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Sample records for pancreas imaging findings

  1. Imaging findings in a case of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Chung, Won Jung; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2010-01-01

    Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma (MAEC) of the pancreas is extremely uncommon. We report here a rare case of MAEC of the pancreas presenting as watery diarrhea. This is the first report in the English-language literature that describes the imaging findings of MAEC of the pancreas, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR cholangiopancreatography features.

  2. MR imaging of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Erin; Hammond, Nancy; Miller, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pancreas is useful as both a problem-solving tool and an initial imaging examination of choice. With newer imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging, MR offers improved ability to detect and characterize lesions and identify and stage tumors and inflammation. MR cholangiopancreatography can be used to visualize the pancreatic and biliary ductal system. In this article, the use of MR to evaluate the pancreas, including recent advances, is reviewed and the normal appearance of the pancreas on different imaging sequences, as well as inflammatory diseases, congenital abnormalities, and neoplasms of the pancreas, are discussed.

  3. Liver, spleen, pancreas and kidney involvement by human fascioliasis: imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Zali, Mohammad Reza; Ghaziani, Tahereh; Shahraz, Saeed; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Radmehr, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica primarily involves the liver, however in some exceptional situations other organs have been reported to be involved. The ectopic involvement is either a result of Parasite migration or perhaps eosinophilic reaction. Case presentation Here we report a known case of multiple myeloma who was under treatment with prednisolone and melphalan. He was infected by Fasciola hepatica, which involved many organs and the lesions were mistaken with metastatic ones. Discussion Presented here is a very unusual case of the disease, likely the first case involving the pancreas, spleen, and kidney, as well as the liver. PMID:15294025

  4. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  6. Pancreas transplant imaging: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Tolat, Parag P; Foley, W Dennis; Johnson, Christopher; Hohenwalter, Mark D; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2015-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation aims to restore physiologic normoglycemia in diabetic patients with glomerulopathy and avoid or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and arteriopathy. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is the most common approach, using a cadaveric pancreas donation in conjunction with either cadaveric or live donor renal transplant. Alternative techniques include pancreas after kidney transplant, in which the pancreas transplant is performed some years after renal transplant. Pancreas transplant alone is utilized rarely in diabetic patients with compensated renal function. Pancreas grafts have vascular and enteric connections that vary in their anatomic approach, and understanding of this is critical for imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging techniques are directed to display the pancreatic transplant arterial and venous vasculature, parenchyma, and intestinal drainage pathway. Critical vascular information includes venous thrombosis (partial or complete), arterial occlusion, or aneurysm. Parenchymal abnormalities are nonspecific and occur in pancreatitis, graft rejection, and subsequent graft ischemia. Peripancreatic fluid collections include hematoma/seroma, pseudocyst, and abscess. The latter two are related to pancreatitis, duct disruption, or leak from the duodenojejunostomy. An understanding of transplant anatomy and complications will lead to appropriate use of imaging techniques to diagnose or exclude important complications.

  7. Papillary carcinoma of the pancreas: findings of US and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.Y.; Lim, J.H.; Lee, J.D.

    1985-02-01

    Two cases of papillary carcinoma of the pancreas were evaluated by ultrasound and CT. The sonographic and CT findings were those of a well-defined oval mass with partial cystic change. There was radiologic-pathologic correlation.

  8. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  9. [Endosonography for differential diagnosis of malignant findings of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Prinz, C

    2009-02-01

    Due to recent technical innovations endosonography has attained a special importance for the examination of malignant pancreatic tumors. Modern high-resolution radial instruments with 360 degrees imaging give a very good overall view with fine resolution and contrast and allow excellent detection of solid space-occupying lesions in the region of the pancreas. In meta-analyses a very good sensitivity for tumor detection of over 90% could be demonstrated, comparable to the results of the modern CT pancreas spiral technique. Endosonography has an advantage over CT examination especially for the diagnostics of very small neuroendocrine tumors (<1 cm), for example for the detection of insulinomas. For cystic pancreas processes only endosonography allows further specific differential diagnostics by the determination of important prognostic tumor markers, such as CEA or CA-19-9 by simultaneous puncture of the lesion.

  10. Pleomorphic carcinoma of the pancreas: computed-tomographic, sonographic, and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfman, N.T.; Karstaedt, N.; Kawamoto, E.H.

    1985-02-01

    The authors present a series of eight cases of pleomorphic carcinoma of the pancreas, an uncommon lesion that contains bizarre giant cells and resembles sarcoma histologically. To our knowledge, this entity has not been described in the radiological literature. Clinical symptoms are similar to those of the usual pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma, but at presentation the primary tumor mass is usually large, and widespread metastatic disease is present. The most striking finding is massive lymphadenopathy, which may mimic lymphoma. A combination of clinical history, imaging findings, and results of percutaneous biopsy should lead to the proper diagnosis and may help to differentiate this entity from others that may affect lymph nodes.

  11. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  12. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Imaging of the pancreas using dynamic positron emission tomography with N-13 ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, N.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Adachi, H.; Senda, M.; Saji, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-05-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new imaging technique of the pancreas. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 3 normal volunteers, 9 patient without the evidence of pancreatic diseases, 2 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head and one patient with islet cell carcinoma. Immediately after the intravenous injection of 10-20mCi of N-13 ammonia, data were obtained every 150 seconds for 30 minutes using a multi-slice whole-body PET scanner. In two cases of adenocarcinoma, the pancreas was not imaged, probably because the nontumorous portion of the pancreas was also suffered from severe pancreatitis due to the duct obstruction at the pancreatic head. In the case with islet cell carcinoma, the radionuclide was accumulated in the tumor and pancreas similarly. Thus, both of them were visualized but not separated. The central necrosis of the tumor showed poor radioactivity. The mechanism of the radionuclide accumulation in the pancreas is not well understood. However, the authors also studied the biodistribution of N-13 ammonia in mice and confirmed that there is an early and high accumulation of the radionuclide in the murine pancreas. These preliminary results of this paper suggest that the dynamic PET study may be useful for the imaging of the pancreas as well as for the further study of the blood supply and metabolism of the pancreas.

  14. A hybrid method for pancreas extraction from CT image based on level set methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction.

  15. A Bottom-up Approach for Pancreas Segmentation using Cascaded Superpixels and (Deep) Image Patch Labeling.

    PubMed

    Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Roth, Holger R; Liu, Jiamin; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M

    2016-11-01

    Robust organ segmentation is a prerequisite for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), quantitative imaging analysis, pathology detection and surgical assistance. For organs with high anatomical variability (e.g., the pancreas), previous segmentation approaches report low accuracies, compared to well studied organs, such as the liver or heart.We present an automated bottomup approach for pancreas segmentation in abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. The method generates a hierarchical cascade of information propagation by classifying image patches at different resolutions and cascading (segments) superpixels. The system contains four steps: 1) decomposition of CT slice images into a set of disjoint boundary-preserving superpixels; 2) computation of pancreas class probability maps via dense patch labeling; 3) superpixel classification by pooling both intensity and probability features to form empirical statistics in cascaded random forest frameworks; and 4) simple connectivity based post-processing. Dense image patch labeling is conducted using two methods: efficient random forest classification on image histogram, location and texture features; and more expensive (but more accurate) deep convolutional neural network classification, on larger image windows (i.e., with more spatial contexts). Oversegmented 2D CT slices by the Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC) approach are adopted through model/parameter calibration and labeled at the superpixel level for positive (pancreas) or negative (non-pancreas or background) classes.

  16. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support.

  17. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis.

  18. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm–16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6–49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image. PMID:27610132

  19. MR imaging findings of endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Cornelius, Rebecca; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Golnik, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is a sight-threatening ophthalmologic emergency. The clinical diagnosis is often challenging, and delayed diagnosis may exacerbate the poor visual prognosis. B-scan ultrasonography or spectral domain optical coherence tomography are imaging aids at the clinician’s office. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and particularly MRI can also help in the assessment of disease extent or complications. MR imaging findings are rarely described in the literature. Here, we discuss the spectrum of imaging findings of endophthalmitis and correlate them with key anatomic and pathophysiologic details of the globe. Early disease is often subtle on MR imaging with thick uveal enhancement, while advanced disease demonstrates retinal/choroidal detachment, vitreal exudates and peribulbar inflammation. Other noninfectious inflammatory diseases of the globe can show similar findings; however, MR diffusion-weighted images help identify infectious exudates and evaluate response to therapy. Knowledge of the spectrum of imaging findings of this disease is important for radiologists and help in the management decision process. PMID:26915896

  20. Abdominal sarcoidosis: cross-sectional imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Başara, Işıl; Altay, Canan; Harman, Mustafa; Rocher, Laurence; Karabulut, Nevzat; Seçil, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The lungs and the lymphoid system are the most commonly involved organs. Extrapulmonary involvement is reported in 30% of patients, and the abdomen is the most common extrapulmonary site with a frequency of 50%–70%. Although intra-abdominal sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic, its presence may affect the prognosis and treatment options. The lesions are less characteristic and may mimick neoplastic or infectious diseases such as lymphoma, diffuse metastasis, and granulomatous inflammation. The liver and spleen are the most common abdominal sites of involvement. Sarcoidosis of the gastrointestinal system, pancreas, and kidneys are extremely rare. Adenopathy which is most commonly found in the porta hepatis, exudative ascites, and multiple granulomatous nodules studding the peritoneum are the reported manifestations of abdominal sarcoidosis. Since abdominal sarcoidosis is less common and long-standing, unrecognized disease can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Imaging contributes to diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal sarcoidosis. In this report we reviewed the cross-sectional imaging findings of hepatobiliary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary sarcoidosis. PMID:25512071

  1. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Miller, Frank H; Chen, Zongming E; Merrick, Laura; Mortele, Koenraad J; Hoff, Frederick L; Hammond, Nancy A; Yaghmai, Vahid; Vahid, Yaghmai; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly used in the detection and characterization of pancreatic lesions. Diffusion-weighted imaging may provide additional information to radiologists evaluating patients who have cystic or solid neoplasms of the pancreas. Because of greater freedom of motion of water molecules in fluid-rich environments, simple cysts in the pancreas have higher signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images with a b value of 0 sec/mm2 and lower signal intensity on high-b-value images. High apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values can be obtained on ADC maps because of the T2 “shine-through” effect. In contrast, solid neoplasms of the pancreas show increased signal intensity relative to the pancreas on diffusion-weighted images with a b value of 0 sec/mm2 and relatively high signal intensity on high-b-value images. Diffusion-weighted imaging can help detect solid pancreatic neoplasms with extremely dense cellularity or extracellular fibrosis by demonstrating significantly low ADC values, and these neoplasms may be better detected on diffusion-weighted MR images because of better contrast, although the resolution is generally worse. However, diffusion-weighted imaging may not be capable of helping definitively characterize solid lesions as inflammatory or neoplastic because of an overlap in ADC values between the two types. For example, it is difficult to distinguish poorly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma from mass-forming pancreatitis at diffusion-weighted imaging because of similarly low ADC values attributed to dense fibrosis.

  2. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: CT imaging features and radiologic-pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Gopinathan; Zhang, Junwei; Al-Hamar, Nawal Ebrahim; Nga, Min En

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the imaging features of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. METHODS Ten patients (all female; mean age, 32 years) with histologic or cytologic diagnosis of SPN encountered between January 2007 and December 2013 were included in this study. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images were reviewed for location, attenuation, enhancement pattern, margin, shape, size, morphology, presence of capsule and calcification. CT appearances were correlated with histopathologic findings. RESULTS Tumors in the distal pancreatic body and tail had a tendency to be larger (mean size 12.6 cm vs. 4.0 cm). Six of the nine tumors that were resected had a fibrous pseudocapsule at histology, five of which could be identified on CT scan. Eight lesions had mixed hypoenhancing solid components and cystic areas corresponding to tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. The two smallest lesions were purely solid and nonencapsulated. Varied patterns of calcification were seen in four tumors. Three of the four pancreatic tail tumors invaded the spleen. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there was no evidence of recurrence in the nine patients who underwent surgical resection of the tumor. CONCLUSION A mixed solid and cystic pancreatic mass in a young woman is suggestive of SPN. However, smaller lesions may be completely solid. Splenic invasion can occur in pancreatic tail SPNs; however, in this series it did not adversely affect the long-term outcome. PMID:28089954

  3. [Histopathological studies of the rat pancreas after prolonged treatment with imuran. Preliminary findings].

    PubMed

    Mansi, C; Savarino, V; Picciotto, A; Testa, R; Dabove, L; Gismondi, C; Celle, G

    1980-01-30

    The AA. have studied the pathological effects on the pancreas of rats after chronic administration of azathioprine (AZA) in different doses. The most significant lesions are flattening of duct epitelium and the presence of protein plugs in the ducts. These pancreatic lesions are significantly more frequent in rate treated with higher doses than in controls and so are dose-dependent.

  4. Gd(III)-Dithiolane Gold Nanoparticles for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Rammohan, Nikhil; Rotz, Matthew W.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Preslar, Adam T.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a 5 year survival of approximately 3% and median survival of 6 months and is among the most dismal of prognoses in all of medicine. This poor prognosis is largely due to delayed diagnosis where patients remain asymptomatic until advanced disease is present. Therefore, techniques to allow early detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are desperately needed. Imaging of pancreatic tissue is notoriously difficult, and the development of new imaging techniques would impact our understanding of organ physiology and pathology with applications in disease diagnosis, staging, and longitudinal response to therapy in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides numerous advantages for these types of investigations; however, it is unable to delineate the pancreas due to low inherent contrast within this tissue type. To overcome this limitation, we have prepared a new Gd(III) contrast agent that accumulates in the pancreas and provides significant contrast enhancement by MR imaging. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a new dithiolane-Gd(III) complex and a straightforward and scalable approach for conjugation to a gold nanoparticle. We present data that show the nanoconjugates exhibit very high per particle values of r1 relaxivity at both low and high magnetic field strengths due to the high Gd(III) payload. We provide evidence of pancreatic tissue labeling that includes MR images, post-mortem biodistribution analysis, and pancreatic tissue evaluation of particle localization. Significant contrast enhancement was observed allowing clear identification of the pancreas with contrast-to-noise ratios exceeding 35:1. PMID:27050622

  5. Painful heel: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Ortega, R; Aguilera, C; Sánchez, A; Andía, E

    2000-01-01

    Heel pain is a common and frequently disabling clinical complaint that may be caused by a broad spectrum of osseous or soft-tissue disorders. These disorders are classified on the basis of anatomic origin and predominant location of heel pain to foster a better understanding of this complaint. The disorders include plantar fascial lesions (fasciitis, rupture, fibromatosis, xanthoma), tendinous lesions (tendinitis, tenosynovitis), osseous lesions (fractures, bone bruises, osteomyelitis, tumors), bursal lesions (retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilleal bursitis), tarsal tunnel syndrome, and heel plantar fat pad abnormalities. With its superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar capability, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help determine the cause of heel pain and help assess the extent and severity of the disease in ambiguous or clinically equivocal cases. Careful analysis of MR imaging findings and correlation of these findings with patient history and findings at physical examination can suggest a specific diagnosis in most cases. The majority of patients with heel pain can be successfully treated conservatively, but in cases requiring surgery (eg, plantar fascia rupture in competitive athletes, deeply infiltrating plantar fibromatosis, masses causing tarsal tunnel syndrome), MR imaging is especially useful in planning surgical treatment by showing the exact location and extent of the lesion.

  6. Pancreas imaging by computed tomography after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. [Dogs; patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; O'Leary, J.F.; Salomonowitz, E.; Stoltenberg, E.; Hutton, S.; Gedgaudas, E.

    1984-01-01

    A method using CT after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (CT-ERP) is described for pancreatic imaging. When using an ERP technique in the canine model comparable to that used in humans, small amounts of contrast material in peripheral pancreatic radicles resulted in enhancement of the pancreas on CT scans. Nine patients were also studied by CT-ERP images. The main pancreatic duct was seen on delayed images. In cases of chronic pancreatitis (n = 2), pancreatic opacification was patchy and heterogeneous. There was no contrast-material enhancement in areas of pancreatic carcimomas (n = 2). CT-ERP showed the true extent of carcinoma better than ERP alone.

  7. Preliminary Study of MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Pancreas for the Diagnosis of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Jian; Chen, Tianwu; Li, Liangjun; Aduah, Emmanuel Ajedichiga; Hu, Jiani

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of differentiating between acute pancreatitis (AP) and healthy pancreas using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and correlate apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) /fractional anisotropy (FA) values with the severity of AP. Material and Methods 66 patients diagnosed with AP and 20 normal controls (NC) underwent DTI sequences and routine pancreatic MR sequences on a 3.0T MRI scanner. Average ADC and FA values of the pancreatic were measured. Differences of FA and ADC values between the AP group and the NC group with AP and healthy pancreas were compared by two-sample independent t-test. The severity of AP on MRI was classified into subgroups using MR severity index (MRSI), where the mean FA and ADC values were calculated. Relationship among the FA values, ADC values and MRSI were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Results The pancreatic mean ADC value in the AP group (1.68 ± 0.45×10−3mm2/s) was significantly lower than in the NC group (2.09 ± 0.55×10−3mm2/s) (P = 0.02); the same as mean FA value (0.39 ± 0.23 vs 0.54 ± 0.12, P = 0.00). In the subgroup analysis, the pancreatic ADC and FA value of edema AP patients was significantly higher than necrosis AP patients with P = 0.000 and P = 0.001respectively. In addition, as severity of pancreatitis increased according to MRSI, lower pancreatic ADC (r = -0.635) and FA value (r = -0.654) were noted. Conclusion Both FA and ADC value from DTI can be used to differentiate AP patients from NC. Both ADC and FA value of pancreas have a negative correlation with the severity of AP. PMID:27584016

  8. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  9. Finding text in color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangying; Lopresti, Daniel P.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    1998-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of locating and extracting text from WWW images. A previous algorithm based on color clustering and connected components analysis works well as long as the color of each character is relatively uniform and the typography is fairly simple. It breaks down quickly, however, when these assumptions are violated. In this paper, we describe more robust techniques for dealing with this challenging problem. We present an improved color clustering algorithm that measures similarity based on both RGB and spatial proximity. Layout analysis is also incorporated to handle more complex typography. THese changes significantly enhance the performance of our text detection procedure.

  10. Development of gamma emitting receptor-binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Progress report, February 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of measuring the change in receptor concentration as a function of disease by external imaging was investigated. The structure-binding-relationship which provides optimal localization of radiolabelled antagonist of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain was studied. These relationships were also studied with respect to localization in the pancreas. (ACR)

  11. Imaging findings in pulmonary vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Castañer, Eva; Alguersuari, Anna; Andreu, Marta; Gallardo, Xavier; Spinu, Cristina; Mata, Josep M

    2012-12-01

    Vasculitis is a destructive inflammatory process affecting blood vessels. Pulmonary vasculitis may develop secondary to other conditions or constitute a primary idiopathic disorder. Thoracic involvement is most common in primary idiopathic large-vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Behçet disease) and primary antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides (Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Primary pulmonary vasculitides are rare, and their signs and symptoms are nonspecific, overlapping with those of infections, connective tissue diseases, and malignancies. The radiologic findings in primary pulmonary vasculitis vary widely and can include vessel wall thickening, nodular or cavitary lesions, ground-glass opacities, and consolidations, among others. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage usually results from primary small-vessel vasculitis in the lungs. To diagnose vasculitis, medical teams must recognize characteristic combinations of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and histopathologic features.

  12. Development of gamma emitting receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Final technical progress report, March 1, 1988--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This document give paragraph synopses of results in research on brain and pancreas imaging, using radiotracers. General catagories of research included chemistry, pharmacology, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling. A list of publications is included

  13. MRI chemical shift imaging of the fat content of the pancreas and liver of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jun; Liu, Peng; Jin, Erhu; Su, Tianhao; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Kaining; Hong, X U; Yin, Jie; Yu, Hengchi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between the content and distribution of fat in the pancreas and liver in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 70 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM (T2DM group) and 30 healthy volunteers (normal control group) were enrolled in the present study. Dual-echo magnetic resonance (MR) chemical shift imaging was used to measure the fat content of the liver and the head, body and tail regions of the pancreas. In addition, the distribution of fat in the various regions of the pancreas, as well as the average fat content of the pancreas versus the liver, were compared. The fat content of the pancreatic head, body and tail regions of the T2DM group were 5.59±4.70, 4.80±3.75 and 4.89±3.86%, respectively. The fat content of these regions in the normal control group were 3.89±2.47, 3.30±2.11 and 3.23±2.23%, respectively. The average fat content of the pancreas was 5.19±3.75% for the T2DM group and 3.47±2.00% for the normal control group. The average fat content of the liver was 9.87±3.19% for the T2DM group and 7.24±2.38% for the normal control group. Therefore, the results from MR chemical shift imaging suggested that there were no significant differences in the distribution of fat between the pancreas of patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and that from the healthy population; however, the average fat content in the pancreas of the T2DM group was significantly higher (F=3.597; P<0.05), as compared with the normal control group. In addition, there was no correlation between the fat contents in the pancreas and liver in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and the healthy population.

  14. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  15. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  16. Magnetic resonance image-guided photodynamic therapy of xenograft pancreas tumors with verteporfin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer generally has very poor prognosis, with less than 4% survival at 5 years after diagnosis. This dismal survival rate is in part due to the aggressive nature of the adenocarcinoma, leading to a late-stage at diagnosis and exhibits resistance to most therapies. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a model cellular and vascular therapy agent, which uses light activation of the delivered drug to photosensitize the local cellular millieu. We suggest that interstitial verteporfin (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A) PDT has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy to the commonly used Gemcitabine chemotherapy. In the current study, an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (Panc-1) has undergone interstitial verteporfin PDT (40 J/cm with verteporfin and 40 J/cm without verteporfin). Prior to PDT, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to determine the location and size of the tumor within the pancreas, allowing accurate placement of the diffusing fiber. The success of therapy was monitored in vivo by assessing the total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes 24 hours pre- and 48 hours post-PDT. Total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes were determined using T2 weighted (T2W) and Gd-DTPA difference T1 weighted (T1W) turbo spin echo (TSE) MR imaging sequences, respectively. The validity of the in vivo imaging for therapeutic response was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and histological staining of frozen tissue sections. The ex vivo DiOC7(3) fluorescence analysis correlates well with the information provided from the MR images, indicating that MR imaging will be a successful surrogate marker for interstitial PDT.

  17. Evolution of incidental branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: A study with magnetic resonance imaging cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano; Pravisani, Riccardo; Intini, Sergio Giuseppe; Isola, Miriam; Cereser, Lorenzo; Risaliti, Andrea; Zuiani, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the type and timing of evolution of incidentally found branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (bd-IPMN) of the pancreas addressed to magnetic resonance imaging cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) follow-up. METHODS We retrospectively evaluated 72 patients who underwent, over the period 2006-2016, a total of 318 MRCPs (mean 4.4) to follow-up incidental, presumed bd-IPMN without signs of malignancy, found or confirmed at a baseline MRCP examination. Median follow-up time was 48.5 mo (range 13-95 mo). MRCPs were acquired on 1.5T and/or 3.0T systems using 2D and/or 3D technique. Image analysis assessed the rates of occurrence over the follow-up of the following outcomes: (1) imaging evolution, defined as any change in cysts number and/or size and/or appearance; and (2) alert findings, defined as worrisome features and/or high risk stigmata (e.g., thick septa, parietal thickening, mural nodules and involvement of the main pancreatic duct). Time to outcomes was described with the Kaplan-Meir approach. Cox regression model was used to investigate clinical or initial MRCP findings predicting cysts changes. RESULTS We found a total of 343 cysts (per-patient mean 5.1) with average size of 8.5 mm (range 5-25 mm). Imaging evolution was observed in 32/72 patients (44.4%; 95%CI: 32-9-56.6), involving 47/343 cysts (13.7%). There was a main trend towards small (< 10 mm) increase and/or decrease of cysts size at a median time of 22.5 mo. Alert findings developed in 6/72 patients (8.3%; 95%CI: 3.4-17.9) over a wide interval of time (13-63 mo). No malignancy was found on endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration (5/6 cases) or surgery (1/6 cases). No clinical or initial MRCP features were significantly associated with changes in bd-IPMN appearance (P > 0.01). CONCLUSION Changes in MRCP appearance of incidental bd-IPNM were frequent over the follow-up (44.4%), with relatively rare (8.3%) occurrence of non-malignant alert findings that prompted

  18. Polycystic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Amarapurkar, Deepak N.; Amarapurkar, Anjali D.

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic disease of the pancreas is a very rare entity with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a symptomatic case of polycystic pancreas associated with pheochromocytoma that was treated surgically. PMID:27144204

  19. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor.

  20. Multimodality Imaging Findings of a Renal Aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Bulakçı, Mesut; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Çelenk, Erhan; Tunçer, Sena; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal aspergillosis is a rare infection that usually occurs in persons with a predisposition for this condition. Its differential diagnosis includes primary and metastatic renal malignancies, pyelonephritis and secondary abscess formation, granulomatous disorders, and renal infarction. We aim to stress the role of multimodality imaging and percutaneous biopsy in the diagnosis of this condition. Case Report We present diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings in addition to conventional imaging modalities in a 55-year-old man with secondary renal aspergilloma. Conclusion Radiological imaging methods are an integral part of diagnostic workup for renal aspergillosis. A definitive diagnosis is made by histopathological and/or microbiological examination of the material obtained via percutaneous biopsy under guidance of imaging methods. PMID:27994929

  1. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic.

  2. Wandering spleen with volvulus of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Karcaaltıncaba, Musturay

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal location of the spleen, which is called wandering spleen, results from laxity or absence of the splenic pedicle. In the presence of an elongated splenic pedicle, torsion of the spleen or neighboring organs may occur, which results in acute or chronic abdominal pain. In this case report, we present imaging findings of a wandering spleen that manifested with volvulus of the pancreas.

  3. Parasitic diseases in the abdomen: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic diseases of the liver and biliary tract include echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, toxocariasis, clonorchiasis, and opisthorchiasis, affecting millions people in some endemic areas. Amebiasis and ascariasis are believed to be the most common bowel lumen indwelling parasitic diseases, affecting billions people worldwide, but sometimes these parasites migrate inadvertently to the liver and biliary tract, resulting in liver abscess or obstructive jaundice. Imaging findings of these parasitic diseases are fairly characteristic and easy to recognize if radiologists are aware of the findings, especially in endemic areas. Because of increased immigration and frequent travelling, some patients with "exotic" parasitic diseases may be encountered in non-endemic areas, and the diagnosis may be delayed or difficult, and it is often made only after operation. This feature section was designed to provide the detailed imaging features of common parasitic diseases affecting the abdominal organs and peritoneal cavity, based on pathology-image correlation.

  4. Finding corners in images by foveated search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnow, Thomas L.; Bovik, Alan C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a new approach to finding corners in images that combines foveated edge detection and curvature calculation with saccadic placement of foveal fixations. Each saccade moves the fovea to a location of high curvature combined with high edge gradient. Edges are located using a foveated Canny edge detector with spatial constant that increases with eccentricity. Next, we calculate a measure of local corner strength, based on a product of curvature and gradient. An inhibition factor based on previous visits to a region of the image prevents the system from repeatedly returning to the same locale. A long saccade is move thes fovea to previously unexplored areas of the image. Subsequent short saccades improve the accuracy of the location of the corner approximated by the long saccade. The system is tested on two natural scenes and the results compared against subjects observing the same test images through an eyetracker. Results show that the algorithm is a good locator of corners.

  5. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ayşe; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  6. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Han, Joungho; Kwon, O Jung; Kim, Tae Sung

    2006-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  7. Pneumoconiosis: Comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.; Lee, K.S.; Chung, M.J.; Han, J.H.; Kwon, O.J.; Kim, T.S.

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  8. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Semin Chong; Kyung Soo Lee; Myung Jin Chung; Joungho Han; O. Jung Kwon; d Tae Sung Kim

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  9. [Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Davies, Nestor R; Kasparian, Andres C; Viotto, Lucas E; Moreno, Walter A; Gramática, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas represents around 6-36% of mucinous cystic neoplasm. The lesions are usually found in the body and tail of the pancreas and are generally solitary with a size range of 6-36 cm. We present a clinical case of a 63 years old patient with abdominal pain and weight loss. We used radiographic imaging studies. It was treated with surgery by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colectomy. Patient was not post operative complications.

  10. Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David ER

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally treated with oral diabetic drugs and/or insulin. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with this condition increases over time, even in patients receiving intensive insulin treatment, and this is largely attributable to diabetic complications or the insulin therapy itself. Pancreas transplantation in humans was first conducted in 1966, since when there has been much debate regarding the legitimacy of this procedure. Technical refinements and the development of better immunosuppressants and better postoperative care have brought about marked improvements in patient and graft survival and a reduction in postoperative morbidity. Consequently, pancreas transplantation has become the curative treatment modality for diabetes, particularly for type I diabetes. An overview of pancreas transplantation is provided herein, covering the history of pancreas transplantation, indications for transplantation, cadaveric and living donors, surgical techniques, immunosuppressants, and outcome following pancreas transplantation. The impact of successful pancreas transplantation on the complications of diabetes will also be reviewed briefly. PMID:21253293

  11. SU-E-J-226: Propagation of Pancreas Target Contours On Respiratory Correlated CT Images Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.

  12. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  13. Imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Ghadirpour, Ali; Ataie-Oskuie, Reza; Kontzialis, Marinos; Nezami, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl was referred to a dentist complaining of parageusia, bad taste in the mouth, which started 9 months ago. Panoramic X-ray and non-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple bilateral unilocular cysts in the mandible and maxilla, along with calcification of anterior part of the falx cerebri. She was eventually diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome based on imaging and histopathologic finding of keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

  14. Characterization of 5-(2- 18F-fluoroethoxy)-L-tryptophan for PET imaging of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ahmed; Beamish, Christine; McGirr, Rebecca; Demarco, John; Cockburn, Neil; Krokowski, Dawid; Lee, Ting-Yim; Kovacs, Michael; Hatzoglou, Maria; Dhanvantari, Savita

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In diabetes, pancreatic beta cell mass declines significantly prior to onset of fasting hyperglycemia. This decline may be due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the system L amino acid transporter LAT1 may be a biomarker of this process. In this study, we used 5-(2- 18F-fluoroethoxy)-L-tryptophan ( 18F-L-FEHTP) to target LAT1 as a potential biomarker of beta cell function in diabetes. Procedures: Uptake of 18F-L-FEHTP was determined in wild-type C57BL/6 mice by ex vivo biodistribution. Both dynamic and static positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired in wild-type and Akita mice, a model of ER stress-induced diabetes, as well as in mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ). LAT1 expression in both groups of mice was evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Uptake of 18F-L-FEHTP was highest in the pancreas, and static PET images showed highly specific pancreatic signal. Time-activity curves showed significantly reduced 18F-L-FEHTP uptake in Akita mice, and LAT1 expression was also reduced. However, mice treated with STZ, in which beta cell mass was reduced by 62%, showed no differences in 18F-L-FEHTP uptake in the pancreas, and there was no significant correlation of 18F-L-FEHTP uptake with beta cell mass. Conclusions: 18F-L-FEHTP is highly specific for the pancreas with little background uptake in kidney or liver. We were able to detect changes in LAT1 in a mouse model of diabetes, but these changes did not correlate with beta cell function or mass. Therefore, 18F-L-FEHTP PET is not a suitable method for the noninvasive imaging of changes in beta cell function during the progression of diabetes. PMID:27909574

  15. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  16. Deconstructing Pancreas Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Cecil M.; Goodyer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless nature and increasing prevalence of human pancreatic diseases, in particular, diabetes mellitus and adenocarcinoma, has motivated further understanding of pancreas organogenesis. The pancreas is a multifunctional organ whose epithelial cells govern a diversity of physiologically vital endocrine and exocrine functions. The mechanisms governing the birth, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, maturation, and maintenance of the endocrine and exocrine components in the pancreas have been discovered recently with increasing tempo. This includes recent studies unveiling mechanisms permitting unexpected flexibility in the developmental potential of immature and mature pancreatic cell subsets, including the ability to interconvert fates. In this article, we describe how classical cell biology, genetic analysis, lineage tracing, and embryological investigations are being complemented by powerful modern methods including epigenetic analysis, time-lapse imaging, and flow cytometry-based cell purification to dissect fundamental processes of pancreas development. PMID:22587935

  17. Insulin-like genes in ascidians: findings in Ciona and hypotheses on the evolutionary origins of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin plays an extensively characterized role in the control of sugar metabolism, growth and homeostasis in a wide range of organisms. In vertebrate chordates, insulin is mainly produced by the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas, while in non-chordate animals insulin-producing cells are mainly found in the nervous system and/or scattered along the digestive tract. However, recent studies have indicated the notochord, the defining feature of the chordate phylum, as an additional site of expression of insulin-like peptides. Here we show that two of the three insulin-like genes identified in Ciona intestinalis, an invertebrate chordate with a dual life cycle, are first expressed in the developing notochord during embryogenesis and transition to distinct areas of the adult digestive tract after metamorphosis. In addition, we present data suggesting that the transcription factor Ciona Brachyury is involved in the control of notochord expression of at least one of these genes, Ciona insulin-like 2. Lastly, we review the information currently available on insulin-producing cells in ascidians and on pancreas-related transcription factors that might control their expression. PMID:25378051

  18. Possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kin, Tatsuya; Korbutt, Gregory S; Shapiro, A M James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the incidental observation of ectopic pancreas in a donor for islet cell transplantation. The donor's clinical and imaging presentation was definitive for holoprosencephaly. This case report discusses a possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

  19. Gallbladder metastasis: spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barretta, Maria Luisa; Catalano, Orlando; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Granata, Vincenza; Marone, Ugo; D'Errico Gallipoli, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study is to report the diagnostic features of hematogenous gallbladder metastasis using various imaging modalities. We carried out a single-center retrospective analysis of 13 patients with gallbladder metastasis. The primary malignancy was cutaneous melanoma (11 cases), hepatocellular carcinoma (1 case), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1 case). All patients underwent sonography (US), with color-power-Doppler assessment in 11 cases. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) was performed in 8 patients, MDCT in 8, and MR imaging in 1. Four subjects studied by whole-body PET. The gallbladder lesions were first detected with US in 9 cases and with MDCT in 3 cases. The remaining patient was investigated because of hepatic fluorodeoxyglucose uptake at PET; CEUS failed to detect any liver metastasis in this subject but identified a gallbladder lesion. Typical findings included multiplicity of gallbladder vegetations, broad base, limited mural thickening, presence of contrast enhancement, absence of gallstones and gallbladder bed infiltration, presence of combined lesions within other organs. Only two patients presented an isolated location in the gallbladder and were successfully treated with surgery. Gallbladder metastasis is a rare but possible occurrence. Knowledge of the typical imaging features and careful evaluation of the gallbladder may avoid an incorrect or false negative diagnosis.

  20. Image Findings in Brain Developmental Venous Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are benign anatomic variations; therefore, they are usually discovered incidentally. The aim of this article was to describe radiological findings of DVAs. Methods A retrospective search for DVAs of the brain was performed in 1899 patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast enhancement between January 1, 2005 and April 25, 2011. We also reviewed the results of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), CT angiography, and transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) studies performed in patients with DVAs. Results Thirty-two DVAs were identified in 31 of the 1899 patients (1.63%). These 31 patients underwent five enhanced CTs, three MRAs, two CT angiographies, and two TFCAs. Thirty of the 32 DVAs were supratentorial (ST) and two were infratentorial (IT). All enhanced MRI studies exhibited excellent resolution of DVAs. All DVAs had only one draining vein. The venous drainage system was an IT vein in three DVAs and an ST vein in 29 DVAs. Two out of five enhanced CTs presented good visualization of the draining vein. None of the MRAs, including the source image, revealed the presence of DVAs. The two CT angiographies exhibited good resolution of DVAs. One of the two TFCAs yielded an excellent illustration of the DVA. Conclusion CT angiography and MRI with contrast enhancement yielded detailed findings of DVAs. In contrast, MRA did not identify the DVAs. Enhanced CT presented only the draining vein of DVAs. PMID:23210028

  1. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  2. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  3. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  4. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:511-5. Gruessner AC, Gruessner RWG. Pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic nephropathy. In: Morris PJ, Knechtle SJ, eds. Kidney Transplantation: ...

  5. Radiological imaging findings of scheuermann disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Erkan; Beyhan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find accompanying anomalies of typical and atypical Scheuermann’s disease (SD) is reported in the present study. METHODS Study included 20 patients (16 men and 4 women) who had radiological imaging radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, if available, due to back pain, curved back and low back pain in November 2011-February 2016 period. Patients were categorized into typical and atypical patterns based on the region involved. Thoracic kyphosis values were measured using real Cobb angle. Accompanying disc degeneration, herniations and spinal cord pathologies were studied using MRI. RESULTS Age of the patients ranged from 11.0 to 23.0 (mean 17.2 ± 3.0). Typical pattern of SD were detected in 15 patients while atypical pattern were detected in 5 patients. Cobb angle range was 40.2-67.2 (mean 55.5 ± 8.7) in typical Scheuermann’s patients and 24.7-49.9 (mean 36.7 ± 10.8) in atypical ones. Intervertebral level was affected and had the measures of 3-8 (mean 5.3 ± 1.6) and 7-9 (mean 8.2 ± 0.8) in typical and atypical Scheuermann’s patients, respectively. Level of degenerative disc disease in MRI was 1-7 discs (mean 4.1 ± 1.7) in typical patients and 5-10 discs (mean 7.6 ± 1.9) in atypical patients. CONCLUSION SD can be seen in typical and atypical patterns, typical being more frequent. Because degenerative disc diseases, herniations and cord pathologies such as syringomyelia can accompany SD (albeit more common in atypical pattern), it is necessary to evaluate these patients with plain radiography and MRI together. PMID:27928471

  6. (Development of gamma emitting, receptor-binding, radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to Feb. 28, 1988. In studies to better understand the nature of the m-AChR receptor subtypes, we have generated a manuscript which has been submitted for publication in Life sciences entitled: The effect of chronic atropine and diisopropylfluorophosphate on rat brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype concentrations. We have also developed a more direct synthesis of 3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate and its analogues. During this contract period, we have been involved with the synthesis of analogues 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). We have determined the affinity constants of various compounds synthesized this year for the muscarinic receptor from rat corpus striatum. We have continued our investigation of the m-AChR in pancreas. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Kidney/Pancreas Facts The kidneys are a pair of reddish- ... the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five to six inch gland located ...

  8. Development of gamma-emitting, receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This progress report covers period from Nov. 1, 1989 to Aug. 31, 1990. The long term objective was to develop receptor-binding radiotracers for SPECT or PET imaging of CNS or peripheral nervous system. The specific chemistry aims, as understood on the basis of past findings, were: to synthesize and develop a more polar analogs of 4IQNB, possessing similar binding characteristics but eliminated more rapidly from the surrounding tissues and the target organ, to design a method of introducing a technetium chelating group onto a molecule or cholinergic agent without drastic lowering of its apparent affinity, to synthesize and develop radiotracers based on m-AChR antagonists selective for one of the subtypes of the receptor. The chemistry service aims were to prepare and characterize (R,R)- and (R,S)-4IQNB and derivatives, to provide the triazene intermediate to other investigators, and to provide ({sup 123}I)4IQNB for in vivo imaging. The biochemistry aims were to characterize the vitro and in vivo properties of novel compounds and to perform the pharmacokinetic studies. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Computer Vision Tools for Finding Images and Video Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Computer vision offers a variety of techniques for searching for pictures in large collections of images. Appearance methods compare images based on the overall content of the image using certain criteria. Finding methods concentrate on matching subparts of images, defined in a variety of ways, in hope of finding particular objects. These ideas…

  10. NASA Technology Finds Uses in Medical Imaging

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA software has been incorporated into a new medical imaging device that could one day aid in the interpretation of mammograms, ultrasounds, and other medical imagery. The new MED-SEG system, dev...

  11. Emphysematous cholecystitis: Imaging findings in nine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sunnapwar, Abhijit; Raut, Abhijit A; Nagar, Arpit M; Katre, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Emphysematous cholecystitis is a severe form of acute cholecystitis and can be rapidly fatal. We present the imaging features of nine patients with proven emphysematous cholecystitis. PMID:21799598

  12. Pulmonary diseases with imaging findings mimicking aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Fernando Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; Marchiori, Edson; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Garcia, Tiago Severo; Irion, Klaus L; Camargo, José Jesus; Felicetti, José Carlos; de Mattos Oliveira, Flavio; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Patients with preexisting lung cavities are at risk of developing intracavitary fungal colonization. Because Aspergillus spp. are the most commonly implicated fungi, these fungal masses are called aspergillomas. Their characteristic "ball-in-hole" appearance, however, may be found in a variety of other conditions that can produce radiologic findings mimicking aspergilloma. In this paper, we review the main diseases that may mimic the radiographic findings of aspergilloma, with brief descriptions of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings.

  13. Blunt diaphragmatic lesions: Imaging findings and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bonatti, Matteo; Lombardo, Fabio; Vezzali, Norberto; Zamboni, Giulia A; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Blunt diaphragmatic lesions (BDL) are uncommon in trauma patients, but they should be promptly recognized as a delayed diagnosis increases morbidity and mortality. It is well known that BDL are often overlooked at initial imaging, mainly because of distracting injuries to other organs. Sonography may directly depict BDL only in a minor number of cases. Chest X-ray has low sensitivity in detecting BDL and lesions can be reliably suspected only in case of intra-thoracic herniation of abdominal viscera. Thanks to its wide availability, time-effectiveness and spatial resolution, multi-detector computed tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing BDL; several direct and indirect CT signs are associated with BDL. Given its high tissue contrast resolution, magnetic resonance imaging can accurately depict BDL, but its use in an emergency setting is limited because of longer acquisition times and need for patient’s collaboration. PMID:27843541

  14. Post-transplant hepatic complications: Imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Drudi, F.M.; Pagliara, E.; Cantisani, V.; Arduini, F.; D'Ambrosio, U.; Alfano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation is considered definitive therapy for acute or chronic irreversible pathologies of the liver, and the increased survival rates are mainly due to improved immunosuppressive therapies and surgical techniques. However, early diagnosis of possible graft dysfunction is crucial to liver graft survival. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of the liver before and after transplant and in the detection of complications such as vascular and biliary diseases, acute and chronic rejection and neoplastic recurrence. Integrated imaging using color-Doppler, CT, MRI and traditional x-ray reach a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the management of transplanted patients. PMID:23395917

  15. Giant infantile gliosarcoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Onguru, Onder; Chen, Lina

    2008-08-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma multiforme, which is composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous elements. The tumor is rarely encountered in childhood. This case report presents the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of a giant gliosarcoma in a 3-year-old girl. Size and location of the tumor are described.

  16. Find Your Image between the Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel Singer

    2004-01-01

    Librarians' unfortunate fixation on image as a defining generational characteristic also makes them just as guilty of promoting misconceptions as nonlibrarians. Can the profession stand another article in the general press that trumpets the amazing new discovery that librarians can be young, trendy, stylish? The level of our colleagues'…

  17. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases.

  18. MR imaging findings in diabetic muscle infarction.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Gitanjali; Nicholas, Richard; Pandey, Tarun; Montgomery, Corey; Jambhekar, Kedar; Ram, Roopa

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, often unrecognized complication seen in patients with poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus. The diagnosis is often missed and leads to unnecessary invasive investigations and inappropriate treatment. The patients usually present with unilateral thigh pain and swelling. MRI typically demonstrates diffuse swelling and increased T2 signal intensity within the affected muscles. The condition is self-limiting and is treated conservatively with bed rest and analgesics. Recurrences have been reported in the same or contralateral limb. We report a case of diabetic muscle infarction with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and imaging abnormality with recurrence on the contralateral side.

  19. Portal Annular Pancreas: A Rare and Overlooked Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Ahmed, Arshad

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic developmental anomaly which is often overlooked at imaging, and often diagnosed retrospectively when it is detected incidentally at the time of surgery. Although the anomaly itself is asymptomatic, it becomes important in cases where pancreatic resection/anastomosis is planned, because of varying ductal anatomy, risk of ductal injury and increased risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. Case Report We present imaging findings in a case of portal annular pancreas in a 45-year-old male patient. Conclusions Portal annular pancreas is a rare and often neglected pancreatic anomaly due to a lack of awareness of this entity. With the advent of MDCT and MRI, accurate preoperative diagnosis of this condition is possible. PMID:28203311

  20. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis.

  1. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  2. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects.

  3. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 761x736 ... View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  4. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... Providing hope to those suffering from pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Support Pancreatic Research Slide2 Providing hope to those ...

  5. MR imaging findings in delayed reversible myelopathy from lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Cynthia B; Goyal, Mayank; Bourque, Pierre R

    2004-05-01

    Delayed spinal cord injury following high-voltage electrical injury is a rare but well-documented phenomenon. The MR imaging features of this entity, however, have not been well documented. We report the MR imaging findings in a case of delayed sensory and motor deficits following a lightning strike. MR imaging revealed hyperintense signal within the cord on T2-weighted and STIR images extending from C1 to C3. Axial images localized the hyperintense signal to the posterolateral region of the spinal cord bilaterally. Follow-up MR imaging 6 weeks later demonstrated resolution of abnormal cord signal intensity.

  6. Generating new pancreas from old.

    PubMed

    Hardikar, Anandwardhan A

    2004-07-01

    Pancreas regeneration after tissue damage is a key response to pancreatic injury, involving pancreatic duct progenitor cells and intra-islet precursor cells. Surgical removal of the pancreas, duct obstruction by cellophane wrapping and bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation act as inductive stimuli, leading to pancreas regeneration. The exact role of growth and differentiation factors regulating pancreatic beta-cell mass remains unknown. Here, I will attempt to integrate recent findings and speculate on the factors that trigger this fascinating response, wherein the pancreas responds to a deficit in cell mass and undergoes new islet formation, leading to restoration of normal beta-cell mass. I will also discuss recent advances in regenerating endocrine pancreatic cells, which could affect stem cell-based approaches to treating diabetes mellitus.

  7. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  8. Leptomeningeal Dissemination of Intraventricular Rhabdoid Meningioma: Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Ihsan; Eren, Suat; Levent, Akin; Kantarci, Mecit; Kurt, Ali; Okay, Onder Hilmi

    A 20-year-old male patient was admitted to our clinic with a 1-year history of headache. The patient's systemic-neurological examination and laboratory findings were normal. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. Imaging findings showed calcified intraventricular mass and subependymal and gyral nodular lesions. There was a slight increase in ventricular volume. Surgical treatment was performed. Pathological specimens revealed the diagnosis of rhabdoid meningioma. Leptomeningeal dissemination refers to diffuse seeding of the leptomeninges by tumor metastases. To our knowledge, leptomeningeal dissemination of intraventricular rhabdoid meningioma is very rare in the literature. We aimed to discuss imaging findings and differential diagnosis of leptomeningeal dissemination of rhabdoid meningioma.

  9. Utility of preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in diagnosing tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and tumor-forming pancreatitis remains difficult, and this situation can cause serious problems because the management and prognosis of these two focal pancreatic masses are entirely different. We herein report a case of tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic carcinoma in an 80-year-old woman. Computed tomography showed a solid mass in the head of the pancreas, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a complete obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. Dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a time-signal intensity curve (TIC) with a slow rise to a peak (1 min after the administration of the contrast material), followed by a slow decline at the pancreatic mass, indicating a fibrotic pancreas. Under the diagnosis of tumor-forming pancreatitis, the patient underwent a segmental pancreatectomy instead of a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathology of the pancreatic mass was chronic pancreatitis without malignancy. The pancreatic TIC obtained from dynamiccontrast MRI can be helpful to differentiate tumor-forming pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma and to avoid any unnecessary major pancreatic surgery.

  10. SU-E-J-42: Evaluation of Fiducial Markers for Ultrasound and X-Ray Images Used for Motion Tracking in Pancreas SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, SK; Armour, E; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Wong, J; Ding, K; Iordachita, I; Sen, H Tutkun; Kazanzides, P; Bell, M Lediju

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Ultrasound tracking of target motion relies on visibility of vascular and/or anatomical landmark. However this is challenging when the target is located far from vascular structures or in organs that lack ultrasound landmark structure, such as in the case of pancreas cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate visibility, artifacts and distortions of fusion coils and solid gold markers in ultrasound, CT, CBCT and kV images to identify markers suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment. Methods Two fusion coils (1mm × 5mm and 1mm × 10 mm) and a solid gold marker (0.8mm × 10mm) were embedded in a tissue–like ultrasound phantom. The phantom (5cm × 12cm × 20cm) was prepared using water, gelatin and psyllium-hydrophilic-mucilloid fiber. Psylliumhydrophilic mucilloid acts as scattering medium to produce echo texture that simulates sonographic appearance of human tissue in ultrasound images while maintaining electron density close to that of water in CT images. Ultrasound images were acquired using 3D-ultrasound system with markers embedded at 5, 10 and 15mm depth from phantom surface. CT images were acquired using Philips Big Bore CT while CBCT and kV images were acquired with XVI-system (Elexta). Visual analysis was performed to compare visibility of the markers and visibility score (1 to 3) were assigned. Results All markers embedded at various depths are clearly visible (score of 3) in ultrasound images. Good visibility of all markers is observed in CT, CBCT and kV images. The degree of artifact produced by the markers in CT and CBCT images are indistinguishable. No distortion is observed in images from any modalities. Conclusion All markers are visible in images across all modalities in this homogenous tissue-like phantom. Human subject data is necessary to confirm the marker type suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment.

  11. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings. PMID:27761192

  12. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get a ...

  13. Intra-islet lesions and lobular variations in β-cell mass expansion in ob/ob mice revealed by 3D imaging of intact pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Saba; Kostromina, Elena; Nord, Christoffer; Eriksson, Maria; Lindström, Per; Ahlgren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The leptin deficient ob/ob mouse is a widely used model for studies on initial aspects of metabolic disturbances leading to type 2 diabetes, including insulin resistance and obesity. Although it is generally accepted that ob/ob mice display a dramatic increase in β-cell mass to compensate for increased insulin demand, the spatial and quantitative dynamics of β-cell mass distribution in this model has not been assessed by modern optical 3D imaging techniques. We applied optical projection tomography and ultramicroscopy imaging to extract information about individual islet β-cell volumes throughout the volume of ob/ob pancreas between 4 and 52 weeks of age. Our data show that cystic lesions constitute a significant volume of the hyperplastic ob/ob islets. We propose that these lesions are formed by a mechanism involving extravasation of red blood cells/plasma due to increased islet vessel blood flow and vessel instability. Further, our data indicate that the primary lobular compartments of the ob/ob pancreas have different potentials for expanding their β-cell population. Unawareness of the characteristics of β-cell expansion in ob/ob mice presented in this report may significantly influence ex vivo and in vivo assessments of this model in studies of β-cell adaptation and function. PMID:27713548

  14. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group which was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  15. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  16. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  17. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer The Pancreas Parts of ...

  18. Spleen in haematological malignancies: spectrum of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Saboo, S S; Krajewski, K M; O'Regan, K N; Giardino, A; Brown, J R; Ramaiya, N; Jagannathan, J P

    2012-01-01

    Imaging morphology and metabolic activity of splenic lesions is of paramount importance in patients with haematological malignancies; it can alter tumour staging, treatment protocols and overall prognosis. CT, MRI and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT have been shown to be powerful tools for the non-invasive assessment of splenic involvement in various haematological malignancies. Since many haematological malignancies and non-neoplastic conditions can involve the spleen and imaging manifestations can overlap, imaging and clinical findings outside of the spleen should be looked for to narrow the differential diagnosis; confirmation can be obtained by pathological findings. Radiologists should be familiar with the cross-sectional imaging patterns of haematological malignancies involving the spleen as well as non-neoplastic splenic findings common in these patients to facilitate their care and follow-up. This pictorial review provides the common and uncommon imaging appearances and complications of various haematological malignancies involving the spleen on CT, MRI and PET/CT, and common pitfalls in diagnosis. PMID:22096219

  19. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  20. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  1. Alveolar echinococcosis: spectrum of findings at cross-sectional imaging.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Mecit; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Karabulut, Nevzat; Aydinli, Bulent; Ogul, Hayri; Yuce, Ihsan; Calik, Muhammet; Eren, Suat; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Oto, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, which is endemic in many parts of the world. Without timely diagnosis and therapy, the prognosis is dismal, with death the eventual outcome in most cases. Diagnosis is usually based on findings at radiologic imaging and in serologic analyses. Because echinococcal lesions can occur almost anywhere in the body, familiarity with the spectrum of cross-sectional imaging appearances is advantageous. Echinococcal lesions may produce widely varied imaging appearances depending on the parasite's growth stage, the tissues or organs affected, and the presence of associated complications. Although the liver is the initial site of mass infestation by E multilocularis, the parasite may disseminate from there to other organs and tissues, such as the lung, heart, brain, bones, and ligaments. In severe infestations, the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels may be invaded. Disseminated parasitic lesions in unusual locations with atypical imaging appearances may make it difficult to narrow the differential diagnosis. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with standard and diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR cholangiopancreatography all provide useful information and play complementary roles in detecting and characterizing echinococcal lesions. Cross-sectional imaging is crucial for differentiating echinococcosis from malignant processes: CT is most useful for depicting the peripheral calcifications surrounding established echinococcal cysts, and MR imaging is most helpful for identifying echinococcosis of the central nervous system.

  2. PYNPOINT: an image processing package for finding exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Adam; Quanz, Sascha P.

    2012-12-01

    We present the scientific performance results of PYNPOINT, our Python-based software package that uses principal component analysis to detect and estimate the flux of exoplanets in two-dimensional imaging data. Recent advances in adaptive optics and imaging technology at visible and infrared wavelengths have opened the door to direct detections of planetary companions to nearby stars, but image processing techniques have yet to be optimized. We show that the performance of our approach gives a marked improvement over what is presently possible using existing methods such as LOCI. To test our approach, we use real angular differential imaging (ADI) data taken with the adaptive optics-assisted high resolution near-infrared camera NACO at the VLT. These data were taken during the commissioning of the apodizing phase plate (APP) coronagraph. By inserting simulated planets into these data, we test the performance of our method as a function of planet brightness for different positions on the image. We find that in all cases PYNPOINT has a detection threshold that is superior to that given by our LOCI analysis when assessed in a common statistical framework. We obtain our best improvements for smaller inner working angles (IWAs). For an IWA of ˜0.29 arcsec we find that we achieve a detection sensitivity that is a factor of 5 better than LOCI. We also investigate our ability to correctly measure the flux of planets. Again, we find improvements over LOCI, with PYNPOINT giving more stable results. Finally, we apply our package to a non-APP data set of the exoplanet β Pictoris b and reveal the planet with high signal-to-noise. This confirms that PYNPOINT can potentially be applied with high fidelity to a wide range of high-contrast imaging data sets.

  3. Imaging and clinical findings in segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM).

    PubMed

    Alhalabi, Kinan; Menias, Christine; Hines, Robert; Mamoun, Ihsan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-02-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory arteriopathy that tends to affect the medium-sized splanchnic branches of the aorta along with renal, carotid, cerebral, and coronary arteries. The clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhage and shock. SAM overlaps clinically and radiologically with other inflammatory vasculitides. This article describes the pathologic-radiologic correlation, imaging findings, and the management of the disease. Radiologists should be familiar with this disease entity as imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis.

  4. Primary osteosarcoma of the breast: pathological and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Conde, Délio Marques; Morais, Larissa Cunha; Pacheco, Cristiane Fagundes; Ferreira, Rogério Bizinoto; Sousa-e-Silva, Érika Pereira de; Nunes, Aline Regina; Pinto, Sebastião Alves; Fonseca, Paulo Sérgio Peres

    2015-01-01

    Primary osteosarcoma of the breast (POB) is an extremely rare and aggressive tumor. Differential diagnosis of POB includes osteosarcoma of the chest wall and metaplastic breast carcinoma. Imaging tests that exclude the existence of a direct connection between the tumor and chest wall, as well as histopathological and immunohistochemical studies that rule out the presence of an epithelial component are required for the diagnosis of POB. We report a case of a 69-year old woman with POB. Imaging and pathological findings are presented. Therapeutic approach is discussed in the light of current knowledge, including potential complications.

  5. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of equine solar penetration wounds.

    PubMed

    del Junco, Carolina I Urraca; Mair, Tim S; Powell, Sarah E; Milner, Peter I; Font, Alex F; Schwarz, Tobias; Weaver, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, signalment, clinical history and outcome of 55 horses with a penetrating sole injury were evaluated. Our aim was to describe MR imaging findings within the hoof capsule, assess the utility of the technique and give recommendations for the optimal MR imaging protocol to evaluate such injuries. Data from five equine hospitals were analyzed retrospectively. The tract was more likely to be visualized in animals scanned within the first week postinjury. There was no significant predisposition based on breed, age, or gender. T2*W transverse sequences were the most useful for assessment of solar penetrations due to their orientation perpendicular to the deep digital flexor tendon, the reduced scanning time, and the T2* capability of enhancing magnetic susceptibility caused by hemorrhage.

  7. Finding the Secret of Image Saliency in the Frequency Domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Duan, Ling-Yu; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Tiejun; Tian, Yonghong

    2015-12-01

    There are two sides to every story of visual saliency modeling in the frequency domain. On the one hand, image saliency can be effectively estimated by applying simple operations to the frequency spectrum. On the other hand, it is still unclear which part of the frequency spectrum contributes the most to popping-out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, this paper tentatively explores the secret of image saliency in the frequency domain. From the results obtained in several qualitative and quantitative experiments, we find that the secret of visual saliency may mainly hide in the phases of intermediate frequencies. To explain this finding, we reinterpret the concept of discrete Fourier transform from the perspective of template-based contrast computation and thus develop several principles for designing the saliency detector in the frequency domain. Following these principles, we propose a novel approach to design the saliency detector under the assistance of prior knowledge obtained through both unsupervised and supervised learning processes. Experimental results on a public image benchmark show that the learned saliency detector outperforms 18 state-of-the-art approaches in predicting human fixations.

  8. [Mucinous papillary cystadenoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ledezma, G; Salloum, S; de Sulbarán, Y; de Armas, L

    1992-01-01

    The case of a 15-years-old female patient is presented, who referred pain and presence of a mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Diagnostic imaging showed a 9 cm diameter cystic lesion in the tail of the pancreas which was removed surgically. Histology demonstrated a pancreatic mucinous cystadenoma with borderline biological behaviour. A review of the literature related to cystic neoplasms of the pancreas is realized.

  9. Surgical transposition of the ovaries: Imaging findings in 14 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.; Chambers, S.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Pelvic radiation therapy for cervical or vaginal cancer often leads to ovarian failure. To remove the ovaries from the radiation portal and preserve their function, they can be transposed to the lateral abdomen. Serial imaging studies in 14 patients who had undergone ovarian transposition (five bilateral, nine unilateral) were reviewed. Images obtained included 32 CT scans, 20 sonograms, and one MR image. Most transposed ovaries were located along the paracolic gutters near the iliac crests, creating an extrinsic mass effect on adjacent bowel. Detection of surgical clips on the ovary on CT scans allowed confident recognition of all 19 transposed ovaries. Cysts in the transposed ovaries, noted on most imaging studies, did not correlate with complications of pain or hormonal dysfunction. In one case, a large physiologic cyst in a transposed ovary distorted the cecum and was mistaken for a mucocele of the appendix. In another case, a large ovarian cyst was thought to be tumor recurrence or a lymphocele. These findings indicate that although the transposed ovaries can be recognized on CT scans by the surgical clips attached to the ovaries, the appearance of the ovary does not predict reliably the development of complications.

  10. Thrombotic and nonthrombotic pulmonary arterial embolism: spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Franquet, Tomas; Müller, Nestor L; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2003-01-01

    Along with clinical examination and laboratory tests, imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Multi-detector row helical computed tomography (CT) is particularly helpful in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) owing to its capacity to directly show emboli as intravascular filling defects. Although parenchymal abnormalities at CT are nonspecific for acute PTE, they may contribute to a correct diagnosis of chronic PTE, the characteristic helical CT features of which are similar to its angiographic features and include webs or bands, intimal irregularities, abrupt narrowing or complete obstruction of the pulmonary arteries, and "pouching defect." Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon condition but is sometimes associated with specific imaging findings, including discrete nodules with cavitation (septic embolism), widespread homogeneous and heterogeneous areas of increased opacity or attenuation that typically appear 12-24 hours after trauma (fat embolism), and fine miliary nodules that subsequently coalesce into large areas of increased opacity or attenuation (talcosis). Knowledge of appropriate imaging methods and familiarity with the specific imaging features of pulmonary embolism should facilitate prompt, effective diagnosis.

  11. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-05-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations.

  12. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations. PMID:27761175

  13. Primary hyperoxaluria: spectrum of clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Sara B; Waltuch, Temima; Bivin, William; Kaskel, Frederick; Levin, Terry L

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism with three known subtypes. In primary hyperoxaluria type 1, the most common of the subtypes, a deficiency in the hepatic enzymes responsible for the metabolism of glycoxylate to glycine, leads to excessive levels of glyoxylate, which is converted to oxalate. The resultant elevation in serum and urinary oxalate that characterizes primary hyperoxaluria leads to calcium oxalate crystal deposition in multiple organ systems (oxalosis). We review the genetics, pathogenesis, variable clinical presentation and course of this disease as well as its treatment. Emphasis is placed on the characteristic imaging findings before and after definitive treatment with combined liver and renal transplantation.

  14. Iniencephaly Clausus: A New Case With Clinical and Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Alireza; Hasanzadeh, Mohsen; Norouzi, Hedayat; Esfandiari, Ehasn; Mehrafarin, Mastooreh

    2015-01-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare kind of neural tube defect that is classified into two types of iniencephaly apertus and iniencephaly clausus. This anomaly could be diagnosed prenatally by obstetric ultrasonography and terminated by therapeutic abortion; however, it could be undiagnosed until birth similar to our case due to the abnormal position of the fetus or lack of experience of the sonographer. Due to abnormality of the neural tube, which causes abnormal head and neck position, all these cases will die shortly after birth. We hereby introduce the photos and imaging findings of a case of an alive neonate with iniencephaly clausus. PMID:26528385

  15. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen: the imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong

    2010-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  16. Iniencephaly Clausus: A New Case With Clinical and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Alireza; Hasanzadeh, Mohsen; Norouzi, Hedayat; Esfandiari, Ehasn; Mehrafarin, Mastooreh

    2015-07-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare kind of neural tube defect that is classified into two types of iniencephaly apertus and iniencephaly clausus. This anomaly could be diagnosed prenatally by obstetric ultrasonography and terminated by therapeutic abortion; however, it could be undiagnosed until birth similar to our case due to the abnormal position of the fetus or lack of experience of the sonographer. Due to abnormality of the neural tube, which causes abnormal head and neck position, all these cases will die shortly after birth. We hereby introduce the photos and imaging findings of a case of an alive neonate with iniencephaly clausus.

  17. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes.

  18. Abdominopelvic actinomycosis: spectrum of imaging findings and common mimickers

    PubMed Central

    der Molen, Aart Van; Es, Ad CMG Van; Giannila, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Actinomycosis is a rare suppurative disease that may mimic other inflammatory conditions on imaging. Its invasive nature may lead to mass formation and atypical presentation thus making accurate diagnosis quite difficult. Purpose To describe the different aspects of abdominopelvic actinomycosis on cross-sectional imaging and indicate discriminative findings from other inflammatory or neoplastic diseases. Material and Methods In our study we analyzed 18 patients (15 women, 3 men; age range, 25–75 years; mean age, 50 years) with pathologically proved abdominopelvic actinomycosis. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) had been performed in all patients. Eleven patients had a history of using intrauterine contraceptive devices. Bowel site, wall thickness and enhancement degree, inflammatory infiltration, and features of peritoneal or pelvic mass were evaluated at CT. Results The sigmoid colon was most commonly involved. Most patients showed concentric bowel wall-thickening, enhancing homogenously and inflammatory infiltration of pericolonic fat was mostly diffuse. In 11 patients, one or more pelvic abscesses were revealed, while a peritoneal or pelvic mass adjacent to the involved bowel segment was seen in three cases. Infiltration into the abdominal wall was seen in three cases while in one case there was thoracic dissemination. Conclusion Actinomycosis is related not only to long-term use of intrauterine contraceptive devices and should be included in the differential diagnosis when cross-sectional imaging studies show concentric bowel wall-thickening, intense contrast enhancement, regional pelvic or peritoneal masses, and extensive inflammatory fat infiltration with abscess formation. PMID:24778807

  19. Gene expression profiles for the human pancreas and purified islets in Type 1 diabetes: new findings at clinical onset and in long-standing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Planas, R; Carrillo, J; Sanchez, A; Ruiz de Villa, M C; Nuñez, F; Verdaguer, J; James, R F L; Pujol-Borrell, R; Vives-Pi, M

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by the selective destruction of the insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas by an autoimmune response. Due to ethical and practical difficulties, the features of the destructive process are known from a small number of observations, and transcriptomic data are remarkably missing. Here we report whole genome transcript analysis validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR) and correlated with immunohistological observations for four T1D pancreases (collected 5 days, 9 months, 8 and 10 years after diagnosis) and for purified islets from two of them. Collectively, the expression profile of immune response and inflammatory genes confirmed the current views on the immunopathogenesis of diabetes and showed similarities with other autoimmune diseases; for example, an interferon signature was detected. The data also supported the concept that the autoimmune process is maintained and balanced partially by regeneration and regulatory pathway activation, e.g. non-classical class I human leucocyte antigen and leucocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B1 (LILRB1). Changes in gene expression in islets were confined mainly to endocrine and neural genes, some of which are T1D autoantigens. By contrast, these islets showed only a few overexpressed immune system genes, among which bioinformatic analysis pointed to chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) and chemokine (CXC motif) receptor 4) (CXCR4) chemokine pathway activation. Remarkably, the expression of genes of innate immunity, complement, chemokines, immunoglobulin and regeneration genes was maintained or even increased in the long-standing cases. Transcriptomic data favour the view that T1D is caused by a chronic inflammatory process with a strong participation of innate immunity that progresses in spite of the regulatory and regenerative mechanisms. PMID:19912253

  20. Diagnosis and management of solid pseudopapillary tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M M; Khan, Z R; Hossain, M S

    2010-10-01

    The finding of a solid or cystic mass in the pancreas is becoming more common secondary to the increasing use of cross-sectional imaging and the improved sensitivity of such studies for the detection of pancreatic abnormalities. Because of the aggressive natural history of pancreatic cancer, this has caused concern that all pancreatic abnormalities may be cancer as well as confusion over proper diagnostic and treatment algorithms. This review provides an overview of the natural history, diagnostic considerations, and treatment recommendations for the less common tumor of the pancreas which can be misinterpreted as pancreatic cancer: solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT). A Medline search was conducted to identify studies investigating the clinicopath-ologic features, molecular genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of SPT. It is often possible to obtain an accurate pretreatment diagnosis for this unusual pancreatic tumor and to successfully differentiate them from the more common pancreatic malignancies.

  1. Radiological imaging findings of Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Erkan; Beyhan, Murat; Sade, Recep

    2017-04-03

    Radiological findings of Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) in patients with different etiologies are presented in our study. The study included 12 patients (seven females, five males) for whom radiological examinations were requested due to reasons such as epilepsy, mental retardation, and/or hemiplegia. CT was performed in 12, MRI in 6, MRA in 1, and DSA in 1 patient. Following imaging findings were evaluated: cerebral and cerebellar involvement (laterality, encephalomalacia), affected territories, ventricular enlargement, sulcal enlargement, calvarial thickening, and paranasal sinus enlargement hyperaeration. Age range of the patients was 5-62 (mean 34.1 ± 21.7). Left hemicrania was affected in eight patients, right hemicrania in four. Ipsilateral calvarial thickening and lateral ventricular dilatation were observed in all patients. 11 patients had ipsilateral frontal sinus hyperaeration, sulcal enlargement and encephalomalacia. Wallerian degeneration of the mesencephalon and middle fossa hypoplasia was seen in ten patients, mastoid hyperaeration, third ventricular enlargement and thalamic involvement in nine, and corpus callosum, basal ganglion injury, and sphenoid sinus hyperaeration in eight. MCA, ACA, and PCA territories were involved in six patients. Only MCA territory involvement was seen in four patients. Cerebellar atrophy was contralateral in two patients. Symmetric bilateral atrophy was observed in one patient. DDMS can be encountered with different radiological findings based on cerebral damage formation process and the extent of damage. Patients may have different levels of cerebral hemiatrophy, ipsilateral carvarial thickening, and lateral ventricular dilatation.

  2. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with “rapid wash-in and slow wash-out” or “progressive enhancement” enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  4. Pancreatic endometrial cyst mimics mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mederos, Michael A; Villafañe, Nicole; Dhingra, Sadhna; Farinas, Carlos; McElhany, Amy; Fisher, William E; Van Buren II, George

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cysts include a variety of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Endometrial cysts in the pancreas are exceedingly rare lesions that are difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This report describes the findings in a 43-year-old patient with a recent episode of acute pancreatitis who presented with a large cyst in the tail of the pancreas. Imaging demonstrated a loculated pancreatic cyst, and cyst fluid aspiration revealed an elevated amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen. The patient experienced an interval worsening of abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, and a 15-pound weight loss 3 mo after the initial episode of pancreatitis. With concern for a possible pre-malignant lesion, the patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, which revealed a 16 cm × 12 cm × 4 cm lesion. Final histopathology was consistent with an intra-pancreatic endometrial cyst. Here we discuss the overlapping imaging and laboratory features of pancreatic endometrial cysts and mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. PMID:28246486

  5. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Güneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Acar, Türker; Savaş, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 1–68 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings. PMID:25010372

  6. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas--evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Horton, Karen H; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fishman, Elliot K

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is a rare cystic pancreatic tumor. In this case report we provide the imaging perspective of the lesion including the role of multidetector CT (MDCT) and CT angiography and 3D imaging.

  7. Finding your voice: a singing lesson from functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah J; Abbott, David F; Lusher, Dean; Gentle, Ellen C; Jackson, Graeme D

    2011-12-01

    Vocal singing (singing with lyrics) shares features common to music and language but it is not clear to what extent they use the same brain systems, particularly at the higher cortical level, and how this varies with expertise. Twenty-six participants of varying singing ability performed two functional imaging tasks. The first examined covert generative language using orthographic lexical retrieval while the second required covert vocal singing of a well-known song. The neural networks subserving covert vocal singing and language were found to be proximally located, and their extent of cortical overlap varied with singing expertise. Nonexpert singers showed greater engagement of their language network during vocal singing, likely accounting for their less tuneful performance. In contrast, expert singers showed a more unilateral pattern of activation associated with reduced engagement of the right frontal lobe. The findings indicate that singing expertise promotes independence from the language network with decoupling producing more tuneful performance. This means that the age-old singing practice of 'finding your singing voice' may be neurologically mediated by changing how strongly singing is coupled to the language system.

  8. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  9. Healthcare reform for imagers: finding a way forward now.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Picard, Michael H

    2013-03-01

    The changing healthcare environment presents many challenges to cardiovascular imagers. This perspective paper uses current trends to propose strategies that cardiovascular imagers can follow to lead in managing change and developing the imaging laboratory of the future. In the area of quality, imagers are encouraged to follow guidelines and standards, implement structured reporting and laboratory databases, adopt ongoing quality improvement programs, and use benchmarks to confirm imaging quality. In the area of access, imagers are encouraged to enhance availability of testing, focus on patient and referring physician value and satisfaction, collaboratively implement new technologies and uses of imaging, integrate health information technology in the laboratory, and work toward the appropriate inclusion of imaging in new healthcare delivery models. In the area of cost, imagers are encouraged to minimize laboratory operating expenses without compromising quality, and to take an active role in care redesign initiatives to ensure that imaging is utilized appropriately and at proper time intervals. Imagers are also encouraged to learn leadership and management skills, undertake strategic planning exercises, and build strong, collaborative teams. Although it is difficult to predict the future of cardiovascular imaging delivery, a reasonable sense of the likely direction of many changes and careful attention to the fundamentals of good health care (quality, access, and cost) can help imagers to thrive now and in the future.

  10. Sublingual Epidermoid Cyst Presenting with Distinctive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Kodama, Kozue; Iino, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    A case of sublingual epidermoid cyst presenting distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is described. A 39-year-old man presented to our hospital with a three months progressive left submandibular swelling, difficulty moving his tongue, and snoring. Preoperative evaluation with MRI and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) revealed that the heterogeneous cystic lesion contained the squamous cells, which is compatible with ectodermal tissue. The mass was located above the mylohyoid muscle and spread to the pharyngeal space. By considering the size, infection history, patient age, and location, the cyst was completely resected under general anesthesia via cervical approach without any complication. Histopathologically, the cyst wall was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with no skin appendage, suggesting an epidermoid cyst. Ultrasound (US), MRI and FNAC were very useful of the preoperative diagnosis for oral and sublingual lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful and without recurrence after 24 months. This case showed that epidermoid cysts formed the rarely heterogeneous cystic tumor and it underlined usefulness of preoperative diagnosis, such as US, MRI and FNAC for oral and sublingual tumor. PMID:25332766

  11. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  12. Imaging of plantar fascia disorders: findings on plain radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Gitto, Salvatore; Bortolotto, Chandra; Draghi, Anna Guja; Ori Belometti, Gioia

    2017-02-01

    Plantar fascia (PF) disorders commonly cause heel pain and disability in the general population. Imaging is often required to confirm diagnosis. This review article aims to provide simple and systematic guidelines for imaging assessment of PF disease, focussing on key findings detectable on plain radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sonographic characteristics of plantar fasciitis include PF thickening, loss of fibrillar structure, perifascial collections, calcifications and hyperaemia on Doppler imaging. Thickening and signal changes in the PF as well as oedema of adjacent soft tissues and bone marrow can be assessed on MRI. Radiographic findings of plantar fasciitis include PF thickening, cortical irregularities and abnormalities in the fat pad located deep below the PF. Plantar fibromatosis appears as well-demarcated, nodular thickenings that are iso-hypoechoic on ultrasound and show low-signal intensity on MRI. PF tears present with partial or complete fibre interruption on both ultrasound and MRI. Imaging description of further PF disorders, including xanthoma, diabetic fascial disease, foreign-body reactions and plantar infections, is detailed in the main text. Ultrasound and MRI should be considered as first- and second-line modalities for assessment of PF disorders, respectively. Indirect findings of PF disease can be ruled out on plain radiography. Teaching Points • PF disorders commonly cause heel pain and disability in the general population.• Imaging is often required to confirm diagnosis or reveal concomitant injuries.• Ultrasound and MRI respectively represent the first- and second-line modalities for diagnosis.• Indirect findings of PF disease can be ruled out on plain radiography.

  13. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas. PMID:27695176

  14. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  15. Von Hippel-Lindau disease involving pancreas and biliary system

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu-Ting; Bo, Qi-Yu; Zhao, Feng; Sun, Dong; Li, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare inherited, autosomal-dominant syndrome caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the VHL gene. VHL patients are prone to develop benign and malignant tumors and cysts in multiple organ systems involving kidneys, pancreas and central nervous system (CNS). The varied and complex clinical manifestations and radiological findings of VHL are of interest. Patient concerns: We report a 38-year-old woman with a ten-year history of VHL disease involving both pancreas and biliary system. To the best of our knowledge, direct involvement of the biliary system in VHL disease has never been reported. Diagnoses: The diagnosis was established via computed tomography scan and was confirmed by genetic testing. Interventions: The patient chose to receive conservative treatment and was followed up by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Outcomes: Renal angiomas and cysts were found during follow-up and there were no evidence of malignant change of the pancreas and biliary system. Lessons: We described the first case of VHL-associated choledochal cysts and may present new visceral manifestations of VHL disease. Gastroenterologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of this rare disease for early detection of its life-threatening manifestations. PMID:28072736

  16. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: (1) describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, (2) outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, (3) illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and (4) highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory, and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with brain

  17. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents.

  18. Central nervous system tuberculosis: pathophysiology and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Deepak; Narang, Jayant; Yanamandala, Rama; Lawande, Malini; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    With the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic, the incidence of tuberculosis, including central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis, has increased in developed countries. It is no longer a disease confined to underdeveloped and developing countries. The imaging appearance has become more complex with the onset of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Imaging plays an important role in the early diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. This article presents an extensive review of typical and atypical imaging appearances of intracranial tuberculosis, and discusses pathogenesis, patterns of involvement, and advances in imaging of intracranial tuberculosis.

  19. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in acute canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bathen-Noethen, A; Stein, V M; Puff, C; Baumgaertner, W; Tipold, A

    2008-09-01

    Demyelination is the prominent histopathological hallmark in the acute stage of canine distemper virus infection. Magnetic resonance imaging is an important diagnostic tool in human beings to determine demyelination in the brain, for example in multiple sclerosis. Five young dogs with clinically suspected canine distemper virus infection were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Hyperintense lesions and loss of contrast between grey and white matter were detected in T2-weighted images in the cerebellum and/or in the brainstem of three dogs, which correlated with demyelination demonstrated in histopathological examination. Furthermore, increased signal intensities in T2-weighted images were seen in the temporal lobe of four dogs with no evidence of demyelination. Magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a sensitive tool for the visualisation of in vivo myelination defects in dogs with acute canine distemper virus infection. Postictal oedema and accumulation of antigen positive cells have to be considered an important differential diagnosis.

  1. Finding corner point correspondence from wavelet decomposition of image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohar, Mareboyana; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    A time efficient algorithm for image registration between two images that differ in translation is discussed. The algorithm is based on coarse-fine strategy using wavelet decomposition of both the images. The wavelet decomposition serves two different purposes: (1) its high frequency components are used to detect feature points (corner points here) and (2) it provides coarse-to-fine structure for making the algorithm time efficient. The algorithm is based on detecting the corner points from one of the images called reference image and computing corresponding points from the other image called test image by using local correlations using 7x7 windows centered around the corner points. The corresponding points are detected at the lowest decomposition level in a search area of about 11x11 (depending on the translation) and potential points of correspondence are projected onto higher levels. In the subsequent levels the local correlations are computed in a search area of no more than 3x3 for refinement of the correspondence.

  2. [Electronic documentation of findings and image in ultrasound diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, K

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art for computer-based generation and documentation of ultrasonography reports is described. Arguments for standard nomenclature and structured data collection are given. Remarks concerning system integration, data privacy, and image archiving follow.

  3. An image feature-based approach to automatically find images for application to clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Stanley, R Joe; De, Soumya; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George R

    2011-07-01

    The illustrations in biomedical publications often provide useful information in aiding clinicians' decisions when full text searching is performed to find evidence in support of a clinical decision. In this research, image analysis and classification techniques are explored to automatically extract information for differentiating specific modalities to characterize illustrations in biomedical publications, which may assist in the evidence finding process. Global, histogram-based, and texture image illustration features were compared to basis function luminance histogram correlation features for modality-based discrimination over a set of 742 manually annotated images by modality (radiological, photo, etc.) selected from the 2004-2005 issues of the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Using a mean shifting supervised clustering technique, automatic modality-based discrimination results as high as 95.57% were obtained using the basis function features. These results compared favorably to other feature categories examined. The experimental results show that image-based features, particularly correlation-based features, can provide useful modality discrimination information.

  4. Torsion of wandering spleen and distal pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Sheflin, J.R.; Lee, C.M.; Kretchmar, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Wandering spleen is the term applied to the condition in which a long pedicle allows the spleen to lie in an abnormal location. Torsion of a wandering spleen is an unusual cause of an acute abdomen and is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Associated torsion of the distal pancreas is even more uncommon. The authors describe a patient with torsion of a wandering spleen and distal pancreas, who was correctly diagnosed, and define the merits of the imaging methods used. The initial examination should be /sup 99//sup m/Tc-sulfur colloid liner-spleen scanning.

  5. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Uchida, Hiroki; Sasahira, Naoki; Kawada, Natsuko; Itoh, Yuya; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a relatively new diagnostic technique for measuring the elasticity (hardness) of tissue. Eleven years have passed since the debut of elastography. Various elastography devices are currently being marketed by manufacturers under different names. Pancreatic elastography can be used not only with transabdominal ultrasonography but also with endoscopic ultrasonography, but some types of elastography are difficult to perform for the pancreas. These guidelines aim to classify the various types of elastography into two major categories depending on the differences in the physical quantity (strain, shear wave), and to present the evidence for pancreatic elastography and how to use pancreatic elastography in the present day. But the number of reports on ultrasound elastography for the pancreas is still small, and there are no reports on some elastography devices for the pancreas. Therefore, these guidelines do not recommend methods of imaging and analysis by elastography device.

  6. Practicing the Code of Ethics, finding the image of God.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The Code of Ethics for Nurses gives a professional obligation to practice in a compassionate and respectful way that is unaffected by the attributes of the patient. This article explores the concept "made in the image of God" and the complexities inherent in caring for those perceived as exhibiting distorted images of God. While the Code provides a professional standard consistent with a biblical worldview, human nature impacts the ability to consistently act congruently with the Code. Strategies and nursing interventions that support development of practice from a biblical worldview and the Code of Ethics for Nurses are presented.

  7. Dropped gallstones: spectrum of imaging findings, complications and diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Nayak, L; Menias, C O; Gayer, G

    2013-08-01

    Spillage of gallstones into the abdominal cavity, referred to as "dropped gallstones" (DGs), occurs commonly during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The majority of these spilled stones remain clinically silent; however, if uncomplicated DGs are not correctly identified on subsequent imaging, they may mimic peritoneal implants and cause unduly concern. A small percentage of DGs cause complications, including abscess and fistula formation. Recognising the DG within the abscess is critical for definitive treatment. This pictorial review illustrates the imaging appearances and complications of DGs on CT, MRI and ultrasound and emphasises pitfalls in diagnosis.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jeong A; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection. PMID:27587946

  9. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Up About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas NPF ... here . About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas Genetics & ...

  10. Iliac vein compression syndrome: Clinical, imaging and pathologic findings

    PubMed Central

    Brinegar, Katelyn N; Sheth, Rahul A; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bautista, Jemianne; Oklu, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is the pathologic compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery, resulting in left lower extremity pain, swelling, and deep venous thrombosis. Though this syndrome was first described in 1851, there are currently no standardized criteria to establish the diagnosis of MTS. Since MTS is treated by a wide array of specialties, including interventional radiology, vascular surgery, cardiology, and vascular medicine, the need for an established diagnostic criterion is imperative in order to reduce misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Although MTS has historically been diagnosed by the presence of pathologic features, the use of dynamic imaging techniques has led to a more radiologic based diagnosis. Thus, imaging plays an integral part in screening patients for MTS, and the utility of a wide array of imaging modalities has been evaluated. Here, we summarize the historical aspects of the clinical features of this syndrome. We then provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature on the efficacy of imaging tools available to diagnose MTS. Lastly, we provide clinical pearls and recommendations to aid physicians in diagnosing the syndrome through the use of provocative measures. PMID:26644823

  11. Journals Find Many Images in Research Are Faked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Kristin Roovers was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania with a bright career ahead of her--a trusted member of a research laboratory at the medical school studying the role of cell growth in diabetes. When an editor of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" did a spot-check on one of her images for an article in 2005, Roovers'…

  12. Incidental Findings on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Vincent, Steven D.; Hellstein, John W.; Qian, Fang; Smoker, Wendy R. K.; Ruprecht, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained widespread acceptance in dentistry for a variety of applications. Most dentists who are not radiologists/trained in radiology are generally not familiar with interpretation of anatomical structures and/or pathosis outside their area of primary interest, as often this was not within the scope of their training. Objectives. To assess that the number of incidental findings on a CBCT scan is high both within and outside of the primary area of interest, thereby emphasizing the importance of interpretation of all areas visualized on the scan. Materials and Methods. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist reviewed 1000 CBCT scans (382 males and 618 females) for findings both in- and outside the area of interest. Results. Of the 1000 subjects that were reviewed, 943 scans showed findings in the primary regions of interest and/or outside the regions of interest, and 76 different conditions were visualized in these scans both in and outside the areas of interest. Conclusion. From the wide scope of findings noted on these scans, it can be concluded that it is essential that a person trained in advanced interpretation techniques in radiology interprets cone beam computed tomography scans. PMID:23304148

  13. Pineal region masses--imaging findings and surgical approaches.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Forrester D; Abele, Travis A; Sivakumar, Walavan; Taussky, Philipp; Shah, Lubdha M; Salzman, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the pineal region is complex. Despite advances in surgical techniques since the first reported successful pineal region surgery in the early 20th century, pineal region surgery remains challenging owing to the proximity of deep cerebral veins and dorsal midbrain structures critical for vision. In this article, we review the relevant surgical anatomy of the pineal region and discuss historically important and current surgical approaches. We describe specific imaging features of pineal region masses that may affect surgical planning and review neoplastic and nonneoplastic masses that occur in the pineal region.

  14. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  15. Retroperitoneal Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma: Imaging Findings and Transarterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Huojun Yang Jijin Lu Jianping; Sheng Jin; Yuan Min; Jiang Xu; Li Yuxiao; Gupta, Sanjay

    2010-04-15

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (EOS) is an uncommon and usually highly aggressive mesenchymal tumor. Retroperitoneal extraskeletal osteosarma (REOS) is exceedingly rare. Due to the rare nature of the disease, both the diagnosis and the management of REOS can be challenging. We present the clinical history, CT findings, angiographic manifestations, and use of transarterial chemoembolization for treatment in a case of REOS. To our knowledge, the angiographic features of and attempt at transarterial treatment of REOS have not been reported in the literature.

  16. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Prenatal Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Sanín-Blair, José Enrique; Gutiérrez-Márquez, Carolina; Herrera, Diego A; Vossough, Arastoo

    2017-03-14

    Brain lesions and malformations have been described on ultrasonography of prenatal Zika infection; however, there are scarce reports about fetal magnetic resonance (MR) findings. We report 3 cases of fetuses with confirmed intrauterine Zika virus infection evaluated by ultrasound and fetal MR. Various morphometric measurements were assessed and brain maturation was calculated with the fetal total maturation score. Fetuses with prenatal Zika virus infection showed retardation in brain maturation indexes evaluated by fetal MR. Brain calcifications were demonstrated by neurosonography in all cases, while fetal MR characterized the specific type of cortical development malformation.

  17. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Hunter, Jill V.; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R.; Wu, Trevor C.; McCauley, Stephen R.; Vogt, Gregory S.; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p < 0.04). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by tractography did not significantly differ between groups. However, DTI metrics were significantly correlated with declarative memory (e.g., left ventral striatum ADC with delayed recall, r = −0.74; p = 0.02) and with RT to the repeating number sequence (r = 0.70; p = 0.04) in the boxers. Years of boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from −0.65 for the right ventral striatum to −0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = −0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = −0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed. PMID:26414735

  18. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hunter, Jill V; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R; Wu, Trevor C; McCauley, Stephen R; Vogt, Gregory S; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian; Levin, Harvey S

    2016-04-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p < 0.04). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by tractography did not significantly differ between groups. However, DTI metrics were significantly correlated with declarative memory (e.g., left ventral striatum ADC with delayed recall, r = -0.74; p = 0.02) and with RT to the repeating number sequence (r = 0.70; p = 0.04) in the boxers. Years of boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from -0.65 for the right ventral striatum to -0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = -0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = -0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed.

  19. Second malignancies in pediatric patients: imaging findings and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Elida; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Ortuno, Pedro; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Nogués, Pere; Lucaya, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic advances in the treatment of pediatric neoplasms have improved the prognosis but have also increased the risk of developing rare second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). Primary neoplasms that are often associated with SMNs include lymphoma, retinoblastoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, and leukemia. The most common SMNs are central nervous system (CNS) tumors, sarcomas, thyroid and parotid gland carcinomas, and leukemia, particularly acute myeloblastic leukemia. Genetic predisposition, chemotherapy, and especially radiation therapy are implicated as pathogenic factors in SMN. All survivors of childhood cancer should have lifelong follow-up, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging, which does not require ionizing radiation and provides greater anatomic detail and resolution in the head and neck region and the CNS. A new or progressive lesion may represent recurrence of the primitive neoplastic process, late radiation injury, or, more infrequently, an SMN. Differential diagnosis can be very difficult, and outcome is often fatal. Treatment protocols should be modified to reduce the risk for SMN without compromising the effectiveness of initial therapy. Clinicians should individualize treatment for patients who are genetically predisposed to SMN. In addition, radiologists should be familiar with the long-term consequences of antineoplastic therapy to facilitate diagnosis and anticipate adverse outcomes.

  20. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN SMALL RUMINANTS WITH BRAIN DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, Katrin; Oevermann, Anna; Precht, Christina; Lauper, Josiane; Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Brain disease is an important cause of neurologic deficits in small ruminants, however few MRI features have been described. The aim of this retrospective, case series study was to describe MRI characteristics in a group of small ruminants with confirmed brain disease. A total of nine small ruminants (six sheep and three goats) met inclusion criteria. All had neurologic disorders localized to the brain and histopathologic confirmation. In animals with toxic-metabolic diseases, there were bilaterally symmetric MRI lesions affecting either the gray matter (one animal with polioencephalomalacia) or the white matter (two animals with enterotoxemia). In animals with suppurative inflammation, asymmetric focal brainstem lesions were present (two animals with listeric encephalitis), or lesions typical of an intra-axial (one animal) or dural abscess (one animal), respectively. No MRI lesions were detected in one animal with suspected viral cerebellitis and one animal with parasitic migration tracts. No neoplastic or vascular lesions were identified in this case series. Findings from the current study supported the use of MRI for diagnosing brain diseases in small ruminants.

  4. CT Imaging Findings after Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Olga R.; Thornton, Eavan; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Mahadevan, Anand; Raptopoulos, Vassilious; Brook, Alexander; Najarian, Robert; Sheiman, Robert; Siewert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study radiological response to stereotactic radiotherapy for focal liver tumors. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study CTs of 68 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy for liver tumors between 01/2006 and 01/2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Two independent reviewers evaluated lesion volume and enhancement pattern of the lesion and of juxtaposed liver parenchyma. Results. 36 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 25 with liver metastases, and seven with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) were included in study. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 ± 7.1 months for HCC, 6.4 ± 5.1 months for metastases, and 10.1 ± 4.8 months for the CCC. Complete response was seen in 4/36 (11.1%) HCCs and 1/25 (4%) metastases. Partial response (>30% decrease in long diameter) was seen in 25/36 (69%) HCCs, 14/25 (58%) metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Partial response followed by local recurrence (>20% increase in long diameter from nadir) occurred in 2/36 (6%) HCCs and 4/25 (17%) metastases. Liver parenchyma adjacent to the lesion demonstrated a prominent halo of delayed enhancement in 27/36 (78%) of HCCs, 19/21 (91%) of metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Conclusion. Sustainable radiological partial response to stereotactic radiotherapy is most frequent outcome seen in liver lesions. Prominent halo of delayed enhancement of the adjacent liver is frequent finding. PMID:26221135

  5. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  6. Pancreas-Specific Deletion of Prox1 Affects Development and Disrupts Homeostasis of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    WESTMORELAND, JOBY J.; KILIC, GAMZE; SARTAIN, CAROLINE; SIRMA, SEMA; BLAIN, JENNIFER; REHG, JEROLD; HARVEY, NATASHA; SOSA–PINEDA, BEATRIZ

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The exocrine portion of the pancreas functions in digestion and preserves pancreatic homeostasis. Learning how this tissue forms during embryogenesis could improve our understanding of human pancreatic diseases. Expression of the homeo-box gene Prox1 in the exocrine pancreas changes throughout development in mice. We investigated the role of Prox1 in development of the exocrine pancreas in mice. METHODS Mice with pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 (Prox1ΔPanc) were generated and their pancreatic tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, histologic techniques, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and morphometric analysis. RESULTS Loss of Prox1 from the pancreas led to multiple exocrine alterations, most notably premature acinar cell differentiation, increased ductal cell proliferation, altered duct morphogenesis, and imbalanced expression of claudin proteins. Prox1ΔPanc mice also had some minor alterations in islet cells, but beta-cell development was not affected. The exocrine congenital defects of Prox1ΔPanc pancreata appeared to initiate a gradual process of deterioration that resulted in extensive loss of acinar cells, lipomatosis, and damage to ductal tissue in adult mice. CONCLUSIONS Pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 causes premature differentiation of acinar cells and poor elongation of epithelial branches; these defects indicate that Prox1 controls the expansion of tip progenitors in the early developing pancreas. During later stages of embryogenesis, Prox1 appears to regulate duct cell proliferation and morphogenesis. These findings identify Prox1 as an important regulator of pancreatic exocrine development. PMID:22178591

  7. The left-sided pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, G.D.; Gibson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) performed in nine patients (two with pancreatic carcinoma, one with hepatomegaly), six with no relevant abdominal disease) showed the pancreas to lie wholly to the left of the aorta. This not uncommon location may give rise to difficulty in demonstrating the pancreas on real-time US scans. The superior mesenteric vessels and splenic vein remain useful land-marks for locating the head of the pancreas in this position.

  8. Stereological analyses of the whole human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Ananta; Fowler, Jonas L.; Zielinski, Mark C.; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami

    2016-01-01

    The large size of human tissues requires a practical stereological approach to perform a comprehensive analysis of the whole organ. We have developed a method to quantitatively analyze the whole human pancreas, as one of the challenging organs to study, in which endocrine cells form various sizes of islets that are scattered unevenly throughout the exocrine pancreas. Furthermore, the human pancreas possesses intrinsic characteristics of intra-individual variability, i.e. regional differences in endocrine cell/islet distribution, and marked inter-individual heterogeneity regardless of age, sex and disease conditions including obesity and diabetes. The method is built based on large-scale image capture, computer-assisted unbiased image analysis and quantification, and further mathematical analyses, using widely-used software such as Fiji/ImageJ and MATLAB. The present study includes detailed protocols of every procedure as well as all the custom-written computer scripts, which can be modified according to specific experimental plans and specimens of interest. PMID:27658965

  9. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X; Cooper, D; Lachaine, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  10. (Development of gamma-emitting, receptor-binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas): Progress report, October 1, 1987--October 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Our objectives as stated in the last removal submission were to synthesize a radioiodinated derivative of 4IQNB with a partition coefficient 10-fold less than that of 4IQNB, i.e., similar to that of QNB; to characterize the interaction of 4IQNB with the m-AChR isolated from pancreas; and to synthesize a high affinity analogue of QNB radiolabeled with F-18. Since the submission of the competitive renewal, we have prepared and submitted three manuscripts relating to studies on the muscarinic receptor. 2 tabs.

  11. Granular cell tumor of the pancreas: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Atsushi; Satoh, Kennichi; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Shin; Umino, Jun; Itoh, Hiromichi; Masamune, Atsushi; Egawa, Shinichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-01-01

    Granular cell tumors, also called Abrikossof’s tumors, were originally described by Abrikossof A in 1926. The first case of a pancreatic granular cell tumor was described in 1975 and only 6 cases have been reported. We describe a case of granular cell tumor in the pancreas showing pancreatic duct obstruction. Because imaging studies showed findings compatible with those of pancreatic carcinoma, the patient underwent distal pancreatectomy. Histological examination showed that the tumor consisted of a nested growth of large tumor cells with ample granular cytoplasm and small round nuclei. The tumor cells expressed S-100 protein and were stained with neuron-specific enolase and periodic acid-Schiff, but were negative for desmin, vimentin, and cytokeratin. The resected tumor was diagnosed as a granular cell tumor. To our knowledge, this is the seventh case of Granular cell tumor of the pancreas to be reported. PMID:21160931

  12. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  13. A Review of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shenton, ME; Hamoda, HM; Schneiderman, JS; Bouix, S; Pasternak, O; Rathi, Y; M-A, Vu; Purohit, MP; Helmer, K; Koerte, I; Lin, AP; C-F, Westin; Kikinis, R; Kubicki, M; Stern, RA; Zafonte, R

    2013-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also referred to as concussion, remains a controversial diagnosis because the brain often appears quite normal on conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Such conventional tools, however, do not adequately depict brain injury in mTBI because they are not sensitive to detecting diffuse axonal injuries (DAI), also described as traumatic axonal injuries (TAI), the major brain injuries in mTBI. Furthermore, for the 15 to 30% of those diagnosed with mTBI on the basis of cognitive and clinical symptoms, i.e., the “miserable minority,” the cognitive and physical symptoms do not resolve following the first three months post-injury. Instead, they persist, and in some cases lead to long-term disability. The explanation given for these chronic symptoms, i.e., postconcussive syndrome, particularly in cases where there is no discernible radiological evidence for brain injury, has led some to posit a psychogenic origin. Such attributions are made all the easier since both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are frequently co-morbid with mTBI. The challenge is thus to use neuroimaging tools that are sensitive to DAI/TAI, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in order to detect brain injuries in mTBI. Of note here, recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, such as DTI, make it possible to characterize better extant brain abnormalities in mTBI. These advances may lead to the development of biomarkers of injury, as well as to staging of reorganization and reversal of white matter changes following injury, and to the ability to track and to characterize changes in brain injury over time. Such tools will likely be used in future research to evaluate treatment efficacy, given their enhanced sensitivity to alterations in the brain. In this article we review the incidence of mTBI and the importance of characterizing this patient population using objective radiological measures. Evidence

  14. Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury: case report with magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lam, Justin Chak Yiu; Lee, Ka Lok Ryan; Griffith, James F

    2016-11-01

    Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury is an uncommon injury occurring in young children. The injury may be misinterpreted or overlooked because of misleading or subtle radiological findings. A case of 7-year-old child with post-traumatic elbow pain and subtle findings on elbow radiography is presented. The injury was initially misinterpreted as an avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle. Following radiological review, a diagnosis of brachialis periosteal avulsion injury was made. The radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of this injury are presented to stress the value of comparing the radiographic findings with previous imaging and to increase awareness of this uncommon injury.

  15. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP. In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.

  16. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP.more » In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.« less

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with otitis.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Coke, Rob L; Kochunov, Peter; Davis, M Duff

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on an adult, male Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with a history of nonspecific neurologic signs and acute discharge from the left ear. MRI revealed findings consistent with otitis and possible osteomyelitis of the temporal and mastoid bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of otitis and MRI findings in a kangaroo.

  18. [Artificial pancreas for automated glucose control].

    PubMed

    Blauw, Helga; van Bon, Arianne C; de Vries, J H Hans

    2013-01-01

    Strict glucose control is important for patients with diabetes mellitus in order to prevent complications. However, many patients find it difficult to achieve the recommended HbA1c level. The possibility of hypoglycaemia plays an important role in this. The artificial pancreas automates glucose control, improving glucose levels without increasing hypoglycaemic events. The required insulin dose is calculated and administered on the basis of continuous glucose measurements, taking over a large part of the treatment from the patient. Several research groups are working on making this technique suitable for home use. It is expected that the artificial pancreas will become available in the near future. However, effectiveness and safety will have to be investigated in long-term studies. A large number of insulin-dependent patients with diabetes could be eligible for this treatment.

  19. Surgery for pancreas divisum.

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Subodh; Johnson, Colin D.

    2002-01-01

    We present our experience of open surgical treatment in 5 patients with symptomatic pancreas divisum (PD). Choice of therapy was based on allocation of patients to one of five clinical presentation groups: (i) with minor symptoms (no operation); (ii) with recurrent acute pancreatitis or upper abdominal pain (RAP/RUAP)--3 patients; (iii) with radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CP)--1 patient; (iv) chronic pancreatic pain without radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CPP); and (v) other pancreatic complications--1 patient. This classification helps to decide management and predict possible outcome. Various types of operation were performed as indicated (open surgical accessory sphincteroplasty [2 also had distal pancreatectomy], n = 3; Puestow's operation, n = 1; or Beger's pancreatectomy, n = 1). All patients improved significantly and are now leading normal personal, professional, and social lives. We conclude that, with careful selection of patients and appropriate therapy, the response to surgical treatment is good. PMID:12092866

  20. MR imaging of the pelvis: a guide to incidental musculoskeletal findings for abdominal radiologists.

    PubMed

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Girish, Gandikota; Kaza, Ravi K; Jacobson, Jon; Fessell, David; Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David

    2014-08-01

    Occasionally patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging for presumed pelvic disease demonstrate unexpected musculoskeletal imaging findings in the imaged field. Such incidental findings can be challenging to the abdominal radiologist, who may not be familiar with their appearance or know the appropriate diagnostic considerations. Findings can include both normal and abnormal bone marrow, osseous abnormalities such as Paget's disease, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, stress and insufficiency fractures, and athletic pubalgia, benign neoplasms such as enchondroma and bone island, malignant processes such as metastasis and chondrosarcoma, soft tissue processes such as abscess, nerve-related tumors, and chordoma, joint- and bursal-related processes such as sacroiliitis, iliopsoas bursitis, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and labral tears, and iatrogenic processes such as bone graft or bone biopsy. Though not all-encompassing, this essay will help abdominal radiologists to identify and describe this variety of pelvic musculoskeletal conditions, understand key radiologic findings, and synthesize a differential diagnosis when appropriate.

  1. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  2. An annular pancreas associated with carcinoma of the papilla of Vater: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Naoki; Imaizumi, Toshihide; Furukawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Masahiro; Gunji, Hisashi; Kato, Kenichiro; Tobita, Kosuke; Nakagohri, Toshio; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Ogoshi, Kyoji

    2012-05-01

    An annular pancreas is an uncommon congenital anomaly that usually presents early in childhood. Malignancy in the setting of an annular pancreas is unusual. We herein report a case of annular pancreas with carcinoma of the papilla of Vater. A 59-year-old man presented with epigastric discomfort and was referred to us after gastroduodenal endoscopy showed a tumor of the papilla of Vater. Preoperative imaging showed the pancreatic parenchyma encircling the descending duodenum and a tumor at the papilla of Vater. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed for the annular pancreas and the ampullary tumor. Histological examination confirmed a complete annular pancreas and carcinoma in situ of the papilla of Vater. We also provide a review of the reported cases of an annular pancreas with periampullary neoplasms and discuss the clinical characteristics of this anomaly.

  3. Fluconazole Penetration into the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shrikhande, Shailesh; Friess, Helmut; Issenegger, Claudia; Martignoni, Marcus E.; Yong, Huang; Gloor, Beat; Yeates, Rodney; Kleeff, Jörg; Büchler, Markus W.

    2000-01-01

    Because of antibiotic prophylaxis for necrotizing pancreatitis, the frequency of fungal superinfection in patients with pancreatic necrosis is increasing. In this study we analyzed the penetration of fluconazole into the human pancreas and in experimental acute pancreatitis. In human pancreatic tissues, the mean fluconazole concentration was 8.19 ± 3.38 μg/g (96% of the corresponding concentration in serum). In experimental edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis, 88 and 91% of the serum fluconazole concentration was found in the pancreas. These data show that fluconazole penetration into the pancreas is sufficient to prevent and/or treat fungal contamination in patients with pancreatic necrosis. PMID:10952621

  4. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: preoperative diagnosis and molecular alterations.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yujiro; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sasaki, Masaru; Morifuji, Masahiko; Sueda, Taijiro

    2003-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which has a less favorable prognosis than common ductal cell carcinoma of the pancreas, and a definite preoperative diagnosis of this tumor is quite difficult. We herein report two cases of this rare variant. The patients were a 41-year-old man (patient 1) and a 67-year-old woman (patient 2). Patient 1 had a hypoechoic mass measuring 3 cm in the uncus of the pancreas, while patient 2 had a huge mass, measuring 8 cm, in the tail of the pancreas. Patient 2 was successfully diagnosed preoperatively as having an adenosquamous carcinoma, by cytological examination of the pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic retrograde pancreatic juice aspiration. A pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed for patient 1, and a distal pancreatectomy with resection of the spleen and the left kidney was performed for patient 2. Subsequent pathological findings of these two tumors revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas. K- ras point mutation, p53 overexpression, and telomerase activity in both tumor specimens were detected by the mutant allele specific amplification method, immunohistochemical staining, and telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay, respectively. The two patients died of recurrent disease 5 and 4 months, respectively, after surgery. Cytological examination of pure pancreatic juice is a useful modality for the preoperative diagnosis of this tumor, and frequent molecular alterations may be associated with the poor prognosis of adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas.

  5. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  6. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  7. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... States is chronic alcohol consumption. Additional causes include cystic fibrosis and other hereditary disorders ofthe pancreas. For a ... inherited disorder that leads to chronic pancreatitis is cystic fibrosis. Recent research demonstrates genetic testing can be a ...

  8. Posterior epidural migration of a sequestrated lumbar disk fragment: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Chuang, Y L; Yao, M S; Chiu, W T; Chen, C L; Chan, W P

    2006-08-01

    We present a 75-year-old man who, for 2 weeks, had progressive pain in both of his thighs when standing straight. MR imaging showed a sequestrated disk fragment, which had a signal intensity similar to that of a herniated disk with a rim enhancement in the posterior epidural space and a ruptured outermost annulus of the intervertebral disk at L2-3. Awareness of these MR imaging findings can help in the diagnosis of posterior epidural disk migration.

  9. Start Your Search Engines. Part 2: When Image is Everything, Here are Some Great Ways to Find One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Anna; Mowers, Helen

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that Google is great for finding images. Simply head to its home page, click the "Images" link, enter criteria in the search box, and--voila! In this article, the authors share some of their other favorite search engines for finding images. To make sure the desired images are available for educational use, consider searching for…

  10. Perforation of jejunal diverticulum with ectopic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shintani, Yukako; Murono, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Perforation of jejunal diverticulum is a rare complication. Here, we report a case of jejunal diverticulum penetration with surrounding ectopic pancreas. An 83-year-old female patient was admitted to our department with acute onset of severe abdominal pain lasting for half a day. Abdominal computed tomography showed outpouching of the small intestine that contained air/fluid, with multiple surrounding air bubbles in the mesentery of the small intestine. She was diagnosed with penetration of the small intestine, and an emergency laparotomy was indicated. The penetrated jejunal diverticulum was identified ~20-cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed, and her postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological findings confirmed diverticulum penetration into the mesentery and severe inflammation at the site, with surrounding ectopic pancreas. Furthermore, the pancreatic ducts were opened through the penetrated diverticulum. This rare case shows that the ectopic pancreas might have caused penetration of jejunal diverticulum owing to the pancreatic duct opening through the diverticulum.

  11. Fibromatosis associated with silicone breast implant: ultrasonography and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyun Seok; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Kim, Ok Hwa; Jung, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Suk Jung; Kim, Woogyeong; Kim, Woon Won

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid type fibromatosis is an uncommon benign disease entity of which its etiology is currently unknown. It constitutes 0.3% of all solid neoplasms, but it is rarely seen in the breast and even more scarcely reported to develop in association with breast implant. We present ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 29-year-old female patient with fibromatosis after breast implant surgery. Knowledge of imaging findings of breast fibromatosis associated with implant will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  12. Lumbar spine after surgery for herniated disk: imaging findings in the early postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Dina, T S; Boden, S D; Davis, D O

    1995-03-01

    Imaging the lumbar spine after surgery for disk herniation is all too often an unrewarding challenge. A constellation of findings is inevitable, and determining their significance is often impossible. The challenge is greatest during the first few months following surgery, when the rules of scar enhancement, deformity, and mass effect do not apply to differentiation of the abnormal from the normal. A clear understanding of normal postoperative healing is necessary to avoid overreaction to misleading findings. This report reviews imaging of the lumbar spine in the early postoperative period (i.e., the first 6 months after surgery), focusing on the normal healing process that so often mimics complicating or recurrent disease.

  13. The Small Bodies Imager Browser --- finding asteroid and comet images without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, E.; Sykes, M.; Davis, D.; Neese, C.

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate accessing and downloading spatially resolved imagery of asteroids and comets in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS), we have created the Small Bodies Image Browser. It is a HTML5 webpage that runs inside a standard web browser needing no installation (http://sbn.psi.edu/sbib/). The volume of data returned by spacecraft missions has grown substantially over the last decade. While this wealth of data provides scientists with ample support for research, it has greatly increased the difficulty of managing, accessing and processing these data. Further, the complexity necessary for a long-term archive results in an architecture that is efficient for computers, but not user friendly. The Small Bodies Image Browser (SBIB) is tied into the PDS archive of the Small Bodies Asteroid Subnode hosted at the Planetary Science Institute [1]. Currently, the tool contains the entire repository of the Dawn mission's encounter with Vesta [2], and we will be adding other datasets in the future. For Vesta, this includes both the level 1A and 1B images for the Framing Camera (FC) and the level 1B spectral cubes from the Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, providing over 30,000 individual images. A key strength of the tool is providing quick and easy access of these data. The tool allows for searches based on clicking on a map or typing in coordinates. The SBIB can show an entire mission phase (such as cycle 7 of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit) and the associated footprints, as well as search by image name. It can focus the search by mission phase, resolution or instrument. Imagery archived in the PDS are generally provided by missions in a single or narrow range of formats. To enhance the value and usability of this data to researchers, SBIB makes these available in these original formats as well as PNG, JPEG and ArcGIS compatible ISIS cubes [3]. Additionally, we provide header files for the VIR cubes so they can be read into ENVI without additional processing. Finally

  14. Radiological Imaging Findings of a Case with Vertebral Osteoid Osteoma Leading to Brachial Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Erkan; Ayan, Erdoğan; Çelikyay, Fatih; Acu, Berat

    2013-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms. PMID:24404413

  15. Radiological imaging findings of a case with vertebral osteoid osteoma leading to brachial neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Erkan; Ayan, Erdoğan; Celikyay, Fatih; Acu, Berat

    2013-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms.

  16. An Integrated Centroid Finding and Particle Overlap Decomposition Algorithm for Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An integrated algorithm for decomposing overlapping particle images (multi-particle objects) along with determining each object s constituent particle centroid(s) has been developed using image analysis techniques. The centroid finding algorithm uses a modified eight-direction search method for finding the perimeter of any enclosed object. The centroid is calculated using the intensity-weighted center of mass of the object. The overlap decomposition algorithm further analyzes the object data and breaks it down into its constituent particle centroid(s). This is accomplished with an artificial neural network, feature based technique and provides an efficient way of decomposing overlapping particles. Combining the centroid finding and overlap decomposition routines into a single algorithm allows us to accurately predict the error associated with finding the centroid(s) of particles in our experiments. This algorithm has been tested using real, simulated, and synthetic data and the results are presented and discussed.

  17. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schlarb, Haley C; Schlarb, Alexander C; Ubert, H Adam; Schlarb, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor is a rare tumor accounting for 1-2% of exocrine neoplasms involving the pancreas. This typically benign tumor is predominately found in young females of non-Caucasian descent between the second and fourth decades of life. Despite the reported increasing incidence of this neoplasm, many physicians are unfamiliar with this tumor, which may lead to uncertainty of diagnosis and treatment. While further delineating the clinical and imaging features of this tumor, we present two cases with review of the literature.

  18. Giant serous microcystic pancreas adenoma.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Kursat; Bostanci, Hasan; Yildirim, Ali Cihat; Sakrak, Omer; Kerem, Mustafa

    2012-10-10

    Serous cystadenomas are rare tumors comprising 1-2% of exocrine pancreas tumors. They are mostly known as benign conditions but malign transformation as serous cystadenocarcinoma is also reported. It is usually seen in females. Non-specific symptoms, such as abdominal pain or symptoms due to mass affect, are usually seen. A 64-year old female patient was investigated for abdominal pain. Physical and laboratory findings were normal. Abdomen ultrasonography confirmed an 11×9.5 cm solid cystic lesion and abdomen computed tomography scan confirmed a 12×11 cm lobulated cystic solid lesion which had central cystic necrotic areas extending from liver hilus inferiorly. Fine needle biopsy confirmed benign cytology and trucut biopsy of the pancreatic mass reported chronic inflamation. Nevertheless, this mass could have malignant contents and transformation potential. A laparatomy was decided due to patient's symptoms and mass effect. Due to vascular invasion of the tumor, Whipple procedure was performed. The pathology report confirmed serous microcystic adenoma. These rare tumors are usually benign but pre-operative malignity criterias are not identified. There are few differential diagnostic tools for excluding malignity. We suggest surgical resection as best treatment approach for selected cases.

  19. Hind brain agenesis a rare imaging findings in cerebro cerebellar lissencephalic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mundaganur, Praveen M; Solwalkar, Pradeep; Nimbal, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    A case report of cerebro cerebellar lissencephaly shows complete agenesis of cerebellum and brainstem which is rare imaging finding of group lissencephaly (type I lissencephaly). Though agenesis of cerebellum and brainstem were included in literature, in most of the cases we saw a hypoplasia or atrophy of cerebellum in lissencephaly syndrome. The CT scan findings of this patient shows features of lissencephaly with complete agenesis of brain stem and cerebellum associated with multiple congenital abnormalities.

  20. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities.

    PubMed

    Bronoosh, Pegah; Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-12-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  1. Incidental parenchymal magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Wendy S.; Heier, Linda A.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Bergner, Amanda; Yohay, Kaleb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whereas T2 hyperintensities known as NF-associated bright spots are well described in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), there is a paucity of data on incidental findings in patients with neurofibromatosis type II (NF-2). We aim to characterize unexplained imaging findings in the brains of patients with NF-2. Materials and methods This study is retrospective, HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. 34 patients with NF-2 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2000 and December 2012. T2 and T1-weighted imaging characteristics, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) characteristics, and enhancement patterns were analyzed by visual inspection. Clinical information at time of imaging was available for all patients. Neuropathologic data was available for one patient. Results We found unexplained T2 hyperintensities present on initial imaging in 23/34 patients (67%). Of the 23 patients with unexplained MRI findings, 15 (65%) had wedge-shaped T2 hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter extending to the cortex suggestive of a cortical dysplasia. 3 additional cases (17%) had a lesion within the cerebellum suggestive of a neuronal migration anomaly. In one patient where the MRI was suggestive of focal cortical dysplasia, histopathologic analysis revealed dysplastic glial foci without other alterations of cortical architecture or other cytologic abnormalities. Conclusion Unexplained T2 hyperintensities occur frequently in patients with NF-2. While they may not be the NF-2 equivalent of NF-associated bright spots seen in NF-1, some of these T2 hyperintensities in patients with NF-2 may represent underlying disorders of neuronal migration. Further studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:24501699

  2. Intrapancreatic Splenule in a Pancreas Allograft: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, K; Serrano, O K; Kandaswamy, R

    2016-11-01

    A 16-year-old white man was involved in a motor vehicle collision and suffered head, chest, and abdominal trauma. Despite initial resuscitative efforts, he progressed to brain death and was designated to be an organ donor by his family. He had no earlier medical or surgical history and no high-risk behaviors. Blood work revealed normal creatinine, liver function tests, lipase, and amylase. Viral serologies were negative except for cytomegalovirus IgG and Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acid. Imaging revealed a right kidney contusion, a manubrial fracture, and fractures of right first rib and bilateral scapulae. No other abdominal trauma was identified, specifically to the pancreas, duodenum, or spleen. Our transplant center accepted the pancreas from this donor. During back-table inspection of the pancreas, a 1.5 × 1.5 cm dark purple rubbery mass was identified within the parenchyma of the pancreas in the tail. An incisional biopsy of the lesion was sent for frozen section, which yielded a mixed inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils and lymphocytes and an overlying fibrous capsule. The diagnosis of lymphoma or another neoplasm could not be definitely ruled out. Owing to uncertainty in diagnosis, the entire lesion was excised along with the distal pancreas with the use of a linear stapler. The staple line was oversewn with running 4-0 polypropylene suture, and the pancreas was transplanted. After surgery, the pancreas allograft functioned well with a small pancreatic leak, which had resolved by the first postoperative outpatient visit.

  3. Current Update on Interstitial Lung Disease of Infancy: New Classification System, Diagnostic Evaluation, Imaging Algorithms, Imaging Findings, and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Paul G; Vargas, Sara O; Fishman, Martha P; Casey, Alicia M; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-11-01

    Childhood interstitial lung disease represents a rare and heterogeneous group of diseases that can result in significant morbidity and mortality, some leading to death during infancy. CT is the imaging test of choice. Although many CT findings are nonspecific and a definitive diagnosis usually cannot be reached by CT alone, the interpreting radiologist is instrumental in defining disease extent and refining the diagnosis. Chest CTs are of key importance in guiding site selection for lung biopsy and for following disease progression and response to treatment. Thus, from the radiologist's perspective, ensuring maximal quality of CT imaging and interpretation is paramount.

  4. Clinical and imaging findings in five dogs with intracranial blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatiditis).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B

    2011-01-01

    Fungal infections affecting the central nervous system are rare. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in dogs with intracranial blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatiditis). The radiology database was searched retrospectively for patients with a diagnosis of intracranial blastomycosis which had computed tomography performed as part of their diagnostic work-up. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed. Five dogs met the inclusion criteria. Major presenting complaints were stertor/nasal discharge (n=2), exophthalmos (n=1), and seizures (n=2). Clinical and laboratory findings were variable. Computed tomographic examination revealed a single contrast-enhancing intra-axial mass (n=1), a nasal mass disrupting the cribriform plate (n=3), and an intracranial mass extending into the orbit and nasal cavity (n=1). Findings in intracranial blastomycosis in dogs are variable, and the disease may mimic other inflammatory disorders or neoplasia.

  5. Athletic pubalgia and "sports hernia": optimal MR imaging technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Omar, Imran M; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Koulouris, George; Bergin, Diane; Gopez, Angela G; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2008-01-01

    Groin injuries are common in athletes who participate in sports that require twisting at the waist, sudden and sharp changes in direction, and side-to-side ambulation. Such injuries frequently lead to debilitating pain and lost playing time, and they may be difficult to diagnose. Diagnostic confusion often arises from the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the pubic symphysis region, the large number of potential sources of groin pain, and the similarity of symptoms in athletes with different types or sites of injury. Many athletes with a diagnosis of "sports hernia" or "athletic pubalgia" have a spectrum of related pathologic conditions resulting from musculotendinous injuries and subsequent instability of the pubic symphysis without any finding of inguinal hernia at physical examination. The actual causal mechanisms of athletic pubalgia are poorly understood, and imaging studies have been deemed inadequate or unhelpful for clarification. However, a large-field-of-view magnetic resonance (MR) imaging survey of the pelvis, combined with high-resolution MR imaging of the pubic symphysis, is an excellent means of assessing various causes of athletic pubalgia, providing information about the location of injury, and delineating the severity of disease. Familiarity with the pubic anatomy and with MR imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and in other confounding causes of groin pain allows accurate imaging-based diagnoses and helps in planning treatment that targets specific pathologic conditions.

  6. Finding regions of interest in pathological images: an attentional model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Francisco; Villalón, Julio; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduces an automated method for finding diagnostic regions-of-interest (RoIs) in histopathological images. This method is based on the cognitive process of visual selective attention that arises during a pathologist's image examination. Specifically, it emulates the first examination phase, which consists in a coarse search for tissue structures at a "low zoom" to separate the image into relevant regions.1 The pathologist's cognitive performance depends on inherent image visual cues - bottom-up information - and on acquired clinical medicine knowledge - top-down mechanisms -. Our pathologist's visual attention model integrates the latter two components. The selected bottom-up information includes local low level features such as intensity, color, orientation and texture information. Top-down information is related to the anatomical and pathological structures known by the expert. A coarse approximation to these structures is achieved by an oversegmentation algorithm, inspired by psychological grouping theories. The algorithm parameters are learned from an expert pathologist's segmentation. Top-down and bottom-up integration is achieved by calculating a unique index for each of the low level characteristics inside the region. Relevancy is estimated as a simple average of these indexes. Finally, a binary decision rule defines whether or not a region is interesting. The method was evaluated on a set of 49 images using a perceptually-weighted evaluation criterion, finding a quality gain of 3dB when comparing to a classical bottom-up model of attention.

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Examination and Imaging Findings for Identifying Subacromial Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of subacromial pathology is limited by the poor accuracy of clinical tests for specific pathologies. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination and imaging features for identifying subacromial pain (SAP) defined by a positive response to diagnostic injection, and to evaluate the influence of imaging findings on the clinical diagnosis of SAP. Methods and Findings In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy design, 208 consecutive patients presenting to their primary healthcare practitioner for the first time with a new episode of shoulder pain were recruited. All participants underwent a standardized clinical examination, shoulder x-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Results were compared with the response to a diagnostic block of xylocaineTM injected into the SAB under ultrasound guidance using ≥80% post-injection reduction in pain intensity as the positive anaesthetic response (PAR) criterion. Diagnostic accuracy statistics were calculated for combinations of clinical and imaging variables demonstrating the highest likelihood of a PAR. A PAR was reported by 34% of participants. In participants with no loss of passive external rotation, combinations of three clinical variables (anterior shoulder pain, strain injury, absence of symptoms at end-range external rotation (in abduction)) demonstrated 100% specificity for a PAR when all three were positive (LR+ infinity; 95%CI 2.9, infinity). A full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound increased the likelihood of a PAR irrespective of age (specificity 98% (95%CI 94, 100); LR+ 6.2; 95% CI 1.5, 25.7)). Imaging did not improve the ability to rule-out a PAR. Conclusion Combinations of clinical examination findings and a full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound scan can help confirm, but not exclude, the presence of subacromial pain. Other imaging findings were of limited value for diagnosing SAP. PMID:27936246

  8. Molecular pathogenesis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Thosani, Nirav; Dasari, Chandra S; Bhutani, Manoop S; Raimondo, Massimo; Guha, Sushovan

    2010-11-01

    Over the last 3 decades, there have been substantial improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques to evaluate pancreatic diseases. The modern technology has helped us to recognize premalignant conditions of pancreas including mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Differentiation between benign and malignant lesions and early detection of any malignant transformation in premalignant lesion are extremely important for further management decisions. Diagnostic cytology has limited sensitivity to further differentiate between benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the pancreas. There is limited information about the epidemiological risk factors and molecular mechanisms leading to development and further progression to malignancy of IPMNs. Several studies have shown that pancreatic juice and pancreatic tissue from the lesion can be tested for molecular markers including K-ras, p53, and p16 to differentiate between cancer and chronic inflammatory process. We review cellular signaling pathways that contribute to pathogenesis of IPMNs of the pancreas to further identify potential biomarkers and molecular targets.

  9. Mesentery neurilemmoma: CT, MRI and angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lao, Wilson T; Yang, Shih-Hung; Chen, Chi-Long; Chan, Wing P

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric neurilemmoma is extremely rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old man with mesenteric neurilemmoma, with CT, MRI and angiographic findings. The patient was healthy and had had no symptoms previously. CT and MRI images revealed a 2.2-cm well-defined, soft-tissue mass adjacent to the posterior border of the left lobe of the liver. The tumor mass displayed a heterogenous low signal on T2-weighted image and peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration. Angiography showed a hypervascular mass beneath the tail of pancreas, which was supplied by small branches of middle splenic artery. Histopathology revealed a mesentery neurilemmoma composed of spindle tumor cells.

  10. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy in a Patient with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Law, Huong Ling; Tan, Suzet; Sedi, Rosleena

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a 3-month history of poor oral intake related to nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy. The patient later developed deep coma while receiving in-patient therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed typical findings of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. The patient was treated with thiamine injections, which resulted in subsequent partial recovery of neurological function. This paper stresses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging for prompt diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. PMID:22135604

  11. Complex venous anomalies: magnetic resonance imaging findings in a 5-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Hazirolan, Tuncay; Ozkan, Efe; Haliloglu, Mithat; Celiker, Alpay; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-10-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a very unusual venous anomaly case. A 5-year-old boy who had surgical repair of coarctation of the thoracic aorta was referred to our department for evaluation of an enlarged venous structure anterior to the aorta, which had been noted during the surgery. Contrast enhanced dynamic MRI revealed partial anomalous pulmonary venous return to the left azygos vein, double inferior and superior vena cava with the left azygos continuation of the left superior vena cava. The recognition of venous anomalies allows correct planning of surgical and interventional procedures. MRI is a valuable imaging tool providing detailed anatomical information.

  12. The imaging findings of infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nekitsing, Indima; Wu, Xing; Tang, Guangyu

    2015-12-01

    Central primitive neuroectodermal tumour (cPNET), a rare malignant neoplasm of embryonal origin, often occurs in children younger than 15 years. This is the first case report of the imaging findings of an infratentorial cPNET to be reported in a patient. Here, is reported the case of a 6-year-old boy presenting with symptoms of diplopia for 14 days. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid mass in the fourth ventricle. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was cPNET. To conclude, whenever a child is diagnosed to have an infratentorial solid tumour in the fourth ventricle, cPNET should always be considered despite its rarity.

  13. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  14. Design of a bioartificial pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Farney, Alan C; Opara, Emmanuel C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Islet transplantation has been shown to be a viable treatment option for patients afflicted with Type 1 diabetes. However, the severe shortage of human pancreas and the need to use risky immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection remain two major obstacles to routine use of islet transplantation in diabetic patients. Successful development of a bioartificial pancreas using the approach of microencapsulation with perm-selective coating of islets in hydrogels for graft immunoisolation holds tremendous promise for diabetic patients because it has great potential to overcome these two barriers. In this review article, we will discuss the need for bioartificial pancreas, provide a detailed description of the microencapsulation process, and review the status of the technology in clinical development. We will also critically review the various factors that need to be taken into consideration in order to achieve the ultimate goal of routine clinical application. PMID:23652283

  15. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 92 cats with clinical signs of spinal cord disease.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rita; Platt, Simon R; Llabrés-Díaz, Francisco J; Rogers, Katherine H; de Stefani, Alberta; Matiasek, Lara A; Adams, Vicki J

    2009-02-01

    Medical records of 92 cats presented with clinical signs of spinal cord disease, which had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were reviewed. The cats were grouped into seven categories based upon the diagnosis suggested by results of MRI, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and other diagnostic procedures: neoplastic (n=25), inflammatory or infectious (n=13), traumatic (n=8), vascular (n=6), degenerative (n=5), anomalous (n=3) and those with an unremarkable MRI (n=32). There were two independent predictors of abnormal MRI findings: severity of clinical signs and presence of spinal pain. Abnormal MRI findings and speed of onset of disease were significantly associated with survival. For the 32 cats with unremarkable MRI findings, only nine died due to spinal disease and, therefore, the median survival time (MST) was not reached (lower 95% confidence interval (CI)=970 days). For the 60 cats with abnormal MRI findings, 37 died due to their disease and the MST was 138 days (95% CI: 7-807).

  16. Volumetric myelographic magnetic resonance imaging to localize difficult-to-find spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jonathan M; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Campeau, Norbert G; Cloft, Harry J; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    Although more prevalent in males in the 6th and 7th decade of life, spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are an uncommon cause of progressive myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and more recently Gd bolus MR angiography have been used to diagnose, radiographically define, and preprocedurally localize the contributing lumbar artery. Three-dimensional myelographic MR imaging sequences have recently been developed for anatomical evaluation of the spinal canal. The authors describe 3 recent cases in which volumetric myelographic MR imaging with a 3D phase-cycled fast imaging employing steady state acquisition (PC-FIESTA) and a 3D constructive interference steady state (CISS) technique were particularly useful not only for documenting an SDAVF, but also for providing localization when CT angiography, MR imaging, MR angiography, and spinal angiography failed to localize the fistula. In a patient harboring an SDAVF at T-4, surgical exploration was performed based on the constellation of findings on the PC-FIESTA images as well as the fact that the spinal segments leading to T-4 were the only ones that the authors were unable to catheterize. In a second patient, who harbored an SDAVF at T-6, after 2 separate angiograms failed to demonstrate the fistula, careful assessment of the CISS images led the authors to focus a third angiogram on the left T-6 intercostal artery and to perform superselective microcatheterization. In a third patient with an SDAVF originating from the lateral sacral branch, the PC-FIESTA sequence demonstrated the arterialized vein extending into the S-1 foramen, leading to a second angiogram and superselective internal iliac injections. The authors concluded that myelographic MR imaging sequences can be useful not only as an aid to diagnosis but also for localization of an SDAVF in complex cases.

  17. Clinical imaging findings in a girl with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Lin, D S; Liu, Y P; Hsu, L J; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    We report an 82-year-old girl with premature aging, a karyotype of 46,XX and a de novo c.1824C>T mutation encoding p.G608G in the lamin A gene. The clinical features of accelerated aging and the molecular finding were consistent with the diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). In this presentation, we demonstrate the radiological imaging findings of skeletal, oral and craniofacial phenotypes of abnormalities associated with HGPS. The oral and craniofacial abnormalities caused dental caries, severe malocclusion, and swallowing, feeding and speech problems. Dural calcification, and granulation in the ear drum and external ear canal were additionally observed.

  18. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  19. Scurvy in a child with autism: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tetsu; Aida, Noriko; Tanaka, Yukichi; Tanaka, Mio; Shiomi, Masae; Machida, Jiro

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of scurvy in a 6-year-old boy with autism and an unbalanced diet. The patient was admitted with difficulties in walking. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the thigh showed diffuse signal abnormality in the bone marrow, periosteum, and the femoral muscle. A biopsy specimen of the femur showed hematoma, proliferative fibroblasts, and few collagen fibers, which suggested a deficiency of vitamin C. Although recurrent periosteal hematoma may be suggestive of scurvy, this finding was subtle in the current case. It is important to be aware of this rare disease because it is easily cured with vitamin C supplementation.

  20. Imaging Findings in Dysgerminoma in a Case of 46 XY, Complete Gonadal Dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Khaladkar, Sanjay; Gujrati, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    A 46 XY pure gonadal dysgenesis also known as Swyer syndrome. These patients are phenotypic females with normal female external genitalia and absent testicular tissue. The patients with swyer syndrome have streak gonads and increased risk of dysgerminoma and gonadoblastoma. We present a case of dysgerminoma in dysgenetic gonads of swyer syndrome. A 23-year-old female had come with complaints of primary amenorrhea, pelvic mass and abdominal pain. Clinical findings, pathology investigation and imaging findings revealed swyer syndrome. On MRI it showed a large lobulated mass in the pelvis. Mass was excised and dysgerminoma was given on the histopathology. PMID:27790550

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 40 dogs with histologically confirmed intracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Marti; Gaitero, Lluís; Zamora, Angels; Añor, Sònia

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 dogs with histologically confirmed primary and secondary intracranial tumours were reviewed. Forty-one tumours were diagnosed by means of MR imaging (MRI). MRI findings allowed diagnosis of a neoplastic lesion in 37/41 cases. Based on MRI features, differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions was possible in 24/27 (89%) primary brain tumours and in 13/14 (92%) secondary brain tumours. Diagnosis of tumour type based on MRI features was correct in 19/27 (70%) primary tumours and in 13/14 secondary tumours. The results of this study show that MRI is a good diagnostic imaging modality to detect neoplastic lesions and to diagnose tumour type in dogs. However, as some neoplasms show equivocal MRI features the technique has limitations in the detection of some intracranial tumours and in predicting tumour type.

  2. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: early magnetic resonance imaging findings and neuroradiological follow-up.

    PubMed

    Toldo, I; Calderone, M; Boniver, C; Dravet, Ch; Guerrini, R; Laverda, A M

    2007-03-01

    We describe a case of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome documented by longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A two-year and nine-month-old boy had a prolonged hemiconvulsion during fever followed by right hemiparesis. Seven days later the imaging abnormality on T2 and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) was limited to the white matter of the left hemisphere. One month later severe gliosis and unilateral brain atrophy were already evident. MRI is useful in the early stages of prolonged seizures and T2 and DWI abnormalities appear to be well correlated with parenchymal damage that results from sustained ictal activity. The neuroradiological findings in our case and in the few HHE patients reported in the literature seem to be very characteristic and, if confirmed in larger series, could permit an early diagnosis.

  3. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  4. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon: clinical and imaging findings, with anatomic correlations.

    PubMed

    Lecouvet, Frederic E; Demondion, Xavier; Leemrijse, Thibaut; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Malghem, Jacques

    2005-11-01

    We report the clinical and imaging findings in two elderly female patients with spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon from the lesser trochanter of the femur. We emphasize the key contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to this diagnosis and provide an anatomic correlation. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute groin pain in the elderly. MR imaging enables positive diagnosis, by showing mass effect on the anterior aspect of the hip joint, proximal muscle thickening, and abnormal signal intensity, and by demonstrating interruption of the psoas tendon, whereas the distal insertion of the lateral portion of the iliacus muscle remains muscular and is preserved.

  5. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  6. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered.

  7. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the head of the pancreas with anorexia and vomiting in a 69-year-old man: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Bu, Xianmin; Tian, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare condition of unclear etiology that is commonly observed in the lung but rarely in the pancreas. WHO classified IMT as a potentially malignant or aggressive tumor. In the present report, the case of a 69-year-old male patient with an IMT in the head of the pancreas, who experienced anorexia, nausea and vomiting, is presented. The patient's clinical symptoms were nonspecific, and the imaging findings revealed a hypovascularized pancreatic mass with stenosis of the descending duodenum. The electronic endoscopy findings revealed protruding lesions in the duodenal bulb and the descending duodenum. Biopsies of the mass were conducted with an electronic endoscope, but were not diagnostic. Subsequent duodenopancreatectomy aided in determining a pathological diagnosis of IMT, based on the histology and immunohistochemistry results. The patient experienced a recovery without further incident, as observed during a regular follow-up 3 years later. IMT in the head of the pancreas is rare, particularly in adults. In the present study, an extremely rare case of IMT involving the head of the pancreas in an adult patient is presented, and the therapeutic options for this condition are discussed. PMID:27446468

  8. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions.

  9. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a “distractor”. This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion’s neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found “serious lesion in children” is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses. PMID:27610341

  10. Medial prefrontal cortex pathology in schizophrenia as revealed by convergent findings from multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pomarol-Clotet, E; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Salvador, R; Sarró, S; Gomar, J J; Vila, F; Ortiz-Gil, J; Iturria-Medina, Y; Capdevila, A; McKenna, P J

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have found evidence of altered brain structure and function in schizophrenia, but have had complex findings regarding the localization of abnormality. We applied multimodal imaging (voxel-based morphometry (VBM), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) combined with tractography) to 32 chronic schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. At a conservative threshold of P=0.01 corrected, structural and functional imaging revealed overlapping regions of abnormality in the medial frontal cortex. DTI found that white matter abnormality predominated in the anterior corpus callosum, and analysis of the anatomical connectivity of representative seed regions again implicated fibres projecting to the medial frontal cortex. There was also evidence of convergent abnormality in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, although here the laterality was less consistent across techniques. The medial frontal region identified by these three imaging techniques corresponds to the anterior midline node of the default mode network, a brain system which is believed to support internally directed thought, a state of watchfulness, and/or the maintenance of one's sense of self, and which is of considerable current interest in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:20065955

  11. Nuclear medicine in the acute clinical setting: indications, imaging findings, and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Uliel, Livnat; Mellnick, Vincent M; Menias, Christine O; Holz, Andrew L; McConathy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging provides valuable functional information that complements information obtained with anatomic imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with specific acute clinical manifestations. Nuclear medicine studies are most often used in conjunction with other imaging modalities and as a problem-solving tool. Under certain circumstances a nuclear medicine study may be indicated as the first-line imaging modality, as in the case of renal scintigraphy for transplant dysfunction in the early postoperative period. Nuclear imaging may be preferred when a conventional first-line study is contraindicated or when it is important to minimize radiation exposure. The portability of nuclear imaging offers particular advantages for the evaluation of critically ill patients whose clinical condition is unstable and who cannot be safely transported out of the intensive care unit. The ability to visualize physiologic and pathophysiologic processes over relatively long time periods without adding to the patient's radiation exposure contributes to the high diagnostic sensitivity of several types of nuclear medicine studies. Viewing the acquired images in the cine mode adds to the value of these studies for diagnosing and characterizing dynamic abnormalities such as intermittent internal bleeding and bile or urine leakage. In this pictorial review, the spectrum of nuclear medicine studies commonly performed in the acute care setting is reviewed according to body systems and organs, with detailed descriptions of the indications, technical considerations, findings, and potential pitfalls of each type of study. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.332125098/-/DC1.

  12. The increased echogenicity of the pancreas in infants and children: the white pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Harms, K; Fendel, H

    1987-09-01

    An increased echogenicity of the pancreas ("white pancreas") was sonographically found in 25 children with various pancreatic and systemic diseases. Fifteen patients with cystic fibrosis had a small white pancreas. Five patients with haemosiderosis, two with pancreatitis and one with Shwachman-syndrome presented with a normal-sized or slightly enlarged pancreas. Fatty infiltration and calcifications of the pancreas can also increase its echogenicity.

  13. Clinical and image findings in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Farias, Diogo Silva; Zen Filho, Edson Virgilio; de Oliveira, Thais Feitosa Leitão; Tinôco-Araújo, José Endrigo; Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio da Silva; Antunes, Heliton Spíndola; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva

    2013-07-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) is characterized as exposed bone in the jaws for more than 8 weeks in patients with current or previous history of therapy with bisphosphonates (BPs) and no history of radiotherapy in the head and neck. We report a case series of 7 patients with BRONJ and analyze the variations of clinical and imaging signs, correlating them with the presence or absence of bone exposure. Among the patients, 6 were women and 1 was a man, aged 42-79 years. Five of the patients were using zoledronic acid and the other 2 alendronate. The use of BPs varied from 3 to 13 years. In 5 patients, tooth extraction was the triggering event of injuries. Panoramic radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were evaluated by a radiologist blinded to the cases. There were persistent unremodeled extraction socket even several months after tooth extraction in 3 of the cases that were consistent wit CT findings that also showed areas of osteosclerosis and osteolysis. Patients were treated according to the recommendations of the AAOMS, with surgical debridement and antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin in the symptomatic patients. The follow-up of these patients ranged from 8 to 34 months, with a good response to treatment. The image findings in this case series were not specific and showed no difference between each stages of BRONJ (AAOMS, 2009). The image features were similar in presence or absence of exposed bone.

  14. Advanced imaging findings and computer-assisted surgery of suspected synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Metzger, Marc C; Böhm, Joachim; Muecke, Thomas; Schulze, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the joint occurs mainly in teenagers and young adults. Only 3% of these neoplasms are located in the head and neck region. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint is therefore a very rare disorder. Therefore, developing a working, histological confirmation is required for differential diagnosis. In this case series, the outcome of histological investigation and imaging techniques are compared. Based on clinical symptoms, five cases of suspected synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are presented. In each of the subjects, the diagnosis was confirmed by histology. Specific imaging features for each case are described. The tomography images were compared with the histological findings. All patients demonstrated preauricular swelling, dental midline deviation, and limited mouth opening. Computer-assisted surgery was performed. Histology disclosed synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in four cases. The other case was found to be a developmental disorder of the tympanic bone. The diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint can only be based on histology. Clinical symptoms are too general and the available imaging techniques only show nonspecific tumorous destruction, infiltration, and/or residual calcified bodies, they are only for advanced cases. A rare developmental disorder of the tympanic bone--persistence of foramen of Huschke--has to be differentiated.

  15. Are magnetic resonance imaging or radiographic findings correlated with clinical prognosis in spinal cord neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Neshat Halati, Fatemeh; Vajhi, Alireza; Molazem, Mohammad; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Ansari, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Dogs presented to the Small Animal Hospital of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran were included in the present study if spinal or intervertebral disc involvement was suspected. Clinical signs were recorded as well as general information of the patient such as age, breed and sex. Sixty dogs were examined radiographically and two standard orthogonal lateral and ventrodorsal projections were taken from the suspected region. Then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for all patients. Agreement between MRI and radiographic findings, comparison of sex and breed with diagnostic imaging grades, comparison between diagnostic imaging grades and mean age, recovery rate after surgery or medical treatment, effects of diagnostic imaging severity grades on surgical or medical referrals were evaluated statistically. There were no significant association between age, sex and breed and frequency of the intervertebral disk disease. Intervertebral disc involvements between L2-L3 and T13-L1 were estimated as the most frequent sites of involvements. Sensitivity and specificity of radiography were evaluated 90.0% and 46.0%, respectively, by considering the MRI as a gold standard modality. There was a significant association between severity of disease in the MRI with referral to surgery and medical treatment. The recovery rate after surgery was significantly higher than medical treatment. These results can be used as a foundation for other studies with more focuses on details of injury and larger group of patients. PMID:27872724

  16. A supervised visual model for finding regions of interest in basal cell carcinoma images

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a supervised learning method for finding diagnostic regions of interest in histopathological images. The method is based on the cognitive process of visual selection of relevant regions that arises during a pathologist's image examination. The proposed strategy emulates the interaction of the visual cortex areas V1, V2 and V4, being the V1 cortex responsible for assigning local levels of relevance to visual inputs while the V2 cortex gathers together these small regions according to some weights modulated by the V4 cortex, which stores some learned rules. This novel strategy can be considered as a complex mix of "bottom-up" and "top-down" mechanisms, integrated by calculating a unique index inside each region. The method was evaluated on a set of 338 images in which an expert pathologist had drawn the Regions of Interest. The proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art methods devised to determine Regions of Interest (RoIs) in natural images. The quality gain with respect to an adaptated Itti's model which found RoIs was 3.6 dB in average, while with respect to the Achanta's proposal was 4.9 dB. PMID:21447178

  17. Symptomatic and complicated nonhereditary developmental liver cysts: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Rigiroli, Francesca; Bianco, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Commonly encountered in the general population, in the vast majority of cases nonhereditary developmental liver cysts are asymptomatic, not associated with altered hepatic function and confidently diagnosed on imaging studies, and do not require further workup, follow-up, or treatment. However, particularly in women, simple hepatic cysts may reach large sizes and cause symptoms and signs resulting from mass effect, vascular compression, and biliary obstruction. Furthermore, although rarely compared to the incidence observed in patients with adult polycystic kidney and liver disease, sporadic hepatic cysts sometimes undergo life-threatening complications such as intracystic hemorrhage, infection, or rupture, which require prompt imaging triage and appropriate interventional, laparoscopic, or open surgical treatment. This pictorial essay reviews with examples the cross-sectional imaging findings of symptomatic and complicated nonhereditary liver cysts, aiming to provide radiologists with an increased familiarity with these uncommon, challenging occurrences. Emphasis is placed on the role of MRI as a useful problem-solving modality to elucidate the complex imaging appearances resulting from intracystic bleeding and superinfection, and to differentiate complicated cysts from other hemorrhagic liver lesions and biliary cystic tumors.

  18. Epidermoid cyst in Meckel's cave with unusual computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Case report.

    PubMed

    Arai, Atsushi; Sasayama, Takashi; Koyama, Junji; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented with headache and occasional numbness over her right face. Computed tomography revealed a hypodense mass in the middle cranial fossa and another adjacent hyperdense mass in the posterior fossa with erosion of the right petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the lesion in the middle cranial fossa as iso- to hypointense on T(1)-weighted and hyperintense on T(2)-weighted imaging, with peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration, and the adjacent lesion in the posterior fossa as hyperintense on T(1)-weighted and hypointense on T(2)-weighted imaging. During surgery, these lesions mimicking two adjacent distinct tumors were revealed to connect through Meckel's cave. The hypodense lesion in the middle cranial fossa consisted of pearly-like solid contents, and the hyperdense lesion in the posterior cranial fossa consisted of viscid dark-green materials. The tumors were gross totally resected with endoscopic assistance. Histological examination confirmed that the tumor was an epidermoid cyst. The present case cyst indicates that although the diffusion-weighted imaging sequence is useful for detection of intracranial epidermoid cysts, epidermoid cysts including viscous materials with unusual radiological findings could complicate the preoperative diagnosis.

  19. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  20. Intra-thoracic rheumatoid arthritis: Imaging spectrum of typical findings and treatment related complications

    PubMed Central

    Chansakul, Thanissara; Dellaripa, Paul F.; Doyle, Tracy J.; Madan, Rachna

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiac thoracic manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cause significant morbidity and mortality among RA patients. Essentially all anatomic compartments in the chest can be affected including the pleura, pulmonary parenchyma, airway, and vasculature. In addition, treatment-related complications and opportunistic infections are not uncommon. Accurate diagnosis of intra-thoracic disease in an RA patient can be difficult as the radiologic findings may be nonspecific and many of these conditions may coexist. This review article serves to highlight the multitude of RA-related intra-thoracic pathological processes, emphasize differential diagnosis, diagnostic conundrums and discuss how tailoring of CT imaging and image-guided biopsy plays a key role in the management of RA-related pulmonary disease. PMID:26210094

  1. Grading of degenerative disk disease and functional impairment: imaging versus patho-anatomical findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Degenerative instability affecting the functional spinal unit is discussed as a cause of symptoms. The value of imaging signs for assessing the resulting functional impairment is still unclear. To determine the relationship between slight degrees of degeneration and function, we performed a biomechanical study with 18 multisegmental (L2-S2) human lumbar cadaveric specimens. The multidirectional spinal deformation was measured during the continuous application of pure moments of flexion/extension, bilateral bending and rotation in a spine tester. The three flexibility parameters neutral zone, range of motion and neutral zone ratio were evaluated. Different grading systems were used: (1) antero-posterior and lateral radiographs (degenerative disk disease) (2) oblique radiographs (facet joint degeneration) (3) macroscopic and (4) microscopic evaluation. The most reliable correlation was between the grading of microscopic findings and the flexibility parameters; the imaging evaluation was not as informative. PMID:18839226

  2. Body image in transgender young people: Findings from a qualitative, community based study.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jenifer K; Doty, Jennifer L; Catalpa, Jory M; Ola, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the ways in which transgender youth experience their bodies with regard to gender and body size. Ninety transgender youth and young adults completed in-depth interviews in eight metropolitan areas of the United States, Canada, and Ireland. Using a queer perspective, qualitative analyses revealed two broad conceptual categories: body dissatisfaction and body satisfaction. Within these categories, participants focused on body issues related to gender characteristics and body size. Findings revealed evidence of self-criticism and social distress related to body image dissatisfaction and self-acceptance and social acceptance related to body image satisfaction. Data demonstrated how gender, body size, and the intersection of gender and body size influenced personal perceptions of body dissatisfaction and satisfaction. Developmental processes were evident: participants further along in consolidating a gender identity described gaining a sense of social awareness, self-acceptance, and body satisfaction reflecting a sense of resilience.

  3. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Nasal Cavity Hemangiomas According to Histological Type

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Soo Chin; Lim, Myung Kwan; Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). Materials and Methods CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. Results The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. Conclusion CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision. PMID:25995686

  4. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  5. A prospective microstructure imaging study in mixed-martial artists using geometric measures and diffusion tensor imaging: methods and findings.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Ling, Josef M; Dodd, Andrew B; Meier, Timothy B; Hanlon, Faith M; Klimaj, Stefan D

    2016-04-12

    Although diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has been widely used to characterize the effects of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI), to date no studies have investigated how novel geometric models of microstructure relate to more typical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. Moreover, few studies have evaluated the sensitivity of different registration pipelines (non-linear, linear and tract-based spatial statistics) for detecting dMRI abnormalities in clinical populations. Results from single-subject analyses in healthy controls (HC) indicated a strong negative relationship between fractional anisotropy (FA) and orientation dispersion index (ODI) in both white and gray matter. Equally important, only moderate relationships existed between all other estimates of free/intracellular water volume fractions and more traditional DTI metrics (FA, mean, axial and radial diffusivity). These findings suggest that geometric measures provide differential information about the cellular microstructure relative to traditional DTI measures. Results also suggest greater sensitivity for non-linear registration pipelines that maximize the anatomical information available in T1-weighted images. Clinically, rmTBI resulted in a pattern of decreased FA and increased ODI, largely overlapping in space, in conjunction with increased intracellular and free water fractions, highlighting the potential role of edema following repeated head trauma. In summary, current results suggest that geometric models of diffusion can provide relatively unique information regarding potential mechanisms of pathology that contribute to long-term neurological damage.

  6. Case report. Peripancreatic intranodal haemangioma mimicking pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, A D; Arellano, R; Baker, G

    2011-12-01

    Haemangiomas are common benign tumours that are generally detected within the skin, mucosal surfaces and soft tissues. However, intranodal haemangiomas are extremely rare and are among the benign primary vascular abnormalities of the lymph nodes that include lymphangioma, haemangioendothelioma, angiomyomatous hamartoma and haemangiomas. In this case report, we present the imaging and pathological findings of an intranodal haemangioma in the pancreatic head simulating a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intranodal haemangioma in this location.

  7. Multifocal Eosinophilic Granuloma of Jaws and Skull with Classical and Unusual Radiographic/Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Suman; Shaik, Sameulla; Kodadala, Amrutha; Kakarla, Prashanti

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma is basically a disorder of reticuloendothelial system and is one of the variants of langerhans cell histiocytosis. Multifocal eosinophilic granuloma affecting jaws and skull is relatively a rare disorder. We hereby report a case of multifocal eosinophilic granuloma involving mandible, maxilla and several skull bones. The present case has mixture of classical floating teeth appearance and an unusual radiographic/imaging finding of periosteal remodeling, which is rarely seen in adult patients of eosinophilic granuloma and pseudo-multilocular appearance in anterior mandibular region in coronal sections and moth-eaten appearance of skull was appreciated in axial slices of Computed Tomography (CT). PMID:28274065

  8. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Haeryoung

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients. PMID:25598674

  9. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  10. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreas carcinoma occurring in the annular pancreas: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Maki, Akira; Amemiya, Hidetake; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Ei; Sano, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    The annular pancreas is a rare congenital anomaly in which a ring of the pancreas parenchyma surrounds the second part of the duodenum. Malignant tumors are extremely rare in patients with an annular pancreas. A 64-year-old man presented with appetite loss and vomiting. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) indicated pancreas parenchyma surrounding the second part of the duodenum, and a hypovascular area occupying lesion in the annular pancreas. Subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathology showed pancreatic carcinoma occurring in the complete annular pancreas.

  11. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN FIVE DOGS WITH CONFIRMED AND SUSPECTED BRAIN TUMORS.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kathleen Ella; Tyrrell, Dayle; Long, Sam Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Early postoperative neuroimaging has been performed in people for over 20 years to detect residual brain tumor tissue and surgical complications. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe characteristics observed using early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in a group of dogs undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor removal. Two independent observers came to a consensus opinion for presence/absence of the following MRI characteristics: residual tumor tissue; hemorrhage and ischemic lesions; abnormal enhancement (including the margins of the resection cavity, choroid plexus, meninges) and signal intensity changes on diffusion-weighted imaging. Five dogs were included in the study, having had preoperative and early postoperative MRI acquired within four days after surgery. The most commonly observed characteristics were abnormal meningeal enhancement, linear enhancement at margins of the resection cavity, hemorrhage, and a thin rim of hyperintensity surrounding the resection cavity on diffusion-weighted imaging. Residual tumor tissue was detected in one case of an enhancing tumor and in one case of a tumor containing areas of hemorrhage preoperatively. Residual tumor tissue was suspected but could not be confirmed when tumors were nonenhancing. Findings supported the use of early postoperative MRI as a method for detecting residual brain tumor tissue in dogs.

  12. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging.

  13. Body Image and Sexuality in Women Survivors of Breast Cancer in India: Qualitative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Barthakur, Michelle S; Sharma, Mahendra P; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Manjunath, Suraj K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: With increasing rates of breast cancer survivors, psychosocial issues surrounding cancer survivorship have been gaining prominence. The following article reports on body image and sexuality-related issues in aftermath of the diagnosis and its treatment in the Indian context. Materials and Methods: Research design was mixed method, cross–sectional, and exploratory in nature. Quantitative sample consisted of fifty survivors while the qualitative sample size included 15 out of the 50 total breast cancer survivors who were recruited from hospitals, nongovernmental organization, and through word-of-mouth. Data was collected using quantitative measures, and in-depth interviews were done using semi-structured interview schedule that was developed for the study. Qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive phenomenological approach. Results: In body image, emerging themes were about identity (womanhood, motherhood, and attractiveness), impact of surgery, hair loss, clothes, and uncomfortable situations. In sexuality, barriers were faced due to difficulty in disclosure and themes were about adjustments made by spouses, role of age, and sexual difficulties due to treatment. Conclusions: Findings imply need to address the issues of body image and sexuality as it impacts quality of life of survivors. PMID:28216857

  14. Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis: spectrum of thoracic imaging findings in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Khorashadi, L; Wu, C C; Betancourt, S L; Carter, B W

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by alveolar capillary haemorrhage resulting in deposition and accumulation of haemosiderin in the lungs. Although its precise pathophysiology remains unclear, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the aetiology of the disorder, including autoimmune, environmental, allergic, and genetic theories. IPH is typically diagnosed in childhood, usually before the age of 10 years; however, this entity may be encountered in older patients given the greater awareness of the diagnosis, availability and utilization of advanced imaging techniques, and improved treatment and survival. The classic presentation of IPH consists of the triad of haemoptysis, iron-deficiency anaemia, and pulmonary opacities on chest radiography. The diagnosis is usually confirmed via bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), at which time haemosiderin-laden macrophages referred to as siderophages, considered pathognomonic for IPH, may be identified. However, lung biopsy may ultimately be necessary to exclude other disease processes. For children with IPH, the disease course is severe and the prognosis is poor. However, adults generally have a longer disease course with milder symptoms and the prognosis is more favourable. Specific imaging features, although non-specific in isolation, may be identified on thoracic imaging studies, principally chest radiography and CT, depending on the phase of disease (acute or chronic). Recognition of these findings is important to guide appropriate clinical management.

  15. The relationship between findings on magnetic resonance imaging and previous history of low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Tonosu, Juichi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Matsudaira, Ko; Higashikawa, Akiro; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and previous low back pain (LBP) in participants without current LBP. Current LBP was defined as LBP during the past month. Previous LBP was defined as a history of medical consultation for LBP. Ninety-one participants without current LBP were included. Sagittal T2-weighted MRI was used to assess the intervertebral space from T12/L1 to L5/S1. These images were classified into five grades based on the Pfirrmann grading system. Furthermore, we evaluated the presence of disk bulging, high-intensity zone, and spondylolisthesis. We compared the MRI findings between groups with (27 participants) and without (64 participants) previous LBP without current LBP. Intraobserver and interobserver kappa values were evaluated. Participants had an average age of 34.9 years; 47 were female and 44 were male; and their average body mass index was 21.8 kg/m2. Compared to the group of participants without previous LBP, the group of participants with previous LBP had a significantly higher incidence of disk degeneration such as a Pfirrmann grade ≥3, disk bulging, and high-intensity zone in the analyses adjusted by age and sex. There were no significant differences in spondylolisthesis between the groups. An odds ratio of >10 was only found for Pfirrmann grade ≥3, ie, a Pfirrmann grade ≥3 was strongly associated with a history of previous LBP in participants without current LBP. PMID:28096690

  16. Paget disease of the breast: mammographic, US, and MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Min Ho; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2011-01-01

    Paget disease is a rare malignancy of the breast characterized by infiltration of the nipple epidermis by adenocarcinoma cells. The clinical features of Paget disease are characteristic and should increase the likelihood of the diagnosis being made. An important point is that more than 90% of cases of Paget disease are associated with an additional underlying breast malignancy. Paget disease is frequently associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the underlying lactiferous ducts of the nipple-areolar complex; it may even be associated with DCIS or invasive breast cancer elsewhere in the breast, at least 2 cm from the nipple-areolar complex. Nevertheless, mammographic findings may be negative in up to 50% of cases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in patients with Paget disease for evaluation of the nipple-areolar complex and identification of an additional underlying malignancy in the breast. The appropriate surgical treatment must be carefully selected and individualized on the basis of radiologic findings, especially those obtained with breast MR imaging.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma: A report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xi; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Huan; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic ependymomas are rare malignant tumors of the central nervous system. Few studies are available regarding their neuroradiological characteristics. The present study aimed to retrospectively review a series of patients with extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma and to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics to distinguish anaplastic ependymoma from other intracranial tumors. The clinical and pathological images of 11 patients who presented with histologically proven anaplastic ependymoma at Nanfang Hospital (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) between September 2004 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. MRI scans were obtained in all 11 cases. Computed tomography scans were obtained in only 3 cases. In total, 8 tumors were located at the supratentorial parenchyma, and 3 tumors were derived from the cerebellar hemisphere. Images displayed quasi-circular (4/11), irregularly-lobulated (7/11) variable-intensity masses. The masses presented with cysts or necrosis (8/11), hemorrhage (7/11), marked (9/11) or mild (2/11) enhancement, and moderate (4/11), mild (3/11) or absent (4/11) peritumoral edema. The tumors were also frequently closely associated with the lateral ventricle (6/11). Tumors appeared isointense to hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense or hypointense on T2WI, demonstrating wreath-like and ring-like characteristics, with intratumoral nodules (3/11) or marked flake-like inhomogeneous (6/11) enhancement on post-contrast MRI. Only 2 solid lesions showed mild enhancement (2/11). Although the MRI features of the extraventricular anaplastic ependymomas varied and were non-specific, these characteristic MRI findings, combined with the locations of the lesions, the age of onset and the short disease course, could be useful in differentiating anaplastic ependymomas from other intracranial neoplasms in the future. PMID:27602137

  18. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  19. Toward a hybrid artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E A

    1989-06-01

    Management of insulinopenic diabetic individuals centers on administration of insulin by means of multiple injections, a wearable or implantable insulin-infusion pump, or a whole-organ or segmental-pancreas transplant. Preliminary trials indicate that surgical implantation of a hybrid device containing living insulin-secreting tissue may function as a combined glucose sensor and insulin-infusion pump. By means of a chamber composed of a semipermeable membrane shaped into hollow fibers or a box surrounding endocrine tissue, pilot studies have shown that isolated islets of Langerhans, fragments of insulinoma, or a fetal pancreas retains function for days to weeks, as judged by the ability to sustain euglycemic conditions in chemically induced diabetic rats. Lacking clear proof that normalizing blood glucose levels will prevent vascular complications of diabetes in humans, the case for further development of a hybrid (tissue plus fabricated components) device rests mainly on optimistic extrapolation of results attained in the chemically induced diabetic rat and dog. For the minority of diabetic patients who have insulin-dependent diabetes, the benefit afforded by a bionic device establishing internal insulin release regulated by silently sensed blood glucose level is more than enough payoff for the discomfort and surgery involved in its implantation. Further trials of a hybrid artificial pancreas in the dog appear warranted as a logical extension of preliminary studies with this species.

  20. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad; Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane; Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

  1. The role of volume perfusion CT in the diagnosis of pathologies of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Grözinger, G; Grözinger, A; Horger, M

    2014-12-01

    The review discusses the potential role of volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in the diagnosis and follow-up of different pathologies of the pancreas. VPCT enables a differentiation of different pancreatic tumors like adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine tumors based on functional parameters like blood flow, blood volume and permeability. Furthermore, the article discusses the potential indications for VPCT imaging of inflammatory diseases of the pancreas such as acute or chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis.

  2. Incidentally Detected Agenesis of Dorsal Pancreas on PET/CT: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kabnurkar, Rasika; Rokade, M L; Bandekar, Kalashree; Kamat, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    Agenesis of Dorsal Pancreas (ADP) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of body and tail of pancreas. We report a case of incidentally detected ADP on Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) component of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in a treated case of carcinoma (Ca) tongue with suspected local recurrence. Dependent Intestine Sign, hallmark of ADP on CECT imaging was noted in our patient. PMID:28242982

  3. Imaging patterns of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: an illustrated discussion of the International Consensus Guidelines for the Management of IPMN.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Naomi M; Katz, Seth S; Escalon, Joanna G; Do, Richard K

    2015-03-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are being diagnosed with increasing frequency, necessitating an algorithm to help stratify patients into low- and high-risk groups, for follow-up versus more invasive evaluation. New evidence concerning their natural history and overall risk of malignancy has emerged since the 2006 International Association of Pancreatology consensus guidelines, prompting an update in 2012, that distinguishes radiologic 'worrisome features' from 'high-risk stigmata'. The aim of this article is to illustrate, with case examples, the variable imaging patterns of IPMN and how their radiologic features, such as cyst size and mural nodules, are interpreted in the context of the new 2012 guidelines. The 2012 and 2006 guidelines will be compared and discussed with reference to additional studies that have since been published. Despite these guidelines, lingering uncertainty remains about the natural history of IPMN, a source of unease to both radiologists and referring clinicians alike, mandating further refinement of clinical and radiologic parameters predictive of malignancy. Emerging data regarding the risk of extrapancreatic malignancy, as well as synchronous or metachronous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remote in location from a branch duct IPMN are also reviewed. With the expanding research and evolving understanding of this clinicopathologic entity across the globe, radiologists will continue to play an important role in the management of patients with IPMN.

  4. Multi-atlas pancreas segmentation: Atlas selection based on vessel structure.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Ken'ichi; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Chu, Chengwen; Zheng, Guoyan; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-03-31

    Automated organ segmentation from medical images is an indispensable component for clinical applications such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) and computer-assisted surgery (CAS). We utilize a multi-atlas segmentation scheme, which has recently been used in different approaches in the literature to achieve more accurate and robust segmentation of anatomical structures in computed tomography (CT) volume data. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas has large inter-patient variability in its position, size and shape. Moreover, the CT intensity of the pancreas closely resembles adjacent tissues, rendering its segmentation a challenging task. Due to this, conventional intensity-based atlas selection for pancreas segmentation often fails to select atlases that are similar in pancreas position and shape to those of the unlabeled target volume. In this paper, we propose a new atlas selection strategy based on vessel structure around the pancreatic tissue and demonstrate its application to a multi-atlas pancreas segmentation. Our method utilizes vessel structure around the pancreas to select atlases with high pancreatic resemblance to the unlabeled volume. Also, we investigate two types of applications of the vessel structure information to the atlas selection. Our segmentations were evaluated on 150 abdominal contrast-enhanced CT volumes. The experimental results showed that our approach can segment the pancreas with an average Jaccard index of 66.3% and an average Dice overlap coefficient of 78.5%.

  5. Computed tomography of cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Moss, A.A.; Ohtomo, K.

    1982-11-01

    Ten cases of cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas were examined by computed tomography (CT). All but one showed characteristic findings consisting of both cystic and solid components. Innumerable small cysts producing a honeycomb appearance were noticed in serous cystadenomas. A well-defined multilocular cystic mass containing thin, straight, and/or curvilinear septa or a unilocular cystic tumor with a papillary projection and locally thickened wall was present in mucinous cystadenomas. The CT findings in cystadenocarcinomas varied depending on the relative size of the cystic and solid portions and the grade of malignancy. CT was useful in detecting and diagnosing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and differentiating benign serous cystadenomas from potentially malignant cystadenomas in typical cases. However, aspiration biopsy is recommended when findings are equivocal.

  6. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  7. Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Robert R; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Odorico, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

  8. Identification of intestinal wall abnormalities and ischemia by modeling spatial uncertainty in computed tomography imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tsunoyama, Taichiro; Pham, Tuan D; Fujita, Takashi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal abnormalities and ischemia are medical conditions in which inflammation and injury of the intestine are caused by inadequate blood supply. Acute ischemia of the small bowel can be life-threatening. Computed tomography (CT) is currently a gold standard for the diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia in the emergency department. However, the assessment of the diagnostic performance of CT findings in the detection of intestinal abnormalities and ischemia has been a difficult task for both radiologists and surgeons. Little effort has been found in developing computerized systems for the automated identification of these types of complex gastrointestinal disorders. In this paper, a geostatistical mapping of spatial uncertainty in CT scans is introduced for medical image feature extraction, which can be effectively applied for diagnostic detection of intestinal abnormalities and ischemia from control patterns. Experimental results obtained from the analysis of clinical data suggest the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty mapping model.

  9. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children.

  10. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma: A Report of 5 Cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with "rapid wash-in and slow wash-out" or "progressive enhancement" enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  12. Retrospective case series of the imaging findings of facial nerve hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yunlong; Jin, Yanfang; Yang, Bentao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhenchang

    2015-09-01

    The aim was to compare high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and thin-section magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of facial nerve hemangioma. The HRCT and MRI characteristics of 17 facial nerve hemangiomas diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients included in the study suffered from a space-occupying lesion of soft tissues at the geniculate ganglion fossa. Affected nerve was compared for size and shape with the contralateral unaffected nerve. HRCT showed irregular expansion and broadening of the facial nerve canal, damage of the bone wall and destruction of adjacent bone, with "point"-like or "needle"-like calcifications in 14 cases. The average CT value was 320.9 ± 141.8 Hu. Fourteen patients had a widened labyrinthine segment; 6/17 had a tympanic segment widening; 2/17 had a greater superficial petrosal nerve canal involvement, and 2/17 had an affected internal auditory canal (IAC) segment. On MRI, all lesions were significantly enhanced due to high blood supply. Using 2D FSE T2WI, the lesion detection rate was 82.4 % (14/17). 3D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) revealed the lesions in all patients. HRCT showed that the average number of involved segments in the facial nerve canal was 2.41, while MRI revealed an average of 2.70 segments (P < 0.05). HRCT and MR findings of facial nerve hemangioma were typical, revealing irregular masses growing along the facial nerve canal, with calcifications and rich blood supply. Thin-section enhanced MRI was more accurate in lesion detection and assessment compared with HRCT.

  13. Case report. Isolated left ventricular myocardium non-compaction: MR imaging findings from three cases.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, F P; Fernandes, F D B; Coutinho, A C; De Pontes, P V; Domingues, R C

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to report three cases of left ventricular myocardium non-compaction (LVNC), with emphasis on the MRI findings. From May 2006 to February 2007, three patients -- 2 females (6 years and 42 years of age) and 1 male (18 years of age) -- presented to our radiology department, two of them with fatigue, shortness of breath and episodes of syncope and arrhythmia, for further investigation by cardiac MRI because an apparent asymmetrical pattern of hypertrophy of the left ventricular myocardium was suspected by transthoracic echocardiography. The 18-year-old patient was only experiencing arrhythmia, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia was suspected. The images (produced by a 1.5T MRI system) were interpreted by two experienced radiologists and post-processed with Argus software (Siemens, Germany) for ejection fraction calculation. In all three patients, MRI aided in the correct identification of prominent ventricular myocardial trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the ventricular cavity, as well as areas of hypokinesia with depressed systolic function, and showed the absence of myocardial delayed enhancement and other structural heart defects. In conclusion, cardiac MRI was useful for correctly identifying this rare congenital heart disorder and appears to increase diagnostic accuracy. Although considered a rare anomaly, radiologists should be capable of recognizing LVNC, as current non-invasive imaging methods have increased the frequency of this diagnosis and timely detection is vital in considering early-stage transplantation.

  14. Clinical features and imaging findings in a case of Capgras syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Maria; Bordone, Andrea; Luca, Antonina; Patti, Andrea; Sortino, Giuseppe; Calandra, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Capgras syndrome consists of the delusional belief that a person or persons have been replaced by doubles or impostors. It can occur in the context of both psychiatric and organic illness, and seems to be related to lesions of the bifrontal and right limbic and temporal regions. Indeed, magnetic resonance imaging has revealed brain lesions in patients suffering from Capgras syndrome. This case study reports the findings of a thorough diagnostic evaluation in a woman suffering from Capgras syndrome and presenting with the following clinical peculiarities: obsessive modality of presentation of the delusional ideation, intrusiveness of such ideation (that even disturbed her sleep), as well as a sense of alienation and utter disgust towards the double. These characteristics bring to mind the typical aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Neuroanatomic investigation, through magnetic resonance imaging, performed on this patient showed alteration of the bilateral semioval centers, which are brain regions associated with the emotion of disgust and often show alterations in subjects suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. Hence, neuroimaging allows researchers to put forward the hypothesis of a common neuroanatomic basis for Capgras syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder, at least for cases in which the delusional ideation is associated with deep feelings of disgust and presents with a certain pervasiveness. PMID:23950650

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of isolated abducent nerve palsy induced by vascular compression of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    If the origin of isolated abducent nerve palsy cannot be found on neuroradiological examinations, diabetes mellitus is known as a probable cause; however, some cases show no potential causes of isolated abducent nerve palsy. Here, we report a 74-year-old male who suffered from diplopia due to isolated left abducent nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition imaging clearly showed a dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery compressing the left abducent nerve upward and outward. There were no abnormal lesions in the brain stem, cavernous sinus, or orbital cavity. Laboratory data showed no abnormal findings. We concluded that neurovascular compression of the left abducent nerve might cause isolated left abducent nerve palsy. We observed him without surgical treatment considering his general condition with angina pectoris and old age. His symptom due to the left abducent nerve palsy persisted. From previous reports, conservative treatment could not improve abducent nerve palsy. Microvascular decompression should be considered for abducent nerve palsy due to vascular compression if patients are young, and their general condition is good. We also discuss interesting characteristics with a review of the literature. PMID:28149097

  16. Biliary obstruction: findings at MR cholangiography and cross-sectional MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Soto, J A; Alvarez, O; Lopera, J E; Múnera, F; Restrepo, J C; Correa, G

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with malignant biliary obstruction and 21 patients with suspected obstruction of biliary-enteric anastomoses were evaluated over a 12-month period with magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiography and cross-sectional MR imaging. In patients with malignant obstruction, MR cholangiography helped accurately determine the status of the biliary ductal system by identifying the exact location and extent of the obstruction and the severity of duct dilatation. In so doing, MR cholangiography helped determine whether percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with antegrade stent placement or retrograde cholangiography with stent placement constituted the more suitable treatment. Cross-sectional MR imaging was necessary to identify the organ of tumor origin, define the tumor margins, and determine the stage of disease. This information helped evaluate the appropriateness of curative surgical therapy versus palliative drainage procedures. In patients with biliary-enteric anastomoses, MR cholangiography clearly depicted the site of the anastomosis and demonstrated the status of the intrahepatic ducts, thereby helping determine which patients would benefit from undergoing antegrade duct cannulation with a drainage procedure or perhaps balloon dilation. In some of these patients, MR cholangiography was sufficient to help plan therapeutic intervention. MR cholangiography also demonstrates the presence and size of biliary stones and associated findings such as intraductal tumor growth. In addition, MR cholangiography may obviate retrograde cholangiography, which can be technically difficult to perform.

  17. Review of MRI technique and imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and the "sports hernia".

    PubMed

    Mullens, Frank E; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2012-12-01

    The clinical syndrome of athletic pubalgia has prematurely ended many promising athletic careers, has made many active, fitness conscious adults more sedentary, and has served as a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum for innumerable trainers and physicians worldwide for decades. This diagnosis actually arises from one or more lesions within a spectrum of musculoskeletal and visceral injuries. In recent years, MRI has helped define many of these syndromes, and has proven to be both sensitive and specific for numerous potential causes of athletic pubalgia. This text will provide a comprehensive, up to date review of expected and sometimes unexpected MRI findings in the setting of athletic pubalgia, and will delineate an imaging algorithm and MRI protocol to help guide radiologists and other clinicians dealing with refractory, activity related groin pain in an otherwise young, healthy patient. There is still more to be learned about prevention and treatment plans for athletic pubalgia lesions, but accurate diagnosis should be much less nebulous and difficult with the use of MRI as a primary imaging modality.

  18. Incidental findings found in “healthy” volunteers during imaging performed for research: current legal and ethical implications

    PubMed Central

    Booth, T C; Jackson, A; Wardlaw, J M; Taylor, S A; Waldman, A D

    2010-01-01

    Incidental findings found in “healthy” volunteers during research imaging are common and have important implications for study design and performance, particularly in the areas of informed consent, subjects' rights, clinical image analysis and disclosure. In this study, we aimed to determine current practice and regulations concerning information that should be given to research subjects when obtaining consent, reporting of research images, who should be informed about any incidental findings and the method of disclosure. We reviewed all UK, European and international humanitarian, legal and ethical agencies' guidance. We found that the guidance on what constitutes incidental pathology, how to recognise it and what to do about it is inconsistent between agencies, difficult to find and less complete in the UK than elsewhere. Where given, guidance states that volunteers should be informed during the consent process about how research images will be managed, whether a mechanism exists for identifying incidental findings, arrangements for their disclosure, the potential benefit or harm and therapeutic options. The effects of incidentally discovered pathology on the individual can be complex and far-reaching. Radiologist involvement in analysis of research images varies widely; many incidental findings might therefore go unrecognised. In conclusion, guidance on the management of research imaging is inconsistent, limited and does not address the interests of volunteers. Improved standards to guide management of research images and incidental findings are urgently required. PMID:20335427

  19. Correlation Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Arthroscopic Findings in the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Ahad, Humayun; Sharma, Pradeep; Bajaj, Pankaj; Hassan, Nazia; Kamal, Younis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knee joint is the largest and the most complex joint of the human body. It is not covered by any thick muscular covering anteriorly. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic capabilities of clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopy in traumatic disorders of the knee joint, to seek correlation between clinical findings, MRI findings and arthroscopic. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 patients with a presentation suggestive of traumatic knee pathology were studied prospectively. A detailed history was taken and relevant clinical examination was done, which was followed by MRI of the knee. The patients were scheduled for arthroscopy under general/spinal anesthesia, whenever indicated. Results: Keeping arthroscopic examination as standard, the correlation between clinical and arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, accuracy of 63.16%, negative predictive value of 93.48%; whereas MRI vs. arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 74.42%, specificity of 93.10%, accuracy of 84.21%, and negative predictive value of 88.04%. Conclusions: The clinical examination is an important and accurate diagnostic modality for evaluation of traumatic derangement of the knee joint. It is noninvasive, easy, available, and valuable diagnostic modality. The MRI is an accurate diagnostic modality. It can be used whenever there is an uncertain indication for arthroscopy. However, costs have to be kept in mind, especially in patients with low socio-economic status. PMID:25825695

  20. Abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Jin Woo; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear in most cases. This study aimed to assess abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SSNHL and evaluate the value of MRI in identifying the cause of SSNHL. A retrospective analysis of the charts and MRI findings of 291 patients with SSNHL was performed. In 291 patients, MRI abnormality, which was considered a cause of SSNHL, was detected in 13 patients. Vestibular schwannoma involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) and/or cerebellopontine angle was observed in 9 patients. All 9 patients had intrameatal tumors, and 6 of the 9 patients displayed extrameatal extension of their tumors. The tumor was small (<1 cm) or medium-sized (1.1–2.9 cm) in these 6 patients. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma, labyrinthine hemorrhage, IAC metastasis, and a ruptured dermoid cyst were each observed in 1 patient. The most commonly observed MRI abnormality in patients with SSNHL was vestibular schwannoma, and all of the lesions were small or medium-sized tumors involving the IAC. PMID:27124066

  1. Spectrum of imaging findings on MDCT enterography in patients with small bowel tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kalra, N; Agrawal, P; Mittal, V; Kochhar, R; Gupta, V; Nada, R; Singh, R; Khandelwal, N

    2014-03-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is the sixth most common extrapulmonary site of involvement. The sites of involvement in abdominal tuberculosis, in descending order of frequency, are lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity, and gastrointestinal tract. The radiological armamentarium for evaluating tuberculosis of the small bowel (SBTB) includes barium studies (small bowel follow-through, SBFT), CT (multidetector CT, CT enterography, and CT enteroclysis), ultrasound (sonoenteroclysis), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; enterography and enteroclysis). In this review, we illustrate the abnormalities at MDCT enterography in 20 consecutive patients with SB TB and also describe extraluminal findings in these patients. MDCT enterography allows non-invasive good-quality assessment of well-distended bowel loops and the adjacent soft tissues. It displays the thickness and enhancement of the entire bowel wall in all three planes and allows examination of all bowel loops, especially the ileal loops, which are mostly superimposed. The terminal ileum and ileocaecal junction are the most common sites of small bowel involvement in intestinal TB. The most common abnormality is short-segment strictures with symmetrical concentric mural thickening and homogeneous mural enhancement. Other findings include lymphadenopathy, ascites, enteroliths, peritoneal thickening, and enhancement. In conclusion, MDCT enterography is a comprehensive technique for the evaluation of SB TB.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings After Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Barabasch, Alexandra; Distelmaier, Martina; Heil, Philipp; Krämer, Nils Andreas; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Bruners, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the course of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity (SI) changes that occur in noncirrhotic livers after irreversible electroporation (IRE) of liver metastases. Methods This study is an institutional review board–approved prospective longitudinal follow-up study on 27 patients with 37 liver metastases who underwent computed tomography–guided percutaneous IRE and a standardized follow-up protocol by serial hepatic MR imaging studies that consisted of a gadobutrol-enhanced dynamic series, axial T2-weighted (T2w) turbo spin echo, and diffusion-weighted imaging (b = 0/50/800), acquired before, within 2, and at 24 hours after IRE; at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks after IRE; and every 3 months thereafter for a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results The ablated target lesion remained visible within the ablation zone in 23 (62%) of 37 of cases for a mean time of 21 ± 20 weeks (median, 12 weeks). The ablation zone appeared homogeneously hyperintense on T2w turbo spin echo images on the day of IRE in 37 of 37 cases. By 24 hours after IRE, the ablation zone inverted its SI in 35 of 37 cases to intermediately hypointense, with a rim of T2w bright SI that exhibited arterial phase enhancement; this persisted for 7 ± 5 weeks (median, 4 weeks). The rim resolved in 35 (95%) of 37 cases within 3 months. The ablation zone increased slightly over the first 48 hours, then shrank progressively. Complete healing of the ablation zone was observed in 57% (21/37) after an average of 14 ± 15 (median, 8 weeks). Average apparent diffusion coefficient values of the ablation zone decreased from 0.74 ± 0.36 × 10−3 mm2/s pre-IRE to 0.63 ± 0.27 × 10−3 mm2/s within the first 24 hours (P < 0.05), followed by a progressive normalization to 0.91 ± 0.30 × 10−3 mm2/s at 2 months. Conclusions Knowledge of the broad spectrum of MR imaging findings after IRE is important to avoid diagnostic errors in the follow-up of

  3. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  4. Perfusion-decellularized pancreas as a natural 3D scaffold for pancreatic tissue and whole organ engineering

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Saik-Kia; Bertera, Suzanne; Olsen, Phillip; Candiello, Joe; Halfter, Willi; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Johnson, Scott; Sicari, Brian; Kollar, Elizabeth; Badylak, Stephen F.; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, with insulin supplementation as the most common treatment measure. Regenerative medicine approaches such as a bioengineered pancreas has been proposed as potential therapeutic alternatives. A bioengineered pancreas will benefit from the development of a bioscaffold that supports and enhances cellular function and tissue development. Perfusion-decellularized organs are a likely candidate for use in such scaffolds since they mimic compositional, architectural and biomechanical nature of a native organ. In this study, we investigate perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas and the feasibility to recellularize the whole pancreas scaffold with pancreatic cell types. Our result demonstrates that perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas effectively removes cellular and nuclear material while retaining intricate three-dimensional microarchitecture with perfusable vasculature and ductal network and crucial extracellular matrix (ECM) components. To mimic pancreatic cell composition, we recellularized the whole pancreas scaffold with acinar and beta cell lines and cultured up to 5 days. Our result shows successful cellular engraftment within the decellularized pancreas, and the resulting graft gave rise to strong up-regulation of insulin gene expression. These findings support biological utility of whole pancreas ECM as a biomaterials scaffold for supporting and enhancing pancreatic cell functionality and represent a step toward bioengineered pancreas using regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:23787110

  5. Histopathological changes in the pancreas of cattle with abdominal fat necrosis

    PubMed Central

    TANI, Chikako; PRATAKPIRIYA, Watanyoo; TANI, Mineto; YAMAUCHI, Takenori; HIRAI, Takuya; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; ANO, Hitoshi; KATAMOTO, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    The association between pancreatic disorder and abdominal fat necrosis in cattle remains unclear. The pancreases of 29 slaughtered cattle with or without fat necrosis were collected to investigate pathological changes. Japanese Black (JB) cattle were classified into the FN group (with abdominal fat necrosis; n=9) and N group (without fat necrosis; n=5). The pancreases were also collected from 15 Holstein Friesian (HF) cows. All JB cattle showed high body condition scores. Regarding the pathological findings, fatty pancreas which involves adipocyte infiltration into the pancreas and fat necrosis (saponification) were observed in 25 and 27 cases, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-Iba-1 antibody showed large numbers of macrophages surrounding the saponified fat in the pancreas. CD3-positive T cells were significantly more common in the pancreas of both the FN and N groups compared with the HF group (P<0.05). Furthermore, fibrosis in the pancreas exhibited a correlative tendency with the formation of necrotic fat mass in the peritoneal cavity (P<0.1). These results indicate that obesity leads to increased severity of pancreatic disorder, including fatty pancreas and pancreatitis. The pathological lesions in the pancreas may play a key role in abdominal fat necrosis through the inflammatory process. PMID:27795463

  6. fibmeasure: Python/Cython module to find the center of back-illuminated optical fibers in metrology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, James

    2016-03-01

    fibmeasure finds the precise locations of the centers of back-illuminated optical fibers in images. It was developed for astronomical fiber positioning feedback via machine vision cameras and is optimized for high-magnification images where fibers appear as resolvable circles. It was originally written during the design of the WEAVE pick-and-place fiber positioner for the William Herschel Telescope.

  7. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity.

  8. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  9. Multimodality imaging in cranial blastomycosis, a great mimicker: Case-based illustration with review of clinical and imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, Puneet S; Lath, Chinar O; Klein, Andrew P; Ulmer, John L

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of three patients who are proven cases of blastomycosis with cranial involvement. In this review, we discuss the imaging features of cranial blastomycosis with relevant clinical case examples including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and advanced MR imaging techniques like magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Literature is reviewed for modern-day diagnosis and treatment of this fatal intracranial infection, if not diagnosed promptly and managed effectively. PMID:27081235

  10. Pancreatic hardness: Correlation of surgeon’s palpation, durometer measurement and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Tae Ho; Choi, Joon-Il; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Lee, Young Joon; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Moon Hyung

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the correlation between subjective assessments of pancreatic hardness based on the palpation, objective measurements using a durometer, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for assessing pancreatic hardness. METHODS Eighty-three patients undergoing pancreatectomies were enrolled. An experienced surgeon subjectively evaluated the pancreatic hardness in the surgical field by palpation. The pancreatic hardness was also objectively evaluated using a durometer. Preoperative MRI findings were evaluated by a radiologist in terms of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, the relative signal intensity decrease (RSID) of the pancreatic parenchyma, and the diameter of the pancreatic parenchyma and duct. Durometer measurement results, ADC values, RSID, pancreatic duct and parenchyma diameters, and the ratio of the diameters of the duct and parenchyma were compared between pancreases judged to be soft or hard pancreas on the palpation. A correlation analysis was also performed between the durometer and MRI measurements. RESULTS The palpation assessment classified 44 patients as having a soft pancreas and 39 patients as having a hard pancreas. ADC values were significantly lower in the hard pancreas group. The ductal diameter and duct-to-pancreas ratio were significantly higher in the hard pancreas group. For durometer measurements, a correlation analysis showed a positive correlation with the ductal diameter and the duct-to-pancreas ratio and a negative correlation with ADC values. CONCLUSION Hard pancreases showed lower ADC values, a wider pancreatic duct diameter and a higher duct-to-pancreas ratio than soft pancreases. Additionally, the ADC values, diameter of the pancreatic duct and duct-to-pancreas ratio were closely correlated with the durometer results. PMID:28373771

  11. Plantar fasciitis and fascial rupture: MR imaging findings in 26 patients supplemented with anatomic data in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, D J; Theodorou, S J; Kakitsubata, Y; Lektrakul, N; Gold, G E; Roger, B; Resnick, D

    2000-10-01

    Understanding of the normal anatomy of the plantar aponeurosis (PA) and familiarity with pathologic conditions are required for an accurate evaluation of the patient with subcalcaneal heel pain. In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the PA with close anatomic correlation. Herein, we describe the MR imaging features of plantar fasciitis and fascial rupture in 26 patients. High-spatial-resolution MR imaging was performed in four cadaveric feet, and a prescribed imaging plane was used for depiction of the peroneal component of the PA. MR imaging delineated the anatomy of the PA and perifascial soft tissues. The peroneal component was best visualized in prescribed sagittal oblique images. Perifascial edema was the most common finding of plantar fasciitis, and it was remarkable in those cases with acute fascial rupture. MR imaging reliably delineated the anatomy of the PA and may allow precise localization and definition of the extent of involvement in disease processes.

  12. Hepatic trauma: CT findings and considerations based on our experience in emergency diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Romano, Luigia; Giovine, Sabrina; Guidi, Guido; Tortora, Giovanni; Cinque, Teresa; Romano, Stefania

    2004-04-01

    Abdominal blunt trauma represents the main cause of death in people of age less than 40 years; the liver injury occurs frequently, with an incidence varying from 3 to 10%. Isolated hepatic lesions are rare and in 77-90% of cases, lesions of other organs and viscera are involved. Right hepatic lobe is a frequent site of injury, because it is the more voluminous portion of liver parenchyma; posterior superior hepatic segments are proximal to fixed anatomical structures such as ribs and spine that may have an important role in determining of the lesion. The coronal ligaments' insertion in this parenchymal region augments the effect of acceleration-deceleration mechanism. Associated lesions usually are homolateral costal fractures, laceration or contusion of the inferior right pulmonary lobe, haemothorax, pneumothorax, renal and/or adrenal lesions. Traumatic lesions of left hepatic lobe are rare and usually associated with direct impact on the superior abdomen, such as in car-crash when the wheel causes a compressive effect on thorax and abdomen. Associated lesions to left hepatic lobe injuries correlated to this mechanism are: sternal fractures, pancreatic, myocardial, gastrointestinal tract injuries. Lesions of the caudal lobe are extremely rare, usually not isolated and noted with other large parenchymal lesions. The Institution of Specialized Trauma Centers and the technical progress in imaging methodology developed in the last years a great reduction of mortality. New diagnostic methodologies allow a reduction of negatives laparotomies and allow the possibility of conservative treatment of numerous traumatic lesions; however, therapy depends from imaging findings and clinical conditions of the patient. Computed tomography (CT) certainly presents a large impact on diagnosis and management of patients with lesions from blunt abdominal traumas. It is important to establish a prognostic criteria allowing decisions for conservative or surgical treatment; CT findings

  13. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  14. Non-functioning Well Differentiated Endocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The author reports a typical but rare case of non-functioning well differentiated endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. A 67-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain. No hormone-related symptoms were recognized. He has no familiar history of pancreatic neoplasms. Various imaging modalities including US, CT and MRI revealed a tumor of the pancreatic body. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. A solid well demarcated tumor was present in the pancreatic body. Peripancreatic lymph nodes showed marked swelling suggestive of metastases. Immunohistyochemically, tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and CD56; they were negative for chromogranin, gastrin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. The pathological diagnosis was non-functioning well differentiated endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. PMID:27990210

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  16. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of pancreas; second case from Asia.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Mir, Mohmad Hussain; Azaz, Sheikh Aejaz; Qadri, Sumyra Khurshid; Lone, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs) are malignant tumours composed of small round cells of neuroectodermal origin that affect soft tissue and bone. PNETs originating in the pancreas are extremely rare; previous to this report, only 14 cases were reported worldwide, making this case the fifteenth in the world and the second in Asia. We present the case of a painful pancreatic lump diagnosed as PNET of the pancreas after a thorough workup. The diagnosis of PNET is made according to the overall clinical picture, imaging, histopathology, cytogenetics, and immunohistochemistry, as in the case we present. It is essential to differentiate primary pancreatic PNET from a secondary involvement. A review of all of the cases diagnosed worldwide thus far is also provided.

  17. Chronic metabolic acidosis destroys pancreas.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Peter; Melamed, Felix

    2014-11-28

    One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis. The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum's walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful tool for pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3(-) capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  18. Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy in Breast Cancer: Association of Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging Findings, Diffusion-weighted Imaging Findings, and Tumor Subtype with Tumor Response.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Gorane; Bargalló, Xavier; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Farrús, Blanca; Caparrós, Xavier; Velasco, Martin

    2016-11-22

    Purpose To investigate the performance of tumor subtype and various magnetic resonance (MR) imaging parameters in the assessment of tumor response to neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) in patients with breast cancer and to outline a model of pathologic response, considering pathologic complete response (pCR) as the complete absence of any residual invasive cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Materials and Methods This was an institutional review board-approved retrospective study, with waiver of the need to obtain informed consent. From November 2009 to December 2014, 111 patients with histopathologically confirmed invasive breast cancer who were undergoing NST were included (mean age, 54 years; range, 27-84 years). Breast MR imaging was performed before and after treatment. Presence of late enhancement was assessed. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were obtained by using two different methods. ADC ratio (mean posttreatment ADC/mean pretreatment ADC) was calculated. pCR was defined as absence of any residual invasive cancer or DCIS. Multivariate regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed. Results According to their immunohistochemical (IHC) profile, tumors were classified as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive (n = 51), estrogen receptor (ER) positive/HER2 negative (n = 40), and triple negative (n = 20). pCR was achieved in 19% (21 of 111) of cases; 86% of them were triple-negative or HER2-positive subtypes. Absence of late enhancement at posttreatment MR imaging was significantly associated with pCR (area under the curve [AUC], 0.85). Mean ADC ratio significantly increased when pCR was achieved (P < .001). A κ value of 0.479 was found for late enhancement (P < .001), and the intraclass correlation coefficient for ADCs was 0.788 (P < .001). Good correlation of ADCs obtained with the single-value method and those obtained with the mean-value methods was observed. The model combining the IHC

  19. Magnetic resonance enterography in Crohn’s disease: How we do it and common imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Mantarro, Annalisa; Scalise, Paola; Guidi, Elisa; Neri, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, with unpredictable clinical course by phases of relapses alternating with other of quiescence. The etiology is multifactorial and is still not completely known; globally the westernization of lifestyle is causing an increasing incidence of CD, with peak age of 20-30 years. The diagnostic workup begins with the evaluation of the clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests. However, the clinical assessment is subjected interobserver variability and, occasionally, the symptoms of acute and chronic inflammation may be indistinguishable. In this regards, the role of magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is crucial to determine the extension, the disease activity and the presence of any complications without ionizing radiations, making this method very suitable for young population affected by CD. The purpose of this review article is to illustrate the MR enterography technique and the most relevant imaging findings of CD, allowing the detection of small bowel involvement and the assessment of disease activity. PMID:28298964

  20. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas: Case report and literature review of reported cases in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hoshimoto, Sojun; Matsui, Junichi; Miyata, Ryohei; Takigawa, Yutaka; Miyauchi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas (ACP) with cyst formation and review 60 ACP cases reported in Japan. In 20% of cases, laboratory tests revealed severe anemia (hemoglobin level < 10.0 g/dL) and elevated leucocyte counts (> 12000/mm3), which were likely attributable to rapid tumor growth, intratumoral hemorrhage, and necrosis. Elevated serum CA19-9 levels were observed in 55% of cases. Cyst-like structures were observed on imaging in 47% of cases, and this finding appears to reflect subsequent cystic degeneration in the lesion. Macroscopically, hemorrhagic necrosis was observed in 77% of cases, and cyst formation was observed in 33% of cases. ACP should be considered when diagnosing pancreatic tumors with a cyst-like appearance, especially in the presence of severe anemia, elevated leucocyte counts, or elevated serum CA19-9 levels. PMID:27784976

  1. SU-E-J-65: Motion Difference Between the Pancreas and Nearby Veins for Pancreas Motion Monitoring Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Erickson, B; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As it is generally difficult to outline the pancreas on an ultrasound b-mode image, visualized structures such as the portal or the splenic veins are assumed to have the same motion as the pancreas. These structures can be used as a surrogate for monitoring pancreas motion during radiation therapy (RT) delivery using ultrasound. To verify this assumption, we studied the motion difference between the head of the pancreas, the portal vein, the tail of the pancreas, and splenic vein. Methods: 4DCT data acquired during RT simulation were analyzed for a total of 5 randomly selected patients with pancreatic cancer. The data was sorted into 10 respiratory phases from 0% to 90% (0%: end of the inspiration, 50%: end of expiration) . The head of the pancreas (HP), tail of the pancreas (TP), portal vein (PV), and splenic vein (SV) were contoured on all 10 phases. The volume change and motion were measured in the left-right (LR), anterior-superior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The volume change for all patients/phases were: 1.2 ± 3% for HP, 0.78 ± 1.6% for PV, 2.5 ± 2.9% for TP, and 0.53 ± 2.1% for SV. Motion for each structure was estimated from the centroid displacements due to the uniformity of the structures and the small volume change. The measured motion between HP and PV was: LR: 0.1 ± 0.17 mm, AP: 0.04 ± 0.1 mm, SI: 0.17 ± 0.16 mm and between TP and the PV was: LR: 0.05 ± 0.3 mm, AP: 0.1 ± 0.4 mm, SI: 0.01 ± 0.022 mm. Conclusion: There are small motion differences between the portal vein and the head of the pancreas, and the splenic vein and the tail of the pancreas. This suggests the feasibility of utilizing these features for monitoring the pancreas motion during radiation therapy.

  2. Normal Postoperative Computed Tomography Findings after a Variety of Pancreatic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Won; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Minwook; Kim, Ki Whang; Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic neoplasms, and plays an important role in the management of medically intractable diseases. Since the original Whipple operation in the 20th century, surgical techniques have advanced, resulting in decreased postoperative complications and better clinical outcomes. Normal postoperative imaging findings vary greatly depending on the surgical technique used. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the normal postoperative imaging findings, in order to distinguish from postoperative complications or tumor recurrence. In this study, we briefly review a variety of surgical techniques for the pancreas, and present the normal postoperative computed tomography findings. PMID:28246510

  3. Lyme disease-related intracranial hypertension in children: clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Obeid, Rawad; Zuccoli, Giulio; Cleves-Bayon, Catalina; Nowalk, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne infection that is endemic to multiple areas of the United States. Patients with LD may present with sign and symptoms of intracranial hypertension (IH). The objective of this study is to evaluate the history, clinical findings, CSF analysis, and brain imaging results in pediatric patients with increased intracranial pressure secondary to LD. A retrospective database search was performed using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9/10 codes to identify patients diagnosed with LD and IH between 2004 and 2014 at a tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging data for each patient were reviewed. Seven patients met inclusion criteria; mean age was 9.6 years (standard deviation 4.0 years); 4/7 patients were male. Average body mass index was 18.8 kg/m(2) (standard deviation 3.0 kg/m(2)). Fever was present in four patients. Four had a history of LD related erythema migrans. All had elevated CSF opening pressure with leukocytosis and lymphocytic predominance. MRI obtained in six patients showed contrast enhancement of various cranial nerves. Tentorial enhancement was noted in all patients. In addition, patients had widening of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve protrusion, and flattening of the posterior globe consistent with increased intracranial pressure. All patients had resolution of their symptoms after initiation of antibiotic therapy. In endemic areas, LD should be included in the differential of IH. MRI can help distinguish IH due to LD from its idiopathic form due to the presence of tentorial and cranial nerve enhancement in the former in addition to abnormal CSF showing leukocytosis with lymphocyte predominance.

  4. Relationship between electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging findings after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at term.

    PubMed

    El-Ayouty, Mostafa; Abdel-Hady, Hesham; El-Mogy, Sabry; Zaghlol, Hamed; El-Beltagy, Mohamed; Aly, Hany

    2007-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Electroencephalography (EEG) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are frequently performed in these infants, but the prognostic value of the combined use of EEG and MRI needs additional exploration. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in neonates with HIE, the role of early EEG and conventional MRI in the prediction of infants at risk for persistent encephalopathy at 18 months of age. Thirty-four term infants with HIE were enrolled in this prospective study. EEG was recorded within the first 72 hours after birth and a brain MRI scan was done between 1 and 4 weeks of age. Denver Developmental Screening Test II was performed at 6, 12, and 18 months of age. Three infants (9%) had mild HIE, 21 infants (62%) had moderate HIE, and 10 infants (29%) had severe HIE. The EEG background was normal, moderately, severely, and extremely discontinuous in eight (24%), three (9%), sixteen (47%), and seven (20%) neonates, respectively. EEG background activities correlated significantly with HIE severity (p = 0.0001). MRI findings significantly correlated with EEG background (p = 0.001). Normal MRI scans and minimal basal ganglia lesions were always associated with normal EEG background. Patients with severe basal ganglia and thalamic lesions in MRI (n = 2) had extreme discontinuous EEG background. For the prediction of poor outcomes, abnormal EEG background activity had a sensitivity (Sn) = 100%, a specificity (Sp) = 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) = 100%, and negative predictive value (NPV) = 100%, whereas values of abnormal MRI scans were Sn of 100%, Sp = 43%, PPV = 82%, and NPV=100%. EEG background activity is the best element to predict abnormal outcomes. Severe basal ganglia and thalamic injuries on MRI scans are associated with poor outcomes. Otherwise, MRI does not contribute to the prediction of outcomes at 18 months of age.

  5. Spinal cord infarction: clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings and short term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Masson, C; Pruvo, J; Meder, J; Cordonnier, C; Touze, E; de la Sayette, V; Giroud, M; Mas, J; Leys, D

    2004-01-01

    Background: Most studies on spinal cord infarction have been conducted in single centres; they usually consisted of case reports, or of larger series of patients recruited over a large period of time, with heterogeneous diagnostic procedures. Therefore, the clinical and radiological presentation of spinal cord infarcts and their short term outcome remain poorly understood. Objective: To define clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and short term outcome in patients with spinal cord infarcts. Methods: The authors prospectively included patients within 10 days of onset. An MRI scan was required and repeated when initially normal. Results: Twenty eight consecutive patients were included over a 24 month period in 16 neurological centres. The infarct was cervical in seven patients, thoracic in three, thoracolumbar in 15, and restricted to the conus in three. On axial MRI scans the infarct was located in the central territory of the anterior spinal artery in 21 patients, and in the peripheral arterial territory in three. At month two, 15 patients had a good outcome and 13 had a poor outcome, including three deaths. Patients who, at onset, could not walk, had bladder dysfunction, or proprioceptive deficits were more likely to have a poor outcome. At month two, pain had occurred in 10 of the 25 survivors and was associated neither with the initial severity, nor the extent of the infarct on MRI. Conclusion: The two month outcome mainly depends on the initial severity of the neurological deficit; however, a few patients with a severe impairment at onset had a good outcome, especially when proprioception remained normal at onset. The study does not support the hypothesis that pain occurs more frequently in small spinal infarcts. PMID:15377691

  6. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes.

  7. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  8. Robotic surgery of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  9. Robotic surgery of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities.

  10. Glucagon in the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  11. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  12. Morphometric Study of Pancreas in Human Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Dhende, Abhijeet S.; Joshi, Deepak S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The pancreas arises from the endoderm as a dorsal and a ventral bud which fuse together to form the single organ. It extends transversely across the posterior abdominal wall from the duodenum to the spleen. Functionally, it is endocrine and exocrine. Aim This study was undertaken to study the morphometry of human pancreas at different gestational age groups of normal, still born fetuses. Materials and Methods Forty aborted human fetuses (25 male and 15 female) of 12-40 weeks gestational age with no obvious congenital abnormality were obtained. The fetuses were dissected and pancreas was removed. The length and weight of the pancreas as well as height of its head were noted. Results It was observed that there was increase in body weight and crown rump length with increasing gestational age. The average length of pancreas was 1.80 cm in 12th week and 4.70 cm in 40th week of gestation. The average height of pancreas head was 0.80 cm in the 12th and 2.70 cm in 40th week of gestation. Conclusion The knowledge of development of pancreas helps in planning new therapeutic interventions in the treatment of various congenital and functional pancreatic anomalies. PMID:28050352

  13. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography findings of vertebral osteosarcoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Okada, Midori; Kitagawa, Masato; Nagasawa, Akinori; Itou, Takuya; Kanayama, Kiichi; Sakai, Takeo

    2009-04-01

    An 8-year-old female Persian cat with a gait disorder was brought to our hospital. Pelvic limb mobility had gradually reduced over the preceding 3 months, then rapidly deteriorated 2 weeks before consultation. Signs also occurred in the thoracic limbs. With a tentative diagnosis of neural disease, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were performed. T1-weighted imaging showed isointensity in the seventh cervical vertebra, while T2-weighted imaging revealed hypointensity. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging revealed a uniformly enhancing mass. Extirpation of the mass relieved the clinical signs, leading to disappearance of the neurological signs. The histopathological examination suggested osteosarcoma.

  15. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Hilbig, Andreas; Rogalla, Patrik

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences.

  16. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Pancreas This booklet is about cancer of the pancreas, also called pancreatic cancer. There are two main ... care. This booklet covers: The anatomy of the pancreas and basics about cancer of the pancreas Treatments ...

  17. Santorinirrhage: hemosuccus pancreaticus in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Durana, J A; Yañez, J; Rodriguez, H; Garcia-Vallejo, L; Arnal, F

    1988-08-01

    We describe a previously unreported complication of pancreas divisum: severe and repeated episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding through the main pancreatic duct (hemosuccus pancreaticus) in a 34-yr-old woman over a period of 10 months. She had negative investigations, including a blank laparotomy, until an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a pancreas divisum with chronic pancreatitis and a small pseudocyst at the tail of the dorsal pancreas. During the procedure, bleeding through the papilla minor was observed coming from Santorini's duct. A corporocaudal pancreatectomy was done and the bleeding episodes have subsided.

  18. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Branding, Gordian; Jefferys, Laura; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Siebert, Eberhard

    2016-02-01

    To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution.

  19. Deciding between Realistic and Representational Visual Images: Findings from the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugenio, Vince

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the theory and research underlying the use of realistic and compressed images or representational images developed from 1950-80 using print, slides, and film media. Topics include the theories of visual realism, visual realism and instruction, and the foundations of visual compression. (20 references) (KRN)

  20. Sharing Visual Arts Images for Educational Use: Finding a New Angle of Repose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Gretchen

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions should be actively rethinking how they are accessing and using copyrighted visual arts images, and they should be exploring an approach that seeks to address copyright owners' interests, as well as users' needs, in an environment that encourages increased, shared access to these images for teaching and study. (Contains 23…

  1. Determining the relative importance of figures in journal articles to find representative images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Henning; Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Lin, Chang; Eggel, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    When physicians are searching for articles in the medical literature, images of the articles can help determining relevance of the article content for a specific information need. The visual image representation can be an advantage in effectiveness (quality of found articles) and also in efficiency (speed of determining relevance or irrelevance) as many articles can likely be excluded much quicker by looking at a few representative images. In domains such as medical information retrieval, allowing to determine relevance quickly and accurately is an important criterion. This becomes even more important when small interfaces are used as it is frequently the case on mobile phones and tablets to access scientific data whenever information needs arise. In scientific articles many figures are used and particularly in the biomedical literature only a subset may be relevant for determining the relevance of a specific article to an information need. In many cases clinical images can be seen as more important for visual appearance than graphs or histograms that require looking at the context for interpretation. To get a clearer idea of image relevance in articles, a user test with a physician was performed who classified images of biomedical research articles into categories of importance that can subsequently be used to evaluate algorithms that automatically select images as representative examples. The manual sorting of images of 50 journal articles of BioMedCentral with each containing more than 8 figures by importance also allows to derive several rules that determine how to choose images and how to develop algorithms for choosing the most representative images of specific texts. This article describes the user tests and can be a first important step to evaluate automatic tools to select representative images for representing articles and potentially also images in other contexts, for example when representing patient records or other medical concepts when selecting

  2. MDCT of pelvic inflammatory disease: a review of the pathophysiology, gamut of imaging findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Spain, James; Rheinboldt, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Representing an ascending, sexually spread pyogenic infection of the female genital tract, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a commonly encountered cause for emergency visits and hospitalizations among young and adult female patients. Though gynecologic evaluation and sonography constitute the mainstay of diagnosis, multidetector CT imaging of the abdomen and pelvis is not uncommonly performed, often as the initial imaging modality, due to the frequently vague and indeterminate clinical presentation. As such, knowledge and attenuation to the often subtle early imaging features of PID afford the radiologist a critical chance to direct and expedite appropriate pathways of patient care, minimizing the risk for secondary complications, including infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and enteric adhesions. In this paper, we will review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, early and late imaging features of PID as well as potential secondary complications and treatment options. Additionally, we will discuss published data metrics on CT performance regarding sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis as well as potential imaging differential diagnostic considerations.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic findings associated with necrotizing encephalitis in two Yorkshire terriers.

    PubMed

    von Praun, Ferdinand; Matiasek, Kaspar; Grevel, Vera; Alef, Michaele; Flegel, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Two young adult Yorkshire terriers had neurologic signs consistent with forebrain and brainstem involvement or forebrain involvement alone. On magnetic resonance imaging studies there were asymmetric bilateral lesions mainly in the cerebral cortex, and in the diencephalon. These areas were hyperintense on T2-weighted and FLAIR images, but hypointense or isointense on T1-weighted images. Lesions had a varying degree of contrast enhancement. Areas which were isointense on T1-weighted images had no contrast enhancement or only foci of contrast enhancement. Lesions with hypointensity in T1-weighted images had no enhancement or more frequently ring-like enhancement around the lesion. Necrotizing encephalitis was confirmed pathohistologically in both dogs. The degree of contrast enhancement appeared to be related to the degree of lymphohistiocytic inflammation on histologic examination.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine in Children: Spinal Incidental Findings in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramadorai, Uma E.; Hire, Justin M.; DeVine, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  5. Prefrontal Structural and Functional Brain Imaging findings in Antisocial, Violent, and Psychopathic Individuals: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaling; Raine, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Brain imaging studies suggest that antisocial and violent behavior is associated with structural and functional deficits in the prefrontal cortex, but there is heterogeneity in findings and it is unclear whether findings apply to psychopaths, non-violent offenders, community-based samples, and studies employing psychiatric controls. A meta-analysis was conducted on 43 structural and functional imaging studies and results show significantly reduced prefrontal structure and function in antisocial individuals. Effect sizes were significant for both structural and functional studies. With minor exceptions, no statistically significant moderating effects of sample characteristics and methodological variables were observed. Findings were localized to the right orbitofrontal cortex, right anterior cingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Findings confirm the replicability of prefrontal structural and functional impairments in antisocial populations and highlight the involvement of orbitofrontal, dorsolateral frontal, and anterior cingulate cortex in antisocial behavior. PMID:19833485

  6. MR and MRCP in the evaluation of primary sclerosing cholangitis: current applications and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Elsayes, Khaled M; Oliveira, Erica P; Narra, Vamsidhar R; Abou El Abbass, Hatem A; Ahmed, Moustafa I; Tongdee, Ranista; Brown, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive cholestatic disease of unknown etiology leading to cirrhosis and liver failure. Several imaging modalities have been used to study this disease, including ultrasonography, computed tomography and hepatobiliary scintigraphy, but accurate diagnosis was found to be best made with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or direct cholangiography. However, these 2 methods are invasive and may produce serious complications. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is a noninvasive imaging technique that has become very useful for diagnosing primary sclerosing cholangitis. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging provides pertinent information of extraductal abnormalities in addition to biliary ductal changes.

  7. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches.

  8. Unusual Presentation of Hydatid Cyst in Breast with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Ali; Vurdem, Umit Erkan; Karabiyik, Ozgur; Gumus, Ummugulsum Ozgul

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of 59-year-old woman with a painful left breast mass, compatible with types II-III hydatid cyst. Lesion was evaluated with mammography, ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging had important diagnostic role with demonstrating characteristic features of the lesion and had capability of showing complications. Surgery also confirmed the diagnosis of a hydatid cyst. PMID:28167966

  9. Cavernous hemangioma of adult pancreas: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Henkes, David; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic hemangioma is a rare type of benign vascular tumor. Low clinical suspicion and inability of current cross sectional imaging techniques to differentiate it from other pancreatic lesions, contribute to the difficulty in making the correct diagnosis. Without a definitive diagnosis, and due to concern for malignancy, in many instances, surgery is performed. We report a case of pancreas cavernous hemangioma in an 18-year-old female. The patient presented with three-month history of epigastric pain. Physical examination and routine blood tests were normal. Abdominal Computed Tomography scan revealed a 5 cm × 6 cm complex non-enhancing cystic mass in the head of pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS guided fine needle aspiration cytology were non-diagnostic. Because of uncontrolled symptoms, the patient underwent surgical resection. Histopathology and Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of pancreas. PMID:26361427

  10. How Relevant Are Imaging Findings in Animal Models of Movement Disorders to Human Disease?

    PubMed

    Bannon, Darryl; Landau, Anne M; Doudet, Doris J

    2015-08-01

    The combination of novel imaging techniques with the use of small animal models of disease is often used in attempt to understand disease mechanisms, design potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, and develop novel methods with translatability to human clinical conditions. However, it is clear that most animal models are deficient when compared to the complexity of human diseases: they cannot sufficiently replicate all the features of multisystem disorders. Furthermore, some practical differences may affect the use or interpretation of animal imaging to model human conditions such as the use of anesthesia, various species differences, and limitations of methodological tools. Nevertheless, imaging animal models allows us to dissect, in interpretable bits, the effects of one system upon another, the consequences of variable neuronal losses or overactive systems, the results of experimental treatments, and we can develop and validate new methods. In this review, we focus on imaging modalities that are easily used in both human subjects and animal models such as positron emission and magnetic resonance imaging and discuss aging and Parkinson's disease as prototypical examples of preclinical imaging studies.

  11. Who needs an artificial pancreas? (?).

    PubMed

    Winikoff, Janet; Drexler, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The development of a closed-loop "artificial pancreas" would be a welcome advance for both endocrinologists and diabetic patients struggling to attain near normal glycemic control. While great strides in automatically controlling blood sugar in the fasting, sedentary state have been made through complex mathematical modeling, management of blood sugar excursions due to food and exercise have been more problematic. An artificial pancreas is not feasible at this time because of limitations inherent in the currently available technology.

  12. Spectrum and Classification of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Greer, Jonathan B; Ferrone, Cristina R

    2016-04-01

    As patients are living longer and axial imaging is more widespread, increasing numbers of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms are the most common. The revised Sendai guidelines provide a safe algorithm for expectant management of certain cystic neoplasms; however, studies are ongoing to identify further subgroups that can be treated nonoperatively. For those patients with high-risk clinical features or symptoms, surgical resection can be performed safely at high-volume pancreatic centers. Accurate diagnosis is critical for accurate decision making.

  13. Diagnostic imaging and endoscopic finding in dogs and cats with gastric tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Terragni, R; Vignoli, M; van Bree, H J; Gaschen, L; Saunders, J H

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging is an essential part of the diagnostic workup of many gastrointestinal disorders. This paper reviews imaging and endoscopy of gastric tumors in dogs and cats and the techniques used. The appearance of the normal as well as the various aspects of gastric tumors are described for these different modalities. Plain radiography is widely available but has limited diagnostic value. Contrast radiography has higher sensitivity but is laborious and time-consuming. Ultrasonography (if an adequate acoustic window is available), endosonography and endoscopy are the most appropriate modalities for diagnosing gastric tumors. They are especially useful when obtaining samples for cytologic or histopathologic examination, because the imaging modalities do not always differentiate between inflammatory or infectious conditions and neoplastic disorders. Hydro-helical CT was found helpful for evaluating the location and local invasiveness of the lesion. Ultrasonography and endoscopy are useful modalities for taking adequate biopsies.

  14. MDCT Imaging Findings of Liver Cirrhosis: Spectrum of Hepatic and Extrahepatic Abdominal Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, Guillermo P.; Previgliano, Carlos H.; Nader, Mathieu; Chwoschtschinsky, Elisa; Heldmann, Maureen G.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is the clinical and pathologic result of a multifactorial chronic liver injury. It is well known that cirrhosis is the origin of multiple extrahepatic abdominal complications and a markedly increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This tumor is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer related death. With the rising incidence of HCC worldwide, awareness of the evolution of cirrhotic nodules into malignancy is critical for an early detection and treatment. Adequate imaging protocol selection with dynamic multiphase Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and reformatted images is crucial to differentiate and categorize the hepatic nodular dysplasia. Knowledge of the typical and less common extrahepatic abdominal manifestations is essential for accurately assessing patients with known or suspected hepatic disease. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the imaging spectrum of intra- and extrahepatic abdominal manifestations of hepatic cirrhosis seen on MDCT. PMID:23986608

  15. The Pancreas: Causes for Malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Thilo; Schütte, Kerstin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The pancreas has a central function in digestion and glucose homeostasis. With regard to the exocrine function, which is responsible for the digestion and absorption of nutrients and vitamins, the most important disturbances of these physiological processes are based on deficiencies in enzyme production and secretion, either due to impaired excretion caused by obstruction of the pancreatic duct or due to loss of pancreatic tissue. Both conditions result in maldigestion, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Methods Systematic literature review. Results Symptoms associated with pancreatic exocrine failure are gastrointestinal discomfort, steatorrhea, and weight loss. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency caused by ductal obstruction occurs in chronic pancreatitis or with neoplasia of the pancreatic head. Loss of functional parenchyma can be caused either by chronic pancreatitis resulting in fibrotic replacement of the destroyed parenchyma or by a postoperative state of pancreatic resection. Conclusion In patients with chronic pancreatitis, a stage-adapted and timely therapy including conservative as well as surgical measures is essential to prevent functional deterioration and to preserve residual function. In the case of pancreatic resection for chronic pancreatitis, this can be achieved with modern organ-sparing surgery such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection. In patients requiring more extended pancreatic resections and even total duodenopancreatectomy, regardless of the underlying indication, adequate enzyme replacement and monitoring of the nutritional status is critical to prevent impairment of quality of life as well as detrimental malnutrition in the long term. PMID:26288593

  16. HSI-Find: A Visualization and Search Service for Terascale Spectral Image Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Smith, A. T.; Castano, R.; Palmer, E. E.; Xing, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers are remote sensing instruments commonly deployed on aircraft and spacecraft. They provide surface reflectance in hundreds of wavelength channels, creating data cubes known as hyperspecrtral images. They provide rich compositional information making them powerful tools for planetary and terrestrial science. These data products can be challenging to interpret because they contain datapoints numbering in the thousands (Dawn VIR) or millions (AVIRIS-C). Cross-image studies or exploratory searches involving more than one scene are rare; data volumes are often tens of GB per image and typical consumer-grade computers cannot store more than a handful of images in RAM. Visualizing the information in a single scene is challenging since the human eye can only distinguish three color channels out of the hundreds available. To date, analysis has been performed mostly on single images using purpose-built software tools that require extensive training and commercial licenses. The HSIFind software suite provides a scalable distributed solution to the problem of visualizing and searching large catalogs of spectral image data. It consists of a RESTful web service that communicates to a javascript-based browser client. The software provides basic visualization through an intuitive visual interface, allowing users with minimal training to explore the images or view selected spectra. Users can accumulate a library of spectra from one or more images and use these to search for similar materials. The result appears as an intensity map showing the extent of a spectral feature in a scene. Continuum removal can isolate diagnostic absorption features. The server-side mapping algorithm uses an efficient matched filter algorithm that can process a megapixel image cube in just a few seconds. This enables real-time interaction, leading to a new way of interacting with the data: the user can launch a search with a single mouse click and see the resulting map in seconds

  17. MR imaging, proton MR spectroscopy, ultrasonographic, histologic findings in patients with chronic lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Fumiere, E; Leduc, O; Fourcade, S; Becker, C; Garbar, C; Demeure, R; Wilputte, F; Leduc, A; Delcour, C

    2007-12-01

    Lymphedema is a progressive disease with multiple alterations occurring in the dermis. We undertook this study using high-frequency ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging, proton MR spectroscopy and histology to examine structural changes occurring in the subcutaneous tissue and precisely describe the nature of intralobular changes in chronic lymphedema. Four cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue biopsies from patients with chronic lymphedema during lymphonodal transplantation were studied. We performed US with a 13.5 MHz transducer, TSE T1 and TSE T2 magnetic resonance images with and without fat-suppression, MR Chemical Shift Imaging Spectroscopy and histological evaluation on these biopsies. We found that normal subcutaneous septa are seen as hyperechogenic lines in US and hyposignal lines in MRI and that hyperechogenic subcutis in US can be due to interlobular and intralobular water accumulation and/or to interlobular and intralobular fibrosis. Our study also confirms the usefulness of MR spectroscopy to assess water or fat content of soft tissue. Thus, multiple imaging modalities may be necessary to precisely delineate the nature of tissue alterations in chronic lymphedema.

  18. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M.; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  19. Transitional cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract: spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Browne, Ronan F J; Meehan, Conor P; Colville, Jane; Power, Raymond; Torreggiani, William C

    2005-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) accounts for up to 10% of neoplasms of the upper urinary tract and usually manifests as hematuria. Imaging plays an important role in assessment of upper tract disease, unlike in bladder TCC, diagnosis of which is usually made at cystoscopy. Traditional imaging modalities, such as excretory urography, retrograde pyelography, and ultrasonography, still play pivotal roles in diagnosis of upper tract TCC, in combination with endourologic techniques. The multicentric nature of TCC makes assessment of the entire urothelium essential before treatment. The advent of minimally invasive surgery, which allows renal preservation in selected patients, makes accurate tumor staging mandatory to determine the appropriate therapy; staging is usually performed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Vigilant urologic and radiologic follow-up is warranted to assess for metachronous lesions and recurrence. The emerging technique of CT urography allows detection of urinary tract tumors and calculi, assessment of perirenal tissues, and staging of lesions; it may offer the opportunity for one-stop evaluation in the initial assessment of hematuria and in follow-up of TCC. Similar MR imaging protocols can be used in patients who are not candidates for CT urography, although detection of urinary tract calcifications may be suboptimal.

  20. A region finding method to remove the noise from the images of the human hand gesture recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Jibran; Mahmood, Waqas

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems depends on the quality of the images presented to the system. Since these systems work in real time environment the images may be corrupted by some environmental noise. By removing the noise the performance of the system can be enhanced. So far different noise removal methods have been presented in many researches to eliminate the noise but all have its own limitations. We have presented a region finding method to deal with the environmental noise that gives better results and enhances the performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems so that the recognition rate of the system can be improved.

  1. Abnormalities of the long head of the biceps tendon of the shoulder: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, G A

    1994-11-01

    The normal anatomy of the long head of the biceps tendon of the shoulder has been described in detail [1]. Descriptions of different pathologic processes affecting this structure also have been published [1-3] but have been incomplete, showing only a limited variety of abnormalities. In this article, abnormalities of the long head of the biceps tendon seen on MR images are illustrated in greater variety and detail. Recognizing abnormalities of the biceps tendon is important because they are a common source of shoulder pain both alone and in combination with abnormalities of the rotator cuff, labrum, and other structures. Because incomplete diagnosis can lead to treatment failure, it is important to recognize less common imaging manifestations of common entities.

  2. The Imaging Findings of Erdheim–Chester Disease: A Multimodality Approach to Diagnosis and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Patrick; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Zeng, Wanzhen

    2017-01-01

    Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare, non-Langerhans histiocytic disorder. The most common manifestations consist of polyostotic sclerotic lesions with the majority of cases also demonstrating soft tissue involvement of the sinuses, retroperitoneum, large vessels, heart, lungs, and central nervous system. Nuclear medicine can play an important role in assessing the extent of the disease with bone scintigraphy and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET). We present the case of a middle-aged female who initially presented with tooth pain. She subsequently underwent imaging including plain film, bone scan, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and FDG-PET/CT, which showed characteristic bony involvement. Biopsy results confirmed the diagnosis of ECD. PMID:28217025

  3. Correlation between visual function, neurodevelopmental outcome, and magnetic resonance imaging findings in infants with periventricular leucomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, G.; Bertuccelli, B.; Boldrini, A.; Canapicchi, R.; Fazzi, B.; Guzzetta, A.; Mercuri, E.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate the correlation between visual function and neurodevelopmental outcome in children with periventricular leucomalacia at 1 and 3years.
METHOD—Visual acuity, visual field, ocular motility, and optokinetic nystagmus were tested in 29 infants with periventricular leucomalacia by brain magnetic resonance imaging. All infants also had a structured neurological examination and a Griffiths developmental assessment.
RESULTS—21 of the infants showed at least one abnormality of visual function. The degree of visual impairment—that is, the number of visual tests showing abnormal results—correlated well with the results on developmental assessment at both ages.
CONCLUSION—Multivariate analysis showed that visual impairment was the most important variable in determining the neurodevelopmental scores of these infants, more than their motor disability and the extent of their lesions on magnetic resonance imaging.

 PMID:10685987

  4. MR Imaging Findings in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease. PMID:25050351

  5. How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object ClassificationTechniques for Difference Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, RollinC.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Wong, Daniel

    2007-05-02

    We present the results of applying new object classificationtechniques to difference images in the context of the Nearby SupernovaFactory supernova search. Most current supernova searches subtractreference images from new images, identify objects in these differenceimages, and apply simple threshold cuts on parameters such as statisticalsignificance, shape, and motionto reject objects such as cosmic rays,asteroids, and subtraction artifacts. Although most static objectssubtract cleanly, even a very low false positive detection rate can leadto hundreds of non-supernova candidates which must be vetted by humaninspection before triggering additional followup. In comparison to simplethreshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as Boosted DecisionTrees, Random Forests, and Support Vector Machines provide dramaticallybetter object discrimination. At the Nearby Supernova Factory, we reducedthe number of non-supernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasingour supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will becrucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automatedtransient alert pipelines of upcoming projects such as PanSTARRS andLSST.

  6. Comparison of technetium-99m and iodine-123 imaging of thyroid nodules: Correlation with pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Kusic, Z.; Becker, D.V.; Saenger, E.L.; Paras, P.; Gartside, P.; Wessler, T.; Spaventi, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Three hundred and sixteen patients with solitary or dominant thyroid nodules were imaged both with technetium-99m- (99mTc) pertechnetate and iodine-123 ({sup 123}I). The images were preferred, but differences were small and in 27%-58% of the cases there was no difference in quality between the two radionuclides. Discrepancies between {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I images were found in 5%-8% of cases, twice as often in multinodular goiters as in single nodules. Cytologic/histologic examination was performed on all nodules but no correlation was found between the pathology and the type of discrepancy. Twelve carcinomas were found (4%) but none in nodules showing a discrepancy. There was great variation among the observers about the preference for radionuclides and about the existence or type of discrepancies. The slightly better overall quality of {sup 123}I scans is probably not of diagnostic significance and does not justify the routine use of {sup 123}I instead of {sup 99m}Tc. Routine reimaging of {sup 99m}Tc hot nodules with radioiodine for cancer detection does not appear to be necessary.

  7. Duodenal Atresia In Utero in Association With Down's Syndrome and Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Clark, John F.J.; Hales, Earle; Ma, Peter; Rosser, Samuel B.

    1984-01-01

    A 28-weeks' gestational trisomic-21 male, with duodenal atresia due to annular pancreas, is presented. The atresia was diagnosed in utero by sonographic techniques. A review of the pertinent literature and discussion of management are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:6231382

  8. Correlation of 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Clinical and Intraoperative Findings for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Arvind; Patil, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A single-center prospective study. Purpose A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is undeniably the gold standard for the diagnosis of a lumbar disc prolapse. Unfortunately it shares a strong association with incidental findings. In this study, we aimed to determine the extent to which a 1.5 Tesla MRI correlates with the clinical features and intraoperative findings in cases of lumbar disc prolapse. Overview of Literature Few studies have correlated MRI with clinical findings, and none have extended this correlation to intraoperative findings. Methods Over a 2-year period, 50 consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation requiring discectomy were studied. The MRI findings we observed consisted of the prolapse level, type, position, migration, high-intensity zones (HIZ), lateral recess, and foraminal stenosis. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the significance for the various MRI findings. Finally, the MRI observations were confirmed with intraoperative findings and inferences were drawn. Results MRI scan sensitivity and specificity for determining surgically significant levels was 100% and 94.94%, respectively. Straight leg raising test was positive in 74% of patients, with 85%, 43%, and 75% for paracentral, central, and foraminal levels, respectively. A foraminal compromise was the only MRI parameter to share a significant association with neurological deficits. Patients with a HIZ on the MRI had a significant increase in back pain and 63% exhibited identifiable annular tears intraoperatively. The intraoperative anatomical findings correlated extensively with the MRI findings. Conclusions MRI findings strongly correlate with intraoperative features and can serve as a useful tool when planning surgery due to the accurate depiction of the morphometric features. However, the decision for surgery should be made only when detailed clinical findings in conjunction with MRI findings allow for an accurate identification of the

  9. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  10. Melatonin, endocrine pancreas and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin influences insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. (i) The effects are MT(1)-and MT(2)-receptor-mediated. (ii) They are specific, high-affinity, pertussis-toxin-sensitive, G(i)-protein-coupled, leading to inhibition of the cAMP-pathway and decrease of insulin release. [Correction added after online publication 4 December 2007: in the preceding sentence, 'increase of insulin release' was changed to 'decrease of insulin release'.] Furthermore, melatonin inhibits the cGMP-pathway, possibly mediated by MT(2) receptors. In this way, melatonin likely inhibits insulin release. A third system, the IP(3)-pathway, is mediated by G(q)-proteins, phospholipase C and IP(3), which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, with a resultant increase in insulin. (iii) Insulin secretion in vivo, as well as from isolated islets, exhibits a circadian rhythm. This rhythm, which is apparently generated within the islets, is influenced by melatonin, which induces a phase shift in insulin secretion. (iv) Observation of the circadian expression of clock genes in the pancreas could possibly be an indication of the generation of circadian rhythms in the pancreatic islets themselves. (v) Melatonin influences diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances. The diabetogens, alloxan and streptozotocin, lead to selective destruction of beta-cells through their accumulation in these cells, where they induce the generation of ROS. Beta-cells are very susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity. Results suggest that melatonin in pharmacological doses provides protection against ROS. (vi) Finally, melatonin levels in plasma, as well as the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity, are lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic rats and humans. In contrast, in the pineal gland, the AANAT mRNA is increased and the insulin receptor mRNA is decreased, which indicates a close interrelationship between insulin and melatonin.

  11. Variability Is Not the Villain: Finding Patterns in Complex Natural Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinton, Brigette Adair; Curran, Mary Carla

    2015-01-01

    Everyone needs strong observational skills to solve challenging problems and make informed decisions. However, many students expect to find exact answers to their questions by using the internet and do not understand the role of uncertainty, especially in decision making and scientific research. Humans and other animals choose among many options…

  12. Clinical forensic radiology in strangulation victims: forensic expertise based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

    PubMed

    Yen, Kathrin; Vock, Peter; Christe, Andreas; Scheurer, Eva; Plattner, Thomas; Schön, Corinna; Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Beutler, Verena; Thali, Michael J; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2007-03-01

    Based on only one objective and several subjective signs, the forensic classification of strangulation incidents concerning their life-threatening quality can be problematic. Reflecting that it is almost impossible to detect internal injuries of the neck with the standard forensic external examination, we examined 14 persons who have survived manual and ligature strangulation or forearm choke holds using MRI technique (1.5-T scanner). Two clinical radiologists evaluated the neck findings independently. The danger to life was evaluated based on the "classical" external findings alone and in addition to the radiological data. We observed hemorrhaging in the subcutaneous fatty tissue of the neck in ten cases. Other frequent findings were hemorrhages of the neck and larynx muscles, the lymph nodes, the pharynx, and larynx soft tissues. Based on the classical forensic strangulation findings with MRI, eight of the cases were declared as life-endangering incidents, four of them without the presence of petechial hemorrhage but with further signs of impaired brain function due to hypoxia. The accuracy of future forensic classification of the danger to life will probably be increased when it is based not only on one objective and several subjective signs but also on the evidence of inner neck injuries. However, further prospective studies including larger cohorts are necessary to clarify the value of the inner neck injuries in the forensic classification of surviving strangulation victims.

  13. An Algorithm for Finding the Singleton Attractors and Pre-Images in Strong-Inhibition Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiwei; Zhan, Meng; Liu, Shuai; Fang, Zebo; Yao, Chenggui

    2016-01-01

    The detection of the singleton attractors is of great significance for the systematic study of genetic regulatory network. In this paper, we design an algorithm to compute the singleton attractors and pre-images of the strong-inhibition Boolean networks which is a biophysically plausible gene model. Our algorithm can not only identify accurately the singleton attractors, but also find easily the pre-images of the network. Based on extensive computational experiments, we show that the computational time of the algorithm is proportional to the number of the singleton attractors, which indicates the algorithm has much advantage in finding the singleton attractors for the networks with high average degree and less inhibitory interactions. Our algorithm may shed light on understanding the function and structure of the strong-inhibition Boolean networks.

  14. An Algorithm for Finding the Singleton Attractors and Pre-Images in Strong-Inhibition Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiwei; Zhan, Meng; Liu, Shuai; Fang, Zebo; Yao, Chenggui

    2016-01-01

    The detection of the singleton attractors is of great significance for the systematic study of genetic regulatory network. In this paper, we design an algorithm to compute the singleton attractors and pre-images of the strong-inhibition Boolean networks which is a biophysically plausible gene model. Our algorithm can not only identify accurately the singleton attractors, but also find easily the pre-images of the network. Based on extensive computational experiments, we show that the computational time of the algorithm is proportional to the number of the singleton attractors, which indicates the algorithm has much advantage in finding the singleton attractors for the networks with high average degree and less inhibitory interactions. Our algorithm may shed light on understanding the function and structure of the strong-inhibition Boolean networks. PMID:27861624

  15. Extrauterine Pelvic Serous Carcinomas: Current Update on Pathology and Cross-sectional Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Amanullah, Farhan S; Menias, Christine O; Chen, Melissa M; Valente, Philip T; Chintapalli, Kedar N; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas includes ovarian serous carcinoma, primary peritoneal serous carcinoma, and primary fallopian tube carcinoma. Ovarian serous carcinoma, the most common ovarian malignant epithelial neoplasm, consists of two distinct entities: high-grade and low-grade serous carcinomas. Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma and primary fallopian tube carcinoma are rare malignancies that share many characteristics of high-grade serous carcinomas. Recent advances in the genetics and molecular biology of gynecologic cancers have suggested a common origin of many extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas from fallopian tube epithelium. With the exception of low-grade serous carcinomas, which arise from cortical inclusion cysts lined by tubal epithelium, most extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas are believed to originate from serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas and show similar clinical-biologic behaviors and natural histories. Indeed, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Committee on Gynecologic Oncology recently recognized that these cancers should be considered collectively, with a common system of staging and management strategies for ovarian, primary peritoneal, and fallopian tube cancers. A paradigm shift has occurred in our understanding of the pathogenesis of extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas that has the potential to change current strategies for screening, prevention, diagnosis, and management. Ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and combined positron emission tomography and CT are pivotal in screening, initial diagnosis, and treatment follow-up; however, because of this paradigm shift, new radiologic techniques, such as contrast material-enhanced US and molecular US imaging, and various optical imaging techniques are being investigated as important screening and diagnostic tools. Because of evolving knowledge of genetic and molecular changes underlying the

  16. The case for pancreas after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Mangus, Richard S; Hollinger, Edward F; Taber, Tim E; Goble, Michelle L; Mohler, Elaine; Milgrom, Martin L; Powelson, John A

    2009-01-01

    Pancreas after kidney (PAK) transplantation has historically demonstrated inferior pancreas allograft survival compared to simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Under our current immunosuppression protocol, we have noted excellent outcomes and rare immunological graft loss. The goal of this study was to compare pancreas allograft survival in PAK and SPK recipients using this regimen. This was a single center retrospective review of all SPK and PAK transplants performed between January 2003 and November 2007. All transplants were performed with systemic venous drainage and enteric exocrine drainage. Immunosuppression included induction with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (thymoglobulin), early steroid withdrawal, and maintenance with tacrolimus and sirolimus or mycophenolate mofetil. Study end points included graft and patient survival and immunosuppression related complications. Transplants included PAK 61 (30%) and SPK 142 (70%). One-yr patient survival was PAK 98% and SPK 95% (p = 0.44) and pancreas graft survival was PAK 95% and SPK 90% (p = 0.28). Acute cellular rejection was uncommon with 2% requiring treatment in each group. Survival for PAK using thymoglobulin induction, early steroid withdrawal and tacrolimus-based immunosuppression is at least comparable to SPK and should be pursued in the recipient with a potential living donor.

  17. Progress and challenges of the bioartificial pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Patrick T. J.; Shah, Dishant K.; Garcia, Jacob A.; Bae, Chae Yun; Lim, Dong-Jin; Huiszoon, Ryan C.; Alexander, Grant C.; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has been validated as a treatment for type 1 diabetes since it maintains consistent and sustained type 1 diabetes reversal. However, one of the major challenges in pancreatic islet transplantation is the body's natural immune response to the implanted islets. Immunosuppressive drug treatment is the most popular immunomodulatory approach for islet graft survival. However, administration of immunosuppressive drugs gives rise to negative side effects, and long-term effects are not clearly understood. A bioartificial pancreas is a therapeutic approach to enable pancreatic islet transplantation without or with minimal immune suppression. The bioartificial pancreas encapsulates the pancreatic islets in a semi-permeable environment which protects islets from the body's immune responses, while allowing the permeation of insulin, oxygen, nutrients, and waste. Many groups have developed various types of the bioartificial pancreas and tested their efficacy in animal models. However, the clinical application of the bioartificial pancreas still requires further investigation. In this review, we discuss several types of bioartificial pancreases and address their advantages and limitations. We also discuss recent advances in bioartificial pancreas applications with microfluidic or micropatterning technology.

  18. Finding the location of the instantaneous center of rotation using a particle image velocimetry algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, Tom

    2017-03-01

    This work is about planar rigid-body kinematics and, in particular, the principle of the instantaneous center of rotation (IC). Using a computer simulated approach, a workflow is presented that results in a visual representation of the locus of the IC, based on particle image velocimetry (PIV). Here, a small number of digital animations of textured objects are created with multibody dynamics software, and later imported in PIV software to extract the velocity field (magnitude and direction) of objects moving within a plane. We believe the workflow presented may help learners improve their understanding of the concept of the IC, thus enhancing their knowledge of rigid body kinematics.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in substance abuse: alcohol and alcoholism and syndromes associated with alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, M Vittoria; Castillo, Mauricio; Rojas, Rafael; Palacios, Enrique; Frascheri, Laura; Descartes, Fernando

    2005-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is common among the population and results in significant diseases that shorten life span. Ethanol may result in chronic brain changes such as atrophy but may also result in neurologic disease that may be acute or chronic and sometimes life threatening. Accompanying vitamin deficiencies may lead to Wernicke's encephalopathy and changes in serum osmosis may lead to several acute demyelinating disorders. In addition, pregnant women who consume alcohol place their babies at high risk for the fetal alcohol syndrome. In this article we review these disorders and emphasize their imaging features.

  20. Evolution of pancreas in aging: degenerative variation or early changes of disease?

    PubMed

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic changes in aging have been described for many decades. They involve not only pancreatic parenchyma but also pancreatic ductal, microscopic, and exocrine functional changes. There have been many studies of these changes based on pathology and various imaging modalities, as well as functional studies. The pancreatic volume was found to decrease with advancing age, with a higher incidence of pancreatic steatosis, as demonstrated in autopsy and imaging studies. The pancreatic ductal structure has been described with wide ranges of normal variation, but many studies have shown a tendency toward enlargement with advancing age. By endoscopic ultrasound imaging, the aging pancreas may exhibit abnormal findings similar to chronic pancreatitis. Microscopically, there has been evidence of patchy lobular fibrosis and papillary hyperplasia and demonstrable k-ras mutation in both normal and dysplastic ductal mucosa. The evidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency has yielded conflicting results, but most studies have shown a tendency toward decreased pancreatic exocrine function in the elderly. Differentiating pancreatic change in the elderly from early chronic pancreatitis may be difficult as there are limited studies to compare these two conditions in terms of structural and functional changes.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Mumps Meningoencephalitis with Bilateral Hippocampal Lesions without Preceding Acute Parotitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ah Reum; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kang, Young Hye; Cho, Soon Gu; Choi, Seong Hye; Baek, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Meningitis is a common central nervous system (CNS) complication of the mumps, a viral infection, but encephalitis and meningoencephalitis are less common in mumps. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings of acute mumps meningoencephalitis in a 32-year-old male who showed bilateral hippocampal lesions without preceding parotitis. Although it is rare, hippocampal involvement should be considered a CNS complication of mumps infection. PMID:28246518

  2. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with similar genetic alterations to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuya, Akira; Kitamura, Shinji; Okamoto, Koichi; Kimura, Masako; Muguruma, Naoki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yoneda, Akiko; Bando, Yoshimi; Takishita, Makoto; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-08-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the pancreas is very rare, and its origin is not fully elucidated. Here, we present a case of a small-size NEC of the pancreas that is genetically similar to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma (IDA). A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to obstructive jaundice and found to have a 12-mm solid tumor in the pancreas head. The tumor exhibited low vascularity on enhanced computed tomography, and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic imaging revealed an irregular obstruction in a branch duct of the pancreas. The patient was thereby diagnosed with a pancreatic ductal cancer, and stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with regional lymph node resection was performed. Histochemical analysis of the resected tumor showed that the neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei strongly expressed chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The Ki-67 index was 40 % in the most proliferative tumor regions, and the tumor was diagnosed as a NEC of the pancreas. However, in the analysis of genetic alterations of the tumor tissue, the neoplastic cells showed altered KRAS, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, suggesting that the NEC in our case is genetically related to IDA. Our data suggest that poorly differentiated IDAs may transform into NECs.

  3. The human GLP-1 analogs liraglutide and semaglutide: absence of histopathological effects on the pancreas in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Thorup, Inger; Nyborg, Niels C Berg; Salanti, Zaki; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Larsen, Marianne O

    2014-07-01

    Increased pancreas mass and glucagon-positive adenomas have been suggested to be a risk associated with sitagliptin or exenatide therapy in humans. Novo Nordisk has conducted extensive toxicology studies, including data on pancreas weight and histology, in Cynomolgus monkeys dosed with two different human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. In a 52-week study with liraglutide, a dose-related increase in absolute pancreas weight was observed in female monkeys only. Such dose-related increase was not found in studies of 4, 13, or 87 weeks' duration. No treatment-related histopathological abnormalities were observed in any of the studies. Quantitative histology of the pancreas from the 52-week study showed an increase in the exocrine cell mass in liraglutide-dosed animals, with normal composition of endocrine and exocrine cellular compartments. Proliferation rate of the exocrine tissue was low and comparable between groups. Endocrine cell mass and proliferation rates were unaltered by liraglutide treatment. Semaglutide showed no increase in pancreas weight and no treatment-related histopathological findings in the pancreas after 13 or 52 weeks' dosing. Overall, results in 138 nonhuman primates showed no histopathological changes in the pancreas associated with liraglutide or semaglutide, two structurally different GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  4. Modified Bi-Rads Scoring of Breast Imaging Findings Improves Clinical Judgment.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Howard; Sheth, Pulin A; Parisky, Yuri R; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J; Sheth, Sindu; Tripathy, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    In contrast with the reporting requirements currently mandated under the Federal Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), we propose a modification of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (Bi-Rads) in which a concluding assessment category is assigned, not to the examination as a whole, but to every potentially malignant abnormality observed. This modification improves communication between the radiologist and the attending clinician, thereby facilitating clinical judgment leading to appropriate management. In patients with breast cancer eligible for breast conserving therapy, application of this modification brings to attention the necessity for such patients to undergo pretreatment biopsies of all secondary, synchronous ipsilateral lesions scored Bi-Rads 3-5. All contralateral secondary lesions scored Bi-Rads 3-5 also require pretreatment biopsies. The application of this modification of the MSQA demonstrates the necessity to alter current recommendations ("short-interval follow-up") for secondary, synchronous Bi-Rads 3 ("probably benign") image-detected abnormalities prior to treatment of the index malignancy.

  5. The prevalence of positive imaging findings on MRI scans ordered by chiropractic versus medical providers

    PubMed Central

    Morries, Larry; Yochum, Terry; Barry, Michael; Slizeski, John; Freuden, Donald; Danielson, Clark

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if there is a greater yield of pathological findings identified on MRI scans of patients referred by chiropractors as compared to those referred by allopathic providers. Methods MRI reports authored by medical radiologists from two independent MRI centers in the Denver metropolitan area were analyzed retrospectively for pathological data related to the spinal regions studied. A pathological report data sheet was used to record pathological findings in 22 different categories. A total of 150 reports from each provider group were reviewed. Results Of the 22 pathological conditions studied, a statistically significant difference between doctor of chiropractic and medical doctor referrers was identified in 4 categories: central spinal canal stenosis, lateral stenosis, facet arthrosis, and negative report. The most common primary diagnoses given for MRI referral were low back pain/sciatica, neck pain, and extremity pain. Seventy-four percent of the reports evaluated were performed on patients referred with a diagnosis of pain. In 3 of the 22 categories (14%), the medical doctors had a statistically higher pathological yield than the chiropractors. However, in 4 of the 22 categories (18%), the chiropractors had a statistically higher pathological yield. In 18 of the 22 categories (82%), there was no statistical difference between the two provider groups. Conclusion The data presented in this study suggests chiropractic and medical providers are compeer at ordering MRI for suspected pathological findings. PMID:19674677

  6. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: A classical presentation with unique paranuclear dot like immunostaining with CD 99.

    PubMed

    Nair Anila, Kunjulekshmi Amma Raveendran; Nayak, Nileena; Muralee, Madhu; Venugopal, Bhaskaran Pillai; Mony, Rari P

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and upper abdominal discomfort of 3 months duration. Her imaging studies done at a local hospital showed a solid-cystic mass involving head of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our surgical oncology department. On examination, there was a nontender mass in the epigastrium. An ultrasound scan guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was done which was showing classical features of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. With this preoperative diagnosis patient was taken up for surgery. Per operatively, there was a solid-cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was done. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed the diagnosis of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. Apart from the routine IHC panel, CD 99 immunostain was also done which demonstrated the characteristic paranuclear dot-like staining observed in previous studies in the literature.

  7. Efficacy of Repeat Review with Flexible Spectral Imaging Color Enhancement in Patients with no Findings by Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Minami-Kobayashi, Yuka; Yamada, Atsuo; Watabe, Hirotsugu; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: The efficacy of flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) ch. 1 (F1) for the detection of ulcerative lesions and angioectasias in the small intestine with capsule endoscopy (CE) has been reported. In the present study, we evaluated whether F1 could detect incremental findings in patients with no findings in a standard review mode. Patients and Methods: In total, 52 patients (age: 60.1 ± 15.3 years; 30 males) with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent CE and in whom no lesion was detected in the small intestine in the standard mode (first review) were enrolled. Two experienced endoscopists independently reviewed CE videos again by F1 (second review). The following findings were defined to be significant: Ulcers, erosions, aphthas, angioectasias, tumors, and bleeding. Incremental findings at the second review were checked at F1 and in standard mode by the two reviewers (third review). Finally, the findings were confirmed by the agreement of the two reviewers at the third review. Results: F1 detected five significant lesions in three patients with overt OGIB; three erosions, one aphtha, and one angioectasia. For nonsignificant lesions, F1 detected 12 red mucosas and 16 red spots. Moreover, 29 patients with 71 findings were considered false positives. Conclusion: F1 detected incremental significant findings in a small percentage of patients with no findings in the standard review mode. In addition, F1 showed many false-positive findings. The incremental effect of a repeated review by F1 in patients with no findings in the first review is limited. PMID:27748326

  8. Congenital Extrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts: Spectrum of Findings on Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sinha, Anindita; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Lal, Anupam; Debi, Uma; Thapa, Babu R.; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is a rare disorder characterised by partial or complete diversion of portomesenteric blood into systemic veins via congenital shunts. Type I is characterised by complete lack of intrahepatic portal venous blood flow due to an end to side fistula between main portal vein and the inferior vena cava. Type II on the other hand is characterised by partial preservation of portal blood supply to liver and side to side fistula between main portal vein or its branches and mesenteric, splenic, gastric, and systemic veins. The presentation of these patients is variable. Focal liver lesions, most commonly nodular regenerative hyperplasia, are an important clue to the underlying condition. This pictorial essay covers imaging characteristics in abdominopelvic region. PMID:26858845

  9. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) findings following pediatric non-penetrating TBI: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R M; Mathias, J L; Rose, S E

    2014-01-01

    This study meta-analyzed research examining Diffusion Tensor Imaging following pediatric non-penetrating traumatic brain injury to identify the location and extent of white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) data from 20 studies were analyzed. FA increased and ADC decreased in most white matter tracts in the short-term (moderate-to-large effects), and FA decreased and ADC increased in the medium- to long-term (moderate-to-very-large effects). Whole brain (short-term), cerebellum and corpus callosum (medium- to long-term) FA values have diagnostic potential, but the impact of age/developmental stage and injury severity on FA/ADC, and the predictive value, is unclear.

  10. Bringing the artificial pancreas home: telemedicine aspects.

    PubMed

    Lanzola, Giordano; Capozzi, Davide; Serina, Nadia; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2011-11-01

    The design and implementation of telemedicine systems able to support the artificial pancreas need careful choices to cope with technological requirements while preserving performance and decision support capabilities. This article addresses the issue of designing a general architecture for the telemedicine components of an artificial pancreas and illustrates a viable solution that is able to deal with different use cases and is amenable to support mobile-health implementations. The goal is to enforce interoperability among the components of the architecture and guarantee maximum flexibility for the ensuing implementations. Thus, the design stresses modularity and separation of concerns along with adoption of clearly defined protocols for interconnecting the necessary components. This accounts for the implementation of integrated telemedicine systems suitable as short-term monitoring devices for supporting validation of closed-loop algorithms as well as devices meant to provide a lifelong tighter control on the patient state once the artificial pancreas has become the preferred treatment for patients with diabetes.

  11. Conservative Pancreas Graft Preservation at the Extreme

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Jerome Martin; Sapisochin, Gonzalo; Selzner, Markus; Norgate, Andrea; Kumar, Deepali; McGilvary, Ian D.; Preig, Paul D.; Schiff, Jeffrey; Cattral, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the value some patients place in remaining insulin-independent after pancreas transplantation, they may be reluctant to undergo graft pancreatectomy, even in the face of extreme complications, such as graft thrombosis and duodenal segment leak. Partly, for this reason, a variety of complex salvage techniques have been described to save the graft in such circumstances. We report a case of a series of extreme complications related to a leak from the duodenal segment after a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant. These included infected thrombosis of the inferior vena cava associated with a graft venous thrombosis and a retroperitoneal fistula. The patient retained graft function with insulin independence and repeatedly declined graft pancreatectomy against the advice of the transplant team. Conservative treatment with percutaneous drainage, antibiotics, and anticoagulation was eventually successful. This outcome is unique in our experience and may be instructive to teams caring for pancreas transplant recipients. PMID:27500244

  12. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas.

  13. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  14. Age-related macular degeneration: clinical findings, histopathology and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Zarbin, Marco A; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among people over age 55 years in industrialized countries. Known major risk factors for AMD include: age >55 years, history of smoking, white race, and mutations in various components of the complement system. Early AMD is characterized by the presence of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities. Late AMD is associated with central visual loss and is characterized by the presence of choroidal neovascularization and/or geographic atrophy. Early AMD is associated with a number of biochemical abnormalities including oxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, complement deposition in the RPE-Bruch's membrane-choriocapillaris complex, lipidization of Bruch's membrane, and extracellular matrix abnormalities (e.g. collagen crosslinking, advanced glycation end product formation). Antiangiogenic drugs block the vascular leakage associated with choroidal new vessels, thus reducing retinal edema and stabilizing or restoring vision. At this time, there are no proven effective treatments for the nonexudative complications of AMD. Modern ocular imaging technologies (including spectral domain and phase variance optical coherence tomography, short- and long-wavelength fundus autofluorescence, adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and near-infrared reflectance) enable one to follow changes in the RPE, photoreceptors, and choriocapillaris quantitatively as the disease progresses. In addition, one can quantitatively assess the volume of drusen and areas of atrophy. These data, when correlated with the known histopathology of AMD, may provide useful measures of treatment efficacy that are likely to be more sensitive and reproducible than conventional end points such as visual acuity and rate of enlargement of geographic atrophy. As a result, these imaging technologies may be valuable in assessing the effects of cell-based therapy for patients with AMD.

  15. Intraoperative Localization of Insulinoma and Normal Pancreas using Invisible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Light

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Joshua; Choi, Hak Soo; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Colson, Yolonda L.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, such as insulinoma, are difficult to localize and complete resection is essential for cure. Our hypothesis is that a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore exhibiting uptake in insulinoma could provide high sensitivity detection intraoperatively. Methods: The optical properties of methylene blue (MB) were measured in vitro in 100% serum at 37°C, and in vivo after tissue uptake. MB was injected as a rapid intravenous bolus at doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 mg/kg into wildtype rats and pigs, and into insulinoma-bearing transgenic mice. The FLARE™ imaging system was used to acquire color video and NIR fluorescence images simultaneously, and in real-time. The signal-to-background ratios (SBR) of tissues and tumors were quantified using FLARE™ software. Results: When appropriately diluted, MB exhibits moderate NIR fluorescence emission peaking at 688 nm. At doses ≥ 1 mg/kg, certain normal tissues, such as pancreas, accumulate MB and remain NIR fluorescent for up to 1 hr with an SBR ≥ 1.6. MB spectral properties are maintained after uptake into tissue. Interestingly, insulinoma exhibits even higher uptake for MB than normal pancreas, resulting in insulinoma-to-pancreas ratios of 3.7 and insulinoma-to-muscle ratios of 16.2. MB permitted high-sensitivity, real-time localization of primary, multi-centric, and metastatic insulinoma, and permitted differentiation among tumor, normal pancreas, and other abdominal structures. Conclusion: A single intravenous injection of a clinically available, commonly used NIR fluorophore provides prolonged intraoperative localization of normal pancreas and insulinoma using invisible NIR fluorescent light. PMID:20033320

  16. F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m sulfur colloid SPECT imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of a case of dual solitary fibrous tumors of the retroperitoneum and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Javad; Subhawong, Andrea; Durand, Daniel James

    2012-03-01

    Although FDG PET is increasingly used for the staging of many types of sarcoma, little has been written regarding the FDG PET imaging characteristics of solitary fibrous tumor. We report a patient undergoing FDG PET/CT surveillance for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue who was incidentally found to have two soft tissue masses in the retroperitoneum and pancreatic tail. Due to their low degree of FDG avidity, they were followed conservatively for approximately one year as they gradually increased in size. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid SPECT helped confirm that the pancreatic tail mass was not a splenule, after which both lesions were surgically resected and found to be extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors without malignant features. These findings suggest that, as with other low-grade sarcomas, benign extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors exhibit relatively little glycolytic metabolism in vivo.

  17. Neutropenic enterocolitis in children and young adults with cancer: prognostic value of clinical and image findings.

    PubMed

    Rizzatti, Marcelo; Brandalise, Silvia Regina; de Azevedo, Amilcar Cardoso; Pinheiro, Vitória Régia Pereira; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2010-09-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens can result in severe toxicities, particularly those that involve the digestive systems, leading to morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. Acute enterocolitis can be a frequent complication. The authors performed a retrospective review or patients treated at their institution to ascertain the prognostic value of the clinical symptoms and signs of acute enterocolitis, the corresponding abdominal ultrasonographic findings, and the impact of previous chemotherapy. Amongst 1159 patients with cancer treated at the Centro Infantil Boldrini from 2003 to 2007, 188 (16.2%) patients had 1 or more episode of enterocolitis. An intestinal wall thickness of >or=3 mm on ultrasound was considered diagnostic of enterocolitis. There were 231 episodes of enterocolitis with a death rate of 11.7%. Previous therapy with cytarabine and the presence of abdominal distention affected survival. An intestinal wall thickness of >or=10 mm in the ultrasonographic examination was associated with greater mortality. In multivariate analysis, age, gender, tumor type, degree of neutropenia, intestinal wall thickness, and number of intestinal segments were not statistically significant difference. In children and young adults with cancer and enterocolitis, the clinical findings of 4 or more symptoms and presence of abdominal distention were associated with higher risk of death. Use of cytarabine and an intestinal wall thickness of >or=10 mm were associated with a higher death rate.

  18. Circumportal pancreas with retroportal main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Ross, Andrew S; Traverso, L William

    2009-08-01

    There have been 6 cases of circumportal pancreas reported, and 2 of them had the main pancreatic duct in a retroportal dorsal portion. This extremely uncommon anomaly is asymptomatic and therefore incidentally discovered. For the surgeon, it is important to discover this during pancreatic resection so the pancreatic duct can be closed and fistula is avoided. We describe the third case where a circumportal pancreas had its main pancreatic duct passing under the portal vein. The duct was identified and ligated. A fistula did not occur.

  19. Retrieval of the pancreas allograft for whole-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Powelson, John A; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Burke, George W; Sageshima, Junichiro; Rogers, Jeffrey; Stratta, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Proper pancreas retrieval during multi-organ recovery is one of the cornerstones of technically successful whole-organ pancreas transplantation. With evolving surgical approaches for organ retrieval and implantation, it has become standard to procure the pancreas in conjunction with other abdominal organs without compromising either vasculature, graft quality, or transplant outcomes. This review summarizes the major steps required for proper whole-organ retrieval of the pancreas allograft with suggestions and tips whenever alternative approaches are available.

  20. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis: unique symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings: case report.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomohiro; Koyanagi, Izumi; Kaneko, Takahisa; Yoneta, Akihiro; Keira, Yoshiko; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Hyperhidrosis is caused by a sympathetic dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Intramedullary spinal cord lesions can be a cause of hyperhidrosis. The authors report a rare case of intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis. This 16-year-old boy presented with abnormal sweating on the right side of the neck, chest, and the right arm that had been occurring for 6 years. Neurological examination revealed mild motor weakness of the right lower extremity and slightly decreased sensation in the left lower extremity. Hyperhidrosis was observed in the right C3-T8 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intramedullary tumor at the right side of the spinal cord at the T2-3 level. The tumor showed partial enhancement after Gd administration. The patient underwent removal of the tumor via hemilaminectomy of T2-3. Only subtotal resection was achieved because the margins of the tumor were unclear. Histopathological examination revealed ganglioglioma. Hyperhidrosis gradually improved after surgery. Hyperhidrosis is a rare clinical manifestation of intramedullary spinal cord tumors, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The location of the tumor origin, around the right gray matter of the lateral spinal cord, may account for the hyperhidrosis as the initial symptom in this patient. Physicians should examine the spinal cord using MRI studies when a patient has hyperhidrosis with some motor or sensory symptoms of the extremities.

  1. Imaging findings of malignant bilateral carotid body tumors: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LV, HAN; CHEN, XIAOHONG; ZHOU, SHUAI; CUI, SUPING; BAI, YUNLONG; WANG, ZHENCHANG

    2016-01-01

    Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are a rare type of extra-adrenal paraganglioma, which originate from the carotid body. A 29-year-old woman was admitted to the Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital (Capital Medical University, Beijing, China) with hoarseness of the throat, which had progressively worsened over seven months. The patient had a family history of CBTs. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging revealed multiple well-enhanced masses located at the bilateral carotid bifurcation and in the left parapharyngeal space. Surgery and pathological examination confirmed that the patient had developed regional lymph node metastasis. Significantly enhanced multiple pulmonary and hepatic lesions indicated that the patient had also developed distal metastasis. A genetic analysis performed on the family members of the patient revealed that the family carried a mutated succinate dehydrogenase D gene. In the present study, a systemic review of the literature indicated that extra vigilance is required in familial forms of CBT, in order to increase the standard of treatment for CBT patients. PMID:27073498

  2. [Resection of the remnant pancreas for recurrent pancreatic cancer after distal pancreatectomy-a case report].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shoichi; Sho, Masayuki; Akahori, Takahiro; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Hokutoh, Daisuke; Yasuda, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    The standard treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy. The effect of surgical resection for localized recurrence in the remnant pancreas after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer is unknown, but is reported to have a moderately good outcome in a few reports. We herein report a case of curative resection for recurrence in the remnant pancreas, 24 months after distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer. A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with pancreas tail cancer. Neoadjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy[ weekly full-dose gemcitabine(GEM) and radiation therapy 50 Gy/25 Fr] was followed by distal pancreatectomy. Postoperative adjuvant therapy with hepatic arterial infusion of 5-FU and systemic GEM therapy was completed. Twenty-four months after surgery, follow-up computed tomography scan results showed a lesion of 15-mm diameter in the remnant pancreas. Resection of the remnant pancreas was performed. The pathological findings showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, morphologically similar to the primary pancreatic cancer. Six months following surgery, there are no signs of recurrence at present.

  3. Prenatal Diagnosis of Annular Pancreas: Reliability of the Double Bubble Sign with Periduodenal Hyperechogenic Band

    PubMed Central

    Dankovcik, Robert; Jirasek, Jan E.; Kucera, Eduard; Feyereisl, Jaroslav; Radonak, Jozef; Dudas, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the power of prenatal 2-D ultrasound examination in the 2nd trimester as a method of choice for accurate diagnosis of annular pancreas. Methods Co-incidence of the double bubble sign (often accompanying gastroduodenal dilatation) together with a hyperechogenic band around the duodenum (corresponding with the tissue of annular pancreas) was used as a diagnostic criterion. Findings from postnatal surgery served for verification. Results From 7,897 screened pregnancies, annular pancreas was proven in the cases where both signs were present, but never without the hyperechogenic band (N1 = 3, N2 = 3, p ≤ 0.05). Sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusions More multicentric studies are required to test this approach. The following diagnostic strategy is reasonable at the present time: when the double bubble sign is discovered, always suspect annular pancreas and look for the second sign: hyperechogenic bands around the duodenum. Also look for known associated anomalies, and vice versa, if any of associated anomalies are noted, also search specifically for the signs of annular pancreas. PMID:19047797

  4. Primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas in a single center over 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yu, Shuangni; Wang, Wenze; Cheng, Yin; Xiao, Yu; Lu, Zhaohui; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In total, 95% of primary tumors in the pancreas are epithelial tumors; primary mesenchymal tumors at this site are extremely rare. At present, only one comprehensive study about these rare tumors has been performed. Another retrospective analysis of these rare tumors is performed in the present study, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first to be performed in China. In the present study, 10 patients that underwent resection for primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas were identified in a 15-year period at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, which accounted for 0.51% of the total surgically resected primary tumors of the pancreas at this hospital. Among the 10 patients, 7 patients (70%) were diagnosed with benign/borderline tumors, and the remaining 3 patients (30%) were diagnosed with malignant tumors. It was a unique finding of the present study that the preoperative diagnosis was frequently a misdiagnosis, in terms of the specific pathological diagnosis. Therefore, although primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas are extremely rare, they should be considered in order to make the correct preoperative diagnosis. Contrarily to a previous study, in the present study, the most common benign tumor was not desmoid tumor, but solitary fibrous tumors; the most frequent primary sarcoma was not undifferentiated/unclassified sarcoma either. In conclusion, the present study aids the understanding of these rare tumors; however, primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas require additional exploration in the future. PMID:27895766

  5. Memory for famous faces and the temporal pole: functional imaging findings in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Griffith, H Randall; Richardson, Elizabeth; Pyzalski, Robert W; Bell, Brian; Dow, Christian; Hermann, Bruce P; Seidenberg, Michael

    2006-08-01

    The ability to recognize, name, and provide information about famous persons is deficient in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), although the neural basis for these deficits is not well understood. We examined the relationship of resting metabolism of the temporal poles, as determined by [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, to performance on a task of famous face recognition, naming, and generation of semantic information in 12 patients with TLE. Correlations between metabolic measures of the temporal poles and performance on the Famous Faces Task revealed strong relationships between all aspects of the Famous Faces Task and the left temporal pole, whereas Famous Faces Task correlations with the right temporal pole were not significant. These findings indicate that the left temporal pole is associated with lexical and semantic retrieval of knowledge of famous persons in patients with TLE. Further study appears warranted to elucidate the networks involved in semantic knowledge for famous faces.

  6. Discoscopic Findings of High Signal Intensity Zones on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Kosuke; Tonogai, Ichiro; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Suzue, Naoto; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Sato, Ryosuke; Kondo, Kenji; Tezuka, Fumitake; Mineta, Kazuaki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Egawa, Hiroshi; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old man underwent radiofrequency thermal annuloplasty (TA) with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (PED) under local anesthesia for chronic low back pain. His diagnosis was discogenic pain with a high signal intensity zone (HIZ) in the posterior corner of the L4-5 disc. Flexion pain was sporadic, and steroid injection was given twice for severe pain. After the third episode of strong pain, PED and TA were conducted. The discoscope was inserted into the posterior annulus and revealed a migrated white nucleus pulposus which was stained blue. Then, after moving the discoscope to the site of the HIZ, a migrated slightly red nucleus pulposus was found, suggesting inflammation and/or new vessels penetrating the mass. After removing the fragment, the HIZ site was ablated by TA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the discoscopic findings of HIZ of the lumbar intervertebral disc. PMID:24963428

  7. Finding imaging patterns of structural covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA.

  8. Angiography, scintigraphy, intraosseous pressure, and histologic findings in high-risk osteonecrotic femoral heads with negative magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Koo, K H; Kim, R; Cho, S H; Song, H R; Lee, G; Ko, G H

    1994-11-01

    One hundred twenty-six hips of 68 patients who were suspected of having osteonecrosis or being at risk for osteonecrosis were studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Abnormal patterns on MR imaging characteristic of osteonecrosis were observed in 98 hips. The remaining 28 hips (22 patients) with negative MR images underwent superselective angiography of the medial femoral circumflex artery. Angiography showed interruption of the superior retinacular arteries in 13 hips (12 patients), including 6 of 7 symptomatic hips. Bone scans were performed on 8 of 13 hips angiographically positive for osteonecrosis. Decrease of radionuclide uptake (cold lesions) was observed in all 8 of these femoral heads. Thirteen femoral heads with interruption of superior retinacular arteries underwent intraosseous pressure measurement and core biopsy. Intraosseous pressure was elevated in 11 hips. The results of histologic study showed evidence of early necrosis in 10 femoral heads. This study indicates that there are a considerable number of femoral heads at high risk, even when they have negative MR images. They do, however, show positive findings on angiography, scintigraphy (cold lesions), intraosseous pressure measurement, and histologic study.

  9. Extraction of structural and chemical information from high angle annular dark-field image by an improved peaks finding method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenhao; Huang, Rong; Qi, Ruijuan; Duan, Chungang

    2016-09-01

    With the development of spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high angle annular dark filed (HAADF) imaging technique has been widely applied in the microstructure characterization of various advanced materials with atomic resolution. However, current qualitative interpretation of the HAADF image is not enough to extract all the useful information. Here a modified peaks finding method was proposed to quantify the HAADF-STEM image to extract structural and chemical information. Firstly, an automatic segmentation technique including numerical filters and watershed algorithm was used to define the sub-areas for each atomic column. Then a 2D Gaussian fitting was carried out to determine the atomic column positions precisely, which provides the geometric information at the unit-cell scale. Furthermore, a self-adaptive integration based on the column position and the covariance of statistical Gaussian distribution were performed. The integrated intensities show very high sensitivity on the mean atomic number with improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Consequently, the polarization map and strain distributions were rebuilt from a HAADF-STEM image of the rhombohedral and tetragonal BiFeO3 interface and a MnO2 monolayer in LaAlO3 /SrMnO3 /SrTiO3 heterostructure was discerned from its neighbor TiO2 layers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:820-826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Post-primary students' images of mathematics: findings from a survey of Irish ordinary level mathematics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Ciara; Stynes, Martin; O'Donoghue, John

    2016-10-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out as part of a PhD research study to investigate the image of mathematics held by post-primary students in Ireland. The study focused on students in fifth year of post-primary education studying ordinary level mathematics for the Irish Leaving Certificate examination - the final examination for students in second-level or post-primary education. At the time this study was conducted, ordinary level mathematics students constituted approximately 72% of Leaving Certificate students. Students were aged between 15 and 18 years. A definition for 'image of mathematics' was adapted from Lim and Wilson, with image of mathematics hypothesized as comprising attitudes, beliefs, self-concept, motivation, emotions and past experiences of mathematics. A questionnaire was composed incorporating 84 fixed-response items chosen from eight pre-established scales by Aiken, Fennema and Sherman, Gourgey and Schoenfeld. This paper focuses on the findings from the questionnaire survey. Students' images of mathematics are compared with regard to gender, type of post-primary school attended and prior mathematical achievement.

  11. TU-F-BRF-06: 3D Pancreas MRI Segmentation Using Dictionary Learning and Manifold Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, S; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recent advent of MRI guided radiotherapy machines has lent an exciting platform for soft tissue target localization during treatment. However, tools to efficiently utilize MRI images for such purpose have not been developed. Specifically, to efficiently quantify the organ motion, we develop an automated segmentation method using dictionary learning and manifold clustering (DLMC). Methods: Fast 3D HASTE and VIBE MR images of 2 healthy volunteers and 3 patients were acquired. A bounding box was defined to include pancreas and surrounding normal organs including the liver, duodenum and stomach. The first slice of the MRI was used for dictionary learning based on mean-shift clustering and K-SVD sparse representation. Subsequent images were iteratively reconstructed until the error is less than a preset threshold. The preliminarily segmentation was subject to the constraints of manifold clustering. The segmentation results were compared with the mean shift merging (MSM), level set (LS) and manual segmentation methods. Results: DLMC resulted in consistently higher accuracy and robustness than comparing methods. Using manual contours as the ground truth, the mean Dices indices for all subjects are 0.54, 0.56 and 0.67 for MSM, LS and DLMC, respectively based on the HASTE image. The mean Dices indices are 0.70, 0.77 and 0.79 for the three methods based on VIBE images. DLMC is clearly more robust on the patients with the diseased pancreas while LS and MSM tend to over-segment the pancreas. DLMC also achieved higher sensitivity (0.80) and specificity (0.99) combining both imaging techniques. LS achieved equivalent sensitivity on VIBE images but was more computationally inefficient. Conclusion: We showed that pancreas and surrounding normal organs can be reliably segmented based on fast MRI using DLMC. This method will facilitate both planning volume definition and imaging guidance during treatment.

  12. Lumbar disc herniation: Is there an association between histological and magnetic resonance imaging findings?

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Shiju A; Seshadrinath, N Arun Kumar; Binoy, Kavitha Ravi; Raji, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although validated radiological scoring systems and histological scoring system of surgically removed degenerated disc are used in assessment of progression of intervertebral disc degeneration, there have not been many studies that integrate these two aspects of assessments. The data available in this respect are very limited. This clinical study was designed to find the correlation between quantitative radiological score (Pfirmann grading system and Modic changes [MC]) and quantitative histological degeneration score (HDS). Materials and Methods: A cohort of 77 patients (45 males, 32 females; mean age of 38 years [range 18–58 years]) who presented with complaints of discogenic pain or radiculopathy at single level were assessed radiologically. They were graded according to the radiological pattern. The surgically excised disc specimen was graded according to HDS. The degree of radiological changes were correlated with the degree of histological changes. Results: Though the overall HDS (0–15) did not show statistically significant correlation with Pfirmann grading system, there were positive association found between mucoid degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation with the Pfirmann grading and mucoid degeneration, which were statistically significant. Female sex also had a higher association with instability pattern. Conclusion: The study shows that the Pfirmann grading system, MCs and HDS can reliably be used as scoring systems for assessing lumbar disc degeneration. The radiological assessment can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess the probable change in content rather than the microstructure of a disc undergoing degeneration. PMID:27293282

  13. Methodology for the assessment of the relationship between structural and functional imaging findings in neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Griselda J.; Furuie, Sergio S.; Busatto, Geraldo F.

    2003-05-01

    Using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), we have implemented methods to investigate the relation between findings from structural MRI and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) SPECT performed in groups of subjects with neuropsychiatric disorders and healthy controls. Using a MATLAB program developed and integrated into SPM, suited means of gray matter values (MGM) were calculated in regions relevant to the disorder in question, and linearly correlated with rCBF values from the same patients. In a study of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), patients showed a focus of increased MGM in the right putamen relative to controls. MGM from the putamen were significantly inversely correlated with rCBF measures in regions critical to OCD, mainly the anterior cingulate gyrus. These results are consistent with the notion that an imbalance of cortico-striatal circuits is relevant to OCD pathophysiology. In a study of Alzheimer's disease (AD), foci of decreased gray matter in patients relative to controls were identified bilaterally in the hippocampus. In AD patients, reduced hippocampal MGM correlated significantly with decreased rCBF during a memory task, in a network of regions usually involved in memory processes. An inverse correlation with frontal rCBF was also observed, suggesting compensatory efforts of executive regions during the memory task.

  14. Intra-Hepatic Spillage of Gallstones as a Late Complication of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: MR Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ragozzino, Alfonso; Puglia, Marta; Romano, Federica; Imbriaco, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Spillage of gallstones in the abdominal cavity may rarely occur during the course of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Dropped gallstones in the peritoneal and extra-peritoneal cavity are usually asymptomatic. However, they may lead to abscess formation with an estimated incidence of about 0.3%. Common locations of the abscess are in the abdominal wall followed by the intra-abdominal cavity, usually in the sub-hepatic or retro-peritoneum inferior to the sub-hepatic space. Case Report We hereby describe an unusual case of infected spilled gallstones in the right sub-phrenic space, prospectively detected on abdominal MRI performed two years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, in a patient with only a mild right-sided abdominal complaint. Conclusions This case highlights the role of MRI in suggesting the right diagnosis in cases with vague or even absent symptomatology. In our case the patient’s history together with high quality abdomen MRI allowed the correct diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware of this rare and late onset complication, even after many years from surgery as an incidental finding in almost asymptomatic patients. PMID:27471576

  15. Dynamic enhanced computed tomography imaging findings of an inflammatory fibroid polyp with massive fibrosis in the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Eun Jung; Ahn, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Seong Jin; Kim, Youn Wha

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp (IFP) is a rare benign lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of computed tomography (CT) imaging finding of a gastric IFP with massive fibrosis. CT scans showed thickening of submucosal layer with overlying mucosal hyperenhancement in the gastric antrum. The submucosal layer showed increased enhancement on delayed phase imaging. An antrectomy with gastroduodenostomy was performed because gastric cancer was suspected, particularly signet ring cell carcinoma. The histopathological diagnosis was an IFP with massive fibrosis. The authors suggest that when the submucosal layer of the gastric wall is markedly thickened with delayed enhancement and preservation of the mucosal layer, an IFP with massive fibrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:28373777

  16. Distinct enhancers of ptf1a mediate specification and expansion of ventral pancreas in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pashos, Evanthia; Park, Joon Tae; Leach, Steven; Fisher, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Development of the pancreas and cerebellum require Pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (Ptf1a), which encodes a subunit of the transcription factor complex PTF1. Ptf1a is required in succession for specification of the pancreas, proper allocation of pancreatic progenitors to endocrine and exocrine fates, and the production of digestive enzymes from the exocrine acini. In several neuronal structures, including the cerebellum, hindbrain, retina and spinal cord, Ptf1a is transiently expressed and promotes inhibitory neuron fates at the expense of excitatory fates. Transcription of Ptf1a in mouse is maintained in part by PTF1 acting on an upstream autoregulatory enhancer. However, the transcription factors and enhancers that initially activate Ptf1a expression in the pancreas and in certain structures of the nervous system have not yet been identified. Here we describe a zebrafish autoregulatory element, conserved among teleosts, with activity similar to that described in mouse. In addition, we performed a comprehensive survey of all non-coding sequences in a 67 kilobase interval encompassing zebrafish ptf1a, and identified several neuronal enhancers, and an enhancer active in the ventral pancreas prior to activation of the autoregulatory enhancer. To test the requirement for autoregulatory control during pancreatic development, we restored ptf1a function through BAC transgenesis in ptf1a morphants, either with an intact BAC or one lacking the autoregulatory enhancer. We find that ptf1a autoregulation is required for development of the exocrine pancreas and full rescue of the ptf1a morphant phenotype. Similarly, we demonstrate that a ptf1a locus lacking the early enhancer region is also capable of rescue, but only supports formation of a hypoplastic exocrine pancreas. Through our dissection of the complex regulatory control of ptf1a, we identified separate cis–regulatory elements that underlie different aspects of its expression and function, and further

  17. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors of the pancreas in children

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsien-Kuan; Lin, Yung-Cheng; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Chen, Yaw-Sen; Su, Yu-Tsun; Tsai, Ching-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are an uncommon neoplasm, which are very rarely located in the pancreas. Clinically and radiologically, this rare pancreatic tumor presents as an abdominal mass lesion that mimics other pancreatic tumors, and should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Clinical Findings and diagnosis: The 15-year-old boy complained of abdominal pain over the left upper quadrant with intermittent fever for 7 days. Abdominal sonography revealed one cystic lesion with a hyperechoic component in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Surgical excision was performed and postoperative findings indicated a pancreatic tail tumor. The pathology indicated inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors. To our knowledge, this patient is a unique case as the tumor was located in the pancreatic tail only, sparing the body. Interventions and outcomes: The patient underwent tumor resection and segmental resection of the transverse colon with simple closure. The patient had no evidence of disease recurrence at 3 years follow-up. Conclusion: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors of the pancreas in children are extremely rare. Surgical excision is the standard treatment, and corticosteroids use in children need more large-scale studies. PMID:28079824

  18. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1−/− embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1−/− microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1−/− epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis. PMID:26657766

  19. Imaging astrocytosis with PET in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: case report with histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Henry; Nennesmo, Inger; Kumlien, Eva; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Lundberg, PO; Savitcheva, Irina; Långström, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, patients with suspect Creutzfeldt-Jakob’s disease (CJD) have been examined with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combining N-[11C-methyl]-L-deuterodeprenyl (DED) and [18F] 2- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in an attempt to detect astrocytosis and neuronal dysfunction, two of the hallmarks in CJD. Increased DED uptake with pronounced hypometabolism matching the areas with high DED retention was found in the fronto-parieto-occipital areas and cerebellum of patients with confirmed CJD. However, the temporal lobes did not present such a pattern. In 6 of the 15 examined patients the autopsy was performed, but a strict comparison between the PET results and the histopathology could not be done. Recently, one patient with suspect CJD was examined with PET using DED and FDG. The results of the examinations in this patient showed a pattern similar to that found in the brain of the CJD patients from the first study. The patient died shortly after the examination and an autopsy could be performed. The autopsy showed neuronal death, astrocytosis and spongiform changes in the brain. The diagnosis of definite sporadic CJD was established by the Western blot analysis, confirming the presence of the prion resistant protein (PrPres). The PET data demonstrated high DED uptake and extreme low glucose uptake in the left brain hemisphere whereas the right side was less affected. The autopsy was performed allowing the comparison between high DED uptake and the histopathological findings of reactive astrocytosis revealed by immunostaining with antibodies against glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP). The results confirmed the presence of a pattern with high ratio DED/FDG, similar to that found in the previous study and revealing for the first time, a good correlation between high DED uptake and high density of reactive astrocytes as demonstrated by immunostaining. PMID:22567182

  20. [Pancreas divisum: endoscopic management. Case report].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Henry; Espinoza, Miguel; Huaman, César; Monge, Eduardo; Salazar, Sonia; Tapia, Abel

    2002-01-01

    This is a case report of a 19 year-old woman, with an acute recurrent pancreatitis diagnose, and pancreas divisum as anatomic alteration. An extensive evaluation including specialized labs, ERCP was done. The diagnosis is suspected during ERCP and confirmed by minor papilla injection. Treatment is directed towards relieving outflow obstruction at the level of the minor papilla, with successful results.

  1. Concurrent Diffuse Pyelonephritis and Prostatitis: Discordant Findings on Sequential FDG PET/CT and 67Ga SPECT/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lucaj, Robert; Achong, Dwight M

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old man underwent FDG PET/CT for initial imaging evaluation of recurrent Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, which demonstrated no significant FDG uptake in either kidney and subtle FDG uptake in the right prostate lobe. Subsequent Ga SPECT/CT demonstrated abnormal intense gallium uptake throughout the right kidney and entire prostate gland, clearly discordant with PET/CT findings and consistent with unexpected concurrent pyelonephritis and prostatitis. Although FDG has effectively replaced Ga in everyday clinical practice, the current case serves as a reminder that there is still a role for Ga in the evaluation of genitourinary infections.

  2. SPECT imaging of Moyamoya disease using /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO. Comparison with computed tomography findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mountz, J.M.; Foster, N.L.; Ackermann, R.J.; Bluemlein, L.; Petry, N.A.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1988-10-01

    /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO was used to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in a 26-year-old woman with Moyamoya disease. This patient had an 18-month history of recurrent neurologic deficits and had angiographic evidence of Moyamoya disease. She had used oral contraceptives and cigarettes, but had no other risk factors for stroke. Single photon emission computed tomographic images showed bilateral and asymmetric reductions in blood flow to anterior and lateral brain regions. These findings correlated better with clinical symptomatology and suggested more extensive brain involvement than did computed tomography.

  3. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS-MULTIMODALITY FINDINGS IN AN ADULT DOG WITH PRIMARY SARCOMA OF THE PULMONARY ARTERY AND MYOCARDIAL METASTASES.

    PubMed

    Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Bottorff, Bryan; Sisson, David; Löhr, Christiane V

    2016-07-01

    Intravascular pulmonary artery sarcomas in combination with myocardial metastasis are rare in dogs. We describe the radiographic, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic-gated (ECG-gated) computed tomographic angiography (CTA) findings in a dog with pulmonary artery sarcoma. All imaging studies demonstrated severe main pulmonary artery enlargement. Echocardiography and ECG-gated CTA revealed a mass occluding the lumen of the right pulmonary artery. In addition, CTA revealed focal left ventricular myocardial contrast enhancement and parenchymal lung changes. Postmortem examination confirmed the presence of a large thrombus associated with arteriosclerosis and an intravascular sarcoma in the right pulmonary artery with metastases to the myocardium, lungs and brain.

  4. Cystic and ductal tumors of the pancreas: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Scoazec, J Y; Vullierme, M P; Barthet, M; Gonzalez, J M; Sauvