being non-vanishing helicity. Such flows are responsible for the generation of large-scale magnetic fields which themselves exhibit magnetic helicity. In the geophysical context, the turbulence has a `magnetostrophic' character in which the force balance is primarily that between buoyancy forces, Coriolis forces and Lorentz forces associated with the dynamo-generated magnetic field; the dominant nonlinearity here arises from the convective transport of buoyant elements erupting from the `mushy zone' at the inner core boundary. At the opposite extreme, in a highly conducting low-density plasma, the near-invariance of magnetic field topology (and of associated helicity) presents the challenging problem of `magnetic relaxation under topological constraints', of central importance both in astrophysical contexts and in controlled-fusion plasma dynamics. These problems are reviewed and open issues, particularly concerning saturation mechanisms, are reconsidered.

  5. PI-line-based image reconstruction in helical cone-beam computed tomography with a variable pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Yu; Pan Xiaochuan; Xia Dan; Wang Ge

    2005-08-15

    Current applications of helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT) involve primarily a constant pitch where the translating speed of the table and the rotation speed of the source-detector remain constant. However, situations do exist where it may be more desirable to use a helical scan with a variable translating speed of the table, leading a variable pitch. One of such applications could arise in helical cone-beam CT fluoroscopy for the determination of vascular structures through real-time imaging of contrast bolus arrival. Most of the existing reconstruction algorithms have been developed only for helical cone-beam CT with constant pitch, including the backprojection-filtration (BPF) and filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithms that we proposed previously. It is possible to generalize some of these algorithms to reconstruct images exactly for helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. In this work, we generalize our BPF and FBP algorithms to reconstruct images directly from data acquired in helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. We have also performed a preliminary numerical study to demonstrate and verify the generalization of the two algorithms. The results of the study confirm that our generalized BPF and FBP algorithms can yield exact reconstruction in helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. It should be pointed out that our generalized BPF algorithm is the only algorithm that is capable of reconstructing exactly region-of-interest image from data containing transverse truncations.

  6. Tbx1 is Necessary for Palatal Elongation and Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Steven; Law, Amy; Sanchez, Gabriela; Baldwin, H. Scott; Brown, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX1 is a key mediator of developmental abnormalities associated with DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndrome. Studies in mice have demonstrated that decreased dosage of Tbx1 results in defects in pharyngeal arch, cardiovascular, and craniofacial development. The role of Tbx1 in cardiac development has been intensely studied; however, its role in palatal development is poorly understood. By studying the Tbx1-/- mice we found defects during the critical points of palate elongation and elevation. The intrinsic palate defects in the Tbx1-/- mice were determined by measuring changes in palate shelf length, proliferation, apoptosis, expression of relevant growth factors, and in palate fusion assays. Tbx1-/- embryos exhibit cleft palate with failed palate elevation in 100% and abnormal palatal-oral fusions in 50%. In the Tbx1-/- mice the palate shelf length was reduced and tongue height was greater, demonstrating a physical impediment to palate elevation and apposition. In vitro palate fusion assays demonstrate that Tbx1-/- palate shelves are capable of fusion but a roller culture assay showed that the null palatal shelves were unable to elongate. Diminished hyaluronic acid production in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves may explain failed palate shelf elevation. In addition, cell proliferation and apoptosis were perturbed in Tbx1-/- palates. A sharp decrease of Fgf8 expression was detected in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves, suggesting that Fgf8 is dependent on Tbx1 in the palate. Fgf10 is also up-regulated in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves and tongue. These data demonstrate that Tbx1 is a critical transcription factor that guides palatal elongation and elevation and that Fgf8 expression in the palate is Tbx1-dependent. PMID:20214979

  7. Iterative image reconstruction for limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Helical trajectory satisfying the condition of exact reconstruction, has been widely utilized in the commercial computed tomography (CT). While limited by the scanning environment in some practical applications, the conventional helical cone-beam CT imaging is hard to complete, thus, developing an imaging system suited for long-object may be valuable. Three-dimensional C-arm CT is an innovative imaging technique which has been greatly concerned. Since there is a high degree of freedom of C-arm, more flexible image acquisition trajectories for 3D imaging can be achieved. In this work, a fast iterative reconstruction algorithm based on total variation minimization is developed for a trajectory of limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam CT, which can be applied to detect long-object without slip-ring technology. The experimental results show that the developed algorithm can yield reconstructed images of low noise level and high image quality.

  8. [Proper technics and the reduction of radiation in helical computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Cordoliani, Y S; Hazebroucq, V; Sarrazin, J L; Lévêque, C; Marque, B; Goasdoué, P

    1999-02-01

    Helical computed tomography is the main source of ionizing radiation delivery in diagnostic radiology. For each series, average radiation dose is between 20 and 30 mGy. This dose can potentially be reduced by decreasing intensity or voltage and by increasing pitch. Helical acquisition allows reformating of images with smaller increment or different obliquity, and avoids additional irradiation. Hardware and software devices designed for dose reduction must be systematically used. Users of CT systems should be aware of radiation dose delivered with CT and must carefully assess the need of each additional acquisition. Obsolete habits, as gantry tilting for lumbar CT, which increases patient exposure, must be given up. Rational use of helical CT decreases radiation exposure and gains time, whereas thoughtless use increases radiation exposure without real benefit.

  9. Eosinophilic Granuloma Presenting as Palatal Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Babu, B. Balaji; Nadendla, Lakshmi Kavitha; Madki, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Swellings involving palate can be challenging to diagnose for the clinician as they have wide range of origin which can result from developmental, inflammatory, reactive or a neoplastic process. The clinical presentation of these swellings is similar and difficult to differentiate from each other. So it is important to take proper history from the patient and subject the patient to appropriate laboratory and radiographic investigations and finally biopsy is mandatory for accurate diagnosis. Thus, this article highlights on various common palatal swellings, their clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis helpful for proper diagnosis of swellings associated with palate. PMID:27891486

  10. Sinonasal Angiomatous Polyp: Evaluation With 2-Phase Helical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changwei; Wang, Qiushi; Guo, Qiyong; Wang, Zhenhai; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sinonasal angiomatous polyp (SAP) is a rare benign nontumorous lesion and previously considered lack of characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. This study aimed to evaluate 2-phase helical CT for characterization of SAP. Twelve patients with pathologically confirmed SAP underwent 2-phase helical CT preoperatively. After injection of 80 mL contrast material at a rate of 3 mL/s, early and delayed phases were obtained with delays of 30 and 120 s, respectively. The degree and pattern of enhancement were visually analyzed. The attenuation changes were also analyzed quantitatively by measuring CT values and compared with those of the internal maxillary artery (IMA). All 12 cases showed vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement at both early and delayed phases. An irregular linear, nodular, and patchy enhancement pattern was found at the early phase, and enlarged and fused together, that is, progressive enhancement pattern was found at the delayed phase. There was no significant difference between the CT values of SAP and those of the IMA at the plain, arterial phase, and delayed phase (53 ± 6 Hounsfield units [HU] vs 56 ± 7 HU, 187 ± 56 HU vs 209 ± 71 HU, and 143 ± 22 HU vs 139 ± 19 HU, respectively, P = 0.361, 0.429, and 0.613, respectively). Vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement was a characteristic CT feature of SAP, and progressive enhancement on 2-phase helical CT could further convince the diagnosis. PMID:26200632

  11. Helically Coiled Graphene Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Maxime; Miao, Dandan; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Morin, Jean-François

    2017-03-07

    Graphene is a zero-gap, semiconducting 2D material that exhibits outstanding charge-transport properties. One way to open a band gap and make graphene useful as a semiconducting material is to confine the electron delocalization in one dimension through the preparation of graphene nanoribbons (GNR). Although several methods have been reported so far, solution-phase, bottom-up synthesis is the most promising in terms of structural precision and large-scale production. Herein, we report the synthesis of a well-defined, helically coiled GNR from a polychlorinated poly(m-phenylene) through a regioselective photochemical cyclodehydrochlorination (CDHC) reaction. The structure of the helical GNR was confirmed by (1) H NMR, FT-IR, XPS, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. This Riemann surface-like GNR has a band gap of 2.15 eV and is highly emissive in the visible region, both in solution and the solid state.

  12. Histology of palate and soft palate tonsil of collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Teófilo, T S; Morais, M R P T; Dias, G F; Diniz, A N; Chaves, H S A; Fontenele-Neto, J D

    2014-10-01

    Peccaries are characterized by a prominent skin gland, known as scent gland, which is located in the middle of the rump. These animals are able to survive in a great variety of habitats, from humid tropical forests to semi-arid areas. They are omnivorous animals, and their diet includes fibrous material, vegetables, fruits, small vertebrates and insects. Collared peccary hard palate and soft palate tonsils were studied, macroscopic morphometric data were collected and tissue samples were paraffin-embedded. Sections were stained with HE, Gomori's trichrome and von Kossa; the first two were used to study general organization and the latter to detect calcium deposits. The hard palate showed one incisive papilla followed by several rugae united by a distinct raphe. The hard palate is lined by a keratinised squamous epithelium resting on a dense connective, whereas in the soft palate, the epithelium is parakeratinised and showed lymphocyte infiltration. The palate showed several pacinian corpuscles in the propria-submucosa. Two ovoid-shaped tonsils were found in the soft palate, and several crypts were observed on its surface. The epithelium was highly infiltrated by lymphocytes, and within the crypts, tonsilloliths were frequently observed. The study showed that the general organization of collared peccary palate is similar to other species, but in its oropharynx, only the soft palate tonsil was present and the pacinian corpuscles formed small aggregates.

  13. Analysis of Helical Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-23

    tube Efficiency Helix structure Backward wave oscillation Gain 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identofy by block number) The...4,vailabilitY CCdes -vai aidIorDist spec a ." iii "- -. .5- S.. . ANALYSIS OF HELICAL WAVEGUIDE I. INTRODUCTION High power (- 10 kW) and broadband ...sys- tems. The frequency range of interest is 60-100 GHz. In this frequency range, the conventional slow wave circuits such as klystrons and TWTs have

  14. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  15. Palatal sinus elevation revisited: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Rudolf; Wagner, Florian; Ewers, Rolf; Ulm, Christian

    2013-08-01

    The palatal sinus lift is a good choice for patients with scarred buccal soft tissue and those with poor wound healing such as smokers or diabetics or when visual side effects such as swelling must be concealed. We provide a surgical protocol for palatal sinus lifting without a vertical release incision. The incision is started in a slightly palatal aspect, at the distal end of the dental arch, and describes a curve laterally on the alveolar crest while running in a mesial direction. As a marginal incision, it can continue to the central incisor. Submucosal exposure will lift the gum and the greater palatine artery. After insertion of a tongue depressor, the sinus is opened on the palatal side, opposite the zygomaticoalveolar crest, using a rose bur or a piezotome. After sinus augmentation, the incision is easy to close, and the wound will heal smoothly.

  16. Magnetic helicity in astrophysical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaresi, Simon

    2012-09-01

    The broad variety of ways in which magnetic helicity affects astrophysical systems, in particular dynamos, is discussed. The so-called alpha effect is responsible for the growth of large-scale magnetic fields. The conservation of magnetic helicity, however, quenches the alpha effect, in particular for high magnetic Reynolds numbers. Predictions from mean-field theories state particular power law behavior of the saturation strength of the mean fields, which we confirm in direct numerical simulations. The loss of magnetic helicity in the form of fluxes can alleviate the quenching effect, which means that large-scale dynamo action is regained. Physically speaking, galactic winds or coronal mass ejections can have fundamental effects on the amplification of galactic and solar magnetic fields. The gauge dependence of magnetic helicity is shown to play no effect in the steady state where the fluxes are represented in form of gauge-independent quantities. This we demonstrate in the Weyl-, resistive- and pseudo Lorentz-gauge. Magnetic helicity transport, however, is strongly affected by the gauge choice. For instance the advecto-resistive gauge is more efficient in transporting magnetic helicity into small scales, which results in a distinct spectrum compared to the resistive gauge. The topological interpretation of helicity as linking of field lines is tested with respect to the realizability condition, which imposes a lower bound for the spectral magnetic energy in presence of magnetic helicity. It turns out that the actual linking does not affect the relaxation process, unlike the magnetic helicity content. Since magnetic helicity is not the only topological variable, I conduct a search for possible others, in particular for non-helical structures. From this search I conclude that helicity is most of the time the dominant restriction in field line relaxation. Nevertheless, not all numerical relaxation experiments can be described by the conservation of magnetic helicity

  17. New interpretation of the palate of Pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Osi, Attila; Prondvai, Edina; Frey, Eberhard; Pohl, Burkhardt

    2010-02-01

    On the basis of a new, three-dimensionally preserved specimen of the Early Jurassic pterosaur Dorygnathus banthensis we present a reinterpretation of the pterosaur palate. The hard palate is formed by the extensive palatal plate of the maxilla and not by the palatine as has been generally reconstructed. This palatal plate of the maxilla emarginates the choana rostrally and rostrolaterally as in other archosaurs and lepidosaurs. The longitudinally elongate and dorsoventrally flat palatine in Dorygnathus is an isolated bone caudal to the palatal plate of the maxilla and morphologically and topographically it resembles that of crocodilians and birds, respectively. The palatine separates the choana laterally from the suborbital fenestra demonstrating the homologous nature of the (primary) choana in all archosaurs and lepidosaurs. Our study indicates that in basal pterosaurs the pterygo-ectopterygoid fenestra existed caudal to the suborbital fenestra, which became confluent with the adductor chamber in pterodactyloids thereby increasing the relative size of the adductor chamber and hence the mass of the jaw adductors. The choana in basal pterosaurs was relatively small compared with the interpterygoid vacuity. With increasing rostroventral inclination of the quadrates in more derived pterosaurs, the interpterygoid vacuity was reduced considerably, whereas the choana increased in size. This exceptional Dorygnathus specimen also shows a hitherto unknown pair of fenestrae situated at the palatal contact of the premaxilla-maxilla and might represent the aperture for the vomeronasal organ.

  18. Palatal asymmetry during development: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R S; Sgrott, E A; Stuker, H; Alonso, L G; Smith, R L

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hard palate asymmetry during development. The palates of 248 dry skulls were photographed and evaluated digitally. The skulls were divided into seven groups: fetus, newborn, infant, child, adolescent, adult, and aged. Linear measures were obtained from great palatine foramen (GPF) to incisive fossa (INC) and to posterior nasal spine (PNS). Angular measures were obtained from the former landmarks plus the point on sutures intersection between maxillary and palatine bones. Asymmetry was evaluated intra and intergroups. All skulls showed some degree of right-left asymmetry in the hard palate. Regardless of hard palate asymmetry, none of the right-left side differences was statistically significant. For the intergroups assessment, none of the asymmetry index means were statistically different. The posterior part of palate (PNS x GPF) measures was more asymmetric than the anterior part (INC x GPF), showing, respectively, 4.6% and 2.8% of mean asymmetry index. Angular measures showed a more symmetric behavior than the linear ones. Hard palate asymmetry occurs even in the absence of masticatory function, showing that this feature begins early in fetal life and persists through development.

  19. [Helical computerized tomography of the thorax in the diagnosis of unresolved chronic pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Matheus, M C; Sandoval Zárate, J; Criales Cortés, J L; Martínez-Guerra, M L; Pulido, T; Palomar Lever, A; Gómez González, A; Santos, E; Barragán, R; Fernández, R A; Cardoso Ramón, M

    2000-01-01

    We assessed the diagnostic usefulness of helical CT scan of the thorax in the setting of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension by prospectively comparing the results of helical CT scan to those of the pulmonary angiogram (gold standard). We studied 40 patients with diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension of diverse etiology (mean age: 40.7 +/- 12 y.o.; mean systolic pulmonary artery pressure: 91 +/- 33 mmHg)). Thirty of these patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the other ten were used as controls. Diagnosis in control patients included: primary pulmonary hypertension (4); patent ductus arteriosus (2); atrial septal defect (1); rheumatic valve disease (1); ischemic heart disease (1); and acute pulmonary embolism (1). Both helical CT scan and pulmonary angiogram were part of the routine diagnostic work up of these patients, and were, performed and interpreted almost simultaneously (within one week) by a different group of investigators in a blind manner. Only the diagnostic accuracy of the method regarding central (major arteries) vascular lesions was evaluated. Helical CT scan had an overall sensitivity of 100% (29/29), and a specificity of 91% (10/11). Positive predictive and negative predictive values were 96.6% (29/30) and 100% (10/10), respectively. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 97.5% (39/40). We conclude that helical CT scan of the thorax is an excellent alternative approach for the diagnosis of major arteries lesions in the setting of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

  20. The Korean Prevocalic Palatal Glide: A Comparison with the Russian Glide and Palatalization.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yunju; Hwang, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    Phonetic studies of the Korean prevocalic glides have often suggested that they are shorter in duration than those of languages like English, and lack a prolonged steady state. In addition, the formant frequencies of the Korean labiovelar glide are reported to be greatly influenced by the following vowel. In this study the Korean prevocalic palatal glide is investigated vis-à-vis the two phonologically similar configurations of another language - the glide /j/ and the secondary palatalization of Russian, with regard to the inherent duration of the glide component, F2 trajectory, vowel-to-glide coarticulation and glide-to-vowel coarticulation. It is revealed that the Korean palatal glide is closer to the Russian palatalization in duration and F2 trajectory, indicating a lack of steady state, and to the Russian segmental glide in the vowel-to-glide coarticulation degree. When the glide-to-vowel coarticulation is considered, the Korean palatal glide is distinguished from both Russian categories. The results suggest that both the Korean palatal glide and the Russian palatalization involve significant articulatory overlap, the former with the vowel and the latter with the consonant. Phonological implications of such a difference in coarticulation pattern are discussed, as well as the comparison between the Korean labiovelar and palatal glides.

  1. Palatal changes after lip surgery in different types of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G J; Hoeksma, J B; Prahl-Andersen, B

    1994-09-01

    This study concerns palatal development during 6 months following primary lip closure. The sample consisted of 75 children with different forms of cleft lip and palate and 51 noncleft children. The palate was measured at 3 months of age, just before lip surgery, after surgery at 6 months, and again at 9 months of age. The results showed that lip closure has a strong effect in the anterior alveolar region. This effect was restricted to 3 months after surgery. The changes in complete clefts were more explicit than in incomplete cleft forms. Furthermore, the data showed that arch depth reduction due to lip surgery was compensated for by continued anteroposterior palatal growth. Early orthopedics appeared to prevent major palatal collapse immediately after lip surgery. Finally simultaneous closure of the alveolar cleft at the nasal side resulted in continued reduction of anterior cleft width.

  2. Prediction of buried helices in multispan alpha helical membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Adamian, Larisa; Liang, Jie

    2006-04-01

    Analysis of a database of structures of membrane proteins shows that membrane proteins composed of 10 or more transmembrane (TM) helices often contain buried helices that are inaccessible to phospholipids. We introduce a method for identifying TM helices that are least phospholipid accessible and for prediction of fully buried TM helices in membrane proteins from sequence information alone. Our method is based on the calculation of residue lipophilicity and evolutionary conservation. Given that the number of buried helices in a membrane protein is known, our method achieves an accuracy of 78% and a Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.68. A server for this tool (RANTS) is available online at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/lab/.

  3. Helical phases in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Raminder P. Kaur

    In conventional superconductors, the Cooper pairs are formed from quasiparticles with opposite momentum and spins because of the degeneracy of the quasiparticles under time reversal and inversion. The absence of any of these symmetries will have pronounced effects on superconducting states. Time reversal symmetry can be broken in the presence of magnetic impurities or by the application of a magnetic field. Similarly, the dislocation of crystal ions from their higher symmetric positions can cause broken inversion symmetry. We studied the effects of broken time reversal and inversion symmetries on unconventional superconductors, such as high temperature cuprates, Sr2RuO 4, and CePt3Si. In the cuprates, the superconducting state exists near the antiferromagnetic order. Sr2RuO4 and CePt3Si do not have spatial inversion, and the superconducting states coexist with magnetic order. In cuprates, the broken time reversal symmetry has been reported in the pseudogap phase which will effect the d-wave superconducting state of underdoped regime. On the basis of symmetry analysis we found that a mixture of spin-singlet and -triplet state, d+ip, which is shown to give rise to a helical superconducting phase. Consequences of this d+ip state on Josephson experiments are also discussed. Sr2RuO 4 is known to be another broken time reversal superconductor with spin triplet superconductivity. The widely believed superconducting state, the chiral p wave state, has been extensively studied through Ginzburg Landau theory, but the predictions for this state contradict some experimental observations like anisotropy in the upper critical field, and the existence of a second vortex state. We have formalize quasiclassical theory to find the origin of these contradictions, and also extended the theory to study other possible super-conducting states. Surprisingly, we find that a superconducting state corresponding to freely rotating in-plane d-vector explains the existing experimental results

  4. The use of helical computed tomographic scan to assess bony physeal bridges.

    PubMed

    Loder, R T; Swinford, A E; Kuhns, L R

    1997-01-01

    Coronal and sagittal reformatted images of the physis obtained with the helical computed tomography (CT) scanner were studied in five children. This technique allows tomographic slices at 1.0-mm thickness and can be performed in approximately 20 s. The distal femora were studied in two children, the distal tibia in two children, and the distal radius in one child. In three children, after physeal mapping, bar resections were performed. In all cases, the location and size of the bar was accurately predicted by the map constructed from the helical CT scan. We recommend the helical CT scan to prepare physeal maps to determine the extent and location of physeal bony bars because of excellent bony detail, radiation doses one half to one quarter those of conventional tomography, and the rapidity of scanning, which bypasses the need for sedation.

  5. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date.

  6. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... to replace missing teeth. Oral appliances called “speech bulbs” or “palatal lifts” may help close the nose ... assure the best possible result. When a speech bulb or palatal lift is developed, the prosthodontist usually ...

  7. Lipoma of the Palate: An Uncommon Finding

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Vasconcelos, Artur Cunha; Lambert, Nayane Assis; de Souza Castro, Paulo Henrique; Aburad, Arlindo; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lipoma is a benign neoplasm originated from adipose cells circumscribed by connective tissue. This neoplasm represents about 1% to 4.4% of all oral benign tumors and it is rarely located in the palate area. Objective: This case reports the occurrence of an oral lipoma in the hard palate of a 57-year-old woman and discusses its etiology and treatment. Case Report: The treatment consisted in the total resection of the lesion and laser therapy. The patient is being followed up for forty three months with no signs of recurrence. Conclusion: Lipoma in hard palate is a rare entity that may be associated with endocrine factors and local inflammation. PMID:28077968

  8. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  9. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  10. Helical Nanofilament Phases

    SciTech Connect

    L Hough; H Jung; D Kruerke; M Heberling; M Nakata; C Jones; D Chen; D Link; N Clark; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the formation of chiral crystals, the tendency for twist in the orientation of neighboring molecules is incompatible with ordering into a lattice: Twist is expelled from planar layers at the expense of local strain. We report the ordered state of a neat material in which a local chiral structure is expressed as twisted layers, a state made possible by spatial limitation of layering to a periodic array of nanoscale filaments. Although made of achiral molecules, the layers in these filaments are twisted and rigorously homochiral - a broken symmetry. The precise structural definition achieved in filament self-assembly enables collective organization into arrays in which an additional broken symmetry - the appearance of macroscopic coherence of the filament twist-produces a liquid crystal phase of helically precessing layers.

  11. Mixing in Helical Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Michael B.; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2001-11-01

    We consider advection and diffusion of a passive scalar in a helical pipe. By assuming that the curvature and torsion are small (equivalent to small Dean number) and the Reynolds number is moderate, we can use a closed form approximation, due to Dean (1927) and Germano (1982), for the induced recirculation. We investigate the problem numerically using a split-step particle method for a variety of localized initial conditions. The problem is governed by two parameters: a nondimensional diffusion constant D (typically small), and the scaled ratio of torsion to curvature λ. At small times, the longitudinal width of the particle distribution, σ, is governed by diffusive effects (σ ∝ √Dt). At large times, Taylor diffusion dominates (σ ∝ √t/D). However, at intermediate times, a ballistic region exists where the width spreads linearly, as postulated by Mezic & Wiggins (1994). We also discuss how these various behaviors scale with the parameters D and λ.

  12. Helical Emg Effective Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, V. K.; Zharinov, E. I.; Busin, V. N.; Grinevich, B. E.; Sokolova, O. V.; Smirnova, G. N.; Klimushkin, K. N.

    2004-11-01

    The efficiency of explosive-magnetic system operation depends on the magnetic flux losses produced under circuit deformation. Losses primarily arise from circuit ohmic resistance and flux pocketing due to the disturbed continuity of helix wires deformation. This is because of technological faults in fabrication and potential electric breakdowns resulting from the voltage overload in the generator circuit. Since it is rather difficult to identify each type of loss mentioned, all soles are expressed as the effective resistance of the circuit, Reff. The EMG-160 multi-sectional helical generator with a 760 mm long helix having an inner diameter of 160 mm is considered as an example. EMG-160 initial conductance was 34 μH and the final inductance was 25 nH. The effective resistance of the circuit was calculated for this experiment. The method of determining the effective resistance allows estimation of EMG efficiency at all stages of generator operation.

  13. Helical Siberian snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    To eliminate spin resonances in circular accelerators ''Siberian Snakes'' may be inserted at one or more azimuths in such a way that the overall spin precession tune ..nu../sub s/ equals 1/2. A snake is a sequence of horizontal and vertical deflection magnets whose overall effect is to rotate the spin by ..pi.. about an axis in the plane of the orbit, either longitudinal or transverse or any angle /var phi/ in between. At the same time the magnets of the snake should be arranged so as to produce zero net deflection and displacement of the particle orbit. We investigate here how the orbit deflections can be made small by using helical deflecting magnets rather than discrete horizontal and vertical deflectors.

  14. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  15. Data Correction for Gantry-tilted Local CT.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongzhu; Zhang, Cishen; Yan, Ming; Zhou, Jiayin

    2005-01-01

    Gantry-tilted helical multi-slice computed tomography (CT) refers to the helical scanning CT system equipped with multi-row detector operating at some gantry tilting angle. Its purpose is to avoid the area which is vulnerable to the X-ray radiation. The local tomography is to reduce the total radiation dose by only scanning the region of interest for image reconstruction. In this paper we consider the scanning scheme, and incorporate the local tomography technique with the gantry-tilted helical multi-slice CT. The image degradation problem caused by gantry tilting is studied, and a new error correction method is proposed to deal with this problem in the local CT. Computer simulation shows that the proposed method can enhance the local imaging performance in terms of image sharpness and artifacts reduction.

  16. Cleft palate in a male water buffalo calf.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Y; Ranjbar, R; Ghadiri, A R; Afsahr, F Saberi; Nejad, S Goorani; Mahabady, M Khaksary; Afrough, M; Karampoor, R; Tavakoli, A

    2007-12-15

    Congenital palatal defects are common in animals but there is only one report of water buffalo has been recorded in Iran. One died male water buffalo calf was examined after hysterotomy operation. At necropsy findings, brachygnathia, palate cleft and small lungs were diagnosed. It is the second report of water buffalo cleft palate in Iran.

  17. L2 Perception of Spanish Palatal Variants across Different Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Christine; Renaud, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    While considerable dialectal variation exists, almost all varieties of Spanish exhibit some sort of alternation in terms of the palatal obstruent segments. Typically, the palatal affricate [??] tends to occur in word onset following a pause and in specific linear phonotactic environments. The palatal fricative [?] tends to occur in syllable onset…

  18. Acoustic Analysis on the Palatalized Vowels of Modern Mongolian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulgantamir, Sangidkhorloo

    2015-01-01

    In Modern Mongolian the palatalized vowels [a?, ??, ?? ] before palatalized consonants are considered as phoneme allophones according to the most scholars. Nevertheless theses palatalized vowels have the distinctive features what could be proved by the minimal pairs and nowadays this question is open and not profoundly studied. The purpose of this…

  19. [Cleft lip and palate in Campeche Mayas].

    PubMed

    Weiss, K M; Georges, E; Levy, B; Aguirre, A; Portilla, R J; Gaitán, C L; Leyva, E; Rodríguez, T

    1988-07-01

    It has been suggested that among American Indians, as in some genetically-related Asiatic ethnic groups, incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate is higher than among people of Caucasian extraction. Such hypothesis, plus growing demand for services observed at a center for the surgery of cleft lip and cleft palate in Campeche state, led the authors to undertake research among the Maya residents of that region. However, neither careful review of case histories nor field research performed in several Indian communities could confirm the hypothesis of a higher incidence among this ethnic community.

  20. Speech evaluation for patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Ann W

    2014-04-01

    Children with cleft palate are at risk for speech problems, particularly those caused by velopharyngeal insufficiency. There may be an additional risk of speech problems caused by malocclusion. This article describes the speech evaluation for children with cleft palate and how the results of the evaluation are used to make treatment decisions. Instrumental procedures that provide objective data regarding the function of the velopharyngeal valve, and the 2 most common methods of velopharyngeal imaging, are also described. Because many readers are not familiar with phonetic symbols for speech phonemes, Standard English letters are used for clarity.

  1. Palatal obturators in patients after maxillectomy

    PubMed Central

    CARDELLI, P.; BIGELLI, E.; VERTUCCI, V.; BALESTRA, F.; MONTANI, M.; DE CARLI, S.; ARCURI, C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthodontic management of palatal defects is fundamental to improve patient’s life undergoing to a maxillary surgical treatment. A lot of maxillary defects are a direct consequence of surgical treatment of malformations, neoplasms or trauma. The obturators are prosthesis used to close palatal defects after maxillectomy, to restore masticatory function and to improve speech. The primary goals of the obturator prosthesis are to preserve the remaining teeth and tissue and to provide comfort, function, and aesthetics to the patients. Different materials and retention methods are a characteristic of new types of obturators. PMID:25992263

  2. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Kristin; Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F; Mistretta, Charlotte M; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC.

  3. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC. PMID:26741369

  4. Plasma driven by helical electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Cihan; Finn, John; Nebel, Richard; Barnes, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A novel plasma state, obtained by applying a helical voltage at the wall with a uniform axial magnetic field, is studied by means of zero-pressure resistive MHD simulations in a periodic cylinder. The radial magnetic field at the wall is taken to be zero. For a small helical electrode voltage, the helical perturbation in the plasma is small and localized to the edge. Beyond a critical electrode voltage, there is a bifurcation to the newly discovered state, which is a single-helicity Ohmic equilibrium with the same helicity as the electrodes, i.e., the fields depend only on radius and mθ - nφ , where θ and φ = z / R are the poloidal and toroidal angles. For electrostatic driving with m = 1 , the mean magnetic field (m = n = 0) has field line safety factor q(r) equal to the pitch of the electrodes m / n = 1 / n except near the edge, where it monotonically increases an amount of order unity. The plasma is force-free in the interior. Near the edge, however, the current crosses the field lines to enter and exit through the helical electrodes. A large helical plasma flow related Pfirsch-Schlüter-like currents exist in this edge vicinity. Applications to current drive in tokamaks, as well as to straight plasmas with endcap electrodes are discussed.

  5. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  6. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  7. Analysis of Fetal Palate to Assist Pre-natal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Yogitha; Ravindranath, Roopa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cleft palate is one of the major facial congenital malformation in newborns. Pre-natal detection of this malformation is limited to detection of clefting of hard palate but isolated soft palate clefting still remains challenge for sonologists. As Indian literature is limited present study was attempted to provide dimensions and position of fetal palate by digitized images. Aim To study dimensions, position and differences in parameters between second and third trimester fetuses. Materials and Methods Median sagittal section of 32 formalin fixed fetuses was selected from the Department of Anatomy, St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Anatomical landmarks-The Nasion (N), Sellaturcica (S), Anterior Nasal Spine (ANS), Posterior Nasal Spine (PNS), tip of Uvula (U) were marked on sections. Length of hard palate (from ANS to PNS), Length of soft palate (from PNS to U), Hard palate/soft palate angle was defined. The anterior position of soft palate and its posterior position in relation to anterior cranial base were marked as N-S-PNS and N-S-U angle, respectively. The measurements were acquired directly from the digitized images using ImageJ software. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16. Results The mean values of ANS-PNS and PNS-U were 23.59±3.69mm and 14.39±2.70mm, respectively. The mean values of hard palate/soft palate angle, N-S-PNS and N-S-U angle were 144.720±11.11,51.150±9.09 and 93.370±9.58, respectively. Significant difference was noted between trimesters for length of hard and soft palate but not for palatal angles. Conclusion During Pre-natal assessment of cleft palate, it is important for sonologist to keep in mind that the dimensions of palate proportionately increased in last two trimesters while the position remains constant. PMID:27891327

  8. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  9. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  10. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  11. Cleft lip and palate care in Romania.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vanessa

    2011-11-01

    Vanessa Martin travelled with a surgical team to Romania over a period of 12 years to support nurses and improve practice in the treatment of cleft lip and palate. She recounts her experiences and the changes that took place during that time.

