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Sample records for palestine case study

  1. Educational Research in Palestine: Epistemological and Cultural Challenges--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalifah, Ayman A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the prevailing epistemological and cultural conditions that underlie educational research in Palestine. Using a case study of a major Palestinian University that awards Masters Degrees in Education, the study analyzes the assumptions and the methodology that characterizes current educational research. Using an analysis of…

  2. Educational Research in Palestine: Epistemological and Cultural Challenges--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalifah, Ayman A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the prevailing epistemological and cultural conditions that underlie educational research in Palestine. Using a case study of a major Palestinian University that awards Masters Degrees in Education, the study analyzes the assumptions and the methodology that characterizes current educational research. Using an analysis of…

  3. Risk factors of hepatitis B transmission in northern Palestine: a case - control study.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Zaher; Sobuh, Inam

    2014-03-28

    The Hepatitis B (HB) infection is a significant health problem in Palestine, which is categorized as an HB virus moderate endemic area, with the HB carrier rate ranging from 2-6%. The aim of this study is to determine the risk factors of Hepatitis transmission in the northern areas of Palestine in order to help prevent and control this prevalent health problem. A case-control study was implemented to achieve the study objectives. One hundred HB virus seropositive cases and another 100 seronegative controls were included in the study. Univariate analysis and a logistic regression model were performed to examine probable risk factors of acquisition of HB infections. Univariate analysis showed that HB case-patients were more likely to report having a history of blood transfusion, dental visits, hospitalization, Hejamat, sharing shaving equipments, intravenous drug use, or living abroad than controls were. The logistic regression model revealed a history of dental visits to be the most significant risk factor, (P value <0.001, OR 5.6; 95% CI 2.8-11.1). The presence of these risk factors emphasizes the need for both increasing the uptake of HB vaccine and implementing risk-targeted public health education. Development and enforcement of appropriate infection control guidelines for dental care services are important to prevent HB virus transmission as well.

  4. Solid waste characterization, quantification and management practices in developing countries. a case study: Nablus district - Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Monou, Maria; Abu Zahra, Abdul Salam F; Shaheen, Hafez Q; Kassinos, Despo

    2010-05-01

    Solid waste management (SWM) is one of the most challenging issues faced by developing countries that suffer from serious pollution problems caused by the generation of large waste quantities. This paper presents the case study of SWM in the Nablus district - Palestine. Surveys for household residents' and SWM program operators, field investigations, on-site waste measurements and characterizations were conducted. Per capita waste generation rates varied between different localities although trends were similar. Overall, the majority of waste was organic (65.1% by weight), suggesting a strong resource recovery potential in terms of animal feed or compost. Recyclable waste (plastic, paper and card) made up 16.7% by weight the waste composition suggesting an incentive to introduce source separation. Household attitudes complemented the waste characterization study, revealing the main problems faced. SWM operators quoted on the current status, highlighting problems with disposing in unsanitary landfills, ineffective solid waste fees system, increasing solid waste quantities and lacking equipment and experienced personnel. To enhance sustainable SWM, public awareness, funding, expertise, equipment and facilities and other provisions currently lacking or inappropriate must be provided. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Value of information analysis for groundwater quality monitoring network design Case study: Eocene Aquifer, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khader, A.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    Value of information (VOI) analysis evaluates the benefit of collecting additional information to reduce or eliminate uncertainty in a specific decision-making context. It makes explicit any expected potential losses from errors in decision making due to uncertainty and identifies the “best” information collection strategy as one that leads to the greatest expected net benefit to the decision-maker. This study investigates the willingness to pay for groundwater quality monitoring in the Eocene Aquifer, Palestine, which is an unconfined aquifer located in the northern part of the West Bank. The aquifer is being used by 128,000 Palestinians to fulfill domestic and agricultural demands. The study takes into account the consequences of pollution and the options the decision maker might face. Since nitrate is the major pollutant in the aquifer, the consequences of nitrate pollution were analyzed, which mainly consists of the possibility of methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). In this case, the value of monitoring was compared to the costs of treating for methemoglobinemia or the costs of other options like water treatment, using bottled water or importing water from outside the aquifer. And finally, an optimal monitoring network that takes into account the uncertainties in recharge (climate), aquifer properties (hydraulic conductivity), pollutant chemical reaction (decay factor), and the value of monitoring is designed by utilizing a sparse Bayesian modeling algorithm called a relevance vector machine.

  6. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Gaza Strip, Palestine: a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the main common cause of cancer mortality among women in the world. This study aims at investigating BC epidemiology and identifying the different risk factors associated and the most affecting ones among women in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. This study was a hospital-based case-control (1:2), as the study was carried out over the period of October 2014 to February 2015. A total of 105 BC patients, chosen from Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza City and European hospital for the south governorate, were the case and compared to 209 women as a control group who matched the cases in age, residence, and with no history of breast problems. The age of the enrolled cases and controlled ranged between 18 to 60 years. The face-to-face interview was conducted during the patient visit to the oncology department and the control visit in their home. The result illustrated that women who had late pregnancy (> 35 years) (odds ratio [OR], 11.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64–81.35), or high body mass index (BMI; ≥ 30 kg/m2) (OR, 4.70; 95% CI, 1.62–13.69), or first-degree family history of BC (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.04–7.20), or hypertensive patients (OR, 12.13; 95% CI, 1.93–76.10), or diabetic (OR, 6.84; 95% CI, 1.77–26.36) were more likely to have increased BC risk. The findings of the present study suggest that positive family history of BC, high BMI, and some common diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus) may be the epigenetic factors promoting the occurrence of BC. PMID:28770179

  7. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Gaza Strip, Palestine: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kariri, Mueen; Jalambo, Marwan O; Kanou, Basil; Deqes, Saleh; Younis, Samaher; Zabut, Baker; Balawi, Usama

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the main common cause of cancer mortality among women in the world. This study aims at investigating BC epidemiology and identifying the different risk factors associated and the most affecting ones among women in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. This study was a hospital-based case-control (1:2), as the study was carried out over the period of October 2014 to February 2015. A total of 105 BC patients, chosen from Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza City and European hospital for the south governorate, were the case and compared to 209 women as a control group who matched the cases in age, residence, and with no history of breast problems. The age of the enrolled cases and controlled ranged between 18 to 60 years. The face-to-face interview was conducted during the patient visit to the oncology department and the control visit in their home. The result illustrated that women who had late pregnancy (> 35 years) (odds ratio [OR], 11.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-81.35), or high body mass index (BMI; ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) (OR, 4.70; 95% CI, 1.62-13.69), or first-degree family history of BC (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.04-7.20), or hypertensive patients (OR, 12.13; 95% CI, 1.93-76.10), or diabetic (OR, 6.84; 95% CI, 1.77-26.36) were more likely to have increased BC risk. The findings of the present study suggest that positive family history of BC, high BMI, and some common diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus) may be the epigenetic factors promoting the occurrence of BC.

  8. Perceptions of Using Smart Mobile Devices in Higher Education Teaching: A Case Study from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shraim, Khitam; Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Smart mobile devices (SMDs), especially smartphones and tablets, are becoming increasingly ubiquitous among educators and students in Palestine. While their use is on the rise, many academics are not effectively incorporating this technology into their teaching, which may be attributable to their negative perceptions of these devices. This study…

  9. Site Effect and Expected Seismic Performance of Buildings in Palestine- Case Study: Nablus City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dabbeek, Jalal N.; El-Kelani, Radwan J.

    2008-07-01

    The effects of local geology on ground-motion amplification and building damage were studied in Palestine-West Bank. Nakamura's method of microtremor analysis was applied in this study. The measurements showed significantly higher amplification in the frequency range of building vulnerability in different parts of Nablus city. This finding is consistent with the distribution of the earthquake damage grades in the urban areas struck by the 11 February 2004 earthquake (ML = 5.2) with a focal depth of 17 km beneath the northeastern part of the Dead Sea Basin. Quite large differences in amplification between around 1 and 9 were computed between the eastern and western rims of the city. The downtown built in the central part of the city on soft clay, marl and valley deposits, whereas the northern and southern parts of urban areas in Nablus city lying on mountains consist of consolidated carbonates bedrock. In the central part of the city and at the rims, where the thickness of fluvial deposits and soft formations is about 15 m, amplifications between 6.74 and 8.67 for dominant natural period range of 0.8-1.1 sec were obtained. On the southern and northern mountains, which are located on limestone rocks covered with a thin layer of soil, the amplification in the same frequency range was low. Calculating the natural period of the existing common buildings (Tb) in the studied area (buildings with 10-12 stories), by using the dynamic analysis method. The values of Tb obtained were much closed to the site dominant natural period (Ts). The findings of this study indicate that the expected differences in damage grades for urban areas in Nablus city could be attributed to variations in the thickness and physical properties of Tertiary-Quaternary sediments, which appear to be rather heterogeneous.

  10. Site Effect and Expected Seismic Performance of Buildings in Palestine- Case Study: Nablus City

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dabbeek, Jalal N.; El-Kelani, Radwan J.

    2008-07-08

    The effects of local geology on ground-motion amplification and building damage were studied in Palestine-West Bank. Nakamura's method of microtremor analysis was applied in this study. The measurements showed significantly higher amplification in the frequency range of building vulnerability in different parts of Nablus city. This finding is consistent with the distribution of the earthquake damage grades in the urban areas struck by the 11 February 2004 earthquake (ML = 5.2) with a focal depth of 17 km beneath the northeastern part of the Dead Sea Basin. Quite large differences in amplification between around 1 and 9 were computed between the eastern and western rims of the city. The downtown built in the central part of the city on soft clay, marl and valley deposits, whereas the northern and southern parts of urban areas in Nablus city lying on mountains consist of consolidated carbonates bedrock. In the central part of the city and at the rims, where the thickness of fluvial deposits and soft formations is about 15 m, amplifications between 6.74 and 8.67 for dominant natural period range of 0.8-1.1 sec were obtained. On the southern and northern mountains, which are located on limestone rocks covered with a thin layer of soil, the amplification in the same frequency range was low. Calculating the natural period of the existing common buildings (T{sub b}) in the studied area (buildings with 10-12 stories), by using the dynamic analysis method. The values of T{sub b} obtained were much closed to the site dominant natural period (Ts). The findings of this study indicate that the expected differences in damage grades for urban areas in Nablus city could be attributed to variations in the thickness and physical properties of Tertiary-Quaternary sediments, which appear to be rather heterogeneous.

  11. A cross sectional study of maternal 'near-miss' cases in major public hospitals in Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Hyam; Saad-Haddad, Ghada; DeJong, Jocelyn; Ramadan, Mohammed Cherine; Hassan, Sahar; Breebaart, Miral; Wick, Laura; Hassanein, Nevine; Kharouf, Mayada

    2015-11-13

    The maternal near-miss approach has been increasingly used as a tool to evaluate and improve the quality of care in maternal health. We report findings from the formative stage of a World Health Organization (WHO) funded implementation research study that was undertaken to collect primary data at the facility level on the prevalence, characteristics, and management of maternal near-miss cases in four major public referral hospitals - one each in Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria. We conducted a cross sectional study of maternal near-miss cases in the four contexts beginning in 2011, where we collected data on severe maternal morbidity in the four study hospitals, using the WHO form (Individual Form HRP A65661). In each hospital, a research team including trained hospital healthcare providers carried out the data collection. A total of 9,063 live birth deliveries were reported during the data collection period across the four settings, with a total of 77 cases of severe maternal outcomes (71 maternal near-miss cases and 6 maternal deaths). Higher indices for the maternal mortality index were found in both Al Galaa hospital, in Egypt (8.6%) and Dar Al Tawleed hospital in Syria (14.3%), being large referral hospitals, compared to Ramallah hospital in Palestine and Rafik Hariri University hospital in Lebanon. Compared to the WHO's Multicountry Survey using the same data collection tool, our study's mortality indices are higher than the index of 5.6% among countries with a moderate maternal mortality ratio in the WHO Survey. Overall, haemorrhage-related complications were the most frequent conditions among maternal near-miss cases across the four study hospitals. In all hospitals, coagulation dysfunctions (76.1%) were the most prevalent dysfunction among maternal near-miss cases, followed by cardiovascular dysfunctions. The coverage of key evidence-based interventions among women experiencing a near-miss was either universal or very high in the study hospitals

  12. Residents' concerns and attitudes toward solid waste management facilities in Palestine: a case study of Hebron district.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Ajlouny, Hiba; Al-Sari', Majed I; Kontogianni, Stamatia

    2014-03-01

    Because of many limitations, the siting, construction and operation of a new solid waste management (SWM) facility is a significant challenge in Palestine. A SWM facility should operate in a sustainable in all aspects, including social acceptance, environmental protection, financial equity, and, in this particular case study, the political acceptance of all regional parts is extremely important. This article presents the outcomes of an extended study that aimed to investigate the concerns and attitudes of the residents of Hebron governorate related to the entire lifecycle of SWM facilities. A structured questionnaire was developed based on literature reviews and was distributed to residents in three different communities in the same governorate with various lifestyle backgrounds. The overall investigation focused on the collection of raw data regarding citizens' levels of concern regarding the environmental impacts of SWM facilities, the general waste management aspects, the benefits gained by the operation of various types of SWM facilities and the attitudes during the construction period of each facility. The results show that concerns about water pollution are significant; the benefits gained as a result of the operation of SWM facilities, particularly the heat supply from incinerators, are welcomed; and 'not in my backyard' syndrome is highlighted. The outcomes of this research are input data for the development of a roadmap that may include educational programs, incentive schemes and active public involvement during all phases of the implementation of SWM facilities (planning, siting, operation), in order to also ensure public acceptance, participation and regional sustainable development.

  13. Management of healthcare waste in circumstances of limited resources: a case study in the hospitals of Nablus city, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Al-Qaroot, Yousef S; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammad S

    2009-06-01

    The objectives of this study were the assessment of healthcare waste management and the characterization of healthcare waste material generated in the hospitals in Nablus city, Palestine, and furthermore, to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B among the cleaning personnel working in these hospitals. The medical waste generation rate in kg per bed per day was between 0.59 and 0.93 kg bed(-1) day(-1). The waste generation rate in the healthcare facilities of Nablus city hospitals was similar to some other developing countries; however, the percentage of medical wastes in the total waste stream was comparatively high. The density of medical waste at the four hospitals studied ranged between 144.9 and 188.4 kg m(-3) with a mean value of 166.7 kg m(-3). The waste segregation and handling practices were very poor. Other alternatives for waste treatment rather than incineration such as a locally made autoclave integrated with a shredder should be evaluated and implemented. The system of healthcare waste management in Nablus city is in need of immediate improvement and attention. Formulating rules and guidelines for medical waste and developing strategies for overcoming the obstacles related to waste management should be considered as an urgent matter.

  14. Examining Education, Media, and Dialogue under Occupation: The Case of Palestine and Israel. Critical Language and Literacy Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Ilham; Berlin, Lawrence N.; Wong, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    This book is an in-depth examination of education and media under occupation. The contributors to this volume engage dialogue to explore these domains and their roles and functioning under occupation while keeping an eye toward resolution, using the on-going conflict between Palestine and Israel as the focus. The uniqueness of this collection is…

  15. Examining Education, Media, and Dialogue under Occupation: The Case of Palestine and Israel. Critical Language and Literacy Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Ilham; Berlin, Lawrence N.; Wong, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    This book is an in-depth examination of education and media under occupation. The contributors to this volume engage dialogue to explore these domains and their roles and functioning under occupation while keeping an eye toward resolution, using the on-going conflict between Palestine and Israel as the focus. The uniqueness of this collection is…

  16. Children's perceptions and behavior with respect to glass littering in developing countries: a case study in Palestine's Nablus district.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A

    2009-04-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the current situation regarding glass litter on the streets and children's attitudes, and behavior concerning glass litter. Out of 240 interviewed children, 41.7% admitted glass littering. This was reflected in the high incidence of injuries caused by street glass among children; 140 (58.3%) of the children interviewed had been injured by broken glass at least once while walking outdoors and 95 of the children had received professional medical care for the lacerations. As reported by the children who admitted to glass littering, the most effective elements (29.6%) in preventing them from littering the streets with glass were moral and religious convictions, and the next most effective practice (20.4%) was improved street cleanliness. Preventive measures such as encouraging moral and religious convictions among children, more effective street cleaning by local authorities, improved footwear, education, and glass recycling incentives, as well as engaging the community in street cleaning campaigns, are all needed to address this public health hazard. More recreational facilities should be provided. Public awareness initiatives led by environmentalists, social workers, primary health care providers or home healthcare providers may also help educate children to wear shoes, prevent glass injuries and increase glass litter awareness.

  17. Management of rainwater harvesting and its impact on the health of people in the Middle East: case study from Yatta town, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ilke; Tamimi, Lina M A; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Apul, Defne S

    2017-06-01

    Water-related diseases are a primary problem in Palestine where many residents revert to harvested rainwater as their primary water source due to water shortages within the area. From an environmental engineering perspective, it is already well known that certain situations (e.g., cross contamination) reduce drinking water quality and ultimately cause diseases in a population. In this study, we investigated the social practices and situations that may lead to lower disease occurrence. Towards this goal, we surveyed 382 residents in Yatta to collect data on the water-related diseases that they experienced and the specific situations that might affect the disease occurrences such as the residents' practices (i) for maintaining a high quality of cistern water, (ii) for maintaining the environment around the cistern, and (iii) for managing the wastewater. In addition, we measured the physicochemical and microbiological parameters in cisterns to support the qualitative survey data. The measured parameters, including turbidity, salinity, free available chlorine, total Coliforms, and fecal Coliforms, were above Palestinian Standard Institution (PSI) and World Health Organization (WHO) guideline levels, suggesting a potential infectious hazard. The poor quality of the water was also observed by residents based on change in taste and by visually noting floating impurities, turbidity, and green coloration. Survey results showed that observations of the poor quality in cisterns and surrounding environment had statistically significant correlation with most of the water-related diseases. Additionally, frequently emptying the septic tank contributes to improving the observed water qualities. Therefore, residents should be encouraged to continue to observe the water quality in the cistern, improve the surrounding environment of cistern, and empty their septic tank frequently, to keep the water diseases away from their households.

  18. Online Teacher Training in a Context of Forced Immobility: The Case of Gaza, Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fassetta, Giovanna; Imperiale, Maria Grazia; Frimberger, Katja; Attia, Mariam; Al-Masri, Nazmi

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses an action research study that involved the design and delivery of an online training course for teachers of Arabic to speakers of other languages in the Gaza Strip (Palestine). Grounded in Freirean pedagogy, the course aimed to respond to the employment needs of university graduates by creating opportunities for online…

  19. The politics of deteriorating health: the case of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Qato, Dima

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the deteriorating health situation of the Palestinian population during the post-Oslo period of the Palestinian Authority and during the current Intifada. It seeks to record findings obtained through primary participants and documents and from personal observations in the field that situate Palestinian health conditions within their political framework. The ongoing crisis highlights longstanding problems in the Palestinian health infrastructure, which make it more vulnerable to Israeli policies, especially the movement restrictions and closures. Efforts by Palestinian professionals and the international health community to provide health services have been constantly thwarted. The Israeli authorities' disregard for Palestinian health care has escalated since 2000 and is directly responsible for a vast number of Palestinian deaths. Israel's indiscriminate obstructions to the coordinated functioning of a health care system in Palestine increase morbidity, degrade health, promote premature deaths, and damage the medical infrastructure. Moreover, the Israeli actions transgress international law and, ultimately, make peace in the region much less likely. This analysis provides further evidence of the social justice violations and the wide-ranging effects on health experienced daily by the Palestinian people as a direct result of the Israeli military occupation.

  20. Epidemiology of polycystic ovary syndrome: a cross sectional study of university students at An-Najah national university-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Musmar, Samar; Afaneh, Asma; Mo'alla, Hafsa

    2013-05-20

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common gynecological endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. Despite its heavy burden on female reproduction and general health, there is no study regarding PCOS prevalence in Palestine. This study aims to establish prevalence of PCOS among female university students at An-Najah National University-Palestine and to explore its possible risk factors. A cross sectional study was conducted on 137 female students using convenience sampling method for age group (18-24) years. PCOS cases were identified according to the National Institute of health (NIH) criteria through clinical interview and assessment for participants at the University clinics. Menstrual irregularities regarding cycle and flow were identified and clinical hyperandrogenism was assessed as the self-reported degree of hirsutism using the modified Ferriman Gallwey (mF-G) scoring method of more than 8 score. Biochemical hyperandrogenism for girls with menstrual irregularities was assessed by measuring free testosterone level. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17 applying descriptive methods; different risk factor relationships were estimated using bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression. The estimated prevalence of PCOS was 7.3%, acne was the only studied risk factor among others to be statistically significantly related to PCOS patients (OR=8.430, P-value=0.015). Clinical Hirsutism was found in 27% of participants, 70% of whom had idiopathic hirsutism. Prevalence of PCOS in Palestine seems to be relatively high but similar to other Mediterranean statistics. We recommend further studies using wider age group and larger sample for all parts of Palestine in order to generalize results.

  1. West Nile Virus: Seroprevalence in Animals in Palestine and Israel.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Manasrah, Mu'taz; Mizrahi, Rotem; Nasereddin, Abed; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Ereqat, Suheir; Abdeen, Ziad; Lustig, Yaniv; Gelman, Boris; Schvartz, Gili; Steinman, Amir

    2017-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) epidemiological situation in Israel and Palestine, due to their unique location, draws attention following to the global spread of West Nile fever (WNF). Although much information is available from Israel on clinical cases and prevalence of WNV, clinical cases are rarely reported in Palestine, and prevalence is not known. The objectives of this study were to determine WNV seroprevalence in various domestic animals in Palestine and to reevaluate current seroprevalence, force of infection, and risk factors for WNV exposure in horses in Israel. Sera samples were collected from 717 animals from Palestine and Israel (460 horses, 124 donkeys, 3 mules, 50 goats, 45 sheep, and 35 camels). Two hundred and ten horses were sampled twice. The level of WNV antibodies was determined using commercial Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Kit. Seroprevalence in equids was 73%. Seroprevalence in Israel (84.6%) was significantly higher than in Palestine (48.6%). Seroprevalence in horses (82.6%) was significantly higher than in donkeys and mules (39.3%). Multivariable statistical analysis showed that geographical area, landscape features (altitude), environmental factors (land surface temperature during the day [LSTD]), species, and age significantly influenced WNV seroprevalence. Fourteen of 95 (14.7%) sheep and goats and 14/35 camels (40%) sampled in Palestine were seropositive for WNV. Of the horses that were sampled twice, 82.8% were seropositive for WNV at the first sampling, and all remained seropositive. Three of the seronegative horses, all from Palestine, converted to positive when resampled (8.5%). The results indicate that domestic animals in Palestine were infected with WNV in the past, and the seroconversion indicates that WNV was circulating in Palestine in the summer of 2014. Control measures to prevent human infection should be implemented in Palestine. Anti WNV antibodies in domestic animals suggest that those species can be used as

  2. Truman, Palestine and the Press--A Study in Agenda-Setting Dance Steps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evensen, Bruce J.

    To investigate the role of the press in the agenda-setting process, a study examined the evolution of Harry Truman's policy on Palestine from November 29, 1947 through May 14, 1948--the 6-month period before Israel declared its nation-state status. Using a model which views the formation of public policy as a multidirectional process among the…

  3. Psychiatry, ethnicity and migration: the case of Palestine, 1920-1948.

    PubMed

    Zalashik, Rakefet

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to explore the development of psychiatry in Palestine from two main perspectives: ethnicity and immigration. In Palestine the subject of immigration and psychiatry were highly complicated and had unique features. Thus, both psychiatrists and patients were immigrants who belonged to the same ethnic group sharing the same ideology and objectives. The examination will uncover the social construction of mental diseases among Jewish immigrants in Palestine - patients and psychiatrists - and elucidate another layer in the development of the Zionist Jewish society in Palestine up to the establishment of the State of Israel.

  4. Optimization of leachate treatment using persulfate/H2O2 based advanced oxidation process: case study: Deir El-Balah Landfill Site, Gaza Strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Hilles, Ahmed H; Abu Amr, Salem S; Hussein, Rim A; Arafa, Anwar I; El-Sebaie, Olfat D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of employing H2O2 reagent in persulfate activation to treat stabilized landfill leachate. A central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the relationships between operating variables, such as persulfate and H2O2 dosages, pH, and reaction time, to identify the optimum operating conditions. Quadratic models for the following two responses proved to be significant with very low probabilities (<0.0001): chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH3-N removal. The obtained optimum conditions included a reaction time of 116 min, 4.97 g S2O8(2-), 7.29 g H2O2 dosage and pH 11. The experimental results were corresponding well with predicted models (COD and NH3-N removal rates of 81% and 83%, respectively). The results obtained in the stabilized leachate treatment were compared with those from other treatment processes, such as persulfate only and H2O2 only, to evaluate its effectiveness. The combined method (i.e., /S2O8(2-)/H2O2) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD and NH3-N compared with other studied applications.

  5. Prevalence of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross sectional study in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic metabolic disorder and one of the main causes of death in Palestine. Palestinians are continuously living under stressful economic and military conditions which make them psychologically vulnerable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among type II diabetic patients and to examine the relationship between depression and socio-demographic factors, clinical factors, and glycemic control. Methods This was a cross-sectional study at Al-Makhfiah primary healthcare center, Nablus, Palestine. Two hundred and ninety-four patients were surveyed for the presence of depressive symptoms using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scale. Patients' records were reviewed to obtain data pertaining to age, sex, marital status, Body Mass Index (BMI), level of education, smoking status, duration of diabetes mellitus, glycemic control using HbA1C test, use of insulin, and presence of additional illnesses. Patients’ medication adherence was assessed using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Results One hundred and sixty four patients (55.8%) of the total sample were females and 216 (73.5%) were < 65 years old. One hundred and twenty patients (40.2%) scored ≥ 16 on BDI-II scale. Statistical significant association was found between high BDI-II score (≥ 16) and female gender, low educational level, having no current job, having multiple additional illnesses, low medication adherence and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). No significant association between BDI score and glycemic control, duration of diabetes, and other socio-demographic factors was found. Multivatriate analysis showed that low educational level, having no current job, having multiple additional illnesses and low medication adherence were significantly associated with high BDI-II scores. Conclusion Prevalence of depression found in our study was higher than that reported in other countries. Although 40% of the

  6. Prevalence of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross sectional study in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Abu-Hadeed, Hanadi M; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2014-02-13

    Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic metabolic disorder and one of the main causes of death in Palestine. Palestinians are continuously living under stressful economic and military conditions which make them psychologically vulnerable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among type II diabetic patients and to examine the relationship between depression and socio-demographic factors, clinical factors, and glycemic control. This was a cross-sectional study at Al-Makhfiah primary healthcare center, Nablus, Palestine. Two hundred and ninety-four patients were surveyed for the presence of depressive symptoms using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scale. Patients' records were reviewed to obtain data pertaining to age, sex, marital status, Body Mass Index (BMI), level of education, smoking status, duration of diabetes mellitus, glycemic control using HbA1C test, use of insulin, and presence of additional illnesses. Patients' medication adherence was assessed using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). One hundred and sixty four patients (55.8%) of the total sample were females and 216 (73.5%) were < 65 years old. One hundred and twenty patients (40.2%) scored ≥ 16 on BDI-II scale. Statistical significant association was found between high BDI-II score (≥ 16) and female gender, low educational level, having no current job, having multiple additional illnesses, low medication adherence and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). No significant association between BDI score and glycemic control, duration of diabetes, and other socio-demographic factors was found. Multivatriate analysis showed that low educational level, having no current job, having multiple additional illnesses and low medication adherence were significantly associated with high BDI-II scores. Prevalence of depression found in our study was higher than that reported in other countries. Although 40% of the screened patients were potential cases of

  7. Child discipline in Qatar and Palestine: A comparative study of ICAST-R.

    PubMed

    Eldeeb, Nehal; Halileh, Samia; Alyafei, Khalid A; Ghandour, Rula; Dargham, Soha; Giacaman, Rita; Kamal, Madeeha; Imseeh, Sawsan; Korayem, Mona; Nasr, Shiraz; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen; Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Tawfik, Hassan; Lynch, Margaret A; Mian, Marcellina

    2016-11-01

    To compare the nature and determinants of child discipline in Qatar and Palestine among young adults through retrospective survey to develop legislation, policies and interventions for effective prevention of child maltreatment, and educational materials to promote positive discipline among parents and caregivers. Cross-sectional random household surveys were conducted in each country (Qataris N=697, Palestinians N=2064) using ISPCAN Child Abuse Screening Tool-Retrospective (ICAST-R) for young adults (18-24 years), to investigate child discipline methods into the maltreatment range. Qatari young adults were more educated (p<0.001) and had more full-time employment (p=0.004) than Palestinian young adults. Qatar reported lower physical and emotional abuse compared to their counterparts in Palestine, e.g. Hit/Punch, Kick (p<0.001) and Insult/Criticize, Threaten to be hurt/killed (p<0.001). Qatari participants found any harsh discipline they received in childhood was not reasonable and not justified compared to Palestinian participants. The more advantaged Qatari population was less likely to experience disciplinary methods that experts developing the ICAST-R defined as abuse compared to Palestinians where the higher incidence of child abuse could be attributed to lower economic advantage, lower level of education and greater exposure to violence. Suggestions are made for future studies in Qatar and Palestine to develop survey methodology with a more culturally appropriate level of intrusion, such as indirect yet meaningful child maltreatment questions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A system dynamics approach for hospital waste management in a city in a developing country: the case of Nablus, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Eleyan, Derar; Garfield, Joy

    2016-09-01

    Hospitals and health centers provide a variety of healthcare services and normally generate hazardous waste as well as general waste. General waste has a similar nature to that of municipal solid waste and therefore could be disposed of in municipal landfills. However, hazardous waste poses risks to public health, unless it is properly managed. The hospital waste management system encompasses many factors, i.e., number of beds, number of employees, level of service, population, birth rate, fertility rate, and not in my back yard (NIMBY) syndrome. Therefore, this management system requires a comprehensive analysis to determine the role of each factor and its influence on the whole system. In this research, a hospital waste management simulation model is presented based on the system dynamics technique to determine the interaction among these factors in the system using a software package, ithink. This model is used to estimate waste segregation as this is important in the hospital waste management system to minimize risk to public health. Real data has been obtained from a case study of the city of Nablus, Palestine to validate the model. The model exhibits wastes generated from three types of hospitals (private, charitable, and government) by considering the number of both inpatients and outpatients depending on the population of the city under study. The model also offers the facility to compare the total waste generated among these different types of hospitals and anticipate and predict the future generated waste both infectious and non-infectious and the treatment cost incurred.

  9. "Growing" Education in Difficult Environments Promoting Problem Solving: A Case from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabr, Dua

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a collaborative educational experiment "The Death of the Dead Sea: A Problem Based Learning" that was applied in two governmental high schools in Ramallah, Palestine in the school year 2006-2007. The students' role was to raise awareness to the phenomenon of the saltiest lake that shrinks towards extinction. In spite…

  10. "Growing" Education in Difficult Environments Promoting Problem Solving: A Case from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabr, Dua

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a collaborative educational experiment "The Death of the Dead Sea: A Problem Based Learning" that was applied in two governmental high schools in Ramallah, Palestine in the school year 2006-2007. The students' role was to raise awareness to the phenomenon of the saltiest lake that shrinks towards extinction. In spite…

  11. Smoking habits and attitudes among university students in Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Musmar, S G

    2012-05-01

    Information about the rate of smoking and factors associated with initiating and maintaining the behaviour is scarce in Palestine. The aim of this study was to explore the rate of and attitudes towards smoking among An-Najah National University students. During spring 2010, a questionnaire adopted from the Global Health Professionals Survey and the Global Youth Tobacco Survey was administered to 954 randomly selected full-time students. Overall 34.7% of the study sample were cigarette or waterpipe smokers, and this rate was higher among males than females (52.7% versus 16.5%). In logistic regression analysis, sex (male), type of college (humanities), older age and higher family income were predictors of current smoking status. Smokers had more negative attitudes to banning smoking in public areas on campus and to education about the harmful effects of smoking. Antismoking programmes with special attention to males and students in humanities are badly needed.

  12. Consanguinity profile in the Gaza Strip of Palestine: large-scale community-based study.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2014-02-01

    Consanguineous marriages which have been practiced throughout history continue to be practiced within different ethnic, religious and social groups to varying degrees with highest prevalences in North Africa, Middle East and central and south Asia. In the Gaza Strip of Palestine, little is known about the consanguinity profile, so the present large-scale study aims to explore the consanguinity profile of two generations using data from the β-thalassemia premarital screening program. Sociodemographic data analysis included 156,635 (141,200 males and 15,435 females) persons and their parents, representing 141,200 couples who were referred to the Thalassemia and Hemophilia Center for premarital testing. In addition, the consanguinity characteristics of parents of 217 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemic non-sibling patients were analyzed. Results revealed a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of consanguineous (first- and second-cousin) marriages between the previous (fathers') generation (45.2%) and the current (groom/bride) generation (39.9%). Among the five governorates of the Gaza Strip, records of Gaza Governorate revealed the lowest occurrence (36.9% current generation and 42.1% previous generation) of consanguineous marriages, as compared to all others. Consanguineous marriages are significantly higher in semi-urban areas (41.6%) than in urban areas (39.1%) in the current generation (previous generation, 46.4% vs 44.7%, respectively). Compound consanguinity (two generation) and a single level of consanguinity were seen in 20.7% and 43.7%, respectively, of the cases. The average age of those with first-cousin marriages is significantly lower (22.4±4.4 years) than those with second-cousin marriages (24.3±6.1 years) and the non-consanguineous (26.5±8.2 years). The rate of consanguineous marriages among never married people (42.2%) is significantly much higher than the rate of people with multiple marriages (18.1%). About 74.7% of the non

  13. The Validity and Reliability of the Parent Fever Management Scale: A Study from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Nabulsi, Masa M; Tubaila, Mais F; Sweileh, Waleed M; Awang, Rahmat; Walsh, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Parental concern about childhood fever and consequent use of antipyretics is increasing. Little is known about childhood fever management among Arab parents. No scales to measure parents' fever management practices in Palestine are available. The aim of this study was to validate the Arabic version of the Parent Fever Management Scale (PFMS) using a sample of parents in Palestine. A standard "forward-backward" procedure was used to translate PFMS into Arabic language. It was then validated on a convenience sample of 402 parents between July and October 2012. Descriptive statistics were used, and instrument reliability was assessed for internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Validity was confirmed using convergent and known group validation. Applying the recommended scoring method, the median (interquartile range) score of the PFMS was 26 (23-30). Acceptable internal consistency was found (Cronbach's alpha = 0.733) and the test-retest reliability value was 0.92 (P < 0.001). The Chi squared (χ (2)) test showed a significant relationship between PFMS groups and frequent daily administration of antipyretic groups (χ (2) = 52.86; P < 0.001). The PFMS sensitivity and specificity were 77.67 and 57.75 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 67.89 and 32.11 %, respectively. The Arabic version of the PFMS is a reliable and valid measure and can be used as a useful tool for health professionals to identify parents' fever management practices. The Arabic version of the PFMS can be used to reduce unnecessary parental practices in fever management for a febrile child.

  14. Electricity and Empire in 1920s Palestine under British Rule.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Ronen

    2016-12-01

    This article examines some techno-political aspects of the early years of electrification in British-ruled 1920s Palestine. It emphasizes the importance of local technical, topographical and hydrological forms of knowledge for understanding the dynamics of electrification. Situating the analysis in a general colonial context of electrification, the study shows that British colonial rulers lagged behind both German firms and local entrepreneurs in understanding the specific conditions pertaining to electrification in Palestine. Subsequently, the study shows that the British had limited control of the actual electrification process and its declared/professed developmental purposes, thereby complicating assumptions about electrification as a tool of the Empire/tool of empire. Finding some similarities between the cases of electrifying Palestine and India, the article's findings may shed further light on the importance of micro-politics of knowledge for understanding the trajectory of electrification in the colonies.

  15. Socio-environmental cooperation and conflict? A discursive understanding and its application to the case of Israel and Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, T.; Fröhlich, C.

    2015-10-01

    The existing literature faces difficulties when accounting for the simultaneity of socio-environmental conflict and cooperation. We suggest that this puzzle can be solved by more recent constructivist works, which argue that conflictive or cooperative behavior is driven by discursively constructed interests, identities and situation assessments. Based on a literature review and field interviews, we analyze and compare the dominant water discourses in Israel and Palestine with the discourse dominant among the activists of a water cooperation project between communities from Israel and the West Bank. Our main result is that discourses are indeed crucial for understanding water-related conflict and cooperation. This finding highlights the relevance of constructivist approaches in the study of socio-environmental conflict and cooperation as well as of practices of bottom-up discursive conflict transformation.

  16. Exposure assessment of radon in the drinking water supplies: a descriptive study in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon gas is considered as a main risk factor for lung cancer and found naturally in rock, soil, and water. The objective of this study was to determine the radon level in the drinking water sources in Nablus city in order to set up a sound policy on water management in Palestine. Methods This was a descriptive study carried out in two phases with a random sampling technique in the second phase. Primarily, samples were taken from 4 wells and 5 springs that supplied Nablus city residents. For each source, 3 samples were taken and each was analyzed in 4 cycles by RAD 7 device manufactured by Durridge Company. Secondly, from the seven regions of the Nablus city, three samples were taken from the residential tap water of each region. Regarding the old city, ten samples were taken. Finally, the mean radon concentration value for each source was calculated. Results The mean (range) concentration of radon in the main sources were 6.9 (1.5-23.4) Becquerel/liter (Bq/L). Separately, springs and wells' means were 4.6 Bq/L and 9.5 Bq/L; respectively. For the residential tap water in the 7 regions, the results of the mean (range) concentration values were found to be 1.0 (0.9-1.3) Bq/L. For the old city, the mean (range) concentration values were 2.3 (0.9-3.9) Bq/L. Conclusions Except for Al-Badan well, radon concentrations in the wells and springs were below the United State Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminated level (U.S EPA MCL). The level was much lower for tap water. Although the concentration of radon in the tap water of old city were below the MCL, it was higher than other regions in the city. Preventive measures and population awareness on radon's exposure are recommended. PMID:22243625

  17. Exposure assessment of radon in the drinking water supplies: a descriptive study in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al Zabadi, Hamzeh; Musmar, Samar; Issa, Shaza; Dwaikat, Nidal; Saffarini, Ghassan

    2012-01-13

    Radon gas is considered as a main risk factor for lung cancer and found naturally in rock, soil, and water. The objective of this study was to determine the radon level in the drinking water sources in Nablus city in order to set up a sound policy on water management in Palestine. This was a descriptive study carried out in two phases with a random sampling technique in the second phase. Primarily, samples were taken from 4 wells and 5 springs that supplied Nablus city residents. For each source, 3 samples were taken and each was analyzed in 4 cycles by RAD 7 device manufactured by Durridge Company. Secondly, from the seven regions of the Nablus city, three samples were taken from the residential tap water of each region. Regarding the old city, ten samples were taken. Finally, the mean radon concentration value for each source was calculated. The mean (range) concentration of radon in the main sources were 6.9 (1.5-23.4) Becquerel/liter (Bq/L). Separately, springs and wells' means were 4.6 Bq/L and 9.5 Bq/L; respectively. For the residential tap water in the 7 regions, the results of the mean (range) concentration values were found to be 1.0 (0.9-1.3) Bq/L. For the old city, the mean (range) concentration values were 2.3 (0.9-3.9) Bq/L. Except for Al-Badan well, radon concentrations in the wells and springs were below the United State Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminated level (U.S EPA MCL). The level was much lower for tap water. Although the concentration of radon in the tap water of old city were below the MCL, it was higher than other regions in the city. Preventive measures and population awareness on radon's exposure are recommended.

  18. Use of complementary and alternative medicines in haemodialysis patients: a cross-sectional study from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M; Tabeeb, Ghada H; Ayaseh, Nora A; Sawafta, Mayas N; Khdeir, Razan L; Mezyed, Diana O; Daraghmeh, Dala N; Awang, Rahmat

    2016-07-11

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and herbal therapies, are accepted worldwide, and have been important from medical, sociological and economic perspectives, among haemodialysis (HD) patients. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the use of CAM among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who are undergoing HD. Face-to-face interviews of patients with ESRD undergoing HD from ten outpatient renal departments at a national level in Palestine were conducted from June 2014 to January 2015. A survey questionnaire, which included questions on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and on the CAM therapies that were used, was administered. Out of 267 patients interviewed, 172 patients used at least one type of CAM in the last month prior to the interview, and thus the utilisation rate was 64.4 %. Forty one (15.4 %) patients reported using one type of CAMs, while 18.7 % used two different CAMs and 30.3 % used more than two types of CAMs for their health status. Of the patients who used CAM, herbal therapies were used most often (43.5 %), followed by honey (35.6 %), diet (22.8 %), and exorcism in Islam (16.9 %). The herbal therapies mentioned most often were Nigella sativa L. (18.7 %), followed by Salvia officinalis L. (16.9 %), and Pimpinella anisum L. (10.5 %). In conclusion, the prevalence of CAM is relatively high in the selected population. Most patients used biological therapies such as herbal remedies, thus highlighting a greater need for patient education regarding CAM therapies and possible herb-drug interactions. Health care providers must be aware of the potential benefits and risks related to CAM use. There is a need for more clinical research pertaining to CAM to reach stronger evidence regarding potential benefits and risks related to CAM use.

  19. Quality of death notification forms in North West Bank/Palestine: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Qaddumi, Jamal A S; Nazzal, Zaher; Yacoup, Allam R S; Mansour, Mahmoud

    2017-04-11

    The death notification forms (DNFs) are important documents. Thus, inability to fill it properly by physicians will affect the national mortality report and, consequently, the evidence-based decision making. The errors in filling DNFs are common all over the world and are different in types and causes. We aimed to evaluate the quality of DNFs in terms of completeness and types of errors in the cause of death section. A descriptive study was conducted to review 2707 DNFs in North West Bank/Palestine during the year 2012 using data abstraction sheets. SPSS 17.0 was used to show the frequency of major and minor errors committed in filling the DNFs. Surprisingly, only 1% of the examined DNFs had their cause of death section filled completely correct. The immediate cause of death was correctly identified in 5.9% of all DNFs and the underlying cause of death was correctly reported in 55.4% of them. The sequence was incorrect in 41.5% of the DNFs. The most frequently documented minor error was "Not writing Time intervals" error (97.0%). Almost all DNFs contained at least one minor or major error. This high percentage of errors may affect the mortality and morbidity statistics, public health research and the process of providing evidence for health policy. Training workshops on DNF completion for newly recruited employees and at the beginning of the residency program are recommended on a regular basis. As well, we recommend reviewing the national DNFs to simplify it and make it consistent with updated evidence-based guidelines and recommendation.

  20. Study of environmental radioactivity in Palestine by in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Al-Masri, Hussein; Judeh, Adnan

    2009-07-01

    This work presents qualitative and quantitative evaluation of environmental radioactivity in the central and southern areas of the West Bank, Palestine. For this purpose, the technology of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy is used with a scintillation of 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) crystal connected to multichannel analyzer InSpector 2000 from Canberra instruments and laptop computer. Gamma-ray spectra were collected using the detector placed 1 m above the ground surface. Calibration of the detection system for in situ measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in open terrain is performed theoretically using Monte Carlo techniques. Measurements are conducted in 18 locations in 3 regions across the West Bank. The vast majority of identified radionuclides are naturally occurring gamma-emitting sources (the decay products of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K). The only identified anthropogenic radionuclide is (137)Cs. Activity concentrations of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th as well as the total outdoor gamma dose rate from these radionuclides were determined from the gamma-ray spectra. The highest activity concentrations of the three primordial radionuclides were 203 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, 32 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 30 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th. The total outdoor gamma dose rate calculated for the whole study area at 1 m above ground ranged from 6 to 30 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 18 +/- 7 nGy h(-1), which represents about 30% of the world average value.

  1. Factors affecting quality of life in patients on haemodialysis: a cross-sectional study from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Daraghmeh, Dala N; Mezyed, Diana O; Khdeir, Razan L; Sawafta, Mayas N; Ayaseh, Nora A; Tabeeb, Ghada H; Sweileh, Waleed M; Awang, Rahmat; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2016-04-27

    Haemodialysis (HD) is a life-sustaining treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). HD can bring about significant impairment in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and outcomes. Therefore, we sought to describe the patterns of HRQOL and determine the independent factors associated with poor HRQOL in Palestinian patients on HD. A multicenter cross-sectional study was performed from June 2014 to January 2015 using the EuroQOL-5 Dimensions instrument (EQ-5D-5L) for the assessment of HRQOL. ESRD patients undergoing HD in all dialysis centres in the West Bank of Palestine were approached and recruited for this study. Multiple linear regression was carried out to identify factors that were significantly associated with HRQOL. Two hundred and sixty-seven patients were participated in the current study giving response rate of 96 %. Overall, 139 (52.1 %) were male, and the mean ± standard deviation age was 53.3 ± 16.2 years. The reported HRQOL as measured by mean EQ-5D-5L index value and Euro QOL visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) score was 0.37 ± 0.44 and 59.38 ± 45.39, respectively. There was a moderate positive correlation between the EQ-VAS and the EQ-5D-5L index value (r = 0.42, p < 0.001). The results of multiple linear regression showed a significant negative association between HRQOL with age, total number of chronic co-morbid diseases and the total number of chronic medications. However, a significant positive association was found between HRQOL with male gender, university education level and patients who live in village. Our results provided insight into a number of associations between patient variables and their HRQOL. Healthcare providers should be aware of low HRQOL among patients with no formal education, female gender, patient's residents of refugee camps, multiple co-morbid diseases, multiple chronic medications, and elderly patients to improve their quality of life.

  2. Treatment adherence and perception in patients on maintenance hemodialysis: a cross - sectional study from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Naalweh, Karam Sh; Barakat, Mohammad A; Sweileh, Moutaz W; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2017-05-30

    Adherence to diet recommendations, fluid restriction, prescribed medications, and attendance at hemodialysis (HD) sessions are essential for optimal and effective treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease. No data regarding this issue are available from Palestine. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess adherence to diet, fluid restriction, medications, and HD sessions. A cross-sectional study of HD patients at An-Najah National University Hospital was carried out during summer, 2016. Self-reported adherence behavior was obtained using a valid and reliable questionnaire (End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire: ESRD-AQ). Predialytic serum levels of potassium and phosphate were obtained as clinical indicator of diet and medication adherence respectively. In addition, interdialytic body weight (IDW) was also obtained from medical records and analyzed in relation to reported adherence of fluid restriction. A total of 220 patients answered all questions pertaining to ESRD-AQ. The mean age ± standard deviation of participants was 56.82 ± 14.51 years. Dietary adherence was observed in 24% while that of fluid restriction adherence was observed in 31% of studied patients. Reported adherence to HD sessions was 52% while that for medications was 81%. Overall, 122 (55.5%) patients had good adherence, 89 (40.5%) had moderate adherence, and 9 (4.1%) had poor adherence behavior. Male patients had significantly higher overall adherence scores than females (p = 0.034). A significant correlation between reported diet adherence and serum pre-HD potassium level (p < 0.01) was observed. A significant correlation between reported fluid restriction adherence and IDW (p < 0.01) was also found. However, no significant correlation between reported adherence and pre-HD phosphate level. There was significant correlation between overall perception and overall adherence score (p < 0.001). Counselling of patients regarding importance of adherence

  3. Lung function and respiratory symptoms among female hairdressers in Palestine: a 5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Nemer, Maysaa; Kristensen, Petter; Nijem, Khaldoun; Bjertness, Espen; Skare, Øivind; Skogstad, Marit

    2015-10-15

    Hairdressers are exposed to chemicals at the workplace which are known to cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. This study aimed to examine changes in self-reported respiratory symptoms over 5 years, as well as to examine the lung function decline and determine whether it is within the expected range, to assess the dropout rate and reasons for leaving the profession, and to examine the associations between occupational factors and lung function changes at follow-up. Prospective study. Female hairdressing salons in Hebron city, Palestine. 170 female hairdressers who participated in a baseline survey in 2008 were followed up in 2013. A total of 161 participants participated in 2013. Change in reported respiratory symptoms and change in lung function over follow-up. Dropout from the profession and reasons for it. Differences between current and former hairdressers in respiratory symptoms and lung function at follow-up. Ambient air ammonia levels in 13 salons. Current hairdressers reported more respiratory symptoms in 2013 compared with baseline. Former hairdressers reported fewer symptoms at follow-up. At follow-up, current hairdressers showed a significant decrease in forced vital capacity of 35 mL/year (95% CI 26 to 44 mL/year) and of 31 mL/year (95% CI 25 to 36 mL/year) for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). 28 (16%) of the hairdressers quit the job during the 5-year follow-up, 8 (28%) because of health problems. Hairdressers who had been working for 4 years or more at baseline showed a stronger decline in FEV1 compared with those who worked less than 4 years (difference 13, 95% CI 1 to 25). Current hairdressers developed more respiratory symptoms and larger lung function decline than former hairdressers during follow-up. Few hairdressers left their profession because of respiratory health problems. Working for more years is associated with lung function decline among current hairdressers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  4. Beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever among parents: a cross-sectional study from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M; Nabulsi, Masa M; Tubaila, Mais F; Awang, Rahmat; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2013-04-28

    Fever is an extremely common occurrence in paediatric patients and the most common cause for a child to be taken to the doctor. The literature indicates that parents have too many misconceptions and conflicting information about fever management. The aim of this study was to identify parents' beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever management. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among parents whose children were enrolled and presented for health care at primary health care clinics in the Nablus region of Palestine. Data were collected using structured questionnaire interviews with parents. The questionnaire consisted of 'yes/no' responses and multiple-response questions. Descriptive statistics were used. Overall, 402 parents were interviewed. All parents believed that fever could cause at least one harmful effect if left untreated. The harmful effects most frequently reported by parents were brain damage (38.1%), dehydration (15.7%), and other organs damage such as liver and kidney damage (14.2%). The study showed that 65.4% of parents would recognise fever by only touching the child, 31.6% would measure the temperature and 3.0% would assess temperature by touching and measuring the child. Antipyretic was preferred to be used by 34.8% of parents, while 49.8% stated that they preferred cold sponges, and 3.2% stated that they preferred homeopathic methods to treat fever. The most common factors influencing frequency of medication administration included physician's instruction (61.7%), the degree of elevated temperature (14.9%) and instructions on the medication leaflet (13.7%). Of the participant parents, 53.2% believed antipyretics used to reduce fever were harmful. Parents reported the most harmful outcomes from these antipyretics to be allergic reactions (20.9%), effects on the stomach (16.9%), kidney damage (16.2%) and overdose (11.4%). Parents were anxious when dealing with a feverish child, which resulted in incorrect or inappropriate practices

  5. Lung function and respiratory symptoms among female hairdressers in Palestine: a 5-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nemer, Maysaa; Kristensen, Petter; Nijem, Khaldoun; Bjertness, Espen; Skare, Øivind; Skogstad, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hairdressers are exposed to chemicals at the workplace which are known to cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. This study aimed to examine changes in self-reported respiratory symptoms over 5 years, as well as to examine the lung function decline and determine whether it is within the expected range, to assess the dropout rate and reasons for leaving the profession, and to examine the associations between occupational factors and lung function changes at follow-up. Design Prospective study. Setting Female hairdressing salons in Hebron city, Palestine. Participants 170 female hairdressers who participated in a baseline survey in 2008 were followed up in 2013. A total of 161 participants participated in 2013. Outcome measures Change in reported respiratory symptoms and change in lung function over follow-up. Dropout from the profession and reasons for it. Differences between current and former hairdressers in respiratory symptoms and lung function at follow-up. Ambient air ammonia levels in 13 salons. Results Current hairdressers reported more respiratory symptoms in 2013 compared with baseline. Former hairdressers reported fewer symptoms at follow-up. At follow-up, current hairdressers showed a significant decrease in forced vital capacity of 35 mL/year (95% CI 26 to 44 mL/year) and of 31 mL/year (95% CI 25 to 36 mL/year) for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). 28 (16%) of the hairdressers quit the job during the 5-year follow-up, 8 (28%) because of health problems. Hairdressers who had been working for 4 years or more at baseline showed a stronger decline in FEV1 compared with those who worked less than 4 years (difference 13, 95% CI 1 to 25). Conclusions Current hairdressers developed more respiratory symptoms and larger lung function decline than former hairdressers during follow-up. Few hairdressers left their profession because of respiratory health problems. Working for more years is associated with lung function decline among

  6. Adherence to guidelines of antibiotic prophylactic use in surgery: a prospective cohort study in North West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Musmar, Samar M J; Ba'ba, Hiba; Owais, Ala'

    2014-09-09

    Surgical site infection is a major contributor to increased mortality and health care costs globally which can be reduced by appropriate antibiotic prophylactic use. In Palestine, there is no published data about preoperative antibiotic use. This study aims to find the pattern of antimicrobial prophylaxis use by evaluating time of the first dose, antibiotic selection and duration after surgery in three governmental hospitals in North West Bank/ Palestine during 2011. After approval of Institutional Review Board, a prospective cohort study included a total of 400 abdominal, orthopedic, and gynecological operations which were performed during study period. Trained clinical pharmacists observed selected 301 operations and followed the patient's files for the three intended study parameters. Compliance of prophylactic antibiotic administration was evaluated according to published guidelines of the American Society for Hospital Pharmacist. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 applying descriptive methods. Relationship between guideline compliance and selected operation factors such as type of surgery, patient care unit, and hospital shift, in addition to provider's age, gender, experience, and specialization were examined applying chi square test. The statistically significant factors with p < 0.01 were further analyzed using logistic regression model. Overall compliance for the studied parameters was very low (2%); only 59.8% received their first dose in appropriate time, 18.5% had appropriate antibiotic selection, and 31.8% of patients received antibiotic in appropriate duration. The OBGYN department had much better compliance regarding timing and duration of antibiotic use (P < 0.001), however the proper antibiotic selection was best adhered to for the abdominal surgeries (OR = 3.64, P = 0.002). Male providers were statistically significantly much less adherent to the timing of antibiotic dose (OR = 0.28, p < 0.001), but better adherent in antibiotic selection

  7. Adherence to guidelines of antibiotic prophylactic use in surgery: a prospective cohort study in North West Bank, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical site infection is a major contributor to increased mortality and health care costs globally which can be reduced by appropriate antibiotic prophylactic use. In Palestine, there is no published data about preoperative antibiotic use. This study aims to find the pattern of antimicrobial prophylaxis use by evaluating time of the first dose, antibiotic selection and duration after surgery in three governmental hospitals in North West Bank/ Palestine during 2011. Methods After approval of Institutional Review Board, a prospective cohort study included a total of 400 abdominal, orthopedic, and gynecological operations which were performed during study period. Trained clinical pharmacists observed selected 301 operations and followed the patient’s files for the three intended study parameters. Compliance of prophylactic antibiotic administration was evaluated according to published guidelines of the American Society for Hospital Pharmacist. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 applying descriptive methods. Relationship between guideline compliance and selected operation factors such as type of surgery, patient care unit, and hospital shift, in addition to provider’s age, gender, experience, and specialization were examined applying chi square test. The statistically significant factors with p < 0.01 were further analyzed using logistic regression model. Results Overall compliance for the studied parameters was very low (2%); only 59.8% received their first dose in appropriate time, 18.5% had appropriate antibiotic selection, and 31.8% of patients received antibiotic in appropriate duration. The OBGYN department had much better compliance regarding timing and duration of antibiotic use (P < 0.001), however the proper antibiotic selection was best adhered to for the abdominal surgeries (OR = 3.64, P = 0.002). Male providers were statistically significantly much less adherent to the timing of antibiotic dose (OR = 0.28, p < 0.001), but better

  8. Community pharmacists' knowledge, practices and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine in Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shraim, Naser Y; Shawahna, Ramzi; Sorady, Muna A; Aiesh, Banan M; Alashqar, Ghadeer Sh; Jitan, Raghad I; Abu Hanieh, Waed M; Hotari, Yasmeen B; Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2017-08-29

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization is dramatically increasing among patients. As community pharmacies are a major provider of CAM products, community pharmacists need to have the sufficient knowledge and information to advice their patients, answer their inquiries and to be proactive in the healthcare process to ensure optimal therapy outputs and minimize both drug-drug and drug-herb interactions. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of community pharmacists in Palestine about CAM. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional design in which a questionnaire was administered on a sample of licensed community pharmacists from Palestine. The questionnaire was of 5 sections: demographic and practice details of the participants, practice, beliefs, and knowledge about CAM. Mann-Whitney-U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to comparison of different issues as appropriate. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. A total of 284 community pharmacists were surveyed, however, 281 were included in the analysis as they met inclusion criteria. Out of the 281, 149 (53.0%) of the participants were males and the rest were females. About 40% of the participants were between 20 to 29 years old. Pharmacists frequently recommended CAM modalities. Exercises (84.0%) and food supplements (82.6%) were the most commonly recommended modalities. In the last year, vitamin B12 was the most frequently prescribed supplement. The median knowledge score was 5 out of 8 and the median beliefs about CAM score was 4.0 out of 7.0. CAM recommendations by pharmacists appear to be commonplace. Although their knowledge scores were fair to average, pharmacists still need more education and training about CAM in order to be more qualified to provide better pharmaceutical care and improve their patient's outcome.

  9. Obesity and overweight: prevalence and associated socio demographic factors among mothers in three different areas in the Gaza Strip-Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    El Kishawi, Rima Rafiq; Soo, Kah Leng; Abed, Yehia Awad; Muda, Wan Abdul Manan Wan

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of obesity and overweight cases in developing countries, especially among women, requires serious attention because of its effects on the health care system and the quality of life. Few studies have been conducted in the Gaza Strip to determine obesity and overweight prevalence and the associated factors. This study aimed at determining the prevalence of obesity and overweight cases in relation to socio-demographic factors among mothers aged 18-50 years in the Gaza Strip-Palestine from June 2012 to September 2012. Mothers childbearing age 18-50 years (n = 357) were selected using a cross-sectional multistage sampling methodology from three different geographical locations, namely, El Remal urban area, Jabalia refugee camp, and Al Qarrara rural area. The weight and height of the mothers were measured, and their body mass indexes (BMI) were computed. The mothers were categorized according to the criteria of World Health Organization (WHO) for BMI. The criteria categorize mothers as overweight if they have a BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2) and obese if their BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m(2). Obesity and overweight rates in urban area, refugee camp, and rural area were found to be 57.0%, 66.8%, and 67.5%, respectively. Moreover, BMI increased with age, adjusted b = 0.39; 95% CI (0.31, 0.48); p = < 0.001, whereas BMI was lower in low-income subjects, adjusted b = -1.59, 95% CI (-2.74,-0.44), p = 0.007. Housewives were more susceptible to obesity than employed woman, adjusted b = -2.76, 95% CI (-5.33,-0.19), p = 0.036. However, the study found no association among BMI level and household size, geographical location, educational level, and family assistance. The results showed that obesity and being overweight are highly prevalent among women in the Gaza Strip. Independent predictors of obesity in the population studied were increasing age, high income, and housewives. This finding is an important baseline for the monitoring of obesity and

  10. Developing Agency through Peacebuilding in the Midst of Intractable Conflict: The Case of Israel and Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonski, Sharri

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of "peacebuilding islands" within civil society as potential agents of transformation in the midst of intractable conflict. Focusing on the particular case of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the argument stems from a deconstruction of the legacy of national myopia perpetuated through social and…

  11. Developing Agency through Peacebuilding in the Midst of Intractable Conflict: The Case of Israel and Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonski, Sharri

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of "peacebuilding islands" within civil society as potential agents of transformation in the midst of intractable conflict. Focusing on the particular case of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the argument stems from a deconstruction of the legacy of national myopia perpetuated through social and…

  12. Pasteur in Palestine: the politics of the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Nadav; Zalashik, Rakefet

    2010-12-01

    We examine the creation and functioning of the "Pasteur Institute in Palestine" focusing on the relationship between biological science, health policy, and the creation of a "new society" within the framework of Zionism. Similar to other bacteriological institutes founded by colonial powers, this laboratory was developed in response to public health needs. But it also had a political role. Dr. Leo Böhm, a Zionist physician, strived to establish his institution along the lines of the Zionist aspiration to develop a national entity based on strong scientific foundations. Even though the institute enjoyed several fruitful years of operation, mainly during World War I, it achieved no lasting national or scientific importance in the country. Böhm failed to adapt to new ways of knowledge production, scientifically and socially. The case study of the "Pasteur Institute in Palestine" serves as a prism to view the role of the public health laboratory in the history of Palestine with its ongoing changes of scientific, organizational, and political context.

  13. Availability of treatment resources for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments among various types of hospitals in Palestine: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poisoning exposures continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of facilities, treatment resources, and antidotes in hospitals may affect the treatments provided and outcomes. This study aimed to determine the availability of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources, and antidotes for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments (EDs) among various types of governmental and private hospitals in Palestine. Methods A cross-sectional study using semi-structured questionnaire was performed. Data were collected based on hospital resources; GI decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources and antidotes from Palestinian hospitals. Results Eighteen hospitals (94.7%) have responded. Among them, paracetamol poisoning was the most frequently reported cases by EDs (mean frequency score = 7.6 ± 2.1), followed by bee stings (mean = 6.9 ± 2.7) and organophosphate poisoning (mean = 6.7 ± 2.7). The availabilities of most resources related to GI decontamination items varied substantially with hospital type, but these differences were not statistical significant. The availability of stabilisation resources was not significantly different between hospitals types. For the availability of techniques used to enhance the elimination of toxic substances, there were variations between the hospitals types. However, these differences were not statistical significant, except for haemodialysis (p = 0.003) which was more available in governmental hospitals. For the availability of antidotes, none of the hospitals had sufficient stock of all antidotes listed. In relation to hospital type, there was variability in the availability of antidotes, but this did not reach statistical significance, except for deferoxamine (p < 0.001), which was available in all governmental hospitals but none of the private hospitals

  14. Factors affecting the sustainability of solid waste management system-the case of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Ammar J; Al-Sari, Majed I; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Anayah, Fathi

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the predictors of sustainability in solid waste management (SWM) systems can significantly contribute to eliminate many waste management problems. In this paper, the sustainability elements of SWM systems of interest are (1) attitudes toward separation at the source, (2) behaviour regarding reuse and/or recycling and (3) willingness to pay for an improved service of SWM. The predictors affecting these three elements were studied in two Palestinian cities: Ramallah and Jericho. The data were collected via structured questionnaires and direct interviews with the respondents, and the analysis utilized a logistic regression model. The results showed that the place of residence and dwelling premises are the significant factors influencing attitudes toward separation at the source; the place of residence and age are the significant factors explaining behaviour regarding reuse and/or recycling; while the dwelling premises, gender, level of education and being received education on waste management are the significant factors affecting willingness to pay for an improved service of SWM.

  15. Workers' Education in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elayassa, Wajih

    2013-01-01

    Due to the political context and the restrictions placed on general freedoms and trade union activities, workers' education in Palestine remained informal and largely reliant on oral memory until the early 1990s. For decades, it was an integral part of political education. Workers' education only became a stand-alone field after the establishment…

  16. Workers' Education in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elayassa, Wajih

    2013-01-01

    Due to the political context and the restrictions placed on general freedoms and trade union activities, workers' education in Palestine remained informal and largely reliant on oral memory until the early 1990s. For decades, it was an integral part of political education. Workers' education only became a stand-alone field after the establishment…

  17. Beliefs About Medicines and Self-reported Adherence Among Patients with Chronic Illness: A Study in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Raniah Majed; Sweileh, Waleed Mohamad; El-Deen Abu Taha, Adham Saed; Zyoud, Sa'ed Husni

    2014-07-01

    Identifying factors associated with adherence is of great value in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to investigate medication adherence, beliefs about medicines held by people with chronic illness and whether beliefs influence medication adherence. The study was carried out at primary health care clinic of the Palestinian Medical Military Services in Nablus, Palestine. The beliefs about medicines questionnaire was used to assess beliefs and Morisky medication adherence scale was used to assess adherence. A total of 187 patients were interviewed. Most participants (79.6%) agreed or strongly agreed that their medications were necessary for their current health. However, 58.2% of the participants were concerned about having to take their medicines on a regular basis and 57.8% were concerned about becoming dependent on their medicines. None of the demographic and clinical variables was significantly associated with medication adherence. However, multivariate analysis showed that patients who had higher beliefs about medication necessity had higher odds (1.107 [1.023-1.197]) of being adherent. On the other hand, patients who had higher concern beliefs had lower odds (0.908 [0.845-0.975]) of being adherent. Beliefs about medicines are a major contributing factor to medication adherence.

  18. Political violence and mental health of Bedouin children in the West Bank, Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Massad, Salwa; Khammash, Umaiyeh; Shute, Rosalyn

    2017-09-06

    The Bedouin population is among the most vulnerable in Palestine, subject to forced relocation and lacking basic necessities, including water and electricity. To our knowledge, there are no studies on the mental health of Palestinian Bedouin children. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted examining exposures to traumatic events and mental health among 455 refugee children between the ages of 5-16 years old, and randomly selected from 18 Bedouin communities throughout the West Bank, including East Jerusalem. Mental health status was measured using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. Based on reports by mothers, teachers and children, 44% of the participants in the study had a probable psychiatric disorder. Exposure to traumatic events, fair/poor maternal self-rated mental health, and younger age were positively associated with child mental health problems. The findings highlight the importance of maternal mental health as a contributing factor affecting children's vulnerability. Bedouin mothers and their children need immediate psychosocial intervention, as well as the protection of their basic human rights.

  19. A simulation/optimization study to assess seawater intrusion management strategies for the Gaza Strip coastal aquifer (Palestine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni, Marta; Deidda, Roberto; Paniconi, Claudio; Qahman, Khalid; Lecca, Giuditta

    2015-03-01

    Seawater intrusion is one of the major threats to freshwater resources in coastal areas, often exacerbated by groundwater overexploitation. Mitigation measures are needed to properly manage aquifers, and to restore groundwater quality. This study integrates three computational tools into a unified framework to investigate seawater intrusion in coastal areas and to assess strategies for managing groundwater resources under natural and human-induced stresses. The three components are a three-dimensional hydrogeological model for density-dependent variably saturated flow and miscible salt transport, an automatic calibration procedure that uses state variable outputs from the model to estimate selected model parameters, and an optimization module that couples a genetic algorithm with the simulation model. The computational system is used to rank alternative strategies for mitigation of seawater intrusion, taking into account conflicting objectives and problem constraints. It is applied to the Gaza Strip (Palestine) coastal aquifer to identify a feasible groundwater management strategy for the period 2011-2020. The optimized solution is able to: (1) keep overall future abstraction from municipal groundwater wells close to the user-defined maximum level, (2) increase the average groundwater heads, and (3) lower both the total mass of salt extracted and the extent of the areas affected by seawater intrusion.

  20. Herbal preparation use by patients suffering from cancer in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Jamous, Rania M

    2011-11-01

    This study sought to describe type, frequency, purpose and patterns of herbal medicine used by a sample of patients with cancer in Palestine. A cross-sectional survey of patients attending the outpatient cancer departments at the Governmental Hospitals was undertaken using semi-structured questionnaires. A total of 1260 patients with cancer were interviewed. Of the participants, 60.9% (n = 767) reported using herbs primarily bought from Palestine (92.3%) frequently employed in the form of decoctions (43%). The most common herbal product was Arum palaestinum (22.5%). Most Complementary and Alternative (CAM) users were more than 40 years of age, predominantly female, and living in rural areas of Palestine. Family member's recommendation was cited as the main factor prompting participants to use CAM (43.5%). This study revealed that there is an appreciable prevalence of herbal use among patients with cancer in Palestine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How Sustained Conflict Makes Moral Education Impossible: Some Observations from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affouneh, Saida Jaser

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the impact of conflict and war on children's moral education, taking the case of Palestine as an example. It begins by giving a brief background to the emergency situation in Palestine and the impact this has on children. The second section reports research findings about the attitudes of Palestinian teachers, parents and…

  2. Chemical Composition, Cytotoxic, Apoptotic and Antioxidant Activities of Main Commercial Essential Oils in Palestine: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    A. Al-Tamimi, Mohammad; Rastall, Bob; M. Abu-Reidah, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Essential oils (EOs) are complex mixtures of several components gifted with a wide array of biological activities. The present research was designed to evaluate whether commercial essential oils could be effective by examining their in vitro antioxidant, cytotoxic, and apoptotic properties of nine commercially available EOs in Palestine, namely, African rue, basil, chamomile, fennel, fenugreek, ginger, spearmint, sage, and thyme, and to assure their effective use. Methods: The cytotoxic activity was determined using HT29-19(A) non-muco secreting and HT29-muco secreting (MS) cell lines. MTT, and trypan blue tests, and DPPH radical scavenging have also been assayed on the studied EOs. Results: In this work chamomile oil showed the lowest IC50 at the content of 60 µL/mL, while all other EOs reached such a decrease when 70–80 µL/mL was used on HT-29 (MS) cell lines. In HT-29 19(A) cells, 50% of viability was obtained when 80 µL/mL of ginger and African rue was used, while all other EOs needed more than 80 µL/mL to reach such a decline in viability. Otherwise, an MTT assay on HT-29 (MS) displayed ginger EO with the lowest IC50, followed by African rue and sage, with 40, 48 and 53 µL/mL, respectively. Otherwise, for the rest of the EOs, the IC50 was obtained by assaying around 80 µL/mL. Ginger showed the lowest IC50 with 60 µL/mL and thyme was the highest with 77 µL/mL when HT-29 19(A) cells were used. Conclusion: The most active EOs were found to be ginger, chamomile oil, and African rue. In general, the results demonstrate that most commercial EOs tested in this work possess low, or no biological activities; this may be due to processing, storage conditions, and handling or other reasons, which may cause losses in the biological and pharmacological properties that endemically exist in the Eos; hence, more investigation is still required on commercial EOs before they are recommended to the public. PMID:28930137

  3. Chemical Composition, Cytotoxic, Apoptotic and Antioxidant Activities of Main Commercial Essential Oils in Palestine: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    A Al-Tamimi, Mohammad; Rastall, Bob; M Abu-Reidah, Ibrahim

    2016-10-25

    Background: Essential oils (EOs) are complex mixtures of several components gifted with a wide array of biological activities. The present research was designed to evaluate whether commercial essential oils could be effective by examining their in vitro antioxidant, cytotoxic, and apoptotic properties of nine commercially available EOs in Palestine, namely, African rue, basil, chamomile, fennel, fenugreek, ginger, spearmint, sage, and thyme, and to assure their effective use. Methods: The cytotoxic activity was determined using HT29-19(A) non-muco secreting and HT29-muco secreting (MS) cell lines. MTT, and trypan blue tests, and DPPH radical scavenging have also been assayed on the studied EOs. Results: In this work chamomile oil showed the lowest IC50 at the content of 60 µL/mL, while all other EOs reached such a decrease when 70-80 µL/mL was used on HT-29 (MS) cell lines. In HT-29 19(A) cells, 50% of viability was obtained when 80 µL/mL of ginger and African rue was used, while all other EOs needed more than 80 µL/mL to reach such a decline in viability. Otherwise, an MTT assay on HT-29 (MS) displayed ginger EO with the lowest IC50, followed by African rue and sage, with 40, 48 and 53 µL/mL, respectively. Otherwise, for the rest of the EOs, the IC50 was obtained by assaying around 80 µL/mL. Ginger showed the lowest IC50 with 60 µL/mL and thyme was the highest with 77 µL/mL when HT-29 19(A) cells were used. Conclusion: The most active EOs were found to be ginger, chamomile oil, and African rue. In general, the results demonstrate that most commercial EOs tested in this work possess low, or no biological activities; this may be due to processing, storage conditions, and handling or other reasons, which may cause losses in the biological and pharmacological properties that endemically exist in the Eos; hence, more investigation is still required on commercial EOs before they are recommended to the public.

  4. History of Neurosurgery in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Darwazeh, Rami; Darwazeh, Mazhar; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-08-01

    Palestinian neurosurgery started with Dr. Antone Tarazi as the first Palestinian neurosurgeon. Before that, there was no organized neurosurgery specialty, and general surgeons performed neurosurgical procedures. Here we review the history of neurosurgery and neurosurgical applications in Palestine, evaluate some limitations of the current system, and discuss major challenges to improving this system. We collected information from various sources in either English or Arabic. The development of neurosurgery and neurosurgical training in Palestine began in 1960 with the first center established in Jerusalem, which provided much-needed neurosurgical services and training in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. Palestine has produced a number of its own neurosurgeons and has promoted further progress by establishing the Palestinian Neurosurgical Society in 2014. Today, there are 34 neurosurgeons (including 1 female neurosurgeon) and 17 residents providing expert care in 17 centers across Palestine, along with 1 neurosurgical residency program. Neurosurgery in Palestine has faced many challenges, some of which have been overcome. However, there remain many challenges, which will require much time and effort to surmount. Political stabilization is a significant factor in the progress of neurosurgery in Palestine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Histopathological study of Enterobius vermicularis among appendicitis patients in Gaza strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Hamdona, Shereen M; Lubbad, Abdel Monem; Al-Hindi, Adnan I

    2016-03-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is one of the most common intestinal parasite in human. The main objective of this study is to determine the role of E. vermicularis in appendicitis through histopathological examination. A cross sectional study included 200 patients who had appendectomy from three hospitals in Gaza strip. The inflamed appendix was the cause of attending the hospital. Histopathological examination for each appendix was carried out. A questionnaire was designed (interview with patients who underwent appendectomy), and information were obtained from patient and analyzed by using SPSS. The study showed that 30 (15.0 %) of 200 appendices had E. vermicularis in histopathological examination. It was found that ages of patients with histologically proven E. vermicularis in appendices less than 18 years old was found to be (18.2 %). Regarding sex, (16.5 %) of females, (14.0 %) of males patients had E. vermicularis in appendices. Patients who had the highest infection with E. vermicularis were students (17.3 %). In conclusion E. vermicularis occurs more frequently inflamed appendices than in normal. From these results we can conclude that E. vermicularis could be associated to cause of appendicitis in Gaza strip.

  6. Traditional knowledge of wild edible plants used in Palestine (Northern West Bank): A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Al-Shafie', Jehan H; Elgharabah, Wafa' A; Kherfan, Fatemah A; Qarariah, Kifayeh H; Khdair, Isra' S; Soos, Israa M; Musleh, Aseel A; Isa, Buthainah A; Herzallah, Hanan M; Khlaif, Rasha B; Aiash, Samiah M; Swaiti, Ghadah M; Abuzahra, Muna A; Haj-Ali, Maha M; Saifi, Nehaya A; Azem, Hebah K; Nasrallah, Hanadi A

    2008-01-01

    Background A comparative food ethnobotanical study was carried out in fifteen local communities distributed in five districts in the Palestinian Authority, PA (northern West Bank), six of which were located in Nablus, two in Jenin, two in Salfit, three in Qalqilia, and two in Tulkarm. These are among the areas in the PA whose rural inhabitants primarily subsisted on agriculture and therefore still preserve the traditional knowledge on wild edible plants. Methods Data on the use of wild edible plants were collected for one-year period, through informed consent semi-structured interviews with 190 local informants. A semi-quantitative approach was used to document use diversity, and relative importance of each species. Results and discussion The study recorded 100 wild edible plant species, seventy six of which were mentioned by three informants and above and were distributed across 70 genera and 26 families. The most significant species include Majorana syriaca, Foeniculum vulgare, Malvasylvestris, Salvia fruticosa, Cyclamen persicum, Micromeria fruticosa, Arum palaestinum, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Gundelia tournefortii, and Matricaria aurea. All the ten species with the highest mean cultural importance values (mCI), were cited in all five areas. Moreover, most were important in every region. A common cultural background may explain these similarities. One taxon (Majoranasyriaca) in particular was found to be among the most quoted species in almost all areas surveyed. CI values, as a measure of traditional botanical knowledge, for edible species in relatively remote and isolated areas (Qalqilia, and Salfit) were generally higher than for the same species in other areas. This can be attributed to the fact that local knowledge of wild edible plants and plant gathering are more spread in remote or isolated areas. Conclusion Gathering, processing and consuming wild edible plants are still practiced in all the studied Palestinian areas. About 26 % (26/100) of the

  7. Traditional knowledge of wild edible plants used in Palestine (Northern West Bank): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Al-Shafie', Jehan H; Elgharabah, Wafa' A; Kherfan, Fatemah A; Qarariah, Kifayeh H; Khdair, Isra' S; Soos, Israa M; Musleh, Aseel A; Isa, Buthainah A; Herzallah, Hanan M; Khlaif, Rasha B; Aiash, Samiah M; Swaiti, Ghadah M; Abuzahra, Muna A; Haj-Ali, Maha M; Saifi, Nehaya A; Azem, Hebah K; Nasrallah, Hanadi A

    2008-05-12

    A comparative food ethnobotanical study was carried out in fifteen local communities distributed in five districts in the Palestinian Authority, PA (northern West Bank), six of which were located in Nablus, two in Jenin, two in Salfit, three in Qalqilia, and two in Tulkarm. These are among the areas in the PA whose rural inhabitants primarily subsisted on agriculture and therefore still preserve the traditional knowledge on wild edible plants. Data on the use of wild edible plants were collected for one-year period, through informed consent semi-structured interviews with 190 local informants. A semi-quantitative approach was used to document use diversity, and relative importance of each species. The study recorded 100 wild edible plant species, seventy six of which were mentioned by three informants and above and were distributed across 70 genera and 26 families. The most significant species include Majorana syriaca, Foeniculum vulgare, Malvasylvestris, Salvia fruticosa, Cyclamen persicum, Micromeria fruticosa, Arum palaestinum, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Gundelia tournefortii, and Matricaria aurea. All the ten species with the highest mean cultural importance values (mCI), were cited in all five areas. Moreover, most were important in every region. A common cultural background may explain these similarities. One taxon (Majoranasyriaca) in particular was found to be among the most quoted species in almost all areas surveyed. CI values, as a measure of traditional botanical knowledge, for edible species in relatively remote and isolated areas (Qalqilia, and Salfit) were generally higher than for the same species in other areas. This can be attributed to the fact that local knowledge of wild edible plants and plant gathering are more spread in remote or isolated areas. Gathering, processing and consuming wild edible plants are still practiced in all the studied Palestinian areas. About 26 % (26/100) of the recorded wild botanicals including the most quoted and with

  8. A Molecular Epidemiology Survey of Respiratory Adenoviruses Circulating in Children Residing in Southern Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Qurei, Lina; Seto, Donald; Salah, Zaidoun; Azzeh, Maysa

    2012-01-01

    A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005–2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections. PMID:22880092

  9. A molecular epidemiology survey of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in children residing in Southern Palestine.

    PubMed

    Qurei, Lina; Seto, Donald; Salah, Zaidoun; Azzeh, Maysa

    2012-01-01

    A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005-2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections.

  10. Examining Social Political Contexts in Teacher Preparation in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Ilham; Wong, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    This study explores teaching English as a foreign language in the West Bank, Palestine. It investigates the perspectives of a group of faculty, preservice, and in-service teachers about teaching and learning English in the primary grades under the overarching harsh realities of political conflict and instability. The study demonstrates the…

  11. Examining Social Political Contexts in Teacher Preparation in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Ilham; Wong, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    This study explores teaching English as a foreign language in the West Bank, Palestine. It investigates the perspectives of a group of faculty, preservice, and in-service teachers about teaching and learning English in the primary grades under the overarching harsh realities of political conflict and instability. The study demonstrates the…

  12. Specific association of teratogen and toxicant metals in hair of newborns with congenital birth defects or developmentally premature birth in a cohort of couples with documented parental exposure to military attacks: observational study at Al Shifa Hospital, Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Manduca, Paola; Naim, Awny; Signoriello, Simona

    2014-05-14

    This study was undertaken in Gaza, Palestine, in a cohort of babies born in 2011. Hair samples of newborns were analyzed for metal load by DRC-ICP-MS. We report specific level of contamination by teratogen/toxicants metals of newborn babies, environmentally unexposed, according to their phenotypes at birth: normal full term babies, birth defects or developmentally premature. The occurrence of birth defects was previously shown to be correlated in this cohort to documented exposure of parents to weapons containing metal contaminants, during attacks in 2009. We detect, in significantly higher amounts than in normal babies, different specific teratogen or toxicant elements, known weapons' components, characteristic for each of birth defect or premature babies. This is the first attempt to our knowledge to directly link a phenotype at birth with the in utero presence of specific teratogen and/or toxicant metals in a cohort with known episodes of acute exposure of parents to environmental contamination by these same metals, in this case delivered by weaponry The babies were conceived 20-25 months after the major known parental exposure; the specific link of newborn phenotypes to war-remnant metal contaminants, suggests that mothers' contamination persists in time, and that the exposure may have a long term effect.

  13. Specific Association of Teratogen and Toxicant Metals in Hair of Newborns with Congenital Birth Defects or Developmentally Premature Birth in a Cohort of Couples with Documented Parental Exposure to Military Attacks: Observational Study at Al Shifa Hospital, Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Manduca, Paola; Naim, Awny; Signoriello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in Gaza, Palestine, in a cohort of babies born in 2011. Hair samples of newborns were analyzed for metal load by DRC-ICP-MS. We report specific level of contamination by teratogen/toxicants metals of newborn babies, environmentally unexposed, according to their phenotypes at birth: normal full term babies, birth defects or developmentally premature. The occurrence of birth defects was previously shown to be correlated in this cohort to documented exposure of parents to weapons containing metal contaminants, during attacks in 2009. We detect, in significantly higher amounts than in normal babies, different specific teratogen or toxicant elements, known weapons’ components, characteristic for each of birth defect or premature babies. This is the first attempt to our knowledge to directly link a phenotype at birth with the in utero presence of specific teratogen and/or toxicant metals in a cohort with known episodes of acute exposure of parents to environmental contamination by these same metals, in this case delivered by weaponry The babies were conceived 20–25 months after the major known parental exposure; the specific link of newborn phenotypes to war-remnant metal contaminants, suggests that mothers’ contamination persists in time, and that the exposure may have a long term effect. PMID:24830451

  14. Climate and Motivation for Women Athletes in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younes, Shima; Ciccomascolo, Lori; Shim, Minsuk

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that motivate women athletes to participate in sport in Palestine and the motivational climate created by coaches and parents. Additionally, participants' commitment to sport was investigated as well as the social constraints that Palestinian women athletes face. Participants (n = 107)…

  15. Medical and biomedical research productivity from Palestine, 2002 – 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical research productivity reflects the level of medical education and practice in a particular country. The objective of this study was to examine the quantity and quality of medical and biomedical research published from Palestine. Findings Comprehensive review of the literature indexed by Scopus was conducted. Data from Jan 01, 2002 till December 31, 2011 was searched for authors affiliated with Palestine or Palestinian authority. Results were refined to limit the search to medical and biomedical subjects. The quality of publication was assessed using Journal Citation Report. The total number of publications was 2207. A total of 770 publications were in the medical and biomedical subject areas. The annual rate of publication was 0.077 articles per gross domestic product/capita. The 770 publications have an h-index of 32. One hundred and thirty eight (18%) articles were published in 46 journals that were not indexed in the web of knowledge. Twenty two (22/770; 2.9%) articles were published in journals with an IF > 10. Conclusions The quantity and quality of research originating from Palestinian institutions is promising given the scarce resources of Palestine. However, more effort is needed to bridge the gap in medical research productivity and to promote better health in Palestine. PMID:23375070

  16. Medical and biomedical research productivity from Palestine, 2002 - 2011.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Sawalha, Ansam F; Abu-Taha, Adham; Hussein, Ayman; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2013-02-02

    Medical research productivity reflects the level of medical education and practice in a particular country. The objective of this study was to examine the quantity and quality of medical and biomedical research published from Palestine. Comprehensive review of the literature indexed by Scopus was conducted. Data from Jan 01, 2002 till December 31, 2011 was searched for authors affiliated with Palestine or Palestinian authority. Results were refined to limit the search to medical and biomedical subjects. The quality of publication was assessed using Journal Citation Report. The total number of publications was 2207. A total of 770 publications were in the medical and biomedical subject areas. The annual rate of publication was 0.077 articles per gross domestic product/capita. The 770 publications have an h-index of 32. One hundred and thirty eight (18%) articles were published in 46 journals that were not indexed in the web of knowledge. Twenty two (22/770; 2.9%) articles were published in journals with an IF > 10. The quantity and quality of research originating from Palestinian institutions is promising given the scarce resources of Palestine. However, more effort is needed to bridge the gap in medical research productivity and to promote better health in Palestine.

  17. Improving Micro-Planning in Education through a Geographical Information System: Studies on Ethiopia and Palestine. School Mapping and Local-Level Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attfield, Ian; Tamiru, Mathewos; Parolin, Bruno; De Grauwe, Anton

    This book contains reports of two projects--one in Ethiopia, one in Palestine--that integrated a Geographical Information System (GIS) into the educational planning process. (A GIS is a computer program that combines two databases: numerical data such as traditional data on schools, teachers, and students; and geographic data such as the location…

  18. Improving Micro-Planning in Education through a Geographical Information System: Studies on Ethiopia and Palestine. School Mapping and Local-Level Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attfield, Ian; Tamiru, Mathewos; Parolin, Bruno; De Grauwe, Anton

    This book contains reports of two projects--one in Ethiopia, one in Palestine--that integrated a Geographical Information System (GIS) into the educational planning process. (A GIS is a computer program that combines two databases: numerical data such as traditional data on schools, teachers, and students; and geographic data such as the location…

  19. Seroprevalence of Cytomegalovirus among pregnant women and hospitalized children in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Neirukh, Tahani; Qaisi, Ayda; Saleh, Niveen; Rmaileh, Areej Abu; Zahriyeh, Eman Abu; Qurei, Lina; Dajani, Firas; Nusseibeh, Taghreed; Khamash, Hatem; Baraghithi, Sabri; Azzeh, Maysa

    2013-11-09

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital infections. The maternal immune status plays a major role in the likelihood of congenital infection. The aim of this study is to shed light on the seroprevalence of HCMV in pregnant women, hospitalized children and newborns including cases of congenital infections in Palestine. We analyzed HCMV IgG and IgM test results that had been ordered for pregnant women, hospitalized children and newborns in the years 2006-2012 at Al-Makassed Islamic Charitable Hospital (MICH) in East Jerusalem. Furthermore, we reviewed the medical charts of newborns and HCMV IgM-positive children. HCMV IgG was positive in 96.6% of pregnant women, in 88% of hospitalized children and in 98.4% of hospitalized newborns. HCMV IgM was positive in 11.5% of pregnant women, in 11.7% of hospitalized children and in 2% of hospitalized newborns respectively. The HCMV avidity assay revealed that 95% of IgM-positive pregnant women had high avidity (>60%) indicating that most Palestinian women were undergoing a recurrent HCMV infection. Real time PCR on limited number of cases indicated that 62.5% of infants, mostly born to IgM-positive mothers and 83.3% of HCMV IgM-positive children had detectable HCMV DNA in their urine. Out of the 249 newborns tested during this study period, four (1.6%) were subjected to Gancyclovir treatment because of symptomatic congenital HCMV infection. This is the first report to provide an insight into HCMV seroprevalence in Palestine. Despite the high rate of seropositivity, the importance of HCMV testing during pregnancy should not be underestimated. A comprehensive study with a long term follow-up examination of offspring born to HCMV IgM-positive mothers would be required to provide estimates of an accurate percentage of symptomatic congenital HCMV infection in Palestine.

  20. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Related Factors among Adults in Palestine: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    El Bilbeisi, Abdel Hamid; Shab-Bidar, Sakineh; Jackson, Diane; Djafarian, Kurosh

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS)is increasingly becoming a challenging public health issue in Palestine. The current burden of MetS in the country is unknown. There has been limited research on the prevalence of MetS. This meta-analysis is the first to estimate the population prevalence of MetS and its related factors among adults in Palestine. A PRISMA systematic search appraisal and meta-analysis were conducted. A systematic literature search of PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar was conducted in December 2014 up to February 2015. Generic, methodological and statistical data was extracted from the eligible studies which reported MetS prevalence. A random effect meta-analysis was conducted on crude MetS prevalence rates. Heterogeneity was assessed by Cochran's Q and I(2) tests. Subgroup analyses were also performed according to the predefined criteria. The literature search yielded a total of 49 studies. Eight papers were included in the final analysis with sample size ranging 163 to 992. In addition, 2937 cases with MetS among people aged 15 years or more were estimated in Palestine between 2001 and 2014. There was high heterogeneity among studies (I(2) = 95.8% p<0.001). The prevalence of MetS was 37.0% among adult Palestinians population ranging from 17 to 59.5%. Subgroup analysis did not show source of heterogeneity based on subject's health status and MetS criteria. Our meta-analysis clearly demonstrates that MetS is highly prevalent (37.0%) among Palestinian adults. The high prevalence of MetS in Palestine should be seriously considered and planners should take steps to reduce it.

  1. Effect of Olive mill wastewater spreading on soil wettability and acidity under different season in a semi humid area: A field study in Bait Reema - West Bank - Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamimi, Nesreen; Marei Sawalha, Amer; Schaumann, Gabriele E.

    2014-05-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) is generated seasonally in large amounts during the olive oil production in Palestine, and it is often disposal of in uncontrolled manner into the open environment. OMW has a high amount of phototoxic compounds, high salinity and acidity and therefore is challenging when disposed on soil. The objective of this study was to study the persistence and degree of water repellency during different season of OMW application in soil samples (0-5 cm deep), and to elucidate how extent this phenomenon is associated with soil acidity, to analyze the relationships between soil water repellency and environmental factors including, temperature and moisture and to describe the seasonal variation in the phenol concentration of the soil. In order to understand how climatic conditions at the time of OMW disposal affect the development of soil water repelleny in field, soil acidity and phenol content in soil, we conducted a field study in Bait Reema village in the West Bank - Palestine. The study site is characterized by 1.5 m thick brown rendzina and has an annual average rainfall of 550 mm. On an extensively used olive orchard field, we implemented 16 plots (2.5 x 3.5 m). OMW application (14 L / m2) was conducted either in winter, spring or summer on two replicate plots distributed randomly among the 16 plots. To test the effect of soil moisture on the persistence of OMW effects, we implemented an OMW application in summer on two additional plots, but kept those plots moist before and after OMW application until start of the rain season. For each of the treatment variants, we implemented two control plots which were treated in the same way as their counterparts, but with tap water. Soil samples (0-5 cm) were collected after 2 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months , 9 months, 12 months , and 18 months. pH was determined and analyzed in aqueous soil extracts (1:5), the total phenol content was determined by using Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent, soil water

  2. Serological and molecular survey of Leishmania parasites in apparently healthy dogs in the West Bank, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is caused by Leishmania infantum in all Mediterranean countries. The Leishmania parasite is transmitted by the bite of a corresponding sand fly vector and primarily maintained in nature by wild and domestic reservoirs, including dogs, foxes and jackals. Infected dogs are the primary reservoir host in endemic regions and are the most significant risk disposing humans to infection. The present study aimed at assessing the prevalence of infection with Leishmania and identification of Leishmania infantum in domestic dogs in the West Bank, Palestine. Methods The infection rate among domestic dogs collected from seven districts in the Palestinian West Bank was investigated by examination of parasites in culture from the buffy coat using serological and molecular methods; based on ELISA, internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and cysteine protease (CPB) PCR. Results Out of 215 dogs examined for Leishmania, 36 (16.7%) were positive in at least one method. Twenty three animals (11.5%) were positive for Leishmania DNA, whereas, ELISA and culture revealed 16 (7.5%), and 4 (1.5%) respectively. CPB-PCR on one of three culture-positive isolates revealed Leishmania infantum as the causative agent for Leishmania infection in dogs. Conclusions Our study showed that canine leishmania infection is prevalent with varying degrees in all the seven studied districts in Palestine despite the absence of human VL cases in 4 of these districts. The causative agent was confirmed to be Leishmania infantum. PMID:22937916

  3. Incidence and causes of home accidents in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A

    2014-01-09

    This study aimed to investigate the incidence and causes of home accidents in the West Bank and Gaza Strip of Palestine. Quantitative data were collected through a field survey of a random sample of 1882 people from the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and qualitative data through 15 focus groups discussions with men and women from diverse sectors of Palestinian society, which contributed to the interpretation of some of the results more deeply. The most important result from the study was that more women's were exposed to home accidents (40.0%) than men (25.1%). The most common type of accident for both women and men was from a blunt or sharp object casing blunt trauma or puncture wound. Economic situation of the family, family size, presence of children and place of residence were significantly associated with exposure to domestic accidents. There is a need to educate the people of Palestine on the causes of home accidents and methods of prevention, to reduce it incidence.

  4. Factors affecting the demarketing of breastmilk substitutes in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohammad Zedan Yehia

    2013-06-01

    Although medical research has proven that breastfeeding is unparalleled in providing the ideal nutrition for infants, "the demarketing of breastmilk substitutes" is a little-known concept. This empirical study tackled the origin and definition of demarketing, examined the different factors affecting the demarketing of breastmilk substitutes in Palestine from the breastfeeding woman's point of view, and developed an appropriate model for the demarketing of breastmilk substitutes. The article subsequently concludes with recommendations for areas of further academic research in the World Health Assembly, for policy makers in Palestine, and for the breastfeeding women themselves. An empirical study was conducted to collect the primary data using a questionnaire as a tool in order to test the hypotheses. The questionnaire was distributed to 400 breastfeeding women who were randomly selected from the population. The findings proved that there is a relationship between independent variables (i.e., product, price, place, and promotion) and the dependent variable (i.e., demarketing of breastmilk substitutes) based on several reasons discussed thoroughly in this article. Product, price, place, and promotion affect the demarketing of breastmilk substitutes in Palestine.

  5. Molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus isolated from sheep in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Adwan, Kamel; Bdir, Sami; Abuseir, Sameh

    2013-06-01

    A total of twenty-three Echinococcus granulosus hydatid cysts were collected from infected sheep slaughtered in Nablus abattoir, Nablus - Palestine. Protoscoleces or germinal membranes were used for DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification. Amplified products were analyzed the presence of a fragment of 444bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene followed by nucleotide sequencing. Overall, 21 hydatid cysts were positive compared to a negative control. The partial sequences of cox1 gene of E. granulosus strains indicated that the sheep in Palestine were infected with genotype 1 (G1), genotype 2 (G2) and genotype 3 (G3). The prevalence of these genotypes was (14/21) 66.7%, (4/21) 19.0% and (3/21) 14.3% for G1, G2 and G3, respectively. Our results showed that twelve strains of G1 belonged to the common haplotype EG01 which is the major haplotype in all the geographic populations. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that two sequences of G1 genotype which have GenBank accession No. KC109657 and KC109659 were corresponding to G1.4 micro-variants. Only the sequence of GenBank accession No. KC109652 identified in our study as G2 was found to have complete identity to the original sequence described for the cox1 gene (GenBank accession No. M84662). It is concluded that G1 genotype is the predominant genotype in sheep in Palestine. Therefore, these findings should be taken into consideration in developing prevention strategies and control programs for hydatidosis in Palestine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mobile Innovations, Executive Functions, and Educational Developments in Conflict Zones: A Case Study from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that exposure to conflict can negatively impact the development of executive functioning, which in turn can affect academic performance. Recognizing the need to better understand the potentially widespread executive function deficiencies among Palestinian students and to help develop educational resources targeted to youth…

  7. Mobile Innovations, Executive Functions, and Educational Developments in Conflict Zones: A Case Study from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that exposure to conflict can negatively impact the development of executive functioning, which in turn can affect academic performance. Recognizing the need to better understand the potentially widespread executive function deficiencies among Palestinian students and to help develop educational resources targeted to youth…

  8. Childbirth in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Wick, L.; Mikki, N.; Giacaman, R.; Abdul-Rahim, H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective This study describes staffing, caseloads and reported routine practices for normal childbirth in Palestinian West Bank (WB) governmental maternity facilities and compares these practices with evidence-based care. Methods Data on routine childbirth practices in all eight governmental hospitals were obtained through interviews with head obstetricians and midwives. Data on staffing and monthly number of births were collected by phone or personal interview from all 37 WB hospitals. Results Forty-eight percent of WB deliveries took place in crowded and understaffed governmental hospitals. Reported practices were not consistently in line with evidence-based care. Lack of knowledge and structural barriers were reasons for this gap. Conclusion The implications of limiting unnecessary interventions in the normal birth process are particularly important in a context of limited access and scarce resources. More skilled birth attendants and a universal commitment to effective care are needed. PMID:15847891

  9. Behind the statistics: the ethnography of suicide in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    As part of the first anthropological study on suicide in the modern Arab world, statistics gathered from the Ramallah region of the West Bank in Palestine painted an apparently remarkably similar picture to that found in Western countries such as the UK and France. More men than women completed suicide, more women than men attempted suicide. Men used more violent methods such as hanging and women softer methods such as medication overdose. Completed suicide was higher in the older age range, attempted suicide in the younger. However, ethnographic fieldwork and detailed examination of the case studies and suicide narratives gathered and analysed within the cultural, political and economic contexts illustrated more starkly the differences in suicidal practices between Palestinian West Bank society of the 1990s and other regions of the world. The central argument of the paper is that although statistics tell a very important story, ethnography uncovers a multitude of stories 'behind the statistics', and thus helps us to make sense of both cultural context and subjective experience.

  10. An Evaluation of Pronunciation Teaching Content of "English for Palestine 10" and Related Teachers' Competency Level in Light of Current Instructional Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Najjar, Rana Abdel-Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate pronunciation teaching with regard to an EFL multi-skills textbook ("English for Palestine 10"). The evaluation was intended to identify the extent to which pronunciation teaching content incorporated in" English for Palestine 10," in addition to the related teachers' competency level match…

  11. Psychological Reactions to Israeli Occupation: Findings from the National Study of School-Based Screening in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdeen, Ziad; Qasrawi, Radwan; Nabil, Shibli; Shaheen, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Children exposed to violent war-like and repeated political violence often experience a continued threat to life and their sense of safety, as well as a disruption of daily functioning. The purpose of the study was to examine the psychological impact of exposure to Israeli occupation on Palestinian school children in the West Bank and Gaza,…

  12. Psychological Reactions to Israeli Occupation: Findings from the National Study of School-Based Screening in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdeen, Ziad; Qasrawi, Radwan; Nabil, Shibli; Shaheen, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Children exposed to violent war-like and repeated political violence often experience a continued threat to life and their sense of safety, as well as a disruption of daily functioning. The purpose of the study was to examine the psychological impact of exposure to Israeli occupation on Palestinian school children in the West Bank and Gaza,…

  13. Environmental characterization report for the Gulf Interior Region, Texas study area. [Oakwood, Palestine and Keechi salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    This report is published as a product of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. The objective of this program is the development of terminal waste storage facilities in deep, stable geologic formations for high-level nuclear waste, including spent fuel elements from commercial power reactors and transuranic nuclear waste for which the federal government is responsible. The report is part of the area study phase and contains environmental information for the Texas Study Area of the Gulf Interior Region acquired from federal, state, and regional agencies. The data in this report meet the requirements of predetermined survey plans and will be used in determining locations of approximately 80 square kilometers (30 square miles) that will be further characterized. Information on surface water, atmosphere, background radiation, natural ecosystems, agricultural systems, demography, socioeconomics, land use, and transportation is presented. The environmental characterization will ensure that data on environmental values required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 are available.

  14. Labor and Related Injuries among Schoolchildren in Palestine: Findings from the National Study of Palestinian Schoolchildren (HBSC-WBG2006)

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Background. Labor related injuries among Palestinian schoolchildren are a significant undocumented public health concern. This study aimed at documenting the prevalence and nature of work related injuries among schoolchildren as well as identifying sociodemographic factors that predict these injuries. Methods. A cross-sectional survey included 15,963 children of whom 6458 (40.8%) completed an optional package related to labor. Students aged 12–18 years self-completed the international WHO collaborative HBSC valid questionnaires between April and May of 2006. Results. Approximately 73.8% of the students who filled the optional package reported working during the last 12 months, of whom 79.1% sustained a work related injury. Work injuries were significantly higher among boys, younger children, and children enrolled in UNRWA schools and living in Gaza Strip (P < 0.05). Children working ≥3 hours/day were more likely to experience injuries, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.53–1.95), than those working ≤3/day. About half of the children worked in retail trade (51.5%), agriculture (20.0%), and cleaning (11.4%). Injury type was related to the type of work performed. Conclusions. The high prevalence of injuries among working Palestinian schoolchildren confirms its severity as a public health problem. To reduce occupational injuries, policymakers and professionals should develop intervention programs that target the public and health providers. PMID:25006490

  15. Plants used during pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and infant healthcare in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Jamous, Rania M

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and the factors related to the use of herbs by women during pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and for infant healthcare. The study also aims to identify the herbs therapeutic uses and preparation. To date, no previous studies have investigated this prevalence in Palestine. A cross-sectional survey of women of different child-bearing age group inhabiting different locations in Palestine was carried out by means of a semi-structured questionnaire. A total of 372 women were interviewed. Of the participants 72.3% reported using herbs at different pregnancy stages and for infant healthcare. The most common herbal products used in this study at different stages of pregnancy were Pimpinella anisum, Salvia fruticosa, Matricaria aurea, and Mentha spicata. This study revealed that there is an appreciable prevalence of herbal use among pregnant women at different pregnancy stages and for infant healthcare in Palestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The clinical burden of human cystic echinococcosis in Palestine, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Ereqat, Suheir; Dumaidi, Kamal; Nasereddin, Abdelmajeed; Al-Jawabreh, Hanan; Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Laham, Nahed; Nairat, Moath; Casulli, Adriano; Maqboul, Husni; Abdeen, Ziad

    2017-07-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is classified by the WHO as a neglected disease inflicting economic losses on the health systems of many countries worldwide. The aim of this case-series study was to investigate the burden of human CE in Palestine during the period between 2010 and 2015. Records of surgically confirmed CE patients from 13 public and private hospitals in the West Bank and Gaza Strip were reviewed. Patients' cysts were collected from surgical wards and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks were collected from histopathology departments. Molecular identification of CE species /genotypes was conducted by targeting a repeat DNA sequence (EgG1 Hae III) within Echinococcus nuclear genome and a fragment within the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, (CO1). Confirmation of CE species/genotypes was carried out using sequencing followed by BLAST analysis and the construction of maximum likelihood consensus dendrogram. CE cases were map-spotted and statistically significant foci identified by spatial analysis. A total of 353 CE patients were identified in 108 localities from the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The average surgical incidence in the West Bank was 2.1 per 100,000. Spot-mapping and purely spatial analysis showed 13 out of 16 Palestinian districts had cases of CE, of which 9 were in the West Bank and 4 in Gaza Strip. Al-Khalil and Bethlehem were statistically significant foci of CE in Palestine with a six-year average incidence of 4.2 and 3.7 per 100,000, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first confirmation of human CE causative agent in Palestine. This study revealed that E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) was the predominating species responsible for CE in humans with 11 samples identified as G1 genotype and 2 as G3 genotype. This study emphasizes the need for a stringent surveillance system and risk assessment studies in the rural areas of high incidence as a prerequisite for control measures.

  17. The clinical burden of human cystic echinococcosis in Palestine, 2010-2015

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Ereqat, Suheir; Dumaidi, Kamal; Nasereddin, Abdelmajeed; Al-Jawabreh, Hanan; Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Laham, Nahed; Nairat, Moath; Casulli, Adriano; Maqboul, Husni; Abdeen, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is classified by the WHO as a neglected disease inflicting economic losses on the health systems of many countries worldwide. The aim of this case-series study was to investigate the burden of human CE in Palestine during the period between 2010 and 2015. Methodology/Principal findings Records of surgically confirmed CE patients from 13 public and private hospitals in the West Bank and Gaza Strip were reviewed. Patients’ cysts were collected from surgical wards and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks were collected from histopathology departments. Molecular identification of CE species /genotypes was conducted by targeting a repeat DNA sequence (EgG1 Hae III) within Echinococcus nuclear genome and a fragment within the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, (CO1). Confirmation of CE species/genotypes was carried out using sequencing followed by BLAST analysis and the construction of maximum likelihood consensus dendrogram. CE cases were map-spotted and statistically significant foci identified by spatial analysis. A total of 353 CE patients were identified in 108 localities from the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The average surgical incidence in the West Bank was 2.1 per 100,000. Spot-mapping and purely spatial analysis showed 13 out of 16 Palestinian districts had cases of CE, of which 9 were in the West Bank and 4 in Gaza Strip. Al-Khalil and Bethlehem were statistically significant foci of CE in Palestine with a six-year average incidence of 4.2 and 3.7 per 100,000, respectively. Conclusions/Significance To the best of our knowledge, this is the first confirmation of human CE causative agent in Palestine. This study revealed that E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) was the predominating species responsible for CE in humans with 11 samples identified as G1 genotype and 2 as G3 genotype. This study emphasizes the need for a stringent surveillance system and risk assessment studies in the rural areas of high

  18. An intervention delivered by text message to increase the acceptability of effective contraception among young women in Palestine: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ona L; Wazwaz, Ola; Jado, Iman; Leurent, Baptiste; Edwards, Phil; Adada, Samia; Stavridis, Amina; Free, Caroline

    2017-10-03

    Unintended pregnancy can negatively impact women's lives and is associated with poorer health outcomes for women and children. Many women, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, continue to face obstacles in avoiding unintended pregnancy. In the State of Palestine, a survey conducted in 2006 estimated that 38% of pregnancies are unintended. In 2014, unmet need for contraception was highest among young women aged 20-24 years, at 15%. Mobile phones are increasingly being used to deliver health support. Once developed, interventions delivered by mobile phone are often cheaper to deliver than face-to-face support. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Association have partnered to develop and evaluate a contraceptive behavioural intervention for young women in Palestine delivered by mobile phone. The intervention was developed guided by behavioural science and consists of short, mobile phone text messages that contain information about contraception and behaviour change methods delivered over 4 months. We will evaluate the intervention by conducting a randomised controlled trial. Five hundred and seventy women aged 18-24 years, who do not report using an effective method of contraception, will be allocated with a 1:1 ratio to receive the intervention text messages or control text messages about trial participation. The primary outcome is self-reported acceptability of at least one method of effective contraception at 4 months. Secondary outcomes include the use of effective contraception, acceptability of individual methods, discontinuation, service uptake, unintended pregnancy and abortion. Process outcomes include knowledge, perceived norms, personal agency and intervention dose received. Outcomes at 4 months will be compared between arms using logistic regression. This trial will determine the effect of the intervention on young women's attitudes towards the most effective methods of

  19. Updating the epidemiology of dermatophyte infections in Palestine with special reference to concomitant dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, M S; Yaish, S; Jamous, R M; Arda, H; Husein, E I

    2015-06-01

    To determine the epidemiology of dermatophytosis in Palestinian patients, detect changes in the etiological agents during the last three decades, and to correlate between concomitant tinea pedis infections, and other cutaneous lesions. 220 suspected dermatophytosis patients were involved in this study. In an additional 38 cases, where consultation was prompted by tinea pedis, the presence of other lesions of concomitant dermatophytosis was studied, to further investigate the diagnosis. Clinical specimens were collected and identification of dermatophyte species was based on gross and microscopic morphology. Epidemiology of tinea capitis has gone the most radical changes in Palestine in the last three decades, with the zoophilic dermatophyte Microsporum canis replacing Trichophyton violaceum, becoming the predominant causative agent. During this study, 21.6% (38/176) patients with tinea pedis and concomitant lesions caused by the same dermatophytes at sites distant from the primary lesions in the foot were prospectively identified. About 63.2% of patients with tinea pedis have a concomitant toenail onychomycosis infection. The epidemiology of dermatophytosis, especially tinea capitis, has gone the most radical changes in Palestine in the last three decades, with M. canis replacing T. violaceum, and becoming the predominant causative agent of all cases of infections. The coexistence of tinea pedis with other types of fungal skin infections is a frequent phenomenon; we believe that the infected foot may be a site of primary infection. Thus, the effective therapy for tinea pedis is essential to prevent spreading the infection to other sites of the skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent Foreign Language Education Policies in Palestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amara, Muhammad Hasan

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the development of foreign language education policies in Palestine at a time when the establishment of a Palestinian state has become a real option, and when, following the Oslo agreements, the Palestinians have become responsible for Palestinian education. (Author/VWL)

  1. Language Learning Strategy Use In Palestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmais, Wafa Abu

    2003-01-01

    Reports on current English language learning strategies used by Arabic-speaking English-majors enrolled at a University in Palestine. Results showed that gender and proficiency had no significant differences on the use of strategies. Recommends that more training should be given in using cognitive, memory and compensation strategies by embedding…

  2. Counseling and Mental Health Care in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawahin, Lamise; Ciftci, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of counseling and mental health care in Palestine, including their history and a summary of their current status. Finally, a discussion is presented of future trends in the development of the profession with regard to recent changes in the region.

  3. Language Learning Strategy Use In Palestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmais, Wafa Abu

    2003-01-01

    Reports on current English language learning strategies used by Arabic-speaking English-majors enrolled at a University in Palestine. Results showed that gender and proficiency had no significant differences on the use of strategies. Recommends that more training should be given in using cognitive, memory and compensation strategies by embedding…

  4. Counseling and Mental Health Care in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawahin, Lamise; Ciftci, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of counseling and mental health care in Palestine, including their history and a summary of their current status. Finally, a discussion is presented of future trends in the development of the profession with regard to recent changes in the region.

  5. Survey on Infant Hearing Loss at Caritas Baby Hospital in Bethlehem-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Corradin, Lucia; Hindiyeh, Musa; Khaled, Rasha; Rishmawi, Fadi; Zidan, Marwan; Marzouqa, Hiyam

    2014-03-06

    This study describes the epidemiology of infants' hearing loss (IHL) among patients under 3 months of age at Caritas Baby Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in Palestine. It was aimed to demonstrate that IHL is a major health problem in Palestine and to assess the first available data of the newborn hearing screening program conducted between September 25, 2006 and December 31, 2011. Data was uploaded and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 21). A total of 8144 infants were tested, 4812 (59%) were males and 3332 (41%) were females. As to their origin, 72% (5886) came from the Bethlehem district, 25% (2044) from the Hebron district, while 3% (214) from the other Palestinian districts (Jericho, Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Jerusalem). The transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) and the automated auditory brainstem response were used according to the manufacturer guidelines. The results were interpreted according to the indications of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Consensus Development Conference on Neonatal Hearing Screening. Out of the 8144 infants tested, 1507 (14.6%) did not pass the 1(st) test, 477 (32.8%) of these 1507 infants failed retesting, while 498 (33%) patients were lost to follow-up. Only 152 (31.9%) patients that failed retesting went to an audiologist. The audiologist evaluation revealed that 101 (66.4%) patients presented with a mild-moderate or profound hearing loss according to the Bureau International of Audiophonologie standards, 44 (28.9%) patients had otitis media, whereas 7 cases (4.7%) had no hearing disorders. The overall unadjusted percentage of hearing loss was 1.24%, and the adjusted overall percentage was 1.85%. The chart review showed that jaundice, sepsis, prematurity, lung disease were more common among the affected patients. The high prevalence of childhood deafness in Palestine is of utmost

  6. Survey on Infant Hearing Loss at Caritas Baby Hospital in Bethlehem-Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Corradin, Lucia; Hindiyeh, Musa; Khaled, Rasha; Rishmawi, Fadi; Zidan, Marwan; Marzouqa, Hiyam

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of infants’ hearing loss (IHL) among patients under 3 months of age at Caritas Baby Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in Palestine. It was aimed to demonstrate that IHL is a major health problem in Palestine and to assess the first available data of the newborn hearing screening program conducted between September 25, 2006 and December 31, 2011. Data was uploaded and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 21). A total of 8144 infants were tested, 4812 (59%) were males and 3332 (41%) were females. As to their origin, 72% (5886) came from the Bethlehem district, 25% (2044) from the Hebron district, while 3% (214) from the other Palestinian districts (Jericho, Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Jerusalem). The transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) and the automated auditory brainstem response were used according to the manufacturer guidelines. The results were interpreted according to the indications of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Consensus Development Conference on Neonatal Hearing Screening. Out of the 8144 infants tested, 1507 (14.6%) did not pass the 1st test, 477 (32.8%) of these 1507 infants failed retesting, while 498 (33%) patients were lost to follow-up. Only 152 (31.9%) patients that failed retesting went to an audiologist. The audiologist evaluation revealed that 101 (66.4%) patients presented with a mild-moderate or profound hearing loss according to the Bureau International of Audiophonologie standards, 44 (28.9%) patients had otitis media, whereas 7 cases (4.7%) had no hearing disorders. The overall unadjusted percentage of hearing loss was 1.24%, and the adjusted overall percentage was 1.85%. The chart review showed that jaundice, sepsis, prematurity, lung disease were more common among the affected patients. The high prevalence of childhood deafness in Palestine is of utmost

  7. Assessing the Roles and Training Needs of Educational Superintendents in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanan, Hana M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to examine the role perceptions of superintendents and their supervisors in Palestine regarding the roles and training needs of superintendents. It was part of a larger study conducted by the Department of Administration and Educational Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University.…

  8. Assessing the Roles and Training Needs of Educational Superintendents in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanan, Hana M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to examine the role perceptions of superintendents and their supervisors in Palestine regarding the roles and training needs of superintendents. It was part of a larger study conducted by the Department of Administration and Educational Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University.…

  9. Pesticide poisoning in Palestine: a retrospective analysis of calls received by Poison Control and Drug Information Center from 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ansam F; O'Malley, Gerald F; Sweileh, Waleed M

    2012-01-01

    The agricultural industry is the largest economic sector in Palestine and is characterized by extensive and unregulated use of pesticides. The objective of this study was to analyze phone calls received by the Poison Control and Drug Information Center (PCDIC) in Palestine regarding pesticide poisoning. All phone calls regarding pesticide poisoning received by the PCDIC from 2006 to 2010 were descriptively analyzed. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 16) was used in statistical analysis and to create figures. A total of 290 calls regarding pesticide poisoning were received during the study period. Most calls (83.8%) were made by physicians. The average age of reported cases was 19.6 ± 15 years. Pesticide poisoning occurred mostly in males (56.9%). Pesticide poisoning was most common (75, 25.9%) in the age category of 20-29.9 years. The majority (51.7%) of the cases were deliberate self-harm while the remaining was accidental exposure. The majority of phone calls (250, 86.2%) described oral exposure to pesticides. Approximately one third (32.9%) of the cases had symptoms consistent with organophosphate poisoning. Gastric lavage (31.7%) was the major decontamination method used, while charcoal was only utilized in 1.4% of the cases. Follow up was performed in 45.5% of the cases, two patients died after hospital admission while the remaining had positive outcome. Pesticide poisoning is a major health problem in Palestine, and the PCDIC has a clear mission to help in recommending therapy and gathering information.

  10. A cost analysis of kidney replacement therapy options in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Younis, Mustafa; Jabr, Samer; Al-Khatib, Abdallah; Forgione, Dana; Hartmann, Michael; Kisa, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a cost analysis of kidney replacement therapy options in Palestine. It informs evidence-based resource allocation decisions for government-funded kidney disease services where transplant donors are limited, and some of the common modalities, i.e., peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HD), are not widely available due to shortages of qualified staff, specialists, and centers to follow the patient cases, provide training, make home visits, or provide educational programs for patients. The average cost of kidney transplant was US$16,277 for the first year; the estimated cost of HD per patient averaged US$16,085 per year--nearly as much as a transplant. Consistent with prior literature and experience, while live, related kidney donors are scarce, we found that kidney transplant was more adequate and less expensive than HD. These results have direct resource allocation implications for government-funded kidney disease services under Palestinian Ministry of Health. Our findings strongly suggest that investing in sufficient qualified staff, equipment, and clinical infrastructure to replace HD services with transplantation whenever medically indicated and suitable kidney donors are available, as well as deploying PD programs and Home HD programs, will result in major overall cost savings. Our results provide a better understanding of the costs of kidney disease and will help to inform Ministry of Health and related policy makers as they develop short- and long-term strategies for the population, in terms of both cost savings and enhanced quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Gulf Coast Salt Domes geologic Area Characterization Report, East Texas Study Area. Volume II. Technical report. [Contains glossary of geological terms; Oakwood, Keechi, and Palestine domes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    The East Texas Area Characterization Report (ACR) is a compilation of data gathered during the Area Characterization phase of the Department of Energy's National Waste Terminal Storage program in salt. The characterization of Gulf Coast Salt Domes as a potential site for storage of nuclear waste is an ongoing process. This report summarizes investigations covering an area of approximately 2590 km/sup 2/ (1000 mi/sup 2/). Data on Oakwood, Keechi, and Palestine Domes are given. Subsequent phases of the program will focus on smaller land areas and fewer specific salt domes, with progressively more detailed investigations, possibly culminating with a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data in this report are a result of drilling and sampling, geophysical and geologic field work, and intensive literature review. The ACR contains text discussing data usage, interpretations, results and conclusions based on available geologic and hydrologic data, and figures including diagrams showing data point locations, geologic and hydrologic maps, geologic cross sections, and other geologic and hydrologic information. An appendix contains raw data gathered during this phase of the project and used in the preparation of these reports.

  12. Incidence of Echinococcus granulosus in Domestic Dogs in Palestine as Revealed by Copro-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Dumaidi, Kamal; Ereqat, Suheir; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Al-Jawabreh, Hanan; Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Laham, Nahed; Abdeen, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Hydatidosis or echinococcosisis considered a neglected zoonotic disease despite its high burden in the livestock industry and the high risk of infection by humans in endemic areas. In a cross-sectional study we estimated the copro-Incidence and also genotyped Echinococcus granulosus isolates from domestic dogs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Medical archives in nine major hospitals in Palestine were reviewed to determine incidence of E. granulosus infection detected in humans during surgery. Faecal samples were collected from 93 domestic dogs in three districts with the highest number of human cases: Al-Khalil (Hebron), Tubas and Jenin. Genomic DNA was extracted from dog faecal samples and amplified by PCR targeting the repeat DNA sequence (EgG1 Hae III) followed by sequencing of five positive samples. Genotyping was determined by sequencing and BLAST searching of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit (CO1). The incidence of E. granulosus infection detected in humans at surgery was 1.2 per 100,000 in the West Bank and 1.0 per 100,000 in Gaza Strip. Seventeen of 93 domestic dogs (18%) were positive, based upon comparison with the Echinococcus DNA control. The five sequenced samples were confirmed to be E. granulosus. Successfully genotyped sample belonged to E.granulosus sensu stricto (formerly G1-G3 complex, sheep strain). For domestic dogs, age group (13-24 months) and sex were identified as two risk factors for contracting E. granulosus. The study identified the high incidence of E. granulosus sensu stricto in dogs in Palestine. PMID:26181591

  13. Incidence of Echinococcus granulosus in Domestic Dogs in Palestine as Revealed by Copro-PCR.

    PubMed

    Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Dumaidi, Kamal; Ereqat, Suheir; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Al-Jawabreh, Hanan; Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Laham, Nahed; Abdeen, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Hydatidosis or echinococcosisis considered a neglected zoonotic disease despite its high burden in the livestock industry and the high risk of infection by humans in endemic areas. In a cross-sectional study we estimated the copro-Incidence and also genotyped Echinococcus granulosus isolates from domestic dogs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Medical archives in nine major hospitals in Palestine were reviewed to determine incidence of E. granulosus infection detected in humans during surgery. Faecal samples were collected from 93 domestic dogs in three districts with the highest number of human cases: Al-Khalil (Hebron), Tubas and Jenin. Genomic DNA was extracted from dog faecal samples and amplified by PCR targeting the repeat DNA sequence (EgG1 Hae III) followed by sequencing of five positive samples. Genotyping was determined by sequencing and BLAST searching of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit (CO1). The incidence of E. granulosus infection detected in humans at surgery was 1.2 per 100,000 in the West Bank and 1.0 per 100,000 in Gaza Strip. Seventeen of 93 domestic dogs (18%) were positive, based upon comparison with the Echinococcus DNA control. The five sequenced samples were confirmed to be E. granulosus. Successfully genotyped sample belonged to E.granulosus sensu stricto (formerly G1-G3 complex, sheep strain). For domestic dogs, age group (13-24 months) and sex were identified as two risk factors for contracting E. granulosus. The study identified the high incidence of E. granulosus sensu stricto in dogs in Palestine.

  14. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among patients with Schizophrenia in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of the most dangerous cardiac risk factors and is associated with high mortality. Ethnic differences in metabolic syndrome (MS) criteria and prevalence rates have been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MS prevalence among patients with schizophrenia in Palestine. Methods We recruited 250 patients with schizophrenia from 4 psychiatric primary healthcare centers in Northern Palestine. The MS prevalence was assessed based on National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Adapted criteria. Results The overall MS prevalence was 43.6%, with 39% in male and 55.9% in female patients. On average, the study patients had 2.3 ± 1.3 metabolic abnormalities. Univariate analysis showed that MS was significantly higher with older age, female gender, longer duration of the illness, smoking, abdominal obesity, high systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL-C, and high fasting plasma glucose. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only systolic blood pressure, high triglycerides, high fasting plasma glucose, and low HDL-C were significant predictors of MS in schizophrenic patients. Conclusions MS is common among Arab patients with schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia should receive regular monitoring and adequate treatment of cardio-metabolic risk factors. PMID:23270504

  15. The practice of humanitarianism: a village birthing clinic in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Wick, Livia

    2011-01-01

    Discourses and practices surrounding humanitarian organisations have changed over time. This is certainly the case for Palestinian non-governmental organisations, which have followed the structural and ideological transformations observed in local, regional and international contexts. There have been three successive but interlocking generations of groups active in health in Palestine: charitable societies, popular committees, and donor-based entities. Against this background, a village clinic in the West Bank is seen to have gone through various incarnations in the context of an emerging neo-liberal economic, administrative and political environment. Despite the critiques justifiably addressed towards them, non-governmental organisations may in some cases be functionally fluid. Communities and people continue to use them strategically in their relations with states, political groups, individuals and receivers of aid, making them potential networking sites in the context of an ongoing occupation.

  16. Risk factors for asthma severity among emergency rooms attendees, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al Zabadi, Hamzeh; El Sharif, Nuha

    2009-06-01

    Emergency Room of Alia Governmental hospital in Hebron district, south of West Bank, Palestine. To determine the factors associated with chronic asthma severity among asthma patients attending the emergency rooms in Palestine. A cross-sectional study using previously validated questionnaires. Among the 121 patients, 45.5% had moderate/severe asthma. Most days' regular intake of oral theophylline, and using >or=5 courses/year of oral steroids were more likely to be associated with moderate/severe asthmatics (p<0.05). Moderate/severe asthmatics compared with mild asthmatics were more likely to use inhaled short B(2)-agonists more frequently (most days, 50% vs. 17%; p<0.05) and in higher concentrations (>or=1 cannister/month, 78% vs. 29%; p<0.05). They were also more likely to get regular treatment (p<0.05) and to report their inability to afford/obtain asthma medicines (p>0.05). Access to health services doesn't necessarily ensure a good quality of care for asthmatics. The effectiveness of oral theophyline in controlling the more severe asthma symptoms should be reconsidered. We recommend a training program for health professionals and an educational one on self-management for the asthma patients.

  17. Respiratory function and chemical exposures among female hairdressers in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Nemer, M; Kristensen, P; Nijem, K; Bjertness, E; Skogstad, M

    2013-01-01

    Hairdressers are exposed to chemicals and work tasks that may cause respiratory symptoms. There is little awareness of occupational health among hairdressing salons in Palestine. To characterize respiratory symptoms, lung function, and knowledge of exposure to hazards among female Palestinian hairdressers. Cross-sectional study of female hairdressers and controls of female university students and staff. Working history and respiratory symptoms were collected using questionnaire. Lung function was measured. Working conditions were characterized in salons. A total of 170 hairdressers from 56 salons and 170 controls participated. Nineteen per cent of the hairdressers reported wheezing versus 11% in the control group. The mean forced vital capacity was 3.31 l compared with 3.42 l for controls. Adjusting for age and height, there was a forced expiratory volume in 1 s reduction of 0.093 l (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.06-0.15) comparing hairdressers with controls. A small number of hairdressers used respiratory protective equipment, and satisfactory ventilation in salons were lacking. Female hairdressers had higher prevalence of reported asthma and respiratory symptoms than the controls, but these differences reduced markedly when adjusted for age, height, weight and years of education. They had lower lung function measurements than the control group. Increasing the awareness of occupational health hazards and improving the work conditions for the hairdressers in Palestine is needed. Possible bias could be present as hairdressers might have over reported symptoms or lung function measurements might be affected by differences in socioeconomic status between the two groups.

  18. [The organization of Jewish dentists in pre-Israel Palestine].

    PubMed

    Keren-Kratz, M

    2016-04-01

    The first modern dental institutes were established in Europe and in the USA during the 1840s. At that period there wasn't a single qualified doctor in Palestine, not to mention a professional dentist. A couple of decades later, as the number of Christian pilgrims grew, some modern hospitals were established and a few non-Jewish dentists opened their clinics in Jerusalem, which was then and in the following decades, the region's largest city. In Europe, dentistry became a popular profession among Jews in general and among Jewish women in particular. The first Jewish dentist settled in Jerusalem in the mid-1880s. Other dentists were slow to arrive and their number began to grow only after the turn of the 20th century. Their professional education varied from those who were trained as apprentices by other dentists to those which studied a couple of years in an academic dental school. The devastation caused by WWI prompted American-Zionist organizations to send a special medical unit to Palestine in 1918. Along medical supplies it also brought a small group of doctors and dentists. The two American dentists that decided to remain in Palestine took upon themselves to spread their medical and scientific knowledge. They also organized the dentists, whose number grew considerably during the 1920s, and called the authorities to regulate the dental profession. In 1926 the British authorities issued a decree regulating all medical professions. It demanded that dental practitioners will be licensed after proving their previous studies and professional knowledge. In 1931, local dentists' organizations decided to establish the Palestine Dental Association. Five years later it was accepted as a member by the International Dental Federation (FDI) and was recognized by the local authorities. Since the 1930s, prominent Jewish dentists from abroad were invited to come to Palestine to lecture, and local dentists participated in international conferences. This prompted the first

  19. Seroprevalence and risk factor analysis for exposure to equine encephalosis virus in Israel, Palestine and Jordan.

    PubMed

    Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Gelman, Boris; Zivotofsky, Doni; Quraan, Lara; Khinich, Evgeny; Nasereddin, Abdelmajeed; Abdeen, Ziad; Steinman, Amir

    2017-05-01

    Equine encephalosis virus (EEV) is an orbivirus transmitted by Culicoides species. Most infected horses show mild clinical signs and mortality is usually very low. EEV is closely related and similarly transmitted to other, more pathogenic and economically important, orbiviruses such as African horse sickness virus (AHSV), bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDV), and may serve as an indicator for possible transmission of the latter. Israel has been reported to be endemic for EEV since 2001. This study was initiated to re-evaluate the current seroprevalence and risk factors for EEV exposure in Israel, and to assess, for the first time, the seroprevalence of EEV in Palestine and Jordan. Three hundred and sixteen serum samples were collected from apparently healthy horses at 21 farms in Israel, 66 horses at nine farms in Palestine and 100 horses at three farms in Jordan. The presence of EEV antibodies was detected by a serum neutralization assay. Seroprevalence of EEV was 58.2% (184/316 horses) in Israel, 48.5% (32/66 horses) in Palestine and 2% (2/100 horses) in Jordan. Seroprevalence in Jordan was significantly lower than in Israel and Palestine (P < 0.001). The farm (P < 0.001) and horse age (P = 0.003) were found as significant risk factors for EEV exposure in Israel in multivariable statistical analysis. The results of this study further demonstrate that EEV is no longer limited to South Africa and is endemic in both Israel and Palestine and horses in Jordan were also exposed to this virus emphasizing the potential of pathogens to invade new ecological niches.

  20. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  1. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  2. Efficacy of diphtheria and tetanus vaccination in Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al Aswad, I H; Shubair, M E

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness and usefulness of vaccination against diphtheria and tetanus in different age groups in Gaza, Palestine. Blood samples were collected from 180 children aged <12 years, 90 males and 90 females. Using ELISA methods, the efficacy of vaccination was estimated at 87.8% for diphtheria and 98.3% for tetanus. Mean serum titres varied significantly by age group: for diphtheria 0.24 IU/mL at age 2-4 years, 0.63 IU/mL at 7-8 years and 0.46 IU/mL at 11-12 years, and for tetanus 1.01 IU/mL, 2.63 IU/mL and 1.20 IU/mL respectively. The relatively low antibody titres, especially for diphtheria, suggest the need for a booster dose.

  3. Prevalence of occult HBV among hemodialysis patients in two districts in the northern part of the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Dumaidi, Kamal; Al-Jawabreh, Amer

    2014-10-01

    Occult hepatitis B infection is the case with undetectable HBsAg, but positive for HBV DNA in liver tissue and/or serum. Occult hepatitis B infection among hemodialysis patients in Palestine has been understudied. In this study, 148 hemodialysis patients from 2 northern districts in Palestine, Jenin (89) and Tulkarem (59), were investigated for occult hepatitis B, HBV, HCV infections with related risk factors. ELISA and PCR were used for the detection of anti-HBc and viral DNA, respectively. The overall prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection among the study group was 12.5% (16/128). Occult hepatitis B infection is more prevalent among males with most cases (15/16) from Jenin District. About one-third (42/132) of the hemodialysis patients were anti-HBc positive. Approximately 27% of the hemodialysis patients were infected with HCV. Around 20% (28/140) were positive for HBV DNA, but only 8.2% (12/146) of the hemodialysis patients were positive for HBsAg. The comparison between hemodialysis patients with occult hepatitis B infection and those without occult hepatitis B infection for selected risk factors and parameters as liver Enzyme, age, sex, HCV infection, blood transfusion, kidney transplant, anti-HBc, and vaccination showed no statistical significance between both categories. Duration of hemodialysis significantly affected the rate of HCV infection. HCV is significantly higher in hemodialysis patients with both Diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection among hemodialysis patients is high; requiring stringent control policies. HBsAg assay is insufficient test for accurate diagnosis of HBV infection among hemodialysis patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ethnopharmacological survey of medicinal plants used by patients with psoriasis in the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Jaradat, Nidal Amin

    2017-01-03

    Psoriasis is a frequent skin inflammatory disorder that inflicts millions of patients around the globe. To meet their healthcare needs, patients with psoriasis often seek treatment outside the allopathic paradigm. Use of medicinal plants has emerged as one of the most common and preferred modalities of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this study was to investigate the use of medicinal plants by patients with psoriasis in the West Bank of Palestine. The current study was a questionnaire based cross-sectional descriptive study on the use of medicinal plants by psoriasis patients in the West Bank of Palestine. A sample of 149 patients with psoriasis who were visiting outpatient clinics responded to the questionnaire in face to face interviews. Medicinal plants were used by 81 (54.4%) patients with psoriasis. Patients used 33 medicinal plants belonging to 26 families. Plants belonging to Lamiaceae and Leguminosae were the most commonly used by the study patients. Aloe vera, Trigonella arabica, Catharanthus roseus and Anthemis cotula were the most frequently used medicinal plants to treat psoriasis. Leaves and fruits were the most commonly used parts by the study patients. Paste was the most commonly used form of preparation. The use of medicinal plants was significantly associated with age and monthly household income of the patients. Enhancement of immunity, improving conventional therapy and reduction of side effects were the most commonly self-reported reasons for using medicinal plants. Patients with psoriasis in Palestine seem to use medicinal plants as a CAM modality to manage their psoriasis. Many medicinal plants were commonly used by patients with psoriasis. More randomized clinical trials are needed to demonstrate safety and efficacy for the majority of these medicinal plants reported to be used by patients with psoriasis in Palestine.

  5. The Teacher's Roles in Light of Knowledge Economy from the Perspective of the Educational Supervisors' in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabbah, Suhair Sulaiman Mohammed; Naser, Inas Aref Saleh; Awajneh, Ahlam Mustafa Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the teacher's roles in light of knowledge economy from the perspective of the educational supervisors in Palestine. To achieve the study's objective, a questionnaire consisted of 35 items was developed and applied on 50 male and female supervisors in the Directorate of Education in governorate of Ramallah, al-Bireh…

  6. Resilience of nurses who work in community mental health workplaces in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Marie, Mohammad; Hannigan, Ben; Jones, Aled

    2017-08-01

    People in Palestine live and work in a significantly challenging environment. As a result of these challenges they have developed resilient responses which are embedded in their cultural context. 'Sumud', in particular, is a socio-political concept which refers to ways of surviving in the context of occupation, chronic adversity, lack of resources and limited infrastructure. Nurses' work in Palestine is an under-researched subject and very little is known about how nurses adjust to such challenging environments. To address this gap in the literature this study aimed to explore the resilience of community mental health nurses (CMHNs) who work in Palestine. An interpretive qualitative design was chosen. Fifteen face-to-face interviews were completed with participants. Thirty-two hours of observations of the day-to-day working environment and workplace routines were conducted in two communities' mental health centres. Written documents relating to practical job-related policies were also collected from various workplaces. Thematic analysis was used across all data sources resulting in four main themes, which describe the sources of resilience among CMHNs. These sources are 'Sumud and Islamic cultures', 'Supportive relationships', 'Making use of the available resources', and 'Personal capacity'. The study concludes with a better understanding of resilience in nursing, which draws on wider cultural contexts and social ecological responses. The outcomes from this study will be used to develop the resilience of CMHNs in Palestine. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia in West-Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Dalal, Salah A; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Al-Ali, Iyad

    2013-03-01

    The main aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with schizophrenia, to compare it with those published in the general population, and to assess significant associations with dysglycemia defined as having either pre-DM or DM. A cross-sectional study carried out in 4 governmental primary psychiatric healthcare centers in Northern West-Bank, Palestine. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured. The World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for defining pre-DM and DM were used. Dysglycemia was defined as FBG >110mg/dl. Based on WHO criteria, 27 patients (10.8%) had diabetes and 34 (13.6%) had pre-diabetes. The prevalence of DM in patients with schizophrenia was not significantly higher than that reported in the general population of Palestine. However, the prevalence of pre-DM was significantly higher than that reported in the general population of Palestine. Regression analysis showed that advancing age and abnormal waist circumference were significant predictors of dysglycemia in patients with schizophrenia. This study confirmed the high prevalence of dysglycemia in patients with schizophrenia, supporting the need for monitoring of blood glucose in this category of patients. The presence of primary risk factors is more important in the development of dysglycemia in patients with schizophrenia than exposure to antipsychotic drugs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intensive Care Unit Physician's Attitudes on Do Not Resuscitate Order in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Fatima S; Radaeda, Mahdy S; Gaghama, Maram K; Salameh, Basma

    2016-01-01

    There is some ambiguity concerning the do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in the Arabic world. DNR is an order written by a doctor, approved by the patient or patient surrogate, which instructs health care providers to not do CPR when cardiac or respiratory arrest occurs. Therefore, this research study investigated the attitudes of Intensive Care Unit physicians and nurses on DNR order in Palestine. A total of 123 males and females from four different hospitals voluntarily participated in this study by signing a consent form; which was approved by the Ethical Committee at Birzeit University and the Ministry of Health. A non-experimental, quantitative, descriptive, and co-relational method was used, the data collection was done by a three page form consisting of the consent form, demographical data, and 24 item-based questionnaire based on a 5-point-Likert scale from strongly agree (score 1) to strongly disagree (score 5). The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software program version 17.0 was used to analyze the data. Finding showed no significant relationship between culture and opinion regarding the DNR order, but religion did. There was statistical significance difference between the physicians' and nurses' religious beliefs, but there was no correlation. Moreover, a total of 79 (64.3%) physicians and nurses agreed with legalizing the DNR order in Palestine. There was a positive attitude towards the legalization of the DNR order in Palestine, and culture and religion did not have any affect towards their attitudes regarding the legalization in Palestine.

  9. The History of Hebrew Secondary Mathematics Education in Palestine during the First Half of the Twentieth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aricha-Metzer, Inbar

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation traces the history of mathematics education in Palestine Hebrew secondary schools from the foundation of the first Hebrew secondary school in 1905 until the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. The study draws on primary sources from archives in Israel and analyzes curricula, textbooks, student notebooks, and…

  10. Role of School Administration in Solving Students' Problems among Bedouin Schools within the Green Line in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badarna, Laila Khaled; abu Ashour, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the role of the school administration in solving the students' problems and differences according to gender, scientific qualification, years of experience and job title. The sample consisted of (300) staff from those who are working in the Bedouin schools within the Green Line of Palestine. The author used a…

  11. The Impact of Creativity Management in Fighting the Educational Crisis in Secondary Schools in Palestine from the Viewpoint of Headmasters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alawawdeh, Sabreen

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to identify the impact of creativity management in fighting the educational crisis in secondary schools in Palestine from the viewpoint of headmasters, researcher worked to follow the descriptive analytical method and also resorted to statistical methods, has developed a questionnaire included several paragraphs about the school…

  12. Challenges of urban planning in Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghayer, Taher J. T.; Tesmamma Daget, Yidnekachew; Wang, Xingping

    2017-08-01

    For the last two centuries, Palestinian territory had faced several changes. This is due to historical precedents and the unstable political situation in the area. This has resulted in mutli-faced challenges in Palestine. The objective of this paper is to analyse and understand the major factors that had impacted the urban planning, urban form and urban development of the Palestinian territory. The findings showed that the lack of available land, rapid urban population growth, failure in urban planning policy decisions, the unstable political situation on the ground, fragmented urban developments in the west bank area, and also diffusion of urban sprawls within the landscapes and around the cities are the major factors that caused challenges in Palestine’s cities.

  13. Public Attitudes towards Socio-Cultural Aspects of Water Supply and Sanitation Services: Palestine as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Marwan

    2005-01-01

    Identifying and considering public attitudes towards various aspects of water supply and sanitation services by planners and decision makers represent an important developmental element relating to the quality, efficiency, and performance of those services. A sample of 1000 Palestinian adults completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes towards…

  14. Livelihood planning and career guidance in Palestine and the broader MENA region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Ronald G.

    2014-04-01

    It has often been stated that the Arab "world" is faced by a demographic challenge which is very different to that of many countries in the global North. As the Arab Spring has shown, youths across the region of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are keen to make a mark, and despite the internal conflicts and contests for power and influence, many young leaders are hoping to establish new forms of social cohesion which could lead to peace and prosperity within a globalised, interconnected world. This paper focuses on one aspect of the relationship between Arab youth and society, namely the difficult transition between formal education and employment. Drawing on, among other sources, a comparative study carried out across eight Arab states, the role which career education and guidance can play in the process is examined. This is followed by a case study of Palestine where, despite very challenging and difficult political and economic circumstances, significant and promising efforts have been made to help young people develop the life skills needed to engage with schooling in ways that do not only enhance learning, but also facilitate access to work and to self-employment. The paper argues that while career education and guidance (CEG) cannot possibly be expected to solve the disconnect between education and work, it does have a role to play in enhancing learning, in supporting transitions, and thus in contributing to both social and economic development goals.

  15. Radioactivity levels in plant samples in Tulkarem district, Palestine and its impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Thabayneh, Kaleel M; Jazzar, Mohannad M

    2013-01-01

    The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive materials such as (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were measured for 44 plant samples collected from different locations in the northwestern region of the West Bank, Palestine, using high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in the investigated plant samples ranged from 7.5 to 157.6 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 7.5 to 66.1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, 1.8 to 48.5 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th, 14.3 to 1622 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K and <0.1 to 4.7 Bq kg(-1) for (137)Cs. The average values of these activities were 48.3, 26.5, 10.1, 288.0 and 2.2 Bq kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The study presents the total gamma radiation dose rate assessed from natural radionuclides,(137)Cs and cosmic radiation, the dose rate of each radionuclide and the effective dose for all the samples. The radiological health implication to the population that may result from these doses is found to be low, except in few cases. The measurements have been taken as representing a baseline database of values of these radionuclides in the plants in the area.

  16. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  17. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  18. 77 FR 57188 - Rusk, Palestine & Pacific Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Texas State Railroad Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Surface Transportation Board Rusk, Palestine & Pacific Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption-- Texas State Railroad Authority Rusk, Palestine & Pacific Railroad, LLC (RP&P), formerly American Heritage Railways of...) between Rusk and Palestine, Tex., currently owned by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Authority. The Line is...

  19. Low infant mortality among Palestine refugees despite the odds

    PubMed Central

    Khader, Ali; Sabatinelli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present data from a 2008 infant mortality survey conducted in Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic, the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and analyse infant mortality trends among Palestine refugees in 1995–2005. Methods Following the preceding birth technique, mothers who were registering a new birth were asked if the preceding child was alive or dead, the day the child was born and the date of birth of the neonate whose birth was being registered. From this information, neonatal, infant and early child mortality rates were estimated. The age at death for early child mortality was determined by the mean interval between successive births and the mean age of neonates at registration. Findings In 2005–2006, infant mortality among Palestine refugees ranged from 28 deaths per 100 000 live births in the Syrian Arab Republic to 19 in Lebanon. Thus, infant mortality in Palestine refugees is among the lowest in the Near East. However, infant mortality has stopped decreasing in recent years, although it remains at a level compatible with the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. Conclusion Largely owing to the primary health care provided by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for Palestine Refugees in the Near East and other entities, infant mortality among Palestine refugees had consistently decreased. However, it is no longer dropping. Measures to address the most likely reasons – early marriage and childbearing, poor socioeconomic conditions and limited access to good perinatal care – are needed. PMID:21479095

  20. Low infant mortality among Palestine refugees despite the odds.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, Flavia; Khader, Ali; Sabatinelli, Guido

    2011-04-01

    To present data from a 2008 infant mortality survey conducted in Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic, the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and analyse infant mortality trends among Palestine refugees in 1995-2005. Following the preceding birth technique, mothers who were registering a new birth were asked if the preceding child was alive or dead, the day the child was born and the date of birth of the neonate whose birth was being registered. From this information, neonatal, infant and early child mortality rates were estimated. The age at death for early child mortality was determined by the mean interval between successive births and the mean age of neonates at registration. In 2005-2006, infant mortality among Palestine refugees ranged from 28 deaths per 100 000 live births in the Syrian Arab Republic to 19 in Lebanon. Thus, infant mortality in Palestine refugees is among the lowest in the Near East. However, infant mortality has stopped decreasing in recent years, although it remains at a level compatible with the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. Largely owing to the primary health care provided by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for Palestine Refugees in the Near East and other entities, infant mortality among Palestine refugees had consistently decreased. However, it is no longer dropping. Measures to address the most likely reasons - early marriage and childbearing, poor socioeconomic conditions and limited access to good perinatal care - are needed.

  1. Design and implementation of a hospital information system for the Palestine Red Crescent Society in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Rossi, L; Materia, E; Hourani, A; Yousef, H; Racalbuto, V; Venier, C; Osman, M

    2009-01-01

    A case-mix hospital information system was designed and implemented in Palestine Red Crescent Society hospitals in order to support the network of Palestinian hospitals in Lebanon and to improve the health of refugees in the country. The system is based on routine collection of essential administrative and clinical data for each episode of hospitalization, relying on internationally accepted diagnostic codes. It is a computerized, user-friendly information system that is a stepping-stone towards better hospital management and evaluation of quality of care. It is also a useful model for the development of hospital information systems in Lebanon and in the Near East.

  2. [Max Eitingon in Palestine/Eretz Israel (1933-1943)].

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 1933, after the Nazi takeover in Germany, Eitingon decided to settle in Palestine. His ten Jerusalem years highlight a multifaceted personality that does not quite correspond to his usual image as a "grey eminence" of the international psychoanalytic movement: enthusiastic, vivid, highly involved in various--artistic, scientific, academic, social and pedagogic--acitivities of zionism in Palestine. In contrast, his last years were overshadowed by illness, financial ruin und the tragedies of war. Eitingon played a major role in the establishment of psychoanalysis in Palestine. However, the omnipresence of his name, associated with a purely Berlin psychoanalytic tradition, tends to obscure the important contributions of representatives of the Viennese tradition and the significant achievement of Moshe Wulff who was the real pioneer of psychoanalysis in Israel.

  3. Medication dosing errors and associated factors in hospitalized pediatric patients from the South Area of the West Bank - Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Ramahi, Rowa'; Hmedat, Bayan; Alnjajrah, Eman; Manasrah, Israa; Radwan, Iqbal; Alkhatib, Maram

    2017-09-01

    Medication dosing errors are a significant global concern and can cause serious medical consequences for patients. Pediatric patients are at increased risk of dosing errors due to differences in medication pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. The aims of this study were to find the rate of medication dosing errors in hospitalized pediatric patients and possible associated factors. The study was an observational cohort study including pediatric inpatients less than 16 years from three governmental hospitals from the West Bank/Palestine during one month in 2014, and sample size was 400 pediatric inpatients from these three hospitals. Pediatric patients' medical records were reviewed. Patients' weight, age, medical conditions, all prescribed medications, their doses and frequency were documented. Then the doses of medications were evaluated. Among 400 patients, the medications prescribed were 949 medications, 213 of them (22.4%) were out of the recommended range, and 160 patients (40.0%) were prescribed one or more potentially inappropriate doses. The most common cause of hospital admission was sepsis which presented 14.3% of cases, followed by fever (13.5%) and meningitis (10.0%). The most commonly used medications were ampicillin in 194 cases (20.4%), ceftriaxone in 182 cases (19.2%), and cefotaxime in 144 cases (12.0%). No significant association was found between potentially inappropriate doses and gender or hospital (chi-square test p-value > 0.05).The results showed that patients with lower body weight, who had a higher number of medications and stayed in hospital for a longer time, were more likely to have inappropriate doses. Potential medication dosing errors were high among pediatric hospitalized patients in Palestine. Younger patients, patients with lower body weight, who were prescribed higher number of medications and stayed in hospital for a longer time were more likely to have inappropriate doses, so these populations require special care. Many

  4. Epidemiological and clinical features of cutaneous leishmaniases in Jenin District, Palestine, including characterisation of the causative agents in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Schönian, Gabriele; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Schnur, Lionel F; Sawalha, Samir; Hamarsheh, Omar; Ereqat, Suheir; Amro, Ahmad; Qaddomi, Sharif E; Abdeen, Ziad

    2012-09-01

    During 2002-2009, 466 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) were reported from Jenin District, Palestine, affecting both genders. The average annual incidence was 23 cases per 100000 inhabitants, increasing with age in children. Most cases presented a single lesion, generally on the face. Diagnosis and species identification was done by applying internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) RFLP analysis to 47 isolates, of which 44 (93.6%) were Leishmania tropica and 3 (6.4%) were L. major. RFLP analysis was also performed on 256 skin tissue scrapings spotted onto filter papers, showing that 138 (53.9%) were positive, of which 50.7% were infected with L. tropica, 17.4% with L. major and 2.9% with L. donovani s.l., and 29.0% could not be identified. This is the first report from Palestine on human CL caused by L. infantum. Nine of the strains of L. tropica were subjected to multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, six of which belonged to the zymodeme MON-137 and three to a new zymodeme (MON-307). This separation was corroborated by excreted factor serotyping. This observation modifies the classical epidemiological view of CL in Palestine. Jenin District is an active focus of CL caused by L. tropica, where Phlebotomus sergenti, the putative vector, is abundant. These data suggest that CL is a zoonotic infection, but an animal reservoir has not been found. Copyright © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differences in tobacco smoking prevalence and frequency between adolescent Palestine refugee and non-refugee populations in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and the West Bank: cross-sectional analysis of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Mohammed; Khader, Ali; Millett, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is conflicting as to the whether tobacco smoking prevalence is higher in refugee than non-refugee populations. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence and frequency of tobacco smoking in Palestine refugee and non-refugee adolescent populations in the Middle East. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) conducted in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and the West Bank among adolescent Palestine refugees and non-refugees. Age- and sex-adjusted regression models assessed the association between refugee status and current (past-30 day) tobacco use prevalence and frequency. Prevalence estimates for current tobacco smoking were similar between Palestine refugee and non-refugee groups in Jordan (26.7 % vs. 24.0 %), Lebanon (39.4 % vs. 38.5 %), and the West Bank (39.5 % vs. 38.4 %). In Syria, Palestine refugees had nearly twice the odds of current tobacco smoking compared to non-refugees (23.2 % vs. 36.6 %, AOR 1.96, 95 % CI 1.46-2.62). Palestine refugees consumed more cigarettes per month than non-refugees in Lebanon (β 0.57, 95 % CI 0.17-0.97) and Palestine refugees consumed more waterpipe tobacco per month than non-refugees in Syria (β 0.40, 95 % CI 0.19-0.61) and the West Bank (β 0.42, 95 % CI 0.21-0.64). Current tobacco smoking prevalence is in excess of 20 % in both adolescent Palestine refugee and non-refugee populations in Middle Eastern countries, however Palestine refugees may smoke tobacco more frequently than non-refugees. Comparison of simple prevalence estimates may therefore mask important differences in tobacco use patterns within population groups.

  6. Radon in harvested rainwater at the household level, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Al Zabadi, Hamzeh; Saffarini, Ghassan

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess Radon concentration in the harvested rainwater (HRW) at the household level in Yatta area, Palestine. HRW is mainly used for drinking as it is the major source of water for domestic uses due to water scarcity. Ninety HRW samples from the household cisterns were collected from six localities (a town and five villages) and Radon concentrations were measured. The samples were randomly collected from different households to represent the Yatta area. Fifteen samples were collected from each locality at the same day. RAD7 device was used for analysis and each sample was measured in duplicate. Radon concentrations ranged from 0.037 to 0.26 Bq/L with a mean ± standard deviation of 0.14 ± 0.06 Bq/L. The estimated annual effective radiation doses for babies, children and adults were all far below the maximum limit of 5 mSvy(-1) set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  7. CASE STUDY CRITIQUE; UPPER CLINCH CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case study critique: Upper Clinch case study (from Research on Methods for Integrating Ecological Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment: A Trade-off Weighted Index Approach to Integrating Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment). This critique answers the questions: 1) does ...

  8. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  9. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  10. Herbal remedies use by breast cancer patients in the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Nidal Amin; Shawahna, Ramzi; Eid, Ahmad Mustafa; Al-Ramahi, Rowa; Asma, Maes Kasem; Zaid, Abdel Naser

    2016-02-03

    Recent ethnopharmacological surveys showed that herbal remedies are the most preferred modality of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). In Palestine as in many other countries, herbal remedies are widely used in the treatment of many diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of herbal remedies by women living with breast cancer in the West Bank of Palestine. This study was a questionnaire based cross-sectional descriptive study on the use of herbal remedies by breast cancer patients in the West Bank. A questionnaire was distributed to 115 patients at outpatient cancer clinics in face to face interviews. The study had a response rate of 89.6%. Of all respondents, 68% were herbal remedies users. Women with breast cancer used 46 plant species belonging to 32 families. Of these, Brassicaceae and Lamiaceae were the most prevalent. Ephedra alata was the most commonly used plant species in the treatment of breast cancer. Leaves and seeds were the most commonly used parts and decoction was the most commonly used method of preparation. Herbal remedies users were more likely to use herbal remedies instead of chemotherapy. The most commonly stated reason for using herbal remedies was the belief in boosting the patient's immune system to fight cancer. The use of herbal remedies is prevalent in breast cancer patients in Palestine. The use of herbal remedies was associated with educational level, time since diagnosis, type of surgery use, and use of endocrine therapy. It was apparent that the majority of users were satisfied with herbal remedies use. Clinical trials and pharmacological tests are required to be established for the presence of side effects, toxicity and efficacy for these herbal remedies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Conflict and Democracy Education in Palestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashweh, Maher Z.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Palestinian teachers' and students' emotional and cognitive conflicts when introduced to a problem- and case-based approach to democracy education. Observation and case study data indicated that participants sometimes held initial beliefs about democracy, student-teacher interactions, and appropriate classroom behaviors reflecting an…

  12. Teacher Education Reform in Palestine: Policy Challenges Amid Donor Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinn, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the role of UNESCO, the World Bank, and the US Agency for International Development as key international actors shaping teacher development in Palestine. The argument presented is that international influence, particularly through donor-funded projects, combined with limited capacity within the Ministry of Education and local…

  13. Narrative Power: Playback Theatre as Cultural Resistance in Occupied Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes The Freedom Theatre's Freedom Bus initiative and its use of Playback Theatre for community mobilisation and cultural activism within Occupied Palestine. Utilising a conflict transformation perspective, conventional dialogue-oriented initiatives are contrasted against interventions that pursue concientisation and alliance…

  14. Narrative Power: Playback Theatre as Cultural Resistance in Occupied Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes The Freedom Theatre's Freedom Bus initiative and its use of Playback Theatre for community mobilisation and cultural activism within Occupied Palestine. Utilising a conflict transformation perspective, conventional dialogue-oriented initiatives are contrasted against interventions that pursue concientisation and alliance…

  15. Pupils' Fear in the Classroom: Portraits from Palestine and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Eleanore; Affouneh, Saida

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the concept of fear related to the authoritarian classroom and how children express its influence on their learning. Its investigations draw on the comments of four classes of primary-age pupils, two from a school near London, England, and two from boys' and girls' schools in the West Bank, Palestine. It is written by one…

  16. Herbs as a food and medicine source in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rabia, Aref

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the broad ethno-botany and folk medicine in Palestine. It presents examples of different edible plants and their use by Palestinians in a host of manners, fresh, cooked and dried, both as foodstuffs and treatment of diseases and medical disorders. Their potential application as cancer chemopreventive agents needs to be a focus of research attention.

  17. Gender Planning, Vocational Education, and Technical Training (VETT) in Palestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahleh, Lamis Abu

    Vocational education and technical training (VETT) in Palestine were examined from the perspective of gender planning and gender integration. First, a literature review and semistructured interviews with key VETT personnel were conducted to determine the extent to which gender institutionalization in VETT is implemented in four spheres: political,…

  18. [Breast feeding in premature babies: development-centered care in Palestine].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Cordero, M J; Batran Ahmed, S M; Padilla López, C A; Guisado Barrilao, R; Gómez García, C

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its important role in the initiation of breastfeeding, early skin-to-skin contact benefits both mothers and their babies. To inform all mothers of premature babies about the importance of skin-to-skin contact and breast-feeding in order to foment a closer bond between mother and child (development-centered care). A prospective cohort study was conducted in various hospitals on the West Bank in Palestine during 2008-2011. The universe was made up of an estimated average of 2,500 childbirths per year in each hospital. All of the subjects in the sample population of n = 252 babies had a gestational age of less than 37 GWs, and had weighed less than 2,500 grams at birth. For health reasons, they were hospitalized in neonatal care units. The results obtained showed that in Palestine, young women tend to breastfeed their babies and have skin-to-skin contact with them more often than older mothers. Once the new mothers were informed of the advantages of these practices, they showed greater interest in learning how to care for their babies in the neonatal care units. Breastfeeding premature babies as well as having skin-to-skin contact with them was made possible by informing and teaching new mothers about the advantages of this type of infant care. This research has had widespread impact and has been very well received by the female population in the country. This is the first study of its kind to be carried out in Palestine.

  19. Survival, family conditions and nutritional status of motherless orphans in the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Adili, Nadim; Shaheen, Mohammad; Bergstrom, Staffan; Johansson, Annika

    2008-05-01

    This study describes survival, family care and growth of the orphans of women dying at reproductive age (15-49 years) in the West Bank, Palestine, in 2000 and 2001. One hundred and sixty-seven children who were below 5 years of age at the time of the mother's death were identified. Three had died soon after birth. The family situation for the remaining 164 children was recorded. A planned baseline study could not be done at that time, due to the escalating political violence in the study area. In 2004, an average of 3 years after the mother's death, all orphan families were contacted. Of the 164 orphans, six had left the country with their fathers, and six could not be reached, due to restricted mobility. Home interviews were conducted with the 148 orphans' custodians/care-takers. Family situation and orphans' health status as judged by the interviewees were investigated, and are presented in descriptive statistics. Orphan weight and height were measured, and rates of wasting and stunting were calculated and analysed by gender. The most striking finding is the high survival rate among the orphans. With the exception of the three neonatal deaths, all orphans who could be reached were alive. Almost all lived with their fathers, most of whom had remarried shortly after the death of their wives, and a stepmother had joined the family in 85% of the cases. Of the orphans under 5 years of age at the time of the interview, 8.8% and 17.6%, respectively, suffered from wasting and stunting, all of whom were girls. These rates were higher than those in the national data from 2003 for Palestinian children. Early family reconstruction is suggested to be a contributing factor to the high survival rate. Close monitoring of motherless orphans' health and nutritional status, with a special emphasis on orphan girls, should be ensured.

  20. Prevalence of Toxocara canis in Dogs, North West Bank of Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of Toxocara canis in local districts in North West Bank of Palestine. Fecal samples from 132 dogs were collected in Nablus, Tulkarm, and Jenin cities from September 2008 to April 2009 and examined for T. canis eggs with the floating technique. The overall infection rate of toxocariasis in dogs was 36.4%. The dogs less than 6 months old showed higher infection rates than those older than 12 months (P=0.04). Vigorous interventions are necessary, such as routine coprological examinations of dogs and prescription of anthelmintics to infected dogs. PMID:21738276

  1. Molecular epidemiology of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in Jericho and its vicinity in Palestine from 1994 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Al-Jawabreh, A; Dumaidi, K; Ereqat, S; Al-Jawabreh, H; Nasereddin, A; Azmi, K; Barghuthy, F; Sawalha, S; Salah, I; Abdeen, Z

    2017-06-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniases (CL) are vector-borne parasitic diseases endemic in many countries of the Middle East including Palestine. Between 1994 and 2015, 2160 clinically suspected human cases of CL from the Jericho District were examined. Stained skin tissue smears and aspirates were checked by microscopy and cultured for promastigotes, respectively. For leishmanial species identification, amplification products from a PCR-ITS1 followed by RFLP analysis using Hae III. Data were analyzed using Epi Info free-software. The overall infection rate was 41.4% (895/2160), 56.3% (504/895) of the cases were male, 43.7% (391/895) female, 60.5% (514/849) children under age 14, 41.3% (259/627) of the cases were caused by Leishmaniamajor and 57.3% (359/627) by Leishmaniatropica. The case numbers peaked in 1995, 2001, 2004, and 2012. Statistically-significant clusters of cases caused by L. major were restricted to the Jericho District; those caused by L. tropica were from the districts of Jericho, Bethlehem, Nablus and Tubas. CL is seasonal and trails the sand fly season. Distribution of cases was parabolic with fewest in July. The monthly total number of cases of CL and just those caused by L. major correlated significantly with temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, evaporation, wind speed and sunshine (P<0.05, r(2)=0.7-0.9 and P<0.05, r(2)=0.5-0.8, respectively). Cases caused by L. tropica, significantly, had a single lesion compared to cases caused by L. major (P=0.0001), which, significantly, had multiple lesions (P=0.0001). This and previous studies showed that CL is present in all Palestinian districts. The surveillance of CL has increased public awareness and molecular biological methodology for leishmanial species identification is an essential addition to classical diagnosis. The overall results are discussed, correlated to climatic and environmental changes and large-scale human activities.

  2. The Effect of Using the "SQP2RS via WTL" Strategy through Science Context to 10th Graders' Reading Comprehension in English in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qabaja, Ziad Mohammed Mahmoud; Nafi', Jamal Subhi Ismail; Abu-Nimah, Maisa' Issa Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the effect of using the "SQP2RS via WTL" strategy through science context to 10th graders' reading comprehension in English in Bethlehem district in Palestine. The study has been applied on a purposeful sample of 10th grade students at public schools in Bethlehem district in the academic year 2015/2016.…

  3. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  5. The Rh allele frequencies in Gaza city in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    EL-Wahhab Skaik, Younis Abed

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Rh blood group system is the second most clinically significant blood group system. It includes 49 antigens, but only five (D, C, E, c and e) are the most routinely identified due to their unique relation to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) and transfusion reactions. Frequency of the Rh alleles showed variation, with regard to race and ethnic. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to document the Rh alleles’ frequencies amongst males (M) and females (F) in Gaza city in Palestine. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-two blood samples (110 M and 122 F) were tested against monoclonal IgM anti-C,anti-c, anti-E, anti-e and a blend of monoclonal/polyclonal IgM/IgG anti-D. The expected Rh phenotypes were calculated using gene counting method. Results: The most frequent Rh antigen in the total sample was e, while the least frequent was E.The order of the combined Rh allele frequencies in both M and F was CDe > cDe > cde > CdE > cDE > Cde > CDE. A significant difference was reported between M and F regarding the phenotypic frequencies (P < 0.05). However, no significance (P > 0.05) was reported with reference to the observed and expected Rh phenotypic frequencies in either M or F students. Conclusion: It was concluded that the Rh antigens, alleles and phenotypes in Gaza city have unique frequencies, which may be of importance to the Blood Transfusion Center in Gaza city and anthropology. PMID:21897594

  6. Causes of traumatic brain injury in patients admitted to Rafidia, Al-Ittihad and the specialized Arab hospitals, Palestine, 2006?2007.

    PubMed

    Younis, Rafif; Younis, Mustafa; Hamidi, Samer; Musmar, Mohamed; Mawson, Anthony R

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Al-Aqsa Intifada created a war situation in Palestine, increasing the number of firearms injuries caused by occupying Israeli forces as well as disabling head injuries. No data were available to the Palestinian Ministry of Health and other health organizations on traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Palestine. This study, therefore, sought to determine the causes and outcomes of TBI in patients who were admitted to three hospitals in Nablus, Palestine. Retrospective review of medical records and contacts with patients and/or caregivers. The medical records of patients who were diagnosed with TBI (n=312) and admitted to any one of the three hospitals in 2006 and 2007 were reviewed. Data were also obtained from follow-up home visits and telephone calls with consenting patients and/or caregivers. The major causes of TBI were assault (33%), falls (32.1%), road traffic crashes (29.8%) and impacts from heavy objects (3.2%). Gunshot wounds are a major cause of head injury in Palestine. The study shows that assault with firearms is the most frequent cause of TBI in this population and that patients with head injuries due to assault have poorer outcomes at discharge than those injured in other ways.

  7. Challenges for nurses who work in community mental health centres in the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Marie, Mohammad; Hannigan, Ben; Jones, Aled

    2017-01-01

    Nurses in Palestine (occupied Palestinian territory) work in a significantly challenging environment. The mental health care system is underdeveloped and under-resourced. For example, the total number of nurses who work in community mental health centres in the West Bank is seventeen, clearly insufficient in a total population of approximately three million. This research explored daily challenges that Palestinian community mental health nurses (CMHNs) face within and outside their demanding workplaces. An interpretive qualitative design was chosen. Face-to-face interviews were completed with fifteen participants. Thirty-two hours of observations of the day-to-day working environment and workplace routines were conducted in two communities' mental health centres. Written documents relating to practical job-related policies were also collected from various workplaces. Thematic analysis was used across all data sources resulting in four main themes, which describe the challenges faced by CMHNs. These themes consist of the context of unrest, stigma, lack of resources, and organisational or mental health system challenges. The study concludes with a better understanding of challenges in nursing which draws on wider cultural contexts and resilience. The outcomes from this study can be used to decrease the challenges for health professionals and enhance the mental health care system in Palestine.

  8. Detection and molecular identification of Hepatozoon canis and Babesia vogeli from domestic dogs in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Abdelkader, Ahmad; Zaid, Taher; Ereqat, Suheir; Sawalha, Samer S; Baneth, Gad; Abdeen, Ziad

    2017-04-01

    Dogs serve as hosts for a great number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. This study aimed to observe tick borne pathogens in dogs from Palestine including Hepatozoon canis and Babesia species. The prevalence of both H. canis and Babesia species infections in apparently healthy dogs, from ten districts of the West Bank was surveyed. DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from dogs (n = 362) and ticks (n = 213) collected from dogs (n = 77). A primer set that amplifies a partial sequence of the Babesia and Hepatozoon 18S rRNA gene was used for PCR and the DNA sequences of the PCR products of all samples were determined. Twenty-nine (8·0%) of the dogs were found infected including 20 with H. canis (5·5%), seven with Babesia vogeli (1·9%) and two with undefined Babesia spp. (0·6%). Twelve Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l ticks were pathogen-positive, including ten with H. canis (4·7%), one with B. vogeli (0·5%), and one with Hepatozoon felis (0·5%). The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens is circulating in the canine population in the surveyed region. This study is the first report on the prevalence of H. canis, B. vogeli and Babesia spp. in dogs in Palestine and its results will assist in the management of diseases associated with these blood parasites.

  9. Digestion of nectar and insects by Palestine sunbirds.

    PubMed

    Roxburgh, Lizanne; Pinshow, Berry

    2002-01-01

    In nectarivorous birds, specialization for feeding on nectar has led to a simple gut structure with high sugar digestive efficiencies and rapid gut passage rates. These features of the digestive system may make digestion of more complex, protein-rich food sources, such as pollen or insects, less efficient. In this light, we hypothesized that sugar metabolizability in nectarivorous Palestine sunbirds (Nectarinia osea) would be high, whereas nitrogen metabolizability would be lower than typically found for birds. We measured glucose and fructose apparent metabolizabilities (*MCs) and transit times (TTs) in eight Palestine sunbirds offered either a 10% or a 50% mixed sugar diet. *MC for glucose (99.9%+/-0.1%) was significantly greater than for fructose (99.6%+/-0.4%; ANOVA; P<0.001). TT for the 10% sugar diet (26.3+/-10.1 min) was significantly shorter than for the 50% sugar diet (47.0+/-7.8 min). We measured nitrogen true metabolizability (MC) and TT in Palestine sunbirds offered a daily fruit fly intake of either 40 or 200 flies. Nitrogen MC was not significantly different between diets, and average MC for both diets was 58.5%+/-8.5% (n=8). TT was not significantly different when birds ate 10 flies (50.1+/-13.6 min) than when they ate 50 flies (48.5+/-16.5 min). The high sugar *MC and relatively rapid TT of nectar in Palestine sunbirds are similar to those found for other nectarivorous species. Transit times of insect material are longer that those found in small insectivorous species. However, MCs of insect material are lower. Thus, even though sunbirds consume easily digestible soft-bodied insects, they are less efficient at extracting protein than nonnectarivores.

  10. Cohort monitoring of persons with diabetes mellitus in a primary healthcare clinic for Palestine refugees in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khader, Ali; Farajallah, Loai; Shahin, Yousef; Hababeh, Majed; Abu-Zayed, Ishtaiwi; Kochi, Arata; Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Venter, Wendy; Seita, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    To illustrate the method of cohort reporting of persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary healthcare clinic in Amman, Jordan, serving Palestine refugees with the aim of improving quality of DM care services. A descriptive study using quarterly and cumulative case findings, as well as cumulative and 12-month analyses of cohort outcomes collected through E-Health in UNRWA Nuzha Primary Health Care Clinic. There were 55 newly registered patients with DM in quarter 1, 2012, and a total of 2851 patients with DM ever registered on E-Health because this was established in 2009. By 31 March 2012, 70% of 2851 patients were alive in care, 18% had failed to present to a healthcare worker in the last 3 months and the remainder had died, transferred out or were lost to follow-up. Cumulative and 12-month cohort outcome analysis indicated deficiencies in several components of clinical care: measurement of blood pressure, annual assessments for foot care and blood tests for glucose, cholesterol and renal function. 10-20% of patients with DM in the different cohorts had serious late complications such as blindness, stroke, cardiovascular disease and amputations. Cohort analysis provides data about incidence and prevalence of DM at the clinic level, clinical management performance and prevalence of serious morbidity. It needs to be more widely applied for the monitoring and management of non-communicable chronic diseases. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Intrinsic vulnerability, hazard and risk mapping for karst aquifers: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimi, Ziad A.; Assi, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    SummaryGroundwater from karst aquifers is among the most important resources of drinking water supply of the worldwide population. The European COST action 620 proposed a comprehensive approach to karst groundwater protection, comprising methods of intrinsic and specific vulnerability mapping, hazard and risk mapping. This paper presents the first application of all components of this European approach to the groundwater underlying the Ramallah district, a karst hydrogeology system in Palestine. The vulnerability maps which were developed can assist in the implementation of groundwater management strategies to prevent degradation of groundwater quality. Large areas in the case study area can be classified as low or very low risk area corresponding to the pollution sources due to the absence of hazards and also due to low vulnerabilities. These areas could consequently be interesting for future development as they are preferable in view of ground water protection.

  12. 3 CFR - Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization Office Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Presidential Determination No. 2009-17 of April 9, 2009 Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine...

  13. 3 CFR - Waiver of and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization Office Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Presidential Determination No. 2010-1 of October 8, 2009 Waiver of and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine...

  14. 3 CFR - Waiver of and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Waiver of and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization Office Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Presidential Determination No. 2010-05 of April 7, 2010 Waiver of and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine...

  15. Case Studies Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, David M.

    The case histories of five students enrolled in a university course in how to study are reported. The students ranged in age from 18 to 35, included two males and three females, and varied in school experience from no college in one case and some college in two cases to college degrees in two cases. Students were initially taught to chart their…

  16. Case study research.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth; Thomas-Gregory, Annette

    2015-06-10

    This article describes case study research for nursing and healthcare practice. Case study research offers the researcher an approach by which a phenomenon can be investigated from multiple perspectives within a bounded context, allowing the researcher to provide a 'thick' description of the phenomenon. Although case study research is a flexible approach for the investigation of complex nursing and healthcare issues, it has methodological challenges, often associated with the multiple methods used in individual studies. These are explored through examples of case study research carried out in practice and education settings. An overview of what constitutes 'good' case study research is proposed.

  17. Molecular detection and genotyping of enteroviruses from CSF samples of patients with suspected sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis from 2012 to 2015 in West Bank, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Dumaidi, Kamal; Al-Jawabreh, Amer

    2017-01-01

    Background Human enteroviruses (HEVs) are the most frequently reported cause of aseptic meningitis with or without CSF pleocytosis in childhood. Rapid detection and genotype of HEVs is essential to determine the causative agent and variant causing sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. Aim To investigate the molecular epidemiology of enteroviruses (EVs) among patients with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis admitted to three major hospitals in West Bank, Palestine from 2012 to 2015. Methods During the study period, 356 CSF samples were collected from patients with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. Two RT-nested PCR assays targeting a partial part of 5'UTR for direct diagnosis and the VP1 region for genotyping by sequence analysis of the viral genome were used. Results HEV RNA was detected in 66 of 356 (18.5%) of CSF samples. Age distribution showed that 64% (42/66) were infants (<1 year), 18% were children between 1 and 5 years old, 12% were children between 5 and 10 years old, and 6% were more than 10 years old. Of the 66 EV cases, 12 were successfully genotyped. Five different EV genotypes were identified. All of them belonged to HEV-B species. The study showed that echovirus 6 genotype accounted for 42% of the sequenced cases. The HEV infections in the present study tended to show slight seasonal pattern with more cases occurring during spring and summer, yet still significant numbers were also reported in fall and winter seasons. Conclusion HEV was isolated from a significant number of children with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. In addition, the molecular method utilized for direct diagnosis and genotyping of HEV from CSF revealed that more than one HEV type circulated in the West Bank, Palestine during the study period. PMID:28225788

  18. Molecular detection and genotyping of enteroviruses from CSF samples of patients with suspected sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis from 2012 to 2015 in West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Dumaidi, Kamal; Al-Jawabreh, Amer

    2017-01-01

    Human enteroviruses (HEVs) are the most frequently reported cause of aseptic meningitis with or without CSF pleocytosis in childhood. Rapid detection and genotype of HEVs is essential to determine the causative agent and variant causing sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. To investigate the molecular epidemiology of enteroviruses (EVs) among patients with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis admitted to three major hospitals in West Bank, Palestine from 2012 to 2015. During the study period, 356 CSF samples were collected from patients with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. Two RT-nested PCR assays targeting a partial part of 5'UTR for direct diagnosis and the VP1 region for genotyping by sequence analysis of the viral genome were used. HEV RNA was detected in 66 of 356 (18.5%) of CSF samples. Age distribution showed that 64% (42/66) were infants (<1 year), 18% were children between 1 and 5 years old, 12% were children between 5 and 10 years old, and 6% were more than 10 years old. Of the 66 EV cases, 12 were successfully genotyped. Five different EV genotypes were identified. All of them belonged to HEV-B species. The study showed that echovirus 6 genotype accounted for 42% of the sequenced cases. The HEV infections in the present study tended to show slight seasonal pattern with more cases occurring during spring and summer, yet still significant numbers were also reported in fall and winter seasons. HEV was isolated from a significant number of children with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. In addition, the molecular method utilized for direct diagnosis and genotyping of HEV from CSF revealed that more than one HEV type circulated in the West Bank, Palestine during the study period.

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Palestine Quadrangle, Texas and Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    McGowen, M.; Basciano, J.; Fose, F.G. Jr.; Fisher, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    The uranium resource potential of the Palestine Quadrangle, Texas and Louisiana, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m (5000 ft) using criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Data derived from geochemical analyses of surface samples (substrate, soil, and stream sediment) in conjunction with hydrochemical data from water wells were used to evaluate geologic environments as being favorable or unfavorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Two favorable environments have been identified in the Palestine Quadrangle: potential deposits of modified Texas roll-type in fluvial channels and associated facies within the Yegua Formation, and potential occurrences along mineralization fronts associated with the Elkhart Graben and Mount Enterprise fault system. Unfavorable environments include: Cretaceous shales and limestones, Tertiary fine-grained marine sequences, Tertiary sandstone units that exhibit favorable host-rock characteristics but fail to show significant syngenetic or epigenetic mineralization, and Quaternary sands and gravels. Unevaluated units include the Woodbine Group (Upper Cretaceous), Jackson Group (Tertiary), and Catahoula Formation (Tertiary). The subsurface interval of the Jackson Group and Catahoula Formation contains depositional facies that may represent favorable environments; however, the evaluation of these units is inconclusive because of the general lack of shallow subsurface control and core material. The Woodbine Group, restricted to the subsurface except for a small exposure over Palestine Dome, occurs above 1500 m (5000 ft) in the northwest quarter of the quadrangle. The unit exhibits favorable host-rock characteristics, but the paucity of gamma logs and cores, as well as the lack of hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data, makes evaluation of the unit difficult.

  20. Increasing Neonatal Mortality among Palestine Refugees in the Gaza Strip

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Maartje M.; Madi, Haifa H.; Khader, Ali; Hababeh, Majed; Zeidan, Wafa’a; Wesley, Hannah; Abd El-Kader, Mariam; Maqadma, Mohamed; Seita, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has periodically estimated infant mortality rates among Palestine refugees in Gaza. These surveys have recorded a decline from 127 per 1000 live births in 1960 to 20.2 in 2008. Methods We used the same preceding-birth technique as in previous surveys. All multiparous mothers who came to the 22 UNRWA health centres to register their last-born child for immunization were asked if their preceding child was alive or dead. We based our target sample size on the infant mortality rate in 2008 and included 3128 mothers from August until October 2013. We used multiple logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of infant mortality. Findings Infant mortality in 2013 was 22.4 per 1000 live births compared with 20.2 in 2008 (p = 0.61), and this change reflected a statistically significant increase in neonatal mortality (from 12.0 to 20.3 per 1000 live births, p = 0.01). The main causes of the 65 infant deaths were preterm birth (n = 25, 39%), congenital anomalies (n = 19, 29%), and infections (n = 12, 19%). Risk factors for infant death were preterm birth (OR 9.88, 3.98–24.85), consanguinity (2.41, 1.35–4.30) and high-risk pregnancies (3.09, 1.46–6.53). Conclusion For the first time in five decades, mortality rates have increased among Palestine refugee newborns in Gaza. The possible causes of this trend may include inadequate neonatal care. We will estimate infant and neonatal mortality rates again in 2015 to see if this trend continues and, if so, to assess how it can be reversed. PMID:26241479

  1. Increasing Neonatal Mortality among Palestine Refugees in the Gaza Strip.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Maartje M; Madi, Haifa H; Khader, Ali; Hababeh, Majed; Zeidan, Wafa'a; Wesley, Hannah; Abd El-Kader, Mariam; Maqadma, Mohamed; Seita, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has periodically estimated infant mortality rates among Palestine refugees in Gaza. These surveys have recorded a decline from 127 per 1000 live births in 1960 to 20.2 in 2008. We used the same preceding-birth technique as in previous surveys. All multiparous mothers who came to the 22 UNRWA health centres to register their last-born child for immunization were asked if their preceding child was alive or dead. We based our target sample size on the infant mortality rate in 2008 and included 3128 mothers from August until October 2013. We used multiple logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of infant mortality. Infant mortality in 2013 was 22.4 per 1000 live births compared with 20.2 in 2008 (p = 0.61), and this change reflected a statistically significant increase in neonatal mortality (from 12.0 to 20.3 per 1000 live births, p = 0.01). The main causes of the 65 infant deaths were preterm birth (n = 25, 39%), congenital anomalies (n = 19, 29%), and infections (n = 12, 19%). Risk factors for infant death were preterm birth (OR 9.88, 3.98-24.85), consanguinity (2.41, 1.35-4.30) and high-risk pregnancies (3.09, 1.46-6.53). For the first time in five decades, mortality rates have increased among Palestine refugee newborns in Gaza. The possible causes of this trend may include inadequate neonatal care. We will estimate infant and neonatal mortality rates again in 2015 to see if this trend continues and, if so, to assess how it can be reversed.

  2. On continuity case studies.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, David; Lombardo, Timothy

    This article is divided into three sections. The first section provides a taxonomy of case studies within the field of business continuity along with a brief commentary. The second section discusses the proper use of case studies in general pedagogy and provides research-based recommendations for their employment. The third section provides suggestions and examples of how business continuity case studies might be utilised specifically for instruction in the discipline of business continuity planning.

  3. beta(S)-Globin gene cluster haplotypes in the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Samarah, Fekri; Ayesh, Suhail; Athanasiou, Miranda; Christakis, John; Vavatsi, Norma

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder of the beta-globin chain. In Palestine it is accompanied by a low level of Hb F (mean 5.14%) and a severe clinical presentation. In this study, 59 Palestinian patients, homozygotes for Hb S were studied for their haplotype background. Eight polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were examined. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 88.1%, followed by a frequency of 5.1% for the Bantu haplotype. One chromosome was found to carry the Cameroon haplotype (0.85%). Three atypical haplotypes were also found (5.95%). Heterogeneity was observed in Hb F production, ranging between 1.5 and 17.0%, whereas the (G)gamma ratio was homogeneous among all haplotypes with a normal amount of about 41%. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of the Benin haplotype origin in the Mediterranean.

  4. [Case and studies].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-11-15

    Case studies and case reports form an important and ever growing part of scientific and scholarly literature. The paper deals with the share and citation rate of these publication types on different fields of research. In general, evidence seems to support the opinion that an excessive number of such publications may negatively influence the impact factor of the journal. In the literature of scientometrics, case studies (at least the presence of the term "case study" in the titles of the papers) have a moderate share, but their citation rate is practically equal to that of other publication types.

  5. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through…

  6. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  7. Work Sharing Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Maureen E.; And Others

    Designed to provide private sector employers with the practical information necessary to select and then to design and implement work sharing arrangements, this book presents case studies of some 36 work sharing programs. Topics covered in the case studies include the circumstances leading to adoption of the program, details of compensation and…

  8. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  9. Compliance with and knowledge about diabetes guidelines among physicians and nurses in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sharif, N El; Samara, I; Titi, I; Awartani, A

    2016-02-01

    Guidelines for the care of patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to improve clinical practice and patient care. This study aimed to analyse the pattern of diabetes care by physicians and nurses in primary care clinics in Palestine and their self-reported compliance with the local Palestinian guidelines. Questionnaires were used to collect data from 401 participants in 3 governorates in the West Bank. In total, 46.0% of participants knew about the existence of the Palestinian guidelines and about 60% believed these were partially used; 32.7% had received training on implementation of the guidelines. Multivariate analysis showed that training on the guidelines was the only factor significantly associated with self-reported compliance with guideline use. Respondents reported high commitment to the use of the guidelines, but their attitudes and behaviour varied with time constraints, availability of the guidelines, availability of laboratory tests and training on how to apply the guidelines.

  10. Workers' safety in the construction industry in the southern West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Sari, M I; Al-Khatib, I A

    2012-10-01

    There are few data about safety in the construction industry in Palestine. The main aim of the study was to assess worker's experiences and perceptions of safety at construction sites in Hebron and Bethlehem governorates of the West Bank. A structured questionnaire was completed through direct interviews with 349 construction workers. Of the respondents, 34.6% had experienced work-related accidents, 13.0% and 65.6% indicated that their workplace did not have a first-aid kit or trained first-aid specialist respectively, 35.8% reported that their work sites did not have safety tools and 83.7% had not received safety training. Workers perceived that awareness and training were the most frequent factor affecting workers' safety, with the foreman position having the greatest impact on the workers' safety. Greater enforcement of the current Palestinian safety laws is needed.

  11. Mental health needs and services in the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Marie, Mohammad; Hannigan, Ben; Jones, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Palestine is a low income country with scarce resources, which is seeking independence. This paper discusses the high levels of mental health need found amongst Palestinian people, and examines services, education and research in this area with particular attention paid to the West Bank. CINAHL, PubMed, and Science Direct were used to search for materials. Evidence from this review is that there is a necessity to increase the availability and quality of mental health care. Mental health policy and services in Palestine need development in order to better meet the needs of service users and professionals. It is essential to raise awareness of mental health and increase the integration of mental health services with other areas of health care. Civilians need their basic human needs met, including having freedom of movement and seeing an end to the occupation. There is a need to enhance the resilience and capacity of community mental health teams. There is a need to increase resources and offer more support, up-to-date training and supervision to mental health teams.

  12. A retrospective analysis of eye conditions among children attending St. John Eye Hospital, Hebron, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Banayot, Riyad G

    2016-04-05

    Eye diseases are important causes of medical consultations, with the spectrum varying in different regions. This hospital-based descriptive study aimed to determine the profile of childhood eye conditions at St. John tertiary Eye hospital serving in Hebron, Palestine. Files of all new patients less than 16 years old who presented to St. John Eye Hospital-Hebron, Palestine between January 2013 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Age at presentation, sex, and clinical diagnosis were extracted from medical records. Data were stored and analyzed using Wizard data analysis version 1.6.0 by Evan Miller. The Chi square test was used to compare variables and a p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. We evaluated the records of 1102 patients, with a female: male ratio of 1:1.1. Patients aged 0-5 years old were the largest group (40.2%). Refractive errors were the most common ocular disorders seen (31.6%), followed by conjunctival diseases (23.7%) and strabismus and amblyopia (13.8%). Refractive errors were recorded more frequently and statistically significant (p < 0.001) among (11-15) age group. Within the conjunctival diseases category, conjunctivitis and dry eyes was more prominent and statistically significant (p < 0.001) among the 6-10 year old age group. Within the strabismus and amblyopia category, convergent strabismus was more common and statistically significant among the youngest age group (0-5 years old). The most common causes of ocular morbidity are largely treatable or preventable. These results suggest the need for awareness campaigns and early intervention programs.

  13. Detection of NDM-2-producing Acinetobacter baumannii and VIM-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, Isabella; Hansen, Frank; Elmanama, Abdelraouf; Khayyat, Rasha; Abu-Zant, Alaeddin; Hussein, Ayman; Taha, Adham Abu; Hammerum, Anette M; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to screen for carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Palestine and subsequently to identify and investigate the mechanisms of resistance. For a period of 6 weeks, all Gram-negative isolates were collected from six Palestinian hospital laboratories and were tested for susceptibility using 10μg meropenem disks. Isolates showing resistance to meropenem were further investigated. The presence of carbapenemases was assessed by PCR. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, an efflux pump inhibitor assay and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Isolates producing carbapenemases were further investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In total, 248 Gram-negative isolates were collected from the six laboratories. Among the 248 tested isolates, 15 Acinetobacter baumannii and 6 Pseudomonas aeruginosa were resistant to meropenem. One A. baumannii from Gaza produced NDM-2 and belonged to ST103. Thirteen of the carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates possessed the intrinsic upregulated blaOXA-66 gene and one isolate carried blaOXA-51. All but one of the OXA-66-producing A. baumannii belonged to ST2; the remaining isolate belonged to ST183. One of the carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa was classified as VIM-4-producing and three were VIM-2-producing isolates. The three VIM-2-producing isolates belonged to three new sequences types (ST1562, ST1563 and ST1564). All of the carbapenemase-producing isolates were multiresistant non-fermenters. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on NDM-producing A. baumannii and VIM-producing P. aeruginosa from Palestine. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Septic Systems Case Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A collection of septic systems case studies to help community planners, elected officials, health department staff, state officials, and interested citizens explore alternatives for managing their decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

  15. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  16. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  17. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  18. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  19. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Incomplete Victory: General Allenby and Mission Command in Palestine, 1917-1918

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    enemy armies. The EEF advanced to Damascus and Aleppo , destroying any Turkish resistance in Palestine.8...time he destroyed three Turkish armies in the Megiddo campaign and the advance to Aleppo , the war changed on the Western Front, and the Ottoman...Armies, driving the Ottoman Empire out of Palestine. The fast-paced battle allowed the EEF to drive all the way to Damascus and Aleppo , leaving the

  1. Distance Learning Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    The Office of Technology Assessment authorized a series of case studies in 1989 to investigate how technologies, services, and programs are implemented in distance education projects. The studies were also intended to look at the role of local, state, and federal agencies, and other public and private entities in providing educational services to…

  2. Determination of trace heavy metals in harvested rainwater used for drinking in Hebron (south West Bank, Palestine) by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Malassa, Husam; Al-Rimawi, Fuad; Al-Khatib, Mahmoud; Al-Qutob, Mutaz

    2014-10-01

    Rainwater samples harvested for drinking from the west part of Hebron (south of West Bank in Palestine), the largest city in the West Bank, were analyzed for the content of different trace heavy metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Ag, Cd, Bi, and Pb) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This study was conducted to determine the water quality of harvested rainwater used for drinking of south West Bank (case study, Hebron area). A total of 44 water samples were collected in November 2012 from 44 house cisterns used to collect rainwater from the roofs of houses. The samples were analyzed for their pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, and different heavy metal contents. The pH of all water samples was within the US Environmental Protection Agency limits (6.5-8.5), while some water samples were found to exceed the allowed WHO limit for total dissolved solids (TDSs) in drinking water. Results showed that concentrations of the heavy metals vary significantly between the 44 samples. Results also showed that the concentration of five heavy metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Ag, and Pb) is higher than the WHO limits for these heavy metals in drinking water. Overall, our findings revealed that harvested rainwater used for drinking of this part of south West Bank is contaminated with heavy metals that might affect human health.

  3. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  4. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  5. Ethnopharmacological survey of medicinal plants practiced by traditional healers and herbalists for treatment of some urological diseases in the West Bank/Palestine.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Nidal Amin; Zaid, Abdel Naser; Al-Ramahi, Rowa; Alqub, Malik A; Hussein, Fatima; Hamdan, Zakaria; Mustafa, Mahmoud; Qneibi, Mohammad; Ali, Iyad

    2017-05-08

    Throughout history, every civilization in the world used plants or their derivatives for treatment or prevention of diseases. In Palestine as in many other countries, herbal medicines are broadly used in the treatment of wide range of diseases including urological diseases. The main objective of this research is to study the use of herbal remedies by herbalists and traditional healers for treatment of various urological diseases in the West Bank regions of Palestine and to assess their efficacy and safety through the literature review of the most cited plants. The study included a survey part, plant identification and a review study. The first part was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Face to face questionnaires were distributed to 150 traditional healers and herbalist in all regions of the West Bank of Palestine. The literature review part was to assess the most cited plants for their efficacy and toxicity. One hundred forty four herbalists and traditional healers accepted to participate in this study which was conducted between March and April, 2016. The results showed that 57 plant species belonging to 30 families were used by herbalists and traditional healers for treatment of various urinary tract diseases in Palestine. Of these, Apiaceae family was the most prevalent. Paronychia argentea, Plantago ovata, Punica granatum, Taraxacum syriacum, Morus alba and Foeniculum vulgare were the most commonly used plant species in the treatment of kidney stones, while Capsella bursa-pastoris, Ammi visnaga and Ammi majus were the most recommended species for treatment of urinary tract infections and Portulaca oleracea used for renal failure. In addition Curcuma longa and Crocus sativus were used for enuresis while Juglans regia, Quercus infectoria, Sambucus ebulus and Zea mays were used for treatment symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia. Fruits were the most common parts used, and a decoction was the most commonly used method of preparation. Through literature

  6. Qualitative Case Study Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    methods in public relations and marketing communications. New York, Routledge 166-185 13. Denzin , N. K. (1978) The Research Act: A Theoretical...Introduction to Sociological Methods. 2nd ed. New York, McGraw-Hill 14. Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (2011) The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative...The Art of Science. In: Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, Sage 19. GAO (1990) Case Study

  7. Remediation case studies: Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing bioremediation. This volume contains reports on nine projects that include bioventing and land treatment technologies, as well as a unique, large-scale slurry-phase project. In these projects, petroleum hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants of concern. Two land treatment projects in this volume represent completed cleanups at creosote sites.

  8. Hydrogeochemical investigation of groundwater in Jericho area in the Jordan Valley, West Bank, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da'as, Ammar; Walraevens, Kristine

    2013-06-01

    Water resources in the Middle East, particularly in Palestine, are extremely scarce and costly. The Jordan Valley is a fertile productive region, described as the food basket of Palestine. Groundwater originating from the Quaternary Aquifer System forms the main water resource in the Jordan Valley. However, the quality of this groundwater is threatened mainly by the high chloride concentration. The most representative area of the Jordan Valley is Jericho area, which was chosen to be the study area. The study area (65 km2) is almost a flat area with a gentle decline towards the east. It is the lowest land on earth with ground levels reaching 400 meters below sea level (mbsl) near the Dead Sea shores. The Quaternary Aquifer System in the study area could be divided into an upper alluvial layer with thickness varying from 40 to 150 m and a lower low-permeable Lisan layer, which crops out in the eastern part of the study area with thickness over 200 m. Hydrogeochemical investigation reveals that the water is generally earth alkaline with higher content of earth alkalis and prevailing chloride. According to Stuyfzand (1986) and Piper's (1944) classification systems, water type in the Alluvial Aquifer varies from fresh hard CaMgHCO3 or MgCaHCO3 water in the west and northwest to brackish very-hard MgNaCl or NaMgCl in the middle. In the east, the water becomes brackish-salt extremely-hard MgNaCl or NaCl. Groundwater quality is deteriorating (increase in salinity) spatially towards the east and vertically with increasing depth (when nearing the Lisan Formation). As an indication of groundwater salinity, total dissolved solids show some variability with time over the last 21 years (1983-2004). In short-time scale, there are high seasonal and yearly fluctuations with regard to salinity, specifically in Cl- and SO42- contents. Spring water from the Upper Cenomanian Aquifer (CaHCO3) represents the fresh end member, while Rift Valley Brines (RVB-CaNaCl) and Dead Sea Brines (DSB

  9. Exploration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Jimmy M.

    1989-04-01

    NASA's Office of Exploration has undertaken four case studies for prospective expansion of manned space activities beyond earth orbit. The subjects of these studies are (1) an expedition to the Martian moon Phobos; (2) a three-mission expedition to Mars; (3) the construction of a man-tended lunar observatory; and (4) the construction of a lunar outpost to serve as the basis for construction of a Martian outpost. The fourth alternative would follow the recommendation of the National Commission on Space for the creation of a 'bridge between worlds' in which explorers would develop ways in which to 'live off the land' in a space environment.

  10. Knowledge and practices of pesticide use among farm workers in the West Bank, Palestine: safety implications

    PubMed Central

    Sawalha, Ansam F.; Sweileh, Waleed M.; Awang, Rahmat; Al-Khalil, Suleiman I.; Al-Jabi, Samah W.; Bsharat, Nihaia M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge and practices associated with pesticide use in an agricultural community in Palestine, and to determine the prevalence of self-reported health symptoms related to pesticide exposure. Methods In this cross-sectional questionnaire study, agricultural farm workers in Nablus district, Palestine, were interviewed on their knowledge and practices of pesticide use. Comparisons of knowledge and practices of pesticide use between various groups were performed using the Mann–Whitney U-test or the Kruskal–Wallis rank test of variance. The program of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15 was used for data analysis. Results The questionnaire was completed by 381 farm workers. The mean age ± SD of the participants was 38.8 ± 11.8 years. The majority (97.9%) of the participants were male. The mean participant scores for knowledge and safety procedures were 2.8 ± 3.2 out of 8 and 9.8 ± 2.4 out of 15, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.323; P < 0.001) between the knowledge and safety procedure scores. Unsafe behaviors were identified as the storage of pesticide products at home, the preparation of pesticides in the kitchen, inadequate disposal of empty pesticide containers, eating and drinking during pesticide application, and using inadequate protective clothing. The most frequent self-reported toxicity symptoms associated with pesticide use were skin rash (37.5%), headache (37%), excessive sweating (24.9%), and diarrhea (21.3%). There was a strong significant negative correlation (r = −0.83; P < 0.001) between self-reported toxicity symptoms and scores for protective measures. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that most farm workers in this district need more educational programs regarding the safety and use of pesticides. Legislation promoting the use of safer pesticides is also needed. PMID:21432553

  11. The Epidemiology of Anti-Sperm Antibodies Among Couples with Unexplained Infertility in North West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Anas Lotfi; Yasin, Ahmad Lotfi; Basha, Walid Salim

    2016-03-01

    Anti sperm antibodies (ASA) can present in serum and semen and they may lead to impair the sperms function leading to infertility. The precise mechanism of generation of these antibodies is yet to be discovered. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in patients with unexplained infertility. The study was initiated also to explore the possible factors that may associate with ASA formation and how ASA status is associated with pregnancy rates after going with in vitro fertilization - intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI). A cross-sectional study was conducted on 42 normal infertile couples consulting Razan Medical Center for Infertility & I.V.F. in Nablus, Palestine, from December 2012 - March 2013. Serum levels of immunoglobulins G (IgG) ASA were measured in participants (males and females) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, participants also filled a questionnaire about the presence of previous varicocele repair, inguinal hernia repair, orchitis, testicular trauma and vasectomy reversal among males and severe coitus bleeding and coitus during menses or puerperium among females. Couples were also asked about previous IVF-ICSI procedures and the outcome of the procedure in terms of either they got pregnant or not. Data was analysed using SPSS software. The prevalence of ASA was 14.3% (6/42) among all couples, 9.5% (4/42) among males and 4.8% (2/42) among females. There was no significant relationship between previous varicocele repair, previous inguinal hernia repair, or orchitis and formation of ASA (p value =0.64, 0.56, and 0.26 respectively). Previous trauma, vasovasostomy, severe coitus bleeding and coitus during menses or puerperium were not observed in any of the study sample. ASA did not seem to affect the outcome of IVF-ICSI (p-value =0.54). Prevalence of ASA in infertile couples in the north part of Palestine is similar to that obtained worldwide. ASA formation does not relate to

  12. The Epidemiology of Anti-Sperm Antibodies Among Couples with Unexplained Infertility in North West Bank, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Yasin, Ahmad Lotfi; Basha, Walid Salim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anti sperm antibodies (ASA) can present in serum and semen and they may lead to impair the sperms function leading to infertility. The precise mechanism of generation of these antibodies is yet to be discovered. Aim This study was performed to determine the prevalence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in patients with unexplained infertility. The study was initiated also to explore the possible factors that may associate with ASA formation and how ASA status is associated with pregnancy rates after going with in vitro fertilization – intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI). Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 42 normal infertile couples consulting Razan Medical Center for Infertility & I.V.F. in Nablus, Palestine, from December 2012 – March 2013. Serum levels of immunoglobulins G (IgG) ASA were measured in participants (males and females) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, participants also filled a questionnaire about the presence of previous varicocele repair, inguinal hernia repair, orchitis, testicular trauma and vasectomy reversal among males and severe coitus bleeding and coitus during menses or puerperium among females. Couples were also asked about previous IVF-ICSI procedures and the outcome of the procedure in terms of either they got pregnant or not. Data was analysed using SPSS software. Results The prevalence of ASA was 14.3% (6/42) among all couples, 9.5% (4/42) among males and 4.8% (2/42) among females. There was no significant relationship between previous varicocele repair, previous inguinal hernia repair, or orchitis and formation of ASA (p value =0.64, 0.56, and 0.26 respectively). Previous trauma, vasovasostomy, severe coitus bleeding and coitus during menses or puerperium were not observed in any of the study sample. ASA did not seem to affect the outcome of IVF-ICSI (p-value =0.54). Conclusion Prevalence of ASA in infertile couples in the north part of Palestine is similar

  13. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  14. Traditional Arabic Palestinian ethnoveterinary practices in animal health care: A field survey in the West Bank (Palestine).

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Jamous, Rania M

    2016-04-22

    In Palestine, medicinal plants have continued to play a vital role in fulfilling animal healthcare needs of rural communities. However, these valuable resources are being depleted mainly due to over-harvesting, inappropriate agricultural practices (e.g., over use of herbicides), agricultural expansion, and over-grazing. Therefore, immediate action is required to conserve these resources and document the associated knowledge. The purpose of this study was, thus, to document and analyze information associated with medicinal plants that are used in managing animal health problems in the West Bank, Palestine. Ethnobotanical data were collected from Apr 2012 to Feb 2014 mainly using semi-structured interviews with informants sampled using purposive sampling technique and through field observations. The study revealed the use of 138 medicinal plant species in the West Bank for the treatment of several livestock diseases, of these 75 species representing 70 genera and 33 families were reported by 3 independent informants or above. Classification of the ethnoveterinary plant species cited by three informants or above used in a rank-order priority (ROP) based on their claimed relative healing potential has demonstrated that the following are the plants with the highest efficacy: Camellia sinenses, Teucrium capitatum, and Salvia fruticosa with ROPs of 97.1, 93.2, and 91.4, respectively, are used primarily to relieve gastric disorders. Gastrointestinal disorders is the disease group in the study area that scored the highest Informant consensus factor (ICF) value (0.90), followed by urinary, and reproductive disorders (0.89). Our study provided evidence that medicinal plants are still playing important role in the management of livestock diseases, and showed that ethnoveterinary plants used in animal health care in Palestine have been also recorded in human Traditional Arabic Palestinian Herbal Medicine (TAPHM), and demonstrated a strong link between human and veterinary

  15. Distribution of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mutations in a Cohort of Patients Residing in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Siryani, Issa; Jama, Mohamed; Rumman, Nisreen; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Kannan, Moein; Lyon, Elaine; Hindiyeh, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited life-threatening disorder that causes severe damage to the lungs and the digestive system. In Palestine, mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator gene (CFTR) that contributes to the clinical presentation of CF are ill defined. A cohort of thirty three clinically diagnosed CF patients from twenty one different Palestinian families residing in the central and southern part of Palestine were incorporated in this study. Sweat chloride testing was performed using the Sweat Chek Conductivity Analyzer (ELITECH Group, France) to confirm the clinical diagnosis of CF. In addition, nucleic acid from the patients' blood samples was extracted and the CFTR mutation profiles were assessed by direct sequencing of the CFTR 27 exons and the intron-exon boundaries. For patient's DNA samples where no homozygous or two heterozygous CFTR mutations were identified by exon sequencing, DNA samples were tested for deletions or duplications using SALSA MLPA probemix P091-D1 CFTR assay. Sweat chloride testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis of CF in those patients. All patients had NaCl conductivity >60 mmol/l. In addition, nine different CFTR mutations were identified in all 21 different families evaluated. These mutations were c.1393-1G>A, F508del, W1282X, G85E, c.313delA, N1303K, deletion exons 17a-17b-18, deletion exons 17a-17b and Q1100P. c.1393-1G>A was shown to be the most frequent occurring mutation among tested families. We have profiled the underling mutations in the CFTR gene of a cohort of 21 different families affected by CF. Unlike other studies from the Arab countries where F508del was reported to be the most common mutation, in southern/central Palestine, the c.1393-1G>A appeared to be the most common. Further studies are needed per sample size and geographic distribution to account for other possible CFTR genetic alterations and their frequencies. Genotype/phenotype assessments are also

  16. Seawater intrusion risk analysis under climate change conditions for the Gaza Strip aquifer (Palestine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni, Marta; Deidda, Roberto; Paniconi, Claudio; Marrocu, Marino; Lecca, Giuditta

    2014-05-01

    Seawater intrusion (SWI) has become a major threat to coastal freshwater resources, particularly in the Mediterranean basin, where this problem is exacerbated by the lack of appropriate groundwater resources management and with serious potential impacts from projected climate changes. A proper analysis and risk assessment that includes climate scenarios is essential for the design of water management measures to mitigate the environmental and socio-economic impacts of SWI. In this study a methodology for SWI risk analysis in coastal aquifers is developed and applied to the Gaza Strip coastal aquifer in Palestine. The method is based on the origin-pathway-target model, evaluating the final value of SWI risk by applying the overlay principle to the hazard map (representing the origin of SWI), the vulnerability map (representing the pathway of groundwater flow) and the elements map (representing the target of SWI). Results indicate the important role of groundwater simulation in SWI risk assessment and illustrate how mitigation measures can be developed according to predefined criteria to arrive at quantifiable expected benefits. Keywords: Climate change, coastal aquifer, seawater intrusion, risk analysis, simulation/optimization model. Acknowledgements. The study is partially funded by the project "Climate Induced Changes on the Hydrology of Mediterranean Basins (CLIMB)", FP7-ENV-2009-1, GA 244151.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Watermelon Chlorotic Stunt Virus (WmCSV) from Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S.; Jamous, Rana M.; Mallah, Omar B.; Abu-Zeitoun, Salam Y.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of watermelon chlorotic stunt disease and molecular characterization of the Palestinian isolate of Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV-[PAL]) are described in this study. Symptomatic leaf samples obtained from watermelon Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants were tested for WmCSV-[PAL] infection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA). Disease incidence ranged between 25%–98% in watermelon fields in the studied area, 77% of leaf samples collected from Jenin were found to be mixed infected with WmCSV-[PAL] and SLCV. The full-length DNA-A and DNA-B genomes of WmCSV-[PAL] were amplified and sequenced, and the sequences were deposited in the GenBank. Sequence analysis of virus genomes showed that DNA-A and DNA-B had 97.6%–99.42% and 93.16%–98.26% nucleotide identity with other virus isolates in the region, respectively. Sequence analysis also revealed that the Palestinian isolate of WmCSV shared the highest nucleotide identity with an isolate from Israel suggesting that the virus was introduced to Palestine from Israel. PMID:24956181

  18. Antioxidant evaluation for Urtica urens, Rumex cyprius and Borago officinalis edible wild plants in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Nidal Amin; Damiri, Basma; Abualhasan, Murad N

    2016-01-01

    Natural plants products are one of the famous and commonly utilized remedies used in fighting diseases. This study was conducted to evaluate antioxidant activity of plants commonly used in Palestine (Urtica urens, Rumex cyprius and Borago officinalis). Free radical scavenging activity method was evaluated by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate. The result show that the overall antioxidant activity of Rumex cyprius was the highest among the plants, followed by Urtica urens, and Borago officinalis; respectively. The (IC(50)) values of the methanolic extracts were 29.70±0.60μg/ml, 5.07±0.49μg/ml, 39.92± 0.52 μg/ml for Urtica urens, Rumex cyprius and Borago officinalis respectively. The results of this study revealed that these edible plants have high antioxidant activity and therefore they can provide natural sources of antioxidants and can be useful in preventing various diseases including cancer. These exhibited properties propose that such plants extracts can possibly be used as natural preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries and further characterization of Rumex cyprius constituents is needed.

  19. PREDICT : A CASE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, W. J. III; Booker, J. M.; Meyer, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and the Los Alamos National Laboratory worked together to develop PREDICT, a new methodology to characterize the reliability of a new product during its development program. Rather than conducting testing after hardware has been built, and developing statistical confidence bands around the results, this updating approach starts with an early reliability estimate characterized by large uncertainty, and then proceeds to reduce the uncertainty by folding in fresh information in a Bayesian framework. A considerable amount of knowledge is available at the beginning of a program in the form of expert judgment which helps to provide the initial estimate. This estimate is then continually updated as substantial and varied information becomes available during the course of the development program. This paper presents a case study of the application of PREDICT, with the objective of further describing the methodology. PREDICT has been honored with an R&D 100 Award presented by R&D Magazine.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and treatment outcomes in Palestine refugees in UNRWA primary health care clinics in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khader, A; Ballout, G; Shahin, Y; Hababeh, M; Farajallah, L; Zeidan, W; Abu-Zayed, I; Kochi, A; Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Kapur, A; Shaikh, I; Seita, A

    2013-12-21

    Six primary health care clinics in Jordan, serving Palestine refugees diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). To report on the number and characteristics of new DM patients registered in the second quarter of 2013 and of all DM patients ever registered by 30 June 2013, with treatment outcomes and cumulative burden of late-stage complications. A descriptive cohort study using routine data collected through e-Health. Of the 288 new patients in Q2 2013 and 12 548 patients ever registered with DM by 30 June 2013, smoking, physical inactivity and obesity were recorded in 19%, 50% and 47%, respectively. In Q2 2013, 9740 (78%) patients attended a clinic, with >99% having undergone disease control measures: of these, 72% had postprandial blood glucose ⩽ 180 mg/dl, 71% had blood cholesterol < 200 mg/dl, 82% had blood pressure < 140/90 and 40% had body mass index < 30 kg/m(2). Late-stage complications were present in 1130 (11.6%) patients who attended a clinic, with cardiovascular disease and stroke being the most common. Several differences in outcomes were found between males and females. There is a high burden of disease due to DM at primary health care clinics in Jordan. Cohort analysis using e-Health is a vital way to assess management and follow-up.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and treatment outcomes in Palestine refugees in UNRWA primary health care clinics in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Khader, A.; Ballout, G.; Shahin, Y.; Hababeh, M.; Farajallah, L.; Zeidan, W.; Abu-Zayed, I.; Kochi, A.; Zachariah, R.; Kapur, A.; Shaikh, I.; Seita, A.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Six primary health care clinics in Jordan, serving Palestine refugees diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). Objectives: To report on the number and characteristics of new DM patients registered in the second quarter of 2013 and of all DM patients ever registered by 30 June 2013, with treatment outcomes and cumulative burden of late-stage complications. Design: A descriptive cohort study using routine data collected through e-Health. Results: Of the 288 new patients in Q2 2013 and 12 548 patients ever registered with DM by 30 June 2013, smoking, physical inactivity and obesity were recorded in 19%, 50% and 47%, respectively. In Q2 2013, 9740 (78%) patients attended a clinic, with >99% having undergone disease control measures: of these, 72% had postprandial blood glucose ⩽ 180 mg/dl, 71% had blood cholesterol < 200 mg/dl, 82% had blood pressure < 140/90 and 40% had body mass index < 30 kg/m2. Late-stage complications were present in 1130 (11.6%) patients who attended a clinic, with cardiovascular disease and stroke being the most common. Several differences in outcomes were found between males and females. Conclusion: There is a high burden of disease due to DM at primary health care clinics in Jordan. Cohort analysis using e-Health is a vital way to assess management and follow-up. PMID:26393043

  2. Dental solid and hazardous waste management and safety practices in developing countries: Nablus district, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Monou, Maria; Mosleh, Salem A; Al-Subu, Mohammed M; Kassinos, Despo

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the dental waste management practices and safety measures implemented by dentists in the Nablus district, Palestine. A comprehensive survey was conducted for 97 of the 134 dental clinics to assess the current situation. Focus was placed on hazardous waste produced by clinics and the handling, storage, treatment and disposal measures taken. Mercury, found in dental amalgam, is one of the most problematic hazardous waste. The findings revealed that there is no proper separation of dental waste by classification as demanded by the World Health Organization. Furthermore, medical waste is often mixed with general waste during production, collection and disposal. The final disposal of waste ends up in open dumping sites sometimes close to communities where the waste is burned. Correct management and safety procedures that could be effectively implemented in developing countries were examined. It was concluded that cooperation between dental associations, government-related ministries and authorities needs to be established, to enhance dental waste management and provide training and capacity building programs for all professionals in the medical waste management field.

  3. Comparative analysis of patient package inserts of local and imported anti-infective agents in palestine.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Af; Sweileh, Wm; Zyoud, Sh; Jabi, Sw

    2008-12-01

    The patient package insert is an important source of drug information. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the PPI of the anti-infective agents manufactured in Palestine with the imported equivalents. The selection criteria generated 15 different anti-infective agents available as 36 locally manufactured products and 15 imported equivalents. The design of the patient package insert was evaluated in terms of the number of words used in eight main headings and the presence or absence of certain information regarding nine statements. Inserts of locally manufactured products have significantly fewer words than those of imported products with respect to warnings, dosage and administration, and side effects. The most significant difference was found in the warnings. Moreover, differences were found between inserts of local and imported products in terms of the presence of the nine informative statements. Locally manufactured products did not mention inactive ingredients, clinical pharmacology or date of last revision, but all of them provided information on the use of the drug during pregnancy and lactation and on the duration of therapy. However, in general they provided less information than the imported equivalents. Palestinian authorities and local manufacturers should implement appropriate measures to regulate the quality and quantity of information in the patient package insert of locally produced anti-infective agents. PPI improvement will better direct health practices to the benefit of the patients.

  4. National G6PD neonatal screening program in Gaza Strip of Palestine: rationale, challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al-Kahlout, M S; Reading, N S

    2016-09-01

    Congenital genetic disorders affecting neonates or young children can have serious clinical consequences if undiagnosed and left untreated. Early detection and an accurate diagnosis are, therefore, of major importance for preventing negative patient outcomes. Even though the occurrence of each specific metabolic disorder may be rare, their collective impact of preventable complications may be of considerable importance to the public health. Our previous studies showed that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a problem of public health importance that has been shown to be a predominant cause of acute hemolytic anemia requiring hospitalization in Palestinian young children in Gaza Strip. Intriguingly, the majority of these children had one of the three variants, Mediterranean(c.) (563T) , African G6PD A-(c.) (202A) (/c.) (376G) and heretofore unrecognized as a common G6PD-deficient variant G6PD Cairo(c.) (404C) . The high prevalence of G6PD deficiency, as well as dietary factors in the region that precipitate anemia, argues for a need to protect the Palestinian children from a treatable and manageable genetic and metabolic disorder. This work reviews and discusses rationales and challenges of G6PD screening program in Gaza Strip. We advocate adopting a national neonatal G6PD screening program in Gaza Strip to identify children at risk and promote wellness and health for Palestine. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular Evidence of Bartonella Species in Ixodid Ticks and Domestic Animals in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Ereqat, Suheir; Nasereddin, Abdelmajeed; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Abdelkader, Ahmad; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Zaid, Taher; Azmi, Kifaya; Abdeen, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Ticks play an important role in disease transmission as vectors for human and animal pathogens, including the Gram-negative pathogen Bartonella. Here, we evaluated the presence of Bartonella in ixodid ticks and domestic animals from Palestine. We tested 633 partly engorged ticks and 139 blood samples from domestic animals (dogs, sheep and camels) for Bartonella using ITS-PCR. Bartonella DNA was detected in 3.9% of the tested ticks. None of the ticks collected from sheep and goats were positive for Bartonella. Seventeen R. sanguineus ticks (17/391; 4.3%) collected from dogs were infected with B. rochalimae (n = 10), B. chomelii (n = 6), and B. koehlerae (n = 1). Four H. dromedarri ticks (4/63; 6.3%) obtained from camels were infected with B. bovis (n = 2) and B. rochalimae (n = 2). Among canine blood samples (n = 110), we found one asymptomatic female dog to be infected with B. rochalimae (0.9%). The detection of zoonotic Bartonella species in this study should raise awareness of these vector-borne diseases among physicians, veterinarians and public health workers and highlight the importance of surveillance and preventive measures in the region.

  6. Molecular Evidence of Bartonella Species in Ixodid Ticks and Domestic Animals in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Ereqat, Suheir; Nasereddin, Abdelmajeed; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Abdelkader, Ahmad; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Zaid, Taher; Azmi, Kifaya; Abdeen, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Ticks play an important role in disease transmission as vectors for human and animal pathogens, including the Gram-negative pathogen Bartonella. Here, we evaluated the presence of Bartonella in ixodid ticks and domestic animals from Palestine. We tested 633 partly engorged ticks and 139 blood samples from domestic animals (dogs, sheep and camels) for Bartonella using ITS-PCR. Bartonella DNA was detected in 3.9% of the tested ticks. None of the ticks collected from sheep and goats were positive for Bartonella. Seventeen R. sanguineus ticks (17/391; 4.3%) collected from dogs were infected with B. rochalimae (n = 10), B. chomelii (n = 6), and B. koehlerae (n = 1). Four H. dromedarri ticks (4/63; 6.3%) obtained from camels were infected with B. bovis (n = 2) and B. rochalimae (n = 2). Among canine blood samples (n = 110), we found one asymptomatic female dog to be infected with B. rochalimae (0.9%). The detection of zoonotic Bartonella species in this study should raise awareness of these vector-borne diseases among physicians, veterinarians and public health workers and highlight the importance of surveillance and preventive measures in the region. PMID:27540374

  7. Physicians' perceptions, attitudes and expectations regarding the role of hospital-based pharmacists in the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Khdour, Maher R; Alayasa, Kawther S; Alshahed, Qusai N; Hawwa, Ahmed F

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the perceptions, expectations and experiences of physicians with regard to hospital-based pharmacists in the West Bank, Palestine. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 250 physicians practising in four general hospitals in the West Bank, Palestine. The main sections of the questionnaire comprised a series of statements pertaining to physicians' perceptions, expectations and experiences with pharmacists. One hundred and fifty seven questionnaires were completed and returned (response rate, 62.8%). The majority of respondents were most comfortable with pharmacists detecting and preventing prescription errors (76.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 69.5-81.2%) and patient education (57.9%; CI 51.2-63.4%) but they were not comfortable with pharmacists suggesting the use of prescription medications to patients (56.7%; CI 49.8-62.4%). Most physicians (62.4%; CI 56.8-69.1%) expected the pharmacist to educate their patients about the safe and appropriate use of their medication. However, approximately one-third (31.7%; CI 26.0-39.6%) did not expect pharmacists to be available for consultation during rounds. Physicians' experiences with pharmacists were less favourable; whereas 77% (CI 70.2-81.5%) of the physicians agreed that pharmacists were always a reliable source of information, only 11.5% (CI 6.2-16.4%) agreed that pharmacists appeared to be willing to take responsibility for solving any drug-related problems. The present study showed that hospital physicians are more likely to accept traditional pharmacy services than newer clinical services for hospital-based pharmacists in the West Bank, Palestine. Pharmacists should therefore interact more positively and more frequently with physicians. This will close the gap between the physicians' commonly held perceptions of what they expect pharmacists to do and what pharmacists can actually do, and gain support for an extended role of hospital-based pharmacists in future patient therapy management.

  8. Outdoor radiofrequency radiation levels in the West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Hammash, Alaa

    2012-05-01

    This work presents the results of exposure levels to radio frequency (RF) emission from different sources in the environment of the West Bank-Palestine. These RF emitters include FM and TV broadcasting stations and mobile phone base stations. Power densities were measured at 65 locations distributed over the West Bank area. These locations include mainly centres of the major cities. Also a 24 h activity level was investigated for a mobile phone base station to determine the maximum activity level for this kind of RF emitters. All measurements were conducted at a height of 1.7 m above ground level using hand held Narda SRM 3000 spectrum analyzer with isotropic antenna capable of collecting RF signals in the frequency band from 75 MHz to 3 GHz. The average value of power density resulted from FM radio broadcasting in all investigated locations was 0.148 μW cm(-2), from TV broadcasting was 0.007 μW cm(-2) and from mobile phone base station was 0.089 μW cm(-2). The maximum total exposure evaluated at any location was 3.86 μW cm(-2). The corresponding exposure quotient calculated for this site was 0.02. This value is well below unity indicating compliance with the International Commission on non-ionising Radiation protection guidelines. Contributions from all relevant RF sources to the total exposure were evaluated and found to be ~62 % from FM radio, 3 % for TV broadcasting and 35 % from mobile phone base stations. The average total exposure from all investigated RF sources was 0.37 μW cm(-2).

  9. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed.

  10. Dioxin: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bond, G G

    1993-01-01

    The need to notify individuals of a possible health risk from their past exposure to potentially hazardous agents frequently extends beyond workers to include community groups. The issues to consider in community notification are frequently similar to those that are important for worker notification but may include some that are unique. This case study traces the evolution of one company's strategy for communicating with the public about possible dioxin contamination associated with its operations. Early communications tended to emphasize the technical aspects of the issues in the fashion of scientists talking to other scientists. This was interpreted by some to be symptomatic of an arrogant and uncaring attitude. Beginning in the early 1980s, the company's management recognized the need to reach out to a variety of audiences on multiple levels, and shifted to a more comprehensive communications strategy. A similar shift is now occurring throughout the chemical manufacturing industry as top managers realize that, if they expect to continue to operate, they must become more accountable and responsive to the public.

  11. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  12. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  13. The Paradox of Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Helen

    1996-01-01

    Examines the paradox of case studies' abilities to understand the complexity in particular contexts while not being generalizable. Argues that the pressure for quantification and multisite case study design in policy research has weakened the original utility of the case study method for understanding complex educational phenomena. (DSK)

  14. 77 FR 24759 - Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization Office Pursuant to the authority vested in me as Deputy Secretary of State, including by section 7086(b)(1) of the...

  15. Balfour's Mission to Palestine: Science, Strategy, and the Inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Roy

    2008-01-01

    In 1925, A.J. Balfour, first Earl Balfour and author of the famous "Balfour Declaration", attended the inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His education and experience of foreign policy equipped him to take a prominent role. However, the conditions of strife-torn Palestine weighed heavily upon him, and raised wider…

  16. Adult Education Providing Leadership Pathways to Peace through Adult Education in Palestine and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    This article determines the role played by adult education in peace efforts in Palestine and Israel. Specific institutions have been developed to target instruction in the democratic, non-violent means of problem-solving with peace as the objective. Textbooks have been cooperatively written with equal representation of all voices in languages that…

  17. 78 FR 25780 - Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine Liberation Organization Office (U) Pursuant to the authority vested in me as Deputy Secretary of State, including by section 7086(b)(1) of the...

  18. Measurement of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities and particle fluxes below geomagnetic cutoff near Palestine, Texas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennypacker, C. R.; Smoot, G. F.; Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    We report a high-statistics magnetic spectrometer measurement of the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity and related effects at Palestine, Texas. The effective cutoffs we observe are in agreement with computer-calculated cutoffs. We also report measured spectra of albedo and atmospheric secondary particles that come below geomagnetic cutoff.

  19. Training under Fire: The Relationship between Obstacles Facing Training and SMEs Development in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlMadhoun, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper is to discuss the relationship between obstacles and weaknesses facing the development of MTPs and SMEs. In recent years many management training programmes (MTPs) of an off-the-job nature have been established in Palestine, after the peace agreement, in order to find a solution for apparent lack of…

  20. Palestine Refugees Today. Human Rights Day: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary. Newsletter Number 76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Relief and Works Agency, New York, NY.

    A special issue of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) newsletter relates the ideals of human rights as carried out for the Palestine refugees. An overview of the publication and its contents is followed by a copy of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Three articles--The Right to Education, An Adequate Standard of Living,…

  1. What Are the Security Requirements for a Two-State Solution between Israel and Palestine?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    REFUGEES, RIGHT OF RETURN..................... 45 G. DISCUSSION...police force guaranteeing the rule-of-law or a military to protect the borders. It involves every aspect of life . To understand what a peaceful two...government that keeps the rights of its citizens as its primary purpose. For there to be security for Israel and development for Palestine, both must

  2. Political Graffiti on the West Bank Wall in Israel/Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olberg, Steven T.

    2011-01-01

    Great strife has plagued the Middle East for decades. Israel and the Occupied Territories of the West Bank of Palestine' have been battling over the land they both claim as holy. Regional threats of war loom and increasingly violent rhetoric has been exchanged regarding the claims to holy sites, land, olives, water, and other natural resources in…

  3. Political Graffiti on the West Bank Wall in Israel/Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olberg, Steven T.

    2011-01-01

    Great strife has plagued the Middle East for decades. Israel and the Occupied Territories of the West Bank of Palestine' have been battling over the land they both claim as holy. Regional threats of war loom and increasingly violent rhetoric has been exchanged regarding the claims to holy sites, land, olives, water, and other natural resources in…

  4. Training under Fire: The Relationship between Obstacles Facing Training and SMEs Development in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlMadhoun, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper is to discuss the relationship between obstacles and weaknesses facing the development of MTPs and SMEs. In recent years many management training programmes (MTPs) of an off-the-job nature have been established in Palestine, after the peace agreement, in order to find a solution for apparent lack of…

  5. Balfour's Mission to Palestine: Science, Strategy, and the Inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Roy

    2008-01-01

    In 1925, A.J. Balfour, first Earl Balfour and author of the famous "Balfour Declaration", attended the inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His education and experience of foreign policy equipped him to take a prominent role. However, the conditions of strife-torn Palestine weighed heavily upon him, and raised wider…

  6. Ethnopharmacological survey of home remedies used for treatment of hair and scalp and their methods of preparation in the West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Jaradat, Nidal Amin; Eid, Ahmad Mustafa; Al Zabadi, Hamzeh; Alkaiyat, Abdulsalam; Darwish, Saja Adam

    2017-07-05

    Natural products have many uses and purposes, including those linked to pharmaceutics and cosmetics. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of natural remedies for the treatment of hair and scalp disorders in the West Bank, Palestine. An ethnopharmacological survey of herbal remedies and other natural products used in cosmetics and cosmeceuticals was carried out in the West Bank, Palestine. A questionnaire was distributed to 267 herbalists, traditional healers, hairdressers and rural dwellers. Collected information included: the names of plants and other natural products, the parts used, hair conditions, diseases and problems for which these products were used and also their methods of preparation. To identify the most important species used, the factor of informant's consensus (Fic), fidelity level (Fl) and the use-value (UV) were calculated. Collected data showed that 41 plants are utilized for the treatment of hair and scalp disorders, belonging to 27 families; among them Lamiaceae and Rosaceae, which were the most commonly used. Plant oils and their fruits are the most commonly used parts. Hair loss, dandruff, split hair endings and lice treatment, are reported as the most treated disorders. The number of plant species used consisted of 19, 14, 13, and again 13 with a factor of informant's consensus (Fic) for these disorders corresponding to 0.93, 0.94, 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. Fl was 100% for many plants; the highest UV value (0.84) was registered for Lawsonia inermis, which belongs to the Lythraceae family. This study showed that many natural remedies are still used in Palestine for the treatment of scalp and hair disorders as well as for cosmeceutical purposes. This study is of great importance as it allows us to have a greater perspective on our folkloric use of these natural products. A combined scientific effort between informants and the scientific community, working in this field, may help in the discovery of new cosmetics, cosmeceutical

  7. Hypertension and treatment outcomes in Palestine refugees in United Nations Relief and Works Agency primary health care clinics in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khader, A; Farajallah, L; Shahin, Y; Hababeh, M; Abu-Zayed, I; Zachariah, R; Kochi, A; Kapur, A; Harries, A D; Shaikh, I; Seita, A

    2014-10-01

    In six United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) primary health care clinics in Jordan serving Palestine refugees diagnosed with hypertension, to determine the number, characteristics, programme outcomes and measures of disease control for those registered up to 30 June, 2013, and in those who attended clinic in the second quarter of 2013, the prevalence of disease-related complications between those with hypertension only and hypertension combined with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective cohort study with programme and outcome data collected and analysed using E-Health. There were 18 881 patients registered with hypertension with females (64%) and persons aged ≥ 40 years (87%) predominating. At baseline, cigarette smoking was recorded in 17%, physical inactivity in 48% and obesity in 71% of patients. 77% of all registered patients attended clinic in the second quarter of 2013; of these, 50% had hypertension and diabetes and 50% had hypertension alone; 9% did not attend the clinics and 10% were lost to follow-up. Amongst those attending clinic, 92% had their blood pressure measured, of whom 83% had blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg. There were significantly more patients with hypertension and diabetes (N = 966, 13%) who had disease-related complications than patients who had hypertension alone (N = 472, 6%) [OR 2.2, 95% CI 2.0-2.5], and these differences were found for both males [18% vs. 10%, OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2] and females [11% vs. 5%, OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.1-2.9]. Large numbers of Palestine refugees are being registered and treated for hypertension in UNRWA primary health care clinics in Jordan. Cohort analysis and E-Health can be used to regularly assess caseload, programme outcomes, clinic performance, blood pressure control and cumulative prevalence of disease-related complications. Current challenges include the need to increase clinic attendance and attain better control of blood pressure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading bacterium strain Bacillus thuringiensis J20 from olive waste in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Ereqat, Suheir I; Abdelkader, Ahmad A; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed F; Al-Jawabreh, Amer O; Zaid, Taher M; Letnik, Ilya; Abdeen, Ziad A

    2017-10-05

    This study aimed at isolation of phenol degrading bacteria from olive mill wastes in Palestine. The efficiency of phenol removal and factors affecting phenol degradation were investigated. A bacterial strain (J20) was isolated from solid olive mill waste and identified as Bacillus thuringiensis based on standard morphological, biochemical characteristics and 16SrRNA sequence analysis. The strain was able to grow in a phenol concentration of 700 mg/L as the sole carbon and energy source. The culture conditions showed a significant impact on the ability of these cells to remove phenol. This strain exhibited optimum phenol degradation performance at pH 6.57 and 30 °C . Under the optimized conditions, this strain could degrade 88.6% of phenol (700 mg/L) within 96 h when the initial cell density was OD600 0.2. However, the degradation efficiency could be improved from about 88% to nearly 99% by increasing the cell density. Immobilization of J20 was carried out using 4% sodium alginate. Phenol degradation efficiency of the immobilized cells of J20 was higher than that of the free cells, 100% versus 88.6% of 700 mg/L of phenol in 120 h, indicating the improved tolerance of the immobilized cells toward phenol toxicity. The J20 was used in detoxifying crude OMWW, phenolic compounds levels were reduced by 61% compared to untreated OMWW after five days of treatment. Hence, B. thuringiensis-J20 can be effectively used for bioremediation of phenol-contaminated sites in Palestine. These findings may lead to new biotechnological applications for the degradation of phenol, related to olive oil production.

  9. Measurement of (222)Rn concentration levels in drinking water and the associated health effects in the Southern part of West Bank - Palestine.

    PubMed

    Thabayneh, Khalil M

    2015-09-01

    Radon concentration and annual effective doses were measured in drinking water in the Southern Part of West Bank - Palestine, by using both passive and active techniques. 184 samples were collected from various sources i.e. tap water, groundwater, rain waters and mineral waters. It is found that the annual effective dose resulting from inhalation and ingestion of radon emanated from all types of drinking water is negligible compared to the total annual effective dose from indoor radon in the region. Results reveal that there is no significant public health risk from radon ingested and inhalation with drinking water in the study region. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  11. Case study--leprosy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A M; Wood, C M; Bakker-Dyos, J

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 26 year old Indian base worker who attended the Role 2 enhanced hospital in Iraq with a case of leprosy. The patient presented four times over a 12 month period with non-specific pain in the right hand and forearm combined with a large lesion of dry skin and reduced sensation in the forearm. A clinical diagnosis of leprosy was made, which was subsequently confirmed as paucibacillary leprosy by skin smears sent to the UK. It was not possible to treat the patient locally and a recommendation made to the patient's employer that the patient return to India to commence treatment.

  12. Ethnopharmacological survey of herbal remedies used for treatment of various types of cancer and their methods of preparations in the West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Nidal Amin; Al-Ramahi, Rowa; Zaid, Abdel Naser; Ayesh, Ola Ibrahim; Eid, Ahmad Mustafa

    2016-03-08

    Plants have been the primary source of medicines since life on earth; more than 50 % of existing cancer treatments are derived from plants. An ethnopharmacological survey of herbal remedies used in cancer treatment was carried out in the West Bank/ Palestine. A questionnaire was distributed to one hundred and fifty herbalists, traditional healers and rural dwellers. Collected information included the names of plants, the used parts, types of cancers for which these plants were used and also their methods of preparation. To identify the most important species used, Factor of informant's consensus (F(ic)), Fidelity level (Fl) and the Use-value (UV) were calculated. Collected data has shown that 72 plants are utilized for treatment of cancer, belonging to 44 families; from them Compositae and Lamiaceae were the most common. Leaves and fruits were the most commonly used parts, while decoctions, infusions and syrups were the main methods of preparation. Lung cancer was the most common type of cancer treated with these plants and Ephedra alata was the most commonly used plant for treatment of cancer in Palestine. The Fic was high for all the plants; Fl was 100% for many plants, the highest UV (0.72) was for Ephedra alata. This study showed that many herbal remedies are still used by herbalists in Palestine for treatment of cancer; some of them have been approved scientifically while others are not. A combined effort between informants and scientific institutions working in this field can help in the discovery of new anticancer agents. Moreover, scientists must explore the most suitable method of extraction, formulation and dose determination in order to achieve the best benefits from these herbals.

  13. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  14. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  15. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  16. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  17. Characterization of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated from Hospitalized Patients in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Handal, Regeen; Qunibi, Lulu; Sahouri, Ibrahim; Juhari, Maha; Dawodi, Rula; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Hindiyeh, Musa

    2017-01-01

    The American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognizes Acinetobacter baumannii as a source of global outbreaks and epidemics especially due to its increasing resistance to commercially available antibiotics. In this study, 69 single patient multidrug resistant isolates collected from all over Palestine, except Gaza, were studied. All the isolates were resistant to all the β-lactam antibiotics including the carbapenems. Of the 69 isolates, 82.6% were positive for blaOXA-23, 14.5% were positive for blaOXA-24, and 3% were positive for blaOXA-58. None were positive for blaOXA-143 and blaOXA-235. In addition, 5.8% and 0% were positive for blaNDM and blaKPC, respectively. Of the 69 isolates, none were positive for the aminoglycoside aphA6 gene while 93% were positive for the aphA1 gene. The acetyltransferases aacC1 and aacA4 genes tested positive in 22% and 13% of the isolates, respectively. The ompA biofilm-producing virulence gene was detected in all isolates. Finally, Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of 13 isolates revealed that more than one strain of A. baumannii was circulating in Palestinian hospitals as results revealed that 7 isolates were of ST208, 2 isolates ST218, 1 isolate ST231, 1 isolate ST348, and 2 new Sequence Types. The detection of these drug resistant pathogens is a reminder of the importance of active surveillance for resistant bacteria in order to prevent their spread in hospital settings.

  18. Occupational Safety Precautions among Nurses at Four Hospitals, Nablus District, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A; El Ansari, W; Areqat, T A; Darkhawaja, R A; Mansour, S H; Tucktuck, M A; Khatib, J I

    2015-10-01

    Occupational hazards, exposure to blood and body fluids (BBF) accidents and safety precautions constitute an important public health issue. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of exposure to occupational hazards among nurses, and their knowledge of occupational safety precautions. In a cross-sectional study, we surveyed 332 nurses working in 4 hospitals, Nablus, West Bank, Palestine, by a questionnaire. Bivariate analysis tested the associations between ever exposure and the high likelihood of BBF exposure and the independent socio-demographic and occupational variables. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations between the same two exposures and selected independent variables (those significant in the bivariate analysis). Prevalence of ever exposure to BBF was 51.7%, and was associated with working in private and charitable hospitals (OR 2.62, 2.68, respectively), having 4-6 family members (OR 0.52) and "nursing" being as one's top career choice at university (OR 0.48). The prevalence of high likelihood of BBF exposure was 62.2%, and was associated with working in charitable and private hospitals (OR 7.81, 2.43, respectively) and "nursing" being as one's top career choice (OR 0.57). Regarding knowledge, most respondents believed it is necessary to enact laws and regulations regarding occupational safety precautions, reported the use of sharps containers, immediate disinfection after an accident, reporting an accident, and using personal protective equipment. Nurses had adequate knowledge of the risks of their hospital work. Nevertheless, they exhibited high prevalence of exposure to BBF accidents. Future studies are needed to re-evaluate existing occupational safety guidelines in hospitals, establish monitoring and evaluation protocols for health care workers' adherence to the guidelines, and institute well-defined policies for reporting occupational injury incidents so these can be handled appropriately.

  19. Parental Self-Feeding Effects on Parental Care Levels and Time Allocation in Palestine Sunbirds

    PubMed Central

    Markman, Shai

    2014-01-01

    The trade-off between parents feeding themselves and their young is an important life history problem that can be considered in terms of optimal behavioral strategies. Recent studies on birds have tested how parents allocate the food between themselves and their young. Until now the effect of food consumption by parent birds on their food delivery to their young as well as other parental activities has rarely been studied. I have previously shown that parent Palestine sunbirds (Nectarinia osea) will consume nectar and liquidized arthropods from artificial feeders. However, they will only feed their young with whole arthropods. This provided a unique opportunity to experimentally manipulate the food eaten by parents independent of that fed to their offspring. Here, I hypothesized that parents invest in their current young according to the quality of food that they themselves consume. Breeding pairs with two or three nestlings were provided with feeders containing water (control), sucrose solution (0.75 mol) or liquidized mealworms mixed with sucrose solution (0.75 mol). As food quality in feeders increased (from water up to liquidized mealworms mixed with sucrose solution): 1) Parents (especially females) increased their food delivery of whole arthropod prey to their young. 2) Only males increased their nest guarding effort. Nestling food intake and growth rate increased with increasing food quality of parents and decreasing brood size. These results imply that increasing the nutrient content of foods consumed by parent sunbirds allow them to increase the rate at which other foods are delivered to their young and to increase the time spent on other parental care activities. PMID:25474620

  20. Increasing disability-free life expectancy among older adults in Palestine from 2006 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Duraidi, Mohammed; Qalalwa, Khaled; Jeune, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    The population of Palestine comprises almost 200 000 Palestinians aged 60 or older. The purpose of the study was to estimate disability-free life expectancy for Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and to evaluate changes from 2006 to 2010. The study combined mortality data and prevalence of activity limitation derived from the Palestinian Family Health Surveys carried out in 2006 and 2010. Based on questions about the ability to perform five basic daily activities, disability-free life expectancy was estimated. Changes between 2006 and 2010 were decomposed into contributions from changes in mortality and disability. Life expectancy at age 60 increased from 17.1 years in 2006 to 17.3 years in 2010 for men and from 18.7 years to 19.0 years for women. Disability-free life expectancy increased significantly, by 1.3 years for 60-year-old men (from 12.8 years to 14.1 years) and 1.8 years for 60-year-old women (from 12.6 years to 14.4 years). This increase was seen in the Gaza Strip as well as in the West Bank. While the modest contribution of the mortality effect did not differ between gender and regions, the strong contributions from the disability effects varied, being greatest for women in the Gaza Strip. The significant increase in disability-free life expectancy for both genders is remarkable and, to our knowledge, not seen in other low-income countries. This change may be due to decreasing incidence of disability and greater recovery from disability as a result of better prevention, care and rehabilitation of chronic diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative analysis of package inserts of local and imported antihypertensive medications in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Qatmosh, Sandra A; Koni, Amer A; Qeeno, Baraa G; Arandy, Dina A; Abu-Hashia, Maysa W; Al-Hroub, Bahaa M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2017-09-25

    Package inserts (PIs) as a reliable reference for patients and health care providers should provide accurate, complete and up-to-date information. The purpose of the current study is to assess and compare the PIs of antihypertensive agents locally produced in Palestine and their imported counterparts. Thirty-five PIs were assessed for the presence of 31 information statements using a scoring method. Word counting of 20 headings and subheadings was used to evaluate and compare local and imported PIs for information quantity. None of the analysed PIs fulfilled the criteria. All of them included the brand name, active ingredients, indications, directions for use, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, pregnancy and lactation considerations, and storage. Whereas none of them, either local or imported PIs, included the shelf life and instructions to convert tablets or capsules into liquid forms. Additionally, only one (5%) imported and no (0%) local PIs mentioned the duration of therapy. Moreover, 93.4% of local PIs were deficient in areas regarding the inactive ingredients and date of last revision, and 86.7% did not mention the drug dose and possibility of tablet splitting. Furthermore, the maximum dose was not indicated in 90% of imported and 86.7% of local PIs. In general, imported PIs contained more detailed information than their local counterparts, where the range of differences in medians between the local and imported PIs was from 1.5-fold for pregnancy considerations to >42.00-fold for the effect on the ability to drive and use machines. The findings of this study revealed the superiority of imported over local PIs in both quality and quantity of information provided. This emphasises the need for appropriate measures to be taken by the Ministry of Health and local manufacturers to ensure efficiency of local PIs in providing accurate, complete and up-to-date information.

  2. Geology, geomorphology and hydrology of the Wadi Gaza catchment, Gaza Strip, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaineldeen, Usama; Aish, Adnan

    2012-11-01

    The geological, geomorphological and hydrological features along the course of the Wadi Gaza (Palestine) are discussed. The study confirms the existence of Pleistocene loess sediments along the Wadi. Wadi Gaza is characterized by meandering features along its course. The watershed of Wadi Gaza is estimated to cover more than 3500 km2 of the Northern Negev Desert and the Hebron Mountains as well as the small catchment sub-area in the Gaza Strip itself. Storm water drains the hills and mountains of Hebron and the northern Negev desert, accumulates in the Beer-Sheva area, crosses the Gaza Strip and discharges into the Mediterranean Sea. In winter the Wadi Gaza brings about 20 million cubic meter of rainwater into the area. Field investigations demonstrate the existence of loess sediments in the Wadi Gaza area, deposited during the dry periods that affected the area during the Pleistocene. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) applied for the Gaza Strip confirmed the existence of three Kurkar ridges within the Gaza Strip. Arranged from west to east (i) Sheikh Ejlin Ridge extends up to the current coastline in the west, (ii) Al Montar Ridge occurs near the armistice line in the east and (iii) Bait Hanon Ridge of which a part is present to the northeast of the Gaza Strip and a part to the east of the armistice line (the intermediate part not being accessible for observation due to political reasons. It is considered as a security zone). All three ridges are running NE-SW, parallel to the Mediterranean coastline.

  3. Breast Milk Lead Levels in 3 Major Regions of the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Zyoud, Ahed; Dwikat, Jamela; El-Helo, Maram; Yacoub, Bayan; Hilal, Hikmat

    2016-08-01

    Lead is a neurotoxic pollutant that is ubiquitously spread in our environment. Breast milk contaminated with lead poses a potential risk of exposing a recipient infant to lead. The primary aims of this study were to evaluate the breast milk lead levels (BMLLs) in breastfeeding mothers in 3 major regions of the West Bank of Palestine and to investigate the effects of some sociodemographic variables on the BMLLs. Breast milk samples were collected from 89 breastfeeding mothers from the Nablus, Ramallah, and Jerusalem regions and analyzed for their BMLLs using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Breastfeeding mothers were interviewed and responded to a sociodemographic questionnaire. The median BMLL was 4.0 µg/L, ranging from 2.0 to 12.0 µg/L. Breast milk lead levels in 19.1% of the samples analyzed were higher than the World Health Organization's safety limits of 2.0 to 5.0 µg/L for an occupationally unexposed population. Breast milk lead levels were significantly higher in breast milk of mothers who lived in cities and refugee camps (P < .01), had lower monthly household income levels (P < .05), lived close to paint shops (P < .05), lived in houses with peeling or chipping paint (P < .05), used eye kohl (P < .01), and worked in agriculture for a duration longer than 3 years (P < .01). Breast milk lead levels were higher than the safety limits for occupationally unexposed populations. Authorities need to implement measures to eliminate or reduce lead exposure, especially in refugee camps and cities. Marketed eye kohl preparations should be tested for their lead contents. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Online Collaborative Case Study Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Case study learning was integrated into a course designed to improve students' potential for academic success and increase student retention. Case studies related to self-regulation of behavior, motivation, and cognition for academic tasks were used to prompt students' critical thinking and facilitate deep learning of self-regulation topics,…

  5. Instructional Computing: Ten Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargan, Carol; Hunter, Beverly

    These case studies are written for educational institutions that wish to plan, extend, or improve their use of computers for learning and teaching. Each case study includes a brief description of each of the following: profile of the institution, history of the development of instructional computing, organization and management, student access to…

  6. Case Studies Reveal Camper Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve; Fullerton, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Case studies in the National Camp Evaluation Project and National Inclusive Camp Practices project used interviews with counselors and parents about camper's growth to yield qualitative data for camp program evaluation. The importance, methods, and benefits of case studies are described. Sidebars give examples of comments on perceived camper…

  7. Fuzzy-Set Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkelsen, Kim Sass

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary case studies rely on verbal arguments and set theory to build or evaluate theoretical claims. While existing procedures excel in the use of qualitative information (information about kind), they ignore quantitative information (information about degree) at central points of the analysis. Effectively, contemporary case studies rely on…

  8. Three Community College Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  9. The Big Read: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  10. Southern Appalachian Case Study

    Treesearch

    Charles C. van Sickle

    1999-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian study covers a region of 37.4 million acres. Its mountains, foothills, and valleys stretch from northern Virginia and northern West Virginia to northern Georgia and Alabama. When Native Americans came to the region, forests dominated the landscape and they still do, covering 70% of the land (Figure 32.1). Terrain characteristics are...

  11. Geostatistical case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Matheron, G.; Armstrong, M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this volume of contributed chapters is to present a series of applications of geostatistics. These range from a careful variographic analysis on uranium data, through detailed studies on geologically complex deposits, right up to the latest nonlinear methods applied to deposits with highly skewed data contributions. Applications of new techniques such as the external drift method for combining well data with seismic information have also been included. The volume emphasizes geostatistics in practice. Notation has been kept to a minimum and mathematical details have been relegated to annexes.

  12. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  13. Case study: a patient's survival.

    PubMed

    Nauer, K A; Kramer, L; Lockard, K L

    2000-05-01

    Presentation of a case study involving a female patient, in her 20s, undergoing routine surgery for removal of atrial myxoma leading to a heart transplant. This case study will show the progression from postcardiotomy failure, the emergent use of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device, the insertion of the HeartMate device, and the final return to the operating room for a heart transplant. The case study will examine the physiologic demands on the patient, as well as the psychological effects from the various life-saving devices.

  14. Larval stages of digenetic trematodes in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from freshwater bodies in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Bdir, Sami; Adwan, Ghaleb

    2011-06-01

    To detect the species of larval trematodes (cercariae) in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from 5 different fresh water bodies in Palestine. A total of 1 880 Melanopsis praemorsa snails were collected from different fresh water bodies in Palestine from October, 2008 to November, 2010. Cercariae in Melanopsis praemorsa snails were obtained by lighting and crushing methods. The behavior of cercariae was observed using a dissecting microscope. Three different species of larval trematodes were identified from Melanopsis praemorsa snails collected only from Al-Bathan fresh water body, while snails from other water bodies were not infected. These species were microcercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria and brevifurcate lophocercous cercaria. These cercariae called Cercaria melanopsi palestinia I, Cercaria melanopsi palestinia II and Cercaria melanopsi palestinia III have not been described before from this snail in Palestine. The infection rate of Melanopsis praemorsa collected from Al-Bathan fresh water body was 5.7%, while the overall infection rate of snails collected from all fresh water bodies was 4.3%. Details are presented on the morphology and behavior of the cercariae as well as their development within the snail. These results have been recorded for the first time and these cercariae may be of medical and veterinary importance.

  15. Larval stages of digenetic trematodes in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from freshwater bodies in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Bdir, Sami; Adwan, Ghaleb

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the species of larval trematodes (cercariae) in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from 5 different fresh water bodies in Palestine. Methods A total of 1 880 Melanopsis praemorsa snails were collected from different fresh water bodies in Palestine from October, 2008 to November, 2010. Cercariae in Melanopsis praemorsa snails were obtained by lighting and crushing methods. The behavior of cercariae was observed using a dissecting microscope. Results Three different species of larval trematodes were identified from Melanopsis praemorsa snails collected only from Al-Bathan fresh water body, while snails from other water bodies were not infected. These species were microcercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria and brevifurcate lophocercous cercaria. These cercariae called Cercaria melanopsi palestinia I, Cercaria melanopsi palestinia II and Cercaria melanopsi palestinia III have not been described before from this snail in Palestine. The infection rate of Melanopsis praemorsa collected from Al-Bathan fresh water body was 5.7%, while the overall infection rate of snails collected from all fresh water bodies was 4.3%. Details are presented on the morphology and behavior of the cercariae as well as their development within the snail. Conclusions These results have been recorded for the first time and these cercariae may be of medical and veterinary importance. PMID:23569759

  16. Dr Walter Henry Anderson (1870-1937) and the mission hospital at Safed, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Gordon S

    2013-02-01

    Walter Henry Anderson, a brewer's clerk in Burton-upon-Trent, became a missionary doctor, supported by a society promoting welfare and evangelism in Jewish communities abroad. His family background was rich in pastoral ministry at home and adventure abroad. Arguably, this background played a part in his decision to serve the Jews of Safed. His life in Palestine entailed much enterprise and hardship as he raised a family, fought disease and set up a mission hospital serving not only the Jewish community but persons of all faiths. His years in Palestine, from 1894 to 1915, were times of peace in the Middle East before the turmoil unleashed by the Great War. Jews from the Diaspora were gaining an increasing foothold in Palestine, their 'Promised Land'. Themes of that era - the rise of Zionism, confrontation between Judaism and evangelical Christianity, conflict between immigrant Jew and Palestinian Arab and the remarkable travels of Lawrence of Arabia were interwoven with the lives of Dr Anderson and his family.

  17. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  19. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  20. Case studies of uncommon headaches.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-05-01

    The following interesting and uncommon headache disorders are presented through case studies: exploding head syndrome, hypnic headache, neck-tongue syndrome, "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, nummular headache, red ear syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, and cardiac cephalalgia.

  1. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  2. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  3. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  4. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  5. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  6. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  7. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine use among cancer patients in Palestine with special reference to safety-related concerns.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Salameh, Nihaya M Y; Jamous, Rania M; Hamadeh, Amneh M A

    2016-07-01

    The use of CAM including herbal medicine as the most preferred CAM modality, among cancer patients who are taking prescription medications has shown to be highly prevalent worldwide as well as in several Middle Eastern countries, with a high percentage of the patients do not disclose their CAM use to treating physician. The current study aimed to evaluate the patterns of CAM use among two cohorts of cancer patients in Palestine over a three-year period, and to identify socio-demographic factors that are associated with CAM use. Across-sectional survey of patients attending outpatient cancer clinics. The method was based on a semi-structured questionnaire. In order to identify safety-related concerns associated with the products listed, a literature search was conducted using different databases (PubMed, Micromedex, AltMedDex, and the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database). In 472 cancer patients including 372 of the 2011 cohort; and 100 of the 2014 cohort, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 69.5%. CAM users were more likely to be ≤65 years old, village resident, being in the midst of chemotherapy, to have high interest spiritual quest, and to have no other chronic diseases. A significant number of CAM users reported using herbal preparations (98.3%, and 89.6% in the two study cohorts, respectively). In the current study, a total of 40 plant taxa belonging to 23 botanical families were reported by ≥3 cancer patients in the two cohort groups. The top most commonly used plant in the 2011 cohort group was Arum palaestinum (43.5%), while Ephedra foeminea emerged as the top most commonly utilized plant (from 0.0% in 2011 to 55.2% in the 2014 cohort), mainly due to a recent publicizing and portraying of the plant in the local media as an effective cancer herbal remedy. Safety-related concerns were associated with 33 (82.5%) herbs, including herb-drug interactions with altered pharmacokinetics (8, 20% herbs), direct toxic effects (16, 40% herbs), and increased in

  9. Case studies in working memory: a case for single cases?

    PubMed

    Della Sala, S; Logie, R H; Marchetti, C; Wynn, V

    1991-06-01

    Patterns of cognitive deficit in single neuropsychological cases are common sources of evidence for theories of normal cognition. In particular, the working memory model has benefited from data obtained from a number of contrasting patients, in some cases resulting in modifications of the working memory model. In this paper, patterns of data from short-term memory patients and anarthric patients are compared with patterns of data from normal subjects. The patterns of patient data that were unlike those patterns typically found for groups of normal subjects, could be incorporated within a modified version of the articulatory loop component of the working memory model. However a small number of individual normal subjects also did not show the pattern that is reported on the basis of average performance of groups of normal subjects. This causes some difficulty in interpreting those data from such 'aberrant normal' patterns, and those data from single patients with functional cognitive deficits. The implications of these findings for the interpretation of neuropsychological data are discussed in the context of the working memory model, but with the intention of making a general point pertaining to the development of functional models of cognition. It is argued that single case studies should continue to provide a useful source of evidence, providing that care is exercised in considering the implications of such data for models of normal cognition.

  10. Trends in the utilization of antihypertensive medications among Palestine refugees in Jordan, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Rawan; Qato, Dima; Khader, Ali; Shahin, Yousef; Seita, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe trends in the utilization of antihypertensive medications, overall and by type of medication, specifically thiazide diuretics, as well as uncontrolled hypertension, in the Palestine refugee population in Jordan between 2008 and 2012. We analyzed aggregate procurement data on antihypertensive medications derived from the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) pharmacy records between 2008 and 2012. Antihypertensive medications were aggregated and utilization was calculated overall and for specific types of antihypertensive medications (e.g. β-blockers, diuretics). We used the WHO (World Health Organization) defined daily dose (DDD) methodology, often used to evaluate drug utilization patterns using aggregate data, to calculate utilization defined as DDDs per 100 persons with hypertension. In addition, UNRWA medical records were used to measure the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension in the primary care setting. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as a systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 in at least 2 out of 3 readings, one of which is the most recent reading, during the year for a patient diagnosed with hypertension. Overall, total utilization of antihypertensive medications has not changed between 2008 and 2012; hypertensive patients persistently used at least 2 antihypertensive medications daily (range 200-280 DDDs/100 patients with hypertension) during this five-year period. However, there is significant variation in utilization patterns by type of antihypertensive medication. While Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACE-I) were persistently the most commonly used antihypertensive medication, there utilization significantly (P < 0.05) declined by 26%. However, there was a statistically significant increase of 124% in the utilization of thiazide diuretics. Further, the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension has also declined at a rate of 3% annually between 2008 and 2012. Our findings

  11. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  12. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  13. Farmers' attitude toward treated sludge use in the villages of West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Md M; Kattou'a, Mary G; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Sato, Chikashi

    2017-07-01

    An application of treated sewage sludge on agricultural land has been widely accepted, as this method is simple and economical for disposal of wastewater residues. When applied properly on an agricultural land, sludge can replenish organic matter and nutrients in soil. Although sewage sludge has been used in agriculture in many parts of the world, its acceptability varies with different cultures and beliefs among farmers. Farmers' concerns on sludge use are primarily due to its anthropogenic origin, pollutants that it carries, a general perception of sewage being dirty, and its offensive odor. This paper aims to investigate farmers' perceptions on land application of treated sewage sludge on their farm. This study targeted two farming communities, namely, Anza and Beit Dajan villages, located in Jenin and Nablus districts in the West Bank, Palestine. In this study, a sample of 106 farmers were randomly selected and surveyed through a mixture of structured and open-ended questions. Results indicated that, overall, farmers have positive perceptions on land application of sludge. A majority of the farmers are in favor of the concept of sludge use when a planned wastewater treatment plant is constructed and it becomes operational. Results also indicate that a majority of the farmers are in favor of using sludge for fertilizing fruit trees, rather than growing vegetables and other plants in a greenhouse, and that many of them have knowledge of sludge properties and advantages and disadvantages of sludge use in agriculture. Despite the positive perceptions by the majority of farmers, a small fraction of the farmers are in disfavor of the use of sludge for the following reasons: psychological and social concerns, potential health risks, and their religious beliefs. Results further suggest that the land application of treated sewage sludge can be accepted by more farmers if the consumers are willing to buy agricultural products fertilized by sludge, sludge meets the public

  14. Self-therapy practices among university students in Palestine: focus on herbal remedies.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ansam F; Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Jabi, Samah W

    2008-12-01

    Herbal self-therapy is a common practice among Palestinians. However, no published data are available on herbal self-therapy in the Middle East in general, and in Palestine in particular. This study was conducted to (1) determine the extent of herbal self-therapy among university students, (2) investigate the different types of herbal remedies used and (3) investigate the correlates and reasons associated with such practices. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was carried out using a structured questionnaire that contained five sections: (1) demographics; (2) medication knowledge and self-care orientation; (3) types of herbal remedies used; (4) clinical conditions treated; and finally, (5) the reasons reported by students for herbal self-therapy practice. Pearson chi(2), multiple logistic regression and one-way ANOVA were performed using SPSS 13 program. 33.9% of the respondents reported using herbal remedies in self-therapy. Female gender, students at medical colleges and those with high self-care orientation were significant predictive model for herbal use. Sage (Salvia fruticosa L.), chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.), anise (Pimpinella anisum L.), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) were the most commonly utilized herbal remedies. The types of herbal remedies selected were significantly influenced by gender, but not by the level of medication knowledge or self-care orientation. Herbal remedies were used primarily for the treatment of headache, flu, menstrual pain and sore throat. The main motivating factor for using herbal remedies reported for using herbal remedies was simplicity of symptoms. Herbal self-therapy was a common practice among university students. Health care providers need to be aware of the students' self-therapy practices and need to have sufficient knowledge regarding herbs not simply because of the widespread use, but also because of significant reported side effects. Academics need to consider offering courses about herbal remedies to

  15. Prevalence of intimate partner violence among women visiting health care centers in Palestine refugee camps in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Modallal, Hanan; Abu Zayed, Ishtaiwi; Abujilban, Sanaa; Shehab, Tariq; Atoum, Maysoun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among a sample of women visiting health care centers in Palestine refugee camps in Jordan. We found that different types of IPV, including physical, emotional, sexual, economic, and control behaviors by the partners were experienced by the participants. This study was among a number of studies that investigated this phenomenon in residents of Palestinian camps. It adds to existing studies in this field, however, as it focuses on the prevalence of the top five types of IPV in these women. Co-occurrence of IPV, that is, experiencing two or more types of partner violence at the same time, was noticed in these women. Experiencing control by one's partner and the presence of different attitudes between men and women toward the use of violence were factors contributing to the occurrence of this phenomenon in these women. National efforts aiming at breaking the cycle of violence should be fostered through media and public awareness campaigns. Changing people's attitudes concerning men's use and women's acceptance of violence should be the aim of these efforts.

  16. Is the interspecific variation of body size of land snails correlated with rainfall in Israel and Palestine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2006-11-01

    The hypothesis that body size of land snail species increases with aridity in Israel and Palestine because large snails lose relatively less water due to their lower surface to volume ratio has been investigated. Data on rainfall amplitudes of 84 land snail species in Israel and Palestine and on their body sizes were used to test for interspecific correlations between body size and rainfall. Four methods, means of body sizes in rainfall categories, the midpoint method, the across-species method, and a phylogenetically controlled analysis (CAIC) showed that there is no significant correlation between body size of land snail species and their rainfall amplitude in Israel and Palestine. The lack of an interspecific correlation between body size and rainfall amplitude may be the result of conflicting selective forces on body size.

  17. Vulnerability assessment for the Gaza Strip, Palestine using DRASTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalousha, H.

    2006-06-01

    The main usefulness of groundwater vulnerability assessment maps is their ability to be an effective preliminary tool for planning, policy, and operational levels of decision-making. DRASTIC is one such assessment method. The DRASTIC index is made up of a calculated sum of products rating and weights for seven hydrogeological parameters that contribute to aquifer vulnerability. With the help of GIS, and based on the available data, maps of DRASTIC parameters were prepared for the Gaza Strip area in a case study. Each map was given a proper rate and a special weight factor developed. The final vulnerability map was obtained as a summation of the seven maps after multiplying each one with the appropriate weight. The vulnerability map was checked against the actual pollution potential in the area and nitrate concentration. The obtained vulnerability map is strongly correlated to known pollution values in the area.

  18. Case Study: Planning as Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Proposes that the objectives of strategic planning may be attained more effectively if implemented via a learning paradigm. In support of this claim, describes a case study detailing implementation of such an initiative plus post-implementation interviews. (Contains 5 figures.)

  19. Case Studies in Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Association of America, Washington, DC.

    This collection of nine case studies in applied mathematics was written primarily for the use of the instructor by a Conference sponsored by the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM). Each chapter contains exercises of varying degrees of difficulty and several include student projects. The materials were used on a trial…

  20. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.; Jones, Marni Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a due process hearing case study of a mother who contended that his son, D.J., has been denied of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) of his School District after being suspended from school. D.J., an elementary student, had been described as hyperactive, inattentive, defiant, and often volatile. He was identified…

  1. The Language Dilemma: Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teboul, J. C. Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Presents the case study involving a fictitious company's English-only policy and threats of legal action based on that policy. Includes the following responses: "Legal Issues Posed in the Language Dilemma" (Gregory S. Walden); "English Only: A Workplace Dilemma" (Alan Pakiela); "Problems with English-Only Policies" (Barbara Lynn Speicher); and…

  2. The Case Study of Frank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eynde, Peter Op't; Hannula, Markku S.

    2006-01-01

    As a unifying feature of this Special Issue, we have asked proponents of each framework to analyse an empirical classroom account of one student's process of solving a mathematical problem. Here, for the case study of "Frank", we give the main data that were available to all authors.

  3. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  4. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  5. Case Studies in Broadcast Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Howard W.

    This collection of case studies, based on factual situations which have challenged broadcast managers in recent years, is designed to stimulate thinking about and solving of "real world" problems in commercial radio and television operations. Topics of a serious, long-run nature include enlarging the radio audience; station revenue and economy;…

  6. Principal Succession: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffery C.; Webber, Charles F.

    Principal succession is misunderstood and underutilized as a means of affecting dynamic renewal in school communities. Previously, the replacement of a principal was examined solely through the experiences of principals and teachers. This paper reports on a case study that added the previously neglected perspectives of students, support staff, and…

  7. Case Studies in College Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle; And Others

    Strategies employed by selected, pseudonymous private colleges in dealing with revenue constraints are detailed in case studies. Attention is directed to the adaptation and policies of eleven private liberal arts and three comprehensive colleges in their efforts to recover from rapid decline in total revenues during 1973-1976. Intensive analysis…

  8. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.; Jones, Marni Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a due process hearing case study of a mother who contended that his son, D.J., has been denied of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) of his School District after being suspended from school. D.J., an elementary student, had been described as hyperactive, inattentive, defiant, and often volatile. He was identified…

  9. The Language Dilemma: Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teboul, J. C. Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Presents the case study involving a fictitious company's English-only policy and threats of legal action based on that policy. Includes the following responses: "Legal Issues Posed in the Language Dilemma" (Gregory S. Walden); "English Only: A Workplace Dilemma" (Alan Pakiela); "Problems with English-Only Policies" (Barbara Lynn Speicher); and…

  10. [What is the link between the sister of the "Titanic" and the history of medicine in Palestine?].

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Zalman

    2006-06-01

    On 21st November 1916, the Royal Navy Hospital ship 'Britannic' (the sister ship of the 'Titanic') was torpedoed near the island of Kea in the Aegean Sea. Captain Dr. John Cropper, aged 52, was one of 30 people who drowned of the 1100 on board. Dr. Cropper was born in 1864, at Guisborough, England. He obtained his medical degree from Cambridge University in 1891. After his marriage to Anne Ellen Walker in 1895, the Church Missionary Society sent him on a medical mission to Palestine. Dr. Cropper stayed in Palestine for about 10 years working in Acre, Nablus, Ramallah and Jerusalem. He published his experiences in 35 articles and letters in English medical periodicals, more than anyone else did in Palestine at that time. In those publications, he described various operations that he carried out and observations on infectious diseases, most of which were the first descriptions from that remote and unhealthy country. His prominent research was in the field of malaria - the most common and important disease in Palestine during that period. It was less than two years after Grassi's discovery of the role of Anopheles mosquitoes as the vector of human malaria that Dr. Cropper carried out surveys of larval and adult mosquitoes in correlation with malarial distribution in Palestine. Dr. Cropper was the first who routinely examined slides microscopically in Palestine and correctly diagnosed the type of malaria. Dr. Cropper was also the first in Palestine to suggest antimalarial measures aimed directly at the mosquito vector and paid attention to ecological aspects such as breeding places and the daily behavior of adult mosquitoes. Dr. Cropper noted the common antimalarial measurements of that time, such as covering of wells, planting of Eucalyptus trees to drain swamps and the routine use of quinine as a preventive medicine, but he wrote that those measures were not effective under the local conditions. He suggested that the only effective measures must be aimed against the

  11. Safety Culture in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the Gaza Strip, Palestine: A Need for Policy Change.

    PubMed

    Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Hamdan, Motasem Abduallah; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalil; Radwan, Abdal-Karim Said; Alshaer, Ahmed Ali

    Assessment of the prevailing safety culture within the Gazan health care system can be used to identify problem areas. Specifically, the need for improvements, raising awareness about patient safety, the identification and evaluation of existing safety programs and interventions for improving the safety culture. This study aims to assess the safety culture in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Gaza Strip hospitals and to assess the safety culture in regards to caregivers' characteristics. In a cross-sectional study using a census sample, we surveyed all nurses and physicians working in at all the NICUs in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) which includes six scales was used to assess participants' attitudes towards safety culture. The overall score for SAQ was 63.9. Domains' scores ranged between 55.5 (perception of management) and 71.8 (stress recognition). The scores reported by our participants fell below the 75 out of a possible score of 100, which was considered as a cut-off point for a positive score. Moreover, our results revealed substantial variation in safety culture domain scores among participating NICUs. These results should be an indicator to our health care policy makers to modify current or adopt new health care policies to improve safety culture. It should also be a call to design customized programs for improving the safety culture in NICUs in the Gaza Strip. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic diversity of Palestine landraces of faba bean (Vicia faba) based on RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Basheer-Salimia, R; Shtaya, M; Awad, M; Abdallah, J; Hamdan, Y

    2013-09-03

    Until now, neither phenotypic nor molecular approaches have been used to characterize the landraces of Palestine faba beans (Vicia faba). We used PCR-based RAPD markers to determine the genetic diversity and relatedness among 26 Palestinian faba bean landraces (traditional farmers' varieties) from 8 localities in the West Bank, Palestine. In tests with 37 primers, 14 generated no polymorphic bands, 12 exhibited weak and unclear products, and 11 primers produced good amplification products with high intensity and pattern stability. Ninety-four DNA fragments (loci) were detected, with an average of 8.54 loci per primer and size ranging from 160 to 1370 bp. A minimum of 4 and a maximum of 14 DNA fragments were obtained using (OPA-05 and OPA-09) and (BC-261) primers, respectively. The maximum percentage of polymorphic markers was 71.4 (BC-298) and the minimum was 50.0 (OPA-05, -09, -16). The 11 primers exhibited relatively high collective resolving power (Rp) values of 26.316, and varied from 0.154 for the OPA-09 primer to 5.236 for the BC-261, with an overall mean of 2.392. The primers BC-261, -322, and -298 were found to be the most useful RAPD primers to assess the genetic diversity of Palestinian faba beans, as they revealed relatively high Rp rates (5.236, 3.618, and 3.150, respectively). Based on the Jaccard coefficient, the genetic distance ranged from 0.358 to 0.069, with a mean of 0.213. We conclude that the RAPD technique is useful for determining genetic diversity and for developing suitable fingerprints for faba bean landraces grown in Palestine.

  13. Subgenotypes and Mutations in the S and Polymerase Genes of Hepatitis B Virus Carriers in the West Bank, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnabi, Zakeih; Saleh, Niveen; Baraghithi, Sabri; Glebe, Dieter; Azzeh, Maysa

    2014-01-01

    The mutation rate and genetic variability of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are crucial factors for efficient treatment and successful vaccination against HBV. Until today, genetic properties of this virus among the Palestinian population remain unknown. Therefore, we performed genetic analysis of the overlapping S and polymerase genes of HBV, isolated from 40 Palestinian patients' sera. All patients were HBsAg positive and presented with a viral load above 105 HBV genome copies/ml. The genotyping results of the S gene demonstrated that HBV D1 was detected in 90% of the samples representing the most prominent subgenotype among Palestinians carrying HBV. Various mutations existed within the S gene; in five patients four known escape mutations including the common G145R and D144E were found. Furthermore, a ratio of 4.25 of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations in the S gene indicated a strong selection pressure on the HBs antigen loops of HBV strains circulating in those Palestinian patients. Although all patients were treatment-naïve, with the exception of one, several mutations were found in the HBV polymerase gene, but none pointed to drug resistance. The study presented here is the first report to address subgenotypes and mutation analyses of HBV S and polymerase genes in Palestine. PMID:25503289

  14. Seasonal variation of indoor radon-222 levels in dwellings in Ramallah province and East Jerusalem suburbs, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Leghrouz, Amin A; Abu-Samreh, Mohammad M; Shehadeh, Ayah K

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the seasonal variations of indoor radon levels in dwellings located in the Ramallah province and East Jerusalem suburbs, Palestine. The measurements were performed during the summer and winter of the year 2006/2007 using CR-39 solid-state-nuclear-track detectors. The total number of investigated buildings is 75 in summer and 81 in winter. A total number of 142 dosemeters are installed in dwellings for each season for a period of almost 100 d. The radon concentration levels in summer varied from 43 to 192 Bq m(-3) for buildings in the Ramallah province and from 30 to 655 Bq m(-3) for East Jerusalem suburbs. In winter, the radon concentration levels are found to vary from 38 to 375 Bq m(-3) in the Ramallah buildings and from 35 to 984 Bq m(-3) in East Jerusalem suburbs. The obtained results for radon concentration levels in most places are found to be within the accepted international levels.

  15. The prevalence of dental caries in primary dentition in 4- to 5-year-old preschool children in northern palestine.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine the prevalence of dental caries among a representative sample of preschool children (4-5 years old) who were accompanied by their parents to the dental centre of the Arab American University in Jenin whether they come seeking dental treatment or as visitors with adult patients. Materials and Methods. 1376 children of both sexes were investigated by three calibrated and trained examiners for dental caries using the dmft index according to the WHO method. Results. 76% of the studied children have already experienced dental caries at the age of 4-5 years (1046 children). The mean dmft score was found to be 2.46 while the other 24% of children were caries-free. There was no significant difference in caries prevalence between boys and girls (77.2% versus 74.6%). Children of highly educated and college graduated mothers were found to have more fillings (restored teeth) in comparison to those who belong to mothers who did not finish their secondary (high school) education. Conclusion. The number of caries-free children in northern Palestine is still far from numbers found in developed countries. There is a real need to make improvements at the level of parents dental health education, application of preventive measures, and dietary habits among preschool children.

  16. Genomic Characterization of VIM metallo-β-lactamase-producing Alcaligenes faecalis from GAZA, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Cienfuegos-Gallet, Astrid V; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Chen, Liang

    2017-08-28

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (CP-GNB) have increasingly spread worldwide, and different families of carbapenemases have been identified in various bacterial species. Here we report the identification of five VIM metallo-β-lactamase-producing Alcaligenes faecalis, associated with a small outbreak in a large hospital in GAZA, Palestine. Next generation sequencing analysis showed blaVIM-2 is harbored by a chromosomal genomic island among three strains, while blaVIM-4 is carried by a novel plasmid in two strains. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Simultaneous epidemics of influenza and malaria in the Australian Army in Palestine in 1918.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis

    In October 1918, an Allied army (Egyptian Expeditionary Force) in Palestine experienced simultaneous epidemics of falciparum malaria and influenza during the cavalry campaign that defeated the Turkish Army. Malaria infection occurred 2 weeks after the advance of cavalry units into areas without environmental mosquito control. Pandemic influenza, now thought to be an A/H1N1 strain, struck at the same time. In the Egyptian Expeditionary Force of 315,000 soldiers, 773 died from malaria and 934 from influenza-pneumonia. Disease casualties outnumbered those due to combat by more than 37 to 1. Simultaneous infectious disease epidemics can cause mass casualties, capable of overwhelming any health service.

  18. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb.

  19. Surprise: The Korean Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-18

    theory through education ; a mre rigid approach toward decision making in foriegn policy; appropriate military doctrine; mobile and flexible forces. 20...TJUR 19 ARSTRAC7 (Contrwe on ,vvere of necesury end iderltIfy by block fnumber) Clearly m.ilitary surorise is arnng the greatest dangers a country ...SURPRISE: THE KOREAN CASE STUDY Clearly military surprise is among the greatest dangers a country can face. Despite a knowledge of this danger, responsible

  20. Case Study: Guidelines for Producing Videos to Accompany Flipped Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Généreux, Annie; Schiller, Nancy A.; Wild, John H.; Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2017-01-01

    Three years ago, the "National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science" (NCCSTS) was inspired to merge the case study and flipped classroom approaches. The resulting project aimed to create the materials required to teach a flipped course in introductory biology by assigning videos as homework and case studies in the classroom. Three…

  1. Case Study Research in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Bryan P.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the rationale for and implications of case study research in therapeutic recreation, examining: what can be learned from studying a single case; issues of validity and reliability; ethical conduct of research; and the practice of case study research (case protocol, case selection, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting data, and…

  2. Ten Things Students Need To Know About the Origins of Israel and Palestine. Footnotes. Volume 13, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luxenberg, Alan H.

    2008-01-01

    This essay is based on the author's book, "The Palestine Mandate and the Creation of Israel." As the sixtieth anniversary of Israel's independence in May 2008 approaches, that country remains a focal point of world attention. Israel's origins do much to explain why the Arab-Israeli conflict has been so hard to resolve, but also provide a…

  3. "Children of Our Future": Climate, Degeneration and Education in Hebrew Society in Mandatory Palestine (1917-1948)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltenreich, Yair

    2016-01-01

    "Children of Our Future" was a short essay published in 1929 in the Hebrew Teachers' Association jubilee book. It boldly claimed that future offspring of European Jews in Palestine were all fatally doomed due to the degenerative characteristics of the local climate. Such concepts stood in clear opposition to the dream of creating a…

  4. Gender Planning and Vocational Education, and Technical Training in Palestine: An Initial Framework. Gender and Society Working Paper #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahleh, Lamis Abu

    Gender planning and vocational education and technical training (VETT) in Palestine were examined through the following: review of available literature and policy-oriented reports, discussions with educators in the field, and roundtable discussion in which representatives of the Palestinian Ministry of Education and Ministry of Labor and experts…

  5. "Children of Our Future": Climate, Degeneration and Education in Hebrew Society in Mandatory Palestine (1917-1948)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltenreich, Yair

    2016-01-01

    "Children of Our Future" was a short essay published in 1929 in the Hebrew Teachers' Association jubilee book. It boldly claimed that future offspring of European Jews in Palestine were all fatally doomed due to the degenerative characteristics of the local climate. Such concepts stood in clear opposition to the dream of creating a…

  6. The Case: Generalisation, Theory and Phronesis in Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Arguments for the value of case study are vitiated by assumptions about the need for generalisation in the warrant of social scientific inquiry--and little generalisation is legitimate from case study, although an argument exists for the role of the case in the establishment of a form of generalisation in a certain kind of theory, a line of…

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among hypertensive patients in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Jamous, Rania M; Salameh, Nihaya M Y

    2013-11-01

    To explore the frequency of CAM use among hypertensive patients in Palestine, determine demographic characteristics that may increase the likelihood of CAM use and to find out how benefits were perceived by patients. Across-sectional survey of patients attending outpatient hypertension clinics. The method was based on a semi-structured questionnaire. Of the 4575 hypertensive patients interviewed, 85.7% respondents used at least one type of CAM. Of the 3921 CAM users, 62.13% reported taking herbs. Most of these users were >50 years old, of low educational level, and had a family history of HTN, 62.9% claimed to have obtained the desired effect from taking these herbs; however, 68.1% did not disclose this fact to their health care providers, 83 plant taxa were reported by these patients, Allium sativum was the most commonly used herb. The use of CAM, particularly herbal therapies for hypertension treatment, is highly prevalent in Palestine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The midwives ordinance of Palestine, 1929: historical perspectives and current lessons.

    PubMed

    Katvan, Eyal; Bartal, Nira

    2010-06-01

    Until 1929, midwifery in Palestine was relatively open to anyone and only partially regulated by the 1918 Public Health Ordinance, legislated shortly after the beginning of British rule. This article describes the factors that guided the shaping of midwifery and suggests possible sources of inspiration for the British legislator in crafting the Midwives Ordinance in 1929, including American, local (Jews and Arabs), and British ones. The Midwives Ordinance reflects the adjustment of midwifery to changes in the society that evolved under the British Mandate. The ordinance shows how the modern midwife's role contracted relative to the traditional one, in the context of social processes in other countries, east and west. This historical research project is based on interviews, archive documents and research literature. It analyzes the British interests in regulating midwifery, including the rationale of preserving public health and reducing infant mortality, against a background of political power struggles as well as cultural, social and professional diversity in Palestine (the tensions between the powers of doctors, nurses, and pharmacists).

  9. An Assessment of the Services Quality of Palestine Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koni, Aida; Zainal, Khalim; Ibrahim, Maznah

    2013-01-01

    The history of the Palestinian universities is relatively recent; however their impact on the Palestinians case and wellbeing is undeniable. Today, almost forty years later the Palestinian universities like many higher education institutions in the region and worldwide tussle to fulfil the students' demands on education while trying to maintain…

  10. A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    AD__ _ _ _ Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8471 TITLE: A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sara S. Strom...Molecular Epidmeiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate DAMD17-98-1-8471 Cancer Susceptibility 6. AUTHOR(S) Sara S. Strom, Ph.D. Sue-Hwa Lin 7. PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer in

  11. Physiologic amputation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Long, Jeri; Hall, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    Acute limb ischemia is a complication of severe peripheral arterial disease that can be a threatening limb as well as life. Multiple procedures exist today to help revascularize extremities; however, even with the latest technologies, surgical amputation of the limb may still be necessary. Cryoamputation, or physiologic amputation, is a method used to treat patients who are hemodynamically unstable for the operating room and who are in need of urgent amputation owing to arterial ischemia. This procedure is used in the rare instance where not only a persons' limb is threatened, but also their life. This is a case study regarding one patient who presented to the hospital with limb-threatening ischemia who became hemodynamically unstable owing to the rhabdomyolysis associated with the ischemia of his lower extremity. Cryoamputation was used to stabilize the patient and prevent further deterioration, so that he could safely undergo surgical amputation of the limb without an increase in mortality risk. Cryoamputation must be followed by formal surgical amputation when the patient is hemodynamically stabilized. It is not a limb salvaging, procedure but it is a life-saving procedure. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure and discusses the technique used for cryoamputation.

  12. Obsessional slowness: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wendy; Wong, Karen W; Fulks, Mary-Ann; Holsti, Liisa

    2008-10-01

    Obsessional slowness is a rare psychiatric disorder with few treatment options and limited research to date. Some suggest that targeted behavioural interventions may reduce the time taken for functional daily activities. To examine whether a behavioural intervention would reduce the amount of time taken for an adolescent with obsessional slowness to walk to class. A single-subject A-B-A withdrawal design was incorporated into this case study. The treatment involved one-to-one pacing and prompting during the subject's walk to gym class. Walking times to gym class were measured during a baseline phase, during a one-month treatment phase, and during a post-treatment follow-up phase. The subject's walking times decreased during the treatment phase. Post-treatment walking times suggested a carry-over effect. This study adds to the sparse evidence on treatments for obsessional slowness and suggests occupation-based treatment options.

  13. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  14. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  15. First report of extended-spectrum β-lactamases among clinical isolates of Escherichia coli in Gaza Strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Tayh, Ghassan; Ben Sallem, Rym; Ben Yahia, Houssem; Gharsa, Haythem; Klibi, Naouel; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Ben Slama, Karim

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in clinical Escherichia coli isolates from Palestine and to characterise their type, genetic environments and associated resistance genes. Twenty-seven broad-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant E. coli isolates were recovered between April and June 2013 in Gaza Strip hospitals. Characterisation of ESBL genes and their genetic environments, detection of associated resistance genes, and the presence and characterisation of integrons were performed by PCR and sequencing. The clonal relationship among ESBL-positive E. coli strains was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzyme XbaI. Phylogroup typing and virulence factors were studied by PCR. The following ESBL genes were identified: blaCTX-M-15 (21 isolates); blaCTX-M-14a (2 isolates); blaCTX-M-1 (2 isolates); blaCTX-M-3 (1 isolate); and blaCTX-M-27 (1 isolate). The blaTEM-1 gene was also detected in eight CTX-M-producing strains. The ISEcp1 sequence was found upstream of blaCTX-M in 23 isolates, and orf477 was found downstream of this gene in 24 isolates. IS903 was also detected downstream in three isolates. Six isolates carried class 1 integrons with the gene cassette arrangement dfrA17-aadA5. High clonal diversity was observed among the studied isolates by PFGE (24 unrelated profiles). The virulence gene fimA was detected in 23 isolates, the aer gene in 8 isolates and the papC gene in 7 isolates. The studied isolates belonged to phylogroups B2 (12 isolates), D (12 isolates) and A (3 isolates). This is the first report of the detection of CTX-M class β-lactamases in E. coli of clinical origin in Gaza Strip hospitals. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. STS Case Study Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  17. Generalization of Findings From Single Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mary M.

    Although single case studies might be useful to evaluators for a variety of purposes, there are no generally accepted ways for drawing inferences about the generality of findings from a case study. Single case studies are defined in this paper as either studies of single events, or disaggregated studies of multiple events. The data may be…

  18. Seasonal and spatial trends in the sources of fine particle organic carbon in Israel, Jordan, and Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, Erika; Zhou, Jiabin; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Schauer, James J.; Qasrawi, Radwan; Abdeen, Ziad; Shpund, Jacob; Vanger, Arye; Sharf, Geula; Moise, Tamar; Brenner, Shmuel; Nassar, Khaled; Saleh, Rami; Al-Mahasneh, Qusai M.; Sarnat, Jeremy A.

    2010-09-01

    A study of carbonaceous particulate matter (PM) was conducted in the Middle East at sites in Israel, Jordan, and Palestine. The sources and seasonal variation of organic carbon, as well as the contribution to fine aerosol (PM 2.5) mass, were determined. Of the 11 sites studied, Nablus had the highest contribution of organic carbon (OC), 29%, and elemental carbon (EC), 19%, to total PM 2.5 mass. The lowest concentrations of PM 2.5 mass, OC, and EC were measured at southern desert sites, located in Aqaba, Eilat, and Rachma. The OC contribution to PM 2.5 mass at these sites ranged between 9.4% and 16%, with mean annual PM 2.5 mass concentrations ranging from 21 to 25 ug m -3. These sites were also observed to have the highest OC to EC ratios (4.1-5.0), indicative of smaller contributions from primary combustion sources and/or a higher contribution of secondary organic aerosol. Biomass burning and vehicular emissions were found to be important sources of carbonaceous PM in this region at the non-southern desert sites, which together accounted for 30%-55% of the fine particle organic carbon at these sites. The fraction of measured OC unapportioned to primary sources (1.4 μgC m -3 to 4.9 μgC m -3; 30%-74%), which has been shown to be largely from secondary organic aerosol, is relatively constant at the sites examined in this study. This suggests that secondary organic aerosol is important in the Middle East during all seasons of the year.

  19. Value of case studies in disaster assessment?

    PubMed

    Grynszpan, Delphine; Murray, Virginia; Llosa, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Case studies can be useful in assessing and learning lessons from emergency situations. In this paper, different uses for disaster case studies, are explored with identification of potential pitfalls that should be avoided. In addition, ways to improve the rigor and significance of case studies are suggested. Case studies can be used as examples or as a research tool. If conducted properly, they can provide robust and compelling results. It is argued that sharing a common guide to conducting and writing case studies among all disaster risk reduction professionals could improve the quality of case study reports and thereby strengthen their value in advancing the prevention, preparedness, and management of disasters and emergencies.

  20. NWCC Transmission Case Study III

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Allison, Steve Wiese

    2000-03-01

    OAK-B135 Transmission System Improvements for Wind Energy Development in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains: Opportunities and Obstacles. This case study set out to ascertain the validity of three assumptions from the perspectives of stakeholders involved in wind energy and transmission issues in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains. The assumptions, and the stakeholders' reactions to each, are summarized below: Assumption 1--Transmission system improvements would provide significant benefits to the electricity network and its customers. Respondents acknowledge the potential for overall system benefits in the form of reduced line losses, improved grid stability and reliability, and enhanced ability to conduct spot market transactions. They also agree that these benefits relate to specific regional needs. However, there is disagreement over the extent of other benefits such as efficiency gains and cost savings from reduced line losses. Further, environmental and community interest groups point out that none of these benefits are realized without significant financial, environmental and social costs. Assumption 2--The benefits of transmission improvements would be helpful, but not confined, to wind power. All respondents agree that wind energy could benefit from transmission system improvements. But they also acknowledge, reluctantly, in the case of environmental stakeholders, that the benefits of an improved transmission system cannot be limited to environmentally preferable forms of generation. Some environmental and community advocate respondents also feel that transmission system improvement projects can be avoided altogether through energy conservation and efficiency measures, and by substituting wind energy for fossil generation. Assumption 3--Transmission alliances among stakeholders within and external to the wind community can provide benefits in the public interest. The fractured, multi-jurisdictional governance of the regional transmission system, and the

  1. Attitude and perception of patients and health care practitioners toward oral sustained release dosage forms in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the knowledge of health professionals in Palestine regarding the advantages of sustained release dosage forms (SRDFs) over conventional therapy. Data were gathered from a questionnaire that was handed out to community pharmacists, physicians and patients. Pharmaceutical industry decision makers were enrolled in this study. Data were analyzed using the SPSS. Pharmacists (92.9%) and 89.2% of physicians thought that SRDFs improve patient compliance. 81.5% of pharmacists and 77% of physicians were in agreement regarding the capacity of SRDFs to maintain therapeutic activity during night. In this study, 81.5% of pharmacists and 81% of physicians believed that SRDFs provide further advantage with psychiatric patients who forget to take their medications. Pharmacists (63.1%) and only 63.5% of physicians believed that SRDFs yield a time saving for nurses who use SRDFs in hospital. Only 45.3% of physicians and 43.4% of pharmacists thought that SRDFs result in cost saving due to better disease management. Pharmacists (95.2%) and 95.9% of physicians agreed that SRDFs could be the right choice for faith patient's who must take their medication during the month of Ramadan. Pharmacists (66.7%) and 50.7% of physicians recognize that SRDFs may be unsafe if they are improperly formulated. Bad swallowing was also recognized as inconveniences of SRDFs by 67.9% of pharmacists and 57.3% of physicians. Given the above advantages, 75% of patients showed economical problems regarding the cost of the single course therapy of SRDFs and 100% of interviewed patients were enthusiastic about the advantage of SRDFs during Ramadan. The advantages of SRDFs are not completely understood by Palestinian health professionals. Pharmaceutical industries should pay more attention to the development and advertising of SRDFs due to the valuable advantages of these dosage forms.

  2. Medications Adherence and Associated Factors among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the Gaza Strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Elsous, Aymen; Radwan, Mahmoud; Al-Sharif, Hasnaa; Abu Mustafa, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence to anti-diabetic medications among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) seeking medical care in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 369 primary care patients with type 2 DM from October to December 2016. Adherence to medications was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-4). Socio-demographic and clinical variables, provider-patient relationship, health literacy, and health belief were examined for each patient. Univariate, binary logistic regression and multiple linear regression were applied to determine the independent factors influencing adherence to anti-diabetic medications using SPSS version 22. Of all the respondents, 214 (58%), 146 (39.5%), and nine (2.5%) had high (MMAS score = 0), medium (MMAS score = 1 + 2), and low (MMAS score ≥ 3) adherence to anti-diabetic medications, respectively. Factors that were independently associated with adherence to anti-diabetic medications were as follows: female gender [odds ratio (OR): 1.657, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.065-2.578] and perception of disease's severity (OR: 1.510, 95% CI: 0.410-5.560). Elderly (t = 1.345) and longer duration of DM (t = 0.899) were also predictors of adherence but showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). The level of complete adherence to anti-diabetic medications was sub-optimal. New strategies that aim to improve patients' adherence to their therapies are necessary taking into consideration the influencing factors and the importance of having diabetes educators in the primary care centers.

  3. Attitude and perception of patients and health care practitioners toward oral sustained release dosage forms in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Abdel Naser

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the knowledge of health professionals in Palestine regarding the advantages of sustained release dosage forms (SRDFs) over conventional therapy. Methods Data were gathered from a questionnaire that was handed out to community pharmacists, physicians and patients. Pharmaceutical industry decision makers were enrolled in this study. Data were analyzed using the SPSS. Results Pharmacists (92.9%) and 89.2% of physicians thought that SRDFs improve patient compliance. 81.5% of pharmacists and 77% of physicians were in agreement regarding the capacity of SRDFs to maintain therapeutic activity during night. In this study, 81.5% of pharmacists and 81% of physicians believed that SRDFs provide further advantage with psychiatric patients who forget to take their medications. Pharmacists (63.1%) and only 63.5% of physicians believed that SRDFs yield a time saving for nurses who use SRDFs in hospital. Only 45.3% of physicians and 43.4% of pharmacists thought that SRDFs result in cost saving due to better disease management. Pharmacists (95.2%) and 95.9% of physicians agreed that SRDFs could be the right choice for faith patient’s who must take their medication during the month of Ramadan. Pharmacists (66.7%) and 50.7% of physicians recognize that SRDFs may be unsafe if they are improperly formulated. Bad swallowing was also recognized as inconveniences of SRDFs by 67.9% of pharmacists and 57.3% of physicians. Given the above advantages, 75% of patients showed economical problems regarding the cost of the single course therapy of SRDFs and 100% of interviewed patients were enthusiastic about the advantage of SRDFs during Ramadan. Conclusion The advantages of SRDFs are not completely understood by Palestinian health professionals. Pharmaceutical industries should pay more attention to the development and advertising of SRDFs due to the valuable advantages of these dosage forms. PMID:23960735

  4. Food sanitation practices in restaurants of Ramallah and Al-Bireh district of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A; Al-Mitwalli, S M

    2009-01-01

    Safe handling of food in restaurants is a basic element in the reduction of foodborne illness. We investigated knowledge and practices about food safety by food-handlers in restaurants in Ramallah and Al-Bireh district of Palestine. A high proportion of workers in the restaurants had no previous experience in other restaurants and 63.4% had received no training on food sanitation and safety. Most of the restaurants in the refugee camps, villages and towns had only 1 worker. Restaurants lacked basic conditions for food sanitation and safety, such as hot water in most and cleaning materials in some. Many workers had poor personal hygiene practices. Training is needed for restaurant owners and staff to improve food handling practices and standards.

  5. Consensual Educational Perspectives in Post-Accord Palestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyke, Blair

    This study proposed to gather, in a systematic fashion, ideas from Palestinian educational leaders about the nature of a culturally Palestinian educational system. The semi-structured interviews focused on the questions: (1) What changes have occurred in Palestinian education since the 1993 peace accord?; (2) What are the central Palestinian…

  6. Allographic agraphia: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to describe or report visual features of letters in any case or font. This case increases our understanding of the allographic level of letter-shape representation in written language production. It provides strong support for previous reports indicating the neural independence of different types of case and font-specific letter-shape information; it provides evidence that letter-shape production does not require explicit access to information about the visual attributes of letter shapes and, finally, it reveals the possibility of interaction between processes involved in letter-shape production and perception. PMID:18489965

  7. PHARMACEUTICAL QUALITY OF GENERIC ATORVASTATIN PRODUCTS COMPARED WITH THE INNOVATOR PRODUCT: A NEED FOR REVISING PRICING POLICY IN PALESTINE.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Hroub, Abdel Kareem; Abed, Eliama; Jibali, Sondos; Al-Saghir, Ruba; Zaid, Abdel Naser

    2016-01-01

    Atorvastatin reduces morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular events. This study was conducted to assess the prices and pharmaceutical quality of innovator atorvastatin 20 mg with its locally available generics in Palestine and to assess the suitability of their interchangeability. The prices of innovator and generic atorvastatin 20 mg were determined and compared. Innovator atorvastatin and four generic products were tested for their pharmaceutical quality. Tablets were tested for their drug contents, weight uniformity, hardness, disintegration and dissolution. Three out of four generics were less expensive than the innovator. Pharmaceutical quality assessments were satisfactory and within limits for all atorvastatin tested products. The average weight ranged from 206.6 ± 8.40 to 330 ± 3.92 mg and the %RSDs were within the permitted limits as per USP. Tablet hardness ranged from 102 ± 1.41 to 197.4 ± 6.88 kg and drug contents ranged from 92.2% to 105.3%. All products disintegrated within permitted time limits and showed very rapid dissolution. Products released more than 85% of their drug contents in less than 15 min. Our results showed that all tested innovator and generic atorvastatin products were of good pharmaceutical quality. Despite the lack of in vivo evaluation, our results indicate that these products are equivalent in vitro. Considering the in vitro release characteristics, these products might be used interchangeably. However, regulatory authorities permit the use of in vitro data in establishing similarity between immediate release oral dosage forms containing biopharmaceutical classification system class I and III drugs only.

  8. Molecular detection of Theileria, Babesia, and Hepatozoon spp. in ixodid ticks from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Ereqat, Suheir; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Baneth, Gad; Abdeen, Ziad

    2016-07-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit various infectious agents that cause disease in humans and livestock worldwide. A cross-sectional survey on the presence of protozoan pathogens in ticks was carried out to assess the impact of tick-borne protozoa on domestic animals in Palestine. Ticks were collected from herds with sheep, goats and dogs in different geographic districts and their species were determined using morphological keys. The presence of piroplasms and Hepatozoon spp. was determined by PCR amplification of a 460-540bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene followed by RFLP or DNA sequencing. A PCR-RFLP method based on the 18S rRNA was used in order to detect and to identify Hepatozoon, Babesia and Theileria spp. A total of 516 ticks were collected from animals in six Palestinian localities. Five tick species were found: Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, Rhipicephalus turanicus, Rhipicephalus bursa, Haemaphysalis parva and Haemaphysalis adleri. PCR-based analyses of the ticks revealed Theileria ovis (5.4%), Hepatozoon canis (4.3%), Babesia ovis (0.6%), and Babesia vogeli (0.4%). Theileria ovis was significantly associated with ticks from sheep and with R. turanicus ticks (p<0.01). H. canis was detected only in R. sanguineus s.l. and was significantly associated with ticks from dogs (p<0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the presence of these pathogens in ticks collected from Palestine. Communicating these findings with health and veterinary professionals will increase their awareness, and contribute to improved diagnosis and treatment of tick-borne diseases.

  9. Case-control studies: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Pearce, Neil

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present in elementary mathematical and statistical terms a simple way to quickly and effectively teach and understand case-control studies, as they are commonly done in dynamic populations-without using the rare disease assumption. Our focus is on case-control studies of disease incidence ('incident case-control studies'); we will not consider the situation of case-control studies of prevalent disease, which are published much less frequently.

  10. Real-Life Case Studies for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, William

    Case studies described in this book reflect conditions present in today's public schools. Situations described in these case studies are intended to introduce education students to the variety of problems existing in today's schools. The 38 case studies highlight: student cheating; teacher's observation by administrator; inclusion; contract…

  11. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  12. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  13. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  14. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  15. Business and Consumer Education Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delta Pi Epsilon, Minneapolis, Minn. Phi Chapter.

    This publication contains 58 case studies for classroom use in teaching various business and consumer education subjects at the high school level. A supplement to a previous Phi Chapter publication, "Office Education Case Studies" (1973), the case studies are intended to create class discussions and help students acquire the ability to analyze…

  16. Levodopa addiction. A case study.

    PubMed

    Tack, E; De Cuypere, G; Jannes, C; Remouchamps, A

    1988-09-01

    A case is presented of a young woman with a serious addiction to levodopa who over the years developed an extrapyramidal syndrome and chronic paranoid psychotic behaviour. The possible pathophysiological mechanism is discussed.

  17. Demystifying Instructional Innovation: The Case of Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantar, Lina D.

    2013-01-01

    Issues emerging from instructional innovation are inevitable, yet basing any curriculum shift on a theoretical framework is paramount. This paper grounds the case-based pedagogy in three learning theories: behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. The three theories are described and situated in relation to the case study method. An…

  18. Reusable experiment controllers, case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brian A.; Gaasbeck, Jim Van

    1996-03-01

    Congress has given NASA and the science community a reality check. The tight and ever shrinking budgets are trimming the fat from many space science programs. No longer can a Principal Investigator (PI) afford to waste development dollars on re-inventing spacecraft controllers, experiment/payload controllers, ground control systems, or test sets. Inheritance of the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) from one program to another is not a significant re-use of technology to develop a science mission in these times. Reduction of operational staff and highly autonomous experiments are needed to reduce the sustaining cost of a mission. The re-use of an infrastructure from one program to another is needed to truly attain the cost and time savings required. Interface and Control Systems, Inc. (ICS) has a long history of re-usable software. Navy, Air Force, and NASA programs have benefited from the re-use of a common control system from program to program. Several standardization efforts in the AIAA have adopted the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) architecture as a point solution to satisfy requirements for re-use and autonomy. The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has been a long-standing customer of ICS and are working on their 4th generation system using SCL. Much of the hardware and software infrastructure has been re-used from mission to mission with little cost for re-hosting a new experiment. The same software infrastructure has successfully been used on Clementine, and an end-to-end system is being deployed for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) for Johns Hopkins University. A case study of the ERIM programs, Clementine and FUSE will be detailed in this paper.

  19. Geohydrology of the Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Jerry E.; Halasz, Stephen J.; Peters, Henry B.

    1980-01-01

    Additional problems concerning the hydrologic stability of Oakwood and Palestine Salt Domes have resulted from the disposal of oil-field salinewater in the cap rock at the Oakwood Dome and previous solution mining of salt at the Palestine Dome Additional investigations are needed to determine if a selected dome is hydrologically stable. Needed investigations include: (1) A more complete comparative analysis of the regional and local geohydrologic system; (2) a site-specific drilling and sampling program to analyze the cap rock-aquifer boundary, sediment distribution, hydraulic-parameter variations, hydraulic-head relationships, and hydrochemical patterns; and (3) mass-transport computer modeling of ground-water flow at the domes.

  20. Families as Case Managers: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Performed follow-up study measuring effects of case management training on management activities of families of elderly persons. Interviewed 78 subjects from original study and found case management to be normative activity for families of elderly. Noted differences reported between male and female case managers and in types of obstacles…

  1. Case Studies for Effective Business Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister-Kizzier, Donna

    This book is designed as a resource for educators who teach business content in a variety of instructional settings. It contains case studies representing all functional areas of business, including corporate training, for grades 7 through graduate education. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the case study method. The history of the case method,…

  2. Orde Wingate and the British Internal Security Strategy during the Arab Rebellion in Palestine, 1936-1939

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    ART AND SCIENCE Art of War by MARK LEHENBAUER, MAJOR, US ARMY B.S., Texas A&M University , College Station, Texas, 1999...some years and knew Arabic well, but since coming to Palestine had developed pronounced Zionist tendencies and was now learning Yiddish or Hebrew ...Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994), 403-408; David French, “Big wars and small wars between the wars, 1919-39,” in Big Wars and Small Wars: The

  3. Geohydrology of the Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.E.; Halasz, S.J.; Peters, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The salt within these domes has penetrated as much as 20,000 feet of Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata, and presently extends to within 120 to 800 feet of the land surface. The salt penetrates or closely underlies major freshwater and salinewater aquifers within the basin. To provide a safe repository for radioactive wastes within one or more of these domes, a thorough understanding of the geohydrology needs to be obtained, and the hydrologic stability of the domes needs to be established for the expected life of the storage facility. Dissolution may exist at all four candidate salt domes, possibly through contact with Cretaceous or Tertiary aquifers, or through fault systems in the vicinity of the domes. Strata overlying and surrounding Palestine and Keechi Salt Domes have been arched into steeply-dipping folds that are complexly faulted. Similar conditions exist at Oakwood and Mount Sylvan Domes, except that the Tertiary strata have been only moderately disturbed. Additional problems concerning the hydrologic stability of Oakwood and Palestine Salt Domes have resulted from the disposal of oil-field salinewater in the cap rock at the Oakwood Dome and previous solution mining of salt at the Palestine Dome.

  4. Drive Electric Vermont Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Fred; Roberts, Dave; Francfort, Jim; White, Sera

    2016-03-01

    Currently in the United States, the heavy majority of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales have been in highly conducive, selected, metropolitan areas; opposed to more broad distribution across the country. The U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge is looking carefully at the barriers and opportunities that exist to enable small and midsize communities to partake in the PEV market and benefit from the economic and environmental advantages of PEVs. In order to gain insight into these challenges and barriers, DOE selected a success story (i.e., Drive Electric Vermont) as the subject of this case study, as the state of Vermont is tied with Detroit, Michigan in having the highest percentage of 2014 (most recent complete data) PEV registrations for cold weather U.S. cities and has seen more than a sixfold increase in charging stations over the last three years. The overall objective of this case study was to use the lessons learned from Drive Electric Vermont to determine what activities are most effective at encouraging acquisitions of PEVs and deployment of charging infrastructure in small to midsize communities, prioritizing and sequencing their implementation, identifying robust means for extrapolation, and applying this understanding to other small to midsize communities across the nation. The Drive Electric Vermont Program was formed in 2012 with a goal of increasing the use of electrified transportation in Vermont through policy development, education and outreach, and infrastructure development. The Drive Electric Vermont Program can be broadly broken into four components: (1) strategic planning/leadership, (2) stakeholder/partnership development, (3) education and outreach, and (4) incentives. The early phases of the program focused heavily on strategic planning, and stakeholder and partnership development, followed by a transition to education and outreach activities, charging infrastructure development, and grant and incentive programs

  5. Pyourachus: study of two cases.

    PubMed

    Thapar, R B; Jha, V U; Mehta, R U; Shah, G R

    2006-07-01

    The urachus, or median umbilical ligament, is a midline tubular structure that extends upward from the anterior dome of the bladder toward, the umbilicus and represents the vestigial remnant of at least two embryonic structures, the cloaca and the allantois. The tubular urachus normally involutes before birth, remaining as a fibrous band, however its persistence can give rise to various clinical problems, not only in infants and children but also in adults. We report two cases of pyourachus at our institute with a review of the clinical presentation, imaging findings and surgical management. Both our patients were young males, with haematuria being the presenting feature in one case which has not been previously described in literature.

  6. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    Eight case studies appropriate for use in a course in management development were prepared and are provided in this document. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision. Questions for…

  7. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  8. Associative visual agnosia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Charnallet, A; Carbonnel, S; David, D; Moreaud, O

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study, an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory.

  9. Case study: a bridge across the paradigms.

    PubMed

    Luck, Lauretta; Jackson, Debra; Usher, Kim

    2006-06-01

    Case study as a teaching and research tool has an extensive history in health and social sciences. Despite its suitability for many of the research questions that face nurses, nurses have not fully embraced case study as a comprehensive approach for research. The vagaries of the real-life clinical setting can confound methodologically purist researchers. Case study provides a milieu in which nurse researchers can respond to these vagaries and move towards a paradigmatic openness. In this paper, we argue that case study offers, as yet, under-explored and under-utilised potential as a bridge across the traditional research paradigms. We argue that case study has broad research application and epistemological, ontological and methodological flexibility. When used as a research approach, case study is both the process and end product of research. It provides a delineated boundary for inquiry, and a structural process within which any methods appropriate to investigating a research area can be applied.

  10. Northeastern Pennsylvania Retrospective Case Study Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA conducted a retrospective case study in northeastern Pennsylvania to investigate reported instances of contaminated drinking water resources in areas where hydraulic fracturing activities occurred

  11. How To Set Up Your Own Small Business. Service Company Case Study. Manufacturing Firm Case Study. Retail Store Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallek, Max

    This collection of case studies is intended for use in a course in setting up a small business. The first, a case study of the process of setting up a service company, covers analyzing the pros and cons of starting one's own business, assessing the competition and local market, and selecting a site for and financing the business. The principal…

  12. Case studies in conservation science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  13. Regional case studies--Africa.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Andrew M

    2009-01-01

    Africa is the final continent to be affected by the nutrition transition and, as elsewhere, is characterized by the paradoxical coexistence of malnutrition and obesity. Several features of the obesity epidemic in Africa mirror those in other emerging nations: it penetrates the richer nations and urban areas first with a strong urban- rural gradient; initially it affects the wealthy, but later there is a demographic switch as obesity becomes a condition more associated with poverty, and it shares many of the same drivers related to the increasing affordability of highly refined oils and carbohydrates, and a move away from subsistence farm work and towards sedentary lifestyles. Africa also has some characteristics of the obesity epidemic that stand out from other regions such as: (1) excepting some areas of the Pacific, Africa is probably the only region in which obesity (especially among women) is viewed culturally as a positive and desirable trait, leading to major gender differences in obesity rates in many countries; (2) most of Africa has very low rates of obesity in children, and to date African obesity is mostly an adult syndrome; (3) Africans seem genetically prone to higher rates of diabetes and hypertension in association with obesity than Caucasians, but seem to be relatively protected from dislipidemias; (4) the case-specific deaths and disabilities from diabetes and hypertension in Africa are very high due to the paucity of health services and the strain that the 'double burden' of disease places on health systems.

  14. Case study: design? Method? Or comprehensive strategy?

    PubMed

    Jones, Colin; Lyons, Christina

    2004-01-01

    As the case study approach gains popularity in nursing research, questions arise with regard to what it exactly is, and where it appears to fit paradigmatically. Is it a method, a design, are such distinctions important? Colin Jones and Christina Lyons review some of the key issues, with specific emphasis on the use of case study within an interpretevist philosophy.

  15. Case Studies in Reading: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trela, Thaddeus M., Comp.; Becker, George J., Comp.

    Descriptions of individual diagnosis and remediation of reading problems experienced by students at all levels are included in this annotated bibliography. Included are books, texts having case study sections, and journal reports which together comprise useful sources of case studies of reading disabilities. An opening section lists nine "first…

  16. Case Studies in Middle Management Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lori S.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents a series of supervision-related case studies of situations that midlevel managers might face. Individuals enrolled in a midlevel management professional development course recommended the topics selected for this chapter. Drawing upon her experience teaching the course, the author selected four case studies that individuals…

  17. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants' work, artists'…

  18. Iowa College Student Aid Commission Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to trace the policy production process of a state agency, the Iowa College Student Aid Commission (Commission), to its function today. This case study relied on a review of federal and state statutes, a news article search, biennium reports of the Commission, and information obtained from the…

  19. Successful Principal Leadership: Australian Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurr, David; Drysdale, Lawrie; Mulford, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide an Australian perspective on successful school leadership. Design/methodology/approach: The paper focuses on case studies in two Australian states (Tasmania and Victoria). Case studies for each state were developed independently and are reported separately. Findings: The findings show a remarkable degree of…

  20. Chemical Case Studies: Science-Society "Bonding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Nae, Nehemia

    1981-01-01

    Describes a unit designed to illustrate the "science-society-technology connection," in which three case studies of the chemical industry in Israel are presented to high school chemistry students. Chosen for the unit are case studies on copper production in Timna, on plastics, and on life from the Dead Sea. (CS)

  1. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants' work, artists'…

  2. Twenty Techniques for Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning and teaching with case studies are instructional approaches that are increasingly being applied in a variety of disciplines, such as business, law, medicine, and education. Instructors who have experienced traditional, teacher-centered instruction are often looking for ways to successfully integrate case studies, a…

  3. Twenty Techniques for Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning and teaching with case studies are instructional approaches that are increasingly being applied in a variety of disciplines, such as business, law, medicine, and education. Instructors who have experienced traditional, teacher-centered instruction are often looking for ways to successfully integrate case studies, a…

  4. Using Case Studies: An International Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Case studies as an instructional strategy have been used in many disciplines, including law, teacher education, science, medicine, and business. Among the benefits of this method of instruction are involving students in learning, developing their critical thinking skills, promoting communication, and engaging in critical analysis. Case studies are…

  5. Case Studies for Teaching Students with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macnamara, Gael R.

    2004-01-01

    This easy-to-use book of case studies helps you recognize the signs of dyslexia and prescribe effective teaching strategies for students with dyslexia. It includes a Case Study Analysis Sheet so you can work through important aspects of a student's personal, academic, and social life. You can then compare what you've compiled to the author's…

  6. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  7. Case Study Considerations for Teaching Educational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    This paper examines the decisions, benefits, and difficulties in teaching educational psychology through a constructivist case study approach. Recent interest in and inquiry into constructivism, pedagogical content knowledge, and case study methodology are influencing the content and goals of educational psychology in teacher preparation. The…

  8. Teaching Case Studies: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, James R.; Harper, Jeffrey S.

    Many of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools require undergraduate Management Information Systems (MIS) majors to take a course in the management of information technology. Over half of these schools utilize case studies in the teaching of this course. The authors emphasize that case studies are an…

  9. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  10. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  11. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G.; MacDonald, M.

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  12. Are nested case-control studies biased?

    PubMed Central

    Langholz, Bryan; Richardson, David

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently asserted that the nested case-control study design, in which case-control sets are sampled from cohort risk sets, can introduce bias (“study design bias”) when there are lagged exposures. The bases for this claim include a theoretic and an “empirical evaluation” argument. Both of these arguments are examined and found to be incorrect. Appropriate methods to explore the performance of nested case-control study designs, analysis methods, and compute power and sample size from an existing cohort are described. This empirical evaluation approach relies on simulating case-control outcomes from risk sets in the cohort from which the case-control study is to be performed. Because it is based on the underlying cohort structure, the empirical evaluation can provide an assessment that is tailored to the specific characteristics of the study under consideration. The methods are illustrated using samples from the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. PMID:19289963

  13. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M B D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or "Classical psychoanalysis" dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals.

  14. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  15. Educating the Human Spirit in Times of Conflict: The Case of Emergency Education in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, J. Mark; Affouneh, Saida Jaser

    2006-01-01

    Many reports have highlighted the vulnerability of children's rights during times of conflict, and emergency education has come into being as a way of ensuring that children's educational needs are met in crisis situations. But how far can emergency education provide meaningful values education? The first section of this article examines the…

  16. The Role of Leadership in Transitional States: The Cases of Lebanon, Israel-Palestine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Hebrew), Mabat Malam , a journal for intelligence and security affairs of the Israel Heri- tage & Commemoration Center (IICC), No. 52, December 2008, p... Malam , a journal for in- telligence and security affairs of the Israel Heritage & Commemo- ration Center (IICC), No. 52, December 2008. Lederach, J. P

  17. Radioactivity concentration in soil samples in the southern part of the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Dabayneh, K M; Mashal, L A; Hasan, F I

    2008-01-01

    The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive materials such as (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were measured for 38 soil samples collected from diverse zones in the southern area of West Bank, Palestine using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were found to range from 32.9 to 104.7, 14.5 to 76.6 and 297 to 962 Bq kg(-1) with averages value of 68.7, 48.0 and 630 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The obtained values of activity concentrations are higher than the world average of 35, 30 and 500 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The measured (137)Cs activity concentration was found to range from 1.8 to 36.1 Bq kg(-1) with an average value of 8.5 Bq kg(-1). The detected activities were attributed to the fallout of (137)Cs, which is the only man-made radionuclide. The calculated average of the total gamma-radiation dose rate of natural radionuclides, (137)Cs and cosmic radiation is 121.4 nGy h(-1). The radium equivalent activity (R(aeq)), dose rate (D(r)), external hazard index (H(ex)) and radioactivity level index (I(gamma)) in all samples are presented. Some values were found to be in the range of worldwide values, whereas others were above the worldwide values.

  18. Suitability of Palestine salt dome, Anderson Co. , Texas for disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Patchick, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The suitability of Palestine salt dome, in Anderson County, Texas, is in serious doubt for a repository to isolate high-level nuclear waste because of abandoned salt brining operations. The random geographic and spatial occurrence of 15 collapse sinks over the dome may prevent safe construction of the necessary surface installations for a repository. The dissolution of salt between the caprock and dome, from at least 15 brine wells up to 500 feet deep, may permit increased rates of salt dissolution long into future geologic time. The subsurface dissolution is occurring at a rate difficult, if not impossible, to assess or to calculate. It cannot be shown that this dissolution rate is insignificant to the integrity of a future repository or to ancillary features. The most recent significant collapse was 36 feet in diameter and took place in 1972. The other collapses ranged from 27 to 105 feet in diameter and from 1.5 to more than 15 feet in depth. ONWI recommends that this dome be removed from consideration as a candidate site.

  19. Spatial assessment and redesign of a groundwater quality monitoring network using entropy theory, Gaza Strip, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogheir, Y.; Singh, V. P.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2006-06-01

    Using entropy theory, a methodology was developed for the evaluation and redesign of groundwater quality monitoring wells in the Gaza Strip in Palestine. Essential to the methodology is the development of a Transinformation Model (TM) which yields the amount of information transfer and the dependency between the wells as a function of distance. The TM parameters, such as the minimum transinformation and the range, were employed for evaluating the network which revealed that most of the distances between wells were less than the range. It also indicated that a high percentage of redundant information existed in the network. Therefore, the network was reduced by superimposing a square pattern over the monitored area and selecting one well per square block in a stratified pattern. The methodology was tested using the chloride data collected from 1972 2000 from 417 groundwater quality monitoring wells in the Gaza Strip. The number of the groundwater quality monitoring wells in the Gaza Strip was reduced by 53%, while there was 26% redundant information based on the minimum existing distance between wells. This methodology is meant to help monitor the groundwater quality (salinity) in the Gaza Strip.

  20. The nature of the Pleistocene-Holocene palaeosols in the Gaza Strip, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubeid, Khalid F.

    2011-09-01

    The Pleistocene to Holocene succession in the Gaza Strip, Palestine, consists of an alternation of calcareous sandstones and reddish fine-grained deposits (palaeosols). The palaeosols can be subdivided into two main groups based on the sand-sized versus clay- to silt-sized grains: (1) the sandy hamra palaeosols, and (2) the loess and loess-derived palaeosols. The hamra palaeosols can, in turn, also be subdivided into two main types according to their colour and grain size: (1) light brown loamy to sandy hamra palaeosols, and (2) dark brown sandy clay hamra palaeosols. The hamra palaeosols are polygenetic and originated in humid environments. Their red colour results from ferric oxides coating the sand grains, but also by illuviation. The various pedogenitic units and their gradual transition to loess palaeosols are due to different phases of dust accretion. Both groups of palaeosols developed during the last glacial. They are considered to represent different climate environments: hamra palaeosols represent humid climates, whereas the loess and loess-derived palaeosols represent dry and semi-dry climates.

  1. Blood zinc levels in nursing women from different regions of the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Zyoud, Ahed; Jallad, Donia; Hadwan, Labebah; Ihssan, Neeran; Hilal, Hikmat

    2017-07-06

    Pregnant and nursing women are at higher risk of zinc deficiency which can have detrimental consequences on health. We assessed blood zinc levels in 72 nursing women from the West Bank of Palestine and investigated the association between sociodemographic variables and blood zinc levels. Blood samples were analyzed for their zinc contents using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Blood and data collection were performed between July and December 2016. The median blood zinc level was 4.53 mg/L (interquartile range of 0.38 mg/L). In unadjusted analyses, blood zinc levels were higher in nursing women who lived in cities (p-value <.001), had higher household income (p-value <.001), whose husbands had a white collar job (p-value <.05), were nonsmokers (p-value <.05), did not use hair dyes (p-value <.05), and consumed energy beverages (p-value <.001). Multiple linear analysis showed that living in cities and consuming energy beverages remained significantly associated with higher blood zinc levels (p-value <.05). Blood zinc levels were in the range previously reported for similar non-malnourished populations. Nursing women living in cities and those consuming energy beverages tended to have higher blood zinc levels. Urbanized lifestyle might have enhanced blood zinc levels in nursing women.

  2. Mapping groundwater development costs for the transboundary Western Aquifer Basin, Palestine/Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, A. M.; Ó Dochartaigh, B. É.; Calow, R. C.; Shalabi, Y.; Selah, K.; Merrett, S.

    2009-11-01

    The costs of developing groundwater in the Western Aquifer Basin vary considerably across the West Bank and Israel. One of the main reasons for this variability is the diverse hydrogeological conditions within the aquifer. Using data from recent hydrogeological investigations, an estimate of the variation of both the drilling and pumping costs was calculated and then mapped across the Upper and Lower Aquifers within the Western Aquifer Basin. These groundwater cost maps proved helpful in analyzing the impacts of hydrogeology on water supply, and also in communicating complex hydrogeological information to a broader audience. The maps clearly demonstrate that the most cost-effective area to develop groundwater is along the Green Line—the 1949 armistice boundary between Israel and the Palestinian West Bank. Any migration of this boundary eastwards will affect the cost and feasibility of developing groundwater within Palestine, making abstraction from the Upper Aquifer impracticable, and increasing the cost of developing the Lower Aquifer. Therefore, the separation wall, which is being constructed to the east of the Armistice Line in Palestinian territory, will significantly reduce the ability of the Palestinians to develop groundwater resources.

  3. Evaluation and numerical modeling of seawater intrusion in the Gaza aquifer (Palestine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qahman, Khalid; Larabi, Abdelkader

    2006-06-01

    A numerical assessment of seawater intrusion in Gaza, Palestine, has been achieved applying a 3-D variable density groundwater flow model. A two-stage finite difference simulation algorithm was used in steady state and transient models. SEAWAT computer code was used for simulating the spatial and temporal evolution of hydraulic heads and solute concentrations of groundwater. A regular finite difference grid with a 400 m2 cell in the horizontal plane, in addition to a 12-layer model were chosen. The model has been calibrated under steady state and transient conditions. Simulation results indicate that the proposed schemes successfully simulate the intrusion mechanism. Two pumpage schemes were designed to use the calibrated model for prediction of future changes in water levels and solute concentrations in the groundwater for a planning period of 17 years. The results show that seawater intrusion would worsen in the aquifer if the current rates of groundwater pumpage continue. The alternative, to eliminate pumpage in the intruded area, to moderate pumpage rates from water supply wells far from the seashore and to increase the aquifer replenishment by encouraging the implementation of suitable solutions like artificial recharge, may limit significantly seawater intrusion and reduce the current rate of decline of the water levels.

  4. A meteorological anomaly in Palestine 33 centuries ago: How did the sun stop?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camuffo, D.

    1990-03-01

    The meteorological conditions pertaining to the famous biblical episode during which Joshua stopped the sun when the Hebrew pursued the Amorites (Joshua 10, 10 13) are analyzed. The story, which cannot be interpreted as an anomaly in the astronomic motions, could be interpreted from the point of view of atmospheric optics. The event occurred at sundown, after an exceptional hailstorm, which left the ground of the valley where the Amorites stayed covered with ice. This resulted in a big drop in the air temperature, forming the conditions for a “superior mirage”. The Hebrew were in another nearby place, untouched by hail, on hot soil, in the usual daytime conditions of “inferior mirage”. When they reached the place of the Amorites, their optical path inverted curvature, displacing upwards the sun which was setting. Hail in Palestine is a quite rare meteorological event and the superior mirage would seem decidedly rare in the subtropical climate. Given that the event has been described in detail it could not have been invented, as the superior mirage was then unknown, in particular its connection with hailstorms. This would thus lead to the conclusion that the miracle described should be interpreted as a meteorological event which actually did happen.

  5. Case Study on Quality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Zahida

    2011-01-01

    Quality of Education, especially at Primary level, is an important issue to be discussed at the International Forum. This study highlights the quality of primary education through a comparison of the quality of Community Model Schools and Govt. Girls Primary Schools in Pakistan. Community Model Schools were established under Girls Primary…

  6. Salary Equity: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConkey, Joan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a six-year effort to complete a salary equity review for librarians at the University of Colorado (Boulder) in the context of general salary equity for women and minority faculty. Recounts the difficulties before a male counterpart study was chosen to complete the process, and advises others seeking salary equity to be realistic,…

  7. Associative Visual Agnosia: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Charnallet, A.; Carbonnel, S.; David, D.; Moreaud, O.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study [1], an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory [4]. PMID:18413915

  8. Case Studies in Wilderness Medicine, the Sequel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarter, Shana Lee; Gray, Melissa

    Five case studies illustrate evacuation decision making in a wilderness setting. The cases describe medical problems encountered during wilderness trips: (1) a hiker suffering from hypothermia; (2) a 49-year-old man with chest pains; (3) a 19-year-old woman with abdominal pain; (4) a young woman in anaphylactic shock; and (5) a teenager hit on the…

  9. Case Study: A Separation of Powers Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Steve

    1986-01-01

    Presents a case study involving students in the issue of separation of powers as applied to the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act. Students examine the case of Jagdish Rai Chadha, an immigrant threatened with deportation whose problems resulted in 1983 U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring legislative veto provision of Immigration and…

  10. Case Studies of Environmental Risks to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Lynn R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents case studies on children's exposure to pesticides, including risks through the use of the insecticide aldicarb on bananas, the home use of diazinon, and the use of interior house paint containing mercury. These cases illustrate how regulatory agencies, parents, health-care providers, and others who come into contact with children have…

  11. Mineral scale management. Part 1, Case studies

    Treesearch

    Peter W. Hart; Alan W. Rudie

    2006-01-01

    Mineral scale increases operating costs, extends downtime, and increases maintenance requirements. This paper presents several successful case studies detailing how mills have eliminated scale. Cases presented include calcium carbonate scale in a white liquor strainer, calcium oxalate scale in the D0 stage of the bleach plant, enzymatic treatment of brown stock to...

  12. Case Studies of Environmental Risks to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Lynn R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents case studies on children's exposure to pesticides, including risks through the use of the insecticide aldicarb on bananas, the home use of diazinon, and the use of interior house paint containing mercury. These cases illustrate how regulatory agencies, parents, health-care providers, and others who come into contact with children have…

  13. Case Study: Mini-Case Studies: Small Infusions of Active Learning for Large-Lecture Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carloye, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the usage of case studies to be an excellent method for engaging students through stories. The author notes she developed a series of mini-case studies that can be implemented, with a little advance preparation, within a 10- to 15-minute window during lecture. What makes them "mini" case studies?…

  14. A Unique Case of Intraabdominal Polyorchidism: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Alemayehu, Biruk; Kozusko, Steven D.; Borao, Frank; Vates III, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Polyorchidism, alternatively supernumerary testes (SNT), is a condition where an individual is born with more than two testicles. This congenital anomaly is quite rare and the literature has described various presentations. Questions/Purposes. To our knowledge, this presentation of polyorchidism has yet to be described in the literature. The goal of this case study is to add to the pediatric, general, and urologic surgery's body of knowledge of the subject matter. Case Study. A nine-month-old boy was admitted for an impalpable right testis and phimosis. At the time of surgical exploration, there appeared to be polyorchid testis on the right-hand side, with three masses that potentially appeared to be undescended testes. Discussion. Proponents of a conservative approach argue that infertility is common in patients with polyorchidism and, by preserving a potentially functional SNT, there may be improved spermatogenesis. When performing definitive surgical treatment, meticulous intra-abdominal and intrainguinal exploration must be undertaken. Orchiopexy should be performed to reduce the chances of torsion, malignancy, and infertility. Conclusion. Our case is important to the literature as it is the first known case of polyorchidism with 3 SNT on the right side, located intra-abdominally, and in a patient less than 1 year of age. PMID:27722006

  15. Case-control studies in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nesvick, Cody L; Thompson, Clinton J; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Observational studies, such as cohort and case-control studies, are valuable instruments in evidence-based medicine. Case-control studies, in particular, are becoming increasingly popular in the neurosurgical literature due to their low cost and relative ease of execution; however, no one has yet systematically assessed these types of studies for quality in methodology and reporting. The authors performed a literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE to identify all studies that explicitly identified themselves as "case-control" and were published in the JNS Publishing Group journals (Journal of Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Neurosurgical Focus) or Neurosurgery. Each paper was evaluated for 22 descriptive variables and then categorized as having either met or missed the basic definition of a case-control study. All studies that evaluated risk factors for a well-defined outcome were considered true case-control studies. The authors sought to identify key features or phrases that were or were not predictive of a true case-control study. Those papers that satisfied the definition were further evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. The search detected 67 papers that met the inclusion criteria, of which 32 (48%) represented true case-control studies. The frequency of true case-control studies has not changed with time. Use of odds ratios (ORs) and logistic regression (LR) analysis were strong positive predictors of true case-control studies (for odds ratios, OR 15.33 and 95% CI 4.52-51.97; for logistic regression analysis, OR 8.77 and 95% CI 2.69-28.56). Conversely, negative predictors included focus on a procedure/intervention (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.998) and use of the word "outcome" in the Results section (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.082-0.65). After exclusion of nested case-control studies, the negative correlation between focus on a procedure

  16. Compared perspectives of Arab patients in Palestine and Israel on the role of complementary medicine in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Hamadeh, Amneh M A; Schiff, Elad; Jamous, Rana M; Dagash, Jamal; Jamous, Rania M; Agbarya, Abed; Bar-Sela, Gil; Massalha, Eyas; Silbermann, Michael; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed Saleem

    2015-05-01

    Complementary medicine (CM) is extensively used by patients with cancer across the Middle East. We aimed to compare the perspectives of two Arab populations residing in diverse socioeconomic-cultural settings in Palestine and Israel regarding the role of CM in supportive cancer care. A 27-item questionnaire was constructed and administered to a convenience sample of Arab patients receiving cancer care in four oncology centers in northern Israel and Palestine. Each of the two groups had 324 respondents and was equally distributed by age and marital status. Compared with the Israeli-Arab group, Palestinian participants reported significantly higher CM use for cancer-related outcomes (63.5% vs. 39.6%, P < 0.001), which included more herbal use (97.6% vs. 87.9%, P = 0.001) and significantly lower use of dietary supplements, acupuncture, mind-body and manual therapies, and homeopathy. Most respondents in both groups stated that they would consult CM providers if CM was integrated in oncology departments. Related to this theoretical integrative scenario, Palestinian respondents expressed fewer expectations from their oncologists to actively participate in building their CM treatment plan. Treatment expectations in both groups focused on improving quality of life (QOL), whereas Palestinian respondents had fewer expectations for CM to improve fatigue, emotional concerns, sleep, and daily functioning. Arab patients with cancer from Palestine and Israel highly support CM integration within their oncology institutions aiming to improve QOL. Nevertheless, respondents differed in their perceived model of CM integration, its treatment objectives, and their oncologists' role in CM integration. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization by electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods of the shallow hydrogeological system at Hebron (West Bank, Palestine) in a semi-arid zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirhan, Asal; Hamidi, Mohammad O.

    2012-09-01

    Multi-electrode geo-electrical and transient electromagnetic surveys were carried out to characterize the nature of the subsurface infiltration zones (5 to 20 m) related to a series of groundwater outlets, and to reveal the geometry of the different aquifers at Bani-Naim, in the south-eastern foothills of the Hebron area, West Bank, Palestine. The purpose of the surveys was to understand the link between water storage/transfer and the characteristics of the geological formations. The strata in this semi-arid region are composed of alternate layers of chalky limestone, hard limestone, marl and chalk. A total of 30 ERT and 15 TDEM were conducted at Bani Naim-Jahir and Bani Naim-Birein. A correlation between the results indicates various infiltration pathways: fractures, feature heterogeneities, and porous chalk. The local heterogeneity on the eastern side were the major pathways for the water infiltration, whereas the thick marl layer underneath acts as a natural impermeable barrier preventing water from infiltrating deeper. A combination of the different geophysical results identified conductive features that correspond to the infiltration zones supplying the dug wells with water. Furthermore, it was established that the fractured chalk and porous chalky limestone act as an aquifer. A three-dimensional visualization of the resistivity allowed a useful reconstruction of the shallow hydrogeological system. Consequently, these studies contribute to regional sustainable development projects in this semi-arid region.

  18. Societal Norms and Conditions and Their Influence on Daily Life in Children With Type 1 Diabetes in the West Bank in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Elissa, Kawther; Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Axelsson, Åsa B; Khatib, Salam; Sparud-Lundin, Carina

    To explore the experiences of daily life in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their parents living in the West Bank in Palestine. A qualitative study using thematic interviews was performed with 10 children with T1D and their parents (n=10). Content analysis was performed with the assistance of NVIVO 10. The overall theme was facing the social reality of diabetes. This was underpinned by two themes: stigmatization and social constraints. Facing the social reality of diabetes described children and their parents' everyday life attempts to place themselves within the context of the disease and social context. Children and their parents described how stigmatization and social constraints impacted their daily life as a result of fear of disclosing the disease, which could affect their social status. These findings highlighted how daily life in children with T1D and their parents was highly affected by cultural impacts, especially as stigma related to the illness affected social interactions of female and male children/adolescents. Lack of knowledge and misunderstandings about T1D in society lead to negative consequences like poorer management of diabetes, and this becomes mediated by gender. The findings suggest health care providers need to be aware of the cultural and social impact of T1D on children's and parents' daily life in order to meet their needs and challenges by providing appropriate interventions, strategies and support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of error estimated from Palestine pharmacists' knowledge and certainty on the adverse effects and contraindications of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Al-Rjoub, Mohammed; Al-Horoub, Mohammed M; Al-Hroub, Wasif; Al-Rjoub, Bisan; Al-Nabi, Bashaaer Abd

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate community pharmacists' knowledge and certainty of adverse effects and contraindications of pharmaceutical products to estimate the risk of error. Factors influencing their knowledge and certainty were also investigated. The knowledge of community pharmacists was assessed in a cross-sectional design using a multiple-choice questions test on the adverse effects and contraindications of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients from May 2014 to March 2015. Self-rated certainty scores were also recorded for each question. Knowledge and certainty scores were combined to estimate the risk of error. Out of 315 subjects, 129 community pharmacists (41.0%) completed the 30 multiple-choice questions test on active ingredients and excipients. Knowledge on active ingredients was associated with the year of graduation and obtaining a licence to practice pharmacy. Knowledge on excipients was associated with the degree obtained. There was higher risk of error in items on excipients than those on ingredients (P<0.01). The knowledge of community pharmacists in Palestine was insufficient with high risk of errors. Knowledge of community pharmacists on the safety issues of active ingredients and excipients need to be improved.

  20. Demand assessment and price-elasticity estimation of quality-improved primary health care in Palestine: a contribution from the contingent valuation method.

    PubMed

    Mataria, Awad; Luchini, Stéphane; Daoud, Yousef; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2007-10-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology to assess demand and price-elasticity for health care, based on patients' stated willingness to pay (WTP) values for certain aspects of health care quality improvements. A conceptual analysis of how respondents consider contingent valuation (CV) questions allowed us to specify a probability density function of stated WTP values, and consequently, to model a demand function for quality-improved health care, using a parametric survival approach. The model was empirically estimated using a CV study intended to assess patients' values for improving the quality of primary health care (PHC) services in Palestine. A random sample of 499 individuals was interviewed following medical consultation in four PHC centers. Quality was assessed using a multi-attribute approach; and respondents valued seven specific quality improvements using a decomposed valuation scenario and a payment card elicitation technique. Our results suggest an inelastic demand at low user fees levels, and when the price-increase is accompanied with substantial quality-improvements. Nevertheless, demand becomes more and more elastic if user fees continue to rise. On the other hand, patients' reactions to price-increase turn out to depend on their level of income. Our results can be used to design successful health care financing strategies that include a consideration of patients' preferences and financial capacities.

  1. Risk of error estimated from Palestine pharmacists’ knowledge and certainty on the adverse effects and contraindications of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate community pharmacists’ knowledge and certainty of adverse effects and contraindications of pharmaceutical products to estimate the risk of error. Factors influencing their knowledge and certainty were also investigated. Methods: The knowledge of community pharmacists was assessed in a cross-sectional design using a multiple-choice questions test on the adverse effects and contraindications of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients from May 2014 to March 2015. Self-rated certainty scores were also recorded for each question. Knowledge and certainty scores were combined to estimate the risk of error. Results: Out of 315 subjects, 129 community pharmacists (41.0%) completed the 30 multiple-choice questions test on active ingredients and excipients. Knowledge on active ingredients was associated with the year of graduation and obtaining a licence to practice pharmacy. Knowledge on excipients was associated with the degree obtained. There was higher risk of error in items on excipients than those on ingredients (P<0.01). Conclusion: The knowledge of community pharmacists in Palestine was insufficient with high risk of errors. Knowledge of community pharmacists on the safety issues of active ingredients and excipients need to be improved. PMID:26743774

  2. Modalities of Generalization Through Single Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Zittoun, Tania

    2016-11-26

    The value of case studies for theory building is still doubted in psychology. The paper argues for the importance of case studies and the possibility of generalizing from these for a specific sociocultural understanding of human development. The paper first clarifies the notion of abduction within case studies, drawing on pragmatists James and Peirce and expanding it with the work of Lewin, and argues that it is the core mechanism that allows generalization from case studies. The second section presents the possibility of generalizing from individual single case studies, for which not only the subjective perspective, but also the dynamics by which the social and cultural environment guide and enable the person's development, have to be accounted for. The third section elaborates the question of institutional case studies, where the challenge is to account both for institutional dynamics, and for persons' trajectories within; this is exemplified with an ongoing study on the process of obtaining citizenship in Switzerland. The paper briefly concludes by highlighting two possible implications of the paper, one concerning the process of theoretical reasoning, the other, the fact that sociocultural psychology could itself be seen as an institution in-the-making.

  3. Memory and Learning: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Raymond E.

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of the Learning Efficency Test (LET), an approach to assessing the learning efficiency and short-term memory recall capacity in children, is described via a case study demonstrating the test's use to develop instructional strategies. (CL)

  4. Abstracts of Remediation Case Studies, Volume 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, published by the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR), is a collection of recently published abstracts summarizing 13 cost and performance case studies on the use of remediation technologies at contaminated sites.

  5. Retrospective Case Study in Northeastern Pennsylvania

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA chose Bradford County, and parts of neighboring Susquehanna County, as a retrospective case study location because of the extensive hydraulic fracturing activities occurring there, coincident with the large number of homeowner complaints.

  6. Travel Efficiency Assessment Method: Three Case Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This slide presentation summarizes three case studies EPA conducted in partnership with Boston, Kansas City, and Tucson, to assess the potential benefits of employing travel efficiency strategies in these areas.

  7. Review of ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following is a letter report from the Executive Committee of the BOSC concerning the review of the ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop: Developing a Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Research Strategy for Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide.

  8. Performable Case Studies in Ethics Education.

    PubMed

    Robeson, Richard; King, Nancy M P

    2017-09-12

    Bioethics education often includes the study of short stories, novels, plays, and films, because such materials present case examples that can highlight relevant issues and questions especially vividly for a wide range of students. In addition, creative writing is widely used in the education of health professional students and in continuing education settings for health professionals. There are very few academic or professional disciplines that do not use case studies, but the case study in dialogic form has not been standard practice for thousands of years. Dramatic arts casuistry-the creation and performance of short case studies designed specifically to raise bioethics issues for discussion-represents an application of literature and the medical humanities that is both unique and uniquely valuable. This essay describes the development and history of a course that has been successfully taught to medical students and graduate bioethics students, in which the class researches, writes, and performs a case study designed to elicit reflection and discussion about a topic and set of bioethics issues of current interest to both academic and general audiences. The model is also suited to the presentation and discussion of existing case studies, both live and via on-demand audio.

  9. Participative Case Studies: Integrating Case Writing and a Traditional Case Study Approach in a Marketing Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Case-based pedagogy is a valuable tool for applying business concepts and theories to organizational contexts. Traditional case-based pedagogy offers such learning opportunities. What this pedagogy lacks, however, is an element of real-time experiential learning opportunities. This research focuses on the advantages of incorporating a case-writing…

  10. Home Start Evaluation Study. Interim Case Studies IIa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Robert

    This formative evaluation study of Home Start uses a case study approach. A brief case study focuses on the administrative structure and staff resources and responsibilities of National Home Start. Also included are reports on seven local programs developed after two field visits had been made to each program. In the first visit, objectives chosen…

  11. Teaching Business Demography Using Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Swanson, David A; Morrison, Peter A

    2010-02-01

    Many faculty members consider using case studies but not all end up using them. We provide a brief review of what cases are intended to do and identify three ways in which they can be used. We then use an example to illustrate how we have used the case study method in teaching business demography. Among other benefits, we note that the case studies method not only encourages the acquisition of skills by students, but can be used to promote "deep structure learning," an approach naturally accommodates other features associated with the case studies method-the development of critical thinking skills, the use of real world problems, the emphasis of concepts over mechanics, writing and presentation skills, active cooperative learning and the "worthwhileness" of a course. As noted by others, we understand the limitations of the case study method. However, given its strengths, we believe it has a place in the instructional toolbox for courses in business demography. The fact that courses we teach is a testament to our perceived efficacy of this tool.

  12. A Case Study about Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case study was to identify what were Taiwanese University English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' perceptions about learning communication strategies. This study collected qualitative data about students' beliefs and attitudes as they learned communication strategies. The research question guiding the study was:…

  13. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  14. Education and Work Councils: Four Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Audrey; And Others

    This collection of four case studies represents the conclusion of a two-phase study of a federal program to sponsor education and work councils. Following an outline of the history and concept of education and work councils as well as the findings of a study of such councils, the importance of council collaboration with selected sectors is…

  15. Measurements of indoor radon concentration levels in dwellings in Bethlehem, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Leghrouz, Amin A; Abu-Samreh, Mohammad M; Shehadeh, Ayah K

    2013-02-01

    Indoor radon level measurements were carried out in 42 dwellings in Bethlehem, Palestine, using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors. The measurements were performed during winter and spring seasons of the year 2010, for a period ranging from 97-118 d using a total of 100 detectors. The detectors were installed in living rooms, bedrooms, kitchens, and storage areas of 39 houses, as well as in three schools, selected randomly in the surveyed area. The results of indoor radon levels and the annual effective dose in houses were found to vary from 26 - 611 Bq m(-3) and 0.65 - 14.1 m Sv y(-1), with average values of 117.0 Bq m(-3) and 2.95 m Sv y(-1), respectively. The mean values of radon concentration levels in bedrooms, kitchens, living rooms, basements, and storage areas are, respectively, 106.5, 113.1, 101.5, and 164.2 Bq m(-3). The corresponding mean values of annual effective dose for the bedrooms, kitchens, living rooms, basements, and storage areas are 2.66, 2.83, 2.54, 14.1 m Sv y(-1), respectively. In schools, the radon levels are found to vary from 31 - 400 Bq m(-3) with an average value of 125.1 Bq m(-3). The average annual effective dose in schools is found to be 3.12 mSv y(-1). This value is higher than the assigned international value. In general, the results show that radon concentration levels in 83% of the investigated dwellings are lower than the indoor radon action level of 150 Bq m(-3) for the United States.

  16. Case Study Research Methodology in Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-11-01

    Through data collection methods using a holistic approach that focuses on variables in a natural setting, qualitative research methods seek to understand participants' perceptions and interpretations. Common qualitative research methods include ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, and historic research. Another type of methodology that has a similar qualitative approach is case study research, which seeks to understand a phenomenon or case from multiple perspectives within a given real-world context.

  17. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  18. [Asteroid hyalopathy. Ultrastructural study of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Adenis, J P; Leboutet, M J; Loubet, R

    1984-01-01

    The vitreous of three patients with asteroïd hyalosis (average age: 57 years) was obtained by a two-hand closed pars plana vitrectomy. Asteroïd hyalosis was associated with alcoholic neuropathy in the first case, long standing retinal detachment in the second case, and diabetes mellitus in the third case. The visual acuity before and after the surgical procedure improved from 1.2/6 to 6/6 in the first case, from light perception to 0.3/6 in the second case, from 0.6/6 to 4.8/6 in the third case. The vitreous was studied by different ultrastructural technics : transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.) scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and electron diffraction X ray analysis (E.D.A.X.). By S.E.M. the asteroïd bodies appeared as rounded structures with an irregular surface connected to each other by fibrous strands among sodium chloride crystals. No cellular remnants were observed. By T.E.M. the asteroïd bodies were composed of interwinned ribbons of multilaminar membranes with a periodicity (10 to 60 A) characteristic of complex lipids, especially phospholipids. At the edge of the ribbons there were dots and sometimes clumps of opaque material that tended to crack out of the specimen with the heat of the electron beam. T.E.M. study disclosed the irregular disposition of the calcific bodies. By E.D.A.X. the calcific composition of the rounded structures could be determined : calcium and phosphorus were the main elements detectable in asteroïd bodies of all sizes for all three patients. The average calcium counts for the three successive cases were : 18, 30, 43 and for phosphorus : 9, 14, 26. Potassium was found in the first case, and sulfur in the third case.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [The significance of activities in the Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society for progression of medicine in the Middle East (to the 130th anniversary of foundation)].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, L Ye; Afanasiyeva, Ye A

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the history of foundation of the Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society in Jerusalem and its input into progression of medicine in the Middle east. The medical activity of Russian physicians in medical institutions of the Society is reflected too.

  20. African-American Women and Doctoral Study: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Susan E.

    Case studies are presented of three African-American women who earned doctoral degrees in physical education and sport disciplines between 1971 and 1990. Personal interviews were conducted with the informants on issues related to the campus environment as well as financial and academic factors. The case studies are analyzed in terms of the women's…

  1. Building clinical practice in the Palestine Red Crescent operation theatres in Lebanon: reflections from the perspective of an expatriate nurse.

    PubMed

    Tjoflåt, I; Karlsen, B

    2013-12-01

    This paper, based on the experience of the first author as an expatriate nurse, aims to describe and discuss some aspects of collaboration that contributed to the building of clinical practice when implementing an operating theatre programme in the Palestine Red Crescent Society (PRCS) hospitals in Lebanon. The operation theatre programme lasted for 8 months: 6 months in 2008 and 2 months in 2009. The programme was part of the partnership project 'Quality of care in the five PRCS hospitals in Lebanon' between the International Committee of the Red Cross and the PRCS Lebanon (PRCS-L) branch. The essential aspects that may have contributed to the building of clinical practice in the operation theatre programme included the expatriate nurse and the Palestine Red Crescent operating theatre nurses working together over time as colleagues, the socio-cultural pedagogic perspective selected for the implementation and the collaboration with the management of the hospitals and counterparts in the PRCS-L branch. One should also note the human and structural issues that seemed to influence the implementation of the programme in a more negative way. This experience may provide insight for other nurses into the importance of working as colleagues, selecting an appropriate pedagogic perspective and establishing productive collaboration with all partners when building clinical practice during a humanitarian mission. © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  2. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  3. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  4. CASE STUDY: DIELDRIN ATTACK IN DALYAN LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the first two weeks of December 2005, NATO sponsored an Advanced Study Institute (ASI) in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of this ASI involved a case study of a terrorist attack, where a chemical was assumed to be dumped into Sulunger Lake in Turkey. This chapter documents the re...

  5. Anthropology and Popular Culture: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Jack

    The study of popular culture in the United States is an appropriate anthropological endeavor, as evidenced in a case study of the volcanic eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Oregon. By examining its popular arts, anthropologists gain understanding of the culture and its people. For example, an analysis of reactions to the Mt. St. Helens eruption…

  6. Prader-Willi Disease: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbus, William R., III

    A case study focuses on the characteristics and physical management of a 15-year-old with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a birth defect associated with hypotonia, insatiable appetite, hypogonadism, central nervous system dysfunction, and abnormal growth and development . A literature review addresses studies dealing with behavior modification of obesity…

  7. Vandalism Prevention Programs: A Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James; Fallis, Anita

    The objective of this study was to identify, describe, and appraise existing behavior-oriented, vandalism-prevention programs using a case-study approach. This report summarizes an investigation of three programs in Ontario (Canada): Project PRIDE (Pupils Responsible in Determining their own Environment); Operation Aware; and a Diversion program.…

  8. Case Studies of Three Interorganizational Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    As part of their study of interorganizational collaboration, researchers present three detailed case studies of how regional education agencies (REAs) supply knowledge utilization services to the school districts they serve. The three REAs are the Wayne County (Michigan) Intermediate School District (with 36 districts), the Educational Improvement…

  9. Curriculum Formation: A Case Study from History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Suellen

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Bernstein and Maton and using a case-study approach, this study explores the formation of an undergraduate history curriculum at the University of Cape Town. This article focuses on two periods of curriculum formation referred to as history as canon and history as social science. With respect to these two curriculum periods…

  10. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  11. Case Study: Interventions for an ADHD Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This case study was done in partial fulfillment of a Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.) Graduate Course the participant-observer was completing. The participant-observer learned a lot about Dmitrov, the child in this study. Dmitrov was a 2nd-grade student who was diagnosed (late in the school year) with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity…

  12. Connecting Reading and Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zhanfang

    2015-01-01

    Connecting reading and writing, proposed by many scholars, is realized in this case study. The 30 participants in this study are the English majors of the third year in one School of Foreign Languages in Beijing. They are encouraged to write journals every week, based on the source text materials in their Intensive Reading class, with the final…

  13. Mecca Hills: Visitor research case study

    Treesearch

    Deborah Chavez; John Baas; Patricia Winter

    1993-01-01

    This "Case Study" represents the first in a series of reports which provide insight into specific management environments and the factors significant to an understanding of the expectations and demands of public land visitors in the West. The study describes the methods and results of a two year inventory of visitors in a wildland area in the desert...

  14. Technologies in Literacy Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on outcomes of a study which explored changes in teachers' literacy pedagogies as a result of their participation in a collaborative teacher professional learning project. The educational usability of schemas drawn from multiliteracies and Learning by Design theory is illustrated through a case study of a teacher's work on…

  15. A Multiple Case Study of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Wei; Khoury, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore how leadership and contextual factors influence innovation in R&D teams in national laboratories, using the approach of multiple case studies. This paper provides some preliminary findings from two highly innovative teams residing in two national laboratories in the US. The preliminary results suggested several common…

  16. Anthropology and Popular Culture: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Jack

    The study of popular culture in the United States is an appropriate anthropological endeavor, as evidenced in a case study of the volcanic eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Oregon. By examining its popular arts, anthropologists gain understanding of the culture and its people. For example, an analysis of reactions to the Mt. St. Helens eruption…

  17. Case Studies in Australian Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ralph J., Ed.; Rooth, S. John, Ed.

    This publication contains the following 24 case studies of adult education in Australia: "NSW Department of Agriculture Home Study Programme" (O'Neill); "Self-Help Adult Education: The University of the Third Age at the Brisbane CAE" (Swindell); "Marriage Enrichment Programme" (D. Kerr, C. Kerr); "Carringbush…

  18. CASE STUDY: DIELDRIN ATTACK IN DALYAN LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the first two weeks of December 2005, NATO sponsored an Advanced Study Institute (ASI) in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of this ASI involved a case study of a terrorist attack, where a chemical was assumed to be dumped into Sulunger Lake in Turkey. This chapter documents the re...

  19. Application of Channel Stability Methods - Case Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Application for Design Using SAM ...................... 25 Conclusions ..................................... 26 3-Case Study, Puerco River...Stability curves for project design ................. 25 Figure 13. Puerco River study reach ....................... 28 Figure 14. Upstream view of the rock...mile 5.5 31 Figure 18. Realigned channel reach showing sheet pile drop structure - river mile 6.6 ...................... 35 Figure 19. Puerco River

  20. Prader-Willi Disease: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbus, William R., III

    A case study focuses on the characteristics and physical management of a 15-year-old with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a birth defect associated with hypotonia, insatiable appetite, hypogonadism, central nervous system dysfunction, and abnormal growth and development . A literature review addresses studies dealing with behavior modification of obesity…

  1. Case Studies in Australian Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ralph J., Ed.; Rooth, S. John, Ed.

    This publication contains the following 24 case studies of adult education in Australia: "NSW Department of Agriculture Home Study Programme" (O'Neill); "Self-Help Adult Education: The University of the Third Age at the Brisbane CAE" (Swindell); "Marriage Enrichment Programme" (D. Kerr, C. Kerr); "Carringbush…

  2. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  3. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  4. Shuttle Case Study Collection Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    As a continuation from summer 2012, the Shuttle Case Study Collection has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. Decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle is gathered into a single database to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes. The goal is to provide additional engineering materials that enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. During this second phase of the project, the Shuttle Case Study Collection website was developed. Extensive HTML coding to link downloadable documents, videos, and images was required, as was training to learn NASA's Content Management System (CMS) for website design. As the final stage of the collection development, the website is designed to allow for distribution of information to the public as well as for case study report submissions from other educators online.

  5. Integrating ethics into case study assignments.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Pamela A

    2014-12-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should," and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good.

  6. Integrating Ethics into Case Study Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should,” and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good. PMID:25574287

  7. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.

  8. Remediation case studies: Soil vapor extraction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing soil vapor extraction (SVE). This volume contains reports on ten projects. Various chlorinated aliphatic contaminants were treated at eight of the locations. One report in this volume describes a project that used SVE followed by bioventing. (Note: this one project, completed at Hill Air Force Base, Site 914, is described in both the SVE and Bioremediation case study volumes.) One of the projects described in the SVE volume used horizontal wells with remote monitoring of equipment.

  9. Tool Version Management Technology: A Case Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Technical Report AD-A235 639 CMU/SEI-90-TR-25 Tool Version Management Technology: A Case Study Peter H. Feiler Grace F. Downey November 1990 x 91...00304 90 7 Technical Report CMU/SEI-90-TR-25 ESD-90-TR-226 November 1990 Tool Version Management Technology: A Case Study Peter H. Feiler Grace F. Downey...trademark holder. Table of Contents 1. lntroducton 1 2. The Problem 3 2.1. Tool Version Organization and Selection 3 2.2. Stability of Selected Tool

  10. Case Studies, Make-Your-Case Studies, and Case Stories: A Critique of Case-Study Methodology in Sustainability in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Peter Blaze; Walker, Kim E.; Wals, Arjen E.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we raise serious concerns about existing case-study research on sustainability in higher education. Our key concern is that the research does not live up to its potential for improving the field of sustainability in higher education. We have argued that case-study research in the field falls short of its promise due to a lack of…

  11. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Study of 48 Cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjit; Bharpoda, Pragnesh; Reddy, Raghuveer

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis represents a group of highly lethal infections characterized by rapidly progressing inflammation and necrosis. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical profile, microbial flora, and predisposing risk factors in patients with necrotizing fasciitis. Lastly, we aimed to formulate a protocol for management of necrotizing fasciitis. Forty-eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis patients who reported to our hospital between April 2007 and September 2009 were included in the study. The commonest predisposing factors were age greater than 50 years (58 % cases) and diabetes mellitus (52 % cases). The commonest site involved was extremity (70.8 %). Majority of infections were polymicrobial (87.5 %). Repeated aggressive debridement was the commonest surgical procedure performed. Early and aggressive surgical debridement, often in multiple sittings, supplemented by appropriate antibiotics and supportive therapy, forms the key to a successful outcome in necrotizing fasciitis.

  12. Case study examples using self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, D; Hutton, C L; Nerbonne, M A; Newman, C W; Smoski, W J

    1990-10-01

    The following case studies demonstrate the application of self-assessment techniques. The selection of procedures reported here is not meant to imply necessarily that these procedures are more or less effective or more widely used than other available self-assessment tests, but rather to illustrate the various purposes for which self-assessment tools may be employed. Case 1 illustrates the contribution of data obtained from the Hearing Performance Inventory (Giolas, Owens, Lamb, & Shubert, 1979) in the management and counseling of a severely hearing impaired adult. Case 2 involves the use of the Hearing Problem Inventory developed by Hutton in Atlanta (HPI-A, Hutton, 1987). Application of the Self-Assessment of Communication (SAC) and Significant Other Assessment of Communication (SOAC) (Schow and Nerbonne, 1982) is shown in Case 3, whereas Case 4 demonstrates the usefulness of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE, Ventry and Weinstein, 1982). Both the SAC/SOAC and HHIE batteries involve problem cases associated with hearing aid fitting and assessment of benefit. The final illustration (Case 5) is a report on the Children's Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS), a new questionnaire developed by Smoski, Brunt, and Tannahill/ISHA (1987) for assessing parent's judgment of children's listening abilities (Appendix). The versatility of self-assessment applications across a broad assortment of impairment levels, age groups, and clinical settings is demonstrated in these cases. Hopefully the reader will see more clearly the application and value of these and other non-audiometric techniques and will be motivated to increase the use of self-assessment tools in the individual work setting.

  13. Case Series Study of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Aller-García, Ana I; Castro-Méndez, Carmen; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Marín-Martínez, Elena M; Breval, Ismail Zakariya-Yousef; Couto-Caro, Carmen; López-Marín, Juan C; Peña-Griñán, Nicolás; Ruiz de Pipaon, Maite; Romero-Mejías, Ana M; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella

    2016-12-02

    Diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is challenging. The objective of the study was to assess the value of microbiological tests to the diagnosis of IPA in the absence of non-specific radiological data. A retrospective study of 23 patients with suspicion of IPA and positivity of some microbiological diagnostic tests was performed. These tests included conventional microbiological culture, detection of Aspergillus galactomannan (GM) antigen and in some patients (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan (BDG) and Aspergillus fumigatus DNA using the LightCycler(®) SeptiFast test. In 10 patients with hematological malignancy, 6 cases were considered 'probable' and 4 'non-classifiable.' In 8 patients with chronic lung disease, 7 cases were classified as 'probable' and 1 as 'proven,' and in 5 patients with prolonged ICU stay (>7 days), there were 2 'proven' cases, 2 'non-classifiable' and 1 putative case. Microbiological culture was positive in 17 cases and 18 Aspergillus spp. were isolated (one mixed culture). A. fumigatus was the most frequent (44.4%) followed by A. tubingensis. The Aspergillus galactomannan (GM) antigen assay was positive in 21 cases (91.3%). The GM antigen and the (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan (BDG) assays were both performed in 12 cases (52.2%), being positive in 9. The SeptiFast test was performed in 7 patients, being positive in 4. In patients with non-classifiable pulmonary aspergillosis and one or more positive microbiological tests, radiological criteria may not be considered a limiting factor for the diagnosis of IPA.

  14. ESL and Digital Video Integration: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, J., Ed.; Gromik, N., Ed.; Edwards, N., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    It should come as no surprise that digital video technology is of particular interest to English language learners; students are drawn to its visual appeal and vibrant creative potential. The seven original case studies in this book demonstrate how video can be an effective and powerful tool to create fluid, fun, interactive, and collaborative…

  15. Case Studies of Altruistic Persons: AERA Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, William N.

    This document presents information from a body of research called Lives of Service, a collection of case studies of 32 altruistic adults. It begins with a review of the research on altruism, service orientation, giving, helpfulness, social responsibility, and voluntarism. Research on altruism in psychology and in other disciplines is included,…

  16. Acoustical case studies of three green buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebein, Gary; Lilkendey, Robert; Skorski, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Case studies of 3 green buildings with LEED certifications that required extensive acoustical retrofit work to become satisfactory work environments for their intended user groups will be used to define areas where green building design concepts and acoustical design concepts require reconciliation. Case study 1 is an office and conference center for a city environmental education agency. Large open spaces intended to collect daylight through clerestory windows provided large, reverberant volumes with few acoustic finishes that rendered them unsuitable as open office space and a conference room/auditorium. Case Study 2 describes one of the first gold LEED buildings in the southeast whose primary design concepts were so narrowly focused on thermal and lighting issues that they often worked directly against basic acoustical requirements resulting in sound levels of NC 50-55 in classrooms and faculty offices, crosstalk between classrooms and poor room acoustics. Case study 3 is an environmental education and conference center with open public areas, very high ceilings, and all reflective surfaces made from wood and other environmentally friendly materials that result in excessive loudness when the building is used by the numbers of people which it was intended to serve.

  17. Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

    2009-01-01

    In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

  18. Marietta Celebration of Unity Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbin, Meg; Phillips, Rebecca

    This case study concerns the forming of a Marietta, Ohio unity committee, entitled Citizens for Social and Racial Justice, in response to the local Ku Klux Klan's (KKK) request for a parade permit in order to demonstrate against blacks in this city. Marietta, the county seat of Washington County, Ohio, has a population composed of both white and…

  19. A CASE STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to support our ongoing research in watershed ecology and global climate change, we gather and analyze environmental data from several government agencies. This case study demonstrates a researcher’s approach to accessing, organizing, and using intersectoral data. T...

  20. A Case Study in Learning to Unlearn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Martin; Grummell, Bernie; Murphy, Conor; Ryan, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, Irish academics reflect on our involvement in a project--Transformative Engagement Network (TEN). This project aims to transform the nature of the engagement between the various stakeholders impacted by or concerned with climate change and to insert the voice and concerns of the most vulnerable food producers into climate…

  1. Successful Fundraising: Case Studies of Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Meredith A., Ed.

    The primary purpose of this book it to assist library directors and those who want to become fundraisers for libraries to learn more about fundraising and find answers to their questions. The 12 case studies presented in this book address issues of building a major gift program; developing library capital campaigns; competing for National…

  2. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  3. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant sprays. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Instead, it is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and unknown about nano-Ag in a selected application. In turn, the external review draft of the document provided a starting point to identify and prioritize possible research directions to support future assessments of nanomaterials. The information presented in the case study and the questions raised in this document are a foundation for a process to determine priorities among various research topics and directions. After that process has been completed, a final chapter will be added to this document to summarize highlights from preceding chapters and the major research issues that have emerged.

  4. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  5. Grade One: Math Computation. Case Study #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to highlight the integral role that progress monitoring (PM) plays throughout any Response to Intervention (RTI) process. This example uses a three-level, responsiveness-to-intervention (RTI) method for identifying students with learning difficulties. Using a fictional first-grade classroom as the setting for…

  6. Case Studies of the AIA Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewbank, H. L.

    At least 17 university faculty members have been the direct objects of unfavorable public commentary by the conservative organization Accuracy in Academia, Inc (AIA). Two case studies that have received much attention involve two political science professors: Dr. Terry Anderson of Texas A & M University, and Dr. Mark Reader of Arizona State…

  7. Changing the Library Brand: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, Ben; Dixon, Simon; Donohue, Neil; Rowlands, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines some of the opportunities and challenges of changing what the library "brand" means to academic and professional services staff in the rapidly changing environment of UK higher education, taking the University of Leicester as a case study. It makes a practitioner contribution to the growing body of evidence of how…

  8. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Jason; Messing, John; Altas, Irfan

    2004-01-01

    This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master's degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU). The Industry Master's degree is an academic program for students currently employed…

  9. Phonological Precedence in Dyslexia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider-Zioga, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is believed to involve a phonological deficit of which the exact properties have not been clearly established. This article presents the findings of a longitudinal case study that suggest that, at least for some people with dyslexia, the fundamental problem involves a disturbance of temporal-spatial ordering abilities. A…

  10. SRM filament wound case resin characterization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The amine cured epoxy wet winding resin used in fabrication of the SRM filament wound case is analyzed. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPSC) is utilized extensively to study lot-to-lot variation in both resin and curing agent. The validity of quantitative hplc methodology currently under development in-process resin/catalyst assay is assessed.

  11. Simulations & Case Studies. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Cathy R., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on simulations and case studies from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: "3-D Virtual Classroom Technology" (Kimberly Arseneau Miller, Angela Glod); "Simulated Lesson Design Studios" (Willis Copeland); "Lights, Camera, Integration: Presentation Programs and…

  12. Fraternization in Accounting Firms: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Tim; Kizirian, Tim; Leese, Wallace

    2004-01-01

    This case study sheds light on how to avoid risks caused by manager-subordinate dating relationships (fraternization) such as employee misunderstandings, retaliation charges, favoritism complaints, wrongful termination lawsuits, and sexual harassment lawsuits, as well as associated ethical risks. Risk avoidance can be accomplished through a better…

  13. A Case Study of Horizontal Teacher Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Trav D.

    Horizontal teacher evaluation increases understanding of teaching through the critical examination of educational goals and classroom practices. This examination includes teachers' classroom observations of one another coupled with in-depth teacher conversations or dialogue about teaching aims and practices. A qualitative case study of a…

  14. Library Virtual Tours: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, Beth; Grogg, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    Virtual tours delivered via the Web have become a common tool for both instruction and outreach. This article is a case study of the creation of a virtual tour for a university library and is intended to provide others interested in creating a virtual tour of their library the opportunity to learn from the mistakes and successes of fellow…

  15. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  16. A Case Study in Learning to Unlearn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Martin; Grummell, Bernie; Murphy, Conor; Ryan, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, Irish academics reflect on our involvement in a project--Transformative Engagement Network (TEN). This project aims to transform the nature of the engagement between the various stakeholders impacted by or concerned with climate change and to insert the voice and concerns of the most vulnerable food producers into climate…

  17. A Case Study of Online Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ling; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2006-01-01

    This case study investigated 12 graduate students' online collaborative experiences and attitudes in an instructional design course. The instructor divided students into 4 groups based on their academic backgrounds. Content analysis of asynchronous group discussion board messages was used to measure degrees of collaboration of each group in terms…

  18. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  19. A Case Study in Acoustical Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Bruce R.; Brown, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Addresses concerns of both facilities planners and instructional designers in planning for the audio component of group presentations. Factors in the architectural design of enclosures for the reproduction of sound are described, including frequency, amplitude, and reverberation; and a case study for creating an acceptable enclosure is presented.…

  20. Case Study of Sabrina and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourgey, Annette F.; Davis, Kevin; Lane, Linda; Smith, Lonna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a case study of an adult student preparing for her first year of college through a writing course and work in a writing workshop. Explains complicating circumstances in the student's life. Presents four professional responses commenting on the difficulties of the situation and possible solutions. (TB)