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Sample records for pancreas benigne neuroendokrine

  1. Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Prentice, M A; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Even though pancreas transplant numbers have steadily declined over the past decade, new listings increased in 2014 compared with the previous year, notably for pancreas transplant alone (PTA) and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant. The number of new PTAs also increased over the past two years. Whether this is a sustainable trend remains to be seen. Significant events in 2014 included implementation of a new pancreas allocation system and development of a proposed uniform definition of pancreas graft failure. Meanwhile, overall pancreas transplant rates and outcomes continued to improve. Substantial decline in pancreas after kidney transplants remains a serious concern. SRTR has not published pancreas graft failure data in the program-specific reports for the past two years. While this will not change in the near future, the acceptance of a uniform definition of graft failure is a crucial first step toward resuming graft failure reporting. Continued improvements and innovation, both surgical and immunological, will be critical to keep pancreas transplant as a viable option for treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. As alternative therapies for diabetes such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas are evolving, improved outcomes with minimizations of complications are more important than ever. PMID:26755263

  2. Nonepithelial Neoplasms of the Pancreas: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation, Part 1--Benign Tumors: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Srivastava, Amogh; Paal, Edina E; Gould, Charles F; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2016-01-01

    Solid and cystic pancreatic neoplasms are being recognized more frequently with increasing utilization and spatial resolution of modern imaging techniques. In addition to the more common primary pancreatic solid (ductal adenocarcinoma) and cystic neoplasms of epithelial origin, nonepithelial neoplasms of the pancreas may appear as well-defined solid or cystic neoplasms. Most of these lesions have characteristic imaging features, such as a well-defined border, which allows differentiation from ductal adenocarcinoma. Solid masses include neurofibroma, ganglioneuroma, leiomyoma, lipoma, and perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa). Schwannomas and desmoid tumors can be solid or cystic. Cystic tumors include mature cystic teratoma and lymphangioma. Lipoma, PEComa, and mature cystic teratoma can contain fat, and ganglioneuroma and mature cystic teratoma may contain calcification. Although these unusual benign neoplasms are rare, the radiologist should at least consider them in the differential diagnosis of well-defined lesions of the pancreas. The goal of this comprehensive review is to improve understanding of these rare primary pancreatic mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26761535

  3. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  4. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  5. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreas Function of the Pancreas What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a long flattened gland located ... controller of blood sugar levels. Where is the pancreas? The pancreas is located deep in the abdomen. ...

  6. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    ... to form the pancreas. Each part has a tube, called a duct. When the parts join together, a final duct, called the pancreatic duct, is formed. Fluid and digestive juices (enzymes) produced by the pancreas normally flow through this duct. If the ducts do not ...

  7. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... evidence that the complications of diabetes, such as diabetic retinopathy, may not get worse and may even improve after a pancreas-kidney transplant. More than 95% of people survive ... of the donated pancreas and kidney for the rest of your life.

  8. Neuroendokrine Regulationsmechanismen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, Wolfgang

    1980-06-01

    The main center for the control of sexual functions is located in the hypothalamus. The medial preoptic area and the mediobasal hypothalamus are sites of production of neuropeptides which are released into the hypothalamo-pituitary portal vessel system and which function as releasing and inhibiting hormones.

  9. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  10. Organ Facts: Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Pancreas Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Pancreas Facts The pancreas is a five to six inch ...

  11. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  12. Nodular Elastosis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Whitney; Talmon, Geoffrey; Sasson, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Elastofibromatous change is a benign process that has been increasingly recognized in the tubular gastrointestinal tract. These changes can present as a colonic polyp or be seen in conjunction with inflammatory changes. Similar lesions have been noted in the liver, apparently associated with vascular injury. We describe a case in which multiple circumscribed nodules of elastofibromatous change within the pancreas had a similar morphology to nodular elastosis of the liver. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a finding occurring within the pancreas. PMID:26346767

  13. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1586x1534 View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows ...

  14. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get a ...

  15. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  16. Pancreas transplantation: review.

    PubMed

    Meirelles Júnior, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone.

  17. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  18. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  19. Giant mucinous cystic adenoma with pancreatic atrophy mimicking dorsal agenesis of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Dupré, Aurélien; Ines, David Da; Tixier, Lucie; Pezet, Denis; Buc, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mucinous cystic adenoma (MCA) of the pancreas is a rare benign cystic tumor with ovarian-like stroma and lack of communication with the pancreatic ductal system. The ovarian tissue is incorporated from the left gonad within the dorsal pancreas during embryogenesis. Consequently, congenital dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) cannot be associated with MCA. We report the case of a giant MCA associated with atrophy of the dorsal pancreas mimicking complete DAP. Pancreato-magnetic resonance imaging failed to identify the dorsal pancreas but the absence of diabetes mellitus and compression of the splenic vein with major tributaries rectified the diagnosis of secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. Unusual proximal location of the cyst in the pancreas may have induced chronic obstruction of both the dorsal pancreatic duct and the splenic vein, with secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. PMID:24672649

  20. Xenopus pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Esther J; Bilogan, Cassandra K; Mukhi, Sandeep; Brown, Donald D; Horb, Marko E

    2009-06-01

    Understanding how the pancreas develops is vital to finding new treatments for a range of pancreatic diseases, including diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Xenopus is a relatively new model organism for the elucidation of pancreas development, and has already made contributions to the field. Recent studies have shown benefits of using Xenopus for understanding both early patterning and lineage specification aspects of pancreas organogenesis. This review focuses specifically on Xenopus pancreas development, and covers events from the end of gastrulation, when regional specification of the endoderm is occurring, right through metamorphosis, when the mature pancreas is fully formed. We have attempted to cover pancreas development in Xenopus comprehensively enough to assist newcomers to the field and also to enable those studying pancreas development in other model organisms to better place the results from Xenopus research into the context of the field in general and their studies specifically. Developmental Dynamics 238:1271-1286, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Giant gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobara, Hideki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-09-01

    A 57-year-old man developed haematemesis and was referred to our institution. His discomfort had begun 3 weeks earlier and localised to the upper abdomen. Abdominal CT showed a defect of gastric mucosa and gastric wall thickening. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed that he had an active gastric ulcer, 40 mm in diameter, on the lesser curvature in the upper third of the corpus and the presence of a pancreatic body at the ulcer base, penetration to the pancreas. Open gastrectomy was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of localised peritonitis caused by penetration of the stomach into the pancreas. Histopathology of resected specimens showed a benign peptic ulcer, 40×40 mm in size, was found on the lesser curvature in the antrum, and this had penetrated through the pancreas. The most serious complications of PUD include haemorrhage, perforation, penetration, and gastric outlet obstruction. Approximately 7% of patients experience perforation, which occurs when an ulcer erodes through the wall and leaks air and digestive contents into the peritoneal cavity. Antral and duodenal ulcers can penetrate into the pancreas. We report a case of gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

  2. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  3. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Katsourakis, Anastasios; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Noussios, Georgios; Chatzis, Iosiph; Chatzitheoclitos, Efthimios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  4. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Noussios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  5. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  6. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys is to remove waste from the body through the production of urine. They also help to regulate blood pressure, blood volume and the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five ...

  7. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to NPF Contact Us Newsletter Sign Up Social Networking Button – Medium Search: Main menu Skip to primary ... 20814 1.866.726.2737 | Contact Us Social Networking Button – Medium © 2014 The National Pancreas Foundation | Health ...

  8. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas. PMID:27695176

  9. [Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Davies, Nestor R; Kasparian, Andres C; Viotto, Lucas E; Moreno, Walter A; Gramática, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas represents around 6-36% of mucinous cystic neoplasm. The lesions are usually found in the body and tail of the pancreas and are generally solitary with a size range of 6-36 cm. We present a clinical case of a 63 years old patient with abdominal pain and weight loss. We used radiographic imaging studies. It was treated with surgery by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colectomy. Patient was not post operative complications.

  10. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas.

  11. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  12. [Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas. A case report].

    PubMed

    Chatti, Kais; Nouira, Kais; Ben Reguigua, Meher; Bedioui, Haykel; Oueslati, Saddik; Laabidi, Besma; Alaya, Mohamed; Ben Abdallah, Nejmeddine

    2006-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT), a rare mesenchymal neoplasm usually arising from the pleura, may also occur in many other extra pleural sites. It has exceptionally been described in the pancreas. This report describes the case of a benign SFT of the pancreas occurring in a 41-year-old man who presented with a solid epigastric mass. Pathological and immunohistochemical findings are presented. Imaging features on ultrasonography, CT, MRI, and arteriography are widely detailed. Surgical resection of the tumour was performed, and the patient died from postoperative complications.

  13. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  14. Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Wang, Huamin; Bhosale, Priya R; Evans, Harry L; Abraham, Susan C

    2015-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) arising in the pancreas is exceedingly rare, with only 11 cases reported in the English literature. All cases described thus far have exhibited benign histology. We report the first case of malignant SFT of the pancreas. The patient was a 52-year-old woman who presented with obstructive jaundice and a 15-cm pancreatic head mass. The mass showed areas with typical histologic features for SFT including small fibroblastlike cells arranged in the well-characterized "patternless pattern" of architecture, hemangiopericytomalike vessels, areas with dense collagen and infrequent mitoses (0-2 per 10 high-power fields [HPFs]). In addition, multiple areas with an overtly sarcomatous morphology were present, containing large spindle and epithelioid cells with nuclear pleomorphism, marked cellularity, up to17 mitoses per 10 HPFs, and necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for CD34 and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in both benign and malignant components and showed strong, diffuse p53 and p16 staining in the malignant component. At last follow-up (40 months), the patient was alive and well without evidence of disease. However, given that the presence of a malignant component in extrapancreatic SFT has been associated with recurrence/metastasis and death, complete surgical resection and close long-term follow-up is required.

  15. Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Wang, Huamin; Bhosale, Priya R; Evans, Harry L; Abraham, Susan C

    2015-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) arising in the pancreas is exceedingly rare, with only 11 cases reported in the English literature. All cases described thus far have exhibited benign histology. We report the first case of malignant SFT of the pancreas. The patient was a 52-year-old woman who presented with obstructive jaundice and a 15-cm pancreatic head mass. The mass showed areas with typical histologic features for SFT including small fibroblastlike cells arranged in the well-characterized "patternless pattern" of architecture, hemangiopericytomalike vessels, areas with dense collagen and infrequent mitoses (0-2 per 10 high-power fields [HPFs]). In addition, multiple areas with an overtly sarcomatous morphology were present, containing large spindle and epithelioid cells with nuclear pleomorphism, marked cellularity, up to17 mitoses per 10 HPFs, and necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for CD34 and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in both benign and malignant components and showed strong, diffuse p53 and p16 staining in the malignant component. At last follow-up (40 months), the patient was alive and well without evidence of disease. However, given that the presence of a malignant component in extrapancreatic SFT has been associated with recurrence/metastasis and death, complete surgical resection and close long-term follow-up is required. PMID:26166470

  16. Advances in pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Shamik; Oskrochi, Youssof; Easton, Graham; Papalois, Vassilios

    2016-04-01

    The potential to reverse diabetes has to be balanced against the morbidity of long-term immunosuppression associated with transplantation. For a patient with renal failure, the treatment of choice is often a simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney or pancreas after kidney. For a patient with glycaemic instability, choices between a solid organ or islet transplant have to be weighed against benefits and risks of remaining on insulin. Results of simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney transplantation are comparable to other solid-organ transplants, and there is evidence of improved quality of life and life expectancy. There is some evidence of benefit with respect to the progression of secondary diabetic complications in patients with functioning transplants for several years.

  17. [Injuries of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Vasiutkov, V Ia; Murasheva, Z M; Sukhov, D V; Burakov, M B

    1989-08-01

    Trauma of the pancreas was studied in 48 patients. It has a typical mechanisms and is characterized by intensity of the exerted force. Due to the last named circumstance, extensive retroperitoneal hematomas, ruptures of the parenchymatous organs, ligaments, veins, and large arteries often occur A severe condition of the patients with fall of arterial pressure and the development of shock is characteristic. It is difficult to establish the diagnosis of trauma of the pancreas before the operation. The most frequent complication is traumatic pancreatitis which is often attended by the development of cysts, fistulas, and peritonitis. The surgeon's tactics is determined by the character of the injury and is individual in each patient.

  18. Benign breast lesions: Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Masciadri, N.; Ferranti, C.

    2011-01-01

    Benign breast diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of lesions arising in the mammary epithelium or in other mammary tissues, and they may also be linked to vascular, inflammatory or traumatic pathologies. Most lesions found in women consulting a physician are benign. Ultrasound (US) diagnostic criteria indicating a benign lesion are described as well as US findings in the most frequent benign breast lesions. PMID:23396888

  19. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  20. MR imaging of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Erin; Hammond, Nancy; Miller, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pancreas is useful as both a problem-solving tool and an initial imaging examination of choice. With newer imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging, MR offers improved ability to detect and characterize lesions and identify and stage tumors and inflammation. MR cholangiopancreatography can be used to visualize the pancreatic and biliary ductal system. In this article, the use of MR to evaluate the pancreas, including recent advances, is reviewed and the normal appearance of the pancreas on different imaging sequences, as well as inflammatory diseases, congenital abnormalities, and neoplasms of the pancreas, are discussed.

  1. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  2. Embolization of an Insulinoma of the Pancreas with Trisacryl Gelatin Microspheres as Definitive Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Gernot Biggemann, Martin; Pfohl, Martin

    2008-05-15

    Insulinomas are rare, mostly benign neuroendocrine tumors, originating in 99% of cases from the pancreas, that synthesize and secrete insulin, causing symptomatic hypoglycemia. Today the treatment of choice is surgical removal. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman with a symptomatic insulinoma who refused surgery and was treated with arterial embolization using trisacryl gelatin microspheres as definitive treatment.

  3. [Prophylactic pancreas surgery].

    PubMed

    Langer, P; Rothmund, M; Bartsch, D K

    2006-01-01

    The goal of prophylactic surgery is to prevent malignant growth in patients with hereditary tumor predisposition. The pancreas presents as particularly challenging, due to the difficulty of operation and comparatively high risk of morbidity and even mortality. In addition, partial operative procedures and, more significantly, total resection lead to exocrine pancreas insufficiency and secondary diabetes, with grave consequences for the patient. Hereditary tumor predisposition syndromes that can result in pancreaticoduodenal endocrine tumors (PET) include multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. As penetrance is maximally 70-80% and the 10-year survival rate over 80%, prophylactic pancreatic resection without evidence of a tumor is not indicated. However, prophylactic extension of a resection would be advised, should a PET be diagnosed. Patients predisposed to developing ductal pancreatic carcinoma (PC) are at risk of familial pancreatic cancer syndrome (FPC), hereditary pancreatitis, and other hereditary tumor predisposition syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and familial atypical multiple mole-melanoma syndrome. As the gene defect responsible for FPC has yet to be identified and the penetrance of PC in the other tumor predisposition syndromes is low or unknown, a prophylactic pancreatectomy based on today's knowledge is not indicated. Prophylactic extension of the resection is advisable should PC or high-grade PanIN lesions be diagnosed, as these patients often present with multifocal dysplasia and even carcinoma.

  4. [Pancreas pseudocyst or metastasis?].

    PubMed

    Gyorffy, Hajnalka; Tihanyi, Tibor; Gyökeres, Tibor; Zsirka-Klein, Attila; Kádár, Péter; Kaszás, Ilona; Kovács, Margit

    2005-10-23

    The authors review a case of a 24-year-old male patient hospitalised for repeated acute abdominal symptoms. His medical history included no diseases worth of mentioning. By imaging techniques (abdominal US and CT scan) a cystic lesion, measuring 40 x 35 x 30 mm in diameter was found, and was diagnosed as pseudocyst in the region of the tail of the pancreas. Jejunal feeding was introduced. The lesion did not improve and the second CT scan suggested a suspicion of pancreatic cystadenoma. Three months after first presentation the surgical resection was performed. The tumour, however, was found independent of the pancreas (90 x 80 x 50 mm). Both histologically and immunohistochemically the lesion proved to be the metastasis of a germ cell (yolk-sac) tumour. Following the morphological diagnosis, detailed urological and medical check up was performed. A previously nonpalpable small tumour was found in the left testis which was radically resected. The testicular tumour measuring 9 x 9 x 5 mm in diameter was diagnosed as embryonal carcinoma. Later on the patient underwent chemotherapy. He has been undergoing close oncological followup. Clinically, he is disease free. Authors emphasize the importance of imaging techniques and fine needle aspiration cytology in the case of retroperitoneal masses in young males. The possibility of a metastasis, especially of germ cell origin, should be excluded (not only by physical examination, but by ultrasound of testis also) in case of retroperitoneal cystic tumours even with unusual morphology.

  5. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Benign bone lesions are a broad category that demonstrates a spectrum of activities from latent to aggressive. Differentiating the various tumors is important in order to properly determine necessary intervention. This chapter focuses on the presentation, imaging, diagnostic features, and treatment of the most common benign bone tumors in order to help guide diagnosis and management. PMID:25070230

  6. Molecular Pathways Controlling Pancreas induction

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Wells, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in generating pancreatic cell types from human pluripotent stem cells has depended on our knowledge of the developmental processes that regulate pancreas development in vivo. The developmental events between gastrulation and formation of the embryonic pancreatic primordia are both rapid and dynamic and studies in frog, fish, chick, and mouse have identified the molecular basis of how the pancreas develops from multipotent endoderm progenitors. Here, we review the current status of our understanding of molecular mechanisms that control endoderm formation, endoderm patterning, and pancreas specification and highlight how these discoveries have allowed for the development of robust methods to generate pancreatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22743233

  7. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease becomes more chronic, patients can develop malnutrition and weight loss. If the pancreas becomes destroyed ... with these disorders may have chronic pain, diarrhea, malnutrition, or diabetes. Treatment focuses on pain control and ...

  8. Pancreas transplantation in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Pozza, G; Di Carlo, V

    1989-01-01

    After a brief historical background on pancreas transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, this review deals with the major surgical, pharmacological and functional aspects of this approach. In the Authors' opinion pancreas transplantation should be proposed only when the end-stage renal failure (ESRF), due to diabetic nephropathy, needs kidney transplantation. By using injection of polymers (mainly neoprene) into the pancreatic ducts, or urinary diversion of pancreatic juice and appropriate immunosuppressive therapy (cyclosporin, corticosteroids and azathioprine), dramatic advantages have been achieved in the last years, so that a satisfactory segmental or total pancreas graft survival on one hand, and the early graft rejection recognition on the other have been presently obtained. A prompt and good functional activity of pancreas graft has also been demonstrated by the Authors in successfully transplanted patients. As far as chronic diabetic complications are concerned, no conclusive results have been reported up to now; it is noteworthy, however, that pancreas transplantation may preserve the transplanted kidney from a relapse of diabetic nephropathy. The combined pancreas-kidney transplantation may actually be considered as a correct solution to the problem of diabetic patients with ESRF. Moreover, careful selection of patients, appropriate surgical technique and experienced immunosuppressive treatment are the major prerequisites to achieve a satisfactory improvement of diabetic status in addition to that of renal failure.

  9. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  10. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the mouth to the stomach). It causes swallowing difficulties. Benign means that it is not caused ... tube (tube through the nose into the stomach) Swallowing substances that harm the lining of the esophagus. ...

  11. The Benign Hamburger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peaslee, Graham; Lantz, Juliette M.; Walczak, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a case study of food poisoning from hamburgers at the fictitious Jill-at-the-Grill to teach the nuclear science behind food irradiation. Includes case teaching notes on the benign hamburger. (ASK)

  12. Benign positional vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical practice guideline: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2008;139(5 Suppl 4):S47-S81. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ...

  13. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  14. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  15. Clinical imaging of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    May, G.; Gardiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Featuring more than 300 high-quality radiographs and scan images, clinical imaging of the pancreas systematically reviews all appropriate imaging modalities for diagnosing and evaluating a variety of commonly encountered pancreatic disorders. After presenting a succinct overview of pancreatic embryology, anatomy, and physiology, the authors establish the clinical indications-including postoperative patient evaluation-for radiologic examination of the pancreas. The diagnostic capabilities and limitations of currently available imaging techniques for the pancreas are thoroughly assessed, with carefully selected illustrations depicting the types of images and data obtained using these different techniques. The review of acute and chronic pancreatitis considers the clinical features and possible complications of their variant forms and offers guidance in selecting appropriate imaging studies.

  16. Primary hepatic benign schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Michihiro; Takeshita, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Schwannoma is predominantly a benign neoplasm of the Schwann cells in the neural sheath of the peripheral nerves. Occurrence of schwannoma in parenchymatous organs, such as liver, is extremely rare. A 64-year-old man without neurofibromatosis was observed to have a space-occupying lesion of 23mm diameter in the liver during follow-up examination for a previously resected gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the small intestine. He underwent lateral segmentectomy of the liver under a provisional diagnosis of hepatic metastatic recurrence of the GIST. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a benign schwannoma, confirmed by characteristic pathological findings and positive immunoreactions with the neurogenic marker S-100 protein, but negative for c-kit, or CD34. The tumor was the smallest among the reported cases. When the primary hepatic schwannoma is small in size, preoperative clinical diagnosis is difficult. Therefore, this disease should be listed as differential diagnosis for liver tumor with clinically benign characteristics. PMID:22530081

  17. Additional Resection of the Pancreas Body Prevents Postoperative Pancreas Fistula in Patients with Portal Annular Pancreas Who Undergo Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Jun; Mano, Yohei; Harada, Noboru; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is a rare variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body and surrounds the portal vein or superior mesenteric vein. Upon pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), when the pancreas is cut at the neck, two cut surfaces are created. Thus, the cut surface of the pancreas becomes larger than usual and the dorsal cut surface is behind the portal vein, therefore pancreatic fistula after PD has been reported frequently. We planned subtotal stomach-preserving PD in a 45-year-old woman with underlying insulinoma of the pancreas head. When the pancreas head was dissected, the uncinate process was extended and fused to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body. Additional resection of the pancreas body 1 cm distal to the pancreas tail to the left side of the original resection line was performed. The new cut surface became one and pancreaticojejunostomy was performed as usual. No postoperative complications such as pancreatic fistula occurred. Additional resection of the pancreas body may be a standardized procedure in patients with PAP in cases of pancreas cut surface reconstruction. PMID:22532811

  18. Antithrombin therapy in pancreas retransplantation and pancreas-after-kidney/pancreas-transplantation-alone patients.

    PubMed

    Fertmann, Jan M; Arbogast, Helmut P; Illner, Wolf-Dieter; Tarabichi, Anwar; Dieterle, Christoph; Land, Walter; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hoffmann, Johannes N

    2011-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a coagulatory inhibitor with pleiotropic activities. AT reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury and has been successfully used in patients with simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation. This study retrospectively analyzes prophylactic high-dose AT application in patients with solitary pancreas transplantation traditionally related to suboptimal results. In our center, 31 patients received solitary pancreas transplantation between 7/1994 and 7/2005 (pancreas retransplantation, PAK/PTA). The perioperative treatment protocol was modified in 5/2002 now including application of 3000 IU. AT was given intravenously before pancreatic reperfusion (AT, n = 18). Patients receiving standard therapy served as controls (n = 13). Daily blood sampling was performed during five postoperative days. Standard coagulatory parameters and number of transfused red blood cell units were not altered by AT. In AT patients serum amylase (p < 0.01) and lipase (p < 0.01) on postoperative days 1, 2 and 3 were significantly reduced. Our actual perioperative management protocol including high dose AT application in human solitary pancreas transplantation reduced postoperative liberation of pancreatic enzymes in this pilot study. Prophylactic AT application should deserve further clinical testing in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:21999781

  19. Collection protocol for human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L; Montgomery, Emily L; Foss, Robin M; Kolheffer, Kerwin M; Phipps, Gerald; Schneider, Lynda; Atkinson, Mark A

    2012-05-23

    This dissection and sampling procedure was developed for the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) program to standardize preparation of pancreas recovered from cadaveric organ donors. The pancreas is divided into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by serial transverse sections throughout the medial to lateral axis. Alternating sections are used for fixed paraffin and fresh frozen blocks and remnant samples are minced for snap frozen sample preparations, either with or without RNAse inhibitors, for DNA, RNA, or protein isolation. The overall goal of the pancreas dissection procedure is to sample the entire pancreas while maintaining anatomical orientation. Endocrine cell heterogeneity in terms of islet composition, size, and numbers is reported for human islets compared to rodent islets. The majority of human islets from the pancreas head, body and tail regions are composed of insulin-containing β-cells followed by lower proportions of glucagon-containing α-cells and somatostatin-containing δ-cells. Pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells and ghrelin-containing epsilon cells are also present but in small numbers. In contrast, the uncinate region contains islets that are primarily composed of pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells. These regional islet variations arise from developmental differences. The pancreas develops from the ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds in the foregut and after rotation of the stomach and duodenum, the ventral lobe moves and fuses with the dorsal. The ventral lobe forms the posterior portion of the head including the uncinate process while the dorsal lobe gives rise to the rest of the organ. Regional pancreatic variation is also reported with the tail region having higher islet density compared to other regions and the dorsal lobe-derived components undergoing selective atrophy in type 1 diabetes. Additional organs and tissues are often recovered from the organ donors and include pancreatic lymph

  20. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered.

  1. Collection Protocol for Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L.; Montgomery, Emily L.; Foss, Robin M.; Kolheffer, Kerwin M.; Phipps, Gerald; Schneider, Lynda; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissection and sampling procedure was developed for the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) program to standardize preparation of pancreas recovered from cadaveric organ donors. The pancreas is divided into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by serial transverse sections throughout the medial to lateral axis. Alternating sections are used for fixed paraffin and fresh frozen blocks and remnant samples are minced for snap frozen sample preparations, either with or without RNAse inhibitors, for DNA, RNA, or protein isolation. The overall goal of the pancreas dissection procedure is to sample the entire pancreas while maintaining anatomical orientation. Endocrine cell heterogeneity in terms of islet composition, size, and numbers is reported for human islets compared to rodent islets 1. The majority of human islets from the pancreas head, body and tail regions are composed of insulin-containing β-cells followed by lower proportions of glucagon-containing α-cells and somatostatin-containing δ-cells. Pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells and ghrelin-containing epsilon cells are also present but in small numbers. In contrast, the uncinate region contains islets that are primarily composed of pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells 2. These regional islet variations arise from developmental differences. The pancreas develops from the ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds in the foregut and after rotation of the stomach and duodenum, the ventral lobe moves and fuses with the dorsal 3. The ventral lobe forms the posterior portion of the head including the uncinate process while the dorsal lobe gives rise to the rest of the organ. Regional pancreatic variation is also reported with the tail region having higher islet density compared to other regions and the dorsal lobe-derived components undergoing selective atrophy in type 1 diabetes4,5. Additional organs and tissues are often recovered from the organ donors and include pancreatic

  2. [Benign bone forming tumors].

    PubMed

    Caufourier, C; Leprovost, N; Guillou-Jamard, M-R; Compère, J-F; Bénateau, H

    2009-09-01

    Benign bone forming tumors typically produce dense bone (osteoma, enostosis) or osteoid tissue (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma). Even though these four lesions have distinct characteristics, it is sometimes difficult to tell them apart and to rule out malignant bone forming lesions such as osteosarcoma. The first line treatment is surgical exeresis.

  3. Benign cephalic histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Joan F.; Libu, Gnanaseelan Kanakamma; Philip, Mariam; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2013-01-01

    A one and a half year old girl born of a non-consanguineous marriage presented with multiple asymptomatic erythematous to hyperpigmented and skin colored papules on both cheeks slowly increasing in number of 1 year duration. On the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemistry findings, a diagnosis of benign cephalic histiocytosis was made. PMID:24350010

  4. Benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Samson, Joan F; Libu, Gnanaseelan Kanakamma; Philip, Mariam; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2013-10-01

    A one and a half year old girl born of a non-consanguineous marriage presented with multiple asymptomatic erythematous to hyperpigmented and skin colored papules on both cheeks slowly increasing in number of 1 year duration. On the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemistry findings, a diagnosis of benign cephalic histiocytosis was made.

  5. Benign tumors —

    Cancer.gov

    In human pulmonary pathology, benign tumors are rare and almost never progress to malignancy. The situation is quite different in mouse pathology, where a significant number of adenomas, especially after some chemical induction schemes and genetic modifications, may progress to carcinomas.

  6. Obstructive Jaundice as a Complication of Macrocystic Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Koncoro, Hendra; Putra, I Komang W D; Wibawa, I Dewa N

    2016-04-01

    Macrocystic serous cystadenoma is an unusual and essentially benign pancreatic tumor. Herein, we report on a 40-year-old woman diagnosed with macrocystic serous cystadenoma who presented with obstructive jaundice. A cystic lesion in the head and body of the pancreas was revealed by abdominal computed tomography. Intraoperative pancreatic cyst aspiration ruled out mucinous cystic neoplasm which has a malignant potential. The pancreatic cyst fluid cytology was basophilic amorph materials concluded as benign cystic lesion. Internal drainage was performed instead of pancreatic resection which showed good outcome. Biliary obstruction is a rare complication of serous cystadenoma. This case describes an unusual clinical presentation of macrocystic serous cystadenoma. PMID:27550882

  7. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of a solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    van der Vorst, Joost R; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Hutteman, Merlijn; Bosse, Tjalling; Smit, Vincent T H B M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Frangioni, John V; Bonsing, Bert A

    2012-07-27

    A 67-year-old female presented with unexplained abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of the abdomen incidentally revealed a mass in the uncinate process of the pancreas. This mass was resected and based on histopathological findings, diagnosed as a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pancreas. A SFT is an extremely rare benign mesenchymal tumor that in 65% of cases affects the visceral pleura but can also affect extra-pleural sites. The intraoperative demarcation of pancreatic tumors, such as SFTs, can be challenging. In this report, the first clear intraoperative identification of a SFT of the pancreas in a human was shown using near-infrared fluorescence and methylene blue.

  8. Pancreas transplant for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Hannah R; Hatipoglu, Betul; Krishnamurthi, Venkatesh

    2015-11-01

    Pancreas transplant is an option for patients with type 1 diabetes and for some patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced diabetic kidney disease. The procedure has a high success rate, and performing it earlier in the course of diabetes could help prevent or reverse the long-term complications of diabetes.

  9. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia reflects a complex interplay between benign prostatic enlargement, which will affect almost all men by the age of 80, and the resulting outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease is now known to adversely affect the quality of life of around one man in three over the age of 50. New medical treatments and new surgical interventions are challenging the previous standard treatment of transurethral resection of prostate, which continues to have a morbidity of 17% and some mortality. Primary care will be increasingly involved in shared care with particular emphasis on monitoring of patients on watchful waiting medical therapy- and following operative intervention. PMID:9196969

  10. Benign familial hyperphosphatasemia

    SciTech Connect

    Siraganian, P.A.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Mulivor, R.A.; Miller, R.W. )

    1989-03-03

    Elevated alkaline phosphatase activity in serum suggests bone or liver disease or a neoplasm but can also indicate pregnancy or another benign condition. A family with benign hyperphosphatasemia was studied to elucidate the genetics and enzyme defect. Serum total alkaline phosphatase activity was greater than the population mean in all six family members, and more than 7 SDs above the mean in two of four offspring. Monoclonal antibodies to three alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, intestinal, placental, and tissue nonspecific demonstrated markedly increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase levels in all family members and significantly elevated liver/bone/kidney activity in the two offspring. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of the liver/bone/kidney component showed high alkaline phosphatase activity from liver in both siblings and from bone in one. The mode of inheritance in this family is obscure, but a complex regulation of the products of two different alkaline phosphatase genes seems likely. Steps toward diagnosis are suggested. Early recognition of this benign biochemical abnormality should help to avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests.

  11. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreas carcinoma occurring in the annular pancreas: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Maki, Akira; Amemiya, Hidetake; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Ei; Sano, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    The annular pancreas is a rare congenital anomaly in which a ring of the pancreas parenchyma surrounds the second part of the duodenum. Malignant tumors are extremely rare in patients with an annular pancreas. A 64-year-old man presented with appetite loss and vomiting. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) indicated pancreas parenchyma surrounding the second part of the duodenum, and a hypovascular area occupying lesion in the annular pancreas. Subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathology showed pancreatic carcinoma occurring in the complete annular pancreas.

  12. Pancreas donation for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, M A; Ruiz, P; Mansilla, J J

    2005-04-01

    Islet transplantation, though still in the experimental phase, is a therapeutic option that has opened new expectations for the control of diabetes mellitus. Initial results are encouraging for the significant advantages compared with whole pancreas transplantation for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, with or without kidney failure. However, the success of transplantation, both at centers with more experience and others with less, is limited by the difficulty in obtaining a suitable number of donors and by laboratory isolation techniques. Significant advances require changes in donor selection, perfusion, oxygenation, and transfer of the pancreas, and in the process of isolation, purification, and culture in the laboratory. Of the 32 pancreases sent to the islet isolation laboratory from different hospitals in Andalusia, a viable percentage of islets was finally available in 19. However, in only 4 (18%) procedures were the preparations considered optimal for implantation in 2 recipients. PMID:15866673

  13. Endocrine pancreas development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Zahra; Lin, Shuo

    2011-10-15

    Type 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Current efforts to cure diabetes are aimed at replenishing damaged cells by generating a new supply of β cells in vitro. The most promising strategy for achieving this goal is to differentiate embryonic stem (ES) cells by sequentially exposing them to signaling molecules that they would normally encounter in vivo. This approach requires a thorough understanding of the temporal sequence of the signaling events underlying pancreatic β-cell induction during embryonic development. The zebrafish system has emerged as a powerful tool in the study of pancreas development. In this review, we provide a temporal summary of pancreas development in zebrafish with a special focus on the formation of pancreatic β cells.

  14. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Domen, Hiromitsu; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Takahashi, Mizuna; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu; Ishizaka, Masanori

    2012-09-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas can be divided into true cysts, pseudocysts, and cystic neoplasms. Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) are a type of true cyst that can mimic pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. LECs are rare lesions; fewer than 90 cases have been reported in the English language literature. The case of a 60-year-old man with an LEC of the pancreas is reported. He was admitted with upper abdominal discomfort. Computed tomography showed a 64 × 39 mm cystic mass in the retroperitoneum behind the duodenum and inferior caval vein. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right-sided mass on T1-weighted imaging, with a clear boundary between the mass and its surroundings, except for the pancreas. The mass had an inhomogeneous intensity on T2-weighted imaging. Within the mass, small floating nodules with low intensity were seen. Endoscopic ultrasound showed many high-echoic nodules and smaller grains scattered everywhere in the mass. Fine needle aspiration and cytologic examination were performed. Characteristic chylaceous fluid was obtained in which anucleate squamous cells were found. There were also a few atypical large cells with irregularly shaped marked nucleoli and degenerative cytoplasm. Cytologic diagnosis was suspicious for malignancy. The lesion was diagnosed as a retroperitoneal cyst, probably of pancreatic origin. Since a neoplastic lesion could not be ruled out, surgery was performed. The lesion was palpable on the dorsal side of the second portion of the duodenum. The mass was completely resected. Macroscopically, the lesion was a multilocular cyst with a thin septal wall. The cyst was filled with cottage cheese-like substance. Microscopically, the cyst wall was composed of stratified squamous epithelium and dense subepithelial lymphatic tissue with developed lymph follicles. The epithelial cells had no atypia. The histopathologic diagnosis was LEC of the pancreas. The patient's postoperative course was good.

  15. Benign Metastasizing Leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare and poorly characterized disease affecting primarily premenopausal women. Asymptomatic patients are often diagnosed incidentally by radiographs or other lung-imaging procedures performed for other indications, and the diagnosis is eventually confirmed by biopsy. Patients with BML are usually treated pharmacologically with antiestrogen therapies or surgically with oophorectomy or hysterectomy. Antiestrogen therapy is typically efficacious and, in general, most patients have a favorable prognosis. Asymptomatic patients with a confirmed diagnosis of BML, may be followed conservatively without treatment. PMID:27514603

  16. Benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, F; Caputo, R; Ermacora, E; Gianni, E

    1986-09-01

    Benign cephalic histiocytosis is a self-healing non-X, nonlipid cutaneous histiocytosis of children, characterized by a papular eruption on the head. Mucous membranes and viscera are always spared. In the 13 cases reported herein, the children were otherwise in good general health. The disease appeared during the first three years of life, and spontaneous regression was complete by the age of nine years in the four cases healed to date. The histiocytic infiltrate was localized in the upper and middle dermis and contained no lipids at any stage of evolution. All the histiocytes contained coated vesicles, and 5% to 30% also contained comma-shaped bodies in their cytoplasm.

  17. Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Robert R; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Odorico, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

  18. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  19. Abnormally high level of CA-19-9 in a benign ovarian cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Seung-Yeon; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    CA-19-9 antigen is mainly elevated in cases of gastrointestinal tract malignancy, including of the pancreas, colorectum, and biliary tract. CA 19-9 antigen can also be elevated in ovarian mucinous neoplasms, however, as well as in many benign conditions. Markedly raised levels of more than 10,000 U/mL were almost observed in advanced stage of malignancy. We report herein the case of a 37-year-old woman who presented with an abnormally high level of CA 19-9 antigen associated with benign mucinous cystadenoma. PMID:26623421

  20. Abnormally high level of CA-19-9 in a benign ovarian cyst.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Seung-Yeon; Park, Ji Young; Ki, Kyung-Do; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-11-01

    CA-19-9 antigen is mainly elevated in cases of gastrointestinal tract malignancy, including of the pancreas, colorectum, and biliary tract. CA 19-9 antigen can also be elevated in ovarian mucinous neoplasms, however, as well as in many benign conditions. Markedly raised levels of more than 10,000 U/mL were almost observed in advanced stage of malignancy. We report herein the case of a 37-year-old woman who presented with an abnormally high level of CA 19-9 antigen associated with benign mucinous cystadenoma.

  1. Robot-Assisted Subtotal Pancreas-Preserving Duodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gheza, Federico; Raimondi, Paolo; D'Ugo, Stefano; Calatayud, David; Giulianotti, Pier C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Angiodysplasia of the duodenum is a rare disorder, often requiring surgical resection. Technical difficulties have made the use of the minimally invasive approach uncommon. Herein, we present a subtotal pancreas-preserving duodenectomy using robotic assistance. Methods: The patient is a 60-y-old female with a long medical history including chronic gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasia with intermittent melena, and requiring multiples blood transfusions. A capsule endoscopy and double-balloon upper endoscopy showed angiectasis, which appeared to be limited to the third and fourth portion of the duodenum and the proximal loops of the jejunum. Despite multiple endoscopic cauterizations, the patient continued to require blood transfusion for several years. The patient underwent a robot-assisted subtotal pancreas-preserving duodenectomy. Results: The operation lasted 420 min with minimal blood loss. The postoperative course was uneventful. The pathology report showed multiple small bowel mucosal and submucosal distorted and dilated vasculature, consistent with angiodysplasia. At 2-mo follow-up, the patient was totally asymptomatic. A barium swallow study showed contrast passed antegrade through the duodenojejunostomy with no evidence of obstruction, stricture, or leakage. Conclusion: The use of robotic assistance to perform a subtotal pancreas-preserving duodenectomy for the treatment of benign duodenal disease, such as angiodysplasia, is feasible and safe. The technical advantages include a high degree of freedom offered by the robotic instruments, as well as enhanced visualization, which allows for precise microdissection and microsuture, thereby preserving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. The use of robotic technology allows for a wider range of indications for minimally invasive surgery. PMID:23484581

  2. European experts consensus statement on cystic tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline; Salvia, Roberto; Klöppel, Gunter; Werner, Jens; McKay, Colin; Friess, Helmut; Manfredi, Riccardo; Van Cutsem, Eric; Löhr, Matthias; Segersvärd, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are increasingly recognized. While some lesions show benign behaviour (serous cystic neoplasm), others have an unequivocal malignant potential (mucinous cystic neoplasm, branch- and main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm). European expert pancreatologists provide updated recommendations: diagnostic computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging are indicated in all patients with cystic lesion of the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis may be used but there is no evidence to suggest this as a routine diagnostic method. The role of pancreatoscopy remains to be established. Resection should be considered in all symptomatic lesions, in mucinous cystic neoplasm, main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm as well as in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodules, dilated main pancreatic duct >6mm and possibly if rapidly increasing in size. An oncological partial resection should be performed in main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and in lesions with a suspicion of malignancy, otherwise organ preserving procedures may be considered. Frozen section of the transection margin in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm is suggested. Follow up after resection is recommended for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm and invasive cancer.

  3. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  4. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  5. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Truong, L D; Rangdaeng, S; Jordan, P H

    1987-11-01

    A rare cystic lesion of the pancreas is reported. Morphologically, this unilocular cyst was filled with keratin material and lined by mature, keratinizing squamous epithelium; it was surrounded by lymphoid tissue and also focally by pancreatic tissue. Clinically, the lesion was associated with diarrhea and abdominal pain, both of which promptly disappeared after its removal. Although the histogenesis of this lesion is not known, it can be histologically differentiated from other pancreatic and retroperitoneal cysts. We propose the name "lymphoepithelial cyst" for this lesion and note that only one similar case has been described previously.

  6. Benign sinonasal capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Darren; Poulios, Aristotelis; Khalil, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Haemangiomas are benign fibrovascular tumours relatively that are common in the head and neck, where 60% of them occur Among the various categories of haemangiomas, lobular capillary haemangiomas (LCH) occur frequently on the skin, lips, buccal mucosa, tongue and gingiva. However, they are vanishingly rare in the paranasal sinuses. The imaging features of LCH are non-specific. The histological characteristics of LCH can also make diagnosis difficult as sometimes resemble highly vascular malignant tumours. This leads to the false preoperative diagnosis of suspected malignancy in many cases, which places the patient under unnecessary distress and anxiety. We present a case of LCH appearing as a suspicious nasal lesion of the lateral nasal wall with unilateral nasal obstruction, necrotic centre and epistaxis. The tumour was excised endoscopically in one operation including endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Further education about this lesion is deemed important as preoperative embolisation may be needed for a safe operation. PMID:25287393

  7. Pancreas Transplantation: An Alarming Crisis in Confidence.

    PubMed

    Stratta, R J; Gruessner, A C; Odorico, J S; Fridell, J A; Gruessner, R W G

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade, the annual number of pancreas transplantations performed in the United States has steadily declined. From 2004 to 2011, the overall number of simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantations in the United States declined by 10%, whereas the decreases in pancreas after kidney (PAK) and pancreas transplant alone (PTA) procedures were 55% and 34%, respectively. Paradoxically, this has occurred in the setting of improvements in graft and patient survival outcomes and transplanting higher-risk patients. Only 11 centers in the United States currently perform ≥20 pancreas transplantations per year, and most centers perform <5 pancreas transplantations annually; many do not perform PAKs or PTAs. This national trend in decreasing numbers of pancreas transplantations is related to a number of factors including lack of a primary referral source, improvements in diabetes care and management, changing donor and recipient considerations, inadequate training opportunities, and increasing risk aversion because of regulatory scrutiny. A national initiative is needed to "reinvigorate" SPK and PAK procedures as preferred transplantation options for appropriately selected uremic patients taking insulin regardless of C-peptide levels or "type" of diabetes. Moreover, many patients may benefit from PTAs because all categories of pancreas transplantation are not only life enhancing but also life extending procedures. PMID:27232750

  8. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Shah; Qari, Hasina; Banday, Tanveer; Altaf, Asma; Para, Mah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst” and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the MCN of the pancreas. In total, 16,322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analyzed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs.

  9. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the “precision-medicine” paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  10. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  11. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Andrew R; Newman, Elliot; Hajdu, Cristina H

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin. Most commonly they affect the pleura but they been described in other viscera. SFT of the pancreas is extremely rare, and only eight cases have been reported to date. We perform a literature review and report a ninth case. The patient is a 54-year-old African-American female who presented with several months of abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography demonstrated a lesion in the head of the pancreas, and she underwent a Whipple operation. Pathology demonstrated SFT of the pancreas. She is alive and well 1 year post-operatively. SFT of the pancreas predominately affects middle-aged women. These tumors are difficult to distinguish radiologically from neuroendocrine tumors. While SFT of the pancreas tend to have an indolent course, there is the potential for malignancy. We recommend complete surgical excision.