  12. Palatability of Forage Chicory Cultivars for Goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SL) in forage chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) may have anthelmintic activity against gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats, but have been implicated in poor palatability of forage. We used three levels of soil P fertilization to influence SL concentrations in three cu...

  13. Speech intelligibility after gingivectomy of excess palatal tissue.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, Aruna; Vinayagavel, Mythreyi; Bandi, Dhathri Priya

    2014-07-01

    To appreciate any enhancement in speech following gingivectomy of enlarged anterior palatal gingiva. Periodontal literature has documented various conditions, pathophysiology, and treatment modalities of gingival enlargement. Relationship between gingival maladies and speech alteration has received scant attention. This case report describes on altered speech pattern enhancement secondary to the gingivectomy procedure. A systemically healthy 24-year- female patient reported with bilateral anterior gingival enlargement who was provisionally diagnosed as "gingival abscess with inflammatory enlargement" in relation to palatal aspect of the right maxillary canine to left maxillary canine. Bilateral gingivectomy procedure was performed by external bevel incision in relation to anterior palatal gingiva and a large wedge of epithelium and connective tissue was removed. Patient and her close acquaintances noticed a great improvement in her pronunciation and enunciation of sounds like "t", "d", "n", "l", "th", following removal of excess gingival palatal tissue and was also appreciated with visual analog scale score. Exploration of linguistic research documented the significance of tongue-palate contact during speech. Any excess gingival tissue in palatal region brings about disruption in speech by altering tongue-palate contact. Periodontal surgery like gingivectomy may improve disrupted phonetics. Excess gingival palatal tissue impedes on tongue-palate contact and interferes speech. Pronunciation of consonants like "t", "d", "n", "l", "th", are altered with anterior enlarged palatal gingiva. Excision of the enlarged palatal tissue results in improvement of speech.

  14. Palate Morphogenesis: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    In the past, most scientists conducted their inquiries of nature via inductivism, the patient accumulation of “pieces of information” in the pious hope that the sum of the parts would clarify the whole. Increasingly, modern biology employs the tools of bioinformatics and systems biology in attempts to reveal the “big picture.” Most successful laboratories engaged in the pursuit of the secrets of embryonic development, particularly those whose research focus is craniofacial development, pursue a middle road where research efforts embrace, rather than abandon, what some have called the “pedestrian” qualities of inductivism, while increasingly employing modern data mining technologies. The secondary palate has provided an excellent paradigm that has enabled examination of a wide variety of developmental processes. Examination of cellular signal transduction, as it directs embryogenesis, has proven exceptionally revealing with regard to clarification of the “facts” of palatal ontogeny—at least the facts as we currently understand them. Herein, we review the most basic fundamentals of orofacial embryology and discuss how functioning of TGFβ, BMP, Shh, and Wnt signal transduction pathways contributes to palatal morphogenesis. Our current understanding of palate medial edge epithelial differentiation is also examined. We conclude with a discussion of how the rapidly expanding field of epigenetics, particularly regulation of gene expression by miRNAs and DNA methylation, is critical to control of cell and tissue differentiation, and how examination of these epigenetic processes has already begun to provide a better understanding of, and greater appreciation for, the complexities of palatal morphogenesis. PMID:20544696

  15. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  16. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  17. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  18. Tunable Helical Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Dai, Eric; Zheng, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has begun to inspire innovations in science and engineering. For example, K. Miura led the study of a paper folding pattern in regards to deployment of solar panels to outer space, resulting in more efficient packing and unpacking of the solar panels into tightly constrained spaces. In this work, we study the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami pattern. The pattern created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius, and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. In our work, we relate the six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. In addition, we demonstrate that the morphogenesis of such folding pattern can be modeled through finite element analysis. We hope our research into the diagonal fold brings insight into the potential scientific and engineering applications of origami and spark further research into how the traditional paper art can be applied as a simple, inexpensive model for complex problems.

  19. omega-Helices in proteins.

    PubMed

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  20. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  1. Tbx1 regulates oral epithelial adhesion and palatal development

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Richardson, James A.; Srivastava, Deepak; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate, the most frequent congenital craniofacial birth defect, is a multifactorial condition induced by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In addition to complete cleft palate, a large number of human cases involve soft palate cleft and submucosal cleft palate. However, the etiology of these forms of cleft palate has not been well understood. T-box transcriptional factor (Tbx) family of transcriptional factors has distinct roles in a wide range of embryonic differentiation or response pathways. Here, we show that genetic disruption of Tbx1, a major candidate gene for the human congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome), led to abnormal epithelial adhesion between the palate and mandible in mouse, resulting in various forms of cleft palate similar to human conditions. We found that hyperproliferative epithelium failed to undergo complete differentiation in Tbx1-null mice (Tbx1−/−). Inactivation of Tbx1 specifically in the keratinocyte lineage (Tbx1KCKO) resulted in an incomplete cleft palate confined to the anterior region of the palate. Interestingly, Tbx1 overexpression resulted in decreased cell growth and promoted cell-cycle arrest in MCF7 epithelial cells. These findings suggest that Tbx1 regulates the balance between proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes and is essential for palatal fusion and oral mucosal differentiation. The impaired adhesion separation of the oral epithelium together with compromised palatal mesenchymal growth is an underlying cause for various forms of cleft palate phenotypes in Tbx1−/− mice. Our present study reveals new pathogenesis of incomplete and submucous cleft palate during mammalian palatogenesis. PMID:22371266

  2. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  3. A Comprehensive Study of Soft Palate Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Alexandre; Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital birth defects. Tremendous efforts have been made over the last decades towards understanding hard palate development. However, little is known about soft palate morphogenesis and myogenesis. Finding an appropriate surgical repair to restore physiological functions of the soft palate in patients with cleft palate is a major challenge for surgeons, and complete restoration is not always achievable. Here, we first analyzed the morphology, orientation and attachments of the four muscles of the murine soft palate and found that they are very similar to their counterparts in humans, validating the use of mus musculus as a model for future studies. Our data suggests that muscle differentiation extends from the lateral region to the midline following palatal fusion. We also detected an epithelial seam in the fusing soft palatal shelves, consistent with the process of fusion of the posterior palatal shelves, followed by degradation of the epithelial remnants. Innervation and vascularization are present mainly in the oral side of the soft palate, complementing the differentiated muscles. Cell lineage tracing using Wnt1-Cre;Zsgreenfl/fl mice indicated that all the tendons and mesenchyme embedding the soft palate muscles are neural crest-derived. We propose that the posterior attachment of the soft palate to the pharyngeal wall is an interface between the neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme in the craniofacial region, and thus can serve as a potential model for the study of boundaries during development. Taken together, our study provides a comprehensive view of the development and morphology of the murine soft palate and serves as a reference for further molecular analyses.

  4. A Comprehensive Study of Soft Palate Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Alexandre; Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital birth defects. Tremendous efforts have been made over the last decades towards understanding hard palate development. However, little is known about soft palate morphogenesis and myogenesis. Finding an appropriate surgical repair to restore physiological functions of the soft palate in patients with cleft palate is a major challenge for surgeons, and complete restoration is not always achievable. Here, we first analyzed the morphology, orientation and attachments of the four muscles of the murine soft palate and found that they are very similar to their counterparts in humans, validating the use of mus musculus as a model for future studies. Our data suggests that muscle differentiation extends from the lateral region to the midline following palatal fusion. We also detected an epithelial seam in the fusing soft palatal shelves, consistent with the process of fusion of the posterior palatal shelves, followed by degradation of the epithelial remnants. Innervation and vascularization are present mainly in the oral side of the soft palate, complementing the differentiated muscles. Cell lineage tracing using Wnt1-Cre;Zsgreenfl/fl mice indicated that all the tendons and mesenchyme embedding the soft palate muscles are neural crest-derived. We propose that the posterior attachment of the soft palate to the pharyngeal wall is an interface between the neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme in the craniofacial region, and thus can serve as a potential model for the study of boundaries during development. Taken together, our study provides a comprehensive view of the development and morphology of the murine soft palate and serves as a reference for further molecular analyses. PMID:26671681

  5. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  6. Nonsyndromic palate Synechia with floor of mouth

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Sharan; Bütow, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the embryological basis, sequela and management of intraoral synechia, and to report on the incidence of this condition at a facial cleft deformity clinic (FCDC), with specific attention to two rare cases of mucosal bands involving the floor of the mouth and palate. Review of the literature and a retrospective analysis of FCDC and case report of two cases. During the period of 30 years (1983–2013), the FCDC - University of Pretoria has managed in excess of 4000 cases. A review of the clinic statistics revealed only six cases in which intraoral synechiae occurred. The rarity of this condition at the FCDC is in keeping with the rare incidence in the international literature. Four syndromic cases were identified. Three cases were cleft palate lateral synechia syndrome, and one was an orofacial digital syndrome. Two nonsyndromic cases were identified, and both cases involved the floor of the mouth and palate. The attending physicians and surgeons should be aware of the most appropriate timing for management of this condition, in order to avoid unwanted sequelae. Supportive care should be provided, and emergency airway protocol should be available for all cases. A differential diagnosis should be considered which includes syndromic conditions. PMID:26389045

  7. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  8. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  9. Impact of new technologies on dose reduction in CT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Yim; Chhem, Rethy K

    2010-10-01

    The introduction of slip ring technology enables helical CT scanning in the late 1980's and has rejuvenated CT's role in diagnostic imaging. Helical CT scanning has made possible whole body scanning in a single breath hold and computed tomography angiography (CTA) which has replaced invasive catheter based angiography in many cases because of its easy of operation and lesser risk to patients. However, a series of recent articles and accidents have heightened the concern of radiation risk from CT scanning. Undoubtedly, the radiation dose from CT studies, in particular, CCTA studies, are among the highest dose studies in diagnostic imaging. Nevertheless, CT has remained the workhorse of diagnostic imaging in emergent and non-emergent situations because of their ubiquitous presence in medical facilities from large academic to small regional hospitals and their round the clock accessibility due to their ease of use for both staff and patients as compared to MR scanners. The legitimate concern of radiation dose has sparked discussions on the risk vs benefit of CT scanning. It is recognized that newer CT applications, like CCTA and perfusion, will be severely curtailed unless radiation dose is reduced. This paper discusses the various hardware and software techniques developed to reduce radiation dose to patients in CT scanning. The current average effective dose of a CT study is ∼10 mSv, with the implementation of dose reduction techniques discussed herein; it is realistic to expect that the average effective dose may be decreased by 2-3 fold.

  10. Recurrent Myoepithelioma Treated by Palatal and Piriform Apertural Approaches.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Takayuki; Nagashima, Hayato; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Yamauchi, Makiko; Kishi, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Myoepithelioma is a rare, benign salivary neoplasm, most frequently located in the salivary gland; extrasalivary cases most commonly occur in the palate. This tumor is prone to recurrence. We present a case of recurrent myoepithelioma in the nasal cavity with a palatal fistula treated both by a palatal approach and a piriform apertural approach. The combination of these approaches widens the surgical space, allowing removal of the mass. It is important not only to excise the mass but also to allow for reconstruction.

  11. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  12. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique.

  13. On steady kinematic helical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, I. A.; Loper, D. E.

    The equations governing steady kinematic helical dynamos are studied, using the formalism of Benton (1979), when the flow has no radial component (in cylindrical coordinates). It is shown that all solutions must decay exponentially to zero at large distances, s, from the axis of the helix. When the flow depends on s only it is shown that a necessary condition for dynamo action is that the flow possesses components along both the primary and secondary helices. It is also found that periodic motion of one mode along the primary helix cannot support dynamo action even if the field is composed of mean and periodic parts.

  14. Surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with tent screws and a custom-made palatal expander: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Kang-Nam; Lee, Chang Youn; Park, In Young; Kim, Jwa Young; Yang, Byoungeun

    2015-12-01

    Rapid palatal expansion(RPE) with the tooth-born appliance is not sufficient to apply to the patients with periodontal problem or insufficient tooth anchorage, and it leads to tipping of the anchorage teeth and increasing teeth mobility and root resorption. To avoid these disadvantages, we present the case using palatal screws and custommade palatal expander. A 23-year-old patient underwent surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion with the Hyrax expansion using 4 tent screws. The study models were used to measure the pre-/-post surgical width of the anterior and posterior dental arches with a digital sliding caliper. In the result, the custom-made palatal expander with 4 tent screws is suitable for delivering a force to the mid-palatal suture expansion. And it is low cost, small sized and simply applied. The results indicated that maxillary expansion with the custom-made palatal anchorage device is predictable and stable technique without significant complications in patients.

  15. CT angiography in the abdomen: a pictorial review and update.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter S; Platt, Joel F

    2014-02-01

    The development of multidetector CT technology and helical scanning techniques has revolutionized the use of CT for primary diagnostic evaluation of the abdominal vasculature, particularly the arterial system. CT angiography has numerous benefits relative to conventional catheter angiography, and has largely replaced catheter-based techniques in many clinical algorithms. This pictorial review and update will cover important technical principles related to modern CT angiography (including contrast delivery and dose considerations), discuss relevant anatomy and variants, and illustrate numerous arterial conditions related to the abdominal aorta and branch vessels.

  16. Better understanding of tubular helical buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.

    1996-09-01

    Tubular buckling is a significant problem within the oil industry. Although it has been studied for many years, methods to analyze tubular helical buckling continues to appear in the literature. Several criteria have been derived and presented leading to confusion in understanding and correctly predicting tubular helical buckling. The prediction of tubular helical buckling is complicated by the fact that the tubular is confined within the wellbore. The tubular initially buckles sinusoidally, and then changes into the shape of a helix (helical buckling) as the axial load increases. Different approaches in modeling the helical buckling process and the use of energy methods resulted in those different helical buckling criteria. Helical buckling criteria proposed in the literature, as well as their derivations are discussed in this paper, to help better understand and effectively predict tubular helical buckling in engineering operations.

  17. The transport of relative canonical helicity

    SciTech Connect

    You, S.

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive boundary conditions.

  18. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  19. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10-10 Pa-1), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (˜10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (˜20 μm without the plug-in support), light (˜5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (˜μN) and high resolution (˜nN) force sensors.

  20. Hybrid helical snakes and rotators for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1995-06-13

    The spin rotators and Siberian snakes presently envisaged for RHIC utilize helical dipole magnets. The snakes and the rotators each consist of four helices, each with a full twist (360{degrees}) of the field. Here we investigate an alternate layout, namely combinations of helical and pure bending magnet, and show that this may have advantages.

  1. Helicity Within and Among Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mark M.

    2004-03-01

    There are several classes of helical polymers and supramolecular arrays in which the left and right helical senses are of equal probability and as well in dynamic equilibrium. One example of this class of materials is a polymer first created at Dupont as a commercial fiber candidate almost fifty years ago but which did not rise to the level necessary for commercial use. The polymer, nylon 1, widely known as a polyisocyanate, did become a focal point of research for polymer physics because of its stiff archetypical wormlike nature. An array of research tools was able to elucidate the conformational characteristics of this polymer and therefore reveal in quantitative detail both the source of its stiffness and the limit to this characteristic. Further effort explored the nature of the expected lyotropic liquid crystal properties with similar success. As part of these studies, chiral experiments, which were introduced to determine how to favor one helical sense, played a key role. Statistical physical analysis of these chiral experiments first by Shneior Lifson for uniform chiral fields and later by Jonathan Selinger for quenched random chiral fields gave insight into the cooperative characteristics by which the chiral information influenced the helical senses in these polymers. These kinds of experiments finding parallels to the behavior of sergeants and soldiers and to majority rule were later applied widely in the literature offering insight into the cooperative nature of helical polymers and arrays in general. Moreover, the interplay between the character of the single chains and the liquid crystals that arise in concentrated solutions from the polyisocyanates yielded new kinds of information about the cholesteric state formed by lyotropic liquid crystals in general and even led to new phenomena connecting liquid crystal behavior to temperature.

  2. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  3. A case of hard palate perforation

    PubMed Central

    Saroch, Atul; Pannu, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries. Lung is most common affected organ, however extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is also not uncommon. The clinical manifestations of EPTB may be non-specific that mimics other diseases and is usually misdiagnosed. Therefore, high clinical suspicion of EPTB infection is important, especially in endemic areas. Here, we present a case of hard palate perforation that proved to be tuberculous in origin. The diagnosis was made by histo-pathological examination and positive TB Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PMID:28349008

  4. Surgical correction of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Rahul; Huppa, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Surgical cleft repair aims to restore function of the oro-nasal sphincter and oro-nasal soft tissues and re-establish the complex relationship between perioral and perinasal muscle rings without compromising subsequent mid-facial growth and development. Here we review the surgical anatomy of this region, optimal timing for surgical repair and current thinking on the use of surgical adjuncts. In addition, an overview of current surgical techniques available for the repair of cleft lip, cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency is presented. Finally, we briefly discuss nasal revision surgery and the use of osteotomy, including distraction osteogenesis in the cleft patient.

  5. Algorithms for the treatment of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Stal, S; Klebuc, M; Taylor, T D; Spira, M; Edwards, M

    1998-10-01

    Developing standardized outcomes and algorithms of treatment is a constantly evolving task. This article examines four variables in this process: cleft type, operative technique, surgical experience, and timing. Input from international cleft lip and palate programs regarding techniques and treatment modalities provide a dynamic tool for assessment and the development of guidelines in the treatment of the cleft lip and palate patient.

  6. [Cleft palate surgery with ENT-pathology correction].

    PubMed

    Radkevich, A A; Vakhrushev, S G; Gantimurov, A A; Ivanov, V A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the cases of cleft palate surgical treatment with simultaneous intervention in ENT organs (bypass of the tympanic cavity, segmental or total adenotomy, etc.) with the restoration of vomer anatomy and hard palate reconstruction by means of super-elastic low-profile nickel titanium implant. The article describes the advantages of the method in comparison with the conventional ones.

  7. Early Speech Production of Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, Theresa; Broen, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    The study comparing word-initial target phonemes and phoneme production of five toddlers with cleft palate and five normal toddlers found that the cleft palate children tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels and fewer words with word-initial stops, fricatives, and affricates than normal children. (Author/DB)

  8. Single-Word Intelligibility in Speakers with Repaired Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara; Chau, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Many speakers with repaired cleft palate have reduced intelligibility, but there are limitations with current procedures for assessing intelligibility. The aim of this study was to construct a single-word intelligibility test for speakers with cleft palate. The test used a multiple-choice identification format, and was based on phonetic contrasts…

  9. The Soft Palate Friendly Speech Bulb for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kahlon, Monaliza; Gupta, Shilpa; Dhingra, Parvinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency is an anatomic defect of the soft palate making palatopharyngeal sphincter incomplete. It is an important concern to address in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Speech aid prosthesis or speech bulbs are best choice in cases where surgically repaired soft palate is too short to contact pharyngeal walls during function but these prosthesis have been associated with inadequate marginal closure, ulcerations and patient discomfort. Here is a case report of untreated bilateral cleft lip and palate associated with palatal insufficiency treated by means of palate friendly innovative speech bulb. This modified speech bulb is a combination of hard acrylic and soft lining material. The hard self-curing acrylic resin covers only the hard palate area and a permanent soft silicone lining material covering the soft palate area. A claw-shaped wire component was extended backwards from acrylic and was embedded in soft silicone to aid in retention and approximation of two materials. The advantage of adding the soft lining material in posterior area helped in covering the adequate superior extension and margins for maximal pharyngeal activity. This also improved the hypernasality, speech, comfort and overall patient acceptance. PMID:27790589

  10. Enhancement technology improves palatability of normal and callipyge lamb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was to determine if BPI Processing Technology improved palatability of normal (NN) and callipyge (CN) lamb meat and determine the mechanism by which palatability was improved. Ten ewe and 10 wether lambs of each phenotype were harvested and carcass traits were assessed by a trained eva...

  11. Palatalization and Intrinsic Prosodic Vowel Features in Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    The presented study is aimed at investigating the interaction of palatalization and intrinsic prosodic features of the vowel in CVC (consonant+vowel+consonant) syllables in Russian. The universal nature of intrinsic prosodic vowel features was confirmed with the data from the Russian language. It was found that palatalization of the consonants…

  12. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-01-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths. PMID:25387544

  13. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  14. Masticatory biomechanics and its relevance to early hominid phylogeny: an examination of palatal thickness using finite-element analysis.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Richmond, Brian G; Spencer, Mark A; Ross, Callum F; Dechow, Paul C; Wood, Bernard A

    2007-05-01

    It has been proposed that morphological characters functionally related to mastication may be unreliable indicators of early hominid phylogeny. One hypothesis states that masticatory characters are highly prone to homoplasy. A second hypothesis states that such characters are likely to be morphologically integrated and thus violate the assumption of character independence implicit in all phylogenetic analyses. Evaluation of these hypotheses requires that masticatory features be accurately identified, but, to date, there have been relatively few attempts to test precisely which early hominid features are functionally related to chewing. This paper uses finite-element analysis to evaluate the functional relationships of a character--palatal thickness--that is one of several Paranthropus synapomorphies putatively related to mastication. A finite-element model of 145,680 elements was created from sixty-one 2-mm-thick CT scans of a Macaca fascicularis skull. The model was assigned the elastic properties of facial bone and loaded with muscle forces corresponding to the moment of centric occlusion during mastication. The model was constrained so as to produce a reaction force (corresponding to the bite force) at M(1). With a few exceptions, the strain patterns in the finite-element model compare well with those gathered from published and unpublished bone-strain experiments. The model was then modified to have a thick palate. The model was reloaded using an identical loading regime, and the strain patterns of the original and thick-palate models were compared. Although a thickened palate acts to reduce palatal strain, strains are elevated in other facial regions. This suggests that a thick palate would not have evolved in isolation as an adaptation to withstand masticatory stress. Rather, a thick palate may have evolved in concert with a suite of other facial features that share a stress-resistance function. This appears to be consistent with hypotheses positing that at

  15. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  16. Rehabilitation of a One-day-Old Neonate with Cleft Lip and Palate using Palatal Obturator: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Pathak, Ashish; Bhatia, Baldev; Gupta, Sailesh; Kumar Gautam, Keshav

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Feeding a neonate with a complete cleft lip and palate is difficult pursuit due to communication between oral cavity and nasal cavity. A multidisciplinary approach is required to manage the complex problems involved in case of such neonates and their families. Present case is of a 1-day-old neonate having complete bilateral cleft lip and palate for which palatal obturator was constructed. A stepwise simple, easy and uncomplicated procedure for making accurate impressions, maxillary cast and fabrication of palatal obturator in infants with cleft lip and palate has been presented. The objective to present this case report is to emphasize the fact that how these palatal obturators /plates help in feeding, speech/language development, presurgical orthopedics and prevent other associated otorhinolaryngeal problems. How to cite this article: Bansal R, Pathak AK, Bhatia B, Gupta S, Gautam KK. Rehabilitation of a One-day Old Neonate with Cleft Lip and Palate using Palatal Obturator: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):145-147. PMID:25206156

  17. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  18. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  19. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  20. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  1. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  2. Topology of modified helical gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The topology of several types of modified surfaces of helical gears is proposed. The modified surfaces allow absorption of a linear or almost linear function of transmission errors. These errors are caused by gear misalignment and an improvement of the contact of gear tooth surfaces. Principles and corresponding programs for computer aided simulation of meshing and contact of gears have been developed. The results of this investigation are illustrated with numerical examples.

  3. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers.

  4. Helicity comparison among three magnetographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiqing; Gao, Yu; Zhang, Hongqi; Sakurai, T.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Sokoloff, D.

    We compare vector magnetograms of 228 active regions observed by Solar Magnetic Field Telescope (SMFT) at Huairou (HR) Solar Observing Station and the Solar Flare Telescope (SFT) at Mitaka (MTK) of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan from 1992 to 2005 and 55 active regions observed by SFT and Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter (HSP) at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii from 1997 to 2000. Two helicity parameters, current helicity density hc and αff coefficient of linear force free field are calculated. From this comparison we conclude: (1) the mean azimuthal angle differences of transverse fields between HR and MTK data are systematic smaller than that between MTK and Mees data; (2) there are 83.8% of hc and 78.1% of αff for 228 active regions observed at HR and MTK agree in sign, and the Pearson linear correlation coefficient between these two data sets is 0.72 for hc and 0.56 for αff. There are 61.8% of hc and 58.2% of αff for 55 active regions observed at MTK and Mees agree in sign, and the Pearson linear correlation coefficient between these two data sets is 0.34 for hc and 0.31 for αff; (3) there is a basic agreement on time variation of helicity parameters in active regions observed at HR, Mees, and MTK.

  5. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    PubMed

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  6. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  7. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  9. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  10. [Use of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning in the presence of a palatally-impacted canine].

    PubMed

    Waugh, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    Unerupted permanent canines can present orthodontists with special challenges. Conventional two-dimensional panoramic radiographs identify the presence or absence of unerupted canines and can only help approximate their locations, when used with various classification schemes in attempts to describe their locations and estimate treatment difficulties. This article suggests using three-dimensional cone beam CT imaging as a direct objective method of evaluation and treatment planning, thereby eliminating the need for using a subjective system of classifying palatally-impacted permanent canines.

  11. "High-precision, reconstructed 3D model" of skull scanned by conebeam CT: Reproducibility verified using CAD/CAM data.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Seiko; Sato, Keita; Ikawa, Tomoko; Yamamura, Keiko; Ando, Eriko; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning has recently been introduced into forensic medicine and dentistry. However, the presence of metal restorations in the dentition can adversely affect the quality of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of a "high-precision, reconstructed 3D model" obtained from a conebeam CT scan of dentition, a method that might be particularly helpful in forensic medicine. We took conebeam CT and helical CT images of three dry skulls marked with 47 measuring points; reconstructed three-dimensional images; and measured the distances between the points in the 3D images with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) marker. We found that in comparison with the helical CT, conebeam CT is capable of reproducing measurements closer to those obtained from the actual samples. In conclusion, our study indicated that the image-reproduction from a conebeam CT scan was more accurate than that from a helical CT scan. Furthermore, the "high-precision reconstructed 3D model" facilitates reliable visualization of full-sized oral and maxillofacial regions in both helical and conebeam CT scans.

  12. Acoustic and Perceptual Analysis of Speech Adaptation to an Artificial Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Megan J.; Robb, Michael P.; Murdoch, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated adaptation to a standard electropalatographic (EPG) practise palate in a group of eight adults (mean age = 24 years). The participants read the phrase "a CVC" over four sampling conditions: prior to inserting the palate, immediately following insertion of the palate, 45 minutes after palate insertion, and 3 hours after…

  13. A modified feeding plate for a newborn with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Mustafa; Karaçay, Seniz; Atay, Arzu; Günay, Yumuşhan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives : Cleft palate is a common congenital maxillofacial defect. We wish to present the fabrication of a modified feeding plate that will adapt to the changing palatal and velopharyngeal morphology during function. Case Report : A neonate with unilateral cleft lip and palate was referred to our clinic for the fabrication of a feeding plate. Intraoral examination revealed a cleft involving the uvula and the soft palate, with an alveolar defect on the left side. An impression was taken and a dental cast was obtained. A 1-mm Bioplast clear soft plate was pressed on the model. After trimming the edges of the plate, several retentive holes were made for its attachment to the hard plate. With the Bioplast soft plate replaced on the cast, plaster was used to cover parts of the soft plate that were not to come in contact with the hard plate. Biocryl resin was put on the retentive holes and 2-mm Biocryl C Rosa-transparent plate was pressed. The edges of the plate were cut, trimmed, and polished. Conclusion : This modified feeding plate effectively obstructed the soft palate defect. The adaptation of the flexible bulb of the appliance with the soft palate was excellent. Evaluation with nasoendoscopy revealed the synchronized movement of the bulb of the appliance with the soft palate during swallowing. Soft extension of the feeding plate eliminated the risk of irritation, and the baby accepted the appliance easily.

  14. Anterior pillarplasty: a modification in cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Çelebiler, Özhan; Ersoy, Burak; Numanoğlu, Ayhan

    2011-07-01

    After the primary repair of cleft palate, surgeons are frequently confronted with a short soft palate and a wide velopharyngeal space, both of which are known to diminish the quality of speech. We introduce a new modification of the primary repair of cleft palate that lengthens the soft palate and helps to reduce the volume of the velopharyngeal space. Ten patients younger than 12 months with nonsyndromic cleft palate were operated on with this technique. The incision at the cleft margin extended behind the uvula as a modification to the classic design of mucoperiosteal flaps. The sagittally divided mucosal layers of each anterior tonsillar pillar are sutured at the midline 1 cm posterior to the new uvula. The rate of postoperative fistula formation and other complications were evaluated postoperatively. One patient had a uvular and partly pillar detachment at the postoperative period. All other clefts healed without complication. The primary repair of the cleft palate with the anterior pillarplasty technique is a safe and easy-to-perform procedure. This modification can effectively reduce the transverse diameter of the velopharyngeal space and increase the anteroposterior length of the palate.

  15. Morphology and function of the palatal dentition in Choristodera.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ryoko; Evans, Susan E

    2016-03-01

    Choristoderes are a group of extinct freshwater reptiles that were distributed throughout Laurasia from the Middle Jurassic to the Miocene. They are inferred to have had a lifestyle similar to that of extant gavialid crocodiles, but they differed from crocodiles in retaining an extensive palatal dentition. All choristoderes had teeth on the vomers, palatines and pterygoids, and teeth are rarely present on the parasphenoid. Palatal teeth are conical, as in the marginal dentition, and form longitudinal and transverse rows. Detailed examination of different genera shows that the orientation of the palatal tooth crowns changes with their position on the palate, supporting the view that they are involved in intra-oral food transportation, presumably in combination with a fleshy tongue. Moreover, observed variation in palatal tooth shape and the width of palatal tooth batteries may provide additional clues about diet. The European Simoedosaurus lemoinei has sharper palatal teeth than its North American counterpart, S. dakotensis, suggesting a preference for softer prey - a conclusion consistent with the more gracile teeth and narrower snout.

  16. Presurgical orthopedic premaxillary alignment in cleft lip and palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Motoki, D S; Yamashiro, D K

    1994-11-01

    Premaxillary malposition is a difficult problem in cleft lip and palate repair. Orthopedic palatal devices are excellent in positioning the premaxilla, though they are somewhat cumbersome and require complex techniques in adjusting precisely the position of the premaxilla prior to repair. A new technique has been developed for premaxillary repositioning in conjunction with palatal shelf expansion and obturation. The procedure implements microplate fixation anterior to the premaxillary segment and linked to a palatal splint by adjustable elastics. The microplate is inserted through a nasal floor incision and secured by a tight submucosal tunnel through minimal dissection between the prolabium and premaxilla. The last hole of each microplate protrudes through the mucosa and is attached to a pin-retained palatal splint by an elastic chain. Differential tension is applied to the chains to allow gradual repositioning of the protruding maxilla while the splint expands and maintains positioning of the lateral palatal segments. These elastic retractors can be adjusted by staff in the outpatient office. During the past 2 years, this technique has been used successfully in 21 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Its technical ease and design allows simple adjustments to control premaxillary positioning and growth before definitive surgical closure.

  17. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  18. Use of buccal myomucosal flap for palatal lengthening in cleft palate patient: Experience of 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Don; Datta, Shubharanjan; Varghese, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the buccal myomucosal flap in secondary repairs of cleft palate in 20 patients. Patients and Methods: Totally, 20 patients, who underwent secondary palatoplasty between 5 years and 8 years in which a buccal myomucosal flap was used, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients had undergone at least one previous attempted repair at other institutions. Indications for the secondary repair included velopharyngeal incompetence and/or oronasal fistula. Patients were evaluated preoperatively for oronasal fistula status, velopharyngeal competence, nasal resonance, speech quality, and nasal escape. Results: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased. In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive Conclusion: Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs. Minimum donor site morbidity and complication makes the buccal flap a useful armamentarium of a cleft surgeon. PMID:25821372

  19. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shaila; Chacko, Reena Annie; Thomas, Abi M; Singh, Namita; Thomas, Rodny; Abraham, Deena

    2014-01-01

    A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient's weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury.

  20. Obturator prostheses following palatal resection: clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Tirelli, G; Rizzo, R; Biasotto, M; Di Lenarda, R; Argenti, B; Gatto, A; Bullo, F

    2010-02-01

    Malignant tumours of the upper gum and hard palate account for 1-5% of malignant neoplasms of the oral cavity; two thirds of the lesions which involve these areas are squamous cell carcinomas. Most of these carcinomas are diagnosed late, when they invade the underlying bone. The procedures of choice for removal are: alveolectomy, palatectomy, maxillectomy, which may be total or partial. Surgical reconstruction of the defect may be carried out using a wide range of microvascularized flaps: osteomuscolocutaneous of the internal iliac crest, an osteocutaneous flap of the fibula or scapula, fascia, or osteocutaneous radial flap, or a pedicled flap of temporal muscle. These flaps are supported by single or multiple obturator prostheses. Rehabilitation via palatal obturators is preferred in patients with a poor prognosis or in weak condition. Rehabilitation aims to: restore the separation between the oral and nasal cavities, enable the patient to swallow, maintain or provide mastication, sufficient occlusion and mandibular support, support the soft facial tissues, re-establish speech and restore an aesthetically pleasing smile. Hence, it is crucial to work in close cooperation with the staff who makes the prosthesis and who evaluates the case when the surgery is planned and obtains the necessary gnatological, anatomical and functional information. Thereafter, during the surgical stage, for the immediate obturators, or in the successive days, for the temporary obturators, work is devoted to making the prostheses. In this regard, the Odonto-prostheses Service of the Stomatological Clinic does not follow a rigid protocol but materials and techniques are selected on a personal basis, according to the features of each individual clinical case. Mobile rehabilitative systems are the systems of choice, both of which related to the traditional concepts of retention and stability and systems of self-stabilizing prostheses according to J. Dichamp, albeit modified in materials

  1. Obturator prostheses following palatal resection: clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Tirelli, G; Rizzo, R; Biasotto, M; Di Lenarda, R; Argenti, B; Gatto, A; Bullo, F

    2010-01-01

    Summary Malignant tumours of the upper gum and hard palate account for 1-5% of malignant neoplasms of the oral cavity; two thirds of the lesions which involve these areas are squamous cell carcinomas. Most of these carcinomas are diagnosed late, when they invade the underlying bone. The procedures of choice for removal are: alveolectomy, palatectomy, maxillectomy, which may be total or partial. Surgical reconstruction of the defect may be carried out using a wide range of microvascularized flaps: osteomuscolocutaneous of the internal iliac crest, an osteocutaneous flap of the fibula or scapula, fascia, or osteocutaneous radial flap, or a pedicled flap of temporal muscle. These flaps are supported by single or multiple obturator prostheses. Rehabilitation via palatal obturators is preferred in patients with a poor prognosis or in weak condition. Rehabilitation aims to: restore the separation between the oral and nasal cavities, enable the patient to swallow, maintain or provide mastication, sufficient occlusion and mandibular support, support the soft facial tissues, re-establish speech and restore an aesthetically pleasing smile. Hence, it is crucial to work in close cooperation with the staff who makes the prosthesis and who evaluates the case when the surgery is planned and obtains the necessary gnatological, anatomical and functional information. Thereafter, during the surgical stage, for the immediate obturators, or in the successive days, for the temporary obturators, work is devoted to making the prostheses. In this regard, the Odonto-prostheses Service of the Stomatological Clinic does not follow a rigid protocol but materials and techniques are selected on a personal basis, according to the features of each individual clinical case. Mobile rehabilitative systems are the systems of choice, both of which related to the traditional concepts of retention and stability and systems of self-stabilizing prostheses according to J. Dichamp, albeit modified in

  2. Helicity fluctuations in incompressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulations of several homogeneous flows and fully developed turbulent channel flow indicate that the probability distribution function (pdf) of relative helicity density exhibits at most a 20 percent deviation from a flat distribution. Isotropic flows exhibit a slight helical nature but the presence of mean strain in homogeneous turbulence suppresses helical behavior. All the homogeneous turbulent flows studied show no correlation between relative helicity density and the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. The channel flow simulations indicate that, except for low-dissipation regions near the outer edge of the buffer layer, there is no tendency for the flow to be helical. The strong peaks in the relative helicity density pdf and the association of these peaks with regions of low dissipation found in previous simulations by Pelz et al.(1985) are not observed.

  3. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  4. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-24

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. In conclusion, we also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  5. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  6. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  7. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  8. Higher helicity invariants and solar dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, D. D.; Illarionov, E. A.; Akhmet'ev, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern models of nonlinear dynamo saturation in celestial bodies (specifically, on the Sun) are largely based on the consideration of the balance of magnetic helicity. This physical variable has also a topological meaning: it is associated with the linking coefficient of magnetic tubes. In addition to magnetic helicity, magnetohydrodynamics has a number of topological integrals of motion (the so-called higher helicity moments). We have compared these invariants with magnetic helicity properties and concluded that they can hardly serve as nonlinear constraints on dynamo action.

  9. Helical tomotherapy superficial dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Seibert, Rebecca M.; Robison, Benjamin; Mitchell, Martha

    2007-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy is a treatment technique that is delivered from a 6 MV fan beam that traces a helical path while the couch moves linearly into the bore. In order to increase the treatment delivery dose rate, helical tomotherapy systems do not have a flattening filter. As such, the dose distributions near the surface of the patient may be considerably different from other forms of intensity-modulated delivery. The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions near the surface for helical tomotherapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom. A hypothetical planning target volume (PTV) was defined on an anthropomorphic head phantom to simulate a 2.0 Gy per fraction IMRT parotid-sparing head and neck treatment of the upper neck nodes. A total of six target volumes were created with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm of separation between the surface of the phantom and the outer edge of the PTV. Superficial doses were measured for each of the treatment deliveries using film placed in the head phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the phantom's surface underneath an immobilization mask. In the 0 mm test case where the PTV extends to the phantom surface, the mean TLD dose was 1.73{+-}0.10 Gy (or 86.6{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose). The measured superficial dose decreases to 1.23{+-}0.10 Gy (61.5{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose) for a PTV-surface separation of 5 mm. The doses measured by the TLDs indicated that the tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimates superficial doses by 8.9{+-}3.2%. The radiographic film dose for the 0 mm test case was 1.73{+-}0.07 Gy, as compared to the calculated dose of 1.78{+-}0.05 Gy. Given the results of the TLD and film measurements, the superficial calculated doses are overestimated between 3% and 13%. Without the use of bolus, tumor volumes that extend to the surface may be underdosed. As such, it is recommended that bolus be added for these

  10. Neutrino helicity asymmetries in leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Luis; Santos, Francisco C.

    2005-05-01

    It is pointed out that the heavy singlet neutrinos characteristic of leptogenesis develop asymmetries in the abundances of the two helicity states as a result of the same mechanism that generates asymmetries in the standard lepton sector. Neutrinos and standard leptons interchange asymmetries in collisions with each other. It is shown that an appropriate quantum number, B-L{sup '}, combining baryon, lepton and neutrino asymmetries, is not violated as fast as the standard B-L. This suppresses the washout effects relevant for the derivation of the final baryon asymmetry. One presents detailed calculations for the period of neutrino thermal production in the framework of the singlet seesaw mechanism.

  11. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  12. A theoretically exact reconstruction algorithm for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Peiping

    2013-08-21

    Differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) reconstruction problems are usually solved by using parallel-, fan- or cone-beam algorithms. For rod-shaped objects, the x-ray beams cannot recover all the slices of the sample at the same time. Thus, if a rod-shaped sample is required to be reconstructed by the above algorithms, one should alternately perform translation and rotation on this sample, which leads to lower efficiency. The helical cone-beam CT may significantly improve scanning efficiency for rod-shaped objects over other algorithms. In this paper, we propose a theoretically exact filter-backprojection algorithm for helical cone-beam DPC-CT, which can be applied to reconstruct the refractive index decrement distribution of the samples directly from two-dimensional differential phase-contrast images. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the proposed algorithm. Our work provides a potential solution for inspecting the rod-shaped samples using DPC-CT, which may be applicable with the evolution of DPC-CT equipments.

  13. Postsurgical use of prosthetic palatal appliances. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Artopoulou, Ioli-Ioanna; Higuera, Stephen; Martin, Jack W; Stal, Samuel; Chambers, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip or palate encounter a myriad of difficulties in their early years of life, some of which begin at birth. The defect often impairs suckling and deglutition in the neonate. It can hinder appropriate speech development and may impose undue social and psychological stresses. Surgical and orthodontic interventions are essential and prosthetic palatal appliances play an important role not only throughout the patient's treatment course, but also in the treatment of unfavorable surgical sequelae.

  14. A Rat Model for Muscle Regeneration in the Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Helmich, Maria P. A. C.; Ulrich, Dietmar J. O.; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. Methods Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4) and 2 (n = 2) were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6) was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2) was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm) were evaluated by (immuno)histochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA) after 7 days. Results The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. Conclusions This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery. PMID:23554995

  15. Treatment of a Maxillary First Molar with Two Palatal Roots

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Ghasemi, Negin; Talebzadeh, Bita; Norlouoni, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of the morphology and internal anatomy of the root canal system is essential, because it determines the successful outcome of endodontic treatment. The main goal of endodontic treatment is to prevent apical periodontitis and/or to promote the healing of periapical lesion. Presence of two canals or roots on the palatal side of the first maxillary molar has rarely been reported. This case report presents a maxillary first molar with two separate palatal roots. PMID:26523146

  16. [Cleft lip and palate--problematic cleft speech].

    PubMed

    Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M A

    1999-01-01

    The early restoration of facial and palatal morphology in patients with cleft of lip and/or palate provides the anatomical base for good speech outcome. The author gives the up todate overview of the main problems concerning cleft speech, such as velopalatal insufficiency and typical articulation errors. The article describes the modern methods for the evaluation of VPI and current trends in treatment modalities for VPI.

  17. Orthognathic surgery in the cleft lip and palate patient.

    PubMed

    Herber, S C; Lehman, J A

    1993-10-01

    Orthognathic surgery for the cleft lip and palate patient should be designed to achieve good facial aesthetics and a stable, functional occlusion. Maxillary and mandibular osteotomies, which benefit cleft lip and palate patients with associated dentofacial deformities, should be modified to meet the needs of the individual patient. Soft-tissue correction of the upper lip and nose adds to the overall aesthetic result, but should be performed as a separate procedure.

  18. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements.

  19. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  20. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  1. Examination of the depth of the equine hard palate.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rebecca Gay; Lowder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Equine behavioral problems and loss of optimum performance have been associated with musculoskeletal injury and, more recently, dental disease. Injuries to a horse's tongue and bars of the mandible due to bitting have been documented. However, another point of contact of the bit, the hard palate, has thus far been virtually ignored. The objective of the study was to determine if there was a significant range associated with the depth of the equine hard palate and if this range was associated with a certain breed, age, or sex of the horse. Oral examinations were performed on 52 horses and a measurement of the hard palate was taken. The study group was comprised of 27 mares, 24 geldings and 1 stallion. They were further divided into the age groups: 3-5 years (3), > 5-10 years (18), > 10-15 years (19), and > 15 years (12). Lastly, the groups were divided into the following breed categories: Quarter Horse, Thoroughbred, and Other. Analyses revealed that palate depth has a broad range that is not associated with any breed, age, or sex. Normal reference ranges were established for the data and suggests that the hard palate should be considered and measured when choosing a bit. Further research is necessary to determine which bits are best suited for each palate depth.

  2. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of the mid-palatal suture in rapid palatal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gumussoy, I; Bayrakdar, I S; Dagistan, S; Caglayan, F

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Orthodontists usually evaluate the mid-palatal sutural opening with occlusal radiography. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the sutural opening with ultrasonography (USG) in a series of patients undergoing rapid palatal expansion (RPE). Methods: The study included 87 USG images and 87 occlusal radiographs from 29 healthy patients (mean age, 13.9 years; range, 11–20 years; boys, 12; girls, 17) who required RPE treatment. The sutural opening was assessed with USG, and the amount of sutural expansion as mesiodistal length was measured immediately after appliance practice (T0), 10 turns (T1) and 20 turns (T2) during the expansion period. Sutural expansion evaluated by occlusal radiographs was scored at every stage. Measurements obtained by USG and scores observed in the occlusal radiographs were compared by non-parametric Kendall's tau test. Results: Both USG and radiographic images revealed normal anatomical structure during pre-expansion (stage T0). On USG, sutural expansion was seen in 19 patients at stage T1. There was no expansion at this stage in ten patients. At stage T2, on USG and radiography, an increase in the amount of expansion was observed in 19 patients with sutural expansion at stage T1 and sutural expansion was observed in 5 patients without sutural expansion at stage T1. No expansion was observed at both stages T1 and T2 in five patients. USG measurements and occlusal scores in both T1 and T2 turns showed statistically significant correlation (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The results indicate that USG might be a useful method to assess mid-palatal sutural opening in patients undergoing RPE. PMID:25168810

  3. Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

  4. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  5. The anatomy of the dog soft palate. I. Histological evaluation of the caudal soft palate in mesaticephalic breeds.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Silvana; Pichetto, Michela; Roccabianca, Paola; Romussi, Stefano

    2011-07-01

    The gross anatomy and overall structure of the soft palate has been described in the average dog's head, however, no descriptive microanatomical studies of the dog soft palate are available, despite their possible utility in view of the manifold and important repercussions of this organ physiology. This is the first of two companion papers, dealing with the caudal part of the soft palate in the canine species, in mesaticephalic and brachycephalic dogs. Specimens from mesaticephalic healthy dogs (N = 8) were collected after euthanasia, processed for histology and sectioned at six transversal levels. Morphological stainings were used for a microscopic evaluation of the tissue layers composing the distal part of the soft palate in adult mesaticephalic dogs, and histochemical reactions were applied to assess mucin types within glandular tissue and to investigate the connective tissues. The organ was characteristically organized into a major deep musculo-connective axis mixed with salivary glands and covered by the mucosal lining on either the nasopharyngeal or the oral sides. The results of this investigation add to the general knowledge of the anatomy of soft palate in the canine species and establish baseline information for the parallel study on the long and thickened soft palate, which is typical of adult brachycephalic dogs.

  6. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28393073

  7. Progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT): clinical and MRI assessment with review of palatal tremors.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Michael; Torun, Nurhan; Tuite, Paul J; Sharpe, James A; Lang, Anthony E

    2004-06-01

    Palatal tremor has been subdivided into essential (EPT) and symptomatic palatal tremor (SPT). A subgroup of the SPT form has a syndrome of progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT). Published details of cases of PAPT are sparse and the disorder appears heterogeneous. We present clinical and MRI features of six patients with sporadic PAPT who attended The University Health Network between 1991 and 2002. Eye movements were recorded using a magnetic search coil technique. We review previously reported cases of PAPT from the English language literature and relate this disorder to EPT and SPT. PAPT may be divided into sporadic and familial forms. We identified 22 other prior reported cases of sporadic PAPT. Sporadic PAPT is a subtype of SPT in which progressive cerebellar degeneration is the most symptomatic feature. A combination of vertical nystagmus and palatal tremor was found in one of our cases. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia, a new finding, was present in two of our patients and indicated additional brainstem dysfunction. Inferior olivary high signal abnormalities were present on MRI in all of our cases. The cause of sporadic PAPT remains uncertain. In some previous reports of sporadic PAPT, the combination of brainstem or pontine atrophy, parkinsonism, autonomic dysfunction or corticospinal tract abnormalities suggests a diagnosis of multiple system atrophy, although pathological verification is lacking. Familial PAPT is associated with marked brainstem and cervical cord atrophy with corticospinal tract findings, but the typical olivary MRI abnormalities have not been reported. A substitution in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene has been described in a family with PAPT, raising the possibility of Alexander's disease. One other familial syndrome of PAPT, termed 'dark dentate disease', has also been reported. PAPT is a subgroup of SPT in which ataxia progresses and is not usually the result of a monophasic illness. Eye movement abnormalities suggest

  8. Role of neurotransmitters in palate development and teratologic implications.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, E F

    1985-01-01

    It is hypothesized that neuropharmacologic agents are more teratogenic to humans. Since many neuropharmacologic agents function through neurotransmitter mechanisms, then neurotransmitters should function to regulate embryonic development. Evidence has been obtained that neurotransmitters do indeed function as biological signals in palate development. It has been shown that palate reorientation is modulated by neurotransmitters with a wide range of diversity, similar to the CNS. Thus serotonin and acetylcholine stimulate and GABA inhibits the reorientation process. Spatial diversity is also observed: serotonin functions at the anterior and acetylcholine at the posterior end, and GABA functions more efficiently at either end in different inbred strains. Many criteria for functioning neurotransmitters have been obtained. Both serotonin and GABA have been measured in the palate and developmental changes observed. Physiologic responses to serotonin have been monitored. Serotonin has been shown to stimulate palate cell motility as well as protein carboxyl methylation and cyclic GMP. The serotonin effects on protein carboxyl methylation and cyclic GMP could function to stimulate palate reorientation by modulating cell contractility and protein secretion. Further support for the hypothesis that neuropharmacologic agents could be teratogenic by perturbation of neurotransmitter mechanisms comes from studying GABA and diazepam. Evidence has been obtained that diazepam induces cleft palate by mimicking GABA in a functional GABAergic system in palate development. A significant finding is that genetic differences in both diazepam teratogenesis and in a GABAergic system have been observed. Comparing the SWV and AJ strains, the SWV mouse showed (1) a greater sensitivity to diazepam-induced cleft palate, (2) a greater sensitivity to GABA and diazepam inhibition of palate reorientation in embryo culture, (3) a greater concentration of palatal GABA and (4) a more efficient GABA

  9. Elliptical Muon Helical Cooling Channel Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Flanagan, G.; Lopes, M. L.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-09-01

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) consisting of a pressurized gas absorber imbedded in a magnetic channel that provides solenoid, helical dipole and helical quadrupole fields has shown considerable promise in providing six-dimensional phase space reduction for muon beams. The most effective approach to implementing the desired magnetic field is a helical solenoid (HS) channel composed of short solenoid coils arranged in a helical pattern. The HS channel along with an external solenoid allows the B$_z$ and B$_{\\phi}$ components along the reference orbit to be set to any desired values. To set dB$_{\\phi}$/dr to the desired value for optimum focusing requires an additional variable to tune. We shall show that using elliptical shaped coils in the HS channel allows the flexibility to achieve the desired dB$_{\\phi}$/dr on the reference orbit without significant change to B$_z$ and B$_{\\phi}$.

  10. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  11. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  12. The frequency split method for helical cone-beam reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shechter, G; Köhler, Th; Altman, A; Proksa, R

    2004-08-01

    A new approximate method for the utilization of redundant data in helical cone-beam CT is presented. It is based on the observation that the original WEDGE method provides excellent image quality if only little more than 180 degrees data are used for back-projection, and that significant low-frequency artifacts appear if a larger amount of redundant data are used. This degradation is compensated by the frequency split method: The low-frequency part of the image is reconstructed using little more than 180 degrees of data, while the high frequency part is reconstructed using all data. The resulting algorithm shows no cone-beam artifacts in a simulation of a 64-row scanner. It is further shown that the frequency split method hardly degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images and that it behaves robustly in the presence of motion.

  13. Formation of helical ion chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatullin, R.; del Campo, A.; De Chiara, G.; Morigi, G.; Plenio, M. B.; Retzker, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of the linear-to-zigzag structural phase transition exhibited by an ion chain confined in a trap with periodic boundary conditions. The transition is driven by reducing the transverse confinement at a finite quench rate, which can be accurately controlled. This results in the formation of zigzag domains oriented along different transverse planes. The twists between different domains can be stabilized by the topology of the trap, and under laser cooling the system has a chance to relax to a helical chain with nonzero winding number. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain a large sample of possible trajectories for different quench rates. The scaling of the average winding number with different quench rates is compared to the prediction of the Kibble-Zurek theory, and a good quantitative agreement is found.

  14. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  15. Best packing of identical helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Youngsik; Hong, Kyungpyo; Kim, Hyoungjun; No, Sungjong; Oh, Seungsang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we prove the unique existence of a ropelength-minimizing conformation of the θ-spun double helix in a mathematically rigorous way, and find the minimal ropelength {{{Rop}}}* (θ )=-\\tfrac{8π }{t} where t is the unique solution in [-θ ,0] of the equation 2-2\\cos (t+θ )={t}2. Using this result, the pitch angles of the standard, triple and quadruple helices are around 39.3771^\\circ , 42.8354^\\circ and 43.8351^\\circ , respectively, which are almost identical with the approximated pitch angles of the zero-twist structures previously known by Olsen and Bohr. We also find the ropelength of the standard N-helix.

  16. Helicity Evolution at Small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievert, Michael; Kovchegov, Yuri; Pitonyak, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We construct small- x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of ln2(1 / x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of ln(1 / x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc &Nf limits. After solving the large-Nc equations numerically we obtain the following small- x asymptotics for the flavor-singlet g1 structure function along with quarks hPDFs and helicity TMDs (in absence of saturation effects): g1S(x ,Q2) ΔqS(x ,Q2) g1L S(x ,kT2) (1/x) > αh (1/x) 2.31√{αsNc/2 π. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin may be at small x and what impact this has on the so-called ``spin crisis.'' Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-SC0004286 (YK), the RIKEN BNL Research Center, and TMD Collaboration (DP), and DOE Contract No. DE-SC0012704 (MS).

  17. Optimization of helical tomotherapy treatment plans for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorov, G.; Kron, T.; Wong, E.; Chen, J.; Sollazzo, J.; Rodrigues, G.

    2003-07-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a novel treatment approach where the ring gantry irradiation geometry of a helical CT scanner is combined with an intensity-modulated megavoltage x-ray fan beam. An inverse treatment planning system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison) was used to optimize the treatment plans for ten randomly selected prostate patients. Five different sets of margins (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 mm uniform 3D margins and a non-uniform margin of 5 to 10 mm) were employed for the prostate (GTV2) and seminal vesicles (GTV1). The dose distribution was evaluated in targets, rectum, bladder and femoral heads. HT plans are characterized by a rapid dose fall off around the target in all directions resulting in low doses (less than 30% of the dose at ICRU reference point) to the femurs in all cases. Up to a margin of 5 mm for target structures, it was always possible to satisfy the requirements for dose delivery set by RTOG protocol P-0126. Using a 'class solution', HT plans require minimal operator interaction and result in excellent sparing of normal structures in prostate radiotherapy.

  18. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (p<0.01). Usually, cleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  19. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-09-15

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity.

  20. Oxytocin gene deletion mice overconsume palatable sucrose solution but not palatable lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Miedlar, J A; Rinaman, L; Vollmer, R R; Amico, J A

    2007-09-01

    We previously reported that oxytocin knockout (OT KO) mice display markedly enhanced intake of sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions compared with intake by wild-type (WT) mice of the same background strain. The present study was conducted to determine whether OT KO mice demonstrate enhanced intake of Intralipid, a palatable lipid emulsion. Male or female mice of both genotypes that were naive to the test solution were given continuous two-bottle access to Intralipid and water with food available ad libitum for 3 days. Throughout the experiment, mice of both genotypes showed a marked preference for Intralipid over water. On the 1st day, OT KO mice displayed twofold greater preference and consumed nearly twice as much Intralipid compared with WT cohorts. However, on subsequent days of exposure, Intralipid preference and intake did not differ between genotypes over a range of lipid concentrations presented in descending or ascending order. Daily and hourly measures of lipid vs. sucrose intake confirmed that OT KO mice consumed more sucrose solution, but not lipid emulsion, than WT mice. During ad libitum access to Intralipid, both genotypes consumed significantly more calories from the emulsion as concentration increased. Both genotypes maintained consistent total daily caloric intake (lipid plus chow) and compensated by decreasing chow intake over the course of the study. These findings, coupled with prior reports from our laboratory, support the view that OT signaling pathways participate in limiting intake of palatable carbohydrate-containing solutions, but do not appear to play a role in limiting intake of Intralipid.

  1. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... test used to help diagnose—or rule out—spinal column damage in injured patients. CT scanning is fast, ... CT is to detect—or to rule out—spinal column damage in patients who have been injured. CT ...

  3. Helicity within the vortex filament model

    PubMed Central

    Hänninen, R.; Hietala, N.; Salman, H.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments. PMID:27883029

  4. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  5. Helicity within the vortex filament model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänninen, R.; Hietala, N.; Salman, H.

    2016-11-01

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments.

  6. Speech outcomes of early palatal repair with or without intravelar veloplasty in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Jean-Charles; Herlin, Christian; Captier, Guillaume; Baylon, Hélène; Verdeil, Mélanie; Bigorre, Michèle

    2013-12-01

    We compared the early speech outcomes of 40 consecutive children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who had been treated according to different 2-stage protocols: the Malek protocol (soft palate closure without intravelar veloplasty at 3 months; lip and hard palate repair at 6 months) (n=20), and the Talmant protocol (cheilorhinoplasty and soft palate repair with intravelar veloplasty at 6 months; hard palate closure at 18 months) (n=20). We compared the speech assessments obtained at a mean (SD) age of 3.3 (0.35) years after treatment by the same surgeon. The main outcome measures evaluated were acquisition and intelligibility of speech, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and incidence of complications. A delay in speech articulation of one year or more was seen more often in patients treated by the Malek protocol (11/20) than in those treated according to the Talmant protocol (3/20, p=0.019). Good intelligibility was noted in 15/20 in the Talmant group compared with 6/20 in the Malek group (p=0.010). Assessment with an aerophonoscope showed that nasal air emission was most pronounced in patients in the Malek group (p=0.007). Velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 11/20 in the Malek group, and in 3/20 in the Talmant group (p=0.019). No patients in the Talmant group had an oronasal fistula (p<0.001). All other outcomes were similar. Despite later closure of the soft and hard palate, early speech outcomes were better in the Talmant group because intravelar veloplasty was successful and there were no fistulas after closure of the hard palate in 2 layers.

  7. Recent advances in primary palate and midface morphogenesis research.

    PubMed

    Diewert, V M; Wang, K Y

    1992-01-01

    During the sixth week of human development, the primary palate develops as facial prominences enlarge around the nasal pits to form the premaxillary region. Growth of craniofacial components changes facial morphology and affects the extent of contact between the facial prominences. Our recent studies have focused on developing methods to analyze growth of the primary palate and the craniofacial complex to define morphological phases of normal development and to determine alterations leading to cleft lip malformation. Analysis of human embryos in the Carnegie Embryology Collection and mouse embryos of cleft lip and noncleft strains showed that human and mouse embryos have similar phases of primary palate development: first, an epithelial seam, the nasal fin, forms; then a mesenchymal bridge develops through the nasal fin and enlarges rapidly. A robust mesenchymal bridge must form between the facial prominences before advancing midfacial growth patterns tend to separate the facial components as the medial nasal region narrows and elongates, the nasal pits narrow, and the primary choanae (posterior nares) open posterior to the primary palate. In mouse strains with cleft lip gene, maxillary growth, nasal fin formation, and mesenchymal replacement of the nasal fin were all delayed compared with noncleft strains of mice. Successful primary palate formation involves a sequence of local cellular events that are closely timed with spatial changes associated with craniofacial growth that must occur within a critical developmental period.

  8. Soft palate preservation after tumor resection with transoral laser microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Gómez-Pedraza, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background: Management and preservation of the soft palate is dependent on clinical stage and tumor histology. However, available literature is scarce regarding the palate preservation with the use of laser CO2. Objectives: We report the results obtained after management with laser surgery and soft palate preservation in three patients with salivary gland neoplasms. Method: Three patients with minor salivary gland tumors were treated by means of transoral laser microsurgery. All tumors were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. All tumors were >3 cm. Soft palate function was preserved and reconstruction was performed with primary closure. Patients began oral feeding the same day and were discharged after 24 h. Conclusions: Transoral laser microsurgery is recommended for treatment of soft palate tumors. This treatment can be considered a better option when compared with other modalities such as radio- or chemoradiotherapy which require a longer time of treatment, are more expensive and tend to produce significant toxicity. Key words:Laser CO2, neoplasms, salivary gland. PMID:23229273

  9. Hydrodynamic interaction between two helical swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Esparza, Alejandro; Godinez, Francisco; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Many motile bacteria, such as E. coli, possess several helical flagellar filaments that bundle together to form a coherent helical element for propulsion. In order to understand the process of bundling, we study the interaction between two identical helical magnetic swimmers that self propel in a highly viscous Newtonian fluid due to the rotation of an external magnetic field. Our experiments reveal that hydrodynamic interactions lead to nontrivial collective and relative effects, both in translation and rotation. We will present our experimental results and discuss the physical mechanisms responsible for our observations.

  10. Helicity oscillations of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, Alexandra; Kartavtsev, Alexander; Raffelt, Georg

    2016-06-01

    The helicity of a Dirac neutrino with mass m evolves under the influence of a B field because it has a magnetic dipole moment proportional to m . Moreover, it was recently shown that a polarized or anisotropic medium engenders the same effect for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Because a B field polarizes a background medium, it instigates helicity oscillations even for Majorana neutrinos unless the medium is symmetric between matter and antimatter. Motivated by these observations, we review the impact of a B field and of an anisotropic or polarized medium on helicity oscillations for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos from the common perspective of in-medium dispersion.

  11. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  12. Thermally activated helicity reversals of skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X. Z.; Shibata, K.; Koshibae, W.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kimoto, K.; Taguchi, Y.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic bubbles with winding number S =1 are topologically equivalent to skyrmions. Here we report the discovery of helicity (in-plane magnetization-swirling direction) reversal of skyrmions, while keeping their hexagonal lattice form, at above room temperature in a thin hexaferrite magnet. We have observed that the frequency of helicity reversals dramatically increases with temperature in a thermally activated manner, revealing that the generation energy of a kink-soliton pair for switching helicity on a skyrmion rapidly decreases towards the magnetic transition temperature.

  13. Helical and rod-shaped bacteria swim in helical trajectories with little additional propulsion from helical shape.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Maira A; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C; Bansil, Rama

    2016-11-01

    It has frequently been hypothesized that the helical body shapes of flagellated bacteria may yield some advantage in swimming ability. In particular, the helical-shaped pathogen Helicobacter pylori is often claimed to swim like a corkscrew through its harsh gastric habitat, but there has been no direct confirmation or quantification of such claims. Using fast time-resolution and high-magnification two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast microscopy to simultaneously image and track individual bacteria in bacterial broth as well as mucin solutions, we show that both helical and rod-shaped H. pylori rotated as they swam, producing a helical trajectory. Cell shape analysis enabled us to determine shape as well as the rotational and translational speed for both forward and reverse motions, thereby inferring flagellar kinematics. Using the method of regularized Stokeslets, we directly compare observed speeds and trajectories to numerical calculations for both helical and rod-shaped bacteria in mucin and broth to validate the numerical model. Although experimental observations are limited to select cases, the model allows quantification of the effects of body helicity, length, and diameter. We find that due to relatively slow body rotation rates, the helical shape makes at most a 15% contribution to propulsive thrust. The effect of body shape on swimming speeds is instead dominated by variations in translational drag required to move the cell body. Because helical cells are one of the strongest candidates for propulsion arising from the cell body, our results imply that quite generally, swimming speeds of flagellated bacteria can only be increased a little by body propulsion.

  14. Helical and rod-shaped bacteria swim in helical trajectories with little additional propulsion from helical shape

    PubMed Central

    Constantino, Maira A.; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C.; Bansil, Rama

    2016-01-01

    It has frequently been hypothesized that the helical body shapes of flagellated bacteria may yield some advantage in swimming ability. In particular, the helical-shaped pathogen Helicobacter pylori is often claimed to swim like a corkscrew through its harsh gastric habitat, but there has been no direct confirmation or quantification of such claims. Using fast time-resolution and high-magnification two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast microscopy to simultaneously image and track individual bacteria in bacterial broth as well as mucin solutions, we show that both helical and rod-shaped H. pylori rotated as they swam, producing a helical trajectory. Cell shape analysis enabled us to determine shape as well as the rotational and translational speed for both forward and reverse motions, thereby inferring flagellar kinematics. Using the method of regularized Stokeslets, we directly compare observed speeds and trajectories to numerical calculations for both helical and rod-shaped bacteria in mucin and broth to validate the numerical model. Although experimental observations are limited to select cases, the model allows quantification of the effects of body helicity, length, and diameter. We find that due to relatively slow body rotation rates, the helical shape makes at most a 15% contribution to propulsive thrust. The effect of body shape on swimming speeds is instead dominated by variations in translational drag required to move the cell body. Because helical cells are one of the strongest candidates for propulsion arising from the cell body, our results imply that quite generally, swimming speeds of flagellated bacteria can only be increased a little by body propulsion. PMID:28138539

  15. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  16. Conditioned taste aversion, drugs of abuse and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-You; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2014-01-01

    LIN, J.-Y., J. Arthurs and S. Reilly. Conditioned taste aversion: Palatability and drugs of abuse. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XX(x) XXX-XXX, 2014. – We consider conditioned taste aversion to involve a learned reduction in the palatability of a taste (and hence in amount consumed) based on the association that develops when a taste experience is followed by gastrointestinal malaise. The present article evaluates the well-established finding that drugs of abuse, at doses that are otherwise considered rewarding and self-administered, cause intake suppression. Our recent work using lick pattern analysis shows that drugs of abuse also cause a palatability downshift and, therefore, support conditioned taste aversion learning. PMID:24813806

  17. Bubble palate and failure to thrive: a case report.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J B

    1997-06-01

    In this report, a mother presents at 29 days postpartum with extremely sore nipples. Her infant is 1 1b 2 oz (511 gms) below birth weight, a continuing weight loss consistent with failure to thrive. Failure to thrive may be caused by a variation in infant palatal structure (VIPS) such as a bubble palate. The mother demonstrated correct latch-on, positioning, and soreness secondary to nipple candidiasis concealing the VIPS as a hidden component to this breastfeeding problem. A thorough assessment of the infant at breast, the infant's oral anatomy and the mother's breasts revealed the VIPS and information necessary for treatment. Alternative positioning and repatterning of oral behavior resolved the breastfeeding problem. A variation in infant palatal structure may be a hidden breastfeeding problem and needs to be considered.

  18. Palatal avulsion injury by a foreign body in a child

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Sulyman Biodun; Aremu, Shuaib Kayode; Abdulkadir, A Y; Legbo, J N; Akande, Halima J

    2012-01-01

    A 6-year-old girl who claimed to have fallen while playing with metal rod that resulted in palatal avulsion injuries was presented. Neither of the parents was around when the incidence happened. She was brought to the hospital because of pain, bleeding from the mouth, drooling of saliva mixed with blood and inability to feed or phonate appropriately. Examinations of the oral cavity revealed a triangular area of avulsion in the posterior aspect of the hard palate extending to the soft palate. She had examination under anaesthesia and wound repaired with 3-0 vicryl interrupted sutures after thorough wound debridement. She did well and was discharged from the clinic. PMID:22605851

  19. Palatal rugae and their role in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anoop; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2014-08-01

    Establishing a person's identity can be a difficult task in cases of traffic accidents or in mass disaster situations. The records collected to identify a decedent should be accurate and totally inclusive of objective findings. When a victim has no teeth, information for use in personal identification based on methods available in forensic odontology is much more limited than in the case of dentate victims. Palatal rugae have been considered relevant for human identification due to its stability, which is equivalent to the fingerprint, in that it is unique for each ruga pattern. Palatal rugae appear to possess the features of an ideal forensic identification parameter, that is, uniqueness, postmortem resistance, and stability. The purpose of this article was to review the literature, in order to determine if there is enough evidence to establish the use of palatal rugae in dental identification.

  20. Dissecting π-helices: sequence, structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-11-01

    A new procedure for the identification of regular secondary structures using a C(α) trace has identified 659 π-helices in 3582 protein chains, solved at high resolution. Taking advantage of this significantly expanded database of π-helices, we have analysed the functional and structural roles of π-helices and determined the position-wise amino acid propensity within and around them. These helices range from 5 to 18 residues in length with the average twist and rise being 85.2 ± 7.2° and 1.28 ± 0.31 Å, respectively. A total of 546 (~ 83%) out of 659 π-helices occur in conjunction with α-helices, with 101 π-helices being interspersed between two α-helices. The majority of interspersed π-helices were found to be conserved across a large number of structures within a protein family and produce a significant bend in the overall helical segment as well as local distortions in the neighbouring α-helices. The presence of a π-helical fragment leads to appropriate orientation of the constituent residues, so as to facilitate favourable interactions and also help in proper folding of the protein chain. In addition to intra helical 6→1 N-H···O hydrogen bonds, π-helices are also stabilized by several other non-bonded interactions. π-Helices show distinct positional residue preferences, which are different from those of α-helices.

  1. Indirect modulation of Shh signaling by Dlx5 affects the oral-nasal patterning of palate and rescues cleft palate in Msx1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Mayo, Julie; Xu, Xun; Li, Jingyuan; Bringas, Pablo; Maas, Richard L; Rubenstein, John L R; Chai, Yang

    2009-12-01

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects in human. During embryonic development, palatal shelves display oronasal (O-N) and anteroposterior polarity before the onset of fusion, but how the O-N pattern is established and how it relates to the expansion and fusion of the palatal shelves are unknown. Here we address these questions and show that O-N patterning is associated with the expansion and fusion of the palatal shelves and that Dlx5 is required for the O-N patterning of palatal mesenchyme. Loss of Dlx5 results in downregulation of Fgf7 and expanded Shh expression from the oral to the nasal side of the palatal shelf. This expanded Shh signaling is sufficient to restore palatal expansion and fusion in mice with compromised palatal mesenchymal cell proliferation, such as Msx1-null mutants. Exogenous Fgf7 inhibits Shh signaling and reverses the cranial neural crest (CNC) cell proliferation rescue in the Msx1/Dlx5 double knockout palatal mesenchyme. Thus, Dlx5-regulated Fgf7 signaling inhibits the expression of Shh, which in turn controls the fate of CNC cells through tissue-tissue interaction and plays a crucial role during palatogenesis. Our study shows that modulation of Shh signaling may be useful as a potential therapeutic approach for rescuing cleft palate.

  2. Methylated MicroRNA Genes of the Developing Murine Palate

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S.; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R.; Appana, Savitri N.; Brock, Guy N.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the etiology of cleft palate (CP). Environmental factors can also affect gene expression via alterations in DNA methylation suggesting a possible mechanism for the induction of CP. Identification of genes methylated during development of the secondary palate provides the basis for examination of the means by which environmental factors may adversely influence palatal ontogeny. We previously characterized the methylome of the developing murine secondary palate focusing primarily on protein-encoding genes. We now extend this study to include methylated microRNA (miRNA) genes. A total of 42 miRNA genes were found to be stably methylated in developing murine palatal tissue. Twenty eight of these were localized within host genes. Gene methylation was confirmed by pyrosequencing of selected miRNA genes. Integration of methylated miRNA gene and expression datasets identified 62 miRNAs, 69% of which were non-expressed. For a majority of genes (83%), upstream CpG islands (CGIs) were highly methylated suggesting down-regulation of CGI-associated promoters. DAVID and IPA analyses indicated that both expressed and non-expressed miRNAs target identical signaling pathways and biological processes associated with palatogenesis. Furthermore, these analyses also identified novel signaling pathways whose roles in palatogenesis remain to be elucidated. In summary, we identify methylated miRNA genes in the developing murine secondary palate, correlate miRNA gene methylation with expression of their cognate miRNA transcripts, and identify pathways and biological processes potentially mediated by these miRNAs. PMID:25642850

  3. Scaling laws in decaying helical hydromagnetic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensson, M.; Hindmarsh, M.; Brandenburg }%, A.

    2005-07-01

    We study the evolution of growth and decay laws for the magnetic field coherence length ξ, energy E_M and magnetic helicity H in freely decaying 3D MHD turbulence. We show that with certain assumptions, self-similarity of the magnetic power spectrum alone implies that ξ σm t1/2. This in turn implies that magnetic helicity decays as Hσm t-2s, where s=(ξ_diff/ξH)2, in terms of ξ_diff, the diffusion length scale, and ξ_H, a length scale defined from the helicity power spectrum. The relative magnetic helicity remains constant, implying that the magnetic energy decays as E_M σm t-1/2-2s. The parameter s is inversely proportional to the magnetic Reynolds number Re_M, which is constant in the self-similar regime.

  4. Helical vortices: viscous dynamics and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maurice; Selcuk, Can; Delbende, Ivan; Ijlra-Upmc Team; Limsi-Cnrs Team

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamical properties of helical vortices is of great importance for numerous applications such as wind turbines, helicopter rotors, ship propellers. Locally these flows often display a helical symmetry: fields are invariant through combined axial translation of distance Δz and rotation of angle θ = Δz / L around the same z-axis, where 2 πL denotes the helix pitch. A DNS code with built-in helical symmetry has been developed in order to compute viscous quasi-steady basic states with one or multiple vortices. These states will be characterized (core structure, ellipticity, ...) as a function of the pitch, without or with an axial flow component. The instability modes growing in the above base flows and their growth rates are investigated by a linearized version of the DNS code coupled to an Arnoldi procedure. This analysis is complemented by a helical thin-cored vortex filaments model. ANR HELIX.

  5. Helical Microfilaments with Alternating Imprinted Intrinsic Curvatures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro Emanuel Santos; Godinho, Maria Helena

    2017-03-01

    There has been an intense research for developing techniques that can produce filaments with helical shapes, given the widespread of potential applications. In this work, how helices with different curvatures can be precisely imprinted in microfilaments is shown. It is also shown that using this technique, it is possible to produce, in a single fiber, helices with different curvatures. This striking and innovative behavior is observed when one side of the stretched filaments is irradiated with UV light, modifying the mechanical properties at surface. Upon release, the regions with higher curvature start to curl first, while regions with lower intrinsic curvature remain stretched until start to curl later. The results presented here can be important to understand why structures adopt a helical shape in general, which can be of interest in nanotechnology, biomolecular science, or even to understand why plant filaments curl.

  6. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    DOE PAGES

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-24

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. In conclusion, we also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks canmore » be assembled.« less

  7. Helical modes in boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    Observations are presented to show that in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer, beneath free-stream turbulence, the interaction between Klebanoff streaks and naturally arising instability waves leads to helical disturbances which break down to form turbulent spots. This occurs under low to moderate levels, 1%-2%, of free-stream turbulence. At high levels of free-stream turbulence, conventional bypass mechanisms are seen. The helical structures are clearly identifiable in visualizations of isosurfaces of streamwise perturbation velocity. A direct numerical simulation also was performed in zero pressure gradient, with a time-periodic Tollmien-Schlichting wave eigenfunction at the inlet. Again, under a moderate level of free-stream turbulence, helices were observed, and found to trigger transition. Their wave speed is on the order of 1/2 U∞ , so helical breakdown can be viewed as a type of inner mode, secondary instability.

  8. Motion of multiple helical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    In 1912 Joukowsky deduced that in an unbounded ideal fluid a set of helical vortices--when these are equal, coaxial and symmetrically arranged--would translate and rotate steadily while the vortices preserve their form and relative position. Each vortex is an infinite tube whose cross-section is circular (with radius a) and whose centerline is a helix of pitch L and radius R. The motion is thus determined by three non-dimensional parameters only: the number of vortices N, the vortex radius α = a / R and the vortex pitch τ = L / 2 πR . Here, we express the linear and angular velocities of the vortices as the sum of the mutually induced velocities found by Okulov (2004) and the self-induced velocities found by Velasco Fuentes (2015). We verified that our results are accurate over the whole range of values of the vortices' pitch and radius by numerically computing the vortex motion with two smoothed versions of the Biot-Savart law. It was found that the translation velocity U grows with the number of vortices (N) but decreases as the vortices' radius and pitch (a and τ, respectively) increase; in contrast, the rotation velocity Ω grows with N and a but has a local minimum around τ = 1 for fixed values of N and a.

  9. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  10. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baechler, S; Bochud, F O; Verellen, D; Moeckli, R

    2007-08-21

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  11. The motion of helical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    We study the motion of a helical vortex in an inviscid, incompressible fluid of infinite extent. The vortex is a thin tube, of circular cross section and uniform vorticity, whose centerline is a helix of uniform pitch. Ever since Joukowsky (1912) deduced that this vortex is a steady solution of the Euler equations, numerous attempts have been made to compute its self-induced velocity. Here we use Hardin's (1982) solution for the velocity field in order to compute, for any pitch value, the linear and angular velocities of the vortex. Our formulas were verified by direct numerical integration of both the Biot-Savart and Helmholtz equations, and were also found to compare favourably with previous theoretical results. In terms of the vortex capacity to transport fluid, we identified three regimes: a helix of large pitch moves slowly, carrying a large mass of fluid; a thin helix of small pitch moves fast, carrying a small mass of fluid; and a fat helix of small pitch is a moderate carrier itself but it pushes fluid forward along its axis.

  12. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  13. Single-layer Closure with Tongue Flap for Palatal Fistula in Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Abdulla K.; Alwabari, Mufeed Saeed; Almugarrab, Fatimah Jawad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tongue flap is a good option to close a complicated palatal fistula in cleft patients. Most surgeons advocate a double-layer closure to decrease the recurrence rates. In this study, we have reported our experience with a modified single-layer closure with tongue flap in cleft patients. Method: All cases done by a single surgeon using this modified technique in a period of 10 years were retrospectively reviewed. A thorough description of this technique is also provided in the study. Results: Only 5 cases were operated on using this technique. The success rate of all these cases was 100%, with no recurrence of fistula and few complications. Conclusions: This technique provides a way to avoid nasal layer closure in cases where nasal layer is difficult or impossible to close. It also limits the need for a second flap for nasal layer closure. PMID:27622120

  14. Decay of helical and nonhelical magnetic knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-07-01

    We present calculations of the relaxation of magnetic field structures that have the shape of particular knots and links. A set of helical magnetic flux configurations is considered, which we call n-foil knots of which the trefoil knot is the most primitive member. We also consider two nonhelical knots; namely, the Borromean rings as well as a single interlocked flux rope that also serves as the logo of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India. The field decay characteristics of both configurations is investigated and compared with previous calculations of helical and nonhelical triple-ring configurations. Unlike earlier nonhelical configurations, the present ones cannot trivially be reduced via flux annihilation to a single ring. For the n-foil knots the decay is described by power laws that range form t-2/3 to t-1/3, which can be as slow as the t-1/3 behavior for helical triple-ring structures that were seen in earlier work. The two nonhelical configurations decay like t-1, which is somewhat slower than the previously obtained t-3/2 behavior in the decay of interlocked rings with zero magnetic helicity. We attribute the difference to the creation of local structures that contain magnetic helicity which inhibits the field decay due to the existence of a lower bound imposed by the realizability condition. We show that net magnetic helicity can be produced resistively as a result of a slight imbalance between mutually canceling helical pieces as they are being driven apart. We speculate that higher order topological invariants beyond magnetic helicity may also be responsible for slowing down the decay of the two more complicated nonhelical structures mentioned above.

  15. Helical rotary screw expander power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.; Sprankle, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    An energy converter for the development of wet steam geothermal fields is described. A project to evaluate and characterize a helical rotary screw expander for geothermal applications is discussed. The helical screw expander is a positive displacement machine which can accept untreated corrosive mineralized water of any quality from a geothermal well. The subjects of corrosion, mineral deposition, the expansion process, and experience with prototype devices are reported.

  16. A Cross-Linguistic Articulatory Analysis of Palatalization in Korean, English, and Scottish Gaelic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Palatalization refers to a type of coarticulation in which the place of articulation of some sound is closer to the palate than otherwise expected, very often triggered by adjacent palatal segments. It has been known as one of the most dynamic phonological phenomena in phonetic and phonological research, but the articulatory nature of…

  17. Prosthetic management of soft palate cleft--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dosumu, O O; Ogunrinde, T J; Ogundipe, O T

    2006-09-01

    The treatment of cleft in the soft palate can be achieved essentially by surgical reconstruction or prosthetic obturation. The goals of prosthetic intervention are to prevent food and liquid leakage into the nose and to improve speech intelligibility by ensuring functional velopharyngeal port closure. In this report, the prosthetic management of a 5-year-old child with soft palatal cleft is presented. The impression of the cleft was taken with tissue conditioner, Visco -gel, TM (De Trey, Amalgamated Dental London) and the pharyngeal obturator (speech bulb) was made in clear acrylic resin. Patient tolerated the appliance well and was referred to speech therapist for speech articulation.

  18. Palatopharyngeus the missing palatal muscles: Anatomical and physiological review

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Abdelrahman E. M.; El-Shenawy, Hanna M.

    2015-01-01

    The first true anatomical descriptions of the normal anatomy of the palate and pharynx were published by Von Luschka in 1868, and then in 1935 anatomist James Whillis described pharyngeal sphincter. Later, in 1941 Michael Oldfield noted that the muscular elements of the soft palate have a sling-like function. Although there have been conflicting descriptions of the role of the palatopharyngeus, multiple function such as speech, swallowing, and respiration, it could role in all this function. Although, the palatopharyngeus muscle has many important functions, but it remains the missing muscle that we need to know more about it. PMID:26981475

  19. Conditioned taste aversion, drugs of abuse and palatability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-You; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2014-09-01

    We consider conditioned taste aversion to involve a learned reduction in the palatability of a taste (and hence in amount consumed) based on the association that develops when a taste experience is followed by gastrointestinal malaise. The present article evaluates the well-established finding that drugs of abuse, at doses that are otherwise considered rewarding and self-administered, cause intake suppression. Our recent work using lick pattern analysis shows that drugs of abuse also cause a palatability downshift and, therefore, support conditioned taste aversion learning.

  20. Palatalization and intrinsic prosodic vowel features in Russian.

    PubMed

    Ordin, Mikhail

    2011-12-01

    The presented study is aimed at investigating the interaction of palatalization and intrinsic prosodic features of the vowel in CVC (consonant+vowel+consonant) syllables in Russian. The universal nature of intrinsic prosodic vowel features was confirmed with the data from the Russian language. It was found that palatalization of the consonants affects intrinsic fundamental frequency (IFO), intensity (I), and duration of the vowels in CVC syllables by modifying the vowel articulatory parameters such as vowel height and fronting. The obtained results are discussed in the light of opposing theories: those suggesting automatic control and those suggesting active control over intrinsic vowel features.

  1. Influence of initial mean helicity on homogeneous turbulent shear flow.

    PubMed

    Jacobitz, Frank G; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J T; Farge, Marie

    2011-11-01

    Helicity statistics are studied in homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Initial mean helicity is imposed on an isotropic turbulence field using a decomposition of the flow into complex-valued helical waves. The initial decay of the turbulent kinetic energy is weakened in the presence of strong mean helicity, consistent with an analytic analysis of the spectral tensor of velocity correlations. While exponential growth of the mean turbulent kinetic energy is obtained, the mean helicity decays. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of helicity are skewed and show that the imposed mean helicity prevails throughout the simulations. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows a trend to two dimensionalization for large scales of motion and a preference for helical motion at small scales. The magnitude of the skewness of the PDFs decreases for smaller scales. Joint PDFs indicate a strong correlation of the signs of both, helicity and superhelicity, for all cases. This correlation supports the conjecture that superhelicity dissipates helicity.

  2. Bioinspired helical microswimmers based on vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Feng, Xiaomiao; Pei, Allen; Kane, Christopher R; Tam, Ryan; Hennessy, Camille; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-08

    Plant-based bioinspired magnetically propelled helical microswimmers are described. The helical microstructures are derived from spiral water-conducting vessels of different plants, harnessing the intrinsic biological structures of nature. Geometric variables of the spiral vessels, such as the helix diameter and pitch, can be controlled by mechanical stretching for the precise fabrication and consistent performance of helical microswimmers. Xylem vessels of a wide variety of different plants have been evaluated for the consistency and reproducibility of their helical parameters. Sequential deposition of thin Ti and Ni layers directly on the spiral vessels, followed by dicing, leads to an extremely simple and cost-efficient mass-production of functional helical microswimmers. The resulting plant-based magnetic microswimmers display efficient propulsion, with a speed of over 250 μm/s, as well as powerful locomotion in biological media such as human serum. The influence of actuation frequencies on the swimming velocity is investigated. Such use of plant vessels results in significant savings in the processing costs and provides an extremely simple, cost-effective fabrication route for the large-scale production of helical magnetic swimmers.

  3. The AGS with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  4. FILAMENT CHANNEL FORMATION VIA MAGNETIC HELICITY CONDENSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-08-20

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear in the form of filament channels at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. In this paper we address the problem of filament channel formation and show how filaments acquire their shear and magnetic helicity. The results of three-dimensional (3D) simulations using the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver are presented. Our findings support the model of filament channel formation by magnetic helicity condensation that was developed by Antiochos. We consider the small-scale photospheric twisting of a quasi-potential flux system that is bounded by a PIL and contains a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by the small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH. This process produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth, and are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH. The accumulated helicity and shear flux are shown to be in excellent quantitative agreement with the helicity condensation model. We present a detailed analysis of the simulations, including comparisons of our analytical and numerical results, and discuss their implications for observations.

  5. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  6. Gpr177-mediated Wnt Signaling Is Required for Secondary Palate Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Wang, M; Zhao, W; Yuan, X; Yang, X; Li, Y; Qiu, M; Zhu, X-J; Zhang, Z

    2015-07-01

    Cleft palate represents one of the major congenital birth defects in humans. Despite the essential roles of ectodermal canonical Wnt and mesenchymal Wnt signaling in the secondary palate development, the function of mesenchymal canonical Wnt activity in secondary palate development remains elusive. Here we show that Gpr177, a highly conserved transmembrane protein essential for Wnt trafficking, is required for secondary palate development. Gpr177 is expressed in both epithelium and mesenchyme of palatal shelves during mouse development. Wnt1(Cre)-mediated deletion of Gpr177 in craniofacial neural crest cells leads to a complete cleft secondary palate, which is formed mainly due to aberrant cell proliferation and increased cell death in palatal shelves. By BATGAL staining, we reveal an intense canonical Wnt activity in the anterior palate mesenchyme of E12.5 wild-type embryos but not in Gpr177(Wnt1-Cre) embryos, suggesting that mesenchymal canonical Wnt signaling activated by Gpr177-mediated mesenchymal Wnts is critical for secondary palate development. Moreover, phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun is impaired in the Gpr177(Wnt1-Cre) palate and is restored by implantation of Wnt5a-soaked beads in the in vitro palate explants, suggesting that Gpr177 probably regulates palate development via the Wnt5a-mediated noncanonical Wnt pathway in which c-Jun and JNK are involved. Importantly, certain cellular processes and the altered gene expression in palates lacking Gpr177 are distinct from that of the Wnt5a mutant, further demonstrating involvement of other mesenchymal Wnts in the process of palate development. Together, these results suggest that mesenchymal Gpr177 is required for secondary palate development by regulating and integrating mesenchymal canonical and noncanonical Wnt signals.

  7. The influence of helical background fields on current helicity and electromotive force of magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Küker, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the empirical finding that the known hemispheric rules for the current helicity at the solar surface are not strict, we demonstrate the excitation of small-scale current helicity by the influence of large-scale helical magnetic background fields on nonrotating magnetoconvection. This is shown within a quasilinear analytic theory of driven turbulence and by nonlinear simulations of magnetoconvection that the resulting small-scale current helicity has the same sign as the large-scale current helicity, while the ratio of both pseudoscalars is of the order of the magnetic Reynolds number of the convection. The same models do not provide finite values of the small-scale kinetic helicity. On the other hand, a turbulence-induced electromotive force is produced including the diamagnetic pumping term, as well as the eddy diffusivity but, however, no α effect. It has thus been argued that the relations for the simultaneous existence of small-scale current helicity and α effect do not hold for the model of nonrotating magnetoconvection under consideration. Calculations for various values of the magnetic Prandtl number demonstrate that, for the considered diffusivities, the current helicity increases for growing magnetic Reynolds number, which is not true for the velocity of the diamagnetic pumping, which is in agreement with the results of the quasilinear analytical approximation.

  8. Helical buckling of pipes in extended reach and horizontal wells -- Part 1: Preventing helical buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.; Lu, R. . Petroleum Engineering Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    This paper studies the helical buckling of pipes (drillstring and tubing) in extended reach and horizontal wells, theoretically and experimentally, resulting in new equations to correctly predict and effectively prevent the helical buckling of pipes in such wells. The theoretically study shows that the so-called helical buckling load that appears in the current literature is only the average axial load in the helical buckling development process. The laboratory experiments confirm the theoretical analysis. The new helical buckling load equations are formulated by combining the theoretical analysis and the experimental results, thereby resolving the existing assumption-and-result inconsistency in the current literature. The new equation predicts the true helical buckling load to be about 1.3 times the so-called helical buckling load in the current literature, and about 1.8 times the critical buckling load that predicts the onset of sinusoidal buckling. Consequently, larger bit weights or packer setting loads can be applied to increase the drilling rate or to ensure a proper seal, before the helical buckling of the pipes can occur.

  9. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  10. Memory-dependent effects on palatability in mice.

    PubMed

    Austen, Joseph M; Strickland, Jasmin A; Sanderson, David J

    2016-12-01

    While palatability depends on the properties of particular foods, it is also determined by prior experience, suggesting that memory affects the hedonic value of a substance. Here, we report two procedures that affect palatability in mice: negative contrast and flavour habituation. A microstructure analysis of licking behaviour was employed, with the lick cluster size (the number of licks made in quick succession before a pause) used as a measure of palatability. It was first confirmed that lick cluster size increased monotonically as a function of sucrose concentration, whereas consumption followed an inverted U-shaped function. In a successive negative contrast procedure it was found that when shifted from a high sucrose concentration (32%) to a low sucrose concentration (4%), mice made smaller lick clusters than a group that only received the low concentration. Mice exposed to flavours (cherry or grape Kool Aid) mixed with sucrose (16%) made larger lick clusters for familiar flavours compared to novel flavours. This habituation effect was evident after short (5min) and long (24h) test intervals. Both successive negative contrast and flavour habituation failed to affect levels of consumption. Collectively, the results show that prior experience can have effects on lick cluster size that are equivalent to increasing or decreasing the sweetness of a solution. Thus, palatability is not a fixed property of a substance but is dependent on expectation or familiarity that occurs as a result of memory.

  11. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  12. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  13. Production of Two Nasal Sounds by Speakers With Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Bressmann, Tim; Radovanovic, Bojana; Harper, Susan; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David; Kulkarni, Gajanan V

    2016-12-29

    Manyspeakers with cleft palate develop atypical consonant productions, especially for pressure consonants such as plosives, fricatives, and affricates. The present study investigated the nature of nasal sound errors. The participants were eight female and three male speakers with cleft palate between the ages of 6 to 20. Speakers were audio-recorded, and midsagittal tongue movement was captured with ultrasound. The speakers repeated vowel-consonant-vowel with the vowels /α/, /i/, and /u/ and the alveolar and velar nasal consonants /n/ and //. The productions were reviewed by three listeners. The participants showed a variety of different placement errors and insertions of plosives, as well as liquid productions. There was considerable error variability between and within speakers, often related to the different vowel contexts. Three speakers co-produced click sounds. The study demonstrated the wide variety of sound errors that some speakers with cleft palate may demonstrate for nasal sounds. Nasal sounds, ideally in different vowel contexts, should be included in articulation screenings for speakers with cleft palate, perhaps more than is currently the case.

  14. Composition and Palatability of Breads Made with Ground Soybean Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Barbara P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Ground soy products made from whole soybeans were used in bread as substitutes for 12 percent of the wheat flour to demonstrate that home-prepared soy products can be used to bake palatable breads and supplement their protein content. (Author/SK)

  15. [A cause of palatal necrosis not to ignore].

    PubMed

    Boulagnon, Camille; Kovacs, Ovidiu-Bujor; Patey, Martine

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral nasal septum and hard palate perforation in a 42-years-old man. The diagnosis retained after differential diagnosis exclusion was necrotic midfacial lesion due to chronic inhalation of cocaine. This condition can mimic vasculitis, primary tumors and granulomatous infections. Differential diagnosis and pathophysiology of this condition will be discussed in this anatomo-clinical case.

  16. Palatability of tastes is associated with facial circulatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hamada, Yuka; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2014-03-01

    To examine whether various types of taste stimuli in the oral cavity elicit unique changes in facial skin blood flow (SkBF) according to the palatability perceived by an individual, the facial SkBF was observed by laser speckle flowgraphy in 15 healthy subjects (11 males and 4 females) before and during the ingestion of bitter tea, chilli sauce, coffee, orange juice, soup, and a water control. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and SkBF in the index finger were recorded continuously. Subjects reported their subjective palatability and taste intensity scores after each stimulus. The vascular conductance indexes (CIs) in the face and finger were calculated as ratios of SkBF to MAP. CI in the eyelid increased significantly in response to chilli sauce, orange juice, and soup, whereas CIs in the forehead, nose, and cheek decreased in response to bitter tea. There was a significant correlation between the palatability scores and CI values in the eyelid when changes induced by chilli sauce were excluded. These results suggest that the facial circulatory response reflects the degree of palatability of a foodstuff.

  17. [Lipid peroxidation indices in children with congenital cleft palate].

    PubMed

    Nagirnyĭ, Ia P

    1989-01-01

    Observed were 66 children with congenital palate clefts and a control group of 25 children. The data suggest that the disease involves the lipid peroxidation disorders and impairment of the antioxydative defence. The results can be used for designing the antioxydant and membrane-stabilizing therapies in out-patient departments.

  18. Progressive Ataxia and Palatal Tremor: Think about POLG Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mongin, Marie; Delorme, Cécile; Lenglet, Timothée; Jardel, Claude; Vignal, Catherine; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) can be observed in both acquired brainstem or cerebellar lesions and genetic disorders. Phenomenology shown PAPT due to mutation in POLG, the gene encoding the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Educational value POLG mutation should be considered in patients with PAPT, particularly when additional clues such as a sensory neuronopathy or an ophthalmoplegia are present. PMID:27351300

  19. Liposomal delivery system for topical anaesthesia of the palatal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Franz-Montan, M; de Paula, E; Groppo, F C; Silva, A L R; Ranali, J; Volpato, M C

    2012-01-01

    An effective topical agent to reduce pain during local anaesthesia of the palate is not yet available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of liposome-encapsulated ropivacaine in different concentrations for topical anaesthesia of the palatal mucosa. In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study 40 (20 male) healthy volunteers were randomised to be given: liposome-encapsulated 2% ropivacaine, liposome-encapsulated 1% ropivacaine, a eutectic mixture of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine (EMLA), and liposomal placebo gel, topically on to the palatal mucosa of the right canine region for 5 min each, at four different sessions. Pain associated with insertion of a 30G needle, and with injection of a local anaesthetic, was rated on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The effect of liposomal ropivacaine 1% and 2% did not differ from that of placebo (p=0.3 and p=0.1, respectively) in reducing pain during insertion of the needle. Lower VAS were obtained with EMLA. In this group VAS were lower in women than men (p=0.007). There was no difference in VAS among groups (p=0.3) as far as injection of the local anaesthetic was concerned. In conclusion, liposomal-encapsulated ropivacaine formulations did not reduce the pain of insertion of a needle into the palatal mucosa. None of the anaesthetic formulations tested, including the positive control (EMLA), were effective in reducing the pain of an injection of local anaesthetic compared with placebo.

  20. Speech and language in the patient with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Mildinhall, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the normal development of speech and speech problems that may arise for the child born with cleft lip and/or palate. It describes current trends and the importance of multidisciplinary working in this complex field. The contribution of the speech and language therapist to the management of this population is considered.

  1. Adaptation to an Electropalatograph Palate: Acoustic, Impressionistic, and Perceptual Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Sharynne; Searl, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. Method: Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to…

  2. Palatal Complexity Revisited: An Electropalatographic Analysis of /image omitted/ in Brazilian Portuguese with Comparison to Peninsular Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shosted, Ryan; Hualde, Jose Ignacio; Scarpace, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Are palatal consonants articulated by multiple tongue gestures (coronal and dorsal) or by a single gesture that brings the tongue into contact with the palate at several places of articulation? The lenition of palatal consonants (resulting in approximants) has been presented as evidence that palatals are simple, not complex: When reduced, they do…

  3. Hydrogels of Superlong Helices to Synthesize Hybrid Ag-Helical Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guihua; Wang, Yitong; Wang, Ling; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-11-22

    The gelation behavior of mixtures of sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and glutathione (GSH) in water is investigated. The system exhibits a structural transition of self-assembled hydrogels from nanofibers to nanohelix structures, and then to helical ribbons with increasing GSH concentration. Superlong helical nanofibers with left- and right-handed orientations are produced by tuning the concentration of GSH at a fixed concentration of NaDC. Random coil and β-sheet structures are significant for the formation of the helical structures, and are indicated by circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The mechanical strength of the "weak" hydrogels is enhanced by the introduction of appropriate suitable amount of AgNO3. Furthermore, the controlled growth of Ag nanoparticles at spatially arranged locations along the nanohelices (hybrid Ag-helical nanomaterial) is readily achieved by UV reduction of Ag (I) ions on the supramolecular helical templates.

  4. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    PubMed

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog.

  5. Radical Dissection of Greater Palatine Artery and Dynamic Reconstruction of Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nauman Ahmad; Chaudry, Ayesha; Ishaq, Irfan; Aslam, Muhammad; Shamim, Romaisa; Kafeel, Mirza Muhammad; Aazam, Muhammad; Sailer, Hermann; Ganatra, Muhammad Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Restoration of proper anatomy and physiology is an integral part of cleft palate repair. The senior author has devised a new technique of radical release of greater palatine vessels, which helps in achieving tension-free closure of palatal cleft. In addition, release and transposition of palatal muscles is performed without the use of operative microscope, resulting in improved palatal function. This technique is applicable to all types of clefts of the palate and can be performed on adult patients as well. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective case series of cleft palate repairs performed over a period of 3 years. Single-stage repair with modified Bardach’s technique for complete cleft palate and von Langenbeck’s technique for incomplete cleft palate with radical release of greater palatine vessels and levator complex retropositioning was performed. The outcome measures were closure of palatal defect and speech production. A follow-up of at least 6 months was completed in each patient. Results: A total of 1568 patients were included in the study. Their age ranged from 9 months to 54 years. The overall fistula rate was 6.1%. Improvement of speech was observed even in adult patients. Conclusions: Radical release of greater palatine artery and levator complex transposition can dramatically improve results of cleft palate repair. This technique helps in dynamic reconstruction of cleft palate and can be effectively applied in all age groups. PMID:28280675

  6. Structure and Protein-Protein Interaction Studies on Chlamydia trachomatis Protein CT670 (YscO Homolog)

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzini, Emily; Singer, Alexander; Singh, Bhag; Lam, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Savchenko, Alexei; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2010-07-28

    Comparative genomic studies have identified many proteins that are found only in various Chlamydiae species and exhibit no significant sequence similarity to any protein in organisms that do not belong to this group. The CT670 protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the proteins whose genes are in one of the type III secretion gene clusters but whose cellular functions are not known. CT670 shares several characteristics with the YscO protein of Yersinia pestis, including the neighboring genes, size, charge, and secondary structure, but the structures and/or functions of these proteins remain to be determined. Although a BLAST search with CT670 did not identify YscO as a related protein, our analysis indicated that these two proteins exhibit significant sequence similarity. In this paper, we report that the CT670 crystal, solved at a resolution of 2 {angstrom}, consists of a single coiled coil containing just two long helices. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that in solution CT670 exists in both monomeric and dimeric forms and that the monomer predominates at lower protein concentrations. We examined the interaction of CT670 with many type III secretion system-related proteins (viz., CT091, CT665, CT666, CT667, CT668, CT669, CT671, CT672, and CT673) by performing bacterial two-hybrid assays. In these experiments, CT670 was found to interact only with the CT671 protein (YscP homolog), whose gene is immediately downstream of ct670. A specific interaction between CT670 and CT671 was also observed when affinity chromatography pull-down experiments were performed. These results suggest that CT670 and CT671 are putative homologs of the YcoO and YscP proteins, respectively, and that they likely form a chaperone-effector pair.

  7. Association of achondroplasia with Down syndrome: difficulty in prenatal diagnosis by sonographic and 3-D helical computed tomographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akimune; Murotsuki, Jun; Kamimura, Miki; Kimura, Masato; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Kanno, Junko; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia and Down syndrome are relatively common conditions individually. But co-occurrence of both conditions in the same patient is rare and there have been no reports of fetal analysis of this condition by prenatal sonographic and three-dimensional (3-D) helical computed tomography (CT). Prenatal sonographic findings seen in persons with Down syndrome, such as a thickened nuchal fold, cardiac defects, and echogenic bowel were not found in the patient. A prenatal 3-D helical CT revealed a large head with frontal bossing, metaphyseal flaring of the long bones, and small iliac wings, which suggested achondroplasia. In a case with combination of achondroplasia and Down syndrome, it may be difficult to diagnose the co-occurrence prenatally without typical markers of Down syndrome.

  8. Rat embryonic palatal shelves respond to TCDD in organ culture

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1990-05-01

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, is teratogenic in mice, inducing cleft palate (CP) and hydronephrosis at doses which are not overtly maternally or embryo toxic. Palatal shelves of embryonic mice respond to TCDD, both in vivo and in organ culture, with altered differentiation of medial epithelial cells. By contrast, in the rat TCDD produces substantial maternal, embryonic, and fetal toxicity, including fetal lethality, with few malformations. In this study the possible effects of maternal toxicity on induction of cleft palate were eliminated by exposure of embryonic rat palatal shelves in organ culture. The shelves were examined for specific TCDD-induced alterations in differentiation of the medial cells. On Gestation Day (GD) 14 or 15 palatal shelves from embryonic F344 rats were placed in organ culture for 2 to 3 days (IMEM:F12 medium, 5% FBS, 0.1% DMSO) containing 0, 1 x 10(-8), 1 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-10), or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. The medial epithelial peridermal cells degenerated on shelves exposed to control media or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. Exposure to 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8) M TCDD inhibited this degeneration in 20, 36, and 60% of the shelves, respectively, and was statistically significant at the two highest doses. A normally occurring decrease in (3H)TdR incorporation was inhibited in some GD 15 shelves cultured with 10(-10) and 10(-9) M TCDD. The medial cells of TCDD-exposed shelves continued to express high levels of immunohistochemically detected EGF receptors. The altered differentiation of rat medial epithelium is similar to that reported for TCDD-exposed mouse medial cells in vivo and in vitro. However, in order to obtain these responses, the cultured rat shelves require much higher concentrations of TCDD than the mouse shelves.

  9. Assessment of palatability attributes of the major beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, L E; Gibson, L L; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R

    2003-11-01

    One kilogram roasts from 33 muscles or muscle groups from 25 Canada AA steer carcasses were evaluated for palatability after roasting to 72 °C internal temperature in an electric convection oven preheated to 177 °C. Initial tenderness ranged from moderately tough to tender. All butt tender and tenderloin samples were tender on the first bite, but less than 10% of the rib cap (top and lower portions), deckle point, brisket, and eye of round samples were rated tender on the first bite. Overall tenderness also ranged from moderately tough to tender. All of the tenderloin, butt tender, rib-eye cap, and cross rib samples were rated tender overall, but none of the deckle point samples were rated tender overall. Perceptible connective tissue ranged from slight to moderately abundant. Juiciness ranged from slightly dry to moderately juicy. All of the tenderloin, cross rib cap, rib-eye cap, tri tip, flap meat, short rib, and skirt samples were rated juicy, but 40% or less of the shoulder, eye of round, and loss side samples were rated juicy. Beef flavor intensity ranged from slightly to moderately intense, and flavor desirability ranged from slightly undesirable to moderately desirable. All tenderloin, butt tender, striploin, rib-eye, and cross rib cap samples were rated desirable in overall palatability, but 25% or less of the rib cap (top and lower portions), shank meat, eye of round, brisket, and deckle point samples were rated desirable in overall palatability. To the extent desirability to the panel utilized is representative of consumer acceptance, only the tenderloin, butt tender, rib-eye cap, cross rib, cross rib cap, and rib-eye either met or came close to meeting the Canadian Cattlemen's Association's goal of 95% acceptance based upon palatability. Consequently, effective postmortem intervention techniques or alternative cooking methods must be developed and applied to improve the palatability of most beef muscles, if the aforementioned goal is to be achieved.

  10. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  11. DNS of helicity-induced stratified turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandy, Abhilash J.; Rahimi, Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Helical flows undergoing density stratification have wide applications in meteorological phenomena such as dust devils, tornadoes, and hurricanes due to the complexity and disasters caused by them. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of transition to turbulence in a stably stratified Boussinesq fluid are presented for different rotation and stratification intensities. In order to understand the effect of velocity on the energy cascade, comparisons are made between helicity initiated and non-helical flows. Results show that stratification decelerates the helicity decay and causes velocity and vorticity to align with each other. With respect to the helical and non-helical flow comparisons, the total energy in the presence of stratification decays faster with helicity. In addition, the behavior of length scales were examined by comparing temporal variations of the vertical shearing of velocities. Results showed a growing asymmetry with time in the case of helical flow, while non-helical flow stayed close to begin symmetric.

  12. Fabrication and experimentation of FRP helical spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanthappa, J.; Shiva Shankar, G. S.; Amith, B. M.; Gagan, M.

    2016-09-01

    In present scenario, the automobile industry sector is showing increased interest in reducing the unsprung weight of the automobile & hence increasing the fuel Efficiency. One of the feasible sub systems of a vehicle where weight reduction may be attempted is vehicle- suspension system. Usage of composite material is a proven way to lower the component weight without any compromise in strength. The composite materials are having high specific strength, more elastic strain energy storage capacity in comparison with those of steel. Therefore, helical coil spring made of steel is replaceable by composite cylindrical helical coil spring. This research aims at preparing a re-usable mandrel (mould) of Mild steel, developing a setup for fabrication, fabrication of FRP helical spring using continuous glass fibers and Epoxy Resin (Polymer). Experimentation has been conducted on fabricated FRP helical spring to determine its strength parameters & for failure analysis. It is found that spring stiffness (K) of Glass/Epoxy helical-spring is greater than steel-coil spring with reduced weight.

  13. TURBULENT DYNAMOS WITH SHEAR AND FRACTIONAL HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepylae, Petri J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2009-07-10

    Dynamo action owing to helically forced turbulence and large-scale shear is studied using direct numerical simulations. The resulting magnetic field displays propagating wave-like behavior. This behavior can be modeled in terms of an {alpha}{omega} dynamo. In most cases super-equipartition fields are generated. By varying the fraction of helicity of the turbulence the regeneration of poloidal fields via the helicity effect (corresponding to the {alpha}-effect) is regulated. The saturation level of the magnetic field in the numerical models is consistent with a linear dependence on the ratio of the fractional helicities of the small and large-scale fields, as predicted by a simple nonlinear mean-field model. As the magnetic Reynolds number (Re{sub M}) based on the wavenumber of the energy-carrying eddies is increased from 1 to 180, the cycle frequency of the large-scale field is found to decrease by a factor of about 6 in cases where the turbulence is fully helical. This is interpreted in terms of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity, which is found to be only weakly dependent on the Re{sub M}.

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2007-03-01

    Multislice CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multislice CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. Moreover, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by using a lung cancer screening algorithm built into mobile helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening done in the region without the hospital. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system.

  15. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  16. An adaptive approach to metal artifact reduction in helical computed tomography for radiation therapy treatment planning: Experimental and clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdia, Mehran; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc . E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, an approach to metal artifact reduction is proposed that is practical for clinical use in radiation therapy. It is based on a new interpolation scheme of the projections associated with metal implants in helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. Methods and Materials: A three-step approach was developed consisting of an automatic algorithm for metal implant detection, a correction algorithm for helical projections, and a new, efficient algorithm for projection interpolation. The modified raw projection data are transferred back to the CT scanner device where CT slices are regenerated using the built-in reconstruction operator. The algorithm was tested on a CT calibration phantom in which the density of inserted objects are known and on clinical prostate cases with two hip prostheses. The results are evaluated using the CT number and shape of the objects. Results: The validations on a CT calibration phantom with various inserts of known densities show that the algorithm improved the overall image quality by restoring the shape and the representative CT number of the objects in the image. For the clinical hip replacement cases, a large fraction of the bladder, rectum, and prostate that were not visible on the original CT slices were recovered using the algorithm. Precise contouring of the target volume was thus feasible. Without this enhancement, physicians would have drawn bigger margins to be sure to include the target and, at the same time, could have prescribed a lower dose to keep the same level of normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: In both phantom experiment and patient studies, the algorithm resulted in significant artifact reduction with increases in the reliability of planning procedure for the case of metallic hip prostheses. This algorithm is now clinically used as a preprocessing before treatment planning for metal artifact reduction.

  17. Working member of a helical downhole motor for drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kochnev, A.M.; Vshivkov, A.N.; Goldobin, V.B.

    1993-06-22

    A working member of a helical downhole motor is described for drilling wells comprising: separate tubular sections having helical teeth arranged in succession and interconnected by connecting elements, each connecting element having the form of a ring, rigidly secured at the tubular sections and having helical teeth of a pitch and a direction equal to a pitch and a direction, respectively, of the helical teeth of the tubular sections, whereas a profile of the helical teeth of the ring is equidistant to a profile of the helical teeth of the sections.

  18. A helically distorted MHD flux rope model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, Michael L.; Montgomery, David

    1990-01-01

    A flux rope model is proposed which has a variable degree of helical distortion from axisymmetry. The basis for this suggestion is a series of numerical and analytical investigations of magnetohydrodynamic states which result when an axial electric current is directed down on dc magnetic field. The helically distorted states involve a flow velocity and seem to be favored because of their lower rate of energy dissipation. Emphasis is on the magnetometer and particle energy analyzer traces that might be characteristic of such flux ropes. It is shown that even a fractionally small helical distortion may considerably alter the traces in minimum-variance coordinates. In short, what may be fairly common MHD processes can render a flux rope almost unrecognizable under standard diagnostics, even if the departures from axisymmetry are not great.

  19. Helicity and singular structures in fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, H. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Helicity is, like energy, a quadratic invariant of the Euler equations of ideal fluid flow, although, unlike energy, it is not sign definite. In physical terms, it represents the degree of linkage of the vortex lines of a flow, conserved when conditions are such that these vortex lines are frozen in the fluid. Some basic properties of helicity are reviewed, with particular reference to (i) its crucial role in the dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in cosmic systems; (ii) its bearing on the existence of Euler flows of arbitrarily complex streamline topology; (iii) the constraining role of the analogous magnetic helicity in the determination of stable knotted minimum-energy magnetostatic structures; and (iv) its role in depleting nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes equations, with implications for the coherent structures and energy cascade of turbulence. In a final section, some singular phenomena in low Reynolds number flows are briefly described. PMID:24520175

  20. Helical motion of chiral liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Sano, Masaki

    Artificial swimmers have been intensively studied to understand the mechanism of the locomotion and collective behaviors of cells and microorganisms. Among them, most of the artificial swimmers are designed to move along the straight path. However, in biological systems, chiral dynamics such as circular and helical motion are quite common because of the chirality of their bodies, which are made of chiral biomolecules. To understand the role of the chirality in the physics of microswimmers, we designed chiral artificial swimmers and the theoretical model for the chiral motion. We found that chiral liquid crystal droplets, when dispersed in surfactant solutions, swim in the helical path induced by the Marangoni effect. We will discuss the mechanism of the helical motion with our phenomenological model. This work is supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (Grant No. 26.9814), and MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 25103004.

  1. Unusually Stable Helical Coil Allotrope of Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Guan, Jie; Jiang, Jingwei; Tománek, David

    2016-12-14

    We have identified an unusually stable helical coil allotrope of phosphorus. Our ab initio density functional theory calculations indicate that the uncoiled, isolated straight one-dimensional chain is equally stable as a monolayer of black phosphorus dubbed phosphorene. The coiling tendency and the attraction between adjacent coil segments add an extra stabilization energy of ∼12 meV/atom to the coil allotrope, similar in value to the ∼16 meV/atom interlayer attraction in bulk black phosphorus. Thus, the helical coil structure is essentially as stable as black phosphorus, the most stable phosphorus allotrope known to date. With an optimum radius of 2.4 nm, the helical coil of phosphorus may fit well and even form inside wide carbon nanotubes.

  2. Generation of acoustic helical wavefronts using metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that acoustic waves with helical wavefronts can carry angular momentum, which can be transmitted towards a propagating medium. Such a wave field can be achieved by using a planar array of electroacoustic transducers, forming a given spatial distribution of phased sound sources which produce the desired helical wavefronts. Here, we introduce a technique to generate acoustic vortices, based on the passive acoustic metasurface concept. The proposed metasurface is composed of space-coiled cylindrical unit cells transmitting sound pressure with a controllable phase shift, which are arranged in a discretized circular configuration, and thus passively transforming an incident plane wavefront into the desired helical wavefront. This method presents the advantage of overcoming the restrictions on using many acoustic sources, and it is implemented with a transmitting metasurface which can be easily three-dimensionally printed. The proposed straightforward design principle can be adopted for easy production of acoustic angular momentum with minimum complexity and using a single source.

  3. Structural Transition from Helices to Hemihelices

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tianxiang; Bertoldi, Katia; Clarke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are amongst the most common structures in nature and in some cases, such as tethered plant tendrils, a more complex but related shape, the hemihelix forms. In its simplest form it consists of two helices of opposite chirality joined by a perversion. A recent, simple experiment using elastomer strips reveals that hemihelices with multiple reversals of chirality can also occur, a richness not anticipated by existing analyses. Here, we show through analysis and experiments that the transition from a helical to a hemihelical shape, as well as the number of perversions, depends on the height to width ratio of the strip's cross-section. Our findings provides the basis for the deterministic manufacture of a variety of complex three-dimensional shapes from flat strips. PMID:24759785

  4. Large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a nonlocal inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic field. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2008-03-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The function to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and security improvement of medical information.

  6. Helicity and nuclear β decay correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ran; Sternberg, Matthew G.; Garcia, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    We present simple derivations of nuclear β-decay correlations with an emphasis on the special role of helicity. This topic provides a good opportunity to teach students about helicity and chirality in particle physics with exercises that use simple aspects of quantum mechanics. In addition, this paper serves as an introduction to nuclear β-decay correlations from both a theoretical and experimental perspective. This article can be used to introduce students to ongoing experiments searching for hints of new physics in the low-energy precision frontier.

  7. Helical Lattice Vibrational Modes in DNA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-10

    VIBRATIONAL MODES IN DNA(U) PURDUE UNIV l’ LAFAYETTE IND DEPT OF PHYSICS V V PRRGHU ET AL. UNCLR~~lll’ 16I MAR *6 N99914...Initiative Organization 1400014-86-K-0252 Washinton, D.C. 20301-7100 %0 %0 .0 Helical Lattixce Vibrational ’ Modes in DNA V.V. Prabhu, ’.,.K. Sclhrol!, L.L...8217+"+ " ’. % " " % ") . " ". ".",°. " . % % . . ,.-. -.-. -. ,, . . - . -]. o % % % o. -.-. , .%** %-N% Revised version Helical Lattice Vibrational Modes in DNA 1 A recent

  8. EVOLUTION OF RELATIVE MAGNETIC HELICITY AND CURRENT HELICITY IN NOAA ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Lee, Jeongwoo; Xu, Yan; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin; Park, Sung-Hong; Wiegelmann, Thomas E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu E-mail: freemler@kasi.re.kr E-mail: wiegelmann@linmpi.mpg.de

    2012-06-10

    Both magnetic and current helicities are crucial ingredients for describing the complexity of active-region magnetic structure. In this Letter, we present the temporal evolution of these helicities contained in NOAA active region 11158 during five days from 2011 February 12 to 16. The photospheric vector magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory were used as the boundary conditions for the coronal field extrapolation under the assumption of nonlinear force-free field, from which we calculated both relative magnetic helicity and current helicity. We construct a time-altitude diagram in which altitude distribution of the magnitude of current helicity density is displayed as a function of time. This diagram clearly shows a pattern of upwardly propagating current helicity density over two days prior to the X2.2 flare on February 15 with an average propagation speed of {approx}36 m s{sup -1}. The propagation is synchronous with the emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere, and indicative of a gradual energy buildup for the X2.2 flare. The time profile of the relative magnetic helicity shows a monotonically increasing trend most of the time, but a pattern of increasing and decreasing magnetic helicity above the monotonic variation appears prior to each of two major flares, M6.6 and X2.2, respectively. The physics underlying this bump pattern is not fully understood. However, the fact that this pattern is apparent in the magnetic helicity evolution but not in the magnetic flux evolution makes it a useful indicator in forecasting major flares.

  9. A Shh-Foxf-Fgf18-Shh Molecular Circuit Regulating Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyue; Liu, Han; Lan, Yu; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Jiang, Rulang

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is among the most common birth defects in humans. Previous studies have shown that Shh signaling plays critical roles in palate development and regulates expression of several members of the forkhead-box (Fox) family transcription factors, including Foxf1 and Foxf2, in the facial primordia. Although cleft palate has been reported in mice deficient in Foxf2, whether Foxf2 plays an intrinsic role in and how Foxf2 regulates palate development remain to be elucidated. Using Cre/loxP-mediated tissue-specific gene inactivation in mice, we show that Foxf2 is required in the neural crest-derived palatal mesenchyme for normal palatogenesis. We found that Foxf2 mutant embryos exhibit altered patterns of expression of Shh, Ptch1, and Shox2 in the developing palatal shelves. Through RNA-seq analysis, we identified over 150 genes whose expression was significantly up- or down-regulated in the palatal mesenchyme in Foxf2-/- mutant embryos in comparison with control littermates. Whole mount in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the Foxf2 mutant embryos exhibit strikingly corresponding patterns of ectopic Fgf18 expression in the palatal mesenchyme and concomitant loss of Shh expression in the palatal epithelium in specific subdomains of the palatal shelves that correlate with where Foxf2, but not Foxf1, is expressed during normal palatogenesis. Furthermore, tissue specific inactivation of both Foxf1 and Foxf2 in the early neural crest cells resulted in ectopic activation of Fgf18 expression throughout the palatal mesenchyme and dramatic loss of Shh expression throughout the palatal epithelium. Addition of exogenous Fgf18 protein to cultured palatal explants inhibited Shh expression in the palatal epithelium. Together, these data reveal a novel Shh-Foxf-Fgf18-Shh circuit in the palate development molecular network, in which Foxf1 and Foxf2 regulate palatal shelf growth downstream of Shh signaling, at least in part, by repressing Fgf18 expression in the palatal

  10. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  11. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  12. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  13. Cleft size at the time of palate repair in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate as an indicator of maxillary growth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-F; Prasad, N K K; Chiu, Y-T; Yun, C; Chen, P K-T

    2010-10-01

    Cleft size at the time of palate repair might affect the difficulty of surgical repair and, thus, indirectly postoperative maxillary growth. This retrospective study aimed to determine whether a correlation existed between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 39 infants with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, taken at the time of palate repair, were used to measure cleft size. Cleft size was defined as the percentage of the total palatal area. The later growth of the maxilla was determined using lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs taken at 9 years of age. The Pearson correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. The results showed negative correlations between cleft size and the maxillary length (PMP-ANS, PMP-A) and the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA). These data suggest that in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate there is a significant correlation between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the maxillary length and protrusion. Patients with a large cleft at the time of palate repair have a shorter and more retrusive maxilla than those with a small cleft by the age of 9 years.

  14. The role of the mandible in mouse palatal development revisited.

    PubMed

    Jelínek, R; Peterka, M

    1977-07-01

    Growth changes associated with formation of the secondary palate were studied in H-Velaz mouse embryos by morphometric measurement of medial sagittal sections of the heads between days 13 and 15 of embryonic development. Horizontalization of the palatine processes depends primarily on the length of the mandible and is effected by a shift of palatine process material into the supralingual space. The administration of 7.5 mg cortisone acetate im to the female on day 12, of 0.5 mg 6-aminonicotinamide im on day 14, or amniocentesis on day 14 significantly retards growth of the embryo in general and of the mandible in particular without significantly affecting deflexion of the skull base. The different spatial conditions created by disproportion between deflexion of the base and the length of the mandible cause irregularities in the course of horizontalization which lead, as a rule, to cleft palate.

  15. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created.

  16. [The orthodontist and the child with a cleft palate].

    PubMed

    Lesne, C

    2004-09-01

    Dealing with this type of malformation, the orthodontist is confronted with a three-level problem: inter-personal, social, and technical. Because families consider the birth of a cleft palate child to be a disaster, orthodontists who undertake their treatment should understand the genesis of the turbulence that families will have to endure. Most parents learn to deal with these difficulties, but the affected children are going to have to submit to the stares of those they encounter. Adolescence is a critical period for them and it is also the time when they will visit their orthodontist most frequently. Problems that accompany treatment of these patients are numerous and the treating orthodontists must point them out and explain them tactfully. The treating team must also establish a therapeutic alliance to envelop the cleft palate patients, ensuring maintenance of expert cooperation between specialists responsible for different aspects of their treatment.

  17. The influence of forage diets and aging on beef palatability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Busboom, J R; Nelson, M L; O'Fallon, J; Ringkob, T P; Rogers-Klette, K R; Joos, D; Piper, K

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the influence of diet and aging on beef palatability, lipid oxidative stability, and fatty acid composition, crossbred steers were assigned to Feedlot S (alfalfa and grain), Forage TR (triticale and annual ryegrass), Forage TK (triticale and kale), or Forage+Feedlot (grazing ryegrass, fescue and orchardgrass, finished on alfalfa and grain) dietary treatments. Heifers were finished on Feedlot H (alfalfa and grain). Longissimus and tricep muscles were sampled from these animals for steaks and ground beef, respectively. Steaks were either dry- or wet-aged for 14 d. Ground beef was dry-aged, wet-aged for 14 d, or not aged. Trained sensory panelists evaluated palatability attributes of steaks and ground beef. Diet did not influence sensory attributes of steaks or ground beef. Aging impacted (P<0.05) sensory attributes of ground beef. Diet and aging had no impact on lipid oxidative stability but affected fatty acid composition of raw ground beef.

  18. Anorexia/bulimia-related sialadenosis of palatal minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, M D; Fedele, S; Lo Russo, L

    2004-08-01

    In patients affected by alimentary disorders sialadenosis is frequently observed. This non-inflammatory condition is described to affect major salivary glands, leading to the characteristic parotid and/or submandibular swelling. Thus fine-needle aspiration cytology or parotid open biopsy are generally required to diagnose histologically the disorder. We report the case of a 28-year-old patient affected by bulimia/anorexia nervosa who presented, in addition to parotid enlargement, a bilateral symmetric painless soft swelling of the hard palate. The lesion was biopsied and histopathological examination showed the classical features of sialadenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of sialadenosis affecting palatal minor salivary glands. It underlines that when sialadenosis is clinically suspected, clinicians could check also patients' oral cavity for minor salivary glands involvement, in order to potentially avoid invasive extra-oral procedures and to easily confirm diagnosis with an intra-oral biopsy.

  19. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:23213503

  20. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  1. Dynamics of helical states in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Stefano; Auriemma, F.; Brower, D.; Chapman, B. E.; den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Duff, J.; Franz, P.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D.; Lin, L.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Morton, L.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    The thermal and the magnetic dynamics of quasi-single-helicity (QSH) plasmas evolve independently during the formation and sustainment of the core helical structure. At higher plasma current (and Lundquist number) MST plasmas transition from an axisymmetric multi-helicity state to a QSH state characterized by a strong core helical mode and reduced secondary mode amplitudes. Plasmas in the QSH state tend to wall-lock, often in an orientation that is unfavorable for optimized measurements of the 3D structure using MST's advanced diagnostics. Recently a technique to control the locking position through an applied resonant magnetic perturbation has been developed. Using this technique it is possible to adjust the 3D phase more optimally for specific diagnostics, to study the dynamics of the QSH structure and thermal features. The multi-chord FIR interferometer shows the presence of a density structure for the duration of the QSH state. Measurements of the time evolution of the electron temperature profile using the Thomson Scattering diagnostic reveal that the transition to QSH allows the presence of a 3D thermal structure, but this structure is intermittent. Understanding the mechanism(s) driving these dynamics is the goal of this work. Work supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  2. Phase diagram of two interacting helical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul A.; Gutman, D. B.; Carr, Sam T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider two coupled time-reversal-invariant helical edge modes of the same helicity, such as would occur on two stacked quantum spin Hall insulators. In the presence of interaction, the low-energy physics is described by two collective modes, one corresponding to the total current flowing around the edge and the other one describing relative fluctuations between the two edges. We find that quite generically, the relative mode becomes gapped at low temperatures, but only when tunneling between the two helical modes is nonzero. There are two distinct possibilities for the gapped state depending on the relative size of different interactions. If the intraedge interaction is stronger than the interedge interaction, the state is characterized as a spin-nematic phase. However, in the opposite limit, when the interaction between the helical edge modes is strong compared to the interaction within each mode, a spin-density wave forms, with emergent topological properties. First, the gap protects the conducting phase against localization by weak nonmagnetic impurities; second, the protected phase hosts localized zero modes on the ends of the edge that may be created by sufficiently strong nonmagnetic impurities.

  3. Coulomb drag between helical Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainaris, N.; Gornyi, I. V.; Levchenko, A.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study Coulomb drag between two helical edges with broken spin-rotational symmetry, such as would occur in two capacitively coupled quantum spin Hall insulators. For the helical edges, Coulomb drag is particularly interesting because it specifically probes the inelastic interactions that break the conductance quantization for a single edge. Using the kinetic equation formalism, supplemented by bosonization, we find that the drag resistivity ρD exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the temperature T . In the limit of low T ,ρD vanishes with decreasing T as a power law if intraedge interactions are not too strong. This is in stark contrast to Coulomb drag in conventional quantum wires, where ρD diverges at T →0 irrespective of the strength of repulsive interactions. Another unusual property of Coulomb drag between the helical edges concerns higher T for which, unlike in the Luttinger liquid model, drag is mediated by plasmons. The special type of plasmon-mediated drag can be viewed as a distinguishing feature of the helical liquid—because it requires peculiar umklapp scattering only available in the presence of a Dirac point in the electron spectrum.

  4. Helical Gears Modified To Decrease Transmission Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tooth surfaces of helical gears modified, according to proposed design concept, to make gears more tolerant of misalignments and to improve distribution of contact stresses. Results in smaller transmission errors, with concomitant decreases in vibrations and noise and, possibly, increases in service lives.

  5. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  6. Deformation of flexible micro helices under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daieff, Marine; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Morozov, Alexander; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    The interaction of small helices with fluids is important because of its relevance to both fundamental science and technological applications, such as swimming microrobots or microflow sensors. Helically shaped flagella are also exploited by swimming microorganisms to move through their surrounding fluids. Here we study experimentally the deformation of flexible helical ribbons under flow in a microfluidic channel. The size of the helix is typically microscale for the diameter and nanoscale for the thickness. We focus on two different aspects: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Due to the non-uniform distribution of the pitch under distributed loading, we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Utilizing our system, we explore the impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties on the mechanics of helix-fluid interactions.

  7. Synthesis of stabilized alpha-helical peptides.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Federico; Katz, Samuel G

    2014-01-01

    Stabilized alpha-helical (SAH) peptides are valuable laboratory tools to explore important protein-protein interactions. Whereas most peptides lose their secondary structure when isolated from the host protein, stapled peptides incorporate an all-hydrocarbon "staple" that reinforces their natural alpha-helical structure. Thus, stapled peptides retain their functional ability to bind their native protein targets and serve multiple experimental uses. First, they are useful for structural studies such as NMR or crystal structures that map and better define binding sites. Second, they can be used to identify small molecules that specifically target that interaction site. Third, stapled peptides can be used to test the importance of specific amino acid residues or posttranslational modifications to the binding. Fourth, they can serve as structurally competent bait to identify novel binding partners to specific alpha-helical motifs. In addition to markedly improved alpha-helicity, stapled peptides also display resistance to protease cleavage and enhanced cell permeability. Most importantly, they are useful for intracellular experiments that explore the functional consequences of blocking particular protein interactions. Because of their remarkable stability, stapled peptides can be applied to whole-animal, in vivo studies. Here we describe a protocol for the synthesis of a peptide that incorporates an all-hydrocarbon "staple" employing a ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction. With proper optimization, stapled peptides can be a fundamental, accurate laboratory tool in the modern chemical biologist's armory.

  8. Helical mode breakdown in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Results of direct numerical simulation of transition to turbulence in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers beneath free-stream turbulence will be presented. Instability waves are excited spontaneously and may be identified when intensity of free-stream turbulence (Tu) is sufficiently low. At very low Tu 0 . 1 % , secondary instability of the TS waves and at high Tu > 2 % , conventional bypass mechanisms trigger turbulent spot formation. At low Tu 1 % transition proceeds through formation of helical modes. Helical structures as in n = 1 instability modes of axisymmetric wakes and jets are clearly identifiable in visualizations of isosurfaces of stream-wise perturbation velocity. Helical modes also trigger transition at same level of Tu in zero pressure gradient boundary layers as well, provided that the inlet disturbances include a low amplitude time-periodic unstable TS wave. This indicates that these secondary instability modes might arise due to interaction of Klebanoff streaks and instability waves. Characteristically, the helical modes are inner instability modes. This work was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  9. On statistical equilibrium in helical fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2006-06-01

    The statistical mechanics of 3-D helical flows is re-examined for a continuum truncated at a top wavenumber. Based on the principle of equipartition of the flow enstrophy between helical modes, the emerging (i) energy spectrum law "-2" and (ii) formal mathematical analogy between the helicity and the thermodynamic entropy are discussed. It is noted that the "-2" scaling law is consistent with both spectral equilibrium and spectral cascade paradigms. In an attempt to apply the obtained results to a turbulent flow regime within the Earth's outer liquid core, where the net helicity of a turbulent flow component is presumably explained by Earth's rotation, it has been noticed that it is the energy spectral law "-1", but not "-2", which is likely realized there and within the logarithmic accuracy corresponds to the case of the velocity structure function [u(l)]2 independency on the spatial scale l, the latter is consistent with observations. It is argued that the "-1" scaling law can also be interpreted in terms of the spectral equilibrium and it is emphasized that the causes of the likely dominance of the spectral law "-1" over the spectral law "-2" in this geophysical application deserve further investigation and clarification.

  10. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion—a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins—that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magnetic field on spin-polarized electrons. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct visualization of skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets. Topologically, skyrmions are equivalent to magnetic bubbles (cylindrical domains) in ferromagnetic thin films, which were extensively explored in the 1970s for data storage applications. In this study we use Lorentz microscopy to image magnetic domain patterns in the prototypical magnetic oxide–M-type hexaferrite with a hint of scandium. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic bubbles and stripes in the hexaferrite have a much more complex structure than the skyrmions and spirals in helimagnets, which we associate with the new degree of freedom—helicity (or vector spin chirality) describing the direction of spin rotation across the domain walls. We observe numerous random reversals of helicity in the stripe domain state. Random helicity of cylindrical domain walls coexists with the positional order of magnetic bubbles in a triangular lattice. Most unexpectedly, we observe regular helicity reversals inside skyrmions with an unusual multiple-ring structure. PMID:22615354

  11. Helical Pulse Line Structures for Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Waldron, W.L.

    2005-05-01

    The basic concept of the ''Pulse Line Ion Accelerator'' is presented, where pulse power sources create a ramped traveling wave voltage pulse on a helical pulse line. Ions can surf on this traveling wave and achieve energy gains much larger than the peak applied voltage. Tapered and untapered lines are compared, and a transformer coupling technique for launching the wave is described.

  12. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-06-05

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion--a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins--that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magnetic field on spin-polarized electrons. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct visualization of skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets. Topologically, skyrmions are equivalent to magnetic bubbles (cylindrical domains) in ferromagnetic thin films, which were extensively explored in the 1970s for data storage applications. In this study we use Lorentz microscopy to image magnetic domain patterns in the prototypical magnetic oxide-M-type hexaferrite with a hint of scandium. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic bubbles and stripes in the hexaferrite have a much more complex structure than the skyrmions and spirals in helimagnets, which we associate with the new degree of freedom--helicity (or vector spin chirality) describing the direction of spin rotation across the domain walls. We observe numerous random reversals of helicity in the stripe domain state. Random helicity of cylindrical domain walls coexists with the positional order of magnetic bubbles in a triangular lattice. Most unexpectedly, we observe regular helicity reversals inside skyrmions with an unusual multiple-ring structure.

  13. Occurrence of cleft-palate and alteration of Tgf-β(3) expression and the mechanisms leading to palatal fusion in mice following dietary folic-acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Estela; Murillo, Jorge; Barrio, Carmen; del Río, Aurora; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; López-Gordillo, Yamila; Partearroyo, Teresa; Paradas, Irene; Maestro, Carmen; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid (FA) is essential for numerous bodily functions. Its decrease during pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations in the progeny. The relationship between FA deficiency and the appearance of cleft palate (CP) is controversial, and little information exists on a possible effect of FA on palate development. We investigated the effect of a 2-8 weeks' induced FA deficiency in female mice on the development of CP in their progeny as well as the mechanisms leading to palatal fusion, i.e. cell proliferation, cell death, and palatal-shelf adhesion and fusion. We showed that an 8 weeks' maternal FA deficiency caused complete CP in the fetuses although a 2 weeks' maternal FA deficiency was enough to alter all the mechanisms analyzed. Since transforming growth factor-β(3) (TGF-β(3)) is crucial for palatal fusion and since most of the mechanisms impaired by FA deficiency were also observed in the palates of Tgf-β(3)null mutant mice, we investigated the presence of TGF-β(3) mRNA, its protein and phospho-SMAD2 in FA-deficient (FAD) mouse palates. Our results evidenced a large reduction in Tgf-β(3) expression in palates of embryos of dams fed an FAD diet for 8 weeks; Tgf-β(3) expression was less reduced in palates of embryos of dams fed an FAD diet for 2 weeks. Addition of TGF-β(3) to palatal-shelf cultures of embryos of dams fed an FAD diet for 2 weeks normalized all the altered mechanisms. Thus, an insufficient folate status may be a risk factor for the development of CP in mice, and exogenous TGF-β(3) compensates this deficit in vitro.

  14. A Whole Genome Association Study on Meat Palatability in Hanwoo

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, K.-E.; Lee, Y.-M.; Kim, Y.-S.; Nam, K. C.; Jo, C.; Lee, K.-H.; Lee, J.-E.; Kim, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was carried out to find quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sensory evaluation traits in Hanwoo. Carcass samples of 250 Hanwoo steers were collected from National Agricultural Cooperative Livestock Research Institute, Ansung, Gyeonggi province, Korea, between 2011 and 2012 and genotyped with the Affymetrix Bovine Axiom Array 640K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Among the SNPs in the chip, a total of 322,160 SNPs were chosen after quality control tests. After adjusting for the effects of age, slaughter-year-season, and polygenic effects using genome relationship matrix, the corrected phenotypes for the sensory evaluation measurements were regressed on each SNP using a simple linear regression additive based model. A total of 1,631 SNPs were detected for color, aroma, tenderness, juiciness and palatability at 0.1% comparison-wise level. Among the significant SNPs, the best set of 52 SNP markers were chosen using a forward regression procedure at 0.05 level, among which the sets of 8, 14, 11, 10, and 9 SNPs were determined for the respectively sensory evaluation traits. The sets of significant SNPs explained 18% to 31% of phenotypic variance. Three SNPs were pleiotropic, i.e. AX-26703353 and AX-26742891 that were located at 101 and 110 Mb of BTA6, respectively, influencing tenderness, juiciness and palatability, while AX-18624743 at 3 Mb of BTA10 affected tenderness and palatability. Our results suggest that some QTL for sensory measures are segregating in a Hanwoo steer population. Additional WGA studies on fatty acid and nutritional components as well as the sensory panels are in process to characterize genetic architecture of meat quality and palatability in Hanwoo. PMID:25178363

  15. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins.

  16. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-­D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n 1, n 2, twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation. PMID:21795813

  17. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n(1), n(2), twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation.

  18. Linking suckling biomechanics to the development of the palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingtao; Johnson, Chelsey A.; Smith, Andrew A.; Hunter, Daniel J.; Singh, Gurpreet; Brunski, John B.; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Skulls are amongst the most informative documents of evolutionary history but a complex geometry, coupled with composite material properties and complicated biomechanics, have made it particularly challenging to identify mechanical principles guiding the skull’s morphogenesis. Despite this challenge, multiple lines of evidence, for example the relationship between masticatory function and the evolution of jaw shape, nonetheless suggest that mechanobiology plays a major role in skull morphogenesis. To begin to tackle this persistent challenge, cellular, molecular and tissue-level analyses of the developing mouse palate were coupled with finite element modeling to demonstrate that patterns of strain created by mammalian-specific oral behaviors produce complementary patterns of chondrogenic gene expression in an initially homogeneous population of cranial neural crest cells. Neural crest cells change from an osteogenic to a chondrogenic fate, leading to the materialization of cartilaginous growth plate-like structures in the palatal midline. These growth plates contribute to lateral expansion of the head but are transient structures; when the strain patterns associated with suckling dissipate at weaning, the growth plates disappear and the palate ossifies. Thus, mechanical cues such as strain appear to co-regulate cell fate specification and ultimately, help drive large-scale morphogenetic changes in head shape. PMID:26842915

  19. Epinephrine Affects Pharmacokinetics of Ropivacaine Infiltrated Into Palate.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Yasuda, Asako; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulpal anesthesia success rates for ropivacaine following maxillary infiltration anesthesia seem to be low. We investigated the hypothesis that the addition of epinephrine would affect the pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine by retaining ropivacaine in the mucosa of the injected area through the time-dependent distribution of ropivacaine in the rat maxilla and serum following maxillary infiltration anesthesia using (3)H-labeled ropivacaine. We then examined the vasoactivity of ropivacaine with or without epinephrine on local peripheral blood flow. The addition of epinephrine to ropivacaine increased ropivacaine concentrations in the palatal mucosa and adjacent maxilla by more than 3 times that of plain ropivacaine at 20 minutes. By observing the autoradiogram of (3)H-ropivacaine, plain ropivacaine in the maxilla was remarkably reduced 20 minutes after injection. However, it was definitely retained in the palatal mucosa, hard palate, adjacent maxilla, and maxillary nerve after the administration with epinephrine. Ropivacaine with epinephrine significantly decreased labial blood flow. This study suggests that 10 μg/mL epinephrine added to 0.5% ropivacaine could improve anesthetic efficacy and duration for maxillary infiltration anesthesia over plain ropivacaine.

  20. Perception of English palatal codas by Korean speakers of English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Sang-Hee

    2003-04-01

    This study aimed at looking at perception of English palatal codas by Korean speakers of English to determine if perception problems are the source of production problems. In particular, first, this study looked at the possible first language effect on the perception of English palatal codas. Second, a possible perceptual source of vowel epenthesis after English palatal codas was investigated. In addition, individual factors, such as length of residence, TOEFL score, gender and academic status, were compared to determine if those affected the varying degree of the perception accuracy. Eleven adult Korean speakers of English as well as three native speakers of English participated in the study. Three sets of a perception test including identification of minimally different English pseudo- or real words were carried out. The results showed that, first, the Korean speakers perceived the English codas significantly worse than the Americans. Second, the study supported the idea that Koreans perceived an extra /i/ after the final affricates due to final release. Finally, none of the individual factors explained the varying degree of the perceptional accuracy. In particular, TOEFL scores and the perception test scores did not have any statistically significant association.

  1. Linking suckling biomechanics to the development of the palate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingtao; Johnson, Chelsey A.; Smith, Andrew A.; Hunter, Daniel J.; Singh, Gurpreet; Brunski, John B.; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-02-01

    Skulls are amongst the most informative documents of evolutionary history but a complex geometry, coupled with composite material properties and complicated biomechanics, have made it particularly challenging to identify mechanical principles guiding the skull’s morphogenesis. Despite this challenge, multiple lines of evidence, for example the relationship between masticatory function and the evolution of jaw shape, nonetheless suggest that mechanobiology plays a major role in skull morphogenesis. To begin to tackle this persistent challenge, cellular, molecular and tissue-level analyses of the developing mouse palate were coupled with finite element modeling to demonstrate that patterns of strain created by mammalian-specific oral behaviors produce complementary patterns of chondrogenic gene expression in an initially homogeneous population of cranial neural crest cells. Neural crest cells change from an osteogenic to a chondrogenic fate, leading to the materialization of cartilaginous growth plate-like structures in the palatal midline. These growth plates contribute to lateral expansion of the head but are transient structures; when the strain patterns associated with suckling dissipate at weaning, the growth plates disappear and the palate ossifies. Thus, mechanical cues such as strain appear to co-regulate cell fate specification and ultimately, help drive large-scale morphogenetic changes in head shape.

  2. [Oral dosage forms for children: acceptability and palatability].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Children generally reject taking medicine which does not have a favorable shape, taste, flavor, etc. However, if a child who needs to take a medicine, rejects taking it, he might never recover from his condition. When a child is unable to take medicine orally, it is intravenously administered, and he and his caregivers then may experience stress. Syrups and suspensions are considered as favorable types of dosage forms in which to orally administer medicine to infants and children. However, they may have disadvantages such as solubility, a bad taste, portability problems or required refrigerator storage. World Health Organization (WHO) currently favors that infants and children be treated with oral solid medicines. New oral solid tablets, such as a mini-tablet, instead of liquid medicines are proposed for this group, however, there are a few reports that mini-tablets are suitable for infants and children. Palatability is one of the main elements of patient acceptability of an oral pediatric medicine. Palatability is defined as the overall appreciation of an oral medicinal product in relation to its smell, taste, aftertaste and feeling in the mouth. Design of the formulation of an oral pediatric medicine should be considered together with its palatability.

  3. Sensory influences on food intake control: moving beyond palatability.

    PubMed

    McCrickerd, K; Forde, C G

    2016-01-01

    The sensory experience of eating is an important determinant of food intake control, often attributed to the positive hedonic response associated with certain sensory cues. However, palatability is just one aspect of the sensory experience. Sensory cues based on a food's sight, smell, taste and texture are operational before, during and after an eating event. The focus of this review is to look beyond palatability and highlight recent advances in our understanding of how certain sensory characteristics can be used to promote better energy intake control. We consider the role of visual and odour cues in identifying food in the near environment, guiding food choice and memory for eating, and highlight the ways in which tastes and textures influence meal size and the development of satiety after consumption. Considering sensory characteristics as a functional feature of the foods and beverages we consume provides the opportunity for research to identify how sensory enhancements might be combined with energy reduction in otherwise palatable foods to optimize short-term energy intake regulation in the current food environment. Moving forward, the challenge for sensory nutritional science will be to assess the longer-term impact of these principles on weight management.

  4. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease of the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nicholas; Kearney, Daniel; Sladden, Nicole; Goss, Alastair; Selva, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with erythematous, nontender, bilateral hard palate nodules of 6-month duration. Biopsy showed collagenous sclerosis and a follicular lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate among the minor salivary glands. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG4 staining showed 280 IgG4(+) cells per high-power field and a ratio of IgG4(+) to IgG(+) cells of 0.8. The patient subsequently developed bilateral lacrimal gland and parotid gland enlargement associated with an increased serum IgG4 level of 3,031 mg/dL (≤ 135 mg/dL). Left lacrimal gland biopsy confirmed IgG4-related dacryoadenitis. The patient declined corticosteroid treatment for IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) and remained stable at 15 months after the first presentation. Spontaneous, partial resolution of the palatal lesion was observed during follow-up. IgG4-RD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lymphoplasmacytic lesions of the hard palate.

  5. Homeostatic responses to palatable food consumption in satiated rats

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Catherine; Jachs, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objective Energy intake is regulated by overlapping homeostatic and hedonic systems. Consumption of palatable foods has been implicated in weight gain, but this assumes that homeostatic control systems do not accurately detect this hedonically driven energy intake. This study tested this assumption, hypothesizing that satiated rats would reduce their voluntary food intake and maintain a stable body weight after consuming a palatable food. Methods Lean rats or rats previously exposed to an obesogenic diet were schedule‐fed with fixed or varying amounts of palatable sweetened condensed milk (SCM) daily, and their voluntary energy intake and body weight were monitored. Results During scheduled feeding of SCM, rats voluntarily reduced bland food consumption and maintained a stable body weight. This behavior was also seen in rats with access to an obesogenic diet and was independent of the predictability of SCM access. However, lean rats offered large amounts of SCM showed an increase in total energy intake. To test whether a nutrient deficiency drove this under‐compensatory behavior, SCM was enriched with protein. However, no effect was seen on voluntary energy intake. Conclusions In schedule‐fed rats, compensatory reductions in voluntary energy intake were seen, but under‐compensation was observed if large amounts of SCM were consumed. PMID:27543760

  6. Morphological Study of Palatal Rugae in a Sudanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla; Hamid, Awrad

    2015-01-01

    Palatal rugae patterns have unique characteristics and have been proposed as an alternative method to establish identity when other means, such as fingerprints and dental records, are not attainable. This study was conducted to determine the morphological characteristics of palatine rugae and to assess the existence of side asymmetry in them in Sudanese Arabs. It also assesses the possibility of determining sex using logistic regression. One hundred dental casts for 50 males and 50 females aged between 18 and 23 were studied for palatal rugae dimensions, shapes, and orientations, as well as sexual dimorphism and side symmetry. The most predominant rugae were primary, and the most prevalent shapes in both sexes were wavy, curved, and straight forms. The predominant orientation was forward. Side asymmetry existed more in the orientations than in the shapes, but no side asymmetry was recorded in the dimensions. There was no significant sexual dimorphism in the rugae dimensions, shapes, and orientations, except for forward-directed rugae (P < 0.037). A predictive value of 60% was obtained in assigning sex using dimensions and orientations and of 58% using shapes alone. Therefore, the palatal rugae are not recommended for assigning sex effectively among Sudanese Arabs unless it is the only means available. PMID:25737723

  7. Epinephrine Affects Pharmacokinetics of Ropivacaine Infiltrated Into Palate

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Yasuda, Asako; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulpal anesthesia success rates for ropivacaine following maxillary infiltration anesthesia seem to be low. We investigated the hypothesis that the addition of epinephrine would affect the pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine by retaining ropivacaine in the mucosa of the injected area through the time-dependent distribution of ropivacaine in the rat maxilla and serum following maxillary infiltration anesthesia using 3H-labeled ropivacaine. We then examined the vasoactivity of ropivacaine with or without epinephrine on local peripheral blood flow. The addition of epinephrine to ropivacaine increased ropivacaine concentrations in the palatal mucosa and adjacent maxilla by more than 3 times that of plain ropivacaine at 20 minutes. By observing the autoradiogram of 3H-ropivacaine, plain ropivacaine in the maxilla was remarkably reduced 20 minutes after injection. However, it was definitely retained in the palatal mucosa, hard palate, adjacent maxilla, and maxillary nerve after the administration with epinephrine. Ropivacaine with epinephrine significantly decreased labial blood flow. This study suggests that 10 μg/mL epinephrine added to 0.5% ropivacaine could improve anesthetic efficacy and duration for maxillary infiltration anesthesia over plain ropivacaine. PMID:27269664

  8. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The hemispheric sign rule for solar magnetic helicity, which states that negative/positive helicity occurs preferentially in the northern/southern hemisphere, provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. However, previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been significantly affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulent motions. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning from 2006 to 2012, we studied the effects of two important data processing steps that imitate the effects of atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values that are weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We applied these processing techniques to the helicity distribution maps for active regions NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, along with the average helicities of 36 active regions, in order to imitate and understand the effects of seeing from atmospheric turbulence. We found that rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, Gaussian smoothing and noise reduction enhanced existing trends by pushing outliers towards the mean or removing them altogether. We also found that, when separated for weak and strong magnetic fields, the average helicities of the 36 active regions conformed to the hemisphere rule for weak field helicities and breached the rule for strong field helicities. In general, we found that data processing did not affect whether the hemisphere rule held for data taken from space-based instruments, and thus that seeing from atmospheric turbulence did not significantly affect previous studies' ground-based results on the hemisphere rule. This work was carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  9. Treatment of Palatal Fractures by Osteosynthesis with 2.0-mm Locking Plates as External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Cienfuegos, Ricardo; Sierra, Eduardo; Ortiz, Benjamin; Fernández, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    Treatment options for palatal fractures range from orthodontic braces, acrylic bars, and arch bars for maxillomandibular fixation to internal fixation, with plates and screws placed under the palate mucosa and periosteum, together with pyriform aperture or alveolar plating plus buttress reconstruction. Forty-five patients, ages 4 to 56, were treated using medium- or high-profile locking plates placed over the palatal mucosa as an external fixator for palatal fractures, together with treatment for other associated facial fractures. In open fractures, plates were placed after approximating the edges of the mucosal wounds. Plates and screws for palate fixation were removed at 12 weeks, when computed tomography scans provided evidence of fracture healing. All palatal fractures healed by 12 weeks, with no cases of mucosal necrosis, bone exposure, fistulae, or infections. This approach achieves adequate stability, reduces the risk of bone and mucosal necrosis, and promotes healing of mucosal wounds in case of open fractures. PMID:22132261

  10. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  11. An Unprecedented alteration in mode of action of IsCT resulting its translocation into bacterial cytoplasm and inhibition of macromolecular syntheses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Jitendra K.; Kathuria, Manoj; Kumar, Amit; Mitra, Kalyan; Ghosh, Jimut K.

    2015-01-01

    IsCT, a 13-residue, non-cell-selective antimicrobial peptide is comprised of mostly hydrophobic residues and lesser cationic residues. Assuming that placement of an additional positive charge in the non-polar face of IsCT could reduce its hydrophobic interaction, resulting in its reduction of cytotoxicity, an analog, I9K-IsCT was designed. Two more analogs, namely, E7K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT, were designed to investigate the impact of positive charges in the polar face as well as polar and non-polar faces at a time. These amino acid substitutions resulted in a significant enhancement of therapeutic potential of IsCT. IsCT and E7K-IsCT seem to target bacterial membrane for their anti-bacterial activity. However, I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT inhibited nucleic acid and protein syntheses in tested E. coli without perturbing its membrane. This was further supported by the observation that NBD-IsCT localized onto bacterial membrane while NBD-labeled I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT translocated into bacterial cytoplasm. Interestingly, IsCT and E7K-IsCT were significantly helical while I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT were mostly unstructured with no helix content in presence of mammalian and bacterial membrane-mimetic lipid vesicles. Altogether, the results identify two novel cell-selective analogs of IsCT with new prototype amino acid sequences that can translocate into bacterial cytoplasm without any helical structure and inhibit macromolecular syntheses. PMID:25773522

  12. TGF-beta(3)-induced chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan mediates palatal shelf adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martinez, M L; Tudela, C; Alonso, I; Moro, J A; Formoso, M A; Ferguson, M W J; Martínez-Alvarez, C

    2002-10-15

    In mammals, the adhesion and fusion of the palatal shelves are essential mechanisms in the development of the secondary palate. Failure of any of these processes leads to the formation of cleft palate. The mechanisms underlying palatal shelf adhesion are poorly understood, although the presence of filopodia on the apical surfaces of the superficial medial edge epithelial (MEE) cells seems to play an important role in the adhesion of the opposing MEE. We demonstrate here the appearance of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) on the apical surface of MEE cells only immediately prior to contact between the palatal shelves. This apical CSPG has a functional role in palatal shelf adhesion, as either the alteration of CSPG synthesis by beta-D-Xyloside or its specific digestion by chondroitinase AC strikingly alters the in vitro adhesion of palatal shelves. We also demonstrate the absence of this apical CSPG in the clefted palates of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-beta(3)) null mutant mice, and its induction, together with palatal shelf adhesion, when TGF-beta(3) is added to TGF-beta(3) null mutant palatal shelves in culture. When chick palatal shelves (that do not adherein vivo nor express TGF-beta(3), nor CSPG in the MEE) are cultured in vitro, they do not express CSPG and partially adhere, but when TGF-beta(3) is added to the media, they express CSPG and their adhesion increases strikingly. We therefore conclude that the expression of CSPG on the apical surface of MEE cells is a key factor in palatal shelf adhesion and that this expression is regulated by TGF-beta(3).

  13. CT in children--dose protection and general considerations when planning a CT in a child.

    PubMed

    Sorantin, E; Weissensteiner, S; Hasenburger, G; Riccabona, M

    2013-07-01

    Today CT represents about 10% of all ionizing radiation based imaging modalities, but delivers more than 50% of the total collective dose for diagnostic imaging. Compared to adults the radiation sensitivity of children is considerable higher than in adults. Additionally children differ from adults--factors like body size, mass, density, proportions as well as metabolism have to be mentioned. Children grow and mature--all this components have to be mapped in examination protocols by Pediatric Radiology. The total dose of a CT examination depends on the settings of several factors such as the scout view, the scan length, exposure settings including automated exposure control, type of scanning (single slice, helical, volume mode), slice thickness, pitch values as well as on image reconstruction parameters. If intravenous contrast media injection is needed bolus tracking or timing represents another source of radiation. The aim of the paper is to present and discuss all aspects of defining a pediatric age and query adapted CT protocol particularly concerning all dose relevant factors in pediatric CT and their adjustment in children. Moreover hints are given concerning optimization of intravenous contrast media injection as well as special (low dose) imaging protocols.

  14. Development of the palatal size in Pan troglodytes, Hominids and Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Zoellner, A; Sebastian, T

    2004-12-01

    As the hard palate plays an important role in speech production it was the aim of this study whether similarities or dissimilarities in palatal size may allow conclusions about the ability to produce speech in the extant investigated species. The palatal size of Pan troglodytes, Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus robustus, Australopithecus boisei, Homo erectus, Homo neanderthalensis and Cro-Magnon has been investigated using euclidian distance matrix analysis (EDMA) and thin-plate-spline analysis. The results show that the palatal size of all australopithecine specimens and H. erectus is very similar to that of P toglodytes, whereas the palatal size of H. neanderthalensis more closely resembles that of H. sapiens. Postnatal development of palatal size in P troglodytes is different from that of H. sapiens. In P troglodytes not only the size of the palate changes but also the form. In H. sapiens there is little change in form, but a continuos uniform growth from infantile to adult specimens. From the results we conclude that in all australopithecine samples which have been investigated, the palatal size is similar to that of P troglodytes. Therefore, it is unlikely that austraopithecine individuals were capable of producing vowels and consonants. The palatal size of H. neandethalensis and Cro-Magnon is similar to that of H. sapiens which may indicate the possibility that they were capable of speech production.

  15. Feeding an infant with high arched palate by high flow rate bottle nipple.

    PubMed

    Eren, Abdulkadir; Bilgin, Huseyin; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    For infants with high arched palate, feeding is one of the most immediate challenges faced by parents and caretakers. General suggestions for feeding in infants with cleft palate may be adapted to infants with high arched palate. These include oral feeding facilitation techniques and special feeding tools. Here we present a newborn with a high arched palate and serious feeding problems who was fed easily by a large size and a large hole nipple, ordinarily used for infants older than 6 months, instead of specialized feeding equipment.

  16. Super-imposing maxillary and palatal locations for electroarticulometry: A SIMPLE method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-rong; Chang, Yueh-chin; Best, Catherine T; Derrick, Donald

    2015-08-01

    This study proposes a method of superimposing a physical palatal profile, extracted from a speaker's maxillary impression, onto real-time mid-sagittal articulatory data. A palatal/dental profile is first obtained by three-dimensional-scanning the maxillary impression of the speaker. Then a high resolution mid-sagittal palatal line, extracted from the profile, is sub-divided into articulatory zones and superimposed, by Iterative Closest Point algorithm, onto reconstructed palatal traces in electromagnetic articulometric (EMA) data. Evaluations were carried out by comparing consonant targets elicited by EMA with the proposed method and by static palatography. The proposed method yields accurate results, as supported by palatography.

  17. Adsorption of small molecules on helical gold nanorods: a relativistic density functional study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Hamilton, Ian

    2014-10-15

    We study the adsorption of a variety of small molecules on helical gold nanorods using relativistic density functional theory. We focus on Au40 which consists of a central linear strand of five gold atoms with seven helical strands of five gold atoms on a coaxial tube. All molecules preferentially adsorb at a single low-coordinated gold atom on the coaxial tube at an end of Au40. In most cases, there is significant charge transfer (CT) between Au40 and the adsorbate, for CO and NO2, there is CT from the Au40 to adsorbate while for all other molecules there is CT from the adsorbate to Au40. Thus, Au40-adsorbate can be described as a donor-accepter complex and we use charge decomposition analysis to better understand the adsorption process. We determine the adsorption energy order to be C5H5N >NO2  > CO > NH3  > CH2=CH2  > CH2=CH-CHO > NO > HC≡CH > H2S > SO2  > HCN > CH3OH > H2C=O > O2  > H2O > CH4  > N2. We find that the Au-C, Au-N, Au-S, and Au-O bonds are surprisingly strong, with clear implications for reactivity enhancement of the adsorbate. The Au-H bond is relatively weak but, for interactions via an H atom that is bonded to a carbon atom (e.g., CH4), we find that there is large charge polarization of the Au-H-C moiety and partial activation of the inert C-H bond. Although the Au-S and Au-O bonds are generally weaker than the Au-C and Au-N bonds, we find that adsorption of H2S or H2O causes greater distortion of Au40 in the binding region. However, the degree of distortion is small and the helical structure is retained, demonstrating the stability of the helical Au40 nanorod under perturbations.

  18. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hooper, E. B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R. H.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX.

  19. Three-dimensional helical computed tomographic evaluation of three obturation techniques: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chokkalingam, M; Ramaprabha; Kandaswamy, D

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of three obturation techniques namely lateral condensation, EQ Fil (backfill obturation) and thermafil (core carrier obturation) techniques using three-dimensional (3D) helical computed tomography (CT) by volume rendering method. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. Biomechanical preparation was done in all the teeth using rotary instruments. All three sets of teeth were placed in helical CT slice scanner and were imaged before obturation. The three sets were then obturated by following methods: Group I: lateral condensation, Group II: EQ Fil (backfill) and Group III: thermafil (core carrier obturation).Volume of the pulp chamber and gutta-percha after obturation were calculated using volume rendering technique and adequacy of the obturation techniques were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and Multiple-Range Tukey Test by Tukey-HSD procedure Results: Mean change in lateral condensation (0.005±0.002) was significantly higher than that of thermafil obturation (0.002±0.001) [P<0.05]. Conclusions: Conventional lateral condensation technique showed maximal inadequacy of obturation and thermafil obturation technique showed the least inadequacy of obturation when the volume of the specimens were calculated and reconstructed PMID:22025832

  20. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi*

    PubMed Central

    Guyader, Christian P. E.; Lamarre, Baptiste; De Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E.; Slater, Nigel K.; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi. PMID:27721465

  1. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi.

    PubMed

    Guyader, Christian P E; Lamarre, Baptiste; De Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E; Slater, Nigel K; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2016-10-10

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi.

  2. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyader, Christian P. E.; Lamarre, Baptiste; de Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E.; Slater, Nigel K.; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2016-10-01

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi.

  3. Multipole Expansion for a Single Helical Current Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaka, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Katayama, T.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give the expression of the multipole expansion for a single helical current conductor. This analytical expression will be useful for the electromagnetic analysis of various helical coils such as helical dipoles, multifilamentary superconductors and superconducting strands. The present treatment of the multipole expansion for a single helical current conductor is derived as the extension of the case for a single straight current conductor. In addition, the comparison between the analytical and numerical calculations is presented for a single helical current conductor. As a result, the agreement between the analytical and numerical calculations is quite good, except the region near the radius of a single helical current conductor. Then, for the sum of the multipole expansion for a single helical current conductor, the Cesaro's method of summation are adopted.

  4. Stabilization of Helical Macromolecular Phases by Confined Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-07-01

    By means of extensive replica-exchange simulations of generic coarse-grained models for helical polymers, we systematically investigate the structural transitions into all possible helical phases for flexible and semiflexible elastic polymers with self-interaction under the influence of torsion barriers. The competing interactions lead to a variety of conformational phases including disordered helical arrangements, single helices, and ordered, tertiary helix bundles. Most remarkably, we find that a bending restraint entails a clear separation and stabilization of the helical phases. This aids in understanding why semiflexible polymers such as double-stranded DNA tend to form pronounced helical structures and proteins often exhibit an abundance of helical structures, such as helix bundles, within their tertiary structure.

  5. Independent quality assurance of a helical tomotherapy machine using the dose magnifying glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Hardcastle, N.; Tome, W. A.; and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Helical tomotherapy is a complex delivery technique, integrating CT image guidance and intensity modulated radiotherapy in a single system. The integration of the CT detector ring on the gantry not only allows patient position verification but is also often used to perform various QA procedures. This convenience lacks the rigor of a machine-independent QA process. Methods: In this article, a Si strip detector, known as the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), was used to perform machine-independent QA measurements of the multileaf collimator alignment, leaf open time threshold, and leaf fluence output factor (LFOF). Results: The DMG measurements showed good agreements with EDR2 film for the MLC alignment test while the CT detector agrees well with DMG measurements for leaf open time threshold and LFOF measurements. The leaf open time threshold was found to be approximately 20 ms. The LFOF measured with the DMG agreed within error with the CT detector measured LFOF. Conclusions: The DMG with its 0.2 mm spatial resolution coupled to TERA ASIC allowed real-time high temporal resolution measurements of the tomotherapy leaf movement. In conclusion, DMG was shown to be a suitable tool for machine-independent QA of a tomotherapy unit.

  6. Iterative Assembly of Helical Proteins by Optimal Hydrophobic Packing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G. Albert; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Dill, Ken A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a method for the computer-based iterative assembly of native-like tertiary structures of helical proteins from alpha-helical fragments. For any pair of helices, our method, called MATCHSTIX, first generates an ensemble of possible relative orientations of the helices with various ways to form hydrophobic contacts between them. Those conformations having steric clashes, or a large radius of gyration of hydrophobic residues, or with helices too far separated to be connected by the intervening linking region, are discarded. Then, we attempt to connect the two helical fragments by using a robotics-based loop-closure algorithm. When loop closure is feasible, the algorithm generates an ensemble of viable interconnecting loops. After energy minimization and clustering, we use a representative set of conformations for further assembly with the remaining helices, adding one helix at a time. To efficiently sample the conformational space, the order of assembly generally proceeds from the pair of helices connected by the shortest loop, followed by joining one of its adjacent helices, always proceeding with the shorter connecting loop. We tested MATCHSTIX on 28 helical proteins each containing up to 5 helices and found it to heavily sample native-like conformations. The average RMSD of the best conformations for the 17 helix-bundle proteins that have 2 or 3 helices is less than 2 Å; errors increase somewhat for proteins containing more helices. Native-like states are even more densely sampled when disulfide bonds are known and imposed as restraints. We conclude that, at least for helical proteins, if the secondary structures are known, this rapid rigid-body maximization of hydrophobic interactions can lead to small ensembles of highly native-like structures. It may be useful for protein structure prediction. PMID:18682227

  7. Analysis of peripheral doses for base of tongue treatment by linear accelerator and helical TomoTherapy IMRT.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian Richard; Lamba, Michael A S; Elson, Howard R

    2010-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral doses to various organs from a typical head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered by linear accelerator (linac) and helical TomoTherapy. Multiple human CT data sets were used to segment critical structures and organs at risk, fused and adjusted to an anthropomorphic phantom. Eighteen contours were designated for thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) placement. Following the RTOG IMRT Protocol 0522, treatment of the primary tumor and involved nodes (PTV70) and subclinical disease sites (PTV56) was planned utilizing IMRT to 70Gy and 56 Gy. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were produced for linac and TomoTherapy treatments. TLDs were placed and each treatment plan was delivered to the anthropomorphic phantom four times. Within 2.5 cm (one helical TomoTherapy field width) superior and inferior to the field edges, normal tissue doses were on average 45% lower using linear accelerator. Beyond 2.5 cm, the helical TomoTherapy normal tissue dose was an average of 52% lower. The majority of points proved to be statistically different using the Student's t-test with p > 0.05. Using one method of calculation, probability of a secondary malignancy was 5.88% for the linear accelerator and 4.08% for helical TomoTherapy. Helical TomoTherapy delivers more dose than a linac immediately above and below the treatment field, contributing to the higher peripheral doses adjacent to the field. At distances beyond one field width (where leakage is dominant), helical TomoTherapy doses are lower than linear accelerator doses.

  8. Palatal development of preterm and low birthweight infants compared to term infants – What do we know? Part 1: The palate of the term newborn

    PubMed Central

    Hohoff, Ariane; Rabe, Heike; Ehmer, Ulrike; Harms, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Background The evidence on prematurity as 'a priori' a risk for palatal disturbances that increase the need for orthodontic or orthognathic treatment is still weak. Further well-designed clinical studies are needed. The objective of this review is to provide a fundamental analysis of methodologies, confounding factors, and outcomes of studies on palatal development. One focus of this review is the analysis of studies on the palate of the term newborn, since knowing what is 'normal' is a precondition of being able to assess abnormalities. Methods A search profile based on Cochrane search strategies applied to 10 medical databases was used to identify existing studies. Articles, mainly those published before 1960, were identified from hand searches in textbooks, encyclopedias, reference lists and bibliographies. Sources in English, German, and French of more than a century were included. Data for term infants were recalculated if particular information about weight, length, or maturity was given. The extracted values, especially those from non-English paper sources, were provided unfiltered for comparison. Results The search strategy yielded 182 articles, of which 155 articles remained for final analysis. Morphology of the term newborn's palate was of great interest in the first half of the last century. Two general methodologies were used to assess palatal morphology: visual and metrical descriptions. Most of the studies on term infants suffer from lack of reliability tests. The groove system was recognized as the distinctive feature of the infant palate. The shape of the palate of the term infant may vary considerably, both visually and metrically. Gender, race, mode of delivery, and nasal deformities were identified as causes contributing to altered palatal morphology. Until today, anatomical features of the newborn's palate are subject to a non-uniform nomenclature. Conclusion Today's knowledge of a newborn's 'normal' palatal morphology is based on non

  9. Selective DNA Recognition and Cytotoxicity of Water-Soluble Helical Metallosupramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Rana, Utpal; Chakraborty, Chanchal; Pandey, Rakesh K; Hossain, Md Delwar; Nagano, Reiko; Morita, Hiromi; Hattori, Shinya; Minowa, Takashi; Higuchi, Masayoshi

    2016-10-19

    Water-soluble helical Fe(II)-based metallosupramolecular polymers ((P)- and (M)-polyFe) were synthesized by 1:1 complexation of Fe(II) ions and bis(terpyridine)s bearing a (R)- and (S)-BINOL spacer, respectively. The binding affinity to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by titration measurements. (P)-PolyFe with the same helicity as B-DNA showed 40-fold higher binding activity (Kb = 13.08 × 10(7) M(-1)) to ct-DNA than (M)-polyFe. The differences in binding affinity were supported by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis. The charge-transfer resistance (Rct) of (P)-polyFe increased from 2.5 to 3.9 kΩ upon DNA binding, while that of (M)-polyFe was nearly unchanged. These results indicate that ionically strong binding of (P)-polyFe to DNA chains decreased the mobility of ions in the conjugate. Unique rod-like images were obtained by atomic force microscopy measurement of the DNA conjugate with (P)-polyFe, likely because of the rigid binding between DNA chains and the polymer. Differences in polymer chirality lead to significantly different cytotoxicity levels in A549 cells. (P)-PolyFe showed higher binding affinity to B-DNA and much higher cytotoxicity than (M)-polyFe. The helicity in metallosupramolecular polymer chains was important not only for chiral recognition of DNA but also for coordination to a biological target in the cellular environment.

  10. Broadband optical isolator based on helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hu; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Based on helical metamaterials, a new broadband optical isolator with a triple-helix structure is proposed in this paper. The right-handed circularly polarized light can transmit through the isolator with its polarization unchanged. The reverse propagating light, which is caused by the reflection of the latter optical devices, is converted into left-handed circularly polarized light that is suppressed by the proposed isolator because of absorption. Our design has some unprecedented advantages such as broad frequency ranges and a compact structure; moreover, neither polarizers nor adscititious magnetic fields are required. Properties of the isolator are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and this phenomenon is studied by the mechanism of helical antenna theory.

  11. Instabilities of a rotating helical rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yunyoung; Ko, William; Kim, Yongsam; Lim, Sookkyung

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus have helical flagellar filament. By rotating a motor, which is located at the bottom end of the flagellar filament embedded in the cell body, CCW or CW, they swim forward or backward. We model a left-handed helix by the Kirchhoff rod theory and use regularized Stokes formulation to study an interaction between the surrounding fluid and the flagellar filament. We perform numerical studies focusing on relations between physical parameters and critical angular frequency of the motor, which separates overwhiring from twirling. We are also interested in the buckling instability of the hook, which is very flexible elastic rod. By measuring buckling angle, which is an angle between rotational axis and helical axis, we observe the effects of physical parameters on buckling of the hook.

  12. Spheromak Formation by Steady Inductive Helicity Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Hamp, W. T.; Marklin, G. J.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Redd, A. J.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Wrobel, J. S.

    2006-09-15

    A spheromak is formed for the first time using a new steady state inductive helicity injection method. Using two inductive injectors with odd symmetry and oscillating at 5.8 kHz, a steady state spheromak with even symmetry is formed and sustained through nonlinear relaxation. A spheromak with about 13 kA of toroidal current is formed and sustained using about 3 MW of power. This is a much lower power threshold for spheromak production than required for electrode-based helicity injection. Internal magnetic probe data, including oscillations driven by the injectors, agree with the plasma being in the Taylor state. The agreement is remarkable considering the only fitting parameter is the amplitude of the spheromak component of the state.

  13. Helical propulsion in shear-thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Saúl; Godínez, Francisco A.; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Swimming microorganisms often have to propel in complex, non-Newtonian fluids. We carry out experiments with self-propelling helical swimmers driven by an externally rotating magnetic field in shear-thinning, inelastic fluids. Similarly to swimming in a Newtonian fluid, we obtain for each fluid a locomotion speed which scales linearly with the rotation frequency of the swimmer, but with a prefactor which depends on the power index of the fluid. The fluid is seen to always increase the swimming speed of the helix, up to 50% faster and thus the strongest of such type reported to date. The maximum relative increase for a fluid power index of around 0.6. Using simple scalings, we argue that the speed increase is not due to the local decrease of the flow viscosity around the helical filament but hypothesise instead that it originates from confinement-like effect due to viscosity stratification around the swimmer.

  14. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  15. On the energy density of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Barros, Manuel; Ferrández, Angel

    2014-12-01

    We solve the problem of determining the energy actions whose moduli space of extremals contains the class of Lancret helices with a prescribed slope. We first see that the energy density should be linear both in the total bending and in the total twisting, such that the ratio between the weights of them is the prescribed slope. This will give an affirmative answer to the conjecture stated in Barros and Ferrández (J Math Phys 50:103529, 2009). Then, we normalize to get the best choice for the helical energy. It allows us to show that the energy, for instance of a protein chain, does not depend on the slope and is invariant under homotopic changes of the cross section which determines the cylinder where the helix is lying. In particular, the energy of a helix is not arbitrary, but it is given as natural multiples of some basic quantity of energy.

  16. SUPERCONDUCTING HELICAL SNAKE MAGNETS: CONSTRUCTION AND MEASUREMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    MACKAY,W.W.

    1999-05-17

    In order to collide polarized protons, the RHIC project will have two snakes in each ring and four rotators around each of two interaction regions. Two snakes on opposite sides of each ring can minimize depolarization during acceleration by keeping the spin tune at a half. Since the spin direction is normally along the vertical direction in a flat ring, spin rotators must be used around an interaction point to have longitudinal polarization in a collider experiment. Each snake or rotator will be composed of four helical dipoles to provide the required rotation of spin with minimal transverse orbit excursions in a compact length of 10m. The basic helical dipole is a superconducting magnet producing a transverse dipole field which is twisted about the magnet axis through 360{degree} in a length of 2.4 m. The design and construction of the magnets is described in this paper.

  17. Patterns of helicity in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Using 46 vector magnetograms from the Stokes Polarimeter of Mees Solar Observatory (MSO), we studied patterns of local helicity in three diverse solar active regions. From these magnetograms we computed maps of the local helicity parameter alpha = J(sub z)/B(sub z). Although such maps are noisy, we found patterns at the level approximately 2 to 3 sigma(sub J(sub z)), which repeat in successive magnetograms for up to several days. Typically, the alpha maps of any given active region contain identifiable patches with both positive and negative values of alpha. Even within a single sunspot complex, several such alpha patches can often be seen. We followed 68 alpha patches that could be identified on at least two successive alpha maps. We found that the persistence fraction of such patches decrease exponentially, with a characteristic time approximately 27 hr.

  18. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  19. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  20. Coherent electron transport in a helical nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Yong-Long; Du, Long; Jiang, Hua; Kang, Guang-Zhen; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-09-01

    The quantum dynamics of carriers bound to helical tube surfaces is investigated in a thin-layer quantization scheme. By numerically solving the open-boundary Schrödinger equation in curvilinear coordinates, geometric effect on the coherent transmission spectra is analysed in the case of single propagating mode as well as multimode. It is shown that, the coiling endows the helical nanotube with different transport properties from a bent cylindrical surface. Fano resonance appears as a purely geometric effect in the conductance, the corresponding energy of quasibound state is obviously influenced by the torsion and length of the nanotube. We also find new plateaus in the conductance. The transport of double-degenerate mode in this geometry is reminiscent of the Zeeman coupling between the magnetic field and spin angular momentum in quasi-one-dimensional structure.

  1. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  2. Inductance Calculations of Variable Pitch Helical Inductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic Phenomena. July 2003;3:392–396. 2. Snow C. Formulas for computing capacitance and inductance . In: National bu- reau of standards circular 544...ARL-TR-7380 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Inductance Calculations of Variable Pitch Helical Inductors by Peter T...report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7380 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Inductance

  3. Field of a helical Siberian Snake

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1995-02-01

    To preserve the spin polarization of a beam of high energy protons in a circular accelerator, magnets with periodic magnetic field, called Siberian Snakes are being used. Recently, it was proposed to build Siberian Snakes with superconducting helical dipoles. In a helical, or twisted dipole, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the axis of the helix and rotates around it as one proceeds along the magnet. In an engineering study of a 4 Tesla helical snake, the coil geometry is derived, by twisting, from the geometry of a cosine superconducting dipole. While waiting for magnetic measurement data on such a prototype, an analytical expression for the field of the helice is important, to calculate the particle trajectories and the spin precession in the helix. This model will also allow to determine the optical characteristics of the snake, as an insertion in the lattice of the accelerator. In particular, one can calculate the integrated multipoles through the magnet and the equivalent transfer matrix. An expression for the field in the helix body, i.e., excluding the fringe field was given in a classical paper. An alternate expression can be found by elaborating on the treatment of the field of a transverse wiggler obtained under the rather general conditions that the variables are separable. This expression exactly satisfies Maxwell`s div and curl equations for a stationary field, {del} {center_dot} B = 0, {del} x B = 0. This approach is useful in that it will allow one to use much of the work already done on the problem of inserting wigglers and undulators in the lattice of a circular accelerator.

  4. Helical Tomotherapy for Parotid Gland Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I.; Gibbons, John P.; Fields, Robert S.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a postoperative treatment for parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy plans were developed for 4 patients previously treated with segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) IMRT. A primary planning target volume (PTV64) and two secondary PTVs (PTV60, PTV54) were defined. The clinical goals from the SMLC plans were applied as closely as possible to the HT planning. The SMLC plans included bolus, whereas HT plans did not. Results: In general, the HT plans showed better target coverage and target dose homogeneity. The minimum doses to the desired coverage volume were greater, on average, in the HT plans for all the targets. Minimum PTV doses were larger, on average, in the HT plans by 4.6 Gy (p = 0.03), 4.8 Gy (p = 0.06), and 4.9 Gy (p = 0.06) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Maximum PTV doses were smaller, on average, by 2.9 Gy (p = 0.23), 3.2 Gy (p = 0.02), and 3.6 Gy (p = 0.03) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Average dose homogeneity index was statistically smaller in the HT plans, and conformity index was larger for PTV64 in 3 patients. Tumor control probabilities were higher for 3 of the 4 patients. Sparing of normal structures was comparable for the two techniques. There were no significant differences between the normal tissue complication probabilities for the HT and SMLC plans. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were comparable to or slightly better than SMLC plans. Helical tomotherapy is an effective alternative to SMLC IMRT for treatment of parotid tumors.

  5. Bacteria that glide with helical tracks

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; McBride, Mark J.; Chen, Jing; Zusman, David R.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria glide smoothly on surfaces, but with no discernable propulsive organelles on their surface. Recent experiments with Myxococcus xanthus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae show that both distantly related bacterial species glide utilizing proteins that move in helical tracks, albeit with significantly different motility mechanisms. Both species utilize proton motive force for movement. However, the motors that power gliding in M. xanthus have been identified, while the F. johnsoniae motors remain to be discovered. PMID:24556443

  6. Use of rotation flap in repair of cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Durucu, Cengiz; Isik, Yasemin; Atik, Bekir; Kocak, Omer Faruk; Karatas, Erkan; Bekerecioglu, Mehmet

    2011-07-01

    Although cleft palate anomaly is frequent, the criterion standards in surgical treatment have not been determined yet. There are a few techniques described for cleft palate repair owing to the limited tissue in the palatal mucosa, the rigid structure of the palatal mucosa, and the limited vascularity of the hard palate. In this study, a novel cleft palate repair technique based on separating the soft palate from the hard palate as a musculomucosal flap and using it as a rotation flap has been described. The operation is evaluated individually for each anomaly because variations occur in the surgical technique according to the extension of the cleft toward the teeth in the palate. This operation was performed on a total of 28 patients (17 girls and 11 boys) aged between 1.5 and 16 years and presented to our clinic. Patients were assessed for speech analysis outcomes, tympanogram values, hearing functions, magnitude of palatal lengthening during the operation, and rate of fistulae. Statistically significant differences in values of the speech analysis and the audiometric assessment were determined between before and 6 months after surgery. Complete recovery of otitis was observed 1 month after surgery without another treatment in 9 (42.8%) of 21 patients who were detected to have serous otitis media preoperatively. Tension-free closure, lower risk of fistula, good restoration of velopharyngeal functions, ability to be performed on all types of cleft palate, ability to provide a good intraoperative exposure, and being a single stage seem to be the most important advantages of this technique.

  7. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers. PMID:24986377

  8. Propulsion by Helical Strips in Circular Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilyurt, Serhat; Demir, Ebru

    2016-11-01

    Progress in manufacturing techniques avails the production of artificial micro swimmers (AMS) in various shapes and sizes. There are numerous studies on the generation of efficient locomotion by means of helical tails with circular cross-sections. This work focuses on locomotion with helical strips in circular channels. A CFD model is used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters and the radius of the channel on swimming velocity of infinite helical-strips in circular channels. Results show that there is an optimum wavelength that depends on thickness to channel radius ratio, suggesting that these parameters need to be optimized simultaneously. With constant torque, thinner strips swim faster, whereas under constant angular velocity application, thicker strips (in radial direction) prevail. As width approaches the wavelength, velocity decreases under both conditions, unless a magnetically coated tail is simulated, for which width has an optimum value. Increasing channel radius to helix amplitude ratio increases the velocity up to a maximum and after a slight drop, saturation occurs as bulk swimming conditions are approached.

  9. Mechanical resonances of helically coiled carbon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Saini, D; Behlow, H; Podila, R; Dickel, D; Pillai, B; Skove, M J; Serkiz, S M; Rao, A M

    2014-07-02

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f₂/f₁ was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  10. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  11. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  12. Double tube helical coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, G.; De Luca, R.A.

    1987-02-24

    A steam generator is described comprising a container having a closed lower end, divided into longitudinally arranged sections including an uppermost disengaging chamber, an upper plenum, and a lower plenum. The upper plenum is above the lower plenum and contains a multiplicity of double tube helical coils, wherein each of the double tube helical coils is comprised of an inner tube individually enclosed for at least a portion of its length by an outer tube to form a double tube portion and thereby define an annular gap which is outside the inner tube but enclosed by the outer tube; the inner tube being attached at one end to a feedwater inlet, and the inner tube being attached at the other end to a steam outlet; the outer tube being in open communication at both ends with the disengaging chamber; the double tube portion being in the configuration of a helix for part of its length; the upper plenum having no communication with the disengaging chamber and having restricted communication with the lower plenum such that liquid metal entering the upper plenum and flowing to the lower plenum closely contacts at least a portion of the double tube helical coils; and the annular gap being at least partially filled with liquid metal.

  13. Buckling transition in long α-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Palenčár, Peter; Bleha, Tomáš

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of α-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  14. Helical swimming in viscoelastic and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagella. These cells often live in polymer suspensions, which are viscoelastic. Recently there have been several theoretical and experimental studies showing that viscoelasticity can either enhance or suppress propulsion, depending on the details of the microswimmer. To help clarify this situation, we study experimentally the motility of the flagellum using a scaled-up model system - a motorized helical coil that rotates along its axial direction. A free-swimming speed is obtained when the net force on the helix is zero. When the helix is immersed in a viscoelastic (Boger) fluid, we find an increase in the force-free swimming speed as compared with the Newtonian case. The enhancement is maximized at a Deborah number of approximately one, and the magnitude depends not only on the elasticity of the fluid but also on the geometry of the helix. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss how spatial confinements, such as a porous medium, affect the flagellated swimming. For clarity, the porous media are modeled as cylindrical cavities with solid walls. A modified boundary element method allows us to investigate a situation that the helical flagella are very close to the wall, with high spatial resolution and relatively low computational cost. To our surprise, at fixed power consumption, a highly coiled flagellum swims faster in narrower confinements, while an elongated flagellum swims faster in a cavity with a wider opening. We try understanding these effects with simple physical pictures.

  15. The infrared dichroism of transmembrane helical polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Kaufman, B K; McElhaney, R N; Lewis, R N

    1995-01-01

    Polarized attenuated total internal reflectance techniques were applied to study the infrared dichroism of the amide I transition moment in two membrane-bound peptides that are known to form oriented transmembrane helices: gramicidin A in a supported phospholipid monolayer and Ac-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24) in oriented multibilayers. These studies were performed to test the ability of these techniques to determine the orientation of these peptides, to verify the value of optical parameters used to calculate electric field strengths, to examine the common assumptions regarding the amide I transition moment orientation, and to ascertain the effect of surface imperfections on molecular disorder. The two peptides exhibit marked differences in the shape and frequency of their amide I absorption bands. Yet both peptides are highly ordered and oriented with their helical axes perpendicular to the membrane surface. In the alpha-helix formed by L24, there is evidence for a mode with type E1 symmetry contributing to amide I, and the amide I transition moment must be more closely aligned with the peptide C=O (< 34 degrees) than earlier studies have suggested. These results indicate that long-standing assumptions about the orientation of amide I in a peptide require some revision, but that in general, infrared spectroscopy yields reliable information about the orientation of membrane-bound helical peptides. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8599683

  16. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  17. Internal packing of helical membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Markus; Shekar, Srinivasan C.; Shieh, Ted; Smith, Steven O.; Fleming, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Helix packing is important in the folding, stability, and association of membrane proteins. Packing analysis of the helical portions of 7 integral membrane proteins and 37 soluble proteins show that the helices in membrane proteins have higher packing values (0.431) than in soluble proteins (0.405). The highest packing values in integral membrane proteins originate from small hydrophobic (G and A) and small hydroxyl-containing (S and T) amino acids, whereas in soluble proteins large hydrophobic and aromatic residues have the highest packing values. The highest packing values for membrane proteins are found in the transmembrane helix–helix interfaces. Glycine and alanine have the highest occurrence among the buried amino acids in membrane proteins, whereas leucine and alanine are the most common buried residue in soluble proteins. These observations are consistent with a shorter axial separation between helices in membrane proteins. The tight helix packing revealed in this analysis contributes to membrane protein stability and likely compensates for the lack of the hydrophobic effect as a driving force for helix–helix association in membranes. PMID:10823938

  18. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  19. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  20. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity Parameters and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    The hemispheric preference for negative/positive helicity to occur in the northern/southern solar hemisphere provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. Previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulence. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning 2006-2013, we studied the effects of two spatial smoothing tests that imitate atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We studied in detail the effects of atmospheric seeing on the helicity distributions across various field strengths for active regions (ARs) NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, in addition to studying the average helicities of 179 ARs with and without smoothing. We found that, rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, spatial smoothing modified existing trends by reducing random noise and by regressing outliers toward the mean, or removing them altogether. Furthermore, the average helicity parameter values of the 179 ARs did not conform to the hemisphere rule: independent of smoothing, the weak-vertical-field values tended to be negative in both hemispheres, and the strong-vertical-field values tended to be positive, especially in the south. We conclude that spatial smoothing does not significantly affect the overall statistics for space-based data, and thus seeing from atmospheric turbulence seems not to have significantly affected previous studies’ ground-based results on the hemisphere rule.

  1. Performance characterization of megavoltage computed tomography imaging on a helical tomotherapy unit

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Harmon, Joseph F. Jr.; Langen, Katja M.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2005-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy is an innovative means of delivering IGRT and IMRT using a device that combines features of a linear accelerator and a helical computed tomography (CT) scanner. The HI-ART II can generate CT images from the same megavoltage x-ray beam it uses for treatment. These megavoltage CT (MVCT) images offer verification of the patient position prior to and potentially during radiation therapy. Since the unit uses the actual treatment beam as the x-ray source for image acquisition, no surrogate telemetry systems are required to register image space to treatment space. The disadvantage to using the treatment beam for imaging, however, is that the physics of radiation interactions in the megavoltage energy range may force compromises between the dose delivered and the image quality in comparison to diagnostic CT scanners. The performance of the system is therefore characterized in terms of objective measures of noise, uniformity, contrast, and spatial resolution as a function of the dose delivered by the MVCT beam. The uniformity and spatial resolutions of MVCT images generated by the HI-ART II are comparable to that of diagnostic CT images. Furthermore, the MVCT scan contrast is linear with respect to the electron density of material imaged. MVCT images do not have the same performance characteristics as state-of-the art diagnostic CT scanners when one objectively examines noise and low-contrast resolution. These inferior results may be explained, at least partially, by the low doses delivered by our unit; the dose is 1.1 cGy in a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. In spite of the poorer low-contrast resolution, these relatively low-dose MVCT scans provide sufficient contrast to delineate many soft-tissue structures. Hence, these images are useful not only for verifying the patient's position at the time of therapy, but they are also sufficient for delineating many anatomic structures. In conjunction with the ability to recalculate radiotherapy doses on

  2. Protein Hydrolysates as Hypoallergenic, Flavors and Palatants for Companion Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagodawithana, Tilak W.; Nelles, Lynn; Trivedi, Nayan B.

    Early civilizations have relied upon their good sense and experience to develop and improve their food quality. The discovery of soy sauce centuries ago can now be considered one of the earliest protein hydrolysates made by man to improve palatability of foods. Now, it is well known that such savory systems are not just sources for enjoyment but complex semiotic systems that direct the humans to satisfy the body's protein need for their sustenance. Recent developments have resulted in a wide range of cost effective savory flavorings, the best known of which are autolyzed yeast extracts and hydrolyzed vegetable proteins. New technologies have helped researchers to improve the savory characteristics of yeast extracts through the application of Maillard reaction and by generating specific flavor enhancers through the use of enzymes. An interesting parallel exists in the pet food industry, where a similar approach is taken in using animal protein hydrolysates to create palatability enhancers via Maillard reaction scheme. Protein hydrolysates are also utilized extensively as a source of nutrition to the elderly, young children and immuno-compromised patient population. These hydrolysates have an added advantage in having peptides small enough to avoid any chance of an allergenic reaction which sometimes occur with the consumption of larger sized peptides or proteins. Accordingly, protein hydrolysates are required to have an average molecular weight distribution in the range 800-1,500 Da to make them non-allergenic. The technical challenge for scientists involved in food and feed manufacture is to use an appropriate combination of enzymes within the existing economic constraints and other physical factors/limitations, such as heat, pH, and time, to create highly palatable, yet still nutritious and hypoallergenic food formulations.

  3. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  4. Morphological analysis of palatal rugae pattern in central Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Neha; Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze the morphological study of palatal rugae pattern in a central Indian population and to determine sex differentiation. Objectives: To investigate the distinctive rugae patterns of the study population and determine the contribution of rugae patterns in gender identification. Material and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted among a Central Indian population with a sample size of 500 participants. The study involved 250 males and 250 females who were randomly selected from the outpatient department of Oral Medicine Diagnosis and Radiology, Hitkarini Dental College and Hospital, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. After collection of impression, casts were made and analyzed to evaluate the palatal rugae pattern in a central Indian population by using Thomas and Kotze classification (1983) for number, shape, direction, and unification of palatal rugae pattern. The statistical analysis was carried out using Mann–Whitney test and Chi-square (χ2) tests for categorical variables. Result: Males showed more number of rugae than females [P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. Males had more number of wavy rugae pattern whereas females showed more number of straight rugae patterns [P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. Males showed more backwardly directed rugae whereas females showed more forwardly directed rugae [P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. The unification did not show any significant difference. Conclusion: This study showed that there was a significant relationship between palatoscopy, human identification, and sex determination. Thus, palatoscopy can be considered as a cost effective, easy, unique, and stable method for human identification. PMID:27891307

  5. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B. Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Yeates, A. R.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  6. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  7. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  8. Chloroquine-induced hyperpigmentation of the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Catarina da Mota Vasconcelos; Ribeiro, Camila Maria Beder; Fonseca, Deborah Daniella Diniz; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro; Leao, Jair Carneiro

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a rare case of extensive palatal pigmentation secondary to long-term chloroquine treatment. Chloroquine was originally used as an antimalarial agent, but it is now widely used as an adjunct in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Adverse effects of chloroquine usually include skin changes such as bullous pemphigoid, exacerbation of psoriasis, and pigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes as well as retinopathy, gastrointestinal alterations, and neuromuscular disorders. Extensive oral pigmentation is an uncommon feature of an adverse drug effect, and diagnosis should be based on clinicopathological findings.

  9. New Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics is a mono-fluid plasma model appropriate for probing Final{some of the} physical processes (other than pure kinetic effects) at length scales smaller than the scales of standard MHD. In sub-ionic space plasma turbulence (e.g. the solar wind) this fluid model has been proved to be useful. Three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses three inviscid invariants which are the total energy, the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. In this presentation, we would like to discuss new exact relations for helicities (magnetic helicities and generalized helicities) which are derived for homogeneous stationary (not necessarily isotropic) Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments and are written simply as ηM = di < δ ( {b} × {j}) \\cdot δ {b} >, with ηM the average magnetic helicity flux rate, {b} the magnetic field, {j} the current and ± ηG = < δ ( {v} × {Ω} ) \\cdot δ {Ω} > , with ηM the average generalized helicity flux rate, {v} the fluid velocity and {Ω} = {b} + dI {ω} being the generalized helicity where ω is simply the fluid vorticity ( = nabla × {v}). It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding helicities even in case of an anisotropic plasma turbulence. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations. The newly derived relations also show that like energy, a non-zero helicity flux can only be associated to a departure of Beltrami flow state. {Reference} S. Banerjee & S. Galtier, {Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence} (submitted).

  10. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  11. Locomotion of Helical Bodies in Viscoelastic Fluids: Enhanced Swimming at Large Helical Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R.

    2013-08-01

    The motion of a rotating helical body in a viscoelastic fluid is considered. In the case of force-free swimming, the introduction of viscoelasticity can either enhance or retard the swimming speed and locomotive efficiency, depending on the body geometry, fluid properties, and the body rotation rate. Numerical solutions of the Oldroyd-B equations show how previous theoretical predictions break down with increasing helical radius or with decreasing filament thickness. Helices of large pitch angle show an increase in swimming speed to a local maximum at a Deborah number of order unity. The numerical results show how the small-amplitude theoretical calculations connect smoothly to the large-amplitude experimental measurements.

  12. The role of renal scintigraphy and unenhanced helical computerized tomography in patients with ureterolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Lorberboym, M; Kapustin, Z; Elias, S; Nikolov, G; Katz, R

    2000-04-01

    Unenhanced helical computerized tomography (UHCT) has recently evolved as an accurate imaging modality for determination of the presence or absence of ureterolithiasis in patients with acute flank pain. Functional renal scintigraphy is considered the gold standard for urinary tract obstruction. The objective of this study was to correlate the secondary signs of urinary obstruction on UHCT with findings of functional renal scintigraphy. UHCT was performed in 30 patients admitted to the emergency room with acute flank pain. All patients had a calcified urinary stone identified on UHCT. The location of each urinary stone was classified as ureteral or in the ureterovesical junction. The presence of secondary CT signs of ureteral obstruction was determined for each patient. After oral or intravenous hydration, a technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid renal scan was performed in all patients within 12 h of the CT scan. Follow-up delayed scintigraphic images were obtained at 2 h and 24 h in patients with evidence of ureteral obstruction. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of each possible combination of CT findings were determined by comparison with the scintigraphic results. The distal ureter was the most common location for a calculus on UHCT, followed in frequency by the ureterovesical junction, proximal ureter and mid-ureter. The renograms showed high-grade, unilateral obstruction in 12 patients, indeterminate scans in five patients and normal renograms in 13 patients. The sensitivities and specificities of individual CT findings ranged from 50% to 75% and from 8% to 69%, respectively. Perinephric stranding gave the highest positive predictive value (PPV) for obstruction (69% including indeterminate renograms). None of the individual CT findings showed a statistically significant correlation with scintigraphic findings. A combination of one or two positive CT findings had a PPV of only 25% for obstruction. A combination of three or four

  13. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Pamplona, Maria Carmen; Calderon, Juan F.; Shaheen, Kenneth; Chaiyasate, Konkgrit; Rontal, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management. PMID:26273595

  14. Local anesthesia in the palate: a comparison of techniques and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, J. G.; Day, P. F.; McMillan, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    It was the purpose of the present investigation to determine if there were differences in soft-tissue anesthesia in the palate following infiltration and greater palatine nerve block anesthesia and to compare lidocaine with lidocaine plus epinephrine as palatal soft tissue anesthetics. Two studies using 10 volunteers were performed. In one trial, volunteers received a palatal infiltration opposite the second maxillary bicuspid on one side and a greater palatine nerve block on the other. Response to sharp probing and pain-pressure thresholds were measured on each side over a 1-hour census period. In the second trial, volunteers received 2% plain lidocaine as a palatal infiltration on one side and a similar infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine on the other in a double-blind randomized fashion. Response to sharp probing was assessed over a 55-minute period. Data were analyzed using Student's paired t tests. The response to sharp probing and pressure-pain thresholds did not differ between palatal infiltration and greater palatine nerve block over the 1-hour period. Lidocaine with epinephrine provided longer lasting anesthesia than plain lidocaine following palatal infiltration (P < .001). Greater palatine nerve block and palatal infiltration provide similar soft-tissue anesthesia. Lidocaine with epinephrine produces longer-lasting soft-tissue anesthesia than plain lidocaine following palatal infiltration. PMID:11432180

  15. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  16. Psychosocial Aspects of Cleft Lip and Palate: Implications for Parental Education. Research Report 138.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalland, Mirjam

    This study focused on the psychosocial aspects of cleft lip and/or palate on maternal emotional reactions and the family, with emphasis on the effect on the maternal-infant bond. Interviews were conducted with 40 mothers of 1-year-old infants with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenological…

  17. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  18. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  19. Broken orthodontic trans-palatal archwire stuck to the throat of orthodontic patient: is it strange?

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kader, H M

    2003-03-01

    Trans-palatal arch wire is in common use in orthodontic practice. This case report of broken trans-palatal wire, swallowed and stuck to the throat of an orthodontic patient, is presented in the hope that it will stress the importance of careful examination of the appliance at each scheduled visit.

  20. Palatal Activity in Voicing Distinctions: A Simultaneous Fiberoptic and Electromyographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell-Berti, Fredericka; Hirose, Hajime

    1975-01-01

    A study of electromyographic (EMG) activity and palatal movement is reported. Motion pictures were taken of the nasal surface of the soft palate and EMG recordings from the levator palatini muscle were obtained. Both were analyzed for the relationship of velar height to EMG strength and time. (SC)

  1. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  2. A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harvey R.; Ferrand, Carole T.

    1987-01-01

    Respirometric quotients (RQ), the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained from the productions of oral and nasal airflow of 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. Cleft palate speakers without their appliances exhibited the lowest RQ values. (Author/DB)

  3. Miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expander (MARPE): the quest for pure orthopedic movement

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hideo; Moon, Won; Previdente, Luiz Henrique; Suzuki, Selly Sayuri; Garcez, Aguinaldo Silva; Consolaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The midpalatal suture has bone margins with thick connective tissue interposed between them, and it does not represent the fusion of maxillary palatal processes only, but also the fusion of palatal processes of the jaws and horizontal osseous laminae of palatal bones. Changing it implies affecting neighboring areas. It has got three segments that should be considered by all clinical analyses, whether therapeutic or experimental: the anterior segment (before the incisive foramen, or intermaxillary segment), the middle segment (from the incisive foramen to the suture transversal to the palatal bone ) and the posterior segment (after the suture transversal to the palatal bone ). Rapid palatal expansion might be recommended for patients at the final pubertal growth stage, in addition to adult patients with maxillary constriction. It represents a treatment solution that can potentially avoid surgical intervention. When performed in association with rapid palatal expanders, it might enhance the skeletal effects of the latter. Of the various designs of expansion appliances, MARPE (miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expander) has been modified in order to allow its operational advantages and outcomes to become familiar in the clinical practice. PMID:27653260

  4. Metric Analysis of the Hard Palate in Children with Down Syndrome--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagyalakshmi, Gopalan; Renukarya, Annappa Jai; Rajangam, Sayee

    2007-01-01

    The hard palate is viewed as playing an important role in the passive articulation of speech. Its probable role in the defective articulation of speech in individuals with Down syndrome has been examined in the present study. In individuals with Down syndrome, the hard palate is highly arched, constricted, and narrow and stair type with malformed…

  5. Roles of collagen and periostin expression by cranial neural crest cells during soft palate development.

    PubMed

    Oka, Kyoko; Honda, Masaki J; Tsuruga, Eichi; Hatakeyama, Yuji; Isokawa, Keitaro; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    The tissue in the palatal region can be divided into the hard and the soft palates, each having a specialized function such as occlusion, speech, or swallowing. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of palatogenesis in relation to the function of each region is important. However, in comparison with the hard palate, there is still a lack of information about the mechanisms of soft palate development. In this study, the authors investigated the contribution of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells to development of both hard and soft palates. They also demonstrated a unique pattern of periostin expression during soft palate development, which was closely related to that of collagen type I (Col I) in palatine aponeurosis. Furthermore, organ culture analysis showed that exogenous transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induced the expression of both periostin and Col I. These novel patterns of expression in the extracellular matrix (ECM) induced by CNC cells suggest that these cells may help to determine the character of both the hard and soft palates through ECM induction. TGF-β signaling appears to be one of the mediators of Col I and periostin expression in the formation of functional structures during soft palate development.

  6. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  7. Maxilla dimension in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Changes from birth until palate surgery at age three.

    PubMed

    Opitz, C; Kratzsch, H

    1997-01-01

    This study traces the changes in maxillary dimension in 44 unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients and 28 bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) patients from birth up to the time of palate surgery at age 3. Measurements on dental casts were carried out at 4 defined registration stages. The results revealed a continuous reduction in cleft dimension parallel to an increase in the transversal and sagittal maxillary dimensions. The inclination of the palatal slope displayed such a high degree of variability that no statement regarding the development in this variable could be made. Differences between the 2 types of cleft patients were found only in the maxillary sagittal dimension. Wearing an orthopedic plate after surgery appears to prevent transversal collapse in the anterior region and to counteract external transversal and sagittal forces. Only temporary inhibition of growth in the sagittal dimension of the maxilla was observed after lip surgery.

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  9. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  10. Stability of Palatal Rugae as a Forensic Marker in Orthodontically Treated Cases.

    PubMed

    Ali, Batool; Shaikh, Attiya; Fida, Mubassar

    2016-09-01

    The palatal rugae have been used as a reference landmark and identification marker by orthodontists and forensic analysts. However, the reliability of palatal rugae as a forensic marker remains questionable once an individual is subjected to orthodontic treatment. This study aimed at evaluating the changes in the rugae pattern after nonextraction, extraction, and maxillary expansion orthodontic treatment. The lengths and shapes of palatal rugae were evaluated on the pretreatment and post-treatment dental casts of 168 subjects using the Thomas and Kotze classification. Extraction treatment significantly reduced the second and third rugae lengths (p < 0.05), whereas the third rugae length was significantly increased after palatal expansion (p < 0.05). The shape of rugae remained consistent in all the study groups which may be used as a reliable forensic marker in subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. However, the use of the lengths of palatal rugae in forensic odontology must be made with caution.

  11. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  12. Three Cases of Palatal Tics and Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Renata; Cath, Danielle; Pavone, Piero; Tijssen, Marina; Robertson, Mary M

    2015-08-01

    Five patients with palatal tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome have been previously reported. Little is known about the characteristics of palatal tics given that there are so few reports. On one hand, palatal tics may be rare. Alternatively, they may be less well recognized than repetitive eye blinking or sniffing, which are both obvious and, therefore, more often reported. We describe 3 patients with palatal tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We also review the 5 patients reported in the literature and explore whether there are characteristic features among this group of 8 cases. The 8 patients had the following features: (1) Personal history of other multiple motor/vocal tics, (2) the presence of typical Gilles de la Tourette syndrome comorbidities, (3) positive family history of tics and/or Gilles de la Tourette syndrome comorbidities, (4) the presence of audible "ear clicks," (5) younger age at onset (2 years). We suggest that palatal tics are underreported.

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of TGF-B1 during morphogenetic movements of the developing mouse palate.

    PubMed

    Williams, J M; Robinson, R A; Solursh, M

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-B1) may play an important role in developmentally active tissues in which it is found in high concentrations. We localized TGF-B1 in the developing fetal mouse palate immunohistochemically using a polyclonal antibody. Mouse fetal palates at 12-17 days (inclusive) of gestation were examined and specific focal concentrations of TGF-B1 identified regions undergoing active morphogenesis. The association of TGF-B1 with aggregates of mesenchymal cells in the palate and chondroblasts, rhabdomyocytes, and epithelia of the craniofacial complex strongly implicates its role in proliferation and differentiation in the developing mouse palate. We believe these findings have important bearing on the normal development of the palate as well as cleft anomalies.

  14. Versatility of Tongue Flaps for Closure of Palatal Defects- Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vishnu; Nair, Roopesh U

    2017-01-01

    Palatal defects following congenital anomalies, traumatic injuries, benign and malignant pathologies frequently require resection and reconstruction. Reconstruction of these defects is challenging and complex due to the amount of tissue left for primary closure after excision, compromised vasculature as on repaired cleft palate and limited pedicled flaps around the lesion. Tongue flap though doesn’t fulfil all the ideal requirements of a flap, however because of its flexibility, good blood supply and position it can be considered as the best among other flaps for reconstruction of oral and palatal defects. In this article we describe two different cases in which tongue flap was used to reconstruct palatal defects, one an oroantral communication secondary to a tumour excision and the other an oro-nasal fistula secondary to cleft palate repair. PMID:28274072

  15. Development of a 3D co-culture model using human stem cells for studying embryonic palatal fusion.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphogenetic tissue fusion is a critical and complex event in embryonic development and failure of this event leads to birth defects, such as cleft palate. Palatal fusion requires adhesion and subsequent dissolution of the medial epithelial layer of the mesenchymal palatal shelv...

  16. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  17. The Role of the Velopharyngeal Sphincter in the Speech of Patients with Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate Using Perceptual Methods

    PubMed Central

    Georgievska-Jancheska, Tatjana; Gjorgova, Juliana; Popovska, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The velopharyngeal sphincter (VPS) plays the main role in speech formation. The cleft palate, due to the damage of the soft palate, leads to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal sphincter thus causing speech disorder. AIM: To establish a link between the nasal air escape and the perceptual symptoms in the speech of patients with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate using auditory-visual perceptual procedures for determining the influence the velopharyngeal dysfunction has on speech. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with speech disorders, out of which 10 have cleft palate or cleft lip and palate (experimental group), participated in the perceptual assessment by means of Czermak mirror fogging test for assessing the nasal air escape and Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale (PWSS) for assessing the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. RESULTS: The respondents with a considerable nasal air escape have a higher velopharyngeal inability, that is, probably incompetent nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. There is a strong correlation between the nasal air escape and the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter (the coefficient of linear correlation r = 0.9756). The calculated p-value is p = 0.000002. CONCLUSION: The perceptual speech symptoms and the nasal air escape provide unique insight into the state and role the velopharyngeal sphincter has in speech. PMID:28028412

  18. Negative Dystonia of the Palate: A Novel Entity and Diagnostic Consideration in Hypernasal Speech

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Catherine F.; Simonyan, Kristina; Brin, Mitchell F.; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present the first documented series of patients with negative dystonia (ND) of the palate, including clinical symptoms, functional MRI findings, and management options. Study Design Case series ascertained from clinical research centers that evaluated patients with both hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorders. Methods Between July 1983 and March 2013, data was collected on patient demographics, disease characteristics, functional MRI findings, long-term management options, and outcomes. We sought patients whose clinical examination demonstrated absent palatal movement on speaking, despite normal palatal activity on other activities. Results Five patients (2 males, 3 females) met clinical criteria. All patients presented with hypernasal speech without associated dysphagia. Clinical examination revealed absent palatal movement on speaking despite intact gag reflexes, normal palate elevation on swallowing, and normal cranial nerve examinations. Other cranial and/or limb dystonias were present in four patients (80.0%). Three patients (60.0%) had previously failed oral pharmacologic therapy. Two patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, which demonstrated an overall decrease of cortical and subcortical activation during production of symptomatic syllables and asymptomatic coughing. Management included speech therapy (all patients) and palatal lift (2 patients) with limited improvement. Calcium hydroxyapatite injection (1 patient) into the soft palate and Passavants’ ridge was beneficial. Conclusions This is the first report of ND of the palate. Characteristic findings were task-specific absent palatal movement with speech, despite normal movement on swallowing, coughing, and an intact gag reflex, as well as disorder-specific decreased brain activation on functional MRI. A diagnosis of ND of the palate should be considered for patients who present with hypernasal speech. Level of Evidence 4. PMID:25646795

  19. Islandized mucoperiosteal flaps: A versatile technique for closure of a wide palatal cleft

    PubMed Central

    Aboul-Wafa, Ahmed Mabrouk

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of surgical methods have been described to repair wide cleft palate; they are all challenging to perform and yield consistently good results. The islandized mucoperiosteal flap, the technique described in the present article, is very versatile because it can close palatal defects of any size without undue tension. Moreover, it provides adequate length and mobility of the soft palate with improved speech and feeding functions without fistula formation. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2011, 36 patients with wide cleft palate were operated on using islandized mucoperiosteal flaps. This technique involves dissection of the neurovascular bundle from the mucoperiosteal flaps for approximately 1 cm and dissecting the muscle from the posterior edge of the hard palate with intravelar veloplasty. The flaps subsequently become freely mobile in all directions. It can move medially to close palatal defects of any size without tension. In addition, posterior or backward mobilization lengthens the soft palate and renders it freely mobile. RESULTS: All repairs were successful, with no complications and no patients requiring secondary procedures. All patients regained normal feeding function three weeks postoperatively. All patients showed normal nasal resonance of speech except for two (three and five years of age) who experienced abnormal resonance in the form of open nasality that required regular speech therapy for six months. There was significant improvement and no secondary procedures were required for either. CONCLUSIONS: A technical modification for closure of wide palatal clefts is introduced. The islandized mucoperiosteal flap, which is a very versatile technique, can close cleft palates of any width without tension, lengthens the soft palate and renders it freely mobile for proper speech functions. Using this technique, good speech and feeding function with no complications were achieved. PMID:23997584

  20. Density of states of helically symmetric boron carbon nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A C M; Bezerra, C G; Lawlor, J A; Ferreira, M S

    2014-01-08

    Motivated by the existence of helical wrapping patterns in composite nanotube systems, in this work we study the effects of the helical incorporation of carbon atoms in boron nitride nanotubes. We consider the substitutional carbon atoms distributed in stripes forming helical patterns along the nanotube axis. The density of states and energy band gap were calculated adopting Green function formalism by using the Rubio-Sancho technique in order to solve the matrix Dyson equation. We report the effects of the helical atomic distribution of carbon atoms on the behaviour of the density of states and the energy band gap. In particular, we show that the electronic energy band gap displays a non-monotonical dependence on the helical pattern, oscillating as a function of the helical angle θ.

  1. Alpha Helices Are More Robust to Mutations than Beta Strands

    PubMed Central

    Abrusán, György

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of data on human genetic variation has resulted in a growing demand to identify pathogenic mutations computationally, as their experimental validation is currently beyond reach. Here we show that alpha helices and beta strands differ significantly in their ability to tolerate mutations: helices can accumulate more mutations than strands without change, due to the higher numbers of inter-residue contacts in helices. This results in two patterns: a) the same number of mutations causes less structural change in helices than in strands; b) helices diverge more rapidly in sequence than strands within the same domains. Additionally, both helices and strands are significantly more robust than coils. Based on this observation we show that human missense mutations that change secondary structure are more likely to be pathogenic than those that do not. Moreover, inclusion of predicted secondary structure changes shows significant utility for improving upon state-of-the-art pathogenicity predictions. PMID:27935949

  2. Dispersion phenomena in helical flow in a concentric annulus.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Seok; Brenner, Howard

    2009-12-14

    We examined dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow in a concentric annulus through a multiscale approach. The helical flow was developed by the combination of the Poiseuille flow and Couette flow. Here, we present an analytic model that can address the multidimensional Taylor dispersion in the helical flow under a lateral field of thermophoresis (or thermal diffusion) in the gapwise direction. Macroscopic parameters including the average solute velocity and dispersivity were analyzed using relevant microscopic physicochemical properties. The mathematically obtained results were validated by the numerical simulation carried out in this study. The findings show that macrotransport processes are robust and straightforward to handle multidimensional dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow. This study is expected to provide a theoretical platform for applications of helical flow such as tube exchangers, oil drilling, and multidimensional field flow fractionations (e.g., helical flow field flow fractionation).

  3. Tissue engineering in cleft palate and other congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Panetta, Nicholas J; Gupta, Deepak M; Slater, Bethany J; Kwan, Matthew D; Liu, Karen J; Longaker, Michael T

    2008-05-01

    Contributions from multidisciplinary investigations have focused attention on the potential of tissue engineering to yield novel therapeutics. Congenital malformations, including cleft palate, craniosynostosis, and craniofacial skeletal hypoplasias represent excellent targets for the implementation of tissue engineering applications secondary to the technically challenging nature and inherent inadequacies of current reconstructive interventions. Apropos to the search for answers to these clinical conundrums, studies have focused on elucidating the molecular signals driving the biologic activity of the aforementioned maladies. These investigations have highlighted multiple signaling pathways, including Wnt, fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, and bone morphogenetic proteins, that have been found to play critical roles in guided tissue development. Furthermore, a comprehensive knowledge of these pathways will be of utmost importance to the optimization of future cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The scope of this review encompasses a discussion of the molecular biology involved in the development of cleft palate and craniosynostosis. In addition, we include a discussion of craniofacial distraction osteogenesis and how its applied forces influence cell signaling to guide endogenous bone regeneration. Finally, this review discusses the future role of cell-based tissue engineering in the treatment of congenital malformations.

  4. Acceleration of palatal wound healing in Smad3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Takahashi, T; Tsuchida, K; Tanaka, E; Moriyama, K

    2009-08-01

    Wound healing is a well-orchestrated complex process leading to the repair of injured tissues. It is suggested that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta/Smad3 signaling is involved in wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling in palatal wound healing in Smad3-deficient (Smad3(-/-)) mice. Histological examination showed that wound closure was accelerated by the proliferation of epithelium and dermal cells in Smad3(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Macrophage/monocyte infiltration at wounded regions in Smad3(-/-) mice was decreased in parallel with the diminished production of TGF-beta1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha compared with WT mice. Fibrocytes, expressing hematopoietic surface marker and fibroblast products, were recruited and produced alpha-smooth-muscle actin in WT mice, but were not observed in Smad3(-/-) mice. These results suggest that TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling may play an important role in the regulation of palatal wound healing.

  5. Decay of magnetic helicity producing polarized Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    When a super-Alfvenic electron beam propagates along an ambient magnetic field, the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave is Cherenkov-emitted (two stream instability). This instability results in a spontaneous conversion of the background plasma helicity to the wave helicity. The background helicity induces a frequency (energy) shift in the eigenmodes, which changes the critical velocity for Cherenkov emission, and it becomes possible for a sub-Alfvenic electron beam to excite a nonsingular Alfven mode.

  6. Swimming and pumping of helical structures in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Spagnolie, Saverio

    2014-11-01

    Many flagellated microorganisms including E. coli swim by rotating slender helical flagella, while ciliated organisms like Paramecia swim by passing helical waves along their surfaces. We will discuss a framework for studying such problems where the Stokes equations describing viscous flow are written in helical coordinates. Analytical predictions match well with full numerical simulations, and suggest optimal geometries. This work may also aid designs in microfluidic manipulation, microswimmer engineering, and the mixing of viscous fluids.

  7. Helicity Injection by Knotted Antennas into Electron Magnetohydrodynamical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1997-08-01

    A fully three-dimensional computer simulation of an ideal electron magnetohydrodynamical plasma is performed. By introducing various pulsed inductive antenna sources, magnetic helicity ( H = A˙B dV) injection is studied. Confirming experimental results, a simple loop provides no net helicity injection. Linked and knotted antennas, however, do inject helicity and preferentially radiate whistler wave packets parallel or antiparallel to the ambient magnetic field. Relative efficiencies of these antennas are reported as well as their unique directional properties.

  8. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography (www.ugct.ugent.be) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kVmax) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  9. The helical decomposition and the instability assumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations show that the triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) peaks sharply when q (or p) is much smaller than k. The triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) gives the rate of energy input into wave number k from all interactions with modes of wave number p and q, where k, p, q form a triangle. This observation was thought to suggest that energy is cascaded downscale through non-local interactions with local transfer and that there was a strong connection between large and small scales. Both suggestions were in contradiction with the classical Kolmogorov picture of the energy cascade. The helical decomposition was found useful in distinguishing between kinematically independent interactions. That analysis has gone beyond the question of non-local interaction with local transfer. In particular, an assumption about the statistical direction of triadic energy transfer in any kinematically independent interaction was introduced (the instability assumption). That assumption is not necessary for the conclusions about non-local interactions with local transfer recalled above. In the case of turbulence under rapid rotation, the instability assumption leads to the prediction that energy is transferred in spectral space from the poles of the rotation axis toward the equator. The instability assumption is thought to be of general validity for any type of triad interactions (e.g. internal waves). The helical decomposition and the instability assumption offer detailed information about the homogeneous statistical dynamics of the Navier-Stokes equations. The objective was to explore the validity of the instability assumption and to study the contributions of the various types of helical interactions to the energy cascade and the subgrid-scale eddy-viscosity. This was done in the context of spectral closures of the Direct Interaction or Quasi-Normal type.

  10. The global distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2016-10-01

    By defining an appropriate field line helicity, we apply the powerful concept of magnetic helicity to the problem of global magnetic field evolution in the Sun's corona. As an ideal-magnetohydrodynamic invariant, the field line helicity is a meaningful measure of how magnetic helicity is distributed within the coronal volume. It may be interpreted, for each magnetic field line, as a magnetic flux linking with that field line. Using magneto-frictional simulations, we investigate how field line helicity evolves in the non-potential corona as a result of shearing by large-scale motions on the solar surface. On open magnetic field lines, the helicity injected by the Sun is largely output to the solar wind, provided that the coronal relaxation is sufficiently fast. But on closed magnetic field lines, helicity is able to build up. We find that the field line helicity is non-uniformly distributed, and is highly concentrated in twisted magnetic flux ropes. Eruption of these flux ropes is shown to lead to sudden bursts of helicity output, in contrast to the steady flux along the open magnetic field lines. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Active region helicity evolution and related coronal mass ejection activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, L.; Mandrini, C.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Demoulin, P.

    The computation of magnetic helicity has become increasingly important in the studies of solar activity. Observations of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, and their subsequent ejection into the interplanetary medium, have resulted in considerable interest to find the link between the amount of helicity in the coronal magnetic field and the origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This is reinforced by theory which shows magnetic helicity to be a well preserved quantity (Berger, 1984), and so with a continued injection into the corona an endless accumulation will occur. CMEs therefore provide a natural method to remove helicity from the corona. Recent works (DeVore, 2000, Chae, 2001, Chae et al., 2001, Demoulin et al., 2002, Green et al., 2002) have endeavoured to find the source of helicity in the corona to explain the observed CME activity in specific cases. The main candidates being differential rotation, shear motions or a transfer of helicity from below the photosphere into the corona. In order to establish a confident relation between CMEs and helicity, these works needs to be expanded to include CME source regions with different characteristics. A study of a very different active region will be presented and the relationship between helicity content and CME activity will be discussed in the framework of the previous studies.

  12. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-23

    2010 The writhe of helical structures in the solar corona T. Török1,2, M. A. Berger2,3, and B. Kliem2,4,5 1 LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC...2009; accepted ... ABSTRACT Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of...twist and writhe helicity . Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates

  13. Superposition of helical beams by using a Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunqing; Qi, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yidong; Weber, Horst

    2010-01-04

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a helical beam is of great interests in the high density optical communication due to its infinite number of eigen-states. In this paper, an experimental setup is realized to the information encoding and decoding on the OAM eigen-states. A hologram designed by the iterative method is used to generate the helical beams, and a Michelson interferometer with two Porro prisms is used for the superposition of two helical beams. The experimental results of the collinear superposition of helical beams and their OAM eigen-states detection are presented.

  14. Helical Magnetic Fields from Sphaleron Decay and Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Copi, Craig J.; Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Achucarro, Ana

    2008-10-24

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields, though the helicity created is smaller than earlier analytical estimates. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics.

  15. Large-scale flow generation by inhomogeneous helicity.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, N; Brandenburg, A

    2016-03-01

    The effect of kinetic helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation) on turbulent momentum transport is investigated. The turbulent kinetic helicity (pseudoscalar) enters the Reynolds stress (mirror-symmetric tensor) expression in the form of a helicity gradient as the coupling coefficient for the mean vorticity and/or the angular velocity (axial vector), which suggests the possibility of mean-flow generation in the presence of inhomogeneous helicity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect, which was previously confirmed at the level of a turbulence- or closure-model simulation, is examined with the aid of direct numerical simulations of rotating turbulence with nonuniform helicity sustained by an external forcing. The numerical simulations show that the spatial distribution of the Reynolds stress is in agreement with the helicity-related term coupled with the angular velocity, and that a large-scale flow is generated in the direction of angular velocity. Such a large-scale flow is not induced in the case of homogeneous turbulent helicity. This result confirms the validity of the inhomogeneous helicity effect in large-scale flow generation and suggests that a vortex dynamo is possible even in incompressible turbulence where there is no baroclinicity effect.

  16. Energy and helicity injection in solar quiet regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.; Park, S.-H.; Tsiropoula, G.; Kontogiannis, I.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity injection in solar quiet regions. Methods: We use the DAVE4VM method to infer the photospheric velocity field and calculate the free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity injection rates in 16 quiet-Sun vector magnetograms sequences. Results: We find that there is no dominant sense of helicity injection in quiet-Sun regions, and that both helicity and energy injections are mostly due to surface shuffling motions that dominate the respective emergence by factors slightly larger than two. We, furthermore, estimate the helicity and energy rates per network unit area as well as the respective budgets over a complete solar cycle. Conclusions: Derived helicity and energy budgets over the entire solar cycle are similar to respective budgets derived in a recent work from the instantaneous helicity and free magnetic energy budgets and higher than previously reported values that relied on similar approaches to this analysis. Free-energy budgets, mostly generated like helicity at the network, are high enough to power the dynamics of fine-scale structures residing at the network, such as mottles and spicules, while corresponding estimates of helicity budgets are provided, pending future verification from high-resolution magneto-hydrodynamic simulations and/or observations.

  17. Inverse moments equilibria for helical anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Hirshman, S. P.; Depassier, M. C.

    1987-11-01

    An energy functional is devised for magnetic confinement schemes that have anisotropic plasma pressure. The minimization of this energy functional is demonstrated to reproduce components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force balance relation in systems with helical symmetry. An iterative steepest descent procedure is applied to the Fourier moments of the inverse magnetic flux coordinates to minimize the total energy and thus generate anisotropic pressure MHD equilibria. Applications to straight ELMO Snaky Torus (NTIS Document No. DE-84002406) configurations that have a magnetic well on the outermost flux surfaces have been obtained.

  18. Study of Zγ Helicity Distributions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakaberia, Irakli; CMS Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Measurement of the production of electroweak gauge bosons (γ, W, Z) provides important tests of the standard model. The production of a diboson final state at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can occur by quark-antiquark annihilation (t-channel) or by boson self-interaction (s-channel). The s-channel production provides a unique probe of triple gauge boson couplings (TGC) and the effects of new physics on these couplings. I present a study of the helicity angle distributions in the Zγ production process at the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and an examination of the sensitivity of these distributions to new physics.

  19. Helical Disruptions in Small Loops of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamical stability of DNA minicircles is investigated by means of path integral techniques. Hydrogen bonds between base pairs on complementary strands can be broken by thermal fluctuations and temporary fluctuational openings along the double helix are essential to biological functions such as transcription and replication of the genetic information. Helix unwinding and bubble formation patterns are computed in circular sequences with variable radius in order to analyze the interplay between molecule size and appearance of helical disruptions. The latter are found in minicircles with < 100 base pairs and appear as a strategy to soften the stress due to the bending and torsion of the helix.

  20. Landau theory for helical nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.; Lebedev, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    We propose Landau phenomenology for the phase transition from the conventional nematic into the conical helical orientationally non-uniform structure recently identified in liquid crystals formed by "banana"-shaped molecules. The mean field predictions are mostly in agreement with experimental data. Based on the analogy with de Gennes model, we argue that fluctuations of the order parameter turn the transition to the first order phase transition rather than continuous one predicted by the mean-field theory. This conclusion is in agreement with experimental observations. We discuss the new Goldstone mode to be observed in the low-temperature phase.