  12. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Andrew R; Newman, Elliot; Hajdu, Cristina H

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin. Most commonly they affect the pleura but they been described in other viscera. SFT of the pancreas is extremely rare, and only eight cases have been reported to date. We perform a literature review and report a ninth case. The patient is a 54-year-old African-American female who presented with several months of abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography demonstrated a lesion in the head of the pancreas, and she underwent a Whipple operation. Pathology demonstrated SFT of the pancreas. She is alive and well 1 year post-operatively. SFT of the pancreas predominately affects middle-aged women. These tumors are difficult to distinguish radiologically from neuroendocrine tumors. While SFT of the pancreas tend to have an indolent course, there is the potential for malignancy. We recommend complete surgical excision. PMID:26628714

  13. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a cystic tumor of the pancreas. The etiology is unknown, but increasing evidence suggests the involvement of several tumorigenesis pathways, including an association with hereditary syndromes. IPMN occurs more commonly in men, with the mean age at diagnosis between 64 and 67 years old. At the time of diagnosis, it may be benign, with or without dysplasia, or frankly malignant with an invasive carcinoma. Tumors arising from the main pancreatic duct are termed main-duct IPMNs, those involving the branch ducts, branch-duct IPMNs. In general, small branch-duct IPMNs are benign, particularly in asymptomatic patients, and can be safely followed. In contrast, main-duct tumors should be surgically resected and examined carefully for an invasive component. In the absence of invasion, patient's survival is excellent, from 94 to 100%. For patients with an IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma, the prognosis overall is better than those with a de novo pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, with a 5-year survival of 40% to 60% in some series. However, no survival advantage can be demonstrated if the invasive component in an IPMN patient is that of the conventional tubular type (versus mucinous carcinoma). Several histomorphologic variants are recognized, although the clinical significance of this “subtyping” is not well defined. PMID:24278753

  14. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: Molecular characterization of 23 patients along with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Borazanci, Erkut; Millis, Sherri Z; Korn, Ron; Han, Haiyong; Whatcott, Clifford J; Gatalica, Zoran; Barrett, Michael T; Cridebring, Derek; Von Hoff, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCP) is a rare entity. Like adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, overall survival is poor. Characteristics of ASCP include central tumor necrosis, along with osteoclasts and hypercalcemia. Various theories exist as to why this histological subtype exists, as normal pancreas tissue has no benign squamous epithelium. Due to the rarity of this disease, limited molecular analysis has been performed, and those reports indicate unique molecular features of ASCP. In this paper, we characterize 23 patients diagnosed with ASCP through molecular profiling using immunohistochemistry staining, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromogenic in situ hybridization, and gene sequencing, Additionally, we provide a comprehensive literature review of what is known to date of ASCP. Molecular characterization revealed overexpression in MRP1 (80%), MGMT (79%), TOP2A (75), RRM1 (42%), TOPO1 (42%), PTEN (45%), CMET (40%), and C-KIT (10%) among others. One hundred percent of samples tested were positive for KRAS mutations. This analysis shows heretofore unsuspected leads to be considered for treatments of this rare type of exocrine pancreas cancer. Molecular profiling may be appropriate to provide maximum information regarding the patient’s tumor. Further work should be pursued to better characterize this disease. PMID:26380056

  15. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  16. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Han

    2010-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is characterized by brief recurrent episodes of vertigo triggered by changes in head position. BPPV is the most common etiology of recurrent vertigo and is caused by abnormal stimulation of the cupula by free-floating otoliths (canalolithiasis) or otoliths that have adhered to the cupula (cupulolithiasis) within any of the three semicircular canals. Typical symptoms and signs of BPPV are evoked when the head is positioned so that the plane of the affected semicircular canal is spatially vertical and thus aligned with gravity. Paroxysm of vertigo and nystagmus develops after a brief latency during the Dix-Hallpike maneuver in posterior-canal BPPV, and during the supine roll test in horizontal-canal BPPV. Positioning the head in the opposite direction usually reverses the direction of the nystagmus. The duration, frequency, and symptom intensity of BPPV vary depending on the involved canals and the location of otolithic debris. Spontaneous recovery may be expected even with conservative treatments. However, canalithrepositioning maneuvers usually provide an immediate resolution of symptoms by clearing the canaliths from the semicircular canal into the vestibule. PMID:20607044

  17. Nihilism: a benign denial.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2003-06-01

    Nihilism is the belief that all possible knowledge on a given topic has been amassed and codified. Ranging from benign denial to deliberate attempts at excommunication, nihilism is often encountered in the history of medicine. Eustachius, Columbus, and Sylvius strongly criticized Vesalius and defended the authority of Galen. Riolan fervently rejected Harvey's monumental work on the circulation of blood. Gross stated that no honest and sensible surgeon would ever sanction thyroidectomy. Sandstrom's discovery of the parathyroids was met with silence. Transplantation of parathyroids by Mandl was not appreciated when announced. Aristotle's dictum that the heart cannot withstand serious injury led to Paget's statement that cardiac surgery had reached the limits set by nature, which no new techniques could overcome. The first Billroth I operation was welcomed as, "Hopefully, also the last." Pancreatic surgery was opposed because the organ was of no clinical interest and was impossible for surgeons to reach. Pancreatic transplantation was rejected for many years, despite good results. When Blundell used blood transfusion for postpartum hemorrhage, critics averred that his next exploit would be radical removal of the spleen. Bassini stated that it could be risky to publish more about radical treatment of inguinal hernias. Carcinomas of the lower sigmoid and upper rectum were deemed untreatable because of their inaccessibility. Colostomy during pediatric surgery was rejected many times. Although it is difficult for the human mind to move from a familiar point of view, this propensity should not infect science, thereby impeding advancement.

  18. Baritosis: a benign pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, A T

    1976-01-01

    Baritosis is one of the benign pneumoconioses in which inhaled particulate matter lies in the lungs for years without producing symptoms, abnormal physical signs, incapacity for work, interference with lung function, or liability to develop pulmonary or bronchial infections or other thoracic disease. Owing to the high radio-opacity of barium, the discrete shadows in the chest radiograph are extremely dense. Even in the most well-marked cases with extreme profusion of the opacities, massive shadows do not occur. When exposure to barium dust ceases the opacities begin slowly to disappear. Nine cases of baritosis occurring in a small factory in which barytes was crushed, graded, and milled are described. Two of the cases occurred after only 18 and 21 month's exposure, and 9 of the 10 men employed for more than one and a half years had baritosis. Five of the affected men examined at intervals since their exposure to barytes ceased in 1964 showed marked clearing of their radiological abnormalities. Images PMID:1257935

  19. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  20. Pancreas transplant imaging: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Tolat, Parag P; Foley, W Dennis; Johnson, Christopher; Hohenwalter, Mark D; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2015-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation aims to restore physiologic normoglycemia in diabetic patients with glomerulopathy and avoid or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and arteriopathy. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is the most common approach, using a cadaveric pancreas donation in conjunction with either cadaveric or live donor renal transplant. Alternative techniques include pancreas after kidney transplant, in which the pancreas transplant is performed some years after renal transplant. Pancreas transplant alone is utilized rarely in diabetic patients with compensated renal function. Pancreas grafts have vascular and enteric connections that vary in their anatomic approach, and understanding of this is critical for imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging techniques are directed to display the pancreatic transplant arterial and venous vasculature, parenchyma, and intestinal drainage pathway. Critical vascular information includes venous thrombosis (partial or complete), arterial occlusion, or aneurysm. Parenchymal abnormalities are nonspecific and occur in pancreatitis, graft rejection, and subsequent graft ischemia. Peripancreatic fluid collections include hematoma/seroma, pseudocyst, and abscess. The latter two are related to pancreatitis, duct disruption, or leak from the duodenojejunostomy. An understanding of transplant anatomy and complications will lead to appropriate use of imaging techniques to diagnose or exclude important complications.

  1. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Pancreas This booklet is about cancer of the pancreas, also called pancreatic cancer. There are two main ... care. This booklet covers: The anatomy of the pancreas and basics about cancer of the pancreas Treatments ...

  2. Benign retroperitoneal schwannoma mimicking a pancreatic cystic tumor: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, W C; Lin, P W; Chang, K C

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of benign retroperitoneal schwannoma mimicking a pancreatic cystic tumor is reported herein. The tumor mass, based on a computed tomography scan and an abdominal echo examination, was initially suspected to be a mucinous cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas. However, the surgical and pathohistological findings made a final diagnosis of benign pancreatic schwannoma. The patient is doing well at a 2-year follow-up. The tumor, 18x17x15 cm in size, represented the largest among reported pancreatic schwannomas. Furthermore, a comprehensive review of reported cases of pancreatic schwannoma was carried out to summarize corresponding findings, including benign or malignant forms, adherence to other tissues, cystic change of the tumor, as well as relation to von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis.

  3. Benign lymphoepithelial lesion: a less than benign disease.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M J; Cawson, R A; Bennett, M H

    1986-02-01

    The precise clinical correlate of the benign lymphoepithelial lesion is unclear. Thirty-six cases of benign lymphoepithelial lesions (BLL), reported to the British Salivary Gland Tumour Panel between 1971 and 1984, have been reviewed. Eighty per cent arose in the parotid gland and 20% were bilateral; 83% were in females and the mean age at presentation was 55.26 years. Only 50% presented with, or developed, symptoms of sicca complex, Sjogren's syndrome or related autoimmune disease. Two cases of BLL had, or went on to develop, extra salivary lymphomas and 5 cases of BLL had lymphomatous change in the initial biopsy. A further case had carcinoma within the benign lymphoepithelial lesion. None of those who developed lymphoma had sicca or Sjogren's syndrome but 3 of them had rheumatoid arthritis. The incidence of lymphomas (salivary or extra-salivary) in this series is very much higher than that reported in Sjogren's patients and amounted to 20% overall.

  4. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  5. Is a fatty pancreas a banal lesion?

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    So far, a fatty pancreas has been related to obesity and the ageing processes in the body. The current list of pathogenetic factors of the condition is clearly extended with genetically conditioned diseases (cystic fibrosis, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome), pancreatitis, especially hereditary and obstructive, metabolic and hormonal disorders (hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypercortisolemia), alcohol overuse, taking some medicines (especially adrenal cortex hormones), disease of the liver and visceral adiposis. As regards lipomatosis of that organ resulting mainly from dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, the term "nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease" was introduced. Experimental studies on animals and histological preparations of the pancreatic fragments show that the lipotoxicity of the collected adipocytes collected ion the organ release a cascade of proinflammatory phenomena, and even induces the processes of carcinogenesis. Pancreas adiposis is best defined in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, a series of works proved the usefulness in the diagnostics of that pathology of transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasonography. In that method, the degree of adiposis was based on the comparison of echogenicity of the pancreas and the liver, renal parenchyma, spleen and/or retroperitoneal adipose. Recently, the evaluation was expanded by the evaluation of the degree of pancreatic adipose with the pancreas-to-liver index, utilizing to that end a special computer program. According to our experience, the simplest solution is the method utilized by us. On one crosssection of the body of the pancreas, its echogenicity is assessed in comparison to retroperitoneal adipose and the visibility of the splenic vein, pancreatic duct and the major retroperitoneal vessels. Depending on the visualization of these structures, it is possible to determine the degree of pancreas adiposis. Such a study applies

  6. Is a fatty pancreas a banal lesion?

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    So far, a fatty pancreas has been related to obesity and the ageing processes in the body. The current list of pathogenetic factors of the condition is clearly extended with genetically conditioned diseases (cystic fibrosis, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome), pancreatitis, especially hereditary and obstructive, metabolic and hormonal disorders (hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypercortisolemia), alcohol overuse, taking some medicines (especially adrenal cortex hormones), disease of the liver and visceral adiposis. As regards lipomatosis of that organ resulting mainly from dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, the term “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” was introduced. Experimental studies on animals and histological preparations of the pancreatic fragments show that the lipotoxicity of the collected adipocytes collected ion the organ release a cascade of proinflammatory phenomena, and even induces the processes of carcinogenesis. Pancreas adiposis is best defined in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, a series of works proved the usefulness in the diagnostics of that pathology of transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasonography. In that method, the degree of adiposis was based on the comparison of echogenicity of the pancreas and the liver, renal parenchyma, spleen and/or retroperitoneal adipose. Recently, the evaluation was expanded by the evaluation of the degree of pancreatic adipose with the pancreas-to-liver index, utilizing to that end a special computer program. According to our experience, the simplest solution is the method utilized by us. On one crosssection of the body of the pancreas, its echogenicity is assessed in comparison to retroperitoneal adipose and the visibility of the splenic vein, pancreatic duct and the major retroperitoneal vessels. Depending on the visualization of these structures, it is possible to determine the degree of pancreas adiposis. Such a study

  7. Is a fatty pancreas a banal lesion?

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    So far, a fatty pancreas has been related to obesity and the ageing processes in the body. The current list of pathogenetic factors of the condition is clearly extended with genetically conditioned diseases (cystic fibrosis, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome), pancreatitis, especially hereditary and obstructive, metabolic and hormonal disorders (hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypercortisolemia), alcohol overuse, taking some medicines (especially adrenal cortex hormones), disease of the liver and visceral adiposis. As regards lipomatosis of that organ resulting mainly from dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, the term “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” was introduced. Experimental studies on animals and histological preparations of the pancreatic fragments show that the lipotoxicity of the collected adipocytes collected ion the organ release a cascade of proinflammatory phenomena, and even induces the processes of carcinogenesis. Pancreas adiposis is best defined in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, a series of works proved the usefulness in the diagnostics of that pathology of transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasonography. In that method, the degree of adiposis was based on the comparison of echogenicity of the pancreas and the liver, renal parenchyma, spleen and/or retroperitoneal adipose. Recently, the evaluation was expanded by the evaluation of the degree of pancreatic adipose with the pancreas-to-liver index, utilizing to that end a special computer program. According to our experience, the simplest solution is the method utilized by us. On one crosssection of the body of the pancreas, its echogenicity is assessed in comparison to retroperitoneal adipose and the visibility of the splenic vein, pancreatic duct and the major retroperitoneal vessels. Depending on the visualization of these structures, it is possible to determine the degree of pancreas adiposis. Such a study

  8. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  9. Melatonin, endocrine pancreas and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin influences insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. (i) The effects are MT(1)-and MT(2)-receptor-mediated. (ii) They are specific, high-affinity, pertussis-toxin-sensitive, G(i)-protein-coupled, leading to inhibition of the cAMP-pathway and decrease of insulin release. [Correction added after online publication 4 December 2007: in the preceding sentence, 'increase of insulin release' was changed to 'decrease of insulin release'.] Furthermore, melatonin inhibits the cGMP-pathway, possibly mediated by MT(2) receptors. In this way, melatonin likely inhibits insulin release. A third system, the IP(3)-pathway, is mediated by G(q)-proteins, phospholipase C and IP(3), which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, with a resultant increase in insulin. (iii) Insulin secretion in vivo, as well as from isolated islets, exhibits a circadian rhythm. This rhythm, which is apparently generated within the islets, is influenced by melatonin, which induces a phase shift in insulin secretion. (iv) Observation of the circadian expression of clock genes in the pancreas could possibly be an indication of the generation of circadian rhythms in the pancreatic islets themselves. (v) Melatonin influences diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances. The diabetogens, alloxan and streptozotocin, lead to selective destruction of beta-cells through their accumulation in these cells, where they induce the generation of ROS. Beta-cells are very susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity. Results suggest that melatonin in pharmacological doses provides protection against ROS. (vi) Finally, melatonin levels in plasma, as well as the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity, are lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic rats and humans. In contrast, in the pineal gland, the AANAT mRNA is increased and the insulin receptor mRNA is decreased, which indicates a close interrelationship between insulin and melatonin. PMID:18078445

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease1

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Abhishek; Marine, Megan; Lu, Debao; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A.; Saxena, Romil; Zyromski, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Obesity leads to fat infiltration of multiple organs including the heart, kidneys, and liver. Under conditions of oxidative stress, fat-derived cytokines are released locally and result in an inflammatory process and organ dysfunction. In the liver, fat infiltration has been termed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. No data are available, however, on the influence of obesity on pancreatic fat and cytokines, and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) has not been described. Therefore, we designed a study to determine whether obesity is associated with increased pancreatic fat and cytokines. Materials and methods. Thirty C57BL/6J lean control and 30 leptin-deficient obese female mice were fed a 15% fat diet for 4 weeks. At 12 weeks of age all animals underwent total pancreatectomy. Pancreata from each strain were pooled for measurement of a) wet and dry weight, b) histologic presence of fat, c) triglycerides, free fatty acids (FFAs), cholesterol, phospholipids, and total fat, and d) interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Data were analyzed by Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Results. Pancreata from obese mice were heavier (p<0.05) and had more fat histologically (p<0.05). Pancreata from obese mice had more triglycerides, FFAs, cholesterol, and total fat (p<0.05). Triglycerides represented 11% of pancreatic fat in lean mice compared with 67% of pancreatic fat in obese mice (p<0.01). Cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α also were elevated in the pancreata of obese mice (p<0.05). Conclusions. These data suggest that obese mice have 1) heavier pancreata, 2) more pancreatic fat, especially triglycerides and FFAs, and 3) increased cytokines. We conclude that obesity leads to nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease. PMID:18345311

  11. Benign lymphoepithelial lesion and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, G J; Meyer, C J

    1981-01-01

    Whereas most patients with benign lymphoepithelial lesion suffer from the involvement of a major salivary gland a number evolve into a clinical form of Sjögren's syndrome or Mikulicz's disease. In a small number development of malignant lymphomas, especially non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, have been described. Therefore, regular follow-up and appropriate histological evaluation of suspected areas in all patients with a benign lymphoepithelial lesion is indicated. Histologically, diagnosis of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma may be difficult. Demonstration of a cell pattern, monoclonal for cytoplasmic Ig by means of the immunoperoxidase technique may facilitate the diagnosis. In this report we present the history of two cases out of our series with benign lymphoepithelial lesion who developed a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  12. Surgery for Benign Salivary Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, M Boyd; Iro, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Salivary neoplasms are relatively infrequent entities that account for only 4% of tumors of the head and neck. Although slow-growing lesions of the preauricular area and submandibular space are often confused with sebaceous cysts, lymph nodes, or lipomas by the non-otolaryngologist, otolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons recognize that all preauricular and submandibular masses should be considered a salivary neoplasm until proven otherwise. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for benign salivary gland neoplasms; however, techniques continue to evolve in order to preserve salivary function and reduce surgical morbidity. The goals of management of benign salivary neoplasms include accurate diagnosis of the lesion, complete surgical extirpation, and functional preservation of adjacent cranial nerves. Accurate diagnosis is aided by appropriate preoperative physical examination, imaging, and fine needle aspiration biopsy. Benign neoplasms typically present as slow-growing, painless, mobile masses without adverse features, such as tissue fixation, ulceration, a cranial nerve deficit, or regional lymphadenopathy. Preoperative imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging reveals well-circumscribed lesions without an infiltrative growth pattern or associated adenopathy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy may favor a benign neoplasm, supporting the clinical presentation. Surgery for a benign or malignant salivary neoplasm is in essence a false dichotomy since the surgeon can never be completely confident of the diagnosis until the specimen is removed. The surgeon must recognize the significant overlap between benign and malignant salivary masses in terms of clinical presentation, imaging, and cytology, which requires the surgeon to remain vigilant and flexible at the time of surgery should tissue characteristics or frozen section analysis suggest a malignant process.

  13. QUILT-2.014: Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  14. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas. PMID:27575268

  15. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-12-26

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  16. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  17. Three-dimensional pancreas organogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Grapin-Botton, A

    2016-09-01

    A rediscovery of three-dimensional culture has led to the development of organ biogenesis, homeostasis and disease models applicable to human tissues. The so-called organoids that have recently flourished serve as valuable models bridging between cell lines or primary cells grown on the bottom of culture plates and experiments performed in vivo. Though not recapitulating all aspects of organ physiology, the miniature organs generated in a dish are useful models emerging for the pancreas, starting from embryonic progenitors, adult cells, tumour cells and stem cells. This review focusses on the currently available systems and their relevance to the study of the pancreas, of β-cells and of several pancreatic diseases including diabetes. We discuss the expected future developments for studying human pancreas development and function, for developing diabetes models and for producing therapeutic cells. PMID:27615129

  18. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158

  19. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  20. Circumportal pancreas with retroportal main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Ross, Andrew S; Traverso, L William

    2009-08-01

    There have been 6 cases of circumportal pancreas reported, and 2 of them had the main pancreatic duct in a retroportal dorsal portion. This extremely uncommon anomaly is asymptomatic and therefore incidentally discovered. For the surgeon, it is important to discover this during pancreatic resection so the pancreatic duct can be closed and fistula is avoided. We describe the third case where a circumportal pancreas had its main pancreatic duct passing under the portal vein. The duct was identified and ligated. A fistula did not occur.

  1. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Molena, Daniela A; Schoeniger, Luke O; Haodong Xu

    2007-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an unusual mesenchymal neoplasm that most often arises in the pleura; however, it has recently been described in a number of extrapleural sites. This report describes an extremely rare case of a benign SFT arising in the pancreas. A 41-year-old woman presented in the clinic with right upper abdominal pain. Subsequent ultrasonographic studies revealed a 1.5x1.5x1.4 cm hypoechoic mass within the pancreatic body, which was later confirmed on both helical computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies. An endocrine tumor was clinically suspected. Laparoscopic enucleation of the mass was performed. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of bland uniform spindle cells arranged between collagen bundles. On immunohistochemical studies, these spindle cells were positive for CD34 and bcl-2 but negative for cytokeratin (AE1+AE3 and Cam5.2), smooth muscle actin, desmin, S-100, and c-kit. Based on the light microscopic morphology and immunohistochemical staining profile, the diagnosis of SFT was rendered.

  2. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  3. OPTN/SRTR 2013 Annual Data Report: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Tyler, K H; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas listings and transplants decreased during the past decade, most notably pancreas after kidney transplants. Center-reported outcomes of pancreas transplant across all groups, short-term and long-term, improved during the same period. Changes to the pancreas allocation system creating an efficient, uniform national system will be implemented in late 2014. Pancreas-alone and simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) candidates will form a single match-run list with priority to most SPK candidates ahead of kidney-alone candidates to decrease waiting times for SPK candidates, given their higher waitlist mortality compared with nondiabetic kidney transplant candidates. The changes are expected to eliminate local variability, providing more consistent pancreas allocation nationwide. Outcomes after pancreas transplant are challenging to interpret due to lack of a uniform definition of graft failure. Consequently, SRTR has not published data on pancreas graft failure for the past 2 years. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Pancreas Transplantation Committee is working on a definition that could provide greater validity for future outcomes analyses. Challenges in pancreas transplantation include high risk of technical failures, rejection (early and late), and surgical complications. Continued outcome improvement and innovation has never been more critical, as alternatives such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas move closer to clinical application.

  4. [Endoscopic ultrasonography in diagnosis of surgical treatment of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Starkov, Iu G; Solodinina, E N; Shishin, K V; Plotnikova, L S

    2008-01-01

    Results of endoscopic ultrasonography at 137 patients suspected for pancreas pathology are analyzed. Methodology of endoscopic ultrasonography, semiotics of pancreas surgical diseases, advantages over other diagnostic methods are described. Endosonography is informative method for final diagnosis of different disease of pancreas. Diagnostic value of method and area of its clinical application are described.

  5. New variant for whole pancreas grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kootstra, G.; van Hooff, J.P.; Joerning, P.J.L.; Leunissen, K.M.; van der Linden, C.J.; Beukers, E.; Buurman, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    A new variant for whole pancreas grafting is described in which a segment of the duodenum and the spleen is included in the graft. The graft is placed extraperitoneally as in kidney transplantation. The exocrine drainage is with side-to-side anastomosis between duodenum and bladder. The spleen is irradiated to prevent the occurrence of GVHD, as is reported in splenic transplantation.

  6. [Sonographic topography of the pancreas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Triller, J

    1978-07-01

    Vascular abdominal structures can be demonstrated by the gray-scale-B-scan-technique. These vascular anatomical structures are important to differentiate pathological lesions from normal structures and to evaluate the localisation of space occupying lesions within the pancreas, liver and retroperitoneal space.

  7. Pancreas After Islet Transplantation: A First Report of the International Pancreas Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, R W G; Gruessner, A C

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas after islet (PAI) transplantation is a treatment option for patients seeking insulin independence through a whole-organ transplant after a failed cellular transplant. This report from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) studied PAI transplant outcomes over a 10-year time period. Forty recipients of a failed alloislet transplant subsequently underwent pancreas transplant alone (50%), pancreas after previous kidney transplant (22.5%), or simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplant (27.5%). Graft and patient survival rates were not statistically significantly different compared with matched primary pancreas transplants. Regardless of the recipient category, overall 1- and 5-year PAI patient survival rates for all 40 cases were 97% and 83%, respectively; graft survival rates were 84% and 65%, respectively. A failed previous islet transplant had no negative impact on kidney graft survival in the SPK category: It was the same as for primary SPK transplants. According to this IPTR/UNOS analysis, a PAI transplant is a safe procedure with low recipient mortality, high graft-function rates in both the short and long term and excellent kidney graft outcomes. Patients with a failed islet transplant should know about this alternative in their quest for insulin independence through transplantation.

  8. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  9. [Evalution of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Desgrandchamps, François

    2005-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a disorder of aging men and according to reasons for consultation its incidence is continually increasing in parallel with the constant increase in life expectancy. Recommendations about its management have been made by numerous national and international, scientific authorities and those responsible for public health. However, despite a rationale based on regularly published data, there are many disparities between them and they are only partially followed up in routine practice. The purpose of a working group during the "2nd Interfaces in Urology" was to make a new assessment on this disorder with regard to the most recent data and existing recommendations, in order to offer clinicians a clearer attitude for the prescription of the initial evaluation of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  10. Benign pleomorphic adenomas in children.

    PubMed

    Malone, B; Baker, S R

    1984-01-01

    Benign pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands in children are rare. Reported are 30 patients under the age of 21 years presenting with this neoplasm. Twelve patients were first seen with recurrent or persistent tumor following previous attempts at removal. Retreatment resulted in control of the neoplasm in eight patients with follow-up from 5 to 24 years. Two additional patients have developed malignant degeneration of their neoplasms. All 18 previously untreated patients have remained free of recurrence. As with adults, the treatment of choice for benign pleomorphic adenomas of the parotid gland developing in children is parotidectomy with preservation of the facial nerve. Tumors arising in the submandibular gland are best treated by complete excision of the gland as well as the tumor.

  11. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions.

  12. Multiple chronic benign pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Kalifa, L G; Schimmel, D H; Gamsu, G

    1976-11-01

    Four cases are discussed in which were found unusual multiple chronic pulmonary nodules: leiomyomatous hamartomas, rheumatoid nodules, multiple histoplasmomas, and possible multiple plasma cell granulomas (hyalinizing pulmonary nodules). In each case the initial impression of metastic malignancy was countered by more than 2 years' observation, during which time the lesions appeared to be benign. Histologic examination is necessary to exclude malignancy, although a definitive diagnosis may be difficult to establish. PMID:981596

  13. A Rare Case of an Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas Fistulizing Into Duodenum With Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pipaliya, Nirav; Rathi, Chetan; Parikh, Pathik; Patel, Ruchir; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) accounts for 20-50% of all cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. Rarely, IPMN, whether benign or malignant, can fistulize into adjacent organs like duodenum, stomach or common bile duct. IPMN can be associated with other diseases like Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis. Association with adult polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is extremely rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old male with a large IPMN in the head of the pancreas diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound and cyst fluid analysis. It was complicated by fistula formation into the second part of the duodenum. Patient was simultaneously having adult polycystic kidney disease. There is only one case report of uncomplicated IPMN with ADPKD in the literature so far. And even rarer, there is no any case report of fistulizing IPMN with ADPKD reported so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  14. Formation of Collateral Veins in a Graft Pancreas After a Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, B H; Lee, H Y; Park, Y M; Yang, K H; Ryu, J H; Chu, C W

    2015-09-01

    A graft vein thrombosis is the main cause of early graft failure after pancreas transplantation. We report a case of formation of collateral veins in a graft pancreas after transplant. A 30-year-old woman underwent simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation. She was discharged 16 days after the operation with good pancreas and kidney function. A total occlusion of the portal vein was discovered on computed tomography (CT) performed at an outpatient clinic. She had no symptoms or signs of hyperglycemia. Venography was attempted for vein thrombectomy but failed. After 2 weeks of heparinization therapy, the edema disappeared and perfusion of the graft pancreas improved. However, the thrombotic occlusion was not resolved on CT. Arteriography of the Y-graft revealed collateral veins. She was discharged with warfarin. She is currently doing well without any symptoms or signs. This is the first reported case of collateral vein formation in a grafted pancreas after pancreas transplantation.

  15. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Sakai, Shinya; Aono, Shoji; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Inoue, Takeshi; Ohta, Koji; Tanada, Minoru; Teramoto, Norihiro

    2010-07-01

    A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) originating in the pancreas is rare. We report a 55-year-old woman with an asymptomatic pancreatic mass incidentally discovered on abdominal ultrasonography. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed a well-demarcated exophytic mass in the pancreatic head with prolonged and delayed enhancement. The mass showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images and heterogeneous hypointensity with spotty hyperintensity foci on T2-weighted images. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT showed no significant FDG uptake. The resected mass was composed of spindle cells that were positive for CD34; and hemangiopericytomatous vessels were focally detected. The mass was finally diagnosed as an SFT of the pancreas.

  16. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  17. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  18. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  19. Pancreas sparing duodenectomy as an emergency procedure

    PubMed Central

    Paluszkiewicz, Piotr; Dudek, Wojciech; Lowery, Kathryn; Hart, Colin A

    2009-01-01

    Background The operative techniques to close extensive wounds to the duodenum are well described. However, postoperative morbidity is common and includes suture line leak and the formation of fistulae. The aim of this case series is to present pancreas sparing duodenectomy as a safe and viable alternative procedure in the emergency milieu. Methods Five patients underwent emergency pancreas sparing duodenal excisions. Re-implantation of the papilla of Vater or the papilla with a surrounding mucosal patch was performed in two patients. In one, the procedure was further supplemented with a duodenocholangiostomy, stapled pyloric exclusion and enterogastrostomy to defunction the pylorus. In another three patients, distal duodenal excisions were done. Results In four patients, an uneventful recovery was made. One patient died following a myocardial infarction. The surgery lasted meanly 160 minutes with average blood loss of approximately 500 milliliters. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. Enteral nutrition was introduced within the 20 hours after the surgery. Long term follow-up of all surviving patients confirmed a good outcome and normal nutritional status. Conclusion Based on the presented series of patients, we suggest that pancreas-sparing duodenectomy can be considered in selected patients with laceration of the duodenum deemed unsuitable for surgical reconstruction. PMID:19445694

  20. Stereological analyses of the whole human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Ananta; Fowler, Jonas L.; Zielinski, Mark C.; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami

    2016-01-01

    The large size of human tissues requires a practical stereological approach to perform a comprehensive analysis of the whole organ. We have developed a method to quantitatively analyze the whole human pancreas, as one of the challenging organs to study, in which endocrine cells form various sizes of islets that are scattered unevenly throughout the exocrine pancreas. Furthermore, the human pancreas possesses intrinsic characteristics of intra-individual variability, i.e. regional differences in endocrine cell/islet distribution, and marked inter-individual heterogeneity regardless of age, sex and disease conditions including obesity and diabetes. The method is built based on large-scale image capture, computer-assisted unbiased image analysis and quantification, and further mathematical analyses, using widely-used software such as Fiji/ImageJ and MATLAB. The present study includes detailed protocols of every procedure as well as all the custom-written computer scripts, which can be modified according to specific experimental plans and specimens of interest. PMID:27658965

  1. Bringing the Artificial Pancreas Home: Telemedicine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lanzola, Giordano; Capozzi, Davide; Serina, Nadia; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    The design and implementation of telemedicine systems able to support the artificial pancreas need careful choices to cope with technological requirements while preserving performance and decision support capabilities. This article addresses the issue of designing a general architecture for the telemedicine components of an artificial pancreas and illustrates a viable solution that is able to deal with different use cases and is amenable to support mobile-health implementations. The goal is to enforce interoperability among the components of the architecture and guarantee maximum flexibility for the ensuing implementations. Thus, the design stresses modularity and separation of concerns along with adoption of clearly defined protocols for interconnecting the necessary components. This accounts for the implementation of integrated telemedicine systems suitable as short-term monitoring devices for supporting validation of closed-loop algorithms as well as devices meant to provide a lifelong tighter control on the patient state once the artificial pancreas has become the preferred treatment for patients with diabetes. PMID:22226255

  2. Pancreas Transplantation: Solid Organ and Islet

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shruti; Johnson, Paul; Friend, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas, either as a solid organ or as isolated islets of Langerhans, is indicated in a small proportion of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes in whom severe complications develop, particularly severe glycemic instability and progressive secondary complications (usually renal failure). The potential to reverse diabetes has to be balanced against the morbidity of long-term immunosuppression. For a patient with renal failure, the treatment of choice is often a simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney (SPK), whereas for a patient with glycemic instability, specifically hypoglycemic unawareness, the choice between a solid organ and an islet transplant has to be individual to the patient. Results of SPK transplantation are comparable to other solid-organ transplants (kidney, liver, heart) and there is evidence of improved quality of life and life expectancy, but the results of solitary pancreas transplantation and islets are inferior with respect to graft survival. There is some evidence of benefit with respect to the progression of secondary diabetic complications in patients with functioning transplants for several years. PMID:24616200

  3. An Integrated Multivariable Artificial Pancreas Control System

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T.; Littlejohn, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system. PMID:24876613

  4. An integrated multivariable artificial pancreas control system.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system.

  5. Early Gastric Cancer Just above a Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Murabayashi, Toji; Kawaguchi, Shinya; Okuda, Naoko; Oyamada, Jun; Yabana, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of early gastric cancer just above a heterotopic pancreas for which the differential diagnosis was carcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas. Routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in an 83-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer revealed a gastric cancer in the lesser curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for evaluating the depth of tumor invasion revealed a hypoechoic mass in the submucosal layer. The depth of tumor invasion was diagnosed as muscularis propria. Distal gastrectomy and sigmoidectomy were performed. Histologically, the resected specimen of the stomach unexpectedly revealed a heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. They were not linked, and the heterotopic pancreas had no dysplasia. The gastric cancer had slightly invaded the submucosa. The hypoechoic mass on EUS was not the invasive tumor but the heterotopic pancreas. The preoperative staging of the gastric cancer on EUS was confounded by the presence of the heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. PMID:27482189

  6. A case of papillary-cystic epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Alm, P; Jönsson, P E; Karp, W; Lindberg, L G; Stenram, U; Sundler, F

    1981-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with a left-sided abdominal mass. X-ray examination and computed tomography disclosed a well-defined tumor close to the tail of the pancreas, stretching the pancreatic branches from the splenic artery as demonstrated by arteriography. Ultrasonography suggested a partly cystic character. Cytologic fine-needle biopsy, histopathological and electron microscopical examination disclosed a cysto-papillary tumor, probably benign, and of an exocrine, ductular origin, and with pseudo-cystic areas similar to those found in adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands. Immunohistochemistry did not demonstrate the presence of polypeptide hormones. The patient is without signs of tumor recurrence 18 months after operation.

  7. Human pancreas scintigraphy using iodine-123-labeled HIPDM and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, K.; Shibata, T.; Saji, H.; Kubo, S.; Aoki, E.; Fujita, T.; Yonekura, Y.; Konishi, J.; Yokoyama, A. )

    1990-06-01

    The pancreatic affinity of iodine-123-labeled HIPDM (N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propane diamine) (({sup 123}I)HIPDM) was studied in 18 cases (5 normal volunteers, 7 cases with pancreas cancer, and 6 with chronic pancreatitis). In the normal cases, the pancreas was visualized in the planar images as early as 3 hr, and again at 20 hr postinjection. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed following 3-hr planar scintigraphy, provided excellent pancreas images without an overlap of activity in the liver or spleen. The mean pancreas-to-liver (P/L) ratio was 1.26 +/- 0.22 in normal controls. With the exception of one case of massive calcification in the pancreas, the entire pancreas could be observed in the cases with chronic pancreatitis, but the P/L ratio was 0.74 +/- 0.15, significantly lower than that of normal cases. Defective areas of the distal portion of the pancreas were clearly seen in those with cancer of the pancreas. The results of our study indicate that ({sup 123}I) HIPDM may have clinical potential as a human pancreas imaging agent.

  8. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  9. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  10. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  11. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  12. Benign lesions of the external auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Tran, L P; Grundfast, K M; Selesnick, S H

    1996-10-01

    Benign mass lesions of the external auditory canal, such as exostoses and osteomas, are common findings on physical examination but most often do not require treatment. The differential diagnosis of lesions in the external auditory canal, however, should not be limited to those benign processes discussed here, but should also include infectious, dermatologic, congenital, and malignant processes.

  13. A large mural nodule in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Koichiro; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Shiba, Hiroaki; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Indications for resection of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) remain controversial because of their low tendency to be malignant. Surgical resection should be recommended if any factors indicating malignancy are present. However, preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant tumors is very difficult, especially in cases of branch duct IPMNs. We herein report a case of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma (IPMA) of the pancreas with a large mural nodule of 25 mm. A 74-year-old woman was admitted for examination and treatment for a cystic tumor in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography showed a cystic lesion, 50 mm in diameter, with an irregular mural nodule in the pancreatic head. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a multicystic tumor connected with the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The mural nodule had a diameter of 18 mm, and the MPD had a slight dilation of 6 mm. These findings suggested a high potential for malignancy. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. The excised pancreas showed multiple cysts located in the branch pancreatic duct with a maximum diameter of 75 mm. The mural nodule had a maximum diameter of 25 mm. The tumor was diagnosed as an IPMA by pathological examination. After operation, the patient was discharged without any complications. Two years after resection, the patient remains in remission with no evidence of tumor recurrence.

  14. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade.

  15. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; TORREZ, Franz Robert Apodaca; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; TRIVIÑO, Tarcisio; HERANI-FILHO, Benedito; GOLDENBERG, Alberto; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; LOBO, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. Aim: To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Results: Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. PMID:27438034

  16. Purinergic signalling in the pancreas in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G; Novak, I

    2012-05-01

    Pancreatic cells contain specialised stores for ATP. Purinergic receptors (P2 and P1) and ecto-nucleotidases are expressed in both endocrine and exocrine calls, as well as in stromal cells. The pancreas, especially the endocrine cells, were an early target for the actions of ATP. After the historical perspective of purinergic signalling in the pancreas, the focus of this review will be the physiological functions of purinergic signalling in the regulation of both endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Next, we will consider possible interaction between purinergic signalling and other regulatory systems and their relation to nutrient homeostasis and cell survival. The pancreas is an organ exhibiting several serious diseases - cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and diabetes - and some are associated with changes in life-style and are increasing in incidence. There is upcoming evidence for the role of purinergic signalling in the pathophysiology of the pancreas, and the new challenge is to understand how it is integrated with other pathological processes.

  17. Benign Hereditary Chorea: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Peall, Kathryn J.; Kurian, Manju A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is a childhood-onset, hyperkinetic movement disorder normally with little progression of motor symptoms into adult life. The disorder is caused by mutations to the NKX2.1 (TITF1) gene and also forms part of the “brain–lung–thyroid syndrome”, in which additional developmental abnormalities of lung and thyroid tissue are observed. In this review, we summarize the main clinical findings in “classical” BHC syndrome and discuss more recently reported atypical features, including non-choreiform movement phenotypes. We highlight additional non-motor characteristics such as cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms, while discussing the evidence for BHC as a developmental disorder involving impaired neural migration and other multisystem developmental abnormalities. Finally, we will discuss the efficacy of available therapies in both affected pediatric and adult cohorts. Delineation of the BHC disease spectrum will no doubt expand our understanding of this disorder, facilitating better targeting of genetic testing and establish a framework for future clinical trials. PMID:26196025

  18. Recurrent Benign Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Witt, Robert Lee; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The most important causes of recurrence of benign pleomorphic adenoma are enucleation with intraoperative spillage and incomplete tumor excision in association with characteristic histologic findings for the lesion (incomplete pseudocapsule and the presence of pseudopodia). Most recurrent pleomorphic adenomas (RPAs) are multinodular. MRI is the imaging method of choice for their assessment. Nerve integrity monitoring may reduce morbidity of RPA surgery. Although treatment of RPA must be individualized, total parotidectomy is generally recommended given the multicentricity of the lesions. However, surgery alone may be inadequate for controlling RPA over the long term. There is growing evidence from retrospective series that postoperative radiotherapy results in significantly better local control. A high percentage of RPAs are incurable. All patients should therefore be informed about the possibility of needing multiple treatment procedures, with possible impairment of facial nerve function, and radiation therapy for RPA. Reappearance of Warthin tumor is a metachronous occurrence of a new focus or residual incomplete excision of all primary multicentric foci of Warthin tumor. Selected cases can be observed. Conservative surgical management can include partial superficial parotidectomy or extracapsular dissection. Not uncommonly, other major and minor salivary gland neoplasms, including myoepithelioma, basal cell adenoma, oncocytoma, canalicular adenoma, cystadenoma, and ductal papilloma, follow an indolent course after surgical resection, with rare cases of recurrence.

  19. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  20. Diagnosis of early pancreas graft failure via antibody-mediated rejection: single-center experience with 256 pancreas transplantations.

    PubMed

    de Kort, H; Mallat, M J K; van Kooten, C; de Heer, E; Brand-Schaaf, S H; van der Wal, A M; Roufosse, C; Roelen, D L; Bruijn, J A; Claas, F H; de Fijter, J W; Bajema, I M

    2014-04-01

    Early pancreas graft loss is usually attributed to technical failure while the possibility of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is generally overlooked. To investigate the role of AMR in early pancreas graft loss, we retrospectively assessed 256 patients with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) between 1985 and 2010 at our institute. We included 33 SPK patients who lost their pancreas graft <1 year after transplantation. AMR was diagnosed based on donor-specific antibodies, C4d and histology in 7 cases, 8 cases were suspicious for AMR and 18 pancreas graft losses were not due to AMR. Acute AMR occurred >1 month after transplantation in 6/7 cases, whereas all other causes typically led to loss <1 month after transplantation. Thrombotic lesions occurred equally among the 33 cases. In 12/18 concurrent kidney specimens, the diagnostic results paralleled those of the pancreas graft. All patients with acute AMR of the pancreas graft lost their renal grafts <1 year after transplantation. In the setting of a thrombotic event, histopathological analysis of early pancreas graft loss is advisable to rule out the possibility of AMR, particularly because a diagnosis of acute AMR has important consequences for renal graft outcomes.

  1. Subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas combined with ductal obliteration of the distal pancreas in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerremans, R P; Penninckx, F M; De Groote, J; Fevery, J

    1987-01-01

    Subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas combined with duct obliteration of the distal pancreas by prolamine was performed in 12 selected patients who had chronic alcohol-induced pancreatitis with most destruction in the proximal pancreas. The main indication for operation was intractable pain. There was no postoperative mortality but morbidity was high when no pancreaticojejunostomy was constructed. After a follow-up period of 32 months, lasting pain relief was obtained in 10 patients; pseudocyst formation occurred in three patients; calcification of the distal pancreas, absent before operation, was demonstrated in four of six patients; six of 11 nondiabetic patients became hyperglycemic either abruptly (1 patient) or progressively (5 patients); quality of life improved in most patients. This procedure preserves the stomach, duodenum, spleen, distal pancreas and common bile duct if possible. However, pancreatic ductal obliteration with prolamine does not prevent relapses of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:3827358

  2. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: background and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Gratzke, C; Schlenker, B; Weidlich, P; Seitz, M; Reich, O; Stief, C G

    2007-08-16

    Lower UrinaryTracts Symptoms (LUTS) due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) represent an increasing prevalent condition in ageing men. Patients often seek primarily consultation at their general practitioner. Aetiology and natural history of LUTS due to BPH have not been completely clarified. The development of symptomatic LUTS is age-dependent and determined to varying degrees by the presence of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), Benign Prostatic Enlargement (BPE) as well as Bladder Outlet Obstruction (BOO). A causal relationship does not always exist. Basis for a specific medical or surgical treatment in the individual patient with LUTS due to BPH is an exact diagnosis by the practising urologist. PMID:17912862

  3. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making.

  4. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the islet cell tumor of pancreas: a comparison between computerized axial tomography and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Darshana; Eloubeidi, Mohammad; Chhieng, David C; Frost, Andra; Eltoum, Isam A; Roberson, Janie; Jhala, Nirag

    2002-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to compare the cytologic features of islet cell tumor (ICT) of pancreas obtained by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and computed tomography guided FNA (CT-FNA). We also describe the cytologic features associated with malignant ICT. Eleven cytology samples from 121 CT- FNA and 30 EUS- FNA of the pancreas were obtained from nine patients with ICT. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and immunohistochemical stains to determine neuroendocrine differentiation and the hormonal status were evaluated. Cytologic features and specimen adequacy were compared between the two techniques. Cytologic features noted in both benign and malignant ICT were also compared. Nine patients (5 men, 4 women) ranging in age from 29 to 84 years (mean age, 53.8 years). Diagnoses consisted of benign (4) and malignant (5) ICT. EUS-FNA was superior to CT-FNA in obtaining adequate cells (2/2 v 7/9) for the diagnosis and increased cellularity to perform additional immunohistochemical stains (2/2 v 4/7). Single, plasmacytoid cells with finely granular chromatin distribution characterized ICT on cytology. Mitoses (3/5) and necrosis (1/5) were noted in malignant ICT but not in benign ICT. EUS-FNA is superior to CT- FNA for obtaining cells for the diagnosis of ICT. Detection of mitoses and or necrosis from patients with ICT should initiate a search for metastasis.

  5. Benign tumours of the bone: A review☆

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Pelly, Theo; Kulendran, Myutan; Caris, Jochem A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign tumours of the bone are not cancerous and would not metastasise to other regions of the body. However, they can occur in any part of the skeleton, and can still be dangerous as they may grow and compress healthy bone tissue. There are several types of benign tumours that can be classified by the type of matrix that the tumour cells produce; such as bone, cartilage, fibrous tissue, fat or blood vessel. Overall, 8 different types can be distinguished: osteochondroma, osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia and enchondroma. The incidence of benign bone tumours varies depending on the type. However, they most commonly arise in people less than 30 years old, often triggered by the hormones that stimulate normal growth. The most common type is osteochondroma. This review discusses the different types of common benign tumours of the bone based on information accumulated from published literature. PMID:26579486

  6. Asbestos-related benign pleural disease.

    PubMed

    Peacock, C; Copley, S J; Hansell, D M

    2000-06-01

    Benign pleural disease is the commonest manifestation of asbestos exposure encountered by radiologists. Benign pleural thickening can appear as circumscribed parietal pleural plaques or as more diffuse thickening of the visceral pleura. Benign-asbestos induced pleural effusions are a significant and under-recognized manifestation of asbestos exposure with important sequelae, such as diffuse pleural thickening which may be associated with functional impairment and for which compensation may be sought. This review concentrates on the strengths and weaknesses of chest radiography and computed tomography for the detection and characterization of benign asbestos-related pleural disease and the relevance of imaging abnormalities to compensation and functional impairment.Peacock, C. (2000). Clinical Radiology55, 422-432. PMID:10873686

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Environmentally Benign Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a growing interest in replacing current non-biodegradable and toxic nanosystems with environmentally benign biopolymer based ones to minimize post-utilization hazards due to uncontrolled accumulation of nanoparticles in the environment. Lignin based nanoparticles (...

  8. Medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Stephen S; Fitzpatrick, John M

    2007-01-01

    Pharmaceutical preparations are commonly used for benign prostate hyperplasia. This article reviews the current understanding of the natural history of the condition and the literature regarding medical treatment. PMID:17308208

  9. ENVIRONMENTALLY-BENIGN MULTIPHASE CATALYSIS. (R826034)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental concerns stemming from the use of conventional solvents and from hazardous waste generation have propelled research efforts aimed at developing benign chemical processing techniques that either eliminate or significantly mitigate pollution at the source. This pap...

  10. [Benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Dusek, J; Cerný, L; Wiedermann, B

    1977-05-01

    A series of eight observations serves for demonstrating the clinico-pathological picture of the benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands. The glandular lesion was associated with joint symptoms, one of the female patients developed malignant lymphoma.

  11. Multiple pulmonary metastases from benign pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Sit, Ko Yung; Chui, Wing Hung; Wang, Elaine; Chiu, Shui Wah

    2008-01-01

    Metastasizing pleomorphic adenoma is a rare condition of metastasis from a histologically benign salivary gland tumor. We report a case of metastasizing pleomorphic adenoma presenting with multiple bilateral lung metastases, and discuss the clinical aspects of this disease.

  12. [Function of pancreas transplants in increased metabolic stress].

    PubMed

    Teuscher, A U; Seaquist, E R; Barrou, Z; Kendall, D M; Robertson, R P

    1995-01-01

    Patients undergoing successful pancreas transplantation have normal glucose levels in the fasting and fed states and normal levels of hemoglobin A1c without use of exogenous inulin or any other medications for diabetes. In some of these patients, these measures have remained stable for more than 10 years. Additionally pancreas transplant recipients recover from short-term hypoglycemia produced by an intravenous pulse of insulin. However, metabolic success has been determined by relatively routine, unsophisticated tests such as oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests or stimulation with intravenous arginine. These tests may not provide measures of the functional reserve of the pancreas, which is called on during periods of maximal stress. Consequently, we designed studies to ascertain beta and alpha cell performance in recipients of whole pancreas transplants and recipients of a segment of a living related donor. All recipients were recruited from the University of Minnesota Transplant Registry, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Successfully transplanted recipients were subjected to prolonged hyperglycemia to assess insulin secretory reserve using the method of glucose potentiation of arginine induced insulin secretion and to prolonged hypoglycemia to assess glucagon responsiveness and hepatic glucose production using the technique of the hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp. Our studies show that pancreas transplant recipients have markedly diminished insulin secretory reserve, a defect not evident with conventional tests of beta-cell function. No difference was found between the whole graft and segmental graft recipients. Pancreas transplantation restores the defective glucagon secretory response and enhances hepatic glucose production during prolonged hypoglycemia in subjects with type I diabetes. We conclude that pancreas transplantation does not completely restore beta-cell secretory reserve. This defect might be probably caused in part by cyclosporine and by the

  13. The Association between Nonalcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Ming-Fong; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatty infiltration of the pancreas has been shown to interfere with insulin secretion. Both insulin sensitivity and secretion are important in the pathogenesis of diabetes and prediabetes. However, the relationship between diabetes, prediabetes, and fatty pancreas remains unknown. We aim to investigate the relationships that fatty pancreas and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have with prediabetes and diabetes in a Chinese population. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 7,464 subjects were recruited. NAFLD and fatty pancreas were assessed by sonography. Clinico-metabolic parameters were compared among subjects with normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between fatty pancreas and NAFLD and diabetes or prediabetes with adjustment for cardiometabolic risk factors. Results With an increase in glycemia, a significantly greater proportion of subjects had NAFLD and fatty pancreas (test for trend p<0.05). Similar trends were also found for hypertension, general and central obesity, low-HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. In the logistic regression analysis, age, hypertension, male gender, hypertriglyceridemia, and central obesity were significantly associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Furthermore, the ORs of prediabetes and diabetes for NAFLD were 1.798 (95% CI 1.544–2.094) and 2.578 (95% CI 2.024–3.284), respectively. In addition, fatty pancreas was independently related to diabetes (OR, 1.379; 95% CI, 1.047–1.816) and prediabetes (OR, 1.222; 95% CI, 1.002–1.491) in male subjects. Conclusions Both NAFLD and fatty pancreas were associated with diabetes independent of age, gender, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. Fatty pancreas was also related to prediabetes in males. PMID:23671610

  14. Intra-abdominal benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Jouvin, I; Dohan, A; Gergi, P; Pocard, M

    2014-04-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesotheliomas are rare: pre-operative diagnosis relies on proper imaging. The differential diagnosis includes pseudomyxoma peritonei and other peritoneal cysts. Absence of previous surgical resection offers the best chance of success when complete resection is performed in a specialized center. We report the case of a 43 year-old man with benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma treated by cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PMID:24433857

  15. Obstructing pseudocyst of the duct of Santorini in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Browder, W; Gravois, E; Vega, P; Ertan, A

    1987-03-01

    Pancreas divisum is a pancreatic duct anomaly that occurs due to failure of fusion of the dorsal and ventral ducts. While recognition of this anomaly is increasing due to more aggressive endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, its significance remains unclear. A patient with chronic pancreatitis and a history of alcohol abuse was noted to have pancreas divisum. At surgical exploration, intraoperative pancreatography revealed an obstructing pseudocyst of the duct of Santorini. Extended sphincteroplasty and cystduodenostomy as well as Roux-en-Y pancreatojejunostomy were necessary to insure adequate accessory duct drainage. Surgical therapy of pancreas divisum in chronic pancreatitis should be designed to correct existing pancreatic duct obstruction.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  17. Experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of the viscoelastic porcine pancreas and preliminary case study on the human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wex, C; Fröhlich, M; Brandstädter, K; Bruns, C; Stoll, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the mechanical properties of the pancreas. Up to now, the mechanical properties of the pancreas are not sufficiently characterized. The possibility of intraoperative mechanical testing of pathological pancreata will allow the classification of pancreatic diseases in the future. The application of mechanical parameters instead of the intraoperative frozen section analysis shortens waiting times in the operating room. This study proves the general applicability of shear rheology for the determination of the mechanical properties of pancreas and the assessment of graft quality for transplantation. Porcine and human pancreas samples were examined ex vivo and a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior was observed. Pancreas was found to be more viscous than liver but both abdominal organs showed a similar flow behavior. The shear deformation dependence of healthy human pancreas was similar to porcine pancreas. An increase in the post-mortem time led to an increase in the complex modulus for a post-mortem time up to 8.5 days. Histological investigations showed that an increased amount of collagen coincides with the stiffening of the pancreatic tissue.

  18. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  19. Proteomic analysis of pancreas derived from adult cloned pig

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Young Keun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Han, Yong-Mahn; Koo, Deog-Bon Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    2008-02-08

    The potential medical applications of animal cloning include xenotransplantation, but the complex molecular cascades that control porcine organ development are not fully understood. Still, it has become apparent that organs derived from cloned pigs may be suitable for transplantation into humans. In this study, we examined the pancreas of an adult cloned pig developed through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting. Proteomic analysis revealed 69 differentially regulated proteins, including such apoptosis-related species as annexins, lamins, and heat shock proteins, which were unanimously upregulated in the SCNT sample. Among the downregulated proteins in SCNT pancreas were peroxiredoxins and catalase. Western blot results indicate that several antioxidant enzymes and the anti-apoptotic protein were downregulated in SCNT pancreas, whereas several caspases were upregulated. Together, these data suggest that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pancreas of an adult cloned pig leads to apoptosis.

  20. Occupational exposure and cancer of the pancreas: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, F; Clavel, F

    1991-01-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed about the aetiology of cancer of the pancreas, especially concerning the effects of tobacco, coffee, alcohol, diet, and pancreatic pathology. Results of numerous epidemiological studies are, however, inconsistent. Chemical carcinogens have been implicated as possible risk factors. Animal studies have been carried out to determine the role of these chemical factors but, except for nitrosamines and their derivatives (components of tobacco), chemicals have not been proved carcinogenic for the pancreas. Many studies have also been conducted among occupational groups. Several of them showed an excess risk of cancer of the pancreas, especially in the chemical and petroleum industries. The lack of accuracy about the nature of products used, however, does not permit a definitive conclusion as to their carcinogenic role. This paper is a review of publications about occupational exposures and cancer of the pancreas. PMID:1911399

  1. Pancreas procurement and preservation for islet transplantation: personal considerations.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising option for the treatment of type 1 diabetic patients. After the successful demonstration of the Edmonton protocol, islet transplantation has advanced significantly on several fronts, including improved pancreas procurement and preservation systems. Since we frequently use pancreata from donors after cardiac death in Japan,we have applied the in situ regional organ cooling system for pancreas procurement to reduce the warm ischemic time. To reduce the apoptosis of pancreatic tissue during cold preservation, we have applied the ductal injection of preservation solution. For pancreas preservation, we use modified Kyoto solution, which is advantageous at trypsin inhibition and less collagenase inhibition. In this paper, we show pancreas procurement and preservation in our group for islet transplantation.

  2. Imaging spectrum after pancreas transplantation with enteric drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Ling; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Sing-E; Tseng, Hsiuo-Shan; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Huang, Shan-Su; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of pancreas transplantation more than 40 years ago, surgical techniques and immunosuppressive regiments have improved and both have contributed to increase the number and success rate of this procedure. However, graft survival corresponds to early diagnosis of organ-related complications. Thus, knowledge of the transplantation procedure and postoperative image anatomy are basic requirements for radiologists. In this article, we demonstrate the imaging spectrum of pancreas transplantation with enteric exocrine drainage.

  3. Stem cells versus plasticity in liver and pancreas regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Janel L; Grompe, Markus; Sander, Maike

    2016-03-01

    Cell replacement in adult organs can be achieved through stem cell differentiation or the replication or transdifferentiation of existing cells. In the adult liver and pancreas, stem cells have been proposed to replace tissue cells, particularly following injury. Here we review how specialized cell types are produced in the adult liver and pancreas. Based on current evidence, we propose that the plasticity of differentiated cells, rather than stem cells, accounts for tissue repair in both organs.

  4. Anaplastic Carcinoma Possibly Arising from a Heterotopic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yasushi; Mita, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Akino, Kimishige; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Endo, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic carcinoma is a rare pancreatic cancer, and the malignant transformation of a heterotopic pancreas is also rare. We herein report a case of an elderly woman with a mass of unknown origin in the abdominal cavity. Computed tomography identified the extent of the tumor but not the organ of origin. The abdominal tumor eventually metastasized to the liver and lung. An autopsy and immunohistochemical examination revealed an anaplastic carcinoma possibly originating in an ectopic pancreas.

  5. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  6. Stem cells versus plasticity in liver and pancreas regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Janel L; Grompe, Markus; Sander, Maike

    2016-03-01

    Cell replacement in adult organs can be achieved through stem cell differentiation or the replication or transdifferentiation of existing cells. In the adult liver and pancreas, stem cells have been proposed to replace tissue cells, particularly following injury. Here we review how specialized cell types are produced in the adult liver and pancreas. Based on current evidence, we propose that the plasticity of differentiated cells, rather than stem cells, accounts for tissue repair in both organs. PMID:26911907

  7. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  8. Spontaneous hemorrhage due to pseudocysts of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wu, T K; Zaman, S N; Gullick, H D; Powers, S R

    1977-09-01

    Spontaneous hemorrhage caused by erosion of major arteries by a pseudocyst of the pancreas is a rare condition. We have encountered three cases, one involving the abdominal aorta and two the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery. It is important to keep in mind that pseudocyst of the pancreas may cause massive gastrointestinal or intraabdominal bleeding. Operative treatment offers a better chance of survival than more conservative management.

  9. Has the gap between pancreas and islet transplantation closed?

    PubMed

    Niclauss, Nadja; Morel, Philippe; Berney, Thierry

    2014-09-27

    Both pancreas and islet transplantations are therapeutic options for complicated type 1 diabetes. Until recent years, outcomes of islet transplantation have been significantly inferior to those of whole pancreas. Islet transplantation is primarily performed alone in patients with severe hypoglycemia, and recent registry reports have suggested that results of islet transplantation alone in this indication may be about to match those of pancreas transplant alone in insulin independence. Figures of 50% insulin independence at 5 years for either procedure have been cited. In this article, we address the question whether islet transplantation has indeed bridged the gap with whole pancreas. Looking at the evidence to answer this question, we propose that although pancreas may still be more efficient in taking recipients off insulin than islets, there are in fact numerous "gaps" separating both procedures that must be taken into the equation. These "gaps" relate to organ utilization, organ allocation, indication for transplantation, and morbidity. In-depth analysis reveals that islet transplantation, in fact, has an edge on whole pancreas in some of these aspects. Accordingly, attempts should be made to bridge these gaps from both sides to achieve the same level of success with either procedure. More realistically, it is likely that some of these gaps will remain and that both procedures will coexist and complement each other, to ensure that β cell replacement can be successfully implemented in the greatest possible number of patients with type 1 diabetes.

  10. GDNF is required for neural colonization of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bravo, José Luis; Hidalgo-Figueroa, María; Pascual, Alberto; López-Barneo, José; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2013-09-01

    The mammalian pancreas is densely innervated by both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which control exocrine and endocrine secretion. During embryonic development, neural crest cells migrating in a rostrocaudal direction populate the gut, giving rise to neural progenitor cells. Recent studies in mice have shown that neural crest cells enter the pancreatic epithelium at E11.5. However, the cues that guide the migration of neural progenitors into the pancreas are poorly defined. In this study we identify glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) as a key player in this process. GDNF displays a dynamic expression pattern during embryonic development that parallels the chronology of migration and differentiation of neural crest derivatives in the pancreas. Conditional inactivation of Gdnf in the pancreatic epithelium results in a dramatic loss of neuronal and glial cells and in reduced parasympathetic innervation in the pancreas. Importantly, the innervation of other regions of the gut remains unaffected. Analysis of Gdnf mutant mouse embryos and ex vivo experiments indicate that GDNF produced in the pancreas acts as a neurotrophic factor for gut-resident neural progenitor cells. Our data further show that exogenous GDNF promotes the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells in organ culture. In summary, our results point to GDNF as crucial for the development of the intrinsic innervation of the pancreas.

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound: morphological predictors of benign disease

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Pratibha; Insaf, Tabassum Z.; McNulty, William; Boutou, Afroditi; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Zoumot, Zaid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the utility of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) morphology of lymph nodes in predicting benign cytology of transbronchial needle aspirates in a prospective observational study. Five ultrasonic morphological characteristics of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes were recorded: size, shape, margins, echogenic appearance and the presence of a central blood vessel. These characteristics were correlated with the final diagnosis. A total of 402 consecutive patients (237 males and 165 females) undergoing EBUS were studied. The final diagnosis was malignant disease in 244 (60.6%) and benign disease in 153 (38.05%) subjects. Out of 740 sampled nodes, in 463 (62.6%) malignant cells were identified, whereas in 270 (36.5%) nodes, no malignant cells were identified. On univariate analysis small size, triangular shape and the presence of a central vessel were predictive of a benign aetiology. In the final multivariate model, a predictive probability of 0.811 (95% CI 0.72–0.91) for benign disease was found if lymph node size was <10 mm and a central vessel was present. Sonographic appearances of lymph nodes improve the predictive probability of EBUS for benign aetiologies, and may reduce the number of nodes requiring sampling and the need for further invasive investigations. PMID:27730169

  12. A historical perspective on the discovery of the accessory duct of the pancreas, the ampulla 'of Vater' and pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Stern, C D

    1986-02-01

    The discovery of the accessory duct of the pancreas is usually ascribed to Giovanni Domenico Santorini (1681-1737), after whom this structure is named. The papilla duodeni (ampulla 'of Vater', or papilla 'of Santorini') is named after Abraham Vater (1684-1751) or after GD Santorini. Pancreas divisum, a persistence through non-fusion of the embryonic dorsal and ventral pancreas is a relatively common clinical condition, the discovery of which is usually ascribed to Joseph Hyrtl (1810-1894). In this review I report that pancreas divisum, the accessory duct and the papilla duodeni (ampulla 'of Vater') had all been observed and the observations published during the 17th century by at least seven anatomists before Santorini, Vater, and Hyrtl. I further suggest, in the light of frequent anatomical misattributions in common usage, that anatomical structures be referred to only by their proper anatomical names.

  13. Epidemiology of pancreas cancer in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, T.M.; Paganini-Hill, A.

    1981-03-15

    The characteristics of the 3614 Los Angeles County residents in whom cancer of the exocrine pancreas was diagnosed during the period 1972-1977 were compared with those of all county residents and patients in whom any cancer was diagnosed during the same period. Seventy-nine percent of the diagnoses had been pathologically verified. This disease still preferentially afflicts the old, the black, and men, although the differences in risk with factors other than age are modest. The disease is not evenly distributed by social class, or over time, although it is not clear that the observed differences reflect etiology. The distributions with respect to important categories of occupation and industry, religion, marital status, geography of residence, and birthplace were rather uniform. Although there is no obvious explanation for any of several unexpected minor inequities in the pattern of incidence, there is no compelling evidence to support any specific environmental cause. There is substantial evidence which is inconsistent with those environmental hypotheses that have been proposed previously.

  14. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  15. [Pancreas and biliary tract: recent developments].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and considerable mortality. In this article, developments relating to this disease that were presented in DDW 2014 are reviewed. Pancreatic steatosis could be a cause of recurrent AP. Patients with DM have an increased incidence of AP and pancreatic cancer. The use of anti-TNF drugs in inflammatory bowel disease may protect against the occurrence of AP. The presence of pancreas divisum protects against acute biliary pancreatitis. The PANCODE system for describing local complications of AP has good interobserver agreement, when the new definitions of the revised Atlanta classification are applied. The use of prophylactic antibiotics in early-stage AP predisposes the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections. Fluid sequestration in AP is linked with young age, alcoholism and indicators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The most common cause of mortality in AP is early onset of multiple organ failure, not pancreatic necrosis infection. Patients with AP and vitamin D deficiency could benefit from taking vitamin D supplements. Moderate fluid administration in emergencies (500-1000 mL) could be associated with better AP development.

  16. Microendoscopes for imaging of the pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Angelique L.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Kroto, Shona M.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2004-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have a 5-year survival rate of only 3%. Endoscopic imaging of the pancreas is limited by the small size of the pancreatic duct, which has an average size of 3 mm. To improve imaging capabilities for the pancreatic duct, two small catheter-based imaging systems have been developed that will fit through the therapeutic channel of a clinical endoscope and into the pancreatic duct. One is a miniature endoscope designed to provide macro-imaging of tissue with both white light reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. The 1.75 mm diameter catheter consists of separate illumination and imaging channels. At a nominal focal distance of 10 mm, the field of view of the system is ~ 10 mm, and the corresponding in-plane resolution is 60 microns. To complement the broadfield view of the tissue, a confocal microendoscope with 2 micron lateral resolution over a field of view of 450 microns and 25 micron axial resolution has been developed. With an outer diameter of 3 mm, the catheter in this system will also fit through the therapeutic channel and into the pancreatic duct. Images of tissue with both the miniature endoscope and confocal microendoscope are presented.

  17. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  18. High precision innovative micropump for artificial pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappel, E.; Mefti, S.; Lettieri, G.-L.; Proennecke, S.; Conan, C.

    2014-03-01

    The concept of artificial pancreas, which comprises an insulin pump, a continuous glucose meter and a control algorithm, is a major step forward in managing patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The stability of the control algorithm is based on short-term precision micropump to deliver rapid-acting insulin and to specific integrated sensors able to monitor any failure leading to a loss of accuracy. Debiotech's MEMS micropump, based on the membrane pump principle, is made of a stack of 3 silicon wafers. The pumping chamber comprises a pillar check-valve at the inlet, a pumping membrane which is actuated against stop limiters by a piezo cantilever, an anti-free-flow outlet valve and a pressure sensor. The micropump inlet is tightly connected to the insulin reservoir while the outlet is in direct communication with the patient skin via a cannula. To meet the requirement of a pump dedicated to closed-loop application for diabetes care, in addition to the well-controlled displacement of the pumping membrane, the high precision of the micropump is based on specific actuation profiles that balance effect of pump elasticity in low-consumption push-pull mode.

  19. [Peroperative ultrasound scanning of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Alexandre, J H; Hernigou, A; Billebaud, T; Bouillot, J L; Plainfosse, M C

    1985-01-01

    Intraoperative realtime high resolution ultrasound scanning of the pancreas seems to be a new and promising procedure. We have performed it in 28 patients: the normal ultrasound picture of pancreatic ducts and parenchyma was defined in 9 patients without pancreatic disease; in 19 patients with pancreatic disease, intraoperative ultrasound was compared with preoperative ultrasound examination. Seven of 8 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 4 of 6 with calcifying chronic pancreatitis had positive findings, respectively. In 3 cancer patients, intraoperative ultrasound investigation avoided a long and unavailing dissection of the tumor by revealing extensive spread. In selected cases, intraoperative sonography allowed to characterize and to localize pancreatic carcinoma: portal vein invasion, relationship of the tumor to the duct of Wirsung and small hepatic metastases. In chronic pancreatitis, intraoperative ultrasound information concerning the dimensions of the pancreatic duct, the structure and the localization of pseudocysts was comparable to that obtained by radiological opacification. Furthermore, intraoperative ultrasound exploration guided proper incision and evacuation of pancreatic pseudocysts in two patients. Operative ultrasound seems to us to be mandatory during pancreatic surgery. Further experience with this technique is needed in a larger number of patients. However, we believe that it could replace intraoperative cholangiography and pancreaticography in the assessment of extension and complications of pancreatic disease.

  20. [Pancreas and biliary tract: recent developments].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and considerable mortality. In this article, developments relating to this disease that were presented in DDW 2014 are reviewed. Pancreatic steatosis could be a cause of recurrent AP. Patients with DM have an increased incidence of AP and pancreatic cancer. The use of anti-TNF drugs in inflammatory bowel disease may protect against the occurrence of AP. The presence of pancreas divisum protects against acute biliary pancreatitis. The PANCODE system for describing local complications of AP has good interobserver agreement, when the new definitions of the revised Atlanta classification are applied. The use of prophylactic antibiotics in early-stage AP predisposes the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections. Fluid sequestration in AP is linked with young age, alcoholism and indicators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The most common cause of mortality in AP is early onset of multiple organ failure, not pancreatic necrosis infection. Patients with AP and vitamin D deficiency could benefit from taking vitamin D supplements. Moderate fluid administration in emergencies (500-1000 mL) could be associated with better AP development. PMID:25294273

  1. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration cytology of pancreas: a review of 61 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, D K; Bhambhani, S; Kumar, N; Chachra, K L; Prakash, S; Gupta, R K; Tripathi, R P

    1995-01-01

    The study includes 61 cases which were subjected to ultrasound (US) guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) to find out the utility of this technique in the diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Age of the patients ranged from 23 to 85 years with a median of 50 years. Male to female ratio was 36:25. One or more clinical diagnoses were offered in 16 and in 9 of these, the disease was related to pancreas. Subsequent to US, the lesions were localized to pancreas in 57 and the nature of pathology in the pancreatic lesion could be diagnosed in 31. By FNAC, 31 cases (50.8%) were diagnosed to have pancreatic malignancy which included adenocarcinoma (23 cases), papillary cystic tumour (1), muco-epidermoid carcinoma (1), acinic cell carcinoma (1), islet cell tumor (1), and non Hodgkin lymphoma (4). FNAC of liver in 2 cases and retroperitoneal lymph node in a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma revealed metastasis. During follow up, 1 case of non Hodgkin's lymphoma showed CSF involvement. Three cases (4.9%) were suspected to have epithelial malignancy of which one was confirmed as an adenocarcinoma following surgery and histology. Four (6.6%) were benign lesions which included nonspecific inflammation (2 cases), tuberculous pancreatitis (1) and pseudopancreatic cyst (1). The remaining 23 cases (37.7%) had normal or inadequate cytology. Of these, FNAC of liver showed metastasis in 2 cases and one case each were diagnosed as adenocarcinoma and pseudopancreatic cyst respectively following surgery. None of the patients had any complication following FNAC. We recommend US guided FNAC to be routinely used for diagnosis of pancreatic lesion.

  2. [Epidemiology of presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Mimoun, C; Fritel, X; Fauconnier, A; Deffieux, X; Dumont, A; Huchon, C

    2013-12-01

    Ovarian cysts presumed benign can be organic or functional. Their prevalence is estimated between 14 and 18% in postmenopausal women and around 7% in asymptomatic women of childbearing age. Their incidence during pregnancy is between 0.2 and 5% and varies within the term of pregnancy. Ovarian cysts presumed benign have caused nearly 45,000 hospitalizations in France in 2012, bringing the annual risk of hospitalization for a woman residing in France to 1.3‰. Among the risk factors studied in the literature, tamoxifen increases the incidence of ovarian cysts in premenopausal patients and immunosuppressive treatments are associated with a high prevalence of benign ovarian cysts while estrogen contraception reduces the risk of developing functional cysts.

  3. Treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Portis, A. J.; Mador, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine current treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia with emphasis on randomized, clinical trials and our current management approach. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Benign prostatic hyperplasia remains difficult to define clinically or measure objectively. As a result, research has been fairly weak. With newer treatments, however, more definitive studies have been reported. MAIN FINDINGS: Transurethral resection of the prostate remains the criterion standard for severe disease. Watchful waiting, medical management, or early surgical intervention are all valid options for moderate disease and should be tailored to the characteristics and desires of individual patients. Recent minimally invasive surgical techniques, such as microwave and laser surgery, have not yet achieved the quality of evidence to be generally recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Management of benign prostatic hyperplasia should be individualized to patients' circumstances and personal choices. PMID:9266125

  4. Selenium level in benign and cancerous prostate.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Wolski, Zbigniew; Tyloch, Janusz; Skok, Zdzislaw; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-03-01

    The dietary microelement selenium (Se) has been proposed as a potential chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer. This element is present in various amounts in all tissues. Little information is available on Se level in patients with prostate gland disorders. The levels of Se in prostatic gland of patients with prostate cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, and healthy controls were examined. The Se level for benign prostate hyperplasia (156 +/- 30.6 ng/g) was the same as in the control group (157 +/- 26.0 ng/g), but in the gland of prostate cancer patients (182 +/- 34.1 ng/g wet weight), the Se level was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than in both healthy controls and benign prostate hyperplasia. Thus, the Se level in human healthy controls is lower than in kidney and liver but higher compared with other tissues. PMID:15784953

  5. Malignancy and the benign lymphoepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G; Bernacki, E G; Rice, D H; Stebler, M E

    1975-02-01

    The benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands is now considered the histological hallmark of a variety of clinical and pathological disorders affecting salivary tissues. Malignancy arising in the lesion is uncommon, but may take origin in either the epithelial or lymphoreticular components. Lymphomas and pseudolymphomas associated with salivary gland lymphoepithelial lesions have been predominately extra-salivary and strongly correlated with Sjögren's syndrome. Epithelial malignancy has not been associated with autoimmunity and with few exceptions has been of the anaplastic type. This report presents two patients with intra-salivary lymphomas arising in a benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands and a patient with anaplastic carcinoma arising in the epithelial islands of the lesion. The fourth patient manifested pseudolymphomatous lymphoreticular hyperplasia in lung and submandibular gland and illustrates the possible multiple organ involvement that may occur in patients with benign lymphoepithelial lesion, even without clinical evidence of concommitant autoimmune disorders.

  6. Benign cephalic histiocytosis: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    de Luna, M L; Glikin, I; Golberg, J; Stringa, S; Schroh, R; Casas, J

    1989-09-01

    We cared for four patients with benign cephalic histiocytosis, a self-healing non-X, nonlipid cutaneous histiocytosis of children. The age of onset of the disease was 5 to 9 months, with papules and erythematous macules involving the head (mainly the cheeks), and posterior spread to the trunk and limbs in three patients. Microscopic examination of skin biopsies revealed a histiocytic infiltrate in the superficial dermis that was S100 protein-negative by immunoperoxidase (PAP method). One patient showed comma-shaped bodies and desmosomelike junctions on electron microscopy. No Birbeck's granules were present. Benign cephalic histiocytosis is a self-limiting condition that requires no treatment.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  8. Osteoid osteoma and benign osteoblastoma in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J A; Levick, R K; Sharrard, W J

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of osteoid osteoma and one of benign osteoblastoma in children are described. The main complaint was severe pain which was worse at night; it was relieved by aspirin or other analgesics. The diagnosis was made on clinical and radiological grounds and was confirmed on histological examination of the central nidus removed at operation. The pain was relieved in the patients with osteoid osteoma, and it was very much less after operative removal of the benign osteoblastoma. Both conditions are probably variations of the same disease process, depending on the anatomical site and the type of bone affected. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:475430

  9. Benign lymphoepithelial lesions of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D R; Spiegel, J C; Maves, M

    1975-01-01

    The benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the salivary glands has been labeled with multiple, confusing terms. We recommend the abandonment of the vague term of Mikulicz disease. The histopathologic findings of lymphoid infiltration, intraductal proliferation, epimyoepithelial islands, and acinar atrophy are presented. The relationship between this lesion and autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren syndrome, is noted. Difficulty of histopathologic differentiation between this lesion and malignant lymphoma can occur. The association of the benign lymphoepithelial lesion with the simultaneous presence or future development of lymphoma is discussed.

  10. Exocrine drainage in vascularized pancreas transplantation in the new millennium

    PubMed Central

    El-Hennawy, Hany; Stratta, Robert J; Smith, Fowler

    2016-01-01

    The history of vascularized pancreas transplantation largely parallels developments in immunosuppression and technical refinements in transplant surgery. From the late-1980s to 1995, most pancreas transplants were whole organ pancreatic grafts with insulin delivery to the iliac vein and diversion of the pancreatic ductal secretions to the urinary bladder (systemic-bladder technique). The advent of bladder drainage revolutionized the safety and improved the success of pancreas transplantation. However, starting in 1995, a seismic change occurred from bladder to bowel exocrine drainage coincident with improvements in immunosuppression, preservation techniques, diagnostic monitoring, general medical care, and the success and frequency of enteric conversion. In the new millennium, pancreas transplants are performed predominantly as pancreatico-duodenal grafts with enteric diversion of the pancreatic ductal secretions coupled with iliac vein provision of insulin (systemic-enteric technique) although the systemic-bladder technique endures as a preferred alternative in selected cases. In the early 1990s, a novel technique of venous drainage into the superior mesenteric vein combined with bowel exocrine diversion (portal-enteric technique) was designed and subsequently refined over the next ≥ 20 years to re-create the natural physiology of the pancreas with first-pass hepatic processing of insulin. Enteric drainage usually refers to jejunal or ileal diversion of the exocrine secretions either with a primary enteric anastomosis or with an additional Roux limb. The portal-enteric technique has spawned a number of newer and revisited techniques of enteric exocrine drainage including duodenal or gastric diversion. Reports in the literature suggest no differences in pancreas transplant outcomes irrespective of type of either venous or exocrine diversion. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature on exocrine drainage in the new millennium (the purported

  11. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to <10 °C after 30 min. Using an intravascular flush (Method B) improved cooling during the entire duration of procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and

  12. Histology of Type 1 Diabetes Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Abby; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans play a critical role in glucose homeostasis. Islets are predominantly composed of insulin-secreting beta cells and glucagon-secreting alpha cells. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells are destroyed by autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta cells resulting in hyperglycemia. This is a gradual process, taking from several months to decades. Much of the beta cell destruction takes place during a silent, asymptomatic phase. Type 1 diabetes becomes clinically evident upon destruction of approximately 70-80 % of beta cell mass. Studying the decline in beta cell mass and the cells which are responsible for their demise is difficult as pancreatic biopsies are not feasible in patients with type 1 diabetes. The relative size of islets and their dispersed location throughout the pancreas means in vivo imaging of human islets is currently not manageable. At present, there are no validated biomarkers which accurately track the decline in beta cell mass in individuals who are at risk of developing, or have already developed, type 1 diabetes. Therefore, studies of pancreatic tissue retrieved at autopsy from donors with type 1 diabetes, or donors with high risk markers of type 1 diabetes such as circulating islet-associated autoantibodies, is currently the best method for studying beta cells and the associated inflammatory milieu in situ. In recent years, concerted efforts have been made to source such tissues for histological studies, enabling great insights to be made into the relationship between islets and the inflammatory insult to which they are subjected. This article describes in detail, a robust immunohistochemical method which can be utilized to study both recent, and archival human pancreatic tissue, in order to examine islet endocrine cells and the surrounding immune cells. PMID:26801316

  13. Repurposed biological scaffolds: kidney to pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Willenberg, Bradley J; Oca-Cossio, Jose; Cai, Yunqing; Brown, Alicia R; Clapp, William L; Abrahamson, Dale R; Terada, Naohiro; Ellison, Gary W; Mathews, Clayton E; Batich, Christopher D; Ross, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Advances in organ regeneration have been facilitated by gentle decellularization protocols that maintain distinct tissue compartments, and thereby allow seeding of blood vessels with endothelial lineages separate from populations of the parenchyma with tissue-specific cells. We hypothesized that a reconstituted vasculature could serve as a novel platform for perfusing cells derived from a different organ: thus discordance of origin between the vascular and functional cells, leading to a hybrid repurposed organ. The need for a highly vascular bed is highlighted by tissue engineering approaches that involve transplantation of just cells, as attempted for insulin production to treat human diabetes. Those pancreatic islet cells present unique challenges since large numbers are needed to allow the cell-to-cell signaling required for viability and proper function; however, increasing their number is limited by inadequate perfusion and hypoxia. As proof of principle of the repurposed organ methodology we harnessed the vasculature of a kidney scaffold while seeding the collecting system with insulin-producing cells. Pig kidneys were decellularized by sequential detergent, enzymatic and rinsing steps. Maintenance of distinct vascular and collecting system compartments was demonstrated by both fluorescent 10 micron polystyrene microspheres and cell distributions in tissue sections. Sterilized acellular scaffolds underwent seeding separately via the artery (fibroblasts or endothelioma cells) and retrograde (murine βTC-tet cells) up the ureter. After three-day bioreactor incubation, histology confirmed separation of cells in the vasculature from those in the collecting system. βTC-tet clusters survived in tubules, glomerular Bowman's space, demonstrated insulin immunolabeling, and thereby supported the feasibility of kidney-to-pancreas repurposing. PMID:26252820

  14. CSF imaging in benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    James, A. Everette; Harbert, J. C.; Hoffer, P. B.; DeLand, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The cisternographic images in 10 patients with benign intracranial hypertension were reviewed. Nine were normal. Transfer of labelled tracer from the subarachnoid space was measured in five patients and was found to be abnormal in only two. The relation of these findings to the proposed pathophysiological alterations is discussed. Images

  15. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: from Bench to Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease, especially in old men, and often results in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This chronic disease has important care implications and financial risks to the health care system. LUTS are caused not only by mechanical prostatic obstruction but also by the dynamic component of obstruction. The exact etiology of BPH and its consequences, benign prostatic enlargement and benign prostatic obstruction, are not identified. Various theories concerning the causes of benign prostate enlargement and LUTS, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, growth factors, androgen receptor, epithelial-stromal interaction, and lifestyle, are discussed. Incomplete overlap of prostatic enlargement with symptoms and obstruction encourages focus on symptoms rather than prostate enlargement and the shifting from surgery to medicine as the treatment of BPH. Several alpha antagonists, including alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, have shown excellent efficacy without severe adverse effects. In addition, new alpha antagonists, silodosin and naftopidil, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are emerging as BPH treatments. In surgical treatment, laser surgery such as photoselective vaporization of the prostate and holmium laser prostatectomy have been introduced to reduce complications and are used as alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy. The status of TURP as the gold standard treatment of BPH is still evolving. We review several preclinical and clinical studies about the etiology of BPH and treatment options. PMID:22468207

  16. Imaging features of benign adrenal cysts.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun; Bulakbasi, Nail; Guvenc, Inanc; Tayfun, Cem; Ucoz, Taner

    2006-12-01

    Benign adrenal gland cysts (BACs) are rare lesions with a variable histological spectrum and may mimic not only each other but also malignant ones. We aimed to review imaging features of BACs which can be helpful in distinguishing each entity and determining the subsequent appropriate management. PMID:16962278

  17. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and its variants.

    PubMed

    Nuti, D; Masini, M; Mandalà, M

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common labyrinthine disorder caused by a mechanic stimulation of the vestibular receptors within the semicircular canals. It is characterized by positional vertigo and positional nystagmus, both provoked by changes in the position of the head with respect to gravity. The social impact of the disease and its direct and indirect costs to healthcare systems are significant owing to impairment of daily activities and increased risk of falls. The first description of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is from Robert Bárány in 1921, but the features of the syndrome and the diagnostic maneuver were well described by Dix and Hallpike in 1952. Since then, the gradually increasing interest of otolaryngologists and neurologists has led to a progressive advance in the knowledge of this labyrinthine disorder with regard to its epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects. Despite the often effective diagnosis and treatment of most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the physiopathologic explanations of the disease are mainly speculative. In this chapter, we describe the epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. PMID:27638076

  18. Common benign oral soft tissue masses.

    PubMed

    Esmeili, Tara; Lozada-Nur, Francina; Epstein, Joel

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews some of the more common benign oral soft tissue masses with emphasis on their etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include traumatic fibroma, mucocele, warts/papilloma, pyogenic granuloma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, generalized gingival hyperplasia, gingival fibromatosis, lateral periodontal cyst, lipoma, and denture-induced hyperplasia.

  19. Functioning pancreas graft with thromboses of splenic and superior mesenteric arteries after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, I; Shinzeki, M; Asari, S; Goto, T; Shirakawa, S; Ajiki, T; Fukumoto, T; Ku, Y

    2014-04-01

    Graft thrombosis is the most common cause of early graft loss after pancreas transplantation. The grafted pancreas is difficult to salvage after complete thrombosis, especially arterial thrombosis, and graft pancreatectomy is required. We describe a patient presenting with a functioning pancreas graft with thromboses of the splenic artery (SA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK). A 37-year-old woman with a 20-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent SPK. The pancreaticoduodenal graft was implanted in the right iliac fossa with enteric drainage. A Carrel patch was anastomosed to the recipient's right common iliac artery, and the graft gastroduodenal artery was anastomosed to the common hepatic artery using an arterial I-graft. The donor portal vein was anastomosed to the recipient's inferior vena cava. Four days after surgery, graft thromboses were detected by Doppler ultrasound without increases in the serum amylase and blood glucose levels. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed thromboses in the SA, splenic vein and SMA. Selective angiography showed that blood flow was interrupted in the SA and SMA. However, pancreatic graft perfusion was maintained by the I-graft in the head of the pancreas and the transverse pancreatic artery in the body and tail of the pancreas. We performed percutaneous direct thrombolysis and adjuvant thrombolytic therapy. However, we had to stop the thrombolytic therapy because of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Thereafter, the postoperative course was uneventful and the pancreas graft was functioning with a fasting blood glucose level of 75 mg/dL, HbA1c of 5.1%, and serum C-peptide level of 1.9 ng/mL at 30 months post-transplantation.

  20. Pancreas Development Ex Vivo: Culturing Embryonic Pancreas Explants on Permeable Culture Inserts, with Fibronectin-Coated Glass Microwells, or Embedded in Three-Dimensional Matrigel™

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hung Ping; Sander, Maike

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas development is a complex and dynamic process orchestrated by cellular and molecular events, including morphogenesis and cell differentiation. As a result of recent explorations into possible cell-therapy-based treatments for diabetes, researchers have made significant progress in deciphering the developmental program of pancreas formation. In vitro pancreas organ culture systems provide a valuable tool for exploring the mechanisms of gene regulation, cellular behaviors, and cell differentiation. In this chapter, we review three common techniques for culturing embryonic pancreas explants. Each technique is suitable for different applications. Specifically, culturing embryonic pancreas on culture inserts provides an excellent platform to test the effects of chemical compounds. Conversely, when the embryonic pancreas is cultured in fibronectin-coated glass microwells, the system provides unique culture conditions to monitor organ growth and cellular dynamic events. Lastly, when the embryonic pancreas is embedded in Matrigel, organogenesis can be studied in a three-dimensional environment instead of limiting the analysis to one plane. PMID:25173172

  1. In Vitro Pancreas Organogenesis from Dispersed Mouse Embryonic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells 1. The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development 2-4. These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  2. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-07-19

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity.

  3. RNA isolation from mouse pancreas: a ribonuclease-rich tissue.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pouly, Ana Clara P; Elgamal, Ola A; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2014-08-02

    Isolation of high-quality RNA from ribonuclease-rich tissue such as mouse pancreas presents a challenge. As a primary function of the pancreas is to aid in digestion, mouse pancreas may contain as much a 75 mg of ribonuclease. We report modifications of standard phenol/guanidine thiocyanate lysis reagent protocols to isolate RNA from mouse pancreas. Guanidine thiocyanate is a strong protein denaturant and will effectively disrupt the activity of ribonuclease under most conditions. However, critical modifications to standard protocols are necessary to successfully isolate RNA from ribonuclease-rich tissues. Key steps include a high lysis reagent to tissue ratio, removal of undigested tissue prior to phase separation and inclusion of a ribonuclease inhibitor to the RNA solution. Using these and other modifications, we routinely isolate RNA with RNA Integrity Number (RIN) greater than 7. The isolated RNA is of suitable quality for routine gene expression analysis. Adaptation of this protocol to isolate RNA from ribonuclease rich tissues besides the pancreas should be readily achievable.

  4. Portal annular pancreas: a systematic review of a clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Harnoss, Jonathan M; Harnoss, Julian C; Diener, Markus K; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B; Büchler, Markus W; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H

    2014-10-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF).On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered.In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery).Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option.

  5. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  6. Tissue-specific deletion of c-Jun in the pancreas has limited effects on pancreas formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ayako; Toyoda, Shuichi; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2007-11-30

    It is well known that activating protein-1 (AP-1) is involved in a variety of cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. AP-1 is a dimer complex consisting of different subunits, and c-Jun is known to be one of its major components. In addition, it has been shown that mice lacking c-Jun are embryonic lethal and that c-Jun is essential for liver and heart development. However, the role of c-Jun in the pancreas is not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of c-Jun in the pancreas. First, c-Jun was strongly expressed in pancreatic duct-like structures at an embryonic stage, while a lower level of expression was observed in some part of the adult pancreas, implying that c-Jun might play a role during pancreas development. Second, to address this point, we generated pancreas-specific c-Jun knock-out mice (Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} mice) by crossing Ptf1a-Cre knock-in mice with c-Jun floxed mice. Ptf1a is a pancreatic transcription factor and its expression is confined to pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, which give rise to all three types of pancreatic tissue: endocrine, exocrine, and duct. Contrary to our expectation, however, there was no morphological difference in the pancreas between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. In addition, there was no difference in body weight, pancreas weight, and the expression of various pancreas-related factors (insulin, glucagon, cytokeratin, and amylase) between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no difference in glucose tolerance between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. Taken together, although we cannot exclude the possibility that c-Jun ablation is compensated by some unknown factors, c-Jun appears to be dispensable for pancreas development at least after ptf1a gene promoter is activated.

  7. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  8. The evolution of diabetic chronic complications after pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Sá, João R; Monteagudo, Patricia T; Rangel, Erika B; Melaragno, Cláudio S; Gonzalez, Adriano M; Linhares, Marcelo M; Salzedas, Alcides; Neves, Maria-Deolinda F; Stela, Camila; Medina-Pestana, José O

    2009-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation is an invasive procedure that can restore and maintain normoglycemic level very successfully and for a prolonged period in DM1 patients. The procedure elevates the morbimortality rates in the first few months following the surgery if compared to kidney transplants with living donors, but it offers a better quality of life to patients.Although controversial, several studies have shown the stabilization or the improvement of some of the chronic complications related to diabetes, as well as the extra number of years of life that patients submitted to a double pancreas-kidney transplantation may gain.Recent studies have demonstrated clashing outcomes regarding isolated pancreas transplantations, a fact which reinforces the need for a more discerning selection of patients for this procedure. PMID:19825148

  9. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  10. The Artificial Pancreas: How Sweet Engineering Will Solve Bitter Problems

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.

    2007-01-01

    An artificial pancreas is a closed-loop system containing only synthetic materials which substitutes for an endocrine pancreas. No artificial pancreas system is currently approved; however, devices that could become components of such a system are now becoming commercially available. An artificial pancreas will consist of functionally integrated components that will continuously sense glucose levels, determine appropriate insulin dosages, and deliver the insulin. Any proposed closed loop system will be closely scrutinized for its safety, efficacy, and economic impact. Closed loop control utilizes models of glucose homeostasis which account for the influences of feeding, stress, insulin, exercise, and other factors on blood glucose levels. Models are necessary for understanding the relationship between blood glucose levels and insulin dosing; developing algorithms to control insulin dosing; and customizing each user's system based on individual responses to factors that influence glycemia. Components of an artificial pancreas are now being developed, including continuous glucose sensors; insulin pumps for parenteral delivery; and control software, all linked through wireless communication systems. Although a closed-loop system providing glucagon has not been reported in 40 years, the use of glucagon to prevent hypoglycemia is physiologically attractive and future devices might utilize this hormone. No demonstration of long-term closed loop control of glucose in a free-living human with diabetes has been reported to date, but many centers around the world are working on closed loop control systems. It is expected that many types of artificial pancreas systems will eventually be available, and they will greatly benefit patients with diabetes. PMID:19888383

  11. Isolated benign primary cutaneous plasmacytosis in a child.

    PubMed

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, You Chan; Kim, Soo-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Isolated benign primary cutaneous plasmacytosis in a child is a very rare and benign disease. Herein we present a case of this condition occurring in a child who showed good response to topical corticosteroid. PMID:25424220

  12. [BENIGN TUMORS OF MEDIASTINUM: CLINIC, DIAGNOSIS, SURGICAL TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Kalabukha, I A; Mayetniy, E M

    2015-12-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 18 patients in a thoracic surgery clinic for benign tumors of mediastinum are presented. The symptoms of benign tumors, efficacy of application of welding technologies in operative intervention were analyzed. PMID:27025028

  13. Benign solid oncocytoma of intraoral minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Damm, D D; White, D K; Geissler, R H; Drummond, J F; Henry, B B

    1989-01-01

    We present an example of an intraoral benign solid oncocytoma of minor salivary gland origin. A review of intraoral benign solid oncocytomas reported in the English-language literature and discussion of the clinical behavior of these tumors are included.

  14. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  15. Under Utilization of Pancreas Transplants in Cystic Fibrosis Recipients in the United Network Organ Sharing (UNOS) Data 1987-2014.

    PubMed

    Usatin, D J; Perito, E R; Posselt, A M; Rosenthal, P

    2016-05-01

    Despite a high prevalence of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF), pancreas transplantation is rarely reported. United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data were used to examine utilization of pancreas transplant and posttransplant outcomes in CF patients. Between 1987-2014, CF patients (N = 4600) underwent 17 liver-pancreas, three lung-pancreas, one liver-lung pancreas, four kidney-pancreas, and three pancreas-only transplants. Of the 303 CF patients who received liver transplantation, 20% had CF-related diabetes (CFRD) before transplantation, and nine of those received a liver-pancreas transplant. Of 4241 CF patients who underwent lung transplantation, 33% had CFRD before transplantation, and three of those received a pancreas transplant. Of 49 CF patients who received a liver-lung transplant, 57% had CFRD before transplantation and one received a pancreas transplant. Posttransplantation diabetes developed in 7% of CF pancreas transplant recipients versus 24% of CF liver and 29% of CF lung recipients. UNOS has no data on pancreas exocrine insufficiency. Two-year posttransplantation survival was 88% after liver-pancreas transplant, 33% after lung-pancreas transplant, and 100% after pancreas-kidney and pancreas-only transplants. Diabetes is common pretransplantation and posttransplantation in CF solid organ transplant recipients, but pancreas transplantation remains rare. Further consideration of pancreas transplant in CF patients undergoing other solid organ transplant may be warranted.

  16. Attempted suicide by insulin injection treated with artificial pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gin, H; Larnaudie, B; Aubertin, J

    1983-01-01

    An elderly woman with longstanding insulin dependent diabetes tried to commit suicide by injecting 400 units of insulin subcutaneously (usual total daily dose 56 units). She was admitted to hospital within the hour and treated with the aid of an artificial pancreas. This avoided the usual difficulty of the physician having to cope with rapid and substantial fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations and 67 hours after the overdose insulin was reinstituted. Using an artificial pancreas in insulin overdose is an important advance in management and may avoid the need for surgical intervention such as excising the site of injection. Images p250-a PMID:6409269

  17. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-06-27

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature. PMID:27358679

  19. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-06-27

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature.

  20. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature. PMID:27358679

  1. Benign lymphoid hyperplasia of the palate.

    PubMed

    Bradley, G; Main, J H; Birt, B D; From, L

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients with benign lymphoid hyperplasia of the palate are reported. Clinically, these lesions presented as painless non-ulcerated masses that were unilateral in 6 of the cases and bilateral in one. Microscopically, the lesions were characterized by a mixed lymphoid infiltrate, germinal centres and vascular channels with hyperplasia of endothelial cells. The patients were followed for 3-10 years subsequent to diagnosis. One patient had 2 sequential lesions on opposite sides of the palate. Another patient with lesions of both submandibular salivary glands in addition to the palate developed rheumatoid arthritis, xerophthalmia and serologic changes consistent with systemic autoimmune disease. To date, none of the patients developed signs and symptoms of lymphoma or leukemia. The etiology of these lesions is unknown. Their distinction from lymphoma of the palate, as well as their possible relationship to the benign lymphoepithelial lesion of palatal mucous glands, is discussed.

  2. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations. PMID:27142278

  3. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  4. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  5. Large Penile Mass With Unusual Benign Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nate; Voznesensky, Maria; VerLee, Graham

    2015-09-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is an extremely rare condition presenting as a lesion on the glans penis in older men. Physical exam without biopsy cannot differentiate malignant from nonmalignant growth. We report a case of large penile mass in an elderly male with a history of lichen sclerosis, highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequent surgical removal and biopsy demonstrated pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, an unusual benign histopathologic diagnosis with unclear prognosis. We review the literature and discuss options for treatment and surveillance. PMID:26793536

  6. New Treatments for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Skepasts, Peter K.; Lee, Laurence M.

    1991-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is the most common of all neoplasms. The most common treatment is prostatectomy, but other available therapies include androgen antagonists, α-adrenergic blockers, anticholinergic agents, prostate dilation with a ballon, and urethral stents. Prostatectomy is likely to remain the standard of care for the foreseeable future because it is safe and much more effective than all other current and experimental forms of therapy. PMID:21229073

  7. Management of familial benign chronic pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Harleen; Bray, Fleta N; Cervantes, Jessica; Falto Aizpurua, Leyre A

    2016-01-01

    Benign familial chronic pemphigus or Hailey–Hailey disease is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in the ATP2C1 gene leading to suprabasilar acantholysis. The disease most commonly affects intertriginous areas symmetrically. The chronic nature of the disease and multiple recurrences make the disease bothersome for patients and a treatment challenge for physicians. Treatments include topical and/or systemic agents and surgery including laser. This review summarizes the available treatment options. PMID:27695354

  8. Management of familial benign chronic pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Harleen; Bray, Fleta N; Cervantes, Jessica; Falto Aizpurua, Leyre A

    2016-01-01

    Benign familial chronic pemphigus or Hailey–Hailey disease is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in the ATP2C1 gene leading to suprabasilar acantholysis. The disease most commonly affects intertriginous areas symmetrically. The chronic nature of the disease and multiple recurrences make the disease bothersome for patients and a treatment challenge for physicians. Treatments include topical and/or systemic agents and surgery including laser. This review summarizes the available treatment options.

  9. [Surgery of benign vocal fold lesions].

    PubMed

    Olthoff, A

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment of benign vocal fold lesions can be indicated for clinical or functional reasons. The principles of phonosurgery have to be maintained in either case. The appropriate phonosurgical technique depends on the type of vocal fold lesion. Depending on the findings, phonosurgery aims to maintain or improve voice quality. The evaluation of clinical and functional results includes indirect laryngoscopy, videostroboscopy, and voice analysis. PMID:27552826

  10. Intra-oral benign solid oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Chau, M N; Radden, B G

    1986-08-01

    Oncocytomas are extremely uncommon in the intra-oral minor salivary glands, they are rarely reported in the literature and the histopathology and clinical details are inadequately documented. This has led to uncertainty with regard to the behaviour and prognosis of this type of lesion. A case of benign solid oncocytoma arising from intra-oral minor salivary glands is reported here with a brief review of the pertinent literature.

  11. Ampullary carcinoma in a patient with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jitendra H; Yadav, Amitabh; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-04-01

    The most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas is pancreatic divisum (Tadokoro et al. in Anat Res Int 2011:1-7, 2011). Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is extremely rare (Schnedl et al. in World J Gastroenterol 15(3):376-377, 2009). We are reporting a case of agenesis of dorsal pancreas presented with ampullary carcinoma.

  12. [Presumed ovarian benign tumors and fertility].

    PubMed

    Aubard, Y; Poirot, C

    2013-12-01

    We reviewed the studies about fertility-sparing in young patient presenting a benign ovarian tumor. It appears that more than the histologic nature of the ovarian cysts, it is the surgical treatment of the cyst which may decrease fertility. Some good practice of surgical procedures must be kept in mind when one manages a benign ovarian tumor in a young patient wishing to preserve her fertility: surgery should be avoided as much as possible; kystectomy is better than oophorectomy; no radical surgery should be done without pathological certitudes; electrocoagulation must be avoided on the cyst walls. In some situations, fertility is specially endangered: bilateral ovarian cysts, recurrence or strong probability of recurrence (endometriomas), poor ovarian reserve (previous chemo- or radiotherapy, age>35, premature ovarian failure). In these situations, a pre-operative assessment of the ovarian reserve could be useful. Beside the surgical 'good procedures', gamete cryopreservation procedures could be used. Cryopreservation of mature oocytes (after ovarian hyperstimulation) or in vitro mature oocytes (after antral follicle retrieval) can be proposed. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation is another option. Oocyte (or embryos) cryopreservation can be proposed before or after the surgery. The global management of benign ovarian tumors in young patients should be decided between surgeons and specialists in reproductive biology.

  13. Environmentally benign silicon solar cell manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Gee, J.M.; Menna, P.; Strebkov, D.S.; Pinov, A.; Zadde, V.

    1998-09-01

    The manufacturing of silicon devices--from polysilicon production, crystal growth, ingot slicing, wafer cleaning, device processing, to encapsulation--requires many steps that are energy intensive and use large amounts of water and toxic chemicals. In the past two years, the silicon integrated-circuit (IC) industry has initiated several programs to promote environmentally benign manufacturing, i.e., manufacturing practices that recover, recycle, and reuse materials resources with a minimal consumption of energy. Crystalline-silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which accounted for 87% of the worldwide module shipments in 1997, are large-area devices with many manufacturing steps similar to those used in the IC industry. Obviously, there are significant opportunities for the PV industry to implement more environmentally benign manufacturing approaches. Such approaches often have the potential for significant cost reduction by reducing energy use and/or the purchase volume of new chemicals and by cutting the amount of used chemicals that must be discarded. This paper will review recent accomplishments of the IC industry initiatives and discuss new processes for environmentally benign silicon solar-cell manufacturing.

  14. Pancreas β cell regeneration and type 1 diabetes (Review)

    PubMed Central

    WU, JINXIAO; YANG, XIYAN; CHEN, BIN; XU, XIUPING

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, which may cause hyperglycemia and a number of complications, mostly results from a deficiency of β cell mass (type 1 diabetes) or a limitation of β cell function (type 2 diabetes). Currently, enhancing β cell regeneration and increasing cell proliferation have not only been described in experimental diabetes models, but have also been proven to improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms controlling the development and regeneration of β cells in the human pancreas may be helpful for the treatment of β cell-deficient disease. In this review, we first introduce the various cell types in the adult pancreas and thereby clarify their functions and origins. Then, the known mechanisms of β cell development and expansion in the normal human pancreas are described. The potential mechanisms of β cell regeneration, including β cell self-replication, neogenesis from non-β cell precursors and transdifferentiation from α cells, are discussed in the next part. Finally, the ability of the pancreas to regenerate mature β cells is explored in pathological conditions, including type 1 diabetes, chronic pancreatitis and persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. PMID:25667609

  15. Exploring the metabolic syndrome: Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Roberto; Cuffari, Biagio; Italia, Angelo; Marotta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    After the first description of fatty pancreas in 1933, the effects of pancreatic steatosis have been poorly investigated, compared with that of the liver. However, the interest of research is increasing. Fat accumulation, associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS), has been defined as “fatty infiltration” or “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” (NAFPD). The term “fatty replacement” describes a distinct phenomenon characterized by death of acinar cells and replacement by adipose tissue. Risk factors for developing NAFPD include obesity, increasing age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, alcohol and hyperferritinemia. Increasing evidence support the role of pancreatic fat in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS, atherosclerosis, severe acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. Evidence exists that fatty pancreas could be used as the initial indicator of “ectopic fat deposition”, which is a key element of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and/or MetS. Moreover, in patients with fatty pancreas, pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with an increased risk of intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pancreatic fistula. PMID:27678349

  16. Exploring the metabolic syndrome: Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Roberto; Cuffari, Biagio; Italia, Angelo; Marotta, Francesco

    2016-09-14

    After the first description of fatty pancreas in 1933, the effects of pancreatic steatosis have been poorly investigated, compared with that of the liver. However, the interest of research is increasing. Fat accumulation, associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS), has been defined as "fatty infiltration" or "nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease" (NAFPD). The term "fatty replacement" describes a distinct phenomenon characterized by death of acinar cells and replacement by adipose tissue. Risk factors for developing NAFPD include obesity, increasing age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, alcohol and hyperferritinemia. Increasing evidence support the role of pancreatic fat in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS, atherosclerosis, severe acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. Evidence exists that fatty pancreas could be used as the initial indicator of "ectopic fat deposition", which is a key element of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and/or MetS. Moreover, in patients with fatty pancreas, pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with an increased risk of intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pancreatic fistula.

  17. Stimulus-secretion coupling in the developing exocrine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.Y.S.

    1986-01-01

    Acinar cells of the embryonic pancreas are filled with zymogen granules containing, among others, the secretory protein, cholecystokinin (CCK) ..cap alpha..-amylase, the rate of amylase secretion from pancreatic lobules incubated in vitro was not increased in response to CCK. In contrast, the rate of CCK-stimulated amylase discharge from the neonatal pancreas was increased 4- to 8-fold above that seen in the embryonic gland. The postnatal amplification of secretory responsiveness was not associated with an increase in the level of /sup 125/I-CCK octapeptide specifically bound/cell equivalent or a change in the affinity of binding. Light microscopic autoradiography revealed a similar /sup 125/I-CCK-33 labeling pattern in pancreatic lobules from both ages with autoradiographic grains specifically localized at the periphery of acinar cells. In order to determine whether CCK binding is coupled to a rise in the cytosolic Ca/sup + +/concentration, (Ca/sup + +/)c, in the embryonic pancreas, /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux from tracer-loaded lobules was measured. Efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ from both embryonic and neonatal pancreas was comparably increased in the presence of CCK.

  18. The surgical anatomy of the lymphatic system of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Malefant, Jason; Patel, Swetal D; Du Plessis, Maira; Renna, Sarah; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-05-01

    The lymphatic system of the pancreas is a complex, intricate network of lymphatic vessels and nodes responsible for the drainage of the head, neck, body, and tail of the pancreas. Its anatomical divisions and embryological development have been well described in the literature with emphasis on its clinical relevance in regards to pancreatic pathologies. A thorough knowledge and understanding of the lymphatic system surrounding the pancreas is critical for physicians in providing diagnostic and treatment strategies for patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a surgeon may try to predict the routes for metastasis for pancreatic cancer, the complexity of this system presents difficulty due to variable drainage patterns. Pancreatitis also presents as another severe disease which has been shown to have an association with the lymphatics. The aim of this article is to review the literature on the lymphatics of the pancreas, pancreatic pathologies, and the available imaging methodologies used to study the pancreatic lymphatics.

  19. Exploring the metabolic syndrome: Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Roberto; Cuffari, Biagio; Italia, Angelo; Marotta, Francesco

    2016-09-14

    After the first description of fatty pancreas in 1933, the effects of pancreatic steatosis have been poorly investigated, compared with that of the liver. However, the interest of research is increasing. Fat accumulation, associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS), has been defined as "fatty infiltration" or "nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease" (NAFPD). The term "fatty replacement" describes a distinct phenomenon characterized by death of acinar cells and replacement by adipose tissue. Risk factors for developing NAFPD include obesity, increasing age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, alcohol and hyperferritinemia. Increasing evidence support the role of pancreatic fat in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS, atherosclerosis, severe acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. Evidence exists that fatty pancreas could be used as the initial indicator of "ectopic fat deposition", which is a key element of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and/or MetS. Moreover, in patients with fatty pancreas, pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with an increased risk of intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pancreatic fistula. PMID:27678349

  20. FDA Approves 1st 'Artificial Pancreas' for Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), said until there's a cure for type 1 diabetes, "I know that the artificial pancreas will change ... welcome step forward for people with type 1 diabetes," he added. "It will be many years for a biologic cure or prevention, and it is exciting to know ...

  1. Exploring the metabolic syndrome: Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Roberto; Cuffari, Biagio; Italia, Angelo; Marotta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    After the first description of fatty pancreas in 1933, the effects of pancreatic steatosis have been poorly investigated, compared with that of the liver. However, the interest of research is increasing. Fat accumulation, associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS), has been defined as “fatty infiltration” or “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” (NAFPD). The term “fatty replacement” describes a distinct phenomenon characterized by death of acinar cells and replacement by adipose tissue. Risk factors for developing NAFPD include obesity, increasing age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, alcohol and hyperferritinemia. Increasing evidence support the role of pancreatic fat in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS, atherosclerosis, severe acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. Evidence exists that fatty pancreas could be used as the initial indicator of “ectopic fat deposition”, which is a key element of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and/or MetS. Moreover, in patients with fatty pancreas, pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with an increased risk of intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pancreatic fistula.

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration characteristics of primary adenocarcinoma versus other malignant neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagovic, Veronika; Spier, Bret J; DeLee, Ryan J; Barancin, Courtney; Lindstrom, Mary; Einstein, Michael; Byrne, Siobhan; Harter, Josephine; Agni, Rashmi; Pfau, Patrick R; Frick, Terrence J; Soni, Anurag; Gopal, Deepak V

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is often used to assist in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and may help to diagnose benign versus malignant neoplasms. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding comparative EUS characteristics of various malignant pancreatic neoplasms (primary and metastatic). OBJECTIVE: To compare and characterize primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma versus other malignant neoplasms, hereafter referred to as nonprimary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (NPPA), diagnosed by EUS-guided FNA. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database. The setting was a tertiary care, academic medical centre. Patients referred for suspected pancreatic neoplasms were evaluated. Based on EUS-FNA characteristics, primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma was differentiated from other malignant neoplasms. The subset of other neoplasms was defined as malignant lesions that were ‘NPPAs’ (ie, predominantly solid or solid/cystic based on EUS appearance and primary malignant lesions or metastatic lesions to the pancreas). Pancreatic masses that were benign cystic lesions (pseudocyst, simple cyst, serous cystadenoma) and focal inflammatory lesions (acute, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis) were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 230 patients were evaluated using EUS-FNA for suspected pancreatic mass lesions. Thirty-eight patients were excluded because they were diagnosed with inflammatory lesions or had purely benign cysts. One hundred ninety-two patients had confirmed malignant pancreatic neoplasms (ie, pancreatic adenocarcinoma [n=144], NPPA [n=48]). When comparing adenocarcinoma with NPPA lesions, there was no significant difference in mean age (P=0.0675), sex (P=0.3595) or average lesion size (P=0.3801). On average, four FNA passes were necessary to establish a cytological diagnosis in both lesion subtypes (P=0.396). Adenocarcinomas were more likely to be located in the pancreatic head

  3. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  5. Pancreatic stellate cells--multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In addition, we have seen great progress in our understanding of the cell biology of PSCs and the interactions between PSCs and other cell types in the pancreas. In response to pancreatic injury or inflammation, quiescent PSCs are activated to myofibroblast-like cells. Recent studies have shown that the activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinases plays a role in the activation of PSCs. microRNAs might also play a role, because the microRNA expression profiles are dramatically altered in the process of activation. In addition to producing extracellular matrix components such as type I collagen, PSCs have a wide variety of cell functions related to local immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and exocrine and endocrine functions in the pancreas. From this point of view, the interactions between PSCs and other cell types such as pancreatic exocrine cells, endocrine cells, and cancer cells have attracted increasing attention of researchers. PSCs might regulate exocrine functions in the pancreas through the cholecystokinin-induced release of acetylcholine. PSCs induce apoptosis and decrease insulin expression in β-cells, suggesting a novel mechanism of diabetes in diseased pancreas. PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that PSCs induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition and enhance the stem-cell like features of pancreatic cancer cells. In conclusion, PSCs should now be recognized as not only profibrogenic cells but as multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

  6. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  7. Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and its association with pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakpal, Sujit Vijay; Sexcius, Lucretia; Babel, Nitin; Chamberlain, Ronald Scott

    2009-05-01

    Morphogenesis of the pancreas is a complex process; nevertheless, congenital anomalies are rare. At embryogenesis, the pancreas develops from the endoderm-lined dorsal and ventral buds of the duodenum. The ventral bud gives rise to the lower head and uncinate process of the pancreas; whereas, the dorsal bud gives rise to the upper head, isthmus, body, and tail of the pancreas. Rarely, developmental failure of the dorsal pancreatic bud at embryogenesis results in the agenesis of the dorsal pancreas--neck, body, and tail. Even rarer is the association of pancreatic tumors with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas. In addition to citing our case, we provide a comprehensive review on agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and its association with pancreatic tumors.

  8. [Benign and borderline tumors of the ovary].

    PubMed

    Schem, Ch; Bauerschlag, D O; Meinhold-Heerlein, I; Fischer, D; Friedrich, M; Maass, N

    2007-07-01

    Alterations of the ovaries easily cause diagnostic uncertainty about relevance and consequence. Palpable or sonographic ovarian tumors are reason for various differential diagnoses. Therefore the clarification of ovarian lesions is one of the main duties in daily gynaecological practice. Although diagnostic procedures might be supplemented by CT-Scan or MRI techniques, classical bimanual examination and vaginal ultrasound scan will determine the diagnosis in most cases comparably accurate. The suspected diagnosis concerning benign or malignant lesions, should take the palpable and sonographic feature, as well as the information from the patients medical history (e.g. family history of malignant diseases (BRCA 1/2 mutations) into account. In this regard, there are no other additional parameters established. Serum tumormarkers (CA 12.5) or sonographic examinations (including Doppler) have low sensitivity and specificity. Clinical diagnostic experience seems to be crucial. Cystic lesions mostly occur in premenopausal women and commonly relapse. They are mostly normal follicle cysts, but may also be a tumor of low malignant potential (LMP-tumor) or even an invasive cancerous lesion. 20-30% of all ovarian tumors are malignant and by the time of primary diagnosis already in a about 60-70% incurable due to intraabdominal dissemination. Benign or malignant lesions may occur in every age group. Ovarian tumors at infantile age are malignant in about 15%. Most malignant tumors occur between the age of 50 to 70. The LMP-tumors occur in average 10 years earlier. Malignant ovarian lesions represent about 15-30% of all genital malignant tumors. Hormonal contraceptives, pregnancy and breast feeding seem to be protective. The persistence of ovarian cysts and tumors will be mostly examined by laparoscopic surgery. In that respect the diagnosis of LMP-tumors might be incidentally and will then have a substantial impact on the extent of the surgery and the follow up. This compilation

  9. [Sonographic diagnosis of presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Marret, H; Cayrol, M

    2013-12-01

    To discriminate ovarian lesions is of particular importance in gynecological practice. Two main problems need answers: discrimination of benign and malignant adnexal masses and choice of the appropriate surgical treatment if necessary. Nearly 2% of the adnexal masses are ovarian carcinomas or borderline tumors. It is now, well established that ultrasonography is the gold standard for ovarian cyst diagnosis. The purpose of this data was to review the literature and to establish, with the evidence base medicine model, which parameters and existing diagnostic models using ultrasound and Doppler perform best in the evaluation of adnexal masses. Transvaginal sonography has demonstrated considerable advantage over conventional transabdominal sonography. However, transparietal sonography is still useful in large tumors. Definition of the nomenclature and classification was done and should be used. Unilocular ovarian cyst characterization seems easy using sonography and Doppler. In front of complication, discrimination of such functional cyst may be difficult but spontaneous regression confirms usually the expectative management. Dermoid cysts and endometriomas seem to be easier to discriminate from other adnexal masses. Ultrasound and morphologic parameters have a sensitivity of about 90% and a specificity of 80%; that makes this exam the gold standard for ovarian masses diagnosis. Only 50% of ovarian masses are characterized by sonography. Scoring systems help to differentiate benign from malignant masses (sensitivity of about 90%). Logistic regression and models are good methods especially for LR1 and 2 and RMI and may be useful for malignancy prediction but are difficult to use in current practice. Expert diagnosis is a subjective but most important performing parameter. Any suspicious ovarian mass or not easily diagnosed mass requires sonography by an expert, which can first use all the techniques and the different parameters to discriminate benign and malignant

  10. [Extracapsular lobectomy in benign monolobar thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Prete, F; Di Ciaula, G; Sammarco, D; Parlati, C

    1995-12-01

    On the basis of their experience acquired in the field of thyroid surgery the authors examine the problems related to extracapsular lobectomy from a tactical and technical point of view, starting with its principal indications: benign monolobar thyroid disease in a single or multiple nodular form. The validity of extemporary histological tests is also assessed on the basis of their experience of rare false negatives and the relative successive totalization programme. Lastly, the paper underlines the fundamental identification of the recurrent nerve as the central point of the operation, before which the authors emphasize that nothing should be cut or ligated apart from the superior vascular peduncle and vena media.

  11. Developmental and benign movement disorders in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Cecilia; Roubertie, Agathe; Doummar, Diane; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Cochen de Cock, Valérie; Roze, Emmanuel

    2010-07-30

    Developmental and benign movement disorders are a group of movement disorders with onset in the neonatal period, infancy, or childhood. They are characterized by the absence of associated neurological manifestations and by their favorable outcome, although developmental abnormalities can be occasionally observed. Knowledge of the clinical, neurophysiological, and pathogenetic aspects of these disorders is poor. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature and our practical experience, this article summarizes current knowledge in this area. We pay special attention to the recognition and management of these movement disorders in children.

  12. Benign schwannoma of the maxillary antrum

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Oshin; Desai, Dinkar; Bhandarkar, Gowri P.; Paul, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma also known commonly as neurilemmoma and schwann cell tumor is a benign nerve sheath tumor. About 1/3rd cases of schwannoma arise from the head and neck region but rarely from the nasal and paranasal sinuses. The recurrence rate in these cases has reported to be very rare. We report a rare case of schwannoma in a 60-year-old woman arising from the maxillary sinus further eroding the orbital floor and nasal bone. We have also described the clinical presentation, radiological, histological findings, and management of the case. PMID:27095911

  13. Benign cardiac tumors and tumorlike conditions.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepali; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Halushka, Marc K

    2010-06-01

    Benign primary cardiac tumors and tumorlike conditions are rare, yet important surgical and autopsy pathology specimens. Although many of these entities are clinically silent, a few can cause significant morbidity or even sudden death. Some cardiac tumors arise in the setting of genetic disorders. Providing the correct diagnosis for a cardiac mass lesion will aid in patient care and genetic counseling. Therefore, a familiarity of these tumors is essential for both surgical and forensic pathologists. This comprehensive and up-to-date review describes the key clinical, gross, and histologic findings for 16 distinct entities. It also provides differential diagnoses and key facts to differentiate between similar appearing tumors. PMID:20471569

  14. Clarithromycin Culprit of Benign Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khan, Habib Rehman; Mason, Colin; Mulcahy, Riona

    2015-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension is characterized with increase in CSF opening pressure with no specific etiology. It is predominantly found in women of child bearing age and particularly in individuals with obesity. Visual disturbances or loss and associated headaches are common and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Diagnosis can be achieved once other causes of visual loss, headaches and high opening pressures are excluded. Management consists of serial optic disc assessments although no specific treatment is available despite recent trials using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Diet modification and weight management can help in therapy. PMID:26713029

  15. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  16. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-10-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting.

  17. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-01-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting. PMID:3225588

  18. Benign retroperitoneal cyst of Mullerian type.

    PubMed

    Yohendran, Jay; Dias, Maxwell M; Eckstein, Robert; Wilson, Tim

    2004-10-01

    Retroperitoneal cysts are rare, usually asymptomatic, lesions. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with an asymptomatic abdominal mass. The mass excised at our district hospital was found in the retroperitoneum. Histologically, the cyst was lined with benign Mullerian-type epithelium. The classification, aetiology and clinical manifestations of retroperitoneal cysts are discussed. Retroperitoneal cysts present as an acute abdomen in only a minority of cases. Ultrasound is the most reliable test for their detection, usually followed by computed tomography and/or an upper gastrointestinal series. Optimally, these cysts should be completely excised.

  19. Laparoscopic renal surgery for benign disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Joseph C; Breda, Alberto; Schulam, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years after the first report, laparoscopic nephrectomy has demonstrated proven efficacy and safety comparable with an open approach, with a significant advantage of a faster recovery. Wide dissemination of these surgical techniques and continued improvement in instrumentation has made laparoscopy the preferred approach for treating benign pathologic conditions of the kidney. In this review, the expanding indications of laparoscopic simple nephrectomy and the outcomes of the larger clinical series are examined. We discuss the technical aspects of both transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. Finally, laparoscopic cyst decortication and some of the novel applications of laparoscopic renal surgery are highlighted.

  20. Thallium-201 uptake in a benign thymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Campeau, R.J.; Ey, E.H.; Varma, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted with atypical angina. A chest radiograph showed an anterior mediastinal mass that was confirmed on CT. The mass was relatively avascular and separate from the heart and great vessels. She underwent stress thallium testing that demonstrated no exercise-induced ischemia; however, an abnormal focus of thallium activity was present in the anterior mediastinum on stress and redistribution images. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated a normal left ventriculogram, coronary arteries and thoracic aorta. Subsequent surgery and pathologic examination revealed the mass to be a benign thymoma arising in the right lobe of the thymus gland.

  1. Benign glandular inclusions in parotid nerve.

    PubMed

    Cramer, S F; Heggeness, L M

    1988-08-01

    Benign salivary ductular and acinar structures were demonstrated within an enlarged, disorderly intraparotid nerve in association with a mucoepidermoid carcinoma that did not, itself, manifest perineural invasion. Salivary gland can thus be added to the growing list of tissues in which "perineural invasion" by noncancerous epithelium has been observed. The proliferative features of the neural tissue in this case support the notion that neural elements may play an active role in the establishment of intimate neural-epithelial relationships. The mechanism for this phenomenon in the present case is postulated to be proliferation and ingrowth of the nerve tissue, possibly mediated by nerve growth factor or some related substance.

  2. Breast-feeding and benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Londero, A P; Bertozzi, S; Driul, L; Marchesoni, D; Petri, R

    2012-01-01

    Benign breast disease (BBD) is very common among women in their fertile age, but its correlation with breast reproductive function remains unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the relation between BBD and breast-feeding. We collected data on 105 women with BBD and 98 controls, focusing on their reproductive history and breast-feeding. We analysed data by R (version 2.12.1) considering p < 0.05 as significant. The results showed that fibroadenoma represented the most frequent BBD (55%), followed by fibrocystic changes (19%), intraductal papilloma (6%) and inflammatory breast disorders (5%). The mean age was 31.5 years (± 6.1), BMI 21.2 kg/m² (± 3.4) and age at menarche 13.0 years (± 1.5). Duration of breast-feeding was not significantly different between controls and BBD types (p = NS). Selecting women with fibroadenoma breast-feeding duration directly correlated with the number of benign lesions (p < 0.05), which remains significant also by multivariate analysis. It was concluded that there seemed to be no difference in breast-feeding among BBDs types, but lactation may influence the number of fibroadenomas. Moreover, prospective studies would better define the correlation between lactation and BBDs.

  3. Histiocytic sarcoma that mimics benign histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boisseau-Garsaud, A M; Vergier, B; Beylot-Barry, M; Nastasel-Menini, F; Dubus, P; de Mascarel, A; Eghbali, H; Beylot, C

    1996-06-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a histiocytic sarcoma of a very uncommon origin, as it had developed for several years like a benign cutaneous histiocytosis resembling generalized eruptive histiocytoma before becoming acute, with nodal and massive pulmonary involvement. Despite various chemotherapies, the patient died within 8 months. Skin biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation in the dermis and node biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation with a sinusoidal pattern. Immunohistochemical analysis, performed on paraffin-embedded sections, demonstrated strong labeling of tumoral cells for CD68 and moderate labeling for CD3 and CD4. CD30 labeling was negative. S-100 protein was positive on a Langerhans' cell reactive subpopulation. Electron microscopy confirmed the histiocytic nature of malignant cells and showed cytoplasmic inclusions such as regularly laminated bodies, dense bodies and pleomorphic inclusions. No Birbeck granules were seen. A gene rearrangement study of T-cell receptor gamma and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes showed a germline configuration. Histiocytic sarcoma is an extremely rare true histiocytic malignancy, the existence of which has been recently debated since it has often been mistaken in the past for large cell lymphomas. Such a deceptive onset as benign cutaneous histiocytosis has not been described in the literature to our knowledge.

  4. Are deep eutectic solvents benign or toxic?

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Hayyan, Adeeb; Al-Saadi, Mohammed A; AlNashef, Inas M; Mirghani, Mohamed E S; Saheed, Olorunnisola Kola

    2013-02-01

    In continuation of investigation for environmentally benign protocol for new solvents termed deep eutectic solvents (DESs), it is herein reported results concerning the toxicity and cytotoxicity of choline chloride (ChCl) based DESs with four hydrogen bond donors including glycerine, ethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and urea. The toxicity was investigated using two Gram positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, and two Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The cytotoxicity effect was tested using the Artemia salina leach. It was found that there was no toxic effect for the tested DESs on all of the studied bacteria confirming their benign effects on these bacteria. Nevertheless, it was found that the cytotoxicity of DESs was much higher than their individual components (e.g. glycerine, ChCl) indicating that their toxicological behavior is different. For our best knowledge this is the first time that toxicity and cytotoxicity of DESs were studied. The toxicity and cytotoxicity of DESs varied depending on the structure of components. Careful usage of the terms non-toxicity and biodegradability must be considered. More investigation on this matter is required. PMID:23200570

  5. CT evaluation of primary benign retroperitoneal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, K; Yamada, T; Saitoh, Y; Yoshikawa, D; Aburano, T; Hashimoto, H; Yachiku, S

    1994-01-01

    We studied CT patterns in 21 cases of primary benign retroperitoneal tumor including teratoma in nine cases, schwannoma in six, leiomyoma in three, lipoma in one, lymphangioma in one, and neurofibroma in one. The tumors were analyzed for size, internal homogeneity, CT density, calcification, border with neighboring organs, and contrast enhancement (CE). The mean diameter of the tumors was 10.2 (+/- 4.8) cm. Internal homogeneous distribution was observed in 33%, calcification in 43%, and well-defined border in 86%. The CT density and calcification were compared according to histology, and the results were as follows: teratoma showed fat density in 78%, water density in 100%, and calcification in 89%; schwannoma showed water density in 100% and septal CE in 33%; leiomyoma showed soft tissue density in 100%, CE in 100%, and water density in 33%; lipoma showed fat density and calcification; and lymphangioma and neurofibroma showed water density. Internal homogeneity, fat density, cyst formation, and calcification are considered to be important predictors of primary benign retroperitoneal tumor on CT.

  6. Surgical treatment of hydatid cysts of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ismail, K; Haluk, G I; Necati, O

    1991-01-01

    This series consists of seven patients with hydatid cysts of the pancreas; five females and two males, with an average age of 31 years. In a follow-up extending up to 33 years, about a 50% rate of correct preoperative diagnosis was recorded. The most sensitive and effective diagnostic modalities such as latex agglutination, ultrasonic, radionuclide, computerized tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques were not available till the late seventies and therefore were only used during diagnosis of the latter 3 cases. Four patients had cysts located in the head of the pancreas. Three cysts were situated in the body and tail. Two distal pancreatectomies, two cystectomies and three marsupialization and external drainage procedures were performed for the surgical management of these cases. Two of the marsupialized and externally drained patients had fistulas which eventually dried up within a month leading to a total morbidity of 29% and a mortality rate of nil. PMID:1938210

  7. Immunosuppression in pancreas transplantation: the Euro SPK trials and beyond.

    PubMed

    Malaise, J; De Roover, A; Squifflet, J P; Land, W; Neuhaus, P; Pratschke, J; Kahl, A; Pascher, A; Boas-Knoop, S; Arbogast, H; Hoffmann, J; Illner, W D; Seissler; Schlamp; Viebahn; Wunsch; Hajt; Klar, E; Scharek, W; Hopt; Pisarski, P; Drognitz, O; Thurow, C; Dette, K; Bechstein, W O; Woeste, G; Klempnauer, J; Becker, T; Lück; Neipp; Königsrainer, A; Steurer, W; Margreiter, R; Mark; Bonatti; Saudek, F; Boucek, P; Adamec, M; Havrdova, T; Koznarova, R; Vanrenterghem, Y; Pirenne, J; Maes, B; Kuypers, D; Coosemans, W; Evenepoel, P; van Ophem, D; Marcelis, V; van Vlem; Peeters; de Hemptinne; de Roose; Fernandez-Cruz, L; Ricart, M J; Nakache, R; Morel, P; Berney, T; Demuylder, S

    2008-01-01

    The Immunosuppression in Pancreas Transplantation was historically based on the fact that the pancreas is an extremely immunogenic organ. Quadruple drug therapy with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies induction was the mainstay therapy since the introduction of Cyclosporine A. In the modern era of Immunosuppression, Mycophenolate Mofetil replaced Azathioprine while Tacrolimus-another potent calcineurin inhibitor-had-and still has-a difficult challenge to replaced Cyclosporine A, due to its potential diabetogenic effect. Thanks to the first two EuroSPK studies which prospectively tried to answer several questions in that field. But, the future challenge will be in understanding the impact of innate immunity and ischemic reperfusion injuries on the long-term graft function. Hopefully, new drugs will be available and tested to block unspecific deleterious reactions to attenuate the proinflammatory response. It will be the aim of the third Euro SPK Study.

  8. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:26696517

  9. A novel strategy for long-term implantable artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Technology has recently changed type 1 diabetes treatment by introducing several advancements able to improve patients' quality of life. However, despite of several decades of research efforts, the dream of a fully-automated implanted artificial pancreas is quite far from its realization. The need for periodically restoring the implanted battery charge and refilling the implanted insulin reservoir are the main issues, for which invasive surgery, transcutaneous catheters or external portable devices are presently the only solutions. In this paper we propose a novel approach to these issues, describing a totally implanted closed-loop artificial pancreas with a wireless battery charger and a non-invasive strategy for insulin refilling, based on sensorized swallowable "insulin carrier" capsules. Such system has the potential to represent a final solution for diabetes treatment, by fully restoring patients' quality of life.

  10. Minor papilla cannulation and dorsal ductography in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Benage, D; McHenry, R; Hawes, R H; O'Connor, K W; Lehman, G A

    1990-01-01

    Until recently, pancreas divisum represented a major technical barrier to a complete evaluation of pancreatic ductal anatomy. Technical refinements have now made it possible to achieve minor papilla cannulation and dorsal ductography in more than 90% of attempts. In 120 consecutive dorsal ductograms, structural pathology was demonstrated in 36 subjects (30%): chronic pancreatitis in 23, pancreatic stones in 10, pseudocyst(s) in 4, ductal "cut-off" in 7, pancreatic cancer in 3, and partial agenesis in 1 (some patients had more than one finding). For patients in whom alcohol abuse was excluded, ductal pathology was present in 25%. Abnormal ventral ductograms were present in only 8% of cases, demonstrating that dorsal ductography has an appreciable additional diagnostic yield. When the clinical situation indicates the need for pancreatography, minor papilla cannulation should be performed if major papilla cannulation fails or reveals only the ventral pancreatogram of pancreas divisum.

  11. PDX-1 functions as a master factor in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kawamori, Dan; Katakami, Naoto; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Matsuhisa, Munehide

    2008-05-01

    Various pancreatic transcription factors are involved in pancreas development and beta-cell differentiation. Among them, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in pancreas development and beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. MafA is a recently isolated beta-cell-specific transcription factor and functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription. These pancreatic transcription factors also play a crucial role in inducing surrogate beta-cells from non-beta-cells and thus could be therapeutic targets for diabetes. On the other hand, under diabetic conditions, expression and/or activities of PDX-1 and MafA in beta-cells are reduced, which leads to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Thus, it is likely that alteration of such transcription factors explains, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for beta-cell glucose toxicity found in diabetes.

  12. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27330126

  13. An immunohistochemical study of the endocrine pancreas in raptors.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Shivaprasad, H L

    2014-12-01

    The cytoarchitecture of the endocrine pancreas of 10 raptors (golden eagles, peregrine falcons, Saker falcon, turkey vultures, red-tailed hawk and unspecified falcon) was examined by immunohistochemistry. Three islet types were identified: type A mixed islets composed mainly by glucagon (A)-secreting cells, type B mixed islets with predominantly insulin (B)-secreting cell component and type M mixed islets (type M) consisting of variable number of glucagon-, insulin- and somatostatin (D)-secreting cells. The latter were further characterized into Type I, II or III according to the cell distribution of the three cell types. A and D cells were also randomly scattered within the exocrine pancreas. The results of this study suggest that the classical concept in birds of a segregation of A and B cells in well-defined and distinct islets is not applicable in raptors, reflecting an evolutionary adaptation to different dietary habits and variation in developmental mechanisms. PMID:25468799

  14. Dynamic development of the pancreas from birth to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Weir, Gordon C.

    2016-01-01

    After birth the endocrine pancreas continues its development, a complex process that involves both the maturation of islet cells and a marked expansion of their numbers. New beta cells are formed both by duplication of pre-existing cells and by new differentiation (neogenesis) across the first postnatal weeks, with the result of beta cells of different stages of maturation even after weaning. Improving our understanding of this period of beta cell expansion could provide valuable therapeutic insights. PMID:26998806

  15. Monitoring Artificial Pancreas Trials Through Agent-based Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Scarpellini, Stefania; Di Palma, Federico; Toffanin, Chiara; Del Favero, Simone; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the availability and reliability of network connections lets envision systems supporting a continuous remote monitoring of clinical parameters useful either for overseeing chronic diseases or for following clinical trials involving outpatients. We report here the results achieved by a telemedicine infrastructure that has been linked to an artificial pancreas platform and used during a trial of the AP@home project, funded by the European Union. The telemedicine infrastructure is based on a multiagent paradigm and is able to deliver to the clinic any information concerning the patient status and the operation of the artificial pancreas. A web application has also been developed, so that the clinic staff and the researchers involved in the design of the blood glucose control algorithms are able to follow the ongoing experiments. Albeit the duration of the experiments in the trial discussed in the article was limited to only 2 days, the system proved to be successful for monitoring patients, in particular overnight when the patients are sleeping. Based on that outcome we can conclude that the infrastructure is suitable for the purpose of accomplishing an intelligent monitoring of an artificial pancreas either during longer trials or whenever that system will be used as a routine treatment. PMID:24876570

  16. Autoimmune diabetes recurrence should be routinely monitored after pancreas transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Martins, La Salete

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes recurrence in pancreas grafts was first described 30 years ago, but it is not yet completely understood. In fact, the number of transplants affected and possibly lost due to this disease may be falsely low. There may be insufficient awareness to this entity by clinicians, leading to underdiagnosis. Some authors estimate that half of the immunological losses in pancreas transplantation are due to autoimmunity. Pancreas biopsy is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis. However, as an invasive procedure, it is not the ideal approach to screen the disease. Pancreatic autoantibodies which may be detected early before graft dysfunction, when searched for, are probably the best initial tool to establish the diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to revisit the autoimmune aspects of type 1 diabetes and to analyse data about the identified autoantibodies, as serological markers of the disease. Therapeutic strategies used to control the disease, though with unsatisfactory results, are also addressed. In addition, the author’s own experience with the prospective monitoring of pancreatic autoantibodies after transplantation and its correlation with graft outcome will be discussed. PMID:25346891

  17. Making β(-like)-cells from exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Staels, W; De Groef, S; Bussche, L; Leuckx, G; Van de Casteele, M; De Leu, N; Baeyens, L; Heremans, Y; Heimberg, H

    2016-09-01

    Creating an abundant source of β(-like)-cells has been a major goal in diabetes research for many decades. The concept of cell plasticity has inspired many strategies towards regenerative medicine, but its successes have been limited until very recently. Today, most cell types in the pancreas are considered candidates for the generation of β(-like)-cells through transdifferentiation. While β(-like)-cells that are in vitro differentiated from human embryonic stem cells are already being grafted in patients, β(-like)-cells generated by transdifferentiation are not yet ready for clinical application. These cells would however offer several advantages over the current β(-like)-cells generated by directed differentiation, especially concerning safety issues. In addition, perfect control of the transdifferentiation efficiency would through targeted drug delivery support a non-invasive cell therapy for diabetes. Lastly, focusing on the exocrine pancreas as prime candidate makes sense in view of their abundance and high plasticity. Keeping these hopeful perspectives in mind, it is worth to continue focused research on the mechanisms that control transdifferentiation from pancreas exocrine to β-cells. PMID:27615144

  18. Composite pheochromocytoma masquerading as solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Geetanjali; Saran, Ravindra Kumar; Godhi, Satyajit; Srivastava, Siddharth; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma form rare composite tumours of the adrenal medulla comprising less than 3% of all sympathoadrenal tumours. We present a case of intraoperatively detected adrenal medullary tumour of composite pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma diagnosed on histopathology, in a normotensive patient. A 50-year-old male with a past history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with abdominal pain and significant weight loss since one month. Ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen revealed a large lobulated lesion in the distal body and tail of pancreas suggestive of solid and papillary neoplasm of body and tail of pancreas. Intra-operatively, a 15 cm × 10 cm solid lesion with cystic areas was seen arising from the left lower pole of the adrenal gland pushing the pancreas which appeared unremarkable. In our case, exploratory laparotomy with tumour excision was done. Extensive sectioning and microscopic examination of this adrenal tumour confirmed a diagnosis of composite Pheochromocytoma with Ganglioneuroma on histopathology. Immunophenotyping with S-100 further supported the diagnosis. The goal of this report is to increase the awareness of this rare disease and to further identify its variable presentation. PMID:25984524

  19. [Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed

    Karvar, S; Breidert, M; Nagel, M; Kirsch, C; Pinkert, J; Ehninger, G

    2001-01-01

    Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma. HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 39-year-old woman was admitted to our department of gastroenterology with recurrent epigastrical pain. Ten years previously the diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-syndrome has been established. Two years before a germ line mutation in exon 3 of the VHL-tumour suppressor gene has been detected. The patient has a healthy son with a normal VHL-gene and four healthy siblings who had refused a genetic blood test. INVESTIGATIONS: At abdominal ultrasound at the head of the pancreas three 4 2 cm large cysts and in the region of the left adrenal gland a 2,9 2,7 cm large tumor were visible. MRI of the abdomen revealed in addition a 2,2 1,5 cm large tumour of the right adrenal gland. An asymptomatic biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was detected by elevated urine catecholamines and 123I-MIBG-scintigraphy. TREATMENT AND COURSE: The cysts of the pancreas were punctured under endosonographical control and analysis of the cyst fluid was not suspicious of a malignant cystic tumour. The patient had no further abdominal complaints. After oral treatment with the alpha-blocker phentolamine the biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was treated by retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery in an organ-sparing fashion. Postoperatively ACTH-stimulating test revealed a normal cortisol response. CONCLUSION: Adrenocortical function can be preserved by la-paroscopic adrenal-sparing surgery in bilateral phaeochromocytoma.

  20. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical manifestations and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Santos Dias, José

    2012-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a very common condition, related to aging and causing symptoms, called lower urinary tract symptoms. On account of its huge prevalence, it is important for clinicians who are involved in the management of patients with BPH to be aware of the very strict recommendations for BPH evaluation. In this article, we describe the different steps and procedures doctors should follow to evaluate these patients; symptoms and signs of BPH are reviewed, as well as the clinical evaluation steps and examinations available. The basic evaluation of the patients with BPH should include, according to the recommendations of the most relevant international guidelines, lower urinary tract symptoms evaluation with appropriate symptom scores, digital rectal examination, voiding charts, prostate-specific antigen and creatinine measurement, urinalysis, and imaging of the urinary tract.

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985961

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985968

  3. [Endoscopic surgery for benign esophageal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Soji

    2006-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal achalasia are common benign esophageal diseases. Today minimally invasive surgery is recommended to treat these diseases. Surgical indications for GERD are failure of medical management, medical complications attributable to a large hiatal hernia, 'atypical' symptoms (asthma, hoarseness, cough, chest pain, aspiration), etc. according to the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) guidelines. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has emerged as the most widely accepted procedure for GERD patients with normal esophageal motility. Partial fundoplication (e.g., Toupet fundoplication) is also considered to decrease the possibility of postoperative dysphagia. Although pneumatic dilatation has been the first line treatment for esophageal achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy and partial fundoplication (e.g., Dor fundoplication) to prevent reflux is preferred by most gastroenterologists and surgeons as the primary treatment modality. Laparoscopic surgery for GERD and esophageal achalasia are effective in most patients and safe in all patients. Finally, laparoscopic surgery should be performed only by skilled surgeons.

  4. Phytotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia. A minireview.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Ester; Laudato, Massimiliano; Griffo, Michele; Capasso, Raffaele

    2014-07-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition affecting older men, with an incidence that is age-dependent. Histological BPH, which typically develops after the age of 40 years, ranges in prevalence from >50% at 60 years to as high as 90% by 85 years of age. Typical symptoms include increased frequency of urination, nocturia, urgency, hesitancy, and weak urine stream. Conventional medicines used for the treatment of BPH include alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. This articles review the mode of action, the efficacy, and the safety, including herb-drug interactions of the most common botanicals (Serenoa repens, Pygeum africanum, Urtica dioica, and Cucurbita pepo) and nutraceuticals (isoflavones, lycopene, selenium, and β-Sitosterol) in controlling the lower urinary tract symptoms associated to BPH. PMID:25165780

  5. A rare benign parotid gland tumor: angiomyolipoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Yang, Hui; Liu, Shi Xi; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Fei

    2013-11-01

    Angiomyolipomas are benign neoplasms composed of smooth muscle, vasculature, and mature adipose tissue, which most commonly occur in the kidney and located in the head and neck region. A very rare neoplasm, there are only 3 cases of angiomyolipoma in the parotid gland that have been reported to date. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old man who had a slow-growing mass in the parotid gland for the past 7 years. The results of a physical examination revealed a rubbery mass that was 2.5 cm in diameter in the below superficial lobe of the left parotid gland. A computed tomographic scan showed a heterogeneous and lobulated nodule with a well-defined margin, which was resected through partial parotidectomy with preservation of the facial nerve. A histologic finding revealed an angiomyolipoma of the parotid gland. In conclusion, angiomyolipoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rubbery parotid gland masses.

  6. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    PubMed

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone. PMID:27377566

  7. The debate over robotics in benign gynecology.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Charles R

    2014-05-01

    The debate over the role of the da Vinci surgical robotic platform in benign gynecology is raging with increasing fervor and, as product liability issues arise, greater financial stakes. Although the best currently available science suggests that, in the hands of experts, robotics offers little in surgical advantage over laparoscopy, at increased expense, the observed decrease in laparotomy for hysterectomy is almost certainly, at least in part, attributable to the availability of the robot. In this author's opinion, the issue is not whether the robot has any role but rather to define the role in an institutional environment that also supports the safe use of vaginal and laparoscopic approaches in an integrated minimally invasive surgery program. Programs engaging robotic surgery should have a clear and self-determined regulatory process and should resist pressures in place that may preferentially support robotics over other forms of minimally invasive surgery.

  8. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are a common indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endoscopic management has evolved over the last 2 decades as the current standard of care. The most common etiologies of strictures encountered are following surgery and those related to chronic pancreatitis. High-quality cross-sectional imaging provides a road map for endoscopic management. Currently, sequential placement of multiple plastic biliary stents represents the preferred approach. There is an increasing role for the treatment of these strictures using covered metal stents, but due to conflicting reports of efficacies as well as cost and complications, this approach should only be entertained following careful consideration. Optimal management of strictures is best achieved using a team approach with the surgeon and interventional radiologist playing an important role.

  9. [Presumed benign ovarian tumors during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Tariel, O; Huissoud, C; Rudigoz, R C; Dubernard, G

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of ovarian tumors diagnosed during pregnancy is between 0.3 and 5.4% (LE2). The most common ovarian tumors diagnosed during pregnancy are functional cysts diagnosed incidentally during the first trimester ultrasound (LE2) and spontaneous regression is often observed. Dermoid cysts and cystadenoma are the most frequent organic benign ovarian tumors diagnosed during pregnancy (LE2). The main complication of presumed benign ovarian tumor (PBOT) during pregnancy is adnexal torsion and is estimated at around 8% (LE2), especially at the end of the first trimester and during the second trimester (LE4). Tumor markers are not reliable during pregnancy to assess the risk of malignancy of ovarian tumor (LE2). Ultrasound remains the gold standard for characterizing an ovarian tumor during pregnancy (LE3), but with a lower specificity for the diagnosis of malignancy. Pelvic MRI is accurate in the diagnosis of ovarian tumors during pregnancy and brings additional information to ultrasound (LE4). Ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian tumors is not recommended during pregnancy (grade C). Expectation is recommended in cases of PBOT during pregnancy, which does not enlarge (grade C). Whatever the gestational age, surgery is recommended in patients with symptoms suggesting an adnexal torsion (grade C). Laparoscopy is possible during the first and second trimester of pregnancy for the management of symptomatic PBOT (LE3). The risk of miscarriage following surgery (laparoscopy and laparotomy) for ovarian tumor during pregnancy is estimated at 2.8% (LE3). The route of delivery should not be modified by the ovarian tumour, except in case of praevia cyst requiring a cesarean section, a complication or suspicion of malignancy (grade C). Surgical treatment of PBOT may be performed during a cesarean section indicated for another reason. The risk of torsion is increased during the postpartum period (LE4).

  10. [Surgical therapy of benign thyroid gland diseases].

    PubMed

    Mann, B; Buhr, H J

    1998-01-01

    Operations due to benign thyroid diseases are one of the most common elective surgical procedures performed in Germany. In the majority of cases, the preoperative determination of the serum thyrotropin concentration and an ultrasound of the thyroid region are sufficient preoperative investigations. In cases of thyroid functional disorders a scintigram should be additionally performed. Indications for operation in nodular goiter are local, mechanical compression, suspicion of malignancy and focal or disseminated autonomy. In Graves' disease the indication for operation is usually recurrent hyperthyroidism after medical treatment. In endemic nodular goiter the morphology of the nodular thyroid tissue is the guideline for resection; i.e. all nodules have to be removed. In Graves' disease the function of the remaining thyroid tissue is essential. The standardized subtotal resection with remaining tissue around the hilus, which frequently barries nodules, should be avoided. Instead a selective resection which takes the individual morphology and function of the diseased thyroid tissue into account should be favorized. With this operative technique the surgeon will have frequently direct contact with the recurrent nerve and the parathyroids. It is documented, that intraoperative visualisation of the recurrent nerve decreases not only the rate of permanent nerve damages but increases as well the completeness of resection. Additionally, ligation of the inferior thyroid artery decreases the incidence of residual or recurrent disease without enlarging the risk of postoperative parathyroiprive hypocalcemia. An individual follow-up with iodine and/or thyroxine replacement therapy is an indispensable component of the surgical therapeutic approach. The target of thyroxine substitution in patients after resection due to benign thyroid diseases is a physiologic serum thyrotropin concentration (0.3 to 4.0 mU/l). PMID:9542021

  11. Robotic Surgery for Benign Duodenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Downs-Canner, Stephanie; Van der Vliet, Wald J.; Thoolen, Stijn J. J.; Boone, Brian A.; Zureikat, Amer H.; Hogg, Melissa E.; Bartlett, David L.; Callery, Mark P.; Kent, Tara S.; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign duodenal and periampullary tumors are uncommon lesions requiring careful attention to their complex anatomic relationships with the major and minor papillae as well as the gastric outlet during surgical intervention. While endoscopy is less morbid than open resection, many lesions are not amenable to endoscopic removal. Robotic surgery offers technical advantages above traditional laparoscopy, and we demonstrate the safety and feasibility of this approach for a variety of duodenal lesions. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all robotic duodenal resections between April 2010 and December 2013 from two institutions. Demographic, clinicopathologic, and operative details were recorded with special attention to the post-operative course. Results Twenty-six patients underwent robotic duodenal resection for a variety of diagnoses. The majority (88 %) were symptomatic at presentation. Nine patients underwent transduodenal ampullectomy, seven patients underwent duodenal resection, six patients underwent transduodenal resection of a mass, and four patients underwent segmental duodenal resection. Median operative time was 4 h with a median estimated blood loss of 50 cm3 and no conversions to an open operation. The rate of major Clavien-Dindo grades 3–4 complications was 15 % at post-operative days 30 and 90 without mortality. Final pathology demonstrated a median tumor size of 2.9 cm with a final histologic diagnoses of adenoma (n=13), neuroendocrine tumor (n=6), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (n=2), lipoma (n=2), Brunner’s gland hamartoma (n=1), leiomyoma (n=1), and gangliocytic paraganglioma (n=1). Conclusion Robotic duodenal resection is safe and feasible for benign and premalignant duodenal tumors not amenable to endoscopic resection. PMID:25348238

  12. Environmentally benign semiconductor processing for dielectric etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Marci Yi-Ting

    Semiconductor processing requires intensive usage of chemicals, electricity, and water. Such intensive resource usage leaves a large impact on the environment. For instance, in Silicon Valley, the semiconductor industry is responsible for 80% of the hazardous waste sites contaminated enough to require government assistance. Research on environmentally benign semiconductor processing is needed to reduce the environmental impact of the semiconductor industry. The focus of this dissertation is on the environmental impact of one aspect of semiconductor processing: patterning of dielectric materials. Plasma etching of silicon dioxide emits perfluorocarbons (PFCs) gases, like C2F6 and CF4, into the atmosphere. These gases are super global warming/greenhouse gases because of their extremely long atmospheric lifetimes and excellent infrared absorption properties. We developed the first inductively coupled plasma (ICP) abatement device for destroying PFCs downstream of a plasma etcher. Destruction efficiencies of 99% and 94% can be obtained for the above mentioned PFCs, by using O 2 as an additive gas. Our results have lead to extensive modeling in academia as well as commercialization of the ICP abatement system. Dielectric patterning of hi-k materials for future device technology brings different environment challenges. The uncertainty of the hi-k material selection and the patterning method need to be addressed. We have evaluated the environmental impact of three different dielectric patterning methods (plasma etch, wet etch and chemical-mechanical polishing), as well as, the transistor device performances associated with the patterning methods. Plasma etching was found to be the most environmentally benign patterning method, which also gives the best device performance. However, the environmental concern for plasma etching is the possibility of cross-contamination from low volatility etch by-products. Therefore, mass transfer in a plasma etcher for a promising hi

  13. Benign lymphoepithelial lesions of the parotid.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R; DiMaio, T; Webber, C; Thelmo, W; Jaffe, B M

    1993-10-01

    Persistent generalized lymphadenopathy has been well described in patients with seropositivity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, isolated enlargement of the parotid gland and parotid lymphadenopathy have been noted much more frequently over the past few years. Histologically, these lesions demonstrate follicular hyperplasia, cystic dilatation of the ducts lined by pseudo-stratified squamous epithelium, and lymphocytic infiltrates. They are generally considered to be benign lymphoepithelial lesions of the parotid or hyperplastic periparotid lymph nodes. The relationship of this entity to the AIDS-related complex (ARC) and the subsequent development of AIDS is not clear. Over the past 7 years, we have seen 50 patients with parotid enlargement in whom the diagnosis of benign lymphoepithelial lesion was made. Fine-needle aspiration was performed in 32 patients. Although not conclusively diagnostic, needle aspirates ruled out primary salivary glandular pathology. Most patients gave a history of intravenous drug abuse. HIV tests have been performed on a routine basis only in the last 2 years, and these were positive in the majority of the patients. Thirty-five patients underwent surgical excision. In the initial 20 patients, we routinely performed parotid exploration, identification of the facial nerve, and superficial parotidectomy. In the last 15 patients, we changed our surgical approach to parotid exploration and excision of the mass in the tail of the parotid. The exposure of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, with identification and removal of the deep jugular node, has become routine. In each case, we found an enlarged lymph node in the deep jugular region, which was not clinically palpable preoperatively. The rate of surgical complications was minimal, and, after resection of the mass, patients improved symptomatically. If the patient shows obvious signs of AIDS, a nonsurgical approach with repeated aspirations should be considered

  14. Successful treatment for graft-versus-host disease after pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jei wen; Sageshima, Junichiro; Ciancio, Gaetano; Mattiazzi, Adela; Chen, Linda; Tsai, Hsin-Lin; Ruiz, Phillip; Burke, George W

    2014-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after pancreas transplantation is a rare but serious complication: All previously reported cases were fatal. We herein report three cases of GVHD after pancreas transplantation with favorable outcomes. Patients with a history of kidney (and pancreas) transplantation subsequently received a pancreas (and kidney) transplantation (i.e., pancreas retransplantation or pancreas after kidney transplantation) and developed acute GVHD. All of them responded to increased immunosuppression (e.g., steroid bolus, antithymocyte globulin) and retained normal graft function. Because the clinical manifestations are non-specific, vigilance is necessary to make an accurate diagnosis. We underscored the importance of a biopsy of involved organs and the clinicopathologic correlation in the early diagnosis of GVHD. Augmented immunosuppression to prevent progression from a self-limited disease to life-threatening pancytopenia or sepsis may be most critical to improve outcome.

  15. [Tertiary syphilis of the pancreas and liver in 82-year-old patient: case study].

    PubMed

    Denisova, T L; Tiul'tiaeva, L A; Lipatova, T E; Bakulev, A L; Alipova, L N; Apanasevich, A V; Bezrodnaia, L A; Borisova, E A

    2013-01-01

    It has been described a clinical case of late diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver of elderly patients. Two years before that it was wrongly diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas with liver metastases, and the patient was operated on with the imposition of cholecystostomy. It was conducted appropriate therapy and reconstructive surgery after verification of the diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver. PMID:24772875

  16. [Treatment of benign laryngeal diseases using a CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Betka, J; Klozar, J; Kasík, P; Taudy, M; Tichý, S

    1989-05-01

    CO2 laser surgery is becoming a part of larynx surgery. The authors inform about their experience in benign larynx tumours treatment. They present analysis of concrete therapeutic procedures in individual larynx affections. They conclude that laser surgery is an advantegous method for benign larynx tumours treatment. PMID:2772545

  17. A Modified Perfusion Method to Improve the Quality of Procured Donor Pancreas in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fu Tian; Lin, Hong Feng; Ding, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background In this animal study, we evaluated a modified pancreas perfusion method to improve the quality of harvested pancreas in rats. In this model, the portal vein was used as the outflow route during the pancreas perfusion. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into study group and control group, with 24 rats in each group. In the study group, the portal vein was used as outflow of perfusion. While in the control group, the post-hepatic vein (right artrium) was used as perfusion outflow. UW solution was used as perfusion and preservation solution. Pancreas tissue samples were collected at 6, 10, and 14 hours after perfusion and cold preserved for histology and immunohistochemistry examination, P-selection (PS) and ICAM-1 were determined. Pancreas samples were also examined using electronic microscope for ultra-structures. Results Compared with the study group, in the pancreas of control group there were significant pathological impairments and cellular ultra-structural alterations observed by immunohistochemistry and electronic microscope, and these impairments aggravated with time. There were mild histological alterations in the pancreas of study group. Conclusions During the donor pancreas perfusion, the early opening of portal vein as the outflow is better than the opening of the post-hepatic vein for the preservation of donor graft pancreas and the reduction of tissue impairments.

  18. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after nonotologic surgery: case series.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Leyla; Aydin, Erdinc; Gulsahi, Kamran

    2015-03-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most common types of vertigo caused by peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Although head trauma, migraine, long-term bed rest, Ménière disease, viral labyrinthitis, and upper respiratory tract infections are believed to be predisposing factors, most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are idiopathic. Ear surgery is another cause, but after non-otologic surgery, attacks of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are rare. We describe three cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo attacks after non-otologic surgery (one patient after a nasal septoplasty and two patients after dental endodontic treatment) and discuss the pathophysiological mechanism of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seen after non-otologic surgery, its diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Na+ Micro-Current Value Detection as a New Modality for Identification of Benign and Malignant Disease in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Long, Zhi-Da; Liu, Xue-Min; Ma, Feng; Li, Qiang; Lv, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Increase of intracellular positive ions (mainly Na+) indicates greater possibility of cell malignancy. The present study investigated the correlation between the Na+ micro-current value (MCV) and tissue characteristics (normal, benign or malignant). 346 tissue samples have been detected within 30 min after surgical isolation by Na+ detector. MCV in 102 malignant tumor was significantly higher than that in benign/borderline tumor or normal tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 24.4 ± 8.6 μA and 14.0 ± 4.0 μA, p < 0.001, respectively). MCV in malignant tumor parenchyma was significantly higher than that in the paired paracanceroustissue, normal tissue and surgical margin tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 18.9 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.0 or 15.2 ± 3.3, p < 0.001, respectively). However, the coincidence rate between Na+ detector and pathological examination was different in tissues from different organs or systems, which was high in pancreas, bile duct system, gastrointestinal system, esophagus, breasts, lungs, nose & throat and thyroids, but poor in urinary tissue. The overall coincidence rate was 83.1% (108/130) between Na+ detector and pathological examination. The sensitivity and specificity of correct diagnosis by Na+ detector was 83.3% (70/84) and 82.6% (38/46), respectively. This new modality may have diagnostic potential in complementing frozen examination in differentiating malignant tumor from benign or normal tissue, justifying tumor metastatic scope and confirming surgical margin. PMID:27103487

  20. Na(+) Micro-Current Value Detection as a New Modality for Identification of Benign and Malignant Disease in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Long, Zhi-Da; Liu, Xue-Min; Ma, Feng; Li, Qiang; Lv, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Increase of intracellular positive ions (mainly Na(+)) indicates greater possibility of cell malignancy. The present study investigated the correlation between the Na(+) micro-current value (MCV) and tissue characteristics (normal, benign or malignant). 346 tissue samples have been detected within 30 min after surgical isolation by Na(+) detector. MCV in 102 malignant tumor was significantly higher than that in benign/borderline tumor or normal tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 24.4 ± 8.6 μA and 14.0 ± 4.0 μA, p < 0.001, respectively). MCV in malignant tumor parenchyma was significantly higher than that in the paired paracanceroustissue, normal tissue and surgical margin tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 18.9 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.0 or 15.2 ± 3.3, p < 0.001, respectively). However, the coincidence rate between Na(+) detector and pathological examination was different in tissues from different organs or systems, which was high in pancreas, bile duct system, gastrointestinal system, esophagus, breasts, lungs, nose &throat and thyroids, but poor in urinary tissue. The overall coincidence rate was 83.1% (108/130) between Na(+) detector and pathological examination. The sensitivity and specificity of correct diagnosis by Na(+) detector was 83.3% (70/84) and 82.6% (38/46), respectively. This new modality may have diagnostic potential in complementing frozen examination in differentiating malignant tumor from benign or normal tissue, justifying tumor metastatic scope and confirming surgical margin. PMID:27103487

  1. Endotherapy in symptomatic pancreas divisum: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Rajan; Samji, N Swetha; Inaganti, Anupama; Komanapalli, Sarah D; Rivera, Ramon; Antillon, Mainor R; Roy, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common congenital variant of the pancreas and has been implicated as a cause of pancreatitis; however, endoscopic treatment is controversial. Our objective was to examine patient response to endotherapy for treatment of symptomatic PD in adult patients in a systematic review of the literature. A systematic review of all case series and case-control studies with ten or more patients undergoing endotherapy for treatment of symptomatic PD indicated by acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), chronic pancreatitis (CP), or chronic abdominal pain (CAP) was performed. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched from inception through February 2013 using [pancreas divisum] AND [endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)] OR [endotherapy] OR [endoscopy] as search terms. Importantly, the majority of studies were retrospective in nature, significantly limiting analysis capacity. Main outcomes measures included endotherapy response rate in patients with PD and ARP, CP, or CAP. Twenty-two studies were included in the review, with a total of 838 patients. Response to endoscopy was seen in 528 patients, but response rate varied by clinical presentation. Patients with ARP had a response rate ranging from 43% to 100% (median 76%). Reported response rates were lower in the other two groups, ranging from 21% to 80% (median 42%) for patients with CP and 11%-55% (median 33%) for patients with CAP. Complications reported included perforation, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis, bleeding, and clogged stents. Endotherapy appears to offer an effective treatment option for patients with symptomatic PD, with the best results in patients presenting with ARP.

  2. Strategy to differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takuma, Kensuke; Kamisawa, Terumi; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Egawa, Naoto; Igarashi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly described entity of pancreatitis in which the pathogenesis appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms. Based on histological and immunohistochemical examinations of various organs of AIP patients, AIP appears to be a pancreatic lesion reflecting a systemic “IgG4-related sclerosing disease”. Clinically, AIP patients and patients with pancreatic cancer share many features, such as preponderance of elderly males, frequent initial symptom of painless jaundice, development of new-onset diabetes mellitus, and elevated levels of serum tumor markers. It is of uppermost importance not to misdiagnose AIP as pancreatic cancer. Since there is currently no diagnostic serological marker for AIP, and approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult, AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. Findings suggesting AIP rather than pancreatic cancer include: fluctuating obstructive jaundice; elevated serum IgG4 levels; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; delayed enhancement of the enlarged pancreas and presence of a capsule-like rim on dynamic computed tomography; low apparent diffusion coefficient values on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image; irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; less upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, presence of other organ involvement such as bilateral salivary gland swelling, retroperitoneal fibrosis and hilar or intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis; negative work-up for malignancy including endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration; and steroid responsiveness. Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy, accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection. PMID:22416175

  3. Effects of prolonged ethanol intake and malnutrition on rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    López, J M; Bombi, J A; Valderrama, R; Giménez, A; Parés, A; Caballería, J; Imperial, S; Navarro, S

    1996-01-01

    Nutritional factors, especially the protein and fat content of the diet, may change pancreatic morphology after ethanol induced injury. This study was performed to delineate the combined effects of a low fat diet and longterm ethanol ingestion on the rat pancreas. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained with five different diets for 12 weeks and the pancreas removed on the day they were killed. Rats fed a very low fat diet without ethanol (5% of total calories as lipid) developed malnutrition, pancreatic steatosis, and reduction in zymogen granules content. Animals fed a 35% lipid diet with ethanol also developed pancreatic steatosis but changes in zymogen granules content were not detected. Both malnutrition and longterm ethanol consumption increased pancreatic cholesterol ester content, and their effects were additive. Pancreatic steatosis was accompanied with hypercholesterolaemia. Amylase, lipase, and cholesterol esterase content were reduced in malnourished rats; but longterm ethanol ingestion, regardless of the nutritional state, increased lipase content and decreased amylase. It is suggested that high serum cholesterol concentrations and increased pancreatic lipase activity could cause accumulation of cholesterol esters in acinar cells. Fat accumulation in the pancreas has been reported as the earliest histopathological feature in alcoholic patients and may be responsible for cytotoxic effects on the acinar cells at the level of the cell membrane. Although it is difficult to extrapolate results in this animal study to the human situation, the results presented in this work might explain the higher incidence of pancreatitis is malnourished populations as well as in alcoholic subjects that is reported in dietary surveys. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8801213

  4. Automatic Data Processing to Achieve a Safe Telemedical Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; García-Sáez, Gema; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Pérez-Gandía, Carmen; Rigla, Mercedes; de Leiva, Alberto; Capel, Ismael; Pons, Belén; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of telemedicine for diabetes care has evolved over time, proving that it contributes to patient self-monitoring, improves glycemic control, and provides analysis tools for decision support. The timely development of a safe and robust ambulatory artificial pancreas should rely on a telemedicine architecture complemented with automatic data analysis tools able to manage all the possible high-risk situations and to guarantee the patient's safety. Methods The Intelligent Control Assistant system (INCA) telemedical artificial pancreas architecture is based on a mobile personal assistant integrated into a telemedicine system. The INCA supports four control strategies and implements an automatic data processing system for risk management (ADP-RM) providing short-term and medium-term risk analyses. The system validation comprises data from 10 type 1 pump-treated diabetic patients who participated in two randomized crossover studies, and it also includes in silico simulation and retrospective data analysis. Results The ADP-RM short-term risk analysis prevents hypoglycemic events by interrupting insulin infusion. The pump interruption has been implemented in silico and tested for a closed-loop simulation over 30 hours. For medium-term risk management, analysis of capillary blood glucose notified the physician with a total of 62 alarms during a clinical experiment (56% for hyperglycemic events). The ADP-RM system is able to filter anomalous continuous glucose records and to detect abnormal administration of insulin doses with the pump. Conclusions Automatic data analysis procedures have been tested as an essential tool to achieve a safe ambulatory telemedical artificial pancreas, showing their ability to manage short-term and medium-term risk situations. PMID:20144417

  5. Plasticity and dedifferentiation within the pancreas: development, homeostasis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Puri, Sapna; Folias, Alexandra E; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Cellular identity is established by genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that regulate organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Although some flexibility in fate potential is beneficial to overall organ health, dramatic changes in cellular identity can have disastrous consequences. Emerging data within the field of pancreas biology are revising current beliefs about how cellular identity is shaped by developmental and environmental cues under homeostasis and stress conditions. Here, we discuss the changes occurring in cellular states upon fate modulation and address how our understanding of the nature of this fluidity is shaping therapeutic approaches to pancreatic disorders such as diabetes and cancer.

  6. Asymptomatic leukemic-cell infiltration of the pancreas: US findings.

    PubMed

    Collado, Laura; Dardanelli, Esteban; Sierre, Sergio; Moguillansky, Silvia; Lipsich, José

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic infiltration of leukemic cells is a very rare manifestation at the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood. Pancreatic enlargement in this situation is unusual and pancreatic involvement is often associated with biliary obstruction, cholestasis and pancreatitis. We report a 3-month-old girl who presented with asymptomatic leukemic infiltration of the pancreas, demonstrated by US with heterogeneous pancreatic enlargement associated with multiple hypoechogenic lesions, without cholestasis. Although these manifestations are rare, ALL should be considered a cause of pancreatic enlargement.

  7. Agent-based model of macrophage action on endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ignacio V; Gómez, Enrique J; Hernando, M Elena; Villares, Ricardo; Mellado, Mario

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an agent-based model of the action of macrophages on the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas. The aim of this model is to simulate the processes of beta cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the process of phagocytosis of cell debris by macrophages, all of which are related to the onset of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. We have used data from the scientific literature to design the model. The results show that the model obtains good approximations to real processes and could be used to shed light on some open questions concerning such processes.

  8. [Differential sonographic diagnosis. Pancreas (pseudo) cyst--choledochus cyst].

    PubMed

    Brockmann, W P; Klapdor, R; Kremer, B

    1984-10-01

    The case of a woman patient with an extended prepapillary choledochal cyst and pancreaticobiliary reflux shows that it is necessary to consider the possibility of a choledochal cyst on detecting a cystic structure in the head of the pancreas (condition after acute pancreatitis); besides this, differential diagnosis will have to consider a pancreatic pseudocyst, hydrops of the gallbladder, a retroperitoneal cyst or even vascular aneurysm. If necessary, the physician should take suitable diagnostic measures before performing any percutaneous cyst drainage which he may have planned, since this may entail the risk of biliary peritonitis.

  9. The human pancreas proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Angelika; Pontén, Fredrik; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Korsgren, Olle; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is composed of both exocrine glands and intermingled endocrine cells to execute its diverse functions, including enzyme production for digestion of nutrients and hormone secretion for regulation of blood glucose levels. To define the molecular constituents with elevated expression in the human pancreas, we employed a genome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of the human transcriptome to identify genes with elevated expression in the human pancreas. This quantitative transcriptomics data was combined with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to allow mapping of the corresponding proteins to different compartments and specific cell types within the pancreas down to the single cell level. Analysis of whole pancreas identified 146 genes with elevated expression levels, of which 47 revealed a particular higher expression as compared to the other analyzed tissue types, thus termed pancreas enriched. Extended analysis of in vitro isolated endocrine islets identified an additional set of 42 genes with elevated expression in these specialized cells. Although only 0.7% of all genes showed an elevated expression level in the pancreas, this fraction of transcripts, in most cases encoding secreted proteins, constituted 68% of the total mRNA in pancreas. This demonstrates the extreme specialization of the pancreas for production of secreted proteins. Among the elevated expression profiles, several previously not described proteins were identified, both in endocrine cells (CFC1, FAM159B, RBPJL and RGS9) and exocrine glandular cells (AQP12A, DPEP1, GATM and ERP27). In summary, we provide a global analysis of the pancreas transcriptome and proteome with a comprehensive list of genes and proteins with elevated expression in pancreas. This list represents an important starting point for further studies of the molecular repertoire of pancreatic cells and their relation to disease states or treatment effects.

  10. [Minimally Invasive Treatment of Esophageal Benign Diseases].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    As a minimally invasive treatment of esophageal achalasia per-oral endoscopic myotomy( POEM) was developed in 2008. More than 1,100 cases of achalasia-related diseases received POEM. Success rate of the procedure was more than 95%(Eckerdt score improvement 3 points and more). No serious( Clavian-Dindo classification III b and more) complication was experienced. These results suggest that POEM becomes a standard minimally invasive treatment for achalasia-related diseases. As an off-shoot of POEM submucosal tumor removal through submucosal tunnel (per-oral endoscopic tumor resection:POET) was developed and safely performed. Best indication of POET is less than 5 cm esophageal leiomyoma. A novel endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was developed. Anti-reflux mucosectomy( ARMS) is nearly circumferential mucosal reduction of gastric cardia mucosa. ARMS is performed in 56 consecutive cases of refractory GERD. No major complications were encountered and excellent clinical results. Best indication of ARMS is a refractory GERD without long sliding hernia. Longest follow-up case is more than 10 years. Minimally invasive treatments for esophageal benign diseases are currently performed by therapeutic endoscopy. PMID:27440038

  11. [Treatment strategies in presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Bourdel, N; Canis, M

    2013-12-01

    Benign ovarian tumors can be separated in three groups: teratoma, unilocular cyst and endometrioma. Laparoscopy should always be preferred for the surgical approach. Before menopause, conservative treatment should be preferred apart from previous oncologic history (breast and ovary). After menopause, the surgical approach (conservative or radical) should be discussed on case-by-case basis. Concerning teratoma, follow-up is one of the options for small cyst (less than 4 to 6 cm). For larger cyst, surgery seems to be justified but there is no definitive argument for this attitude. Concerning unilocular cyst, hormonal treatment or ultrasound-guided puncture are not recommended. For symptomatic patient, laparoscopic surgery is the gold standard. For asymptomatic patient, there is no definitive argument for systematic surgery. There is no justification for systematic ultrasound follow-up. For cyst larger than 10 cm, the data in the literature are very poor and surgery can be proposed. Concerning endometrioma, there isn't strong data that allows preferring one treatment (surgical, medical, follow-up) over another. Preoperative medical treatment is not recommended. Stripping technique is the gold standard. Hormonal postoperative treatment is recommended (if there is no desire for pregnancy).

  12. [Complications of presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Deffieux, X; Thubert, T; Huchon, C; Demoulin, G; Rivain, A-L; Faivre, E; Trichot, C

    2013-12-01

    The main risk factor of adnexal torsion is a previous adnexal torsion (LE3). There is no clinical, biological or radiological sign that may exclude the diagnosis of adnexal torsion (LE3). The presence of flow at color Doppler imaging does not allow exclusion of the diagnosis (LE2). An emergent laparoscopy is recommended for adnexal untwisting (Grade B), except in postmenopausal women where oophorectomy is recommended (grade C). A persistent black color of the adnexa after untwisting is not an indication for systematic oophorectomy (grade C), since a functional recovery is possible (LE3). Ovariopexy is not routinely recommended following adnexal untwisting (grade C). The clinical signs of intra-cystic hemorrhage and those of rupture of the corpus luteum are not specific (LE4). MRI is not recommended to confirm the diagnosis of intra-cystic hemorrhage (grade C). Malignant transformation of an ovarian cyst is very rare. The presence of a benign ovarian cyst is not associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer at long-term follow-up (LE2). For these women, an ultrasound follow-up is not recommended (grade C). Dermoid ovarian cyst containing nerve tissue can trigger the production of pathogenic auto-antibody-anti-NMDA, leading to encephalitis. A high proportion of thyroid tissue in a mature teratoma (struma ovarii) may cause hyperthyroidism.

  13. [Surgical treatments of presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Borghese, B; Marzouk, P; Santulli, P; de Ziegler, D; Chapron, C

    2013-12-01

    The surgical management of presumed benign ovarian tumors (PBOT) must ensure complete removal of the cyst, reduce the risk of recurrence (especially in case of endometrioma), prevent any risk of tumor dissemination, and must preserve healthy ovarian tissue. Asymptomatic PBOT should not be punctured. Expectation is preferable to puncture. Laparoscopy is the gold standard for surgical treatment. Single-port laparoscopy is feasible and being evaluated. Peritoneal exploration and peritoneal cytology are conventionally performed. Ovarian cystectomy, oophorectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy are the standard techniques. Suture after cystectomy is not recommended. The extraction of the cyst using an endoscopic bag is recommended. Peritoneal washing after surgery is recommended. The use of anti-adhesions barriers is not recommended routinely. In case of dermoid cyst, cystectomy by mesial incision may decrease the risk of intraoperative rupture. In case of endometrioma, the intraperitoneal cystectomy is recommended as first-line surgery. Exclusive bipolar coagulation should be avoided because of increased risk of recurrence and lower pregnancy rates. There is no argument to support the use of plasma energy and CO2 laser in the treatment of endometriomas. Ethanol sclerotherapy may be proposed in patients with recurrent endometriomas after surgery and referred to medically assisted procreation, although there is no comparative trial with cystectomy.

  14. Treating benign prostatic hyperplasia with botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, G; Vanella, S; Marniga, G; Crocco, A; Maria, G

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been increasingly used in the interventional treatment of several disorders; the use of this agent has extended to a plethora of conditions including focal dystonia, spasticity, inappropriate contraction in most gastrointestinal sphincters, eye movement disorders, hyperhidrosis, genitourinary disorders and aesthetically undesirable hyperfunctional facial lines. In addition, BoNT is being investigated for the control of pain, and for the management of tension or migraine headaches and myofascial pain syndrome. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in ageing men; the goal of therapy is to reduce the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with BPH and to improve the quality of life. However, medical treatment, including drugs that relax smooth muscle within the prostate and drugs that shrink the gland are not totally effective or without complications. The standard surgical treatment for BPH is progressively changing to minimally invasive therapies, but none of them has provided clear results. The use of BoNT-A to inhibit the autonomic efferent effects on prostate growth and contraction, and inhibit the abnormal afferent effects on prostate sensation, might be an alternative treatment for BPH. BoNT injections have several advantages over drugs and surgical therapies in the management of intractable or chronic disease; systemic pharmacologic effects are rare, permanent destruction of tissue does not occur, and graded degrees of relaxation may be achieved by varying the dose injected. In this paper, clinical experience over the last years with BoNT in BPH impaired patients will be illustrated.

  15. Adolescent Carotenoid Intake and Benign Breast Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tamimi, Rulla M.; Berkey, Catherine S.; Colditz, Graham A.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Malspeis, Susan; Willett, Walter C.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotenoids may reduce risk of benign breast disease (BBD), an independent risk factor for breast cancer, through antioxidative or antiproliferative mechanisms. Exposure to carotenoids may be most important during adolescence when breast tissue is still developing. We examined adolescent carotenoid intake in relation to BBD in young women. METHODS: In 6593 adolescent girls in the prospective Growing Up Today Study cohort, intakes of α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, and lycopene were assessed by using the means from food-frequency questionnaires in 1996, 1997, and 1998. Girls reported biopsy-confirmed BBD on questionnaires in 2005, 2007, and 2010 (n = 122). We conducted logistic regression of energy-adjusted carotenoid intakes in relation to BBD, adjusted for age, family history of breast cancer or BBD, age at menarche, nulliparity, alcohol intake, BMI, and physical activity. RESULTS: Mean (SD) age at baseline was 12.0 (1.6) years. β-Carotene intake was inversely associated with BBD; comparing the highest to lowest quartile, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio was 0.58 (95% confidence interval: 0.34–1.00; P-trend = .03). α-Carotene and lutein/zeaxanthin were also inversely associated with BBD, but the associations were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent carotenoid intake may be associated with lower BBD risk; these findings warrant further study. PMID:24709924

  16. Benign encephalopathy of pregnancy. Preliminary clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Poser, C M; Kassirer, M R; Peyser, J M

    1986-01-01

    A survey of 67 pregnancies in 51 professional women (physicians, psychologists, nurses, administrators, etc.) revealed the occurrence of symptoms of cognitive dysfunction such as forgetfulness, disorientation, confusion and reading difficulties in 28 pregnancies occurring in 21 women. These were unrelated to such factors as age of delivery, percentage weight gain, the baby's sex or birth weight, alcohol consumption, smoking, a history of migraine or allergy or other symptoms occurring during pregnancy such as sleepiness and lack of concentration, irritability, loss of interest in job or nightmares. Nor was there any correlation with hypertension, proteinuria, glycosuria, ketonuria, anemia, or morning sickness. Furthermore, these cognitive disturbances were not related to depression or sleep deprivation. Despite these symptoms, none of the women suffering from them were forced to interrupt their professional activities during pregnancy. The syndrome of benign encephalopathy of pregnancy should be recognized so that simple precautions can be taken to prevent any interference with professional or other activities. The etiology of the syndrome is unknown.

  17. Benign paroxysmal tonic upgaze of childhood.

    PubMed

    Ouvrier, R A; Billson, F

    1988-07-01

    Four cases of an apparently benign ocular motor syndrome of childhood are reported. The features of the disorder are: (1) onset in early life; (2) periods of constant or variably sustained tonic conjugate upward deviation of the eyes; (3) down-beating saccades in attempted downgaze, which are difficult to sustain below the neutral positions; (4) apparently normal horizontal eye movements; (5) frequent relief by sleep; (6) otherwise normal neurological findings apart from mild ataxia, chronic in one boy and at times of illness in one of the other patients; (7) absence of deterioration during observation spanning up to 15 years; (8) eventual improvement but with some residual ocular movement problems in two cases; (9) normal metabolic, electroencephalographic, and neuroradiologic investigations; (10) normal brain examination findings in one patient who died accidentally; and (11) an apparently good response to levodopa therapy in one patient. To the authors' knowledge, this condition has not been described previously. It may be a new levodopa-responsive condition, secondary to a localized neurotransmitter deficiency. PMID:3209843

  18. Vivax malaria: neglected and not benign.

    PubMed

    Price, Ric N; Tjitra, Emiliana; Guerra, Carlos A; Yeung, Shunmay; White, Nicholas J; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2007-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax threatens almost 40% of the world's population, resulting in 132-391 million clinical infections each year. Most of these cases originate from Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, although a significant number also occurs in Africa and South America. Although often regarded as causing a benign and self-limiting infection, there is increasing evidence that the overall burden, economic impact, and severity of disease from P. vivax have been underestimated. Malaria control strategies have had limited success and are confounded by the lack of access to reliable diagnosis, emergence of multidrug resistant isolates, the parasite's ability to transmit early in the course of disease and relapse from dormant liver stages at varying time intervals after the initial infection. Progress in reducing the burden of disease will require improved access to reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of both blood-stage and latent parasites, and more detailed characterization of the epidemiology, morbidity, and economic impact of vivax malaria. Without these, vivax malaria will continue to be neglected by ministries of health, policy makers, researchers, and funding bodies.

  19. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in mountain bikers.

    PubMed

    Vibert, Dominique; Redfield, Robin C; Häusler, Rudolf

    2007-12-01

    We evaluated 4 men who had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) that occured several hours after intensive mountain biking but without head trauma. The positional maneuvers in the planes of the posterior and horizontal canals elicited BPPV, as well as transitory nystagmus. This was attributed to both the posterior and horizontal semicircular canals (SCCs) on the left side in 1 patient, in these 2 SCCs on the right side in another patient, and to the right posterior SCC in the other 2 patients. The symptoms disappeared after physiotherapeutic maneuvers in 2 patients and spontaneously in the other 2 patients. Cross-country or downhill mountain biking generates frequent vibratory impacts, which are only partially filtered through the suspension fork and the upper parts of the body. Biomechanically, during a moderate jump, before landing, the head is subjected to an acceleration close to negative 1 g, and during impact it is subjected to an upward acceleration of more than 2g. Repeated acceleration-deceleration events during intensive off-road biking might generate displacement and/or dislocation of otoconia from the otolithic organs, inducing the typical symptoms of BPPV. This new cause of posttraumatic BPPV should be considered as an injury of minor severity attributed to the practice of mountain biking.

  20. Benign cardiac tumors of the pluripotent mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Butany, Jagdish W

    2008-02-01

    Among benign primary cardiac tumors, myxomas and papillary fibroelastomas are the most common. Cardiac myxomas arise from pluripotent mesenchymal cells and are seen as intracardiac, glistening polypoid masses arising most frequently from the interatrial septum in the left atrium. They are composed of stellate to polygonal myxoma cells in a mucopolysaccharide-rich matrix. These tumors can be sporadic or familial. On the other hand, papillary fibroelastomas are sporadic, seen as a mass of delicate papillary fronds ("sea anemone"-like) arising from a slender stalk, commonly located on diseased left-sided valves. They are lined by plump endothelial cells, which rest on stalks composed of mucopolysaccharides enclosing a collagen- and elastin-rich core. Embolism is often the mode of presentation for both of the tumors; myxomas are also associated with obstructive and constitutional symptoms. In contrast, neurogenic tumors (paraganglia or nerve sheath tumors) are exceedingly rare and occur as epicardial and infrequently as intracatdiac masses. The tumors are often incidentally diagnosed by the usual echocardiography, but magnetic resonance imaging is useful for further characterization of the tumors. The tumors are, in general, treated by surgical resection, but may require a little or at times more significant reconstruction. Among these tumors, the myxomas are associated with a higher rate of recurrences. PMID:18350919

  1. Benign paroxysmal torticollis of infancy: An underdiagnosed condition.

    PubMed

    Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Efstathiou, Elisavet; Neubauer, David

    2015-07-01

    Benign paroxysmal torticollis is probably an under-diagnosed condition of infancy. It is a self-limiting disorder characterised by periods of unusual, sustained posture of the head and neck, during which the head tilts to one side. Episodes are often accompanied by marked autonomic features, irritability, ataxia, apathy and drowsiness. They last several hours to a few days and are often recurring every few weeks. They subside within the pre-school years; however, during later childhood, there is a tendency to develop migraine. Three cases of benign paroxysmal torticollis are presented and are compared with cases in the literature. A telephone survey has been conducted to determine what is the general awareness of paediatricians of this condition in Cyprus. Eighty-two paediatricians were randomly selected out of 235 paediatricians. All of them agreed to participate. Our cases revealed that benign paroxysmal torticollis may coexist with other problems during infancy. The telephone survey showed that only two out of eighty-two (2.4%) of the paediatricians are aware of the condition, and none of them was confident regarding the management. Our telephone survey clearly shows that Cypriot paediatricians are not familiar with benign paroxysmal torticollis in infancy which is a benign, self-limiting disorder. It is essential to recognise the condition and to reassure parents of its benign course and not to be misdiagnosed for other disorders, such as epileptic seizures. We have shown again that benign paroxysmal torticollis in infancy may coexist with motor delay and hearing problems.

  2. Benign metastasizing leiomyoma: clonality, telomere length and clinicopathologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Patton, Kurt T; Cheng, Liang; Papavero, Veronica; Blum, Matthew G; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Adley, Brian P; Luan, Chunyan; Diaz, Leslie K; Hui, Pei; Yang, Ximing J

    2006-01-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma is a rare condition affecting women with a history of uterine leiomyomata and is characterized by multiple histologically benign pulmonary smooth muscle tumors. Speculations on its pathogenesis include a benign uterine leiomyoma colonizing the lung, a metastatic low-grade uterine leiomyosarcoma, and primary pulmonary leiomyomatosis. To elucidate its pathogenesis, we analyzed the clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical features, clonality, and telomere length of multiple lung and uterine tumors in three patients with benign metastasizing leiomyoma. In all cases, pulmonary tumors had benign histology and immunohistochemical profiles (estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor positive, and very low proliferative index) identical to uterine leiomyoma. In eight tumors from three patients, clonality was assessed by analyzing the variable length of the polymorphic CAG repeat sequence within the human androgen receptor gene. In the two informative patients pulmonary and uterine tumors showed identical patterns of androgen receptor allelic inactivation, indicating that they were clonal. The telomere length measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization in pulmonary leiomyomas of all three patients were either long or very long and were identical to the uterine counterparts, indicating significant telomere shortening is not a crucial step for developing metastases. Our evidence supports the notion that benign metastasizing leiomyoma is clonally derived from benign-appearing uterine leiomyomas.

  3. Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Glenna

    2004-01-01

    Childrens’ complaints of headache and dizziness merit careful evaluation to differentially diagnose a vestibular disorder. Children can manifest with a syndrome mimicking certain classic signs and symptoms of adult vestibular disorders, such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, usually associated with aging. Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood in which migraine is a key manifestation along with sudden onset of dizziness, is a rare peripheral vestibular disorder in children that is commonly overlooked or misdiagnosed. This review covers the historical development of the diagnosis, evaluation and treatment approaches of benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood. PMID:19654978

  4. FDG PET/CT appearance of benign pilomatricoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Manoj Kumar; Sommerville, Ryan; Ravi Kumar, Aravind S

    2012-07-01

    A 56-year-old patient was referred for FDG PET/CT with a right preauricular lymph node fine-needle biopsy, suggesting poorly differentiated carcinoma and no obvious primary lesion. There was intense FDG uptake in the right preauricular nodule. The node was excised, and formal histology demonstrated a benign pilomatricoma rather than malignancy. Pilomatricoma is uncommon in adults and an unusual cause for marked FDG uptake, likely due to foreign body inflammation. Pilomatricoma can be either benign or malignant. The marked FDG uptake demonstrated in our patient with benign pilomatricoma also suggests that FDG PET cannot reliably grade this rare condition.

  5. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Brijbassie, Alan; Stelow, Edward; Shami, Vanessa M

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare tumor with the normal pancreas being entirely devoid of squamous cells. It, however, has been noted that during inflammatory episodes, squamous metaplasia of ductal columnar cells has been observed; however, transformation to SCC is rare. We herein describe a case of pancreatic SCC and provide a review of existing literature.

  6. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  7. Roles of Commensal Microbiota in Pancreas Homeostasis and Pancreatic Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Lopes, Camila; Velloso, Fernando J.; Campopiano, Julia C.; Sogayar, Mari C.; Correa, Ricardo G.

    2015-01-01

    The pancreas plays a central role in metabolism, allowing ingested food to be converted and used as fuel by the cells throughout the body. On the other hand, the pancreas may be affected by devastating diseases, such as pancreatitis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC), and diabetes mellitus (DM), which generally results in a wide metabolic imbalance. The causes for the development and progression of these diseases are still controversial; therefore it is essential to better understand the underlying mechanisms which compromise the pancreatic homeostasis. The interest in the study of the commensal microbiome increased extensively in recent years, when many discoveries have illustrated its central role in both human physiology and maintenance of homeostasis. Further understanding of the involvement of the microbiome during the development of pathological conditions is critical for the improvement of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the present review, we discuss recent findings on the behavior and functions played by the microbiota in major pancreatic diseases and provide further insights into its potential roles in the maintenance of pancreatic steady-state activities. PMID:26347203

  8. Metastatic tumors to the pancreas: The role of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sperti, Cosimo; Moletta, Lucia; Patanè, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from other primary malignancies are a rare entity. By far, the most common primary cancer site resulting in an isolated pancreatic metastasis is the kidney, followed by colorectal cancer, melanoma, breast cancer, lung carcinoma and sarcoma. Only few data on the surgical outcome of pancreatic resections performed for metastases from other primary tumor have been published, and there are no guidelines to address the surgical treatment for these patients. In this study, we performed a review of the published literature, focusing on the early and long-term results of surgery for the most frequent primary tumors metastasizing to the pancreas. Results for the Literature’s analysis show that in last years an increasing number of surgical resections have been performed in selected patients with limited pancreatic disease. Pancreatic resection for metastatic disease can be performed with acceptable mortality and morbidity rates. The usefulness of pancreatic resection is mainly linked to the biology of the primary tumor metastasizing to the pancreas. The benefit of metastasectomy in terms of patient survival has been observed for metastases from renal cell cancer, while for other primary tumors, such as lung and breast cancers, the role of surgery is mainly palliative. PMID:25320654

  9. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1(-/-) embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1(-/-) microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1(-/-) epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis.

  10. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  11. The bioartificial pancreas (BAP): Biological, chemical and engineering challenges.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Veronica; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2016-01-15

    The bioartificial pancreas (BAP) represents a viable solution for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). By encapsulating pancreatic cells in a semipermeable membrane to allow nutrient, insulin and glucose exchange, the side effects produced by islets and whole organ transplantation-related immunosuppressive therapy can be circumvented. Several factors, mainly related to materials properties, capsule morphology and biological environment, play a key role in optimizing BAP systems. The BAP is an extremely complex delivery system for insulin. Despite considerable efforts, in some instances meeting with limited degree of success, a BAP capable of restoring physiological pancreas functions without the need for immunosuppressive drugs and of controlling blood glucose levels especially in large animal models and a few clinical trials, does not exist. The state of the art in terms of materials, fabrication techniques and cell sources, as well as the current status of commercial devices and clinical trials, are described in this overview from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. In addition, challenges to the creation of effective BAP systems are highlighted including future perspectives in terms of component integration from both a biological and an engineering viewpoint.

  12. [A case of solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Makoto; Kuroiwa, Ganji; Sato, Yasushi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi; Kato, Junji

    2009-07-01

    A 58-year-old woman without any clinical symptoms had a routine health check-up, during which a mass in the head of the pancreas was detected by US. Abdominal US showed a round, hypoechogenic nodule of the pancreatic head. The tumor measured 3cm in diameter and contained an anechoic area. CT revealed a well-demarcated tumor in the pancreatic head. The tumor was partially enhanced by contrast medium, but the left portion of the tumor, which US had shown to be an anechoic area was not enhanced. Imaging findings suggested an endocrine tumor with cystic changes. A pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. The tumor was composed of spindle-shaped cells. There was a typical patternless growth of short fascicles and a short storiform arrangement of cells in the stroma with varying degrees of collagenization. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CD34 and Bcl-2. Based on the light microscopic morphology and immunostaining profile, the tumor was classified as a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pancreas.

  13. Pancreatic pseudocyst or a cystic tumor of the pancreas?

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Mohammad Ezzedien; El Hakeem, Ismail; Al Skaini, Mohammad Saad; El Hadad, Ahmad; Jamil, Salim; Tahir Shah, Mian; Obaid, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesions of the pancreas and may complicate acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic trauma. While the majority of acute pseudocysts resolve spontaneously, few may require drainage. On the other hand, pancreatic cystic tumors, which usually require extirpation, may disguise as pseudocysts. Hence, the distinction between the two entities is crucial for a successful outcome. We conducted this study to highlight the fundamental differences between pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic tumors so that relevant management plans can be devised. We reviewed the data of patients with pancreatic cystic lesions that underwent intervention between June 2007 and December 2010 in our hospital. We identified 9 patients (5 males and 4 females) with a median age of 40 years (range, 30–70 years). Five patients had pseudocysts, 2 had cystic tumors, and 2 had diseases of undetermined pathology. Pancreatic pseudocysts were treated by pseudocystogastrostomy in 2 cases and percutaneous drainage in 3 cases. One case recurred after percutaneous drainage and required pseudocystogastrostomy. The true pancreatic cysts were serous cystadenoma, which was treated by distal pancreatectomy, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, which was initially treated by drainage, like a pseudocyst, and then by distal pancreatectomy when its true nature was revealed. We conclude that every effort should be exerted to distinguish between pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic tumors of the pancreas to avoid the serious misjudgement of draining rather than extirpating a pancreatic cystic tumor. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst is a useful adjunct that may substitute for surgical drainage. PMID:23958054

  14. Management of mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Testini, Mario; Gurrado, Angela; Lissidini, Germana; Venezia, Pietro; Greco, Luigi; Piccinni, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumour”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst”, and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. In total, 16 322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analysed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis, and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs. PMID:21128317

  15. Elucidation of cell secretion: pancreas led the way.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Constantin

    2004-01-01

    Secretion is a basic process in all cells and is required for several important functions such as neurotransmission, the secretion of digestive juices from the exocrine pancreas and the release of hormones from endocrine and neuroendocrine cells. Due to these important functions, the mechanism of cell secretion has been intensely investigated for over half a century. However, it is only in the last decade, with the discovery of a new cellular structure, the 'porosome' or 'fusion pore', and the elucidation of SNARE-induced membrane fusion, that has finally provided us with an understanding of cell secretion at the molecular level. The 'porosome', a supramolecular structure at the cell plasma membrane, was first discovered in the exocrine pancreas, and subsequently in endocrine/neuroendocrine cells and in neurons. The structure and dynamics of the 'porosome' in live cells at nanometer resolution and in real-time, its composition and functional reconstitution in lipid membrane, have all been determined. These findings have fundamentally changed our understanding of cell secretion and provide a clear understanding of this highly regulated process in cells.

  16. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2013: Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hovorka, R.

    2015-01-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade. PMID:25819473

  17. Polyomavirus associated nephropathy after kidney and pancreas transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Gracin, Sonja; Vojtusek, Ivana Kovacević; Vidas, Zeljko; Knotek, Mladen; Skelin, Ika Kardum; Ljubanović, Danica

    2010-06-01

    Polyomavirus virus associated nephropathy (PVAN) is an important cause of graft failure in the renal transplant population. The prevalence of PVAN has increased from 1% to 10% in the past decade, leading to loss of transplanted organ in 30% to 80% of cases. In the absence of specific antiviral drugs, early detection of disease and modification/reduction of immunosuppressive regimen is currently the cornerstone of therapy. In the setting of multiorgan transplantation, like simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPKT), diagnosis and therapy of PVAN can be even more challenging problem. We report a first described case of PVAN in patient after SPKT in Croatia. Patient is a 32 years old Caucasian male with type 1 diabetes mellitus and end stage renal failure, diagnosed for PVAN 6 month after SPKT. Patient was treated with reduced immunosuppressive regimen. At 32 month follow up, patient has preserved kidney and pancreas function with estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) rate of 91 mL/min and no signs of PVAN on his 2 year protocol kidney biopsy.

  18. Role of Connexins and Pannexins in the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Cigliola, Valentina; Allagnat, Florent; Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Lamprianou, Smaragda; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    The pancreas produces enzymes with a digestive function and hormones with a metabolic function, which are produced by distinct cell types of acini and islets, respectively. Within these units, secretory cells coordinate their functioning by exchanging information via signals that flow in the intercellular spaces and are generated either at distance (several neural and hormonal inputs) or nearby the pancreatic cells themselves (inputs mediated by membrane ionic-specific channels and by ionic- and metabolite-permeant pannexin channels and connexin "hemichannels"). Pancreatic secretory cells further interact via the extracellular matrix of the pancreas (inputs mediated by integrins) and directly with neighboring cells, by mechanisms that do not require extracellular mediators (inputs mediated by gap and tight junction channels). Here, we review the expression and function of the connexins and pannexins that are expressed by the main secretory cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Available data show that the patterns of expression of these proteins differ in acini and islets, supporting distinct functions in the physiological secretion of pancreatic enzymes and hormones. Circumstantial evidence further suggests that alterations in the signaling provided by these proteins are involved in pancreatic diseases.

  19. Purification of monolayer cell cultures of the endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Braaten, J T; Järlfors, U; Smith, D S; Mintz, D H

    1975-01-01

    Experimental use of primary cultures of endocrine pancreas is constrained by early, vigorous proliferation of fibroblastoid cells. The addition of heavy metals, sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, phenyl mercuric acetate, phenyl mercuric nitrate and sodium aurothiomalate to the culture media selectively destroys these fibroblastoid cells yielding highly enriched, morphologically intact, functionally competent endocrine cells that are capable of cell replication. This action of heavy metals appears to be due to reversible inhibition of sulfhydryl enzymes since glutathione and thioglycolate were demonstrated to completely inhibit the cytotoxic effects of the mercury and gold containing agents, respectively. Certain variables in the application of the mercurial agents to pancreatic endocrine cell cultures were defined, most notably the enhanced sensitivity of fetal vs. neonatal tissue, and in inverse relationship of cell density to effective toxicity. After removal of the heavy metal agent from the culture media, many pancreatic islets send out cytoplasmic projections, containing large numbers of oriented microtubules which serve as bridging units to adjacent endocrine cells. The sustained availability of virtually pure pancreatic endocrine cell cultures, which results from the application of mercury to the culture media will undoubtedly permit many aspects of the cell biology of the endocrine pancreas to be directly and sequentially assailed. PMID:1239830

  20. Tracking the Clonal Evolution of Adenosquamous Carcinoma, a Rare Variant of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Suguru; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Ogata, Munehiko; Oikawa, Kensuke; Tamakawa, Susumu; Chiba, Shin-Ichi; Muraki, Miho; Yokochi, Tomoki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo; Mizukami, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is an uncommon variant of pancreatic neoplasm. We sought to trace the mode of tumor progression using specimens of ASC associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. A resected specimen of the primary pancreatic ASC, developed in a 72-year-old man, was subjected to mutation profiling using amplicon-targeted sequencing and digital polymerase chain reaction. DNA was isolated from each histological compartment including noninvasive IPMN, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and adenocarcinoma (AC). Histologically, an IPMN with a large mural nodule was identified. The invasive tumor predominantly consisted of SCC, and a smaller AC was found around the lesion. Squamous metaplasias were sporadically distributed within benign IPMNs. Mutation alleles KRAS and GNAS were identified in all specimens of IPMN including the areas of squamous metaplasia. In addition, these mutations were found in SCC and AC. Clear transition from flat/low-papillary IPMN to SCC indicated a potent invasion front, and the SCC compartment was genetically unique, because the area has a higher frequency of mutation KRAS. The invasive tumors with distinct histological appearances shared the form of noninvasive IPMN as a common precursor, rather than de novo cancer, suggesting the significance of a genetic profiling scheme of tumors associated with IPMN. PMID:27295533

  1. Utility of the 2006 Sendai and 2012 Fukuoka guidelines for the management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chih-Yang; Yang, Ching-Yao; Wu, Jin-Ming; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Tien, Yu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the utility of the 2006 Sendai and 2012 Fukuoka guidelines for differentiating malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas from benign IPMN. Between January 2000 and March 2015, a total of 138 patients underwent surgery and had a pathologically confirmed pancreatic IPMN. Clinicopathological parameters were reviewed, and all patients were classified according to both the 2006 Sendai and 2012 Fukuoka guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used for identifying significant factors associated with malignancy in IPMN. There were 9 high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and 37 invasive cancers (ICs) in the 138 patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the Sendai and Fukuoka guidelines for HGD/IC was 35.1%, 43.3%, 100%, and 85.4%, respectively. Of the 36 patients with worrisome features using the Fukuoka guideline, 7 patients had HGD/IC in their IPMNs. According to the multivariate analysis, jaundice, tumors of ≥3 cm, presence of mural nodule on imaging, and aged <65 years were associated with HGD/IC in patients with IPMN. The Sendai guideline had a better NPV, but the Fukuoka guideline had a better PPV. We suggest that patients with worrisome features based on the Fukuoka guideline be aggressively managed. PMID:27661043

  2. [Diagnosis of presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Laculle-Massin, C; Collinet, P; Faye, N

    2013-12-01

    Symptoms of presumed benign ovarian tumors (PBOT) are not specific (LE4). Personal or family history of gynecological cancers can guide the diagnostic strategy. Clinical examination is ineffective for positive, topographic and etiologic diagnosis of PBOT (LE4). Signs of hormonal impregnation may refer to certain types of tumors (LE4). For any patient presenting with a pelvic mass, pelvic ultrasound is in the first-line exam (grade A); it can classify most ovarian tumors. In case of pure liquid unilocular mass smaller than 7 cm, ultrasound is sufficient to characterize the mass (grade A). In case of indeterminate or complex ovarian mass on ultrasound, MRI is useful to characterize the mass (LE2). Beyond 7 cm, the diagnostic performance of ultrasound decreases (LE2). When a non-unilocular liquid ovarian formation is characterized using ultrasound as determinate mass, ultrasound scan is the only exam recommended (grade B). MRI is indicated as a second-line scan for indeterminate masses or greater than 7 cm (grade B). Cyst puncture for diagnostic purposes has no place in the diagnostic strategy of ovarian cysts (grade C). In case of PBOT in pre-pubertal period, dosing biomarkers is useful but should not delay care. In adult women with PBOT, the measurement of CA125 is not recommended for first-line diagnosis (grade C). Current literature data are not sufficient to specify the diagnostic strategy for an ovarian tumor discovered incidentally during laparoscopy. In case of discovery of a high CA125 value, pelvic ultrasound is the first-line examination. The literature data are still limited to define a CA125 threshold value requiring further exploration or special monitoring, in case of normal pelvic ultrasound.

  3. Current Laser Treatments for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hwancheol; Song, Sang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The latest technical improvements in the surgical armamentarium are remarkable. In particular, advancements in the urologic field are so exceptional that we could observe the flare-up of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and laser prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) and holmium laser prostatectomy are the most generalized options for laser surgery of BPH, and both modalities have shown good postoperative results. In comparison to transurethral prostatectomy (TURP), they showed similar efficacy and a much lower complication rate in randomized prospective clinical trials. Even in cases of large prostates, laser prostatectomy showed comparable efficacy and safety profiles compared to open prostatectomy. From a technical point of view, PVP is considered to be an easier technique for the urologist to master. Furthermore, patients can be safely followed up in an outpatient clinic. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) mimics open prostatectomy because the adenomatous tissue is peeled off the surgical capsule in both procedures. Therefore, HoLEP shows notable volume reduction of the prostate similar to open prostatectomy with fewer blood transfusions, shorter hospital stay, and cost reduction regardless of prostate size. Outcomes of laser prostatectomy for BPH are encouraging but sometimes are unbalanced because safety and feasibility studies were reported mainly for PVP, whereas long-term data are mostly available for HoLEP. We need longer-term randomized clinical data to identify the reoperation rate of PVP and to determine which procedure is the ideal alternative to TURP and open prostatectomy for each patient. PMID:21165192

  4. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: prostatectomy and alternatives].

    PubMed

    Sulser, T

    1995-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease of men and will lead in most cases to micturition difficulties. Up to now 2 or 4 of 10 men in their sixties are operated for BPH. As standard treatment we know the transurethral resection of the prostate and in some cases of very big adenomas the open adenomectomy carried out in a suprapubic or retropubic way. However, in view of a rare, but as a result of these treatments appearing morbidity we have to ask ourselves whether the surgical resection of the obstructive prostatic tissue remains the only way of treatment. For several years now apart from drug therapy there have also been applied less invasive alternatives. Whether these alternatives of little side effect and further complications are equally effective for the treatment of the obstructive BPH is to verify. This paper provides a general view of the possibilities of the surgical interventions as well as of their alternatives. Because of a lack of dates as to the efficiency of particular procedures a final judgement is outstanding in most cases. Where possible we hear of particular alternatives, though fully promoted, being nothing but a passing tendency. This is certainly true of the hyperthermy, the balloon dilatation and the urethral implants. These by now various conspicuous necrotising procedures (transurethral microwave thermotherapy, laser-ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound, transurethral needle-ablation) are by now in prospective random studies still subject to extensive clinical tests. The question whether one of these alternatives will one day be apt to exceed the TURP as "golden standard" of BPH-treatment, that remains as far as now the question to be put. The advantages of the necrotising procedures, at present highly recommended, consist in the first place of a rare intra- and postoperative morbidity with a simultaneous lack of mortality. These procedures can be performed as a outpatient or as a short stationary treatment and sometime

  5. Pancreas and Diabetes Mellitus: The Relationship between the Organ and the Disease.

    PubMed

    Menon, Saumya; Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been a fascinating disease from the dawn of medical history. The first breakthrough in its treatment came in 1922, with the discovery of insulin which was extracted from the pancreas of a dog. Even earlier, a relationship between pancreas and diabetes mellitus had been suspected by medical scientists. However, the study of diabetes mellitus is much more than its relationship with the pancreas. On the other hand the pancreas has been known to be a very reclusive organ that is hidden away from physicians and surgeons for centuries. In recent times, it has become more accessible and has yielded some of its secrets. The relationship between the pancreas and diabetes mellitus is a story full of complexities and surprises. This article attempts to reveal some of the important events and persons in the story and the controversies surrounding them. PMID:27608692

  6. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-01

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer.

  7. Analyses of pancreas development by generation of gfp transgenic zebrafish using an exocrine pancreas-specific elastaseA gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Haiyan; Korzh, Svitlana; Li Zhen; Mudumana, Sudha Puttur; Korzh, Vladimir; Jiang Yunjin; Lin Shuo; Gong Zhiyuan . E-mail: dbsgzy@nus.edu.sg

    2006-05-15

    In contrast to what we know on development of endocrine pancreas, the formation of exocrine pancreas remains poorly understood. To create an animal model that allows observation of exocrine cell differentiation, proliferation, and morphogenesis in living animals, we used the zebrafish elastaseA (elaA) regulatory sequence to develop transgenic zebrafish that display highly specific exocrine pancreas expression of GFP in both larvae and adult. By following GFP expression, we found that the pancreas in early development was a relatively compact organ and later extended posterior along the intestine. By transferring the elaA:gfp transgene into slow muscle omitted mutant that is deficient in receiving Hedgehog signals, we further showed that Hedgehog signaling is required for exocrine morphogenesis but not for cell differentiation. We also applied the morpholino knockdown and toxin-mediated cell ablation approaches to this transgenic line. We showed that the development of exocrine pancreas is Islet-1 dependent. Injection of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) construct under the elastaseA promoter resulted in selective ablation of exocrine cells while the endocrine cells and other endodermal derivatives (liver and intestine) were not affected. Thus, our works demonstrated the new transgenic line provided a useful experimental tool in analyzing exocrine pancreas development.

  8. False aneuploidy in benign tumors with a high lymphocyte content: a study of Warthin's tumor and benign thymoma.

    PubMed

    Bañez, E I; Krishnan, B; Ansari, M Q; Carraway, N P; McBride, R A

    1992-11-01

    The quality of results of flow cytometric DNA content analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may be affected by a number of preanalytical variables. We performed flow cytometric DNA content analysis on two types of benign tumors to investigate the effect of a prominent lymphocytic component: Warthin's tumor (N = 20) and benign thymoma (N = 8). Malignant tumors (N = 23) were included as DNA aneuploid controls. All tissues studied were archival material processed using Hedley's technique either without prolonged rehydration in water (day 0 samples) or with 24- or 48-hour rehydration (day 1 and day 2 samples, respectively). Image cytometric DNA ploidy analysis was also performed on most cases. Eight cases (40%) of Warthin's tumor and five cases (63%) of benign thymoma showed either hyperdiploid peaks or marked asymmetry on the day 0 DNA histograms; nine of the malignant tumors were aneuploid. The DNA histogram abnormalities of the benign tumors could be gated out by excluding the lymphocyte nuclei. None of the DNA indices of the benign tumors corresponded with expected deviations based on published chromosomal studies. All of the DNA histogram abnormalities of the benign tumors disappeared and/or fused with the main peaks on the day 1 or day 2 samples, except for one case of benign thymoma. All the DNA aneuploid peaks on the malignant tumors persisted with prolonged rehydration. Image cytometric DNA analysis showed a diploid pattern in all benign tumors. We conclude that a high lymphocyte content may be a cause of false aneuploidy in these benign tumors. Furthermore, the degree of rehydration appears to be an important factor in achieving optimum fluorochrome staining of DNA.

  9. Treatment Challenges with Benign Bone Tumors of the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Helen; Yin, Vivian T.; Pfeiffer, Margaret L.; Wang, Wei-Lien; Sniegowski, Matthew C.; Esmaeli, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Benign mesenchymal tumors of the craniofacial complex present unique challenges for orbital surgeons because of their potential for orbital compartment syndrome, ocular morbidity, and facial disfigurement and because definitive surgical management may be associated with significant morbidity. While the precise classification of such lesions depends on radiologic as well as histologic evaluations and remains controversial, benign tumors involving the bony walls of the orbit share features of bony expansion, facial deformity, and the potential to cause significant orbital and ophthalmic morbidity. We herein present 2 cases of benign mesenchymal tumors with bony involvement in the orbitofacial region (1 juvenile ossifying fibroma and 1 central giant cell granuloma) and review the current management of similar benign fibro-osseous and reactive bone lesions of the orbit. These rare entities presented share common orbital and ophthalmic manifestations and remain without any effective definitive treatment options. PMID:27171013

  10. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  11. Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma: A Rare Tumour of the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Soundappan; Khajanchi, Monty; Vaja, Tejas; Jajoo, Bhushan; Dey, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma: a rare tumor of the abdomen, is a diagnostic dilemma. This report emphasizes the importance of diagnostic laparoscopy in the diagnosis of the tumour. PMID:25866695

  12. Atypical periorbital xanthogranulomas associated with systemic benign lymphoepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, J H; Bartley, G B

    1994-12-01

    The report reviews the clinical, laboratory, and pathologic features of a 47-year-old woman with systemic benign lymphoepithelial lesions in whom atypical periorbital xanthogranulomas with rare central necrosis subsequently developed.

  13. Benign metastatic mixed tumours or unrecognized salivary carcinomas?

    PubMed

    el-Naggar, A; Batsakis, J G; Kessler, S

    1988-09-01

    'Benign metastasizing mixed tumours' are enigmatic lesions of the parotid gland. The authors, through the illustrations of a case and review of the literature, conclude that the tumours are unrecognized and currently unclassified malignancies.

  14. Clinical study of benign lesions in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuichi; Takahashi, Hiroomi; Inagi, Katsuhide; Nakayama, Meijin; Okamoto, Makito

    2002-01-01

    This retrospective study was designed to investigate the detailed clinical features of benign oral diseases. A total of 792 patients with benign oral lesions were treated at Kitasato University Hospital over a 27-year period. Benign oral lesions were classified into nine groups as follows: epithelial proliferating lesions (n = 234); fibroma-like lesions (n = 150); cysts and cyst-like lesions of the minor salivary glands (n = 140); ranulas (n = 64); angiomas (n = 62); inflammation/ulcer/granulation lesions (n = 56); pyogenic granulomas (n = 44); pleomorphic adenomas (n = 23); and others (n = 19). The characteristics of all these benign oral lesions are summarized. We believe that these characteristics will be helpful for physicians in their daily clinical examinations.

  15. Benign myoepithelioma of the breast: origin and development.

    PubMed

    Hikino, Hajime; Nagaoka, Saburo; Miura, Hiroshi; Kurosumi, Masafumi

    2009-06-01

    A case of benign myoepithelioma of the breast in a 55-year-old woman is described. The tumor was a well-circumscribed solid mass, measuring 13 x 12 mm. Histopathology indicated that the tumor was composed of entirely myoepithelial cells, which was confirmed by immunoreactivity to calponin and S-100. There was no ductal differentiation in the tumor, and staining for pan-cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen was weak and negative, respectively. Although the biological behavior of the tumor remains to be ascertained, the tumor was considered to be myoepithelioma with benign features due to mild nuclear pleomorphism, sparse mitotic figures, low Ki-67 labeling index and low S-phase fraction. Diagnostic confusion between benign myoepithelioma and other myoepithelial-rich cell tumors is possible. Considering the classification of myoepithelial tumor in the salivary glands, benign myoepithelioma of the breast may possess a different development process from adenomyoepithelioma.

  16. Benign mixed tumors (pleomorphic adenomas) of the breast.

    PubMed

    Moran, C A; Suster, S; Carter, D

    1990-10-01

    Six cases of benign mixed tumors of the female breast are described. The tumors were found in three settings: (a) as a de-novo lesion arising from breast parenchyma, (b) as single or multiple nodules arising in a background of benign proliferative epithelial elements, and (c) in association with breast carcinoma. The tumors ranged from 1 to 4 cm in diameter, and were histologically characterized by the admixture in various proportions of benign glandular epithelial and myoepithelial elements and cartilaginous or myxoid components. Immunohistochemical staining supported this interpretation. One of the cases was remarkable for the presence of abundant tyrosine-like crystals, a feature described in benign mixed tumors of salivary glands. None of the tumors has recurred during a follow-up period of 1-7 years. Mixed tumors of the breast are considered to be similar to their dermal and salivary gland counterparts.

  17. Benign fibrous xanthoma of the parotid gland: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, R; Lind, O

    1978-11-01

    A fibrous xanthoma of the parotid gland is reported, the literature is reviewed with a discussion of the classification of such tumours. The present case is possibly the first report of a typical benign fibrous xanthoma of the parotid gland.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign soft tissue neoplasms in adults.

    PubMed

    Walker, Eric A; Fenton, Michael E; Salesky, Joel S; Murphey, Mark D

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews a spectrum of benign soft tissue tumors found in adults. Rather than presenting a complete review, the focus of this article is on benign tumors for which the diagnosis may be confidently made or strongly suggested on the basis of imaging. Diagnoses presented include nodular fasciitis, superficial and deep fibromatosis, elastofibroma, lipomatous lesions, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, Morton neuroma, hemangioma, and myxoma.

  19. Diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls in benign vocal fold diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bohlender, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    More than half of patients presenting with hoarseness show benign vocal fold changes. The clinician should be familiar with the anatomy, physiology and functional aspects of voice disorders and also the modern diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities in order to ensure an optimal and patient specific management. This review article focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic limitations and difficulties of treatment of benign vocal fold tumors, the management and prevention of scarred vocal folds and the issue of unilateral vocal fold paresis. PMID:24403969

  20. Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases: volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Volume 1 of ''Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases'' comprises chapters devoted to: general remarks and considerations, radiopharmaceuticals, Paget disease, osteomyelitis, trauma, benign bone tumors, chronic renal dialysis, acute renal failure, osteomalacia and rickets, and osteoporosis. Although published in 1981, the most recent references in the book were 1978 and most are 1977 or earlier. One of the strongest aspects of the volume are tables which categorize diseases, pathophysiology of disease, and image abnormalities. (JMT)

  1. Laparoscopic removal of a benign pelvic retroperitoneal dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, L A; Van Oppen, D J

    1995-02-01

    Retroperitoneal tumors are rare, often malignant, and difficult to diagnose. Surgical removal is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We believe this to be the first report of laparoscopic removal of a benign pelvic retroperitoneal dermoid cyst from the right pararectal and presacral areas. Iatrogenic enterocele was prevented by laparoscopic suturing and knot tying to perform a modified McCall culdoplasty. The excellent outcome of this case suggests that laparoscopic management should be considered for carefully selected benign retroperitoneal tumors.

  2. Synchronous benign and malignant tumors in the ipsilateral parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Chan Il

    2007-01-01

    Synchronous benign and malignant tumors in the ipsilateral salivary glands are extremely rare. We report a unique case of synchronous unilateral parotid tumors in a 71-year-old man. The main parotid lesion was preoperatively suggested to be adenocarcinoma by fine needle aspiration cytology. A coexisting Warthin's tumor was also diagnosed on microscopic examination of total parotidectomy specimens. We describe this case of rare synchronous salivary gland tumors exhibiting both benign and malignant components with a review of the literature.

  3. Treatment of oral soft tissues benign tumors using laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, Bogdan; Baciut, Mihaela; Crisan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Dinu, Cristian; Moldovan, Iuliu; Baciut, Grigore

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the efficacy and indications of surgical laser therapy in the treatment of oral soft tissues benign tumors compared to classic surgery. A controlled clinical study was conducted in a group of 93 patients presenting various forms of oral soft tissues benign tumors. These patients were examined pre-and postoperatively and the oral benign tumors were measured linearly and photographed. The surgery of laser-assisted biopsy excision of oral benign tumors was carried out using a diode laser device of 980 nm. In patients who received surgical laser treatment, therapeutic doses of laser to biostimulate the operated area were administered on the first day after the surgery. The interventions of conventional excision of oral soft tissues benign tumors consisted in removing them using scalpel. In patients who have received therapeutic doses of laser for biostimulation of the operated area, a faster healing of wound surfaces and tumor bed was observed during the first days after surgery. Two weeks after the surgical treatment, good healing without scarring or discomfort in the area of excision was documented. Surgical treatment of oral soft tissues benign tumors with laser assisted postoperative therapy confirms the benefits of this surgical procedure. A faster healing process of the excision area due to laser biostimulation of low intensity has been observed in patients with surgical laser assisted treatment in the postoperative period.

  4. Benign skin disease with pustules in the newborn*

    PubMed Central

    Reginatto, Flávia Pereira; Villa, Damie De; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal period comprises the first four weeks of life. It is a period of adaptation where the skin often presents several changes: transient lesions, resulting from a physiological response, others as a consequence of transient diseases and some as markers of severe disorders. The presence of pustules in the skin of the newborn is always a reason for the family and for the assisting doctor to be worried, since the newborn is especially vulnerable to bacterial, viral or fungal infection. However, the majority of neonatal skin pustules is not infectious, comprising the benign neonatal pustulosis. Benign neonatal pustuloses are a group of clinical disease characterized by pustular eruptions in which a contagious agent is not responsible for its etiology. The most common ones are erythema toxicum neonatorum, the transient neonatal pustular melanosis and the benign cephalic pustulosis. These dermatoses are usually benign, asymptomatic and self-limited. It is important that the dermatologist and the neonatologist can identify benign and transient lesions, those caused by genodermatoses, and especially differentiate between neonates with systemic involvement from those with benign skin lesions, avoiding unnecessary diagnostic tests and worries. PMID:27192509

  5. Inverted papillomas and benign nonneoplastic lesions of the nasal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Casiano, Roy R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Benign lesions of the nasal cavity represent a diverse group of pathologies. Furthermore, each of these disorders may present differently in any given patient as pain and discomfort, epistaxis, headaches, vision changes, or nasal obstruction. Although these nasal masses are benign, many of them have a significant capacity for local tissue destruction and symptomatology secondary to this destruction. Advances in office-based endoscopic nasendoscopy have equipped the otolaryngologist with a safe, inexpensive, and rapid means of directly visualizing lesions within the nasal cavity and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Methods: The purpose of this study is to review the diagnosis, management, and controversies of many of the most common benign lesions of the nasal cavity encountered by the primary care physician or otolaryngologist. Results: This includes discussion of inverted papilloma (IP), juvenile angiofibroma, squamous papilloma, pyogenic granuloma, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, schwannoma, benign fibro-osseous lesions, and other benign lesions of the nasal cavity, with particular emphasis on IP and juvenile angiofibroma. Conclusion: A diverse array of benign lesions occur within the nasal cavity and paranasal cavities. Despite their inability to metastasize, many of these lesions have significant capability for local tissue destruction and recurrence. PMID:22487294

  6. SU-E-J-65: Motion Difference Between the Pancreas and Nearby Veins for Pancreas Motion Monitoring Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Erickson, B; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As it is generally difficult to outline the pancreas on an ultrasound b-mode image, visualized structures such as the portal or the splenic veins are assumed to have the same motion as the pancreas. These structures can be used as a surrogate for monitoring pancreas motion during radiation therapy (RT) delivery using ultrasound. To verify this assumption, we studied the motion difference between the head of the pancreas, the portal vein, the tail of the pancreas, and splenic vein. Methods: 4DCT data acquired during RT simulation were analyzed for a total of 5 randomly selected patients with pancreatic cancer. The data was sorted into 10 respiratory phases from 0% to 90% (0%: end of the inspiration, 50%: end of expiration) . The head of the pancreas (HP), tail of the pancreas (TP), portal vein (PV), and splenic vein (SV) were contoured on all 10 phases. The volume change and motion were measured in the left-right (LR), anterior-superior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The volume change for all patients/phases were: 1.2 ± 3% for HP, 0.78 ± 1.6% for PV, 2.5 ± 2.9% for TP, and 0.53 ± 2.1% for SV. Motion for each structure was estimated from the centroid displacements due to the uniformity of the structures and the small volume change. The measured motion between HP and PV was: LR: 0.1 ± 0.17 mm, AP: 0.04 ± 0.1 mm, SI: 0.17 ± 0.16 mm and between TP and the PV was: LR: 0.05 ± 0.3 mm, AP: 0.1 ± 0.4 mm, SI: 0.01 ± 0.022 mm. Conclusion: There are small motion differences between the portal vein and the head of the pancreas, and the splenic vein and the tail of the pancreas. This suggests the feasibility of utilizing these features for monitoring the pancreas motion during radiation therapy.

  7. Smoking habits and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Gu, Meng; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have warned against the promoting effects of cigarette smoking on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In contrast, some have argued that smoking confers a protective effect regarding BPH, while others have observed an aggravated effect. Thus, we performed this meta-analysis to determine whether cigarette use is associated with BPH risk. To identify articles from observational studies of relevance, a search was performed concurrent to March 21, 2016, on PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, and EMBASE databases. Random-effect model, according to the heterogeneity, was calculated to reveal the relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eight articles were included in this meta-analysis, representing data for 44,100 subjects, of which 5221 (11.8%) had BPH as defined according to the criteria. Seven reports are concerned with analysis between nonsmokers and ex-smokers, in which no significant difference was observed (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.94–1.05). Another meta-analysis of 7 studies indicated an observable trend, but without significant difference between groups of nonsmokers and current smokers (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.98–1.41). Between groups of heavy (6 articles; RR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.84–1.24) and light smokers (5 articles; RR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.71–1.15), again no significant difference appears. Finally, we combined individuals as never-smokers and ever-smokers and still found no significant difference between the 2 groups of patients (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.92–1.15). Sensitivity analysis was displayed and confirmed the stability of the present results. Combined evidence from observational studies shows no significant association between cigarette smoking and BPH risk, either for ex-smokers or for current smokers. The trend of elevated BPH risk from smoking was observed only in current smokers compared with nonsmokers, while marginal significance was observed in comparing ever-smokers with

  8. Abnormalities of the Exocrine Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Battaglia, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is considered a pancreatic beta cell-specific disease that results in absolute insulin deficiency. Nevertheless, clinical studies from 1940 onwards showed that patients with T1D had an abnormal exocrine pancreas due to the presence of subclinical exocrine insufficiency and acinar atrophy. Exocrine abnormalities are an important, and mostly neglected, characteristic associated with T1D. It is however still unclear whether the exocrine dysfunction in T1D is a primary damage caused by the same pathogenic event that led to beta cell destruction or secondary to beta cell loss. In this review, we collect evidence supporting the hypothesis that T1D is a combined endocrine-exocrine disease in which the loss of functional beta cell mass is most clinically apparent. PMID:26318606

  9. Glucagon in the artificial pancreas: supply and marketing challenges.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  10. Hydro-proteolytic activity in rat's pancreas after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Koćmierska-Grodzka, D; Radwan, J

    1975-07-01

    Investigations were carried out on the problem of hydrolytic ability of rat's pancreas 24 h after whole body irradiation with the single dose of 800 R and after fractionated irradiation (5 x 150 R). Besides kallikrein, enzymes of intracellular digestion (B-glucuronidase, acid phosphatase, cathepsin) and enzymes of intraluminal digestion (amylase, lipase) were chosed for examination. It was stated, that single irradiation evokes rather moderate changes in the activity of examined enzymes causing increase of catheptic and lipolytic activity and decrease in amylase activity accompanied by sharp increase of kallikrein activity in the tissue. Mechanical obstruction of biliopancreatic duct renders trend to decrease of enzymatic activity in almost all enzymes of irradiated group. After fractionated irradiation the general increase of hydroproteolytic activity (with one exception of pancreatic amylase) was stated. PMID:241136

  11. The Human Endocrine Pancreas: New Insights on Replacement and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Klein, Dagmar; Álvarez-Cubela, Silvia; Pastori, Ricardo L

    2016-03-01

    Islet transplantation is an effective cell therapy for type 1 diabetes (T1D) but its clinical application is limited due to shortage of donors. After a decade-long period of exploration of potential alternative cell sources, the field has only recently zeroed in on two of them as the most likely to replace islets. These are pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) (through directed differentiation) and pancreatic non-endocrine cells (through directed differentiation or reprogramming). Here we review progress in both areas, including the initiation of Phase I/II clinical trials using human embryonic stem cell (hESc)-derived progenitors, advances in hESc differentiation in vitro, novel insights on the developmental plasticity of the pancreas, and groundbreaking new approaches to induce β cell conversion from the non-endocrine compartment without genetic manipulation. PMID:26774512

  12. Glucagon in the artificial pancreas: supply and marketing challenges.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market.

  13. Facultative stem cells in liver and pancreas: fact and fancy.

    PubMed

    Yanger, Kilangsungla; Stanger, Ben Z

    2011-03-01

    Tissue turnover is a regular feature of higher eukaryotes, either as part of normal wear and tear (homeostasis) or in response to injury (regeneration). Cell replacement is achieved either through replication of existing cells or differentiation from a self-renewing pool of stem cells. The major distinction regards cellular potential, because stem cells by definition have a capacity to differentiate, while replication implies that cells adopt a single fate under physiologic conditions. A hybrid model, the facultative stem cell (FSC) model, posits that tissues contain cells that normally exhibit unipotency but have the capacity to function as stem cells upon injury. The FSC paradigm is well established in urodele amphibians, but the nature and role of FSCs in mammals is less defined. Here, we review the evidence for FSCs in two mammalian organs, the liver and the pancreas, and discuss alternative models that could account for regeneration in these organs.

  14. The mediators of bile action on the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Lehnert, P

    1993-05-01

    Under basal conditions, bile and bile salts applied intraduodenally influence plasma levels of several gastroenteropancreatic peptides. Besides those with stimulatory effects on exocrine pancreatic secretion, others with inhibitory or no effects are released as well. Furthermore, cholinergic and peptidergic neural mechanisms may also be activated. Secretin seems to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced water and bicarbonate secretion. In addition, VIP released from peptidergic nerve endings in the pancreas may also be involved in the mediation of the hydrokinetic effect. With regard to water and bicarbonate secretion, cholinergic mechanisms probably are of minor importance. Cholinergic mechanisms, however, seem to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion. CCK may act as an additional mediator of the ecbolic effect. This statement, however, is based on few results only and has to be confirmed by further studies. Gastroenteropancreatic peptides with an inhibitory action on the exocrine pancreas were also released by intraduodenal bile or bile salts. Somatostatin is released in physiologically relevant amounts to bring about a counter-regulation. Plasma PP levels are also enhanced by bile and bile salts. The amounts of PP released, however, are below those observed postprandially. In contrast to their stimulatory action on basal pancreatic secretion, bile and bile salts have no or even an inhibitory effect on pancreatic secretion stimulated by intraluminal nutrients. Accordingly, the release of gastroenteropancreatic peptides is not influenced (for example, secretin) or even reduced (for example, CCK) when bile or bile salts are added to intraluminal nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Properties of immunoreactive glucagon fractions of canine stomach and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; McCorkle, K; Unger, R H

    1977-03-25

    The present study was designed to identify the physicochemical, immunologic, and biologic properties of the immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) moieties of canine gastric fundus and to compare them with those of the canine pancreas. Acid-alcohol extracts of the gastric fundus and pancreas of dogs were subjected to Bio-Gel P-10 chromatography, The elution profiles of extracts of both organs revealed IRG peaks in the Mr = 2,000 3,500, and 9,000 zones; in the gastric extracts, a void volume peak was also present. On the basis of Sephadex G-150 rechromatography and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation the latter IRG was estimated to have a Mr = 65,000. Incubation of fundic IRG65,000 in 8 M urea failed to alter its elution position. Its pI was 6.4, while fundic IRG3,500 had a pI of 6.15 and pancreatic glucagon 6.25. Fundic IRG9,000 had a pI of 4.5 and pancreatic IRG9,000 4.65. Dilution curves of these three fundic and two pancreatic IRGs were parallel to crystalline beef-pork glucagon. The glycogenolytic activity of fundic IRG3,500 and IRG65,000, measured in the isolated rat liver system, was not different from that of immunoequivalent amounts of dog pancreatic glucagon or crystalline beef-pork glucagon. Both fundic and pancreatic IRG9,000 were devoid of glycogenolytic activity and lacker adenylate cyclase stimulating activity and 125I-glucagon displacing activity when tested on partially purified rat liver membranes. Fundic IRG65,000, however, stimulated adenylate cyclase and displaced 125I-glucagon to the same degree as immunoequivalent amounts of pancreatic glucagon. Fundic IRG3,500 was more active than pancreatic glucagon in stimulating adenylate cyclase activity. This was not clearly attributable to differences in binding to liver cell membranes.

  16. The mediators of bile action on the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Lehnert, P

    1993-05-01

    Under basal conditions, bile and bile salts applied intraduodenally influence plasma levels of several gastroenteropancreatic peptides. Besides those with stimulatory effects on exocrine pancreatic secretion, others with inhibitory or no effects are released as well. Furthermore, cholinergic and peptidergic neural mechanisms may also be activated. Secretin seems to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced water and bicarbonate secretion. In addition, VIP released from peptidergic nerve endings in the pancreas may also be involved in the mediation of the hydrokinetic effect. With regard to water and bicarbonate secretion, cholinergic mechanisms probably are of minor importance. Cholinergic mechanisms, however, seem to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion. CCK may act as an additional mediator of the ecbolic effect. This statement, however, is based on few results only and has to be confirmed by further studies. Gastroenteropancreatic peptides with an inhibitory action on the exocrine pancreas were also released by intraduodenal bile or bile salts. Somatostatin is released in physiologically relevant amounts to bring about a counter-regulation. Plasma PP levels are also enhanced by bile and bile salts. The amounts of PP released, however, are below those observed postprandially. In contrast to their stimulatory action on basal pancreatic secretion, bile and bile salts have no or even an inhibitory effect on pancreatic secretion stimulated by intraluminal nutrients. Accordingly, the release of gastroenteropancreatic peptides is not influenced (for example, secretin) or even reduced (for example, CCK) when bile or bile salts are added to intraluminal nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8099758

  17. Further development of artificial pancreas: blocked by patents?

    PubMed

    Erdin, Nils; Robin, Franck; Heinemann, Lutz; Brandt, Derek; Hovorka, Roman

    2008-11-01

    Patent activity in the field of medical device technology and especially in the area of artificial pancreas development has surged in recent years. According to the search presented in this article, the number of granted U.S. patents in the area of closed-loop glucose control (CLGC) increased from 24 filed in 1991 to 247 filed in 2001. A company active in the area of diabetes technology development will likely need to understand a patent landscape consisting of hundreds of patents. Currently, both in the United States and in Europe, patentability requirements seem to be raised in order to ensure patent quality. However, the current patent landscape reflects the work of the patent offices in the past, as already granted patents are not affected by changes made to the patent grant procedure today.Regarding the increasing amount of patents and considering the complexity of CLGC systems, the attempt to develop a CLGC system will become more and more venturesome regarding the risk of infringement of already existing patents. The consequence of this situation can be that less innovation takes place.This article highlights some important general aspects of the patent system, briefly characterizes the current CLGC patent landscape, and illustrates by means of two exemplary patents what one angle of said patent landscape looks like. It is our opinion that, in order to support the rapid development of an artificial pancreas for patients with diabetes, adequate action to lower this hurdle should be undertaken by a consortium of all parties involved (industries, patient organizations, health-care professionals, and institutional payers).

  18. Eosinophilic pancreatitis and increased eosinophils in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Susan C; Leach, Steven; Yeo, Charles J; Cameron, John L; Murakata, Linda A; Boitnott, John K; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Hruban, Ralph H

    2003-03-01

    Prominent eosinophilic infiltrates are an unusual finding in the pancreas. Eosinophilic pancreatitis is one rare etiology of pancreatic eosinophilia, but other described causes of eosinophilic infiltrates have also included pancreatic allograft rejection, pancreatic pseudocyst, lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and histiocytosis X. In this study we describe the clinicopathologic features of three new cases of eosinophilic pancreatitis and conduct a retrospective 18-year institutional review of the myriad disease processes associated with pancreatic eosinophilia. In the files of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, <1% of all pancreatic specimens had been noted to show increased numbers of eosinophils. Eosinophilic pancreatitis itself was a rare etiology for pancreatic eosinophilia, with only one in-house case over the 18-year study period and two additional referral cases. Other disease processes associated with prominent eosinophilic infiltrates were more common and included pancreatic allograft rejection (14 cases), LPSP (5 of 24 total LPSP cases evaluated), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (4 cases), and systemic mastocytosis (1 case). Patients with eosinophilic pancreatitis showed two distinct histologic patterns: 1) a diffuse periductal, acinar, and septal eosinophilic infiltrate with eosinophilic phlebitis and arteritis; and 2) localized intense eosinophilic infiltrates associated with pseudocyst formation. All three patients with eosinophilic pancreatitis had peripheral eosinophilia, and all had multiorgan involvement. One patient with LPSP also had marked peripheral eosinophilia, and 5 of 24 LPSP cases demonstrated prominent eosinophilic infiltrates in the gallbladder, biliary tree, and/or duodenum. Notably, not all of these patients with LPSP with prominent eosinophils in other organs had increased eosinophils in the pancreas itself. These results emphasize the infrequent nature of pancreatic eosinophilia and

  19. Phenotypic characterization of GPR120-expressing cells in the interstitial tissue of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yufeng; Zha, Dingjun; Wang, Li; Qiao, Li; Lu, Lianjun; Mei, Lin; Chen, Chen; Qiu, Jianhua

    2013-12-01

    GPR120 functions as a plasma membrane receptor for unsaturated long-chain free fatty acids and involves in GLP-1 secretion, adipogenesis and the control of energy balance. Pancreas is the key organ in fuel and energy metabolism. Here GPR120 expression in human and rat pancreas was observed by RT-PCR, and the distribution and phenotypes of GPR120-positive cells in human and rat pancreas were shown by immunohistochemical staining. GPR120 mRNA expression was found in human and rat pancreas. GPR120-positive cells were scattered mainly in the interstitial tissues of human and rat pancreas, and they were not co-localized with nestin, vimentin, alpha-SMA and glucagon, respectively. However, GPR120 was distributed on the cells positively stained by CD68, the specific marker of macrophages, and on the cells positive stained by CD34 and CD117, the markers of interstitial cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the expression of GPR120 in pancreas and shows the distribution of GPR120 in human and rat pancreas.

  20. Immunodetection of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in bovine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Janiuk, Izabela; Młynek, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    This study was aimed at identifying and determining the configuration of structures which contain the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the bovine pancreas. The study material was collected from 20 animals. The distribution of CART in the bovine pancreas was investigated, by an immunohistochemical evaluation. CART peptide in the normal pancreas has been identified in intrapancreatic ganglia, nerve fibres and in endocrine cells of Langerhans islets and exocrine pancreas. CART immunoreactive nerve fibres innervate the exocrine and endocrine regions and the intrapancreatic ganglia, where they form a moderate number of networks, encircling the cell bodies. The few CART-immunoreactive endocrine cells, that appear in the bovine pancreas, are not limited to the islet cells, where they form a subpopulation of CART-containing cells, but are also individually distributed in the exocrine region. Furthermore, CART has been visualized in nerve fibres, innervating pancreatic outlet ducts and blood vessels. CART plays a physiological role in the integrated mechanisms that regulate both endocrine and exocrine pancreatic secretion. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that CART expression in nerve fibres and intrapancreatic ganglia is a common feature of the mammalian pancreas, whereas its expression in endocrine cells appears to be restricted to single cells of the bovine pancreas.

  1. Extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the pancreas: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGISTs) arising in the pancreas is extremely rare: only 20 cases have previously been reported in the English literature from 2000 to 2013. We reported a case of EGIST of the pancreas in a 69-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and with a solid, heterogeneously enhancing neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas, revealed preoperatively by an abdominal computed tomography scan. A diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor was suggested. Positron emission tomography with 68Ga-DOTATOC did not show pathological accumulation of the tracer in the pancreas. The patient underwent enucleation, under ultrasonic guidance, of the pancreatic tumor that emerged to the surface of the pancreas. Histopathology and immunohistochemical examination confirmed the final diagnosis of EGIST of the pancreas (CD117+), with one mitosis per 50 high-power fields. Although rarely, GIST can involve the pancreas as a primary site, and this tumor should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:24755359

  2. A Hybrid Method for Pancreas Extraction from CT Image Based on Level Set Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction. PMID:24066016

  3. A hybrid method for pancreas extraction from CT image based on level set methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction.

  4. Incident Cardiovascular Disease Events in Metabolically Benign Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ogorodnikova, Alexandra D.; Kim, Mimi; McGinn, Aileen; Muntner, Paul; Khan, Unab I.; Wildman, Rachel P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE While several studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of metabolically benign obesity, little is known about the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in this group. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using pooled data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities and Cardiovascular Health Studies, we assessed the association of metabolically benign obesity with incident CVD (coronary heart disease and stroke) using three existing definitions of metabolically benign obesity: (1) the ATP-III metabolic syndrome definition (≤2 of the ATP-III components, excluding waist), (2) the expanded ATP-III definition (≤1 of: the ATP-III components, HOMA-IR>75th percentile, systemic inflammation [WBC>75th percentile]), and (3) the insulin resistance (IR) based definition (sex-specific lowest quartile of the HOMA-IR distribution among non-diabetic obese). RESULTS The sample included 4,323 normal weight and 6,121 obese individuals. Among obese, 27.0%, 18.1%, and 20.4% were metabolically benign by the three definitions, respectively. CVD incidence among metabolically benign obese defined by the three definitions (mean follow-up 11.8 years) was 8.7%, 7.2%, and 10.3%, respectively, versus 7.9% in low-risk normal weight individuals. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) of incident CVD in metabolically benign obese compared to low-risk normal weight individuals were 1.24 (0.99-1.57), 1.16 (0.86-1.56), and 1.28 (1.01-1.62), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Regardless of the definition used, we observed a high prevalence of metabolically benign obesity. All three commonly used definitions were similar in terms of both classification and subsequent risk of CVD, with the expanded ATP-III criteria perhaps identifying the obese group at lowest risk of CVD. PMID:21799477

  5. Cytology Specimen Management, Triage and Standardized Reporting of Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won Jae; Bishop Pitman, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in pancreas cytology specimen sampling methods have enabled a specific cytologic diagnosis in most cases. Proper triage and processing of the cytologic specimen is pivotal in making a diagnosis due to the need for ancillary testing in addition to cytological evaluation, which is especially true in the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts. Newly proposed terminology for pancreaticobiliary cytology offers a standardized language for reporting that aims to improve communication among patient caregivers and provide for increased flexibility in patient management. This review focuses on these updates in pancreas cytology for the optimal evaluation of solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:26265683

  6. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  7. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  8. Lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction: are these conditions related to vascular dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shogo; Tsounapi, Panagiota; Shimizu, Takahiro; Honda, Masashi; Inoue, Keiji; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-09-01

    Although the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction is poorly understood and thought to be multifactorial, it has been traditionally recognized that these conditions increase with age. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between cardiovascular disease and lower urinary tract symptoms as well as benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction in elderly patients. Age might activate systemic vascular risk factors, resulting in disturbed blood flow. Hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis are also linked to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. In the present review, we discuss the relationship between decreased pelvic blood flow and lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest possible common mechanisms underlining these urological conditions.

  9. Adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Fukino, Nobutada; Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kuboi, Youichi; Kida, Kazutoshi

    2015-04-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of weight loss of 6 kg in 4 mo. Imaging examinations revealed a tumor located on the third portion of the duodenum with stenosis. We suspected duodenal carcinoma and performed pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy. Adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum was finally diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Malignant transformation in the duodenum arising from a heterotopic pancreas is extremely rare; to our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported worldwide, including the present case. The most common location of malignancy is the proximal duodenum at the first and descending portion. Herein, we describe the first case of adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas, which was located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a review of the literature.

  10. Metastases to the Pancreas Encountered on Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided, Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Pang, Judy C; Roh, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic lesions in the pancreas are very uncommon and may be difficult to differentiate from the more commonly encountered primary neoplasms derived from the exocrine and endocrine pancreas because of the significant overlap in clinical presentation, imaging, and cytologic features. Metastasis to the pancreas may occur years after treatment of the primary neoplasm and is often not considered on initial evaluation because of the rarity of such events. The possibility of a metastasis to the pancreas should be entertained in patients with any prior history of malignancy because a proper diagnosis is essential in identifying surgical candidates, or avoiding potentially unnecessary surgery and facilitating triage to more appropriate nonoperative therapy. Herein, we describe intrapancreatic metastases secondary to renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and lung carcinoma, as documented by cytologic examination of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the pancreatic masses.

  11. Adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Fukino, Nobutada; Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kuboi, Youichi; Kida, Kazutoshi

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of weight loss of 6 kg in 4 mo. Imaging examinations revealed a tumor located on the third portion of the duodenum with stenosis. We suspected duodenal carcinoma and performed pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy. Adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum was finally diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Malignant transformation in the duodenum arising from a heterotopic pancreas is extremely rare; to our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported worldwide, including the present case. The most common location of malignancy is the proximal duodenum at the first and descending portion. Herein, we describe the first case of adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas, which was located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a review of the literature. PMID:25852297

  12. A 3D map of the islet routes throughout the healthy human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Gagniuc, Paul A.; Gubceac, Elvira; Mardare, Liliana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona; Militaru, Manuella

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans are fundamental in understanding diabetes. A healthy human pancreas from a donor has been used to asses various islet parameters and their three-dimensional distribution. Here we show that islets are spread gradually from the head up to the tail section of the pancreas in the form of contracted or dilated islet routes. We also report a particular anatomical structure, namely the cluster of islets. Our observations revealed a total of 11 islet clusters which comprise of small islets that surround large blood vessels. Additional observations in the peripancreatic adipose tissue have shown lymphoid-like nodes and blood vessels captured in a local inflammatory process. Our observations are based on regional slice maps of the pancreas, comprising of 5,423 islets. We also devised an index of sphericity which briefly indicates various islet shapes that are dominant throughout the pancreas. PMID:26417671

  13. A rare case of ectopic pancreas in the ampulla of Vater presented with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Dimitrios K; Vezakis, Antonios; Filippou, Georgios; Condilis, Nicolas; Rizos, Spiros; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of ectopic pancreas in the ampulla of Vater presented with obstructive jaundice. Ectopic pancreas is a common congenital disorder which is referred to as pancreatic rest. The incidence in autopsy series varies from 1 to 2% (range 0.55 to 13%). Most common site of ectopic pancreatic tissue is the stomach, although it can be found anywhere in the foregut and the proximal midgut. Ectopic pancreatic tissue in the ampulla of Vater is a very rare condition. Searching in the literature, using the terms "ectopic pancreas" and "Ampulla of Vater", we found only 10 records. The authors report on a rare case of a 69 years old female with ectopic pancreas in the ampulla of Vater, presented with painless obstructive jaundice, and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy that followed.

  14. Xenotransplantation of embryonic pig pancreas for treatment of diabetes mellitus in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Hammerman, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for diabetes in humans is limited by the low availability of human donor whole pancreas or islets. Outcomes are complicated by immunosuppressive drug toxicity. Xenotransplantation is a strategy to overcome supply problems. Implantation of tissue obtained early during embryogenesis is a way to reduce transplant immunogenicity. Pig insulin is biologically active in humans. In that regard the pig is an appropriate xenogeneic organ donor. Insulin-producing cells originating from embryonic pig pancreas obtained very early following pancreatic primordium formation [embryonic day 28 (E28)] engraft long-term in rhesus macaques. Endocrine cells originating from embryonic pig pancreas transplanted in host mesentery migrate to mesenteric lymph nodes, engraft, differentiate and improve glucose tolerance in rhesus macaques without the need for immune suppression. Transplantation of embryonic pig pancreas is a novel approach towards beta cell replacement therapy that could be applicable to humans. PMID:24312695

  15. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-10-07

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36,923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum.

  16. [Pancreatic cancer in a patient with congenital agenesis of the dorsal pancreas].

    PubMed

    Oki, Yusuke; Onoyama, Hirohiko; Nikaido, Mitsuhiro; Iinuma, Shoji; Endo, Koji; Tomita, Yumi; Mizuno, Katsuhiko; Yasui, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    A 65-year-old man with back pain showed a hypovascular lesion of the head of the pancreas on dynamic computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. The distal portion of the pancreas was not visible. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed pancreatic duct obstruction, and the duodenal minor papilla was not visible. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient's condition as stage IVa pancreatic cancer with congenital agenesis of the dorsal pancreas. The patient underwent successful chemotherapy with 3 courses of gemcitabine and S-1, which was followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological staging revealed invasive ductal carcinoma, pT3, pN0, pM0, stage III. We report a rare case of pancreatic cancer with congenital agenesis of the dorsal pancreas.

  17. Shear mechanical properties of the porcine pancreas: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2013-10-01

    We provide the first account of the shear mechanical properties of porcine pancreas using a rheometer both in linear oscillatory tests and in constant strain-rate tests reaching the non-linear sub-failure regime. Our results show that pancreas has a low and weakly frequency-dependent dynamic modulus and experiences a noticeable strain-hardening beyond 20% strain. In both linear and non-linear regime, the viscoelastic behaviour of porcine pancreas follows a four-parameter bi-power model that has been validated on kidney, liver and spleen. Among the four solid organs of the abdomen, pancreas proves to be the most compliant and the most viscous one. PMID:23820244

  18. On the diabetic menu: Zebrafish as a model for pancreas development and function

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Mary D.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Development of the vertebrate pancreas is a complex stepwise process comprising regionalization, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis. Studies in zebrafish are contributing to an emerging picture of pancreas development in which extrinsic signaling molecules influence intrinsic transcriptional programs to allow ultimate differentiation of specific pancreatic cell types. Zebrafish experiments have revealed roles for several signaling molecules in aspects of this process; for example our own work has shown that Retinoic Acid signals specify the pre-pancreatic endoderm. Time-lapse imaging of live zebrafish embryos has started to provide detailed information about early pancreas morphogenesis. In addition to modeling embryonic development, the zebrafish has recently begun to be used as a model for pancreas regeneration studies. Here we review the significant progress in these areas and consider the future potential of zebrafish as a diabetes research model. PMID:19204986

  19. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36 923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum. PMID:25293684

  20. Single-port approach to benign gynecologic pathology. A review.

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, M; Revaux, A; Frydman, R; Yazigi, A; Ayoubi, J M

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopy is the gold standard in gynecological surgery. Single-port laparoscopic surgery, has been developed in order to improve minimally invasive surgery. We analyzed single-port approach in benign gynecologic pathology and made a bibliographic research on Pubmed and Medline from January 2000 to January 2015. From what emerges from the papers taken into consideration, single-port laparoscopy can be used for salpingostomy or salpingectomy to treat tubal ectopic pregnancy, benign adnexal disease (ovarian cystectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy), and for hysterectomy. We do not have enough data for complex procedures like myomectomy or hysteropexy. Robotic single-port laparoscopy seems to be a very attractive perspective and its use in benign gynecology surgery is expanding. More and more ergonomic limitations of single-port laparoscopy are corrected by development of articulated or flexible instruments and camera. Beyond these preliminary results, more ample prospective studies with an adapted and standardized instrumentation are thus essential to highlight real profits. PMID:25714874

  1. Benign cementoblastoma of the anterior mandible: an unusual case report.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Armağan; Karöz, Tuğçe Berre; Sumer, Mahmut; Açıkgöz, Aydan; Süllü, Yurdanur

    2016-08-01

    A benign cementoblastoma, which is another name for a true cementoma, is a rare neoplasm that develops from odontogenic ectomesenchyme. It is characterized by a mineralized mass attached to the apex of the root produced by neoplastic cementoblasts. More than 75% of cases arise in the mandible, with 90% of them manifesting in the molar and premolar regions. This neoplasm occurs most commonly in children and young adults, with males being affected slightly more than females. Radiographically, the tumor is observed as a well-defined radiopaque mass that is fused to a tooth root and is surrounded by a radiolucent rim. The treatment of benign cementoblastoma consists of removal of the lesion and extraction of the affected tooth. This report presents an unusual case of benign cementoblastoma in a 31-year-old female, presenting as a densely mineralized mass seen at the apex of the impacted right mandibular canine tooth on radiographs. PMID:27595092

  2. Benign cementoblastoma of the anterior mandible: an unusual case report

    PubMed Central

    Karöz, Tuğçe Berre; Sumer, Mahmut; Açıkgöz, Aydan; Süllü, Yurdanur

    2016-01-01

    A benign cementoblastoma, which is another name for a true cementoma, is a rare neoplasm that develops from odontogenic ectomesenchyme. It is characterized by a mineralized mass attached to the apex of the root produced by neoplastic cementoblasts. More than 75% of cases arise in the mandible, with 90% of them manifesting in the molar and premolar regions. This neoplasm occurs most commonly in children and young adults, with males being affected slightly more than females. Radiographically, the tumor is observed as a well-defined radiopaque mass that is fused to a tooth root and is surrounded by a radiolucent rim. The treatment of benign cementoblastoma consists of removal of the lesion and extraction of the affected tooth. This report presents an unusual case of benign cementoblastoma in a 31-year-old female, presenting as a densely mineralized mass seen at the apex of the impacted right mandibular canine tooth on radiographs.

  3. Benign prenatal hypophosphatasia: a treatable disease not to be missed.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Michigami, Toshimi; Tachikawa, Kanako; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-03-01

    Prenatal bowing of the long bones is often associated with severe bone dysplasias. We report a child who presented marked bowing of the long bones at birth but showed a relatively benign postnatal course with spontaneous improvement of bowing. The fetal imaging showed normal skeletal mineralization and normal chest and abdominal circumferences despite the limb bowing and shortening. Decreased serum alkaline phosphatase activity and elevated urine phosphoethanolamine was biochemically evident, and compound heterozygous mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) gene were identified, which confirmed the diagnosis of a benign form of prenatal hypophosphatasia. Benign prenatal hypophosphatasia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital bowing of the long bones. PMID:24145968

  4. Idiopathic benign paroxysmal vertigo in children, a migraine precursor.

    PubMed

    Ralli, G; Atturo, F; de Filippis, C

    2009-12-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common conditions in the adult population that can be rarely seen during childhood; only a few articles describing vertigo in children can be found in literature. Although many causes of vertigo in adulthood occur also in childhood, their frequency may be different. A typical example is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the most common peripheral vestibular disorder in adults, which occurs quite uncommonly in children. Furthermore, many common diseases causing vertigo in children may be unique for this population, such as benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV) of childhood. At present, BPV is defined as a migraine's equivalent, a precursor of migraine or a periodic syndrome of childhood. The International Headache Society also studied this form of vertigo and included the Benign Paroxysmal Vertigo in section 1.3.3. of the International Classification of Headaches (ICHD-2). The present review analyzes recent patho-physiological and clinical evidences regarding idiopathic BPV in children.

  5. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Adam; Kepenek, Yildiz; Rindock, Heike; Müller-Mazzotta, Jochen; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Mylius, Veit; Rosenow, Felix

    2011-06-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent cause of recurrent vertigo and according to the canalo- and cupulolithiasis theory it is caused by detached otoconia which accumulate in the semicircular canals. However, the mechanisms leading to detachment of otoconia from the matrix are still poorly understood. Head trauma, inner ear diseases, advanced age, migraine and bed rest are known predisposing factors. We report a case of a healthy 44-year-old female, who developed left sided benign paroxysmal positional vertigo 10 hours following standard bilateral diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation. As our patient did not innate any established predisposing factor and has a relatively young age, we conclude that diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation to elicit motor evoked potentials might be an iatrogenic cause of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  6. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil.

  7. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  8. Benign cementoblastoma of the anterior mandible: an unusual case report

    PubMed Central

    Karöz, Tuğçe Berre; Sumer, Mahmut; Açıkgöz, Aydan; Süllü, Yurdanur

    2016-01-01

    A benign cementoblastoma, which is another name for a true cementoma, is a rare neoplasm that develops from odontogenic ectomesenchyme. It is characterized by a mineralized mass attached to the apex of the root produced by neoplastic cementoblasts. More than 75% of cases arise in the mandible, with 90% of them manifesting in the molar and premolar regions. This neoplasm occurs most commonly in children and young adults, with males being affected slightly more than females. Radiographically, the tumor is observed as a well-defined radiopaque mass that is fused to a tooth root and is surrounded by a radiolucent rim. The treatment of benign cementoblastoma consists of removal of the lesion and extraction of the affected tooth. This report presents an unusual case of benign cementoblastoma in a 31-year-old female, presenting as a densely mineralized mass seen at the apex of the impacted right mandibular canine tooth on radiographs. PMID:27595092

  9. BENIGN LYMPHOEPITHELIAL SALIVARY LESION TO BE DISTINGUISHED FROM ADENOLYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    CRUICKSHANK, A H

    1965-07-01

    In a collection of 11 cases, the benign lymphoepithelial lesion presented clinically in every case as a tumour of a salivary gland. In eight cases the parotid was affected, in two a palatal salivary gland, and in one the submandibular gland was affected. Microscopically the lesion consisted of a mixture of lymphoid and epithelial components and, although the appearances in several cases suggested lymphosarcoma or reticulosarcoma, the arrangement of the epithelial component in characteristic islands (epi-myoepithelial islands) indicated the benign nature of the lesion. In one case incomplete excision of a lesion of the palate was followed by a recurrence that was cured by a radium mould. The microscopical appearances of the benign lymphoepithelial lesion were identical with those of the salivary lesions of Sjögren's syndrome but in all the cases the lesion was an isolated one and the sicca syndrome was absent.

  10. Benign mucocele-like lesions of the breast: revisited.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Shabnam; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Nagi, Chandandeep S

    2011-05-01

    Mucocele-like lesions of the breast are ruptured ducts that discharge their contents into the stroma. They constitute a spectrum from benign to atypical to malignant. The current management of these lesions diagnosed on core biopsy is excision. The goal of our study was to evaluate the necessity of this practice for benign mucocele-like lesions. Retrospective review of the pathology database from 1 January 2000 to 1 June 2008 identified 61 cases, with follow-up information available in 50 cases. Clinical, radiological, and pathological information was correlated. Core biopsies were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis and verify previous biopsy site. In all, 45 patients underwent surgery, whereas 5 patients were followed for >1 year and remained stable. Patient's ages ranged from 44 to 76 years. Most benign mucoceles were diagnosed stereotactically while targeting calcifications (93.3%); rarely, the lesion was a sonographically detected mass. Most excisions had no residual mucocele (37/45=82%). In seven cases (15.6%), atypical duct hyperplasia was present, three with residual mucocele. In one case, the residual mucocele showed a continuum from florid to atypical duct hyperplasia at the core biopsy site. The other six cases showed atypical duct hyperplasia adjacent to but not directly at the core biopsy site. The sizes of the benign mucoceles ranged from incipient to 0.6 cm, all containing calcifications except one, which was incidental. Radiological-pathological correlation was concordant in all cases except one with suspicious calcification, which was ductal carcinoma in situ on excision. In this series, the largest of its kind, the upstage rate of benign mucoceles diagnosed on core biopsy was 17.8%. With the exception of the ductal carcinoma in situ case, no radiological or morphological features were predictive of atypia. Thus, because of associated atypical duct hyperplasia, sampling reasons, and intralesional heterogeneity, we continue to recommend excision of

  11. The Conundrum of Genetic “Drivers” in Benign Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Advances in deep genomic sequencing have identified a spectrum of cancer-specific passenger and driver aberrations. Clones with driver anomalies are believed to be positively selected during carcinogenesis. Accumulating evidence, however, shows that genomic alterations, such as those in BRAF, RAS, EGFR, HER2, FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, CDKN2A, and NF1/2, all of which are considered hallmark drivers of specific cancers, can also be identified in benign and premalignant conditions, occasionally at frequencies higher than in their malignant counterparts. Targeting these genomic drivers can produce dramatic responses in advanced cancer, but the effects on their benign counterparts are less clear. This benign-malignant phenomenon is well illustrated in studies of BRAF V600E mutations, which are paradoxically more frequent in benign nevi (∼80%) than in dysplastic nevi (∼60%) or melanoma (∼40%-45%). Similarly, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 is more commonly overexpressed in ductal carcinoma in situ (∼27%-56%) when compared with invasive breast cancer (∼11%-20%). FGFR3 mutations in bladder cancer also decrease with tumor grade (low-grade tumors, ∼61%; high-grade, ∼11%). “Driver” mutations also occur in nonmalignant settings: TP53 mutations in synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis and FGFR3 mutations in seborrheic keratosis. The latter observations suggest that the oncogenicity of these alterations may be tissue context–dependent. The conversion of benign conditions to premalignant disease may involve other genetic events and/or epigenetic reprogramming. Putative driver mutations can also be germline and associated with increased cancer risk (eg, germline RAS or TP53 alterations), but germline FGFR3 or NF2 abnormalities do not predispose to malignancy. We discuss the enigma of genetic “drivers” in benign and premalignant conditions and the implications for prevention strategies and theories of tumorigenesis. PMID:27059373

  12. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:26547222

  13. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches.

  14. Mechanisms of islet damage mediated by pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming.

    PubMed

    Omori, Keiko; Kobayashi, Eiji; Rawson, Jeffrey; Takahashi, Masafumi; Mullen, Yoko

    2016-10-01

    Prolonged pancreas cold ischemia is known to negatively correlate with islet isolation outcomes, hindering successful islet transplantation to treat Type-1 Diabetes. Due to poor islet isolation outcome, pancreata with over 16 h cold ischemia are currently not considered for islet transplantation. Mechanisms involved in pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming mediated islet damage during islet isolation and culture are not well understood. Using an en bloc cold preserved rat pancreas preparation, we attempted to clarify possible mechanisms of islet death associated with prolonged pancreas cold ischemia and subsequent rewarming. Cold ischemia lasting 16 h decreased post-isolation islet yield and increased islet death during the initial 6 h of culture. Electron micrographs revealed swelling and severe disruption of cellular and mitochondrial membranes, as well as an enlarged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in β-cells isolated from cold preserved pancreata. Prolonged cold ischemia of the pancreas transiently activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in isolated islets and increased lipid peroxidation products 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 after culture, indicating the activation of oxidative stress signaling pathways. The islet isolation process, irrespective of pancreas cold ischemia, activated unfolded protein response (UPR), while the ER protective chaperon BiP was further upregulated by pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming. During the first 6 h of culture following islet isolation, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and caspase-3 activation were also upregulated. Our study indicates the involvement of both apoptosis and necrosis in islet death, and suggests oxidative stress and disruption of membranes are critical mechanisms mediated by pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming. PMID:27587006

  15. Infectious complications following 72 consecutive enteric-drained pancreas transplants.

    PubMed

    Berger, N; Wirmsberger, R; Kafka, R; Margreiter, C; Ebenbichler, C; Stelzmueller, I; Margreiter, R; Steurer, W; Mark, W; Bonatti, H

    2006-07-01

    New immunosuppressive protocols and advanced surgical technique resulted in an improved outcome of pancreatic transplantation (PTx) with infection remaining the most common complication. Seventy-two enteric-drained whole PTxs performed at the Innsbruck University Hospital between September 2002 and October 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Prophylactic immunosuppression consisted of either the standard protocol consisting of single bolus antithymocyteglobulin (ATG) (Thymoglobulin, Sangstat or ATG Fresenius) induction (9 mg/kg), tacrolimus (TAC), mycophenylate mofetil (MMF) and steroids (38 patients) or a 4-day course of ATG (4 mg/kg) tacrolimus and steroids with MMF (n = 19), or Sirolimus (n = 15). Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis consisted of Piperacillin/Tazobactam (4.5 g q 8 h) in combination with ciprofloxacin (200 mg q 12 h) and fluconazole (400 mg daily). Ganciclovir was used for cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis if donor was positive and recipient-negative. Patient, pancreas, and kidney graft survival at 1 year were 97.2%, 88.8%, and 93%, respectively, with no difference between the groups. All retransplants (n = 8) and single transplants (n = 8) as well as all type II diabetics and nine of 11 patients older 55 years received standard immunosuppression (IS). The rejection rate was 14% and infection rate 46% with no difference in terms of incidence or type according to the three groups. Severe infectious complications included intra-abdominal infection (n = 12), wound infection (n = 7), sepsis (n = 13), respiratory tract infection (n = 4), urinary tract infection (n = 12), herpes simplex/human herpes virus 6 infection (n = 5), CMV infection/disease (n = 7), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, n = 3), invasive filamentous fungal infection (n = 4), Clostridial/Rotavirus colitis (n = 1), and endocarditis (n = 1). All four patients in this series died of infectious complications (invasive aspergillosis n = 2) (one with Candida glabrata

  16. Minimally invasive surgical management of benign breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakoma, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Benign breast disease is common among women, and when symptomatic, definitive surgical management is preferred by both clinicians and patients. Given the nonmalignant nature of these lesions, an important factor in treatment is cosmesis. Novel minimally invasive techniques for breast lesions are rapidly emerging and demonstrate good efficacy, safety and cosmesis. This review will describe minimally invasive techniques of breast lesions via surgical and percutaneous approaches and discuss the outcomes, advantages and limitations for each. Based on promising initial results, the future standard of care for benign breast lesions may focus on one or more of these minimally invasive techniques. PMID:25083508

  17. Role of stenting in gastrointestinal benign and malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Arena, Monica; Miraglia, Stefania; Consolo, Pierluigi; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Virgilio, Clara; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Advances in stents design have led to a substantial increase in the use of stents for a variety of digestive diseases. Initially developed as a non-surgical treatment for palliation of esophageal cancer, the stents now have an emerging role in the management of malignant and benign conditions as well as in all segments of the gastrointestinal tract. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the key-role of stenting in gastrointestinal benign and malignant diseases. PMID:25992186

  18. Indeterminate cell histiocytosis that presented clinically as benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Haimovic, Adele; Chernoff, Karen; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Schaffer, Julie V

    2014-12-16

    Indeterminate cell histiocytosis (ICH) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by immunophenotypic features of both Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-LCH. We describe a 12-month-old boy with a four-month history of asymptomatic, small, pink-tan papules on his face. Histopathologic evaluation showed a superficial, dermal infiltrate of histiocytes that was positive for S100, CD1a, CD68, and Factor XIIIa. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of the clinical presentation of benign cephalic histiocytosis with immunohistochemical findings of ICH. We review the classification of histiocytic disorders and the clinical and immunohistochemical features of both ICH and benign cephalic histiocytosis.

  19. [Benign tumors of vulva: review and case report of achrocordon].

    PubMed

    Galeana, Cuauhtémoc; Casas, Donovan; Rodríguez, Alejandra; Cantú, Marco Antonio; Aguilar, Fabiola; Moreno, Víctor; Galindo, María Estela; Gutiérrez, Eduardo Ernesto

    2014-01-17

    The vulvovaginal region is a very complex area because of its anatomy and the fact that it can be source of a large number of benign tumors and less frequent malignant tumors. In recent decades, there have been significant gains in the diagnosis and treatment of vulvovaginal tumors, thanks to the contributions of cellular and molecular biology. The purpose of this review article is to serve as a practical reference for clinical and pathological diagnosis as well as in the outpatient treatment and monitoring of these benign tumors.

  20. A Benign Cardiac Growth but Not So Indolent

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sahadev T.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac lipomatous hypertrophy is a rare benign condition that usually involves the interatrial septum. Due to its benign nature it rarely requires intervention. Its presence outside the interatrial septum is reported infrequently. We present a case of lipomatous hypertrophy in the intraventricular septum that was complicated by a severe, symptomatic, and disabling dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The symptoms significantly improved following the excision of the mass. In our case transthoracic echocardiogram was used to visualize the mass and measure the severity of the obstruction; Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to characterize the mass and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27293911

  1. Single benign metastasising leiomyoma of an inguinal lymph node.

    PubMed

    Laban, Kamil G; Tobon-Morales, Roberto E; Hodge, Janice A L; Schreuder, Henk W R

    2016-01-01

    Benign metastasising leiomyoma (BML) is a rare benign disease associated with uterine leiomyoma and history of uterine surgery. It most frequently occurs in premenopausal woman, with a pulmonary localisation, and consisting of multiple nodules. We present an uncommon case of a 69-year-old woman with a single BML of an inguinal lymph node. CT scans of thorax and abdomen excluded other metastasis localisation. The patient was cured with surgical excision of the mass. Lymph node involvement has been reported incidentally in BML literature. Lymphangitic spread can be considered a possible mechanism of BML metastasis. PMID:27511755

  2. A Benign Cardiac Growth but Not So Indolent.

    PubMed

    Wani, Adil S; Reddy, Sahadev T; Harinath, Lakshmi; Biederman, Robert W W

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac lipomatous hypertrophy is a rare benign condition that usually involves the interatrial septum. Due to its benign nature it rarely requires intervention. Its presence outside the interatrial septum is reported infrequently. We present a case of lipomatous hypertrophy in the intraventricular septum that was complicated by a severe, symptomatic, and disabling dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The symptoms significantly improved following the excision of the mass. In our case transthoracic echocardiogram was used to visualize the mass and measure the severity of the obstruction; Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to characterize the mass and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27293911

  3. The migraine: benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood complex.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, C; Calvin, F J; Tapia, M C; de Lucas, P; Arroyo, R

    1999-01-01

    The migraine--a benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood complex is the most frequent etiology of pediatric dizziness, with an incidence of 34.7%. We present a series of 34 children in whom this entity was diagnosed. We describe the most important characteristics and discuss the possible etiological factors. We review the theories about a common pathophysiological origin for migraine, benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood, and paroxysmal torticollis. Evolution of these entities confirms the idea of a common origin and a different vestibular symptomatology, depending on the age of the child experiencing dizziness.

  4. Rare Malignant and Benign Salivary Gland Epithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Raja R; Barnes, E Leon

    2011-12-01

    Although at least 24 distinct histologic salivary gland carcinomas exist, many of them are rare, comprising only 1% to 2% of all salivary gland tumors. These include epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, (hyalinizing) clear cell carcinoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, cystadenocarcinoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma (low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma), oncocytic carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified. Few tumors (clear cell carcinoma and basal cell adenocarcinoma) have unique molecular correlates. Benign tumors, although histologically less diverse, are far more common, with pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin tumor the most common salivary gland tumors. Many benign tumors have malignant counterparts for which histologic distinction can pose diagnostic challenge.

  5. Benign parotid oncocytoma with the chromosomal abnormality trisomy 7.

    PubMed

    Mark, J; Dahlenfors, R; Havel, G; Böckmann, P

    1991-01-01

    This report concerns the first cytogenetical study of a benign salivary gland oncocytoma. The cultured tumor was studied in five consecutive preparations. The first three were dominated by cells with a normal karyotype. In the two subsequent preparations a hyperdiploid stemline characterized by trisomy 7 had taken over. Trisomy 7 has previously been observed in a number of different, benign, premalignant and malignant conditions. We interpreted trisomy 7 in the salivary gland oncocytoma, as in these other conditions, to be a neoplasia-related, probably primary, gross chromosomal change and not an expression of aging or comparable events in normal cells.

  6. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system.

  7. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  8. Dynamic expression and localization of c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yulong; Cheng, Mei; Shi, Zhen; Feng, Zhenqing; Guan, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Pancreata from Sprague Dawley rats of different developmental stages were studied to determine the expression and cellular localization of different c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas. Pancreatic mRNA and protein expression levels of c-MET at different developmental stages from embryo to adult were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and by western blotting. To identify the cellular localization of c-MET protein in the developing rat pancreas, double immunofluorescent staining was performed using antibodies for cell type-specific markers and for c-MET. The expression of two isoforms of c-MET (190 kDa and 170 kDa) coincided with the development of the pancreas. The 190 kDa isoform of c-MET is expressed during embryonic stages, and its expression is replaced by the expression of the 170 kDa isoform as the pancreas develops. Only the 170 kDa isoform is expressed in the adult rat pancreas. Throughout all stages of pancreatic development, c-MET is expressed by vimentin-positive cells. In contrast, c-MET staining was stronger in rat pancreata from newborn to adult stages and overlapped with insulin-positive beta-cells. The dynamic expression and localization of different c-MET isoforms in the rat pancreas during different developmental stages indicates that distinct c-MET isoform might be involved in different aspects of pancreatic development.

  9. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system. PMID:27198785

  10. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of Pancreas; A Case Series and Review Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mirminachi, Babak; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Sharifi, Amir Houshang; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Information regarding solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is limited in Iran. We aimed to review the clinicocytopathological features and follow-up of patients with SPN of pancreas who were diagnosed in a single center in Iran. METHODS Seven patients with SPN of the pancreas were diagnosed during January 2010 to March 2015 at the Digestive Disease Research Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients were reviewed prospectively. RESULTS Six out of the 7 patients were female and the mean age of all the patients was 29.4 years ranging from 15 to 61 years. The most common clinical presentation was nonspecific abdominal pain (N=6). The tumors were located mostly in head and neck of the pancreas. SPN was diagnosed in all patients by fine needle aspiration through endosonography (EUS-FNA). All patients underwent surgery. Histological findings of surgical tissues were consistent with EUS-FNA. The postoperative follow-up period of about 14 months was uneventful. CONCLUSION SPN of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor which affects primarily young women. EUS-guided FNA could play an important role in preoperative diagnosis of SPN of the pancreas. PMID:27252816

  11. Coming of age: the artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2016-09-01

    The artificial pancreas (closed-loop system) addresses the unmet clinical need for improved glucose control whilst reducing the burden of diabetes self-care in type 1 diabetes. Glucose-responsive insulin delivery above and below a preset insulin amount informed by sensor glucose readings differentiates closed-loop systems from conventional, threshold-suspend and predictive-suspend insulin pump therapy. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetes can vary between one-third-threefold on a daily basis. Closed-loop systems accommodate these variations and mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia associated with tight glucose control. In this review we focus on the progress being made in the development and evaluation of closed-loop systems in outpatient settings. Randomised transitional studies have shown feasibility and efficacy of closed-loop systems under supervision or remote monitoring. Closed-loop application during free-living, unsupervised conditions by children, adolescents and adults compared with sensor-augmented pumps have shown improved glucose outcomes, reduced hypoglycaemia and positive user acceptance. Innovative approaches to enhance closed-loop performance are discussed and we also present the outlook and strategies used to ease clinical adoption of closed-loop systems. PMID:27364997

  12. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS. PMID:26879163

  13. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS.

  14. CT pancreatogram in carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, E.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; London, S.S.

    1983-08-01

    CT has made it possible to determine the contour of the pancreatic duct, to measure its caliber, and to detect dilatation of the duct. CT scans of 75 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and of 45 patients with chronic pancreatitis were obtained. Dilatation of the pancreatic duct was seen in 56% of patients with carcinoma, and in 70% of those with tumors confined to the pancreatic head and body. Smooth dilatation (43%) or beaded dilatation (40%) were most commonly associated with carcinoma. Ductal dilatation was present in 58% of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, and irregular dilatation was seen in 73% of the patients in this group. About half of the patients who had irregular dilatation had calculi within the ducts. Eight cases of dilatation of the duct with no detectible pancreatic mass were seen in a subgroup of 13 patients who had small carcinomas of the pancreas (tumor size of 3 cm or less). Our findings indicate that a dilated pancreatic duct with a smooth contour and a ratio of duct to total gland width of 0.50 or greater suggests carcinoma as the underlying pathology.

  15. Pathophysiological effects of nicotine on the pancreas: an update.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; MacLeod, Stewart; Udupa, Kodetthor B; Rayford, Phillip L

    2002-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests an association between cigarette smoking and pancreatic diseases. It is well recognized that nicotine, a major component in cigarette smoke, is an addictive agent and, therefore, reinforces smoking behavior. The current review update focuses on the genetics of nicotine dependence and its role on the development of pancreatic diseases. The role of smoking and nicotine in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer development is also discussed. Exposure of laboratory animals to nicotine clearly supports the notion that nicotine can induce pancreatic injury. The mechanism by which nicotine induces such effects is perhaps mediated via signal transduction pathways in the pancreatic acinar cell, leading to enhanced levels of intracellular calcium release, resulting in cytotoxicity and eventual cell death. The induction of pancreatic injury by nicotine may also involve activation and expression of protooncogene, H-ras, which can increase cytosolic calcium via second messenger pathways. Development of pancreatic carcinoma in cigarette smokers as observed in human populations may be the result of activation and mutation of the H-ras gene. A possible pathogenetic mechanism of nicotine in the pancreas activating multiple signal transduction pathways is schematically summarized in Figure 1.

  16. Centroacinar Cells Are Progenitors That Contribute to Endocrine Pancreas Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Delaspre, Fabien; Beer, Rebecca L; Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangliang; Gee, Stephen; Vitery, Maria del Carmen; Wheelan, Sarah J; Parsons, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with a paucity of insulin-producing β-cells. With the goal of finding therapeutic routes to treat diabetes, we aim to find molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in β-cell neogenesis and regeneration. To facilitate discovery of such mechanisms, we use a vertebrate organism where pancreatic cells readily regenerate. The larval zebrafish pancreas contains Notch-responsive progenitors that during development give rise to adult ductal, endocrine, and centroacinar cells (CACs). Adult CACs are also Notch responsive and are morphologically similar to their larval predecessors. To test our hypothesis that adult CACs are also progenitors, we took two complementary approaches: 1) We established the transcriptome for adult CACs. Using gene ontology, transgenic lines, and in situ hybridization, we found that the CAC transcriptome is enriched for progenitor markers. 2) Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that CACs do form new endocrine cells after β-cell ablation or partial pancreatectomy. We concluded that CACs and their larval predecessors are the same cell type and represent an opportune model to study both β-cell neogenesis and β-cell regeneration. Furthermore, we show that in cftr loss-of-function mutants, there is a deficiency of larval CACs, providing a possible explanation for pancreatic complications associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:26153247

  17. Electrolytic ablation of the rat pancreas: a feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Fosh, Beverley G; Finch, Jonathon Guy; Anthony, Adrian A; Texler, Michael; Maddern, Guy J

    2001-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a biologically aggressive disease with less than 20% of patients suitable for a "curative" surgical resection. This, combined with the poor 5-year survival indicates that effective palliative methods for symptom relief are required. Currently there are no ablative techniques to treat pancreatic cancer in clinical use. Tissue electrolysis is the delivery of a direct current between an anode and cathode to induce localised necrosis. Electrolysis has been shown to be safe and reliable in producing hepatic tissue and tumour ablation in animal models and in a limited number of patients. This study investigates the feasibility of using electrolysis to produce localised pancreatic necrosis in a healthy rat model. Method Ten rats were studied in total. Eight rats were treated with variable "doses" of coulombs, and the systemic and local effects were assessed; 2 rats were used as controls. Results Seven rats tolerated the procedure well without morbidity or mortality, and one died immediately post procedure. One control rat died on induction of anaesthesia. Serum amylase and glucose were not significantly affected. Conclusion Electrolysis in the rat pancreas produced localised necrosis and appears both safe, and reproducible. This novel technique could offer significant advantages for patients with unresectable pancreatic tumours. The next stage of the study is to assess pancreatic electrolysis in a pig model, prior to human pilot studies. PMID:11570977

  18. Cell proliferation in the exocrine pancreas during development.

    PubMed Central

    Oates, P S; Morgan, R G

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the relative proliferation of the ductule cell compartment and the mononucleate and binucleate acinar cell populations in the developing pancreas in rats from 5 to 49 days of age. Proliferation of these cell types was assessed in the intact gland and in isolated acinar cells by autoradiography after in vivo labelling with tritiated thymidine at 5, 10, 17, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days of age. It was found that the acinar cell population was predominantly mononucleate at birth, but following weaning became progressively binucleate. At all times studied, DNA synthesis in mononucleate acinar cells was between 3- and 10-fold greater than in binucleate acinar cells. Ductule cell labelling was high relative to that seen in the adult from 5 to 17 days after birth, but after weaning duct cell labelling fell to levels seen in the adult. The results suggest that up to weaning acinus formation is derived from duct cell differentiation and mononucleate acinar cell proliferation, and that after weaning mononucleate acinar cells continue to replicate, either giving rise to binucleate acinar cells or continuing to divide as mononucleate cells. The mononucleate acinar cell thus appears to have the capacity to proliferate, while the binucleate acinar cell appears to be static and non-dividing. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2630538

  19. Exercise and the Development of the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Michael C.; Zaharieva, Dessi P.; Yavelberg, Loren; Cinar, Ali; Jamnik, Veronica K.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) promotes numerous health benefits for people living with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, PA also complicates blood glucose control. Factors affecting blood glucose fluctuations during PA include activity type, intensity and duration as well as the amount of insulin and food in the body at the time of the activity. To maintain equilibrium with blood glucose concentrations during PA, the rate of glucose appearance (Ra) to disappearance (Rd) in the bloodstream must be balanced. In nondiabetics, there is a rise in glucagon and a reduction in insulin release at the onset of mild to moderate aerobic PA. During intense aerobic -anaerobic work, insulin release first decreases and then rises rapidly in early recovery to offset a more dramatic increase in counterregulatory hormones and metabolites. An “exercise smart” artificial pancreas (AP) must be capable of sensing glucose and perhaps other physiological responses to various types and intensities of PA. The emergence of this new technology may benefit active persons with T1D who are prone to hypo and hyperglycemia. PMID:26428933

  20. Diurnal blood pressure variation in kidney-pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Marx, M A; Gardner, S F; Ketel, B L

    1996-08-01

    Blood pressure normally follows a characteristic pattern throughout the 24 h cycle with daytime pressures higher than nighttime pressures. Patients lacking a nocturnal decrease in pressure have a higher incidence of end organ damage. This investigation was designed to characterize the diurnal pattern of blood pressure and to evaluate blood pressure load in patients who have received a combined kidney-pancreas (KP) transplant. Ten patients (mean 10 months posttransplant) underwent 48 h of noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring using a commercially available device (SpaceLabs 90202 or 90207). Blood pressure was measured every 15 min from 6 AM to 9 PM and every 30 min from 9 PM to 6 AM. Ambulatory monitoring revealed a markedly increased nocturnal blood pressure (up to 25% greater than daytime pressures). These patients were found to have a higher nocturnal blood pressure load than during the day. No relationship was demonstrated between diurnal blood pressure variation and immunosuppression regimen, elapsed time after transplantation, or antihypertensive treatment. These results indicate that close attention must be given to the nocturnal blood pressure of KP recipients and suggest that standard antihypertensive medication regimens do not adequately treat the nocturnal hypertension in these patients. This may predispose these patients to further cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications.

  1. Impact of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Isla Pera, P; Moncho Vasallo, J; Guasch Andreu, O; Ricart Brulles, MJ; Torras Rabasa, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few qualitative studies of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK Tx) have been published. The aims of this study were to explore from the perspective of patients, the experience of living with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM), suffering from complications, and undergoing SPK Tx with good outcome; and to determine the impact of SPK Tx on patients and their social and cultural environment. Methods: We performed a focused ethnographic study. Twenty patients were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison following the method proposed by Miles and Huberman. Results: A functioning SPK Tx allowed renal replacement therapy and insulin to be discontinued. To describe their new situation, patients used words and phrases such as “miracle”, “being reborn” or “coming back to life”. Although the complications of T1DM, its surgery and treatment, and associated psychological problems did not disappear after SPK Tx, these were minimized when compared with the pretransplantation situation. Conclusion: For patients, SPK Tx represents a recovery of their health and autonomy despite remaining problems associated with the complications of T1DM and SPK Tx. The understanding of patients’ existential framework and their experience of disease are key factors for planning new intervention and improvement strategies. PMID:22936846

  2. Intraductal tubular neoplasms of the pancreas: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Adeline; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal lesions of the pancreas are an uncommon but increasingly recognized group of entities mainly because of advances in imaging technology. In the past, precise categorization and understanding of true pancreatic intraduct neoplasms were hampered not only by their relative rarity but also because of the plethora of terminology and criteria used in nomenclature and diagnosis. Although significant progress has been made in the characterization of some of these lesions, as exemplified by intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, understanding of the rare intraductal tubular adenoma (ITA) and intraduct tubular carcinoma (ITC) continues to evolve. By definition, these are a group of intraductal, radiologically detectable neoplasms that can progress to or be associated with invasive adenocarcinoma and, as such, are precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Their often shared clinical and radiological features make precise histological diagnosis essential for appropriate management and optimal outcome. We provide an overview of these neoplasms and highlight recent developments in the understanding of ITA and ITC which have led to ITA being considered a variant of gastric-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and ITC being encompassed within the intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm category. We also emphasize the distinguishing histological features to aid diagnosis of these rare lesions.

  3. Zebrafish pancreas as a model for development and disease.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, R A; Meyer, D

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate pancreas is composed of acinar tissue that produces digestive enzymes, a ductal system for transporting those enzymes, and the endocrine islets which produce hormones critical for organism glucose homeostasis. Recent studies have highlighted similarities between zebrafish and mammals in organ development, and increasingly reveal that the regulation of metabolic homeostasis is highly conserved as well. Use of zebrafish as a model organism, with its ease of genetic manipulation, high fecundity, and ready access for imaging, has been highly productive for studies of islet cell development. We review the most recent progress in our understanding of how the later forming endocrine cells develop from duct-associated progenitors and new tools available for these studies. We also discuss current approaches and technological advances for addressing beta cell physiology, organism glucose homeostasis, and associated processes within zebrafish. Finally, we describe emerging methods being used to establish new zebrafish models of diabetes and related pathologies, to expand the use of this model organism to discover new therapies and to facilitate studies of disease pathology.

  4. Stimulus-secretion coupling in the developing exocrine pancreas: secretory responsiveness to cholecystokinin

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the onset of secretory responsiveness to cholecystokinin (CCK) during development of the rat exocrine pancreas. Although acinar cells of the fetal pancreas (1 d before birth) are filled with zymogen granules containing the secretory protein, alpha- amylase, the rate of amylase secretion from pancreatic lobules incubated in vitro was not increased in response to CCK. In contrast, the rate of CCK-stimulated amylase discharge from the neonatal pancreas (1 d after birth) was increased four- to eightfold above that of the fetal gland. The postnatal amplification of secretory responsiveness was not associated with an increase in the number or cell surface expression of 125I-CCK binding sites. When 125I-CCK-33 binding proteins were analyzed by affinity crosslinking, two proteins of Mr 210,000 and 100,000-160,000 were labeled specifically in both fetal and neonatal pancreas. To determine if cell surface receptors for CCK in the fetal pancreas are functional and able to generate a rise in the cytosolic [Ca++], we measured 45Ca++ efflux from tracer-loaded lobules. 45Ca++ efflux from both fetal and neonatal pancreas was comparably increased by CCK, indicating CCK-induced Ca++ mobilization and elevated cytosolic [Ca++]. The Ca++ ionophore A23187 also stimulated the rate of 45Ca++ extrusion from pancreas of both ages. Increased amylase secretion occurred concurrently with A23187-stimulated 45Ca++ efflux in neonatal pancreas, but not in the fetal gland. A23187 in combination with dibutyryl cAMP potentiated amylase release from the neonatal gland, but not from fetal pancreas. Similarly, the protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate, did not increase the rate of secretion from the fetal gland when added alone or in combination with A23187 or CCK. We suggest that CCK-receptor interaction in the fetal pancreas triggers intracellular Ca++ mobilization. However, one or more signal transduction events distal to Ca++ mobilization have not yet matured. The onset of

  5. Benign Occipital Epilepsies of Childhood: Clinical Features and Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Isabella; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Kivity, Sara; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2008-01-01

    The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC) are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. Our aim was to explore the clinical features, classification and clinical genetics of these syndromes using twin and multiplex family studies to determine whether…

  6. Caveolin-1 overexpression in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Nazhvani, Ali Dehghani; Azizi, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Caveolin-1, a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, is supposed to have different regulatory roles as promoter or suppressor in many human cancers. However, no published study concerned its expression in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of Cav-1 in the most common benign and malignant salivary gland tumors and evaluate its correlation with proliferation activity. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, immunohistochemical expression of caveolin-1 and Ki67 were evaluated in 49 samples, including 11 normal salivary glands, 15 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PA), 13 adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCC), and 10 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC). The expression of Cav-1 was seen in 18 % of normal salivary glands and 85 % of tumors. The immunoreaction in the tumors was significantly higher than normal tissues (P = 0.001), but the difference between benign and malignant tumors was not significant (P = 0.07). Expression of Cav-1 was correlated with Ki67 labeling index in PAs, but not in malignant tumors. Cav-1 expression was not in association with tumor size and stage. Overexpression of Cav-1 was found in salivary gland tumors in comparison with normal tissues, but no significant difference was observed between benign and malignant tumors. Cav-1 was inversely correlated with proliferation in PA. Therefore, this marker may participate in tumorigenesis of salivary gland tumors and may be a potential biomarker for cancer treatments.

  7. Benign eccrine cylindroma of the external auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R S; Johnson, J T

    1980-03-01

    The benign eccrine cylindroma is one of a number of histologically different tumors of the external auditory canal that have been grouped by some as "ceruminomas." The eccrine cylindroma, malignant apocrine gland tumors, and the adenoid cystic carcinomas of salivary gland origin are distinctly different histologically and in natural history and prognosis. Therapy should, therefore, be tailored to the specific tumor. A patient is presented who developed an asymptomatic external auditory canal mass that was initially incompletely excised. A recurrence five years later again proved to be a benign eccrine cylindroma of sweat gland origin. Successful and adequate treatment was local excision with a cuff of normal tissue. A variety of tumors originating from the adnexal skin structures may appear in the external auditory meatus and canal. Treatment must include biopsy and close consultation with the pathologist. The term cylindroma has been loosely applied to both benign and malignant glandular neoplasms but its usage should be restricted to the specific benign eccrine cylindrome herein described. A rationale of therapy is presented.

  8. Unilateral multiple benign mixed tumors of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Behnke, E E

    1982-11-01

    Multiple tumors of a single salivary gland in an unoperated-on patient are rare; only five have previously been reported in the world literature. The author reports the sixth case of multiple, benign mixed tumors of a unilateral parotid gland in a 61-year-old woman, discusses its management, and reviews the literature.

  9. Benign and malignant thyroid nodules after neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fjaelling, M.T.; Tisell, L.E.; Carlsson, S.; Hansson, G.; Lundberg, L.M.; Oden, A.

    1986-09-15

    A total of 444 persons were examined for the presence of thyroid nodules on average of 43 years after having been treated with x-rays for cervical tuberculous adenitis. Of this total, 101 subjects had undergone surgery for thyroid nodules: 25 for carcinoma (6%) and 76 for benign nodules (17%). Carcinoma occurred with the same frequency in multinodular and uninodular glands. Because of the uneven age distribution in the current series, it could not be decided whether there was a higher susceptibility of the young thyroid to the induction of thyroid carcinoma or benign nodules. The dosage range for the whole series was 0.40 to 50.90 Gy (40-5090 rad). There was a positive correlation between the absorbed radiation dose and the probability of developing benign and malignant thyroid nodules, even after doses of 20 Gy or more. The risk of developing thyroid carcinoma was equal for men and women, while the female-to-male ratio for benign nodules was 2.9:1, indicating that risk factors associated with females are of less importance in irradiated than in nonirradiated populations. The median latency for carcinoma was 40 years, suggesting that the increased risk of thyroid carcinoma after irradiation remains for the rest of the patient's life.

  10. A drainage operation for injury to the pancreas preserved the distal pancreas, spleen and the residual stomach after distal gastrectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Kimura, Wataru; Yano, Mitsumasa; Hachiya, Osamu; Ma, Jinfeng; Fuse, Akira

    2007-01-01

    We experienced a case in which a drainage operation for injury of the pancreas preserved the distal pancreas, spleen and the residual stomach after distal gastrectomy for complete laceration of the stomach. A 23-year-old male was crushed by a large truck while driving a car without a seat belt. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed a low-density area in and around the body of the pancreas, which suggested contusion of the pancreatic parenchyma. An emergent operation was indicated due to free air and massive bleeding in the abdominal cavity and liver damage. At the operation, the antrum of the stomach was completely lacerated and distal gastrectomy was performed. Drains were set around the body of the pancreas. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy would have led to total gastrectomy because of lack of blood supply to the residual stomach after distal gastrectomy. We limited the drainage operation for pancreatic trauma. As a result, the pancreatic body and tail were preserved, which is thought to be a much better long-term result for this patient. PMID:18251137

  11. Application of glycerol to freezing bovine pancreas. Part 1. Effect of cryoprotector on activity of certain enzymes in frozen minced pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, E; Fik, M

    1990-01-01

    Effects of different concentrations of glycerol on the activity of amylase, lipase, and proteases in frozen minced pancreas were studied. A 15% glycerol addition was found to decrease the proteolytic enzyme activity and to increase the activity of amylase. Moreover, accelerated freezing was shown to enhance the activity of all the enzymes studied. PMID:1691448

  12. Role of robotic-assisted surgery in benign esophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Shireesh; Unger, Eric; Grossman, Julie; Couto, Francisco; Singh, Namrata; Lind, David Scott; Panait, Lucian; Castellanos, Andres

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopic treatment of benign esophageal conditions is technically complex with several inherent limitations. Robotic-assisted surgery provides technical improvement and helps to overcome some of these limitations. We therefore report a single surgeon's experience in management of benign esophageal diseases by robotic-assisted surgery. Over a period of 8 consecutive years, a retrospective chart review was performed of 105 patients who underwent robotic-assisted surgery for benign esophageal diseases by a single surgeon. Demographic data and outcome measures were studied. The robotic-assisted procedures included 85 Nissen fundoplications with and without mesh repair, 12 Heller myotomies and eight para-esophageal hernia repairs. The mean total operating time was lowest for the Nissen group (94 min) and highest for the para-esophageal group (183 min). Operating time decreased from a mean of 105 min in the first 20 cases to 84 min in the last 20 cases for the Nissen group (P = 0.014). The mean length of stay was 1.3, 1.6, 1.5 and 4.8 days for the groups, respectively. Persistent symptoms of dysphagia/reflux/dysphonia requiring further investigation were seen in nine (8 %) of these patients. Two of these patients required repeat Nissen fundoplication in the mesh group. Our complication rate, total operating time and length of stay for robotic-assisted benign esophageal surgery are comparable to those reported in the literature. When performed by an experienced surgeon, robotic-assisted surgery is safe and effective in the management of benign esophageal diseases.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime of normal, benign, and malignant thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandao, Mariana; Iwakura, Ricardo; Basilio, Fagne; Haleplian, Kaique; Ito, Amando; de Freitas, Luiz Carlos Conti; Bachmann, Luciano

    2015-06-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology is the standard technique to diagnose thyroid pathologies. However, this method results in a high percentage of inconclusive and false negatives. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to detect biochemical composition and tissue structure alterations could help to develop a portable, minimally invasive, and nondestructive method to assist during surgical procedures. This study aimed to use fluorescence lifetimes to differentiate healthy and benign tissues from malignant thyroid tissue. The thyroid tissue was excited at 298-300 nm and the fluorescence decay registered at 340 and 450 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes at 340 nm emission of 0.80±0.26 and 3.94±0.47 ns for healthy tissue; 0.90±0.24 and 4.05±0.46 ns for benign lesions; and 1.21±0.14 and 4.63±0.25 ns for malignant lesions. For 450 nm emissions, we obtain lifetimes of 0.25±0.18 and 3.99±0.39 ns for healthy tissue, 0.24±0.17 and 4.20±0.48 ns for benign lesions, 0.33±0.32 and 4.55±0.55 ns for malignant lesions. Employing analysis of variance, we differentiate malignant lesions from benign and healthy tissues. In addition, we use quadratic discriminant analysis to distinguish malignant from benign and healthy tissues with an accuracy of 76.1%, sensitivity of 74.7%, and specificity of 83.3%. These results indicate that time-resolved fluorescence can assist medical evaluation of thyroid pathologies during surgeries.

  14. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Graft Pancreas Divisum in a Patient with Modified Multi-Visceral Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Slivka, Adam

    2014-01-01

    A patient with modified multivisceral transplant developed recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) 1 year after transplant and was found to have graft pancreas divisum with otherwise negative work-up for identifying the etiology of RAP. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed with minor papilla sphincterotomy and pancreatic duct stent placement of the graft pancreas. The patient's symptoms resolved following endotherapy for a follow-up period of 2 years. This is a unique case of graft pancreatitis secondary to pancreas divisum. PMID:26157839

  15. Enigmatic Ectopic Fat: Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease and Its Associated Factors in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih‐Yuan; Ou, Horng‐Yih; Chen, Ming‐Fong; Chang, Tien‐Chun; Chang, Chih‐Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is an enigmatic manifestation of ectopic fat deposition in obesity. Studies have shown that pancreatic lipid accumulation interferes with insulin secretion in humans. However, the prevalence of fatty pancreas and its associated factors in the general population remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of fatty pancreas and its association with diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Chinese population. Methods and Results This was a cross‐sectional study. A total of 8097 subjects with or without fatty pancreas (n=1297 and 6800, respectively) were recruited. Each subject was assessed by using abdominal sonography to diagnose NAFLD and fatty pancreas. Clinical and metabolic parameters were compared between groups, and their associations with fatty pancreas were examined. The prevalence of fatty pancreas was 16%. The fatty pancreas group had a significantly greater proportion of subjects with diabetes (12.6% versus 5.2%) and NAFLD (67.2% versus 35.1%) than did the non–fatty pancreas group (P<0.001). In the logistic regression analysis, age (P<0.001), general or central obesity (P<0.001), diabetes (P<0.001), and NAFLD (P<0.001) were independently associated with fatty pancreas after adjustment for sex, lipid profile, alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase ratio, hypertension, smoking, alcohol drinking, and exercise. Conclusions The prevalence of fatty pancreas is high in the general population. Both diabetes and NAFLD are important associated factors of fatty pancreas, independent of age, sex, adiposity, and other cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:24572250

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Disease Stratified Human Pancreas Tissue Indicates Unique Signature of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tanya C; Morris, Margaret A; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Pugliese, Alberto; Nadler, Jerry L; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with functional beta cell loss due to ongoing inflammation. Despite shared similarities, T1D is an autoimmune disease with evidence of autoantibody production, as well as a role for exocrine pancreas involvement. Our hypothesis is that differential protein expression occurs in disease stratified pancreas tissues and regulated proteins from endocrine and exocrine tissues are potential markers of disease and potential therapeutic targets. The study objective was to identify novel proteins that distinguish the pancreas from donors with T1D from the pancreas from patients with T2D, or autoantibody positive non-diabetic donors. Detailed quantitative comprehensive proteomic analysis was applied to snap frozen human pancreatic tissue lysates from organ donors without diabetes, with T1D-associated autoantibodies in the absence of diabetes, with T1D, or with T2D. These disease-stratified human pancreas tissues contain exocrine and endocrine tissues (with dysfunctional islets) in the same microenvironment. The expression profiles of several of the proteins were further verified by western blot. We identified protein panels that are significantly and uniquely upregulated in the three disease-stratified pancreas tissues compared to non-disease control tissues. These proteins are involved in inflammation, metabolic regulation, and autoimmunity, all of which are pathways linked to, and likely involved in, T1 and T2 diabetes pathogenesis. Several new proteins were differentially upregulated in prediabetic, T1D, and T2D pancreas. The results identify proteins that could serve as novel prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic tools to preserve functional islet mass in Type 1 Diabetes.

  17. Pheochromocytoma of the pancreas: A report of three cases and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Ding, Hui; Cai, Min; He, Yan-An; Cai, Yu; Zeng, Yong; Tian, Bo-Le

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is primarily derived from the adrenal medulla. The majority of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma cases occur in the superior para-aortic region and para-adrenal area. However, pheochromocytoma originating from the pancreas is rare. The present study reports the cases of three patients who had no history of hypertension but were post-operatively diagnosed with pheochromocytoma located in the pancreas. Of the three patients, two were admitted to hospital due to abdominal pain, and imaging examinations revealed a soft-tissue lesion in the head of pancreas. Local resection of the pancreatic tumor was successfully performed and a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma derived from the pancreas was subsequently made by pathologists. The third patient was admitted to hospital for surgical treatment due to the identification of a continuously growing lesion in the tail of pancreas during physical examinations. Distal resection of the pancreas was stopped during surgery when the patient's blood pressure and heart rate suddenly increased to 180/110 mmHg and 140 beats/min, respectively. Due to a marked rise in noradrenaline and adrenaline levels in the blood subsequent to surgery, the patient was diagnosed with pancreatic pheochromocytoma. The present study additionally reviewed the associated literature concerning pheochromocytoma in order to improve the understanding of this rare clinical phenomenon. The aim of the present study is to highlight to surgeons that although patients may not present with typical clinical manifestations due to the non-functional status of the tumor, undiagnosed pheochromocytoma of the pancreas should be considered when surgeons observe an unexpected hypertensive crisis during pancreatic tumor surgery. PMID:27446377

  18. Enhancement of the normal pancreas: comparison of manganese-DPDP and gadolinium chelate.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, U; Warshauer, D M; Brown, E D; Schlund, J F; Eisenberg, L B; Semelka, R C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare manganese-DPDP (Mn-DPDP) and gadolinium chelate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agents for enhancement of the normal pancreas. A total of 14 patients with focal liver disease underwent Mn-DPDP- and Gd-DTPA-enhanced 1.5 T MR examinations using spoiled gradient-echo (FLASH) technique at two separate times. Contrast agents were injected according to the currently recommended practices; Gd-DTPA was injected as a rapid bolus injection in a dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg, and Mn-DPDP was injected as a slow IV injection in a dosage of 5 mumol/kg. Quantitative region of interest measurements were made in 11 patients, and percent contrast enhancement of the pancreas and pancreas-fat signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were determined for each agent. Images were also evaluated qualitatively by consensus reading of two investigators and overall scan quality was rated on a scale from 1 (poor) to 4 (very good). Enhancement of the pancreas immediately post Gd-DTPA was significantly higher than 15 min post Mn-DPDP (73.3 vs 36.3%; p = 0.003). On postcontrast images the pancreas-fat SNR measurements were 7.7 (i.e., pancreas higher in signal than fat) and -6.1 for Gd-DTPA and Mn-DPDP, respectively, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). Image quality was rated as 3.1 and 2.5 for Gd-DTPA- and Mn-DPDP-enhanced images, respectively. The normal pancreas enhances significantly more with Gd-DTPA than with Mn-DPDP administered under the conditions of this study. Overall image quality is also greater on the Gd-DTPA-enhanced images.

  19. Precipitation Reactions in Agar Between Swine Serum and Homologous Pancreas Extracts.

    PubMed

    Pirtle, E C

    1963-10-01

    Hyperimmune anti-hog cholera and nonimmune swine sera yielded approximately 50% more precipitation reactions in agar-gel diffusion tests with pancreas extracts from SPF noninfected swine than with extracts obtained from swine experimentally infected with virulent hog cholera virus. The pancreas-reacting property of swine serum was determined to be relatively heat stable, withstanding 68 C for 30 minutes. Of various swine serum fractions tested, the only one that reacted with pancreas extracts contained gamma, beta and alpha-globulins. In the absence of alpha-globulin, precipitation reactions were not observed. Sera of newborn SPF piglets, containing 50% alpha-2 globulin, formed more intense precipitation lines with swine pancreas extracts than were formed by the sera of their dams with the same extracts. The pancreas-reacting activity of swine sera was completely removed by absorption with pancreatic tissue. This property was not removed by absorption with guinea pig kidney, or beef, swine or human erythrocytes. Maceration of pancreatic tissue released reactive substances in a polydispersed form. This was demonstrated by the ability of almost all supernates and sediments from differential centrifugation of such preparations to form precipitation lines with swine sera. Reactive substances from swine pancreas were found to be relatively heat labile, being inactivated in one hour at 56C. No evidence was obtained in this study to indicate that the observed precipitation reactions were related to hog cholera virus and its corresponding antibody. The reactions are believed to have resulted from the interaction of protein-related substances present in normal swine pancreas with a relatively heat stable component, possibly alpha-globulin, in swine serum.

  20. Macrophage dynamics are regulated by local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment in injured pancreas.

    PubMed

    Van Gassen, Naomi; Van Overmeire, Eva; Leuckx, Gunter; Heremans, Yves; De Groef, Sofie; Cai, Ying; Elkrim, Yvon; Gysemans, Conny; Stijlemans, Benoît; Van de Casteele, Mark; De Baetselier, Patrick; De Leu, Nico; Heimberg, Harry; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2015-05-01

    Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL) activates a healing response, encompassing β-cell neogenesis and proliferation. Macrophages (MΦs) were recently shown to promote β-cell proliferation after PDL, but they remain poorly characterized. We assessed myeloid cell diversity and the factors driving myeloid cell dynamics following acute pancreas injury by PDL. In naive and sham-operated pancreas, the myeloid cell compartment consisted mainly of two distinct tissue-resident MΦ types, designated MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) MΦs, the latter being predominant. MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) pancreas MΦs differed at the molecular level, with MHC-II(lo) MΦs being more M2-activated. After PDL, there was an early surge of Ly6C(hi) monocyte infiltration in the pancreas, followed by a transient MHC-II(lo) MΦ peak and ultimately a restoration of the MHC-II(hi) MΦ-dominated steady-state equilibrium. These intricate MΦ dynamics in PDL pancreas depended on monocyte recruitment by C-C chemokine receptor 2 and macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor as well as on macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor-dependent local MΦ proliferation. Functionally, MHC-II(lo) MΦs were more angiogenic. We further demonstrated that, at least in C-C chemokine receptor 2-KO mice, tissue MΦs, rather than Ly6C(hi) monocyte-derived MΦs, contributed to β-cell proliferation. Together, our study fully characterizes the MΦ subsets in the pancreas and clarifies the complex dynamics of MΦs after PDL injury.

  1. Islet isolation from human pancreas with extended cold ischemia time.

    PubMed

    Kühtreiber, W M; Ho, L T; Kamireddy, A; Yacoub, J A W; Scharp, D W

    2010-01-01

    The general consensus among transplant centers is that a cold ischemia time (CIT) beyond 8 hours results in reduced yields and quality of human islets. We sought to optimize the isolation process and enzymes for pancreata with extended CIT. We processed 16 extended CIT pancreata (13.2 +/- 0.7 hours). Donors averaged 50.8 +/- 2.6 (standard error of the mean) years old with a body mass index of 28.6 +/- 1.5. Glands were shipped in cold organ preservation solution without oxygenated perfluorocarbon. Isolations were performed under a protocol optimized for digestion with the new cGMP collagenase from Roche. Purification used continuous Euroficoll/University of Wisconsin gradients. Islets were cultured in two types of Prodo cGMP islet culture media and/or in Miami 1A media. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assays were performed after 8 to 16 days of culture. Prepurification yield averaged 415 +/- 41 KIEQ postpurification, 359 +/- 29 KIEQ (purification loss 13.5%); and postculture 317 +/- 27 KIEQ (culture loss 11.7%). Our process liberated an average of 4278 IEQ/g of pancreas (97 +/- 5 g). Most islets were recovered in the purest fraction (purity 79.7% +/- 1.9%). Culture loss in our enhanced culture media was 11.7%. After 2 to 3 days in culture, viability was 92% +/- 1%. Islets exhibited compactness and dithizone staining. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assays performed after 3 to 23 days in our PIM(R) media resulted in a stimulation index of 6.8 +/- 1.7 (G50 to G350). We concluded that our human islet isolation process permitted the recovery of large numbers of high-quality human islets from extended CIT pancreata and that our cGMP islet culture media was superior to the current standard CMRL-based media. PMID:20692399

  2. Calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1979-10-01

    The quantitative relation of calcium and protein secretion was studied on the isolated perfused canine pancreas at different secretory states of hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation and various extracellular Ca++-concentrations. 1. Calcium and protein secretion are correlated at both ecbolic and hydrokinetic stimulation as well as by biological or synthetic secretion. 2. Enzyme-associated calcium was estimated at 35 nmol/mg protein and did not vary under differing stimulatory and secretory conditions. 3. During variable concentrations of synthetic secretin basal protein and calcium concentrations in the pancreatic juice show a hyperbolic relationship to the respective rates of fluid secretion. At flow rates beyond 3 ml/5 min the calcium concentrations asymptotically tend to 0.46 mEq/l while protein concentrations nearly decrease to zero. Moreover, the y-intercept of the regressionline correlating the calcium and protein concentrations gives with 0.48 mEq/l Ca++ additional evidence of the existence and magnitude of an enzyme-independent calcium fraction, which seems to remain constant over the whole range of secretory rates. 4. The omission of perfusate calcium does not abolish the calcium-protein correlation either at hydrokinetic or at ecbolic stimulation, but diminishes the enzyme-independent calcium fraction. 5. Enhancing perfusate Ca++-concentrations augments calcium output byt fails in stimulating enzyme secretion. It is concluded that at exclusively hydrokinetic stimulation basal secreted protein with a definite amount of chelated calcium is diluted by variable rates of pancreatic juice containing enzyme independent Ca++ at a constant concentration. During different secretory states of hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation the respective proportions of enzyme associated and independent calcium vary, and thus determine changes in the calcium-protein ratios. Extracellular calcium can only influence the non-protein-bound calcium fraction of the pancreatic juice

  3. GoCARB in the Context of an Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Agianniotis, Aristotelis; Anthimopoulos, Marios; Daskalaki, Elena; Drapela, Aurélie; Stettler, Christoph; Diem, Peter; Mougiakakou, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an artificial pancreas (AP), the meals are either manually announced or detected and their size estimated from the blood glucose level. Both methods have limitations, which result in suboptimal postprandial glucose control. The GoCARB system is designed to provide the carbohydrate content of meals and is presented within the AP framework. Method: The combined use of GoCARB with a control algorithm is assessed in a series of 12 computer simulations. The simulations are defined according to the type of the control (open or closed loop), the use or not-use of GoCARB and the diabetics’ skills in carbohydrate estimation. Results: For bad estimators without GoCARB, the percentage of the time spent in target range (70-180 mg/dl) during the postprandial period is 22.5% and 66.2% for open and closed loop, respectively. When the GoCARB is used, the corresponding percentages are 99.7% and 99.8%. In case of open loop, the time spent in severe hypoglycemic events (<50 mg/dl) is 33.6% without the GoCARB and is reduced to 0.0% when the GoCARB is used. In case of closed loop, the corresponding percentage is 1.4% without the GoCARB and is reduced to 0.0% with the GoCARB. Conclusion: The use of GoCARB improves the control of postprandial response and glucose profiles especially in the case of open loop. However, the most efficient regulation is achieved by the combined use of the control algorithm and the GoCARB. PMID:25904142

  4. Mechanisms of Action of GLP-1 in the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Máire E.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2007-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone that is encoded in the proglucagon gene. It is mainly produced in enteroendocrine L cells of the gut and is secreted into the blood stream when food containing fat, protein hydrolysate and/or glucose enters the duodenum. Its particular effects on insulin and glucagon secretion have generated a flurry of research activity over the past twenty years culminating in a naturally occurring GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, now being used to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 engages a specific G-protein coupled receptor that is present in tissues other than the pancreas (brain, kidney, lung, heart, major blood vessels). The most widely studied cell activated by GLP-1 is the insulin-secreting beta cell where its defining action is augmentation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. Upon GLP-1 receptor activation, adenylyl cyclase is activated and cAMP generated, leading, in turn, to cAMP-dependent activation of second messenger pathways, such as the PKA and Epac pathways. As well as short-term effects of enhancing glucose-induced insulin secretion, continuous GLP-1 receptor activation also increases insulin synthesis, and beta cell proliferation and neogenesis. Although these latter effects cannot be currently monitored in humans, there are substantial improvements in glucose tolerance and increases in both first phase and plateau phase insulin secretory responses in type 2 diabetic patients treated with exendin-4. This review we will focus on the effects resulting from GLP-1 receptor activation in islets of Langerhans PMID:17306374

  5. Concise review: pancreas regeneration: recent advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lysy, Philippe A; Weir, Gordon C; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2012-02-01

    The replacement of functional pancreatic β-cells is seen as an attractive potential therapy for diabetes, because diabetes results from an inadequate β-cell mass. Inducing replication of the remaining β-cells and new islet formation from progenitors within the pancreas (neogenesis) are the most direct ways to increase the β-cell mass. Stimulation of both replication and neogenesis have been reported in rodents, but their clinical significance must still be shown. Because human islet transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donors and graft failure within a few years, efforts have recently concentrated on the use of stem cells to replace the deficient β-cells. Currently, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells achieve high levels of β-cell differentiation, but their clinical use is still hampered by ethical issues and/or the risk of developing tumors after transplantation. Pancreatic epithelial cells (duct, acinar, or α-cells) represent an appealing alternative to stem cells because they demonstrate β-cell differentiation capacities. Yet translation of such capacity to human cells after significant in vitro expansion has yet to be achieved. Besides providing new β-cells, cell therapy also has to address the question on how to protect the transplanted cells from destruction by the immune system via either allo- or autoimmunity. Encouraging developments have been made in encapsulation and immunomodulation techniques, but many challenges still remain. Herein, we discuss recent advances in the search for β-cell replacement therapies, current strategies for circumventing the immune system, and mandatory steps for new techniques to be translated from bench to clinics.

  6. Calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1979-10-01

    The quantitative relation of calcium and protein secretion was studied on the isolated perfused canine pancreas at different secretory states of hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation and various extracellular Ca++-concentrations. 1. Calcium and protein secretion are correlated at both ecbolic and hydrokinetic stimulation as well as by biological or synthetic secretion. 2. Enzyme-associated calcium was estimated at 35 nmol/mg protein and did not vary under differing stimulatory and secretory conditions. 3. During variable concentrations of synthetic secretin basal protein and calcium concentrations in the pancreatic juice show a hyperbolic relationship to the respective rates of fluid secretion. At flow rates beyond 3 ml/5 min the calcium concentrations asymptotically tend to 0.46 mEq/l while protein concentrations nearly decrease to zero. Moreover, the y-intercept of the regressionline correlating the calcium and protein concentrations gives with 0.48 mEq/l Ca++ additional evidence of the existence and magnitude of an enzyme-independent calcium fraction, which seems to remain constant over the whole range of secretory rates. 4. The omission of perfusate calcium does not abolish the calcium-protein correlation either at hydrokinetic or at ecbolic stimulation, but diminishes the enzyme-independent calcium fraction. 5. Enhancing perfusate Ca++-concentrations augments calcium output byt fails in stimulating enzyme secretion. It is concluded that at exclusively hydrokinetic stimulation basal secreted protein with a definite amount of chelated calcium is diluted by variable rates of pancreatic juice containing enzyme independent Ca++ at a constant concentration. During different secretory states of hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation the respective proportions of enzyme associated and independent calcium vary, and thus determine changes in the calcium-protein ratios. Extracellular calcium can only influence the non-protein-bound calcium fraction of the pancreatic juice

  7. Human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas express extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, M.; Trautmann, B.; Göttler, M.; Peters, S.; Zauner, I.; Maillet, B.; Klöppel, G.

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterised by a dense connective tissue reaction. To test the hypothesis that stroma components are synthesised and produced by the tumour cells themselves, eight cell lines as well as six xenografted tumours from human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were examined for the expression of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), using cDNA probes and antibodies to collagen types I, III and IV, vitronectin, fibronectin, undulin and laminin. All tumour cell lines (CAPAN-1, CAPAN-2, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1, PaCa-2, PaCa-3, PaCa-44) and xenografted human pancreatic tumours expressed at least one of the examined ECM at the RNA (collagen type IV > laminin = fibronectin = vitronectin > collagen type III > undulin > collagen type I) or protein level (collagen type IV = collagen type III > vitronectin > laminin > collagen type I = fibronectin > undulin). In nude mouse tumours expression of laminin and collagen I was most pronounced in well-differentiated carcinomas. In a few tumours, collagen type III, vitronectin and undulin were expressed on the luminal side of the neoplastic glands, suggesting loss of normal polar differentiation. Incubation with fetal calf serum modulated ECM RNA levels to a varying extent in all but one cell line (AsPC-1). The results suggest that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas cells are capable of synthesising and producing extracellular matrix proteins in vitro and in vivo, but that the extent and pattern of ECM expression differs between the various tumours and conditions tested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8286197

  8. AP@home: The Artificial Pancreas Is Now at Home.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Benesch, Carsten; DeVries, J Hans

    2016-07-01

    In the past years the development of an artificial pancreas (AP) has made great progress and many activities are ongoing in this area of research. The major step forward made in the last years was moving the evaluation of AP systems from highly controlled experimental conditions to daily life conditions at the home of patients with diabetes; this was also the aim of the European Union-funded AP@home project. Over a time period of 5 years a series of clinical studies were performed that culminated in 2 "final studies" during which an AP system was used by patients in their home environment for 2 or 3 months without supervision by a physician, living their normal lives. Two different versions of the AP system developed within this project were evaluated. A significant improvement in glycated hemoglobin was observed during closed-loop conditions despite the fact that during the control period the patients used the best currently available therapeutic option. In addition, a "single-port AP system" was developed within the project that combines continuous glucose monitoring and insulin infusion at a single tissue site. By using such a combined device the patients not only have to carry one less device around, the number of access points through the skin is also reduced from 2 to 1. In summary, close cooperation of 12 European partners, both academic centers and industry, enabled the development and evaluation of AP systems under daily life conditions. The next step is to develop these into products in cooperation with commercial partners. PMID:26888971

  9. Distinct enhancers of ptf1a mediate specification and expansion of ventral pancreas in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pashos, Evanthia; Park, Joon Tae; Leach, Steven; Fisher, Shannon

    2013-09-15

    Development of the pancreas and cerebellum require Pancreas-specific transcription factor-1a (Ptf1a), which encodes a subunit of the transcription factor complex PTF1. Ptf1a is required in succession for specification of the pancreas, proper allocation of pancreatic progenitors to endocrine and exocrine fates, and the production of digestive enzymes from the exocrine acini. In several neuronal structures, including the cerebellum, hindbrain, retina and spinal cord, Ptf1a is transiently expressed and promotes inhibitory neuron fates at the expense of excitatory fates. Transcription of Ptf1a in mouse is maintained in part by PTF1 acting on an upstream autoregulatory enhancer. However, the transcription factors and enhancers that initially activate Ptf1a expression in the pancreas and in certain structures of the nervous system have not yet been identified. Here we describe a zebrafish autoregulatory element, conserved among teleosts, with activity similar to that described in mouse. In addition, we performed a comprehensive survey of all non-coding sequences in a 67kb interval encompassing zebrafish ptf1a, and identified several neuronal enhancers, and an enhancer active in the ventral pancreas prior to activation of the autoregulatory enhancer. To test the requirement for autoregulatory control during pancreatic development, we restored ptf1a function through BAC transgenesis in ptf1a morphants, either with an intact BAC or one lacking the autoregulatory enhancer. We find that ptf1a autoregulation is required for development of the exocrine pancreas and full rescue of the ptf1a morphant phenotype. Similarly, we demonstrate that a ptf1a locus lacking the early enhancer region is also capable of rescue, but only supports formation of a hypoplastic exocrine pancreas. Through our dissection of the complex regulatory control of ptf1a, we identified separate cis-regulatory elements that underlie different aspects of its expression and function, and further demonstrated

  10. Benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms: neuropsychological findings.

    PubMed

    Germanò, Eva; Gagliano, Antonella; Magazù, Angela; Sferro, Caterina; Calarese, Tiziana; Mannarino, Erminia; Calamoneri, Filippo

    2005-05-01

    Benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms is classified among childhood benign partial epilepsies. The absence of neurological and neuropsychological deficits has long been considered as a prerequisite for a diagnosis of benign childhood partial epilepsy. Much evidence has been reported in literature in the latest years suggesting a neuropsychological impairment in this type of epilepsy, particularly in the type with Rolandic paroxysms. The present work examines the neuropsychological profiles of a sample of subjects affected by the early-onset benign childhood occipital seizures (EBOS) described by Panayotopulos. The patient group included 22 children (14 males and 8 females; mean age 10.1+/-3.3 years) diagnosed as having EBOS. The patients were examined with a set of tests investigating neuropsychological functions: memory, attention, perceptive, motor, linguistic and academic (reading, writing, arithmetic) abilities. The same instruments have been given to a homogeneous control group as regards sex, age, level of education and socio-economic background. None of the subjects affected by EBOS showed intellectual deficit (mean IQ in Wechsler Full Scale 91.7; S.D. 8.9). Results show a widespread cognitive dysfunction in the context of a focal epileptogenic process in EBOS. In particular, children with EBOS show a significant occurrence of specific learning disabilities (SLD) and other subtle neuropsychological deficits. We found selective dysfunctions relating to perceptive-visual attentional ability (p<0.05), verbal and visual-spatial memory abilities (p<0.01), visual perception and visual-motor integration global abilities (p<0.01), manual dexterity tasks (p<0.05), some language tasks (p<0.05), reading and writing abilities (p<0.01) and arithmetic ability (p<0.01). The presence of cognitive dysfunctions in subjects with EBOS supports the hypothesis that epilepsy itself plays a role in the development of neuropsychological impairment. Supported by other

  11. Outcomes of Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation in Type 2 Diabetic Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Marcelo Santos; Kuo, Hung-Tien

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease may receive a simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplant. However, outcomes are not well described. Risks for death and graft failure were examined in SPK type 2 diabetic recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using the United Network for Organ Sharing database, outcomes of SPK transplants were compared between type 2 and type 1 diabetic recipients. All primary SPK adult recipients transplanted between 2000 and 2007 (n = 6756) were stratified according to end-stage pancreas disease diagnosis (type 1: n=6141, type 2: n=582). Posttransplant complications and risks for death and kidney/pancreas graft failure were compared. Results Of the 6756 SPK transplants, 8.6% were performed in recipients with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Rates of delayed kidney graft function and primary kidney nonfunction were higher in the type 2 diabetics. Five-year overall and death-censored kidney graft survival were inferior in type 2 diabetics. After adjustment for other risk factors, including recipient (age, race, body weight, dialysis time, and cardiovascular comorbidities), donor, and transplant immune characteristics, type 2 diabetes was not associated with increased risk for death or kidney or pancreas failure when compared with type 1 diabetic recipients. Conclusions After adjustment for other risk factors, SPK recipients with type 2 diabetes diagnosis were not at increased risk for death, kidney failure, or pancreas failure when compared with recipients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21441123

  12. Novel Methods of Insulin Replacement: The Artificial Pancreas and Encapsulated Islets.

    PubMed

    Malek, Rana; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes represents 5-10% of patients with diabetes worldwide. The importance of tight glycemic control has been demonstrated definitively in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial but is often elusive for patients because of the associated risk of hypoglycemia. Care for these patients requires coordination amongst a variety of health professionals including primary care providers, endocrinologists, nephrologists, ophthalmologists, pharmacists, podiatrists and others. The 21(st) century is witnessing emerging and exciting treatment options for this disease. Previous attempts at curative therapy have included pancreas or islet transplantation, but limitations of organ availability and the risk associated with immunosuppression have resulted in renewed efforts for novel methods of insulin replacement. Advancement in technology has resulted in several versions of an artificial pancreas-technology that uses a continuous glucose monitor to sense the blood sugar, transmit those numbers to a control algorithm that then doses insulin ± glucagon in response to changes in blood sugar. Free living experiments with two versions of the artificial pancreas have recently been published. A quest for a bioartificial pancreas has been ongoing as well. In this system, islets (porcine, human, or embryonic stem cell derived) are encapsulated in a biocompatible device that is either a macrocapsule or a microcapsule. The benefits of this system allows for replacement therapy without immunosuppression. Human trials with encapsulation are currently ongoing. This review will provide a detailed review of artificial and bioartificial pancreas systems with a focus on human trials.

  13. [Diagnostic evaluation of tubeless methods in the study of external secretions of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Zueva, E D

    1997-09-01

    Difficulties of examining the external secretion of the pancreas by direct secretin-pancreozymin test prompted us to try 4 probe-free methods for functional assessment of the pancreas in 33 patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis, 50 patients with reactive pancreatitis concomitant with duodenal ulcer, chronic duodenal obstruction, etc., and in 22 patients with primary chronic pancreatitis during a relapse. The Benda-Zheltvai method with assessment of the debit of uric excretion of alpha-amylase during three 30-min intervals before and after standard food loading and calculation of the pancreozymin induction coefficient, assessment of the ratio of alpha-amylase and creatinine clearance from their content in the urine, the proserine provocation urotest, and Lasus test for hyperaminoaciduria resultant from exocrine insufficiency of the pancreas were used. The Benda-Zheltvai method proved to be a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of exocrine insufficiency of the pancreas; moreover, it can be used for assessing the treatment efficacy. The proserine test helps assess the type and severity of disorders of pancreatic external secretion. The ratio of alpha-amylase to creatinine clearance demonstrates just the most expressed disorders of pancreatic exocrine secretion during the relapse of primary chronic pancreatitis. Lasus test for hyperaminoaciduria detects pancreatic dyscrinia and provides valuable information about the function of the pancreas.

  14. Novel Methods of Insulin Replacement: The Artificial Pancreas and Encapsulated Islets.

    PubMed

    Malek, Rana; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes represents 5-10% of patients with diabetes worldwide. The importance of tight glycemic control has been demonstrated definitively in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial but is often elusive for patients because of the associated risk of hypoglycemia. Care for these patients requires coordination amongst a variety of health professionals including primary care providers, endocrinologists, nephrologists, ophthalmologists, pharmacists, podiatrists and others. The 21(st) century is witnessing emerging and exciting treatment options for this disease. Previous attempts at curative therapy have included pancreas or islet transplantation, but limitations of organ availability and the risk associated with immunosuppression have resulted in renewed efforts for novel methods of insulin replacement. Advancement in technology has resulted in several versions of an artificial pancreas-technology that uses a continuous glucose monitor to sense the blood sugar, transmit those numbers to a control algorithm that then doses insulin ± glucagon in response to changes in blood sugar. Free living experiments with two versions of the artificial pancreas have recently been published. A quest for a bioartificial pancreas has been ongoing as well. In this system, islets (porcine, human, or embryonic stem cell derived) are encapsulated in a biocompatible device that is either a macrocapsule or a microcapsule. The benefits of this system allows for replacement therapy without immunosuppression. Human trials with encapsulation are currently ongoing. This review will provide a detailed review of artificial and bioartificial pancreas systems with a focus on human trials. PMID:26638972

  15. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Estrogen Receptor α Regulates β-Cell Formation During Pancreas Development and Following Injury.

    PubMed

    Yuchi, Yixing; Cai, Ying; Legein, Bart; De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Coppens, Violette; Van Overmeire, Eva; Staels, Willem; De Leu, Nico; Martens, Geert; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Heimberg, Harry; Van de Casteele, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Identifying pathways for β-cell generation is essential for cell therapy in diabetes. We investigated the potential of 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling for stimulating β-cell generation during embryonic development and in the severely injured adult pancreas. E2 concentration, ER activity, and number of ERα transcripts were enhanced in the pancreas injured by partial duct ligation (PDL) along with nuclear localization of ERα in β-cells. PDL-induced proliferation of β-cells depended on aromatase activity. The activation of Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) gene expression and β-cell growth in PDL pancreas were impaired when ERα was turned off chemically or genetically (ERα(-/-)), whereas in situ delivery of E2 promoted β-cell formation. In the embryonic pancreas, β-cell replication, number of Ngn3(+) progenitor cells, and expression of key transcription factors of the endocrine lineage were decreased by ERα inactivation. The current study reveals that E2 and ERα signaling can drive β-cell replication and formation in mouse pancreas.

  17. Organogenesis of exocrine pancreas in sharpsnout sea bream (Diplodus puntazzo) larvae: characterization of trypsin expression.

    PubMed

    Kamaci, H Okan; Suzer, Cüneyt; Coban, Deniz; Saka, Sahin; Firat, Kürşat

    2010-12-01

    The ontogeny and differentiation stages of digestive systems related with trypsin expression in larvae of sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo, were investigated from hatching to 40 DAH (days after hatching), and total lengths and weights of larvae were determined. Histologic and enzymatic techniques were used to explain the functional development of the pancreas including trypsin activity. The pancreas was identified as a compact structure located in the region slightly posterior to the liver. At 3 DAH, first anus and then mouth opened. Incipient pancreas secretion polyhedral cells could be first observed as zymogen granules. During larval metamorphosis, the pancreas became diffuse, spreading throughout the mesentery in proximity to the stomach, the anterior intestine and the pyloric caeca. The specific activity of trypsin (42.54±6.8 mU/mg protein(-1)) was found as early as after hatching at larvae size of 2.87±0.34 mm at 0 DAH. Activity further increased until 10 DAH, especially after exogenous feeding. The highest trypsin activity was detected at 25 DAH as 119.26±11.6 mU/mg protein(-1). It is concluded that exocrine pancreas organogenesis is the main critical step in the development of digestive system that results in zymogen granules accumulation and increased trypsin activity. PMID:20077135

  18. [Resection of the remnant pancreas for recurrent pancreatic cancer after distal pancreatectomy-a case report].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shoichi; Sho, Masayuki; Akahori, Takahiro; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Hokutoh, Daisuke; Yasuda, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    The standard treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy. The effect of surgical resection for localized recurrence in the remnant pancreas after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer is unknown, but is reported to have a moderately good outcome in a few reports. We herein report a case of curative resection for recurrence in the remnant pancreas, 24 months after distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer. A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with pancreas tail cancer. Neoadjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy[ weekly full-dose gemcitabine(GEM) and radiation therapy 50 Gy/25 Fr] was followed by distal pancreatectomy. Postoperative adjuvant therapy with hepatic arterial infusion of 5-FU and systemic GEM therapy was completed. Twenty-four months after surgery, follow-up computed tomography scan results showed a lesion of 15-mm diameter in the remnant pancreas. Resection of the remnant pancreas was performed. The pathological findings showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, morphologically similar to the primary pancreatic cancer. Six months following surgery, there are no signs of recurrence at present.

  19. AMYLOID FORMATION IN HUMAN IAPP TRANSGENIC MOUSE ISLETS AND PANCREAS AND HUMAN PANCREAS IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Hull, R.L.; Zraika, S.; Udayasankar, J.; Aston-Mourney, K.; Subramanian, S.L.; Kahn, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis Supraphysiological levels of the amyloidogenic peptide human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) have been associated with beta cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, in human type 2 diabetes, levels of hIAPP are equivalent or decreased relative to matched controls. Thus, we sought to investigate whether ER stress is induced during amyloidogenesis at physiological levels of hIAPP. Methods Islets from hIAPP transgenic mice that develop amyloid, and non-transgenic mice that do not, were cultured for up to seven days in 11.1, 16.7 and 33.3 mmol/l glucose. Pancreata from hIAPP transgenic and non-transgenic mice and human subjects with or without type 2 diabetes were also evaluated. Amyloid formation was determined histologically. ER stress was determined in islets by quantifying mRNA levels of BiP, Atf4 and Chop, and alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA or in pancreata by immunostaining for BiP, CHOP and XBP-1. Results Amyloid formation in hIAPP transgenic islets was associated with reduced beta-cell area in a glucose- and time-dependent manner. However, amyloid formation was not associated with significant increases in expression of ER stress markers under any culture condition. Thapsigargin treatment, a positive control, did result in significant ER stress. Amyloid formation in vivo in pancreas samples from hIAPP transgenic mice or humans was not associated with upregulation of ER stress markers. Conclusions/interpretation Our data suggest that ER stress is not an obligatory pathway mediating the toxic effects of amyloid formation at physiological levels of hIAPP. PMID:19352619

  20. Iterative use of nuclear receptor Nr5a2 regulates multiple stages of liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Sahar; Weeks, Olivia; Talbot, Jared C; Hedgepeth, John W; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Swinburne, Ian; Cortes, Mauricio; Alexa, Kristen; Megason, Sean; North, Trista E; Amacher, Sharon L; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    The stepwise progression of common endoderm progenitors into differentiated liver and pancreas organs is regulated by a dynamic array of signals that are not well understood. The nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 gene nr5a2, also known as Liver receptor homolog-1 (Lrh-1) is expressed in several tissues including the developing liver and pancreas. Here, we interrogate the role of Nr5a2 at multiple developmental stages using genetic and chemical approaches and uncover novel pleiotropic requirements during zebrafish liver and pancreas development. Zygotic loss of nr5a2 in a targeted genetic null mutant disrupted the development of the exocrine pancreas and liver, while leaving the endocrine pancreas intact. Loss of nr5a2 abrogated exocrine pancreas markers such as trypsin, while pancreas progenitors marked by ptf1a or pdx1 remained unaffected, suggesting a role for Nr5a2 in regulating pancreatic acinar cell differentiation. In the developing liver, Nr5a2 regulates hepatic progenitor outgrowth and differentiation, as nr5a2 mutants exhibited reduced hepatoblast markers hnf4α and prox1 as well as differentiated hepatocyte marker fabp10a. Through the first in vivo use of Nr5a2 chemical antagonist Cpd3, the iterative requirement for Nr5a2 for exocrine pancreas and liver differentiation was temporally elucidated: chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 function during hepatopancreas progenitor specification was sufficient to disrupt exocrine pancreas formation and enhance the size of the embryonic liver, suggesting that Nr5a2 regulates hepatic vs. pancreatic progenitor fate choice. Chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 at a later time during pancreas and liver differentiation was sufficient to block the formation of mature acinar cells and hepatocytes. These findings define critical iterative and pleiotropic roles for Nr5a2 at distinct stages of pancreas and liver organogenesis, and provide novel perspectives for interpreting the role of Nr5a2 in disease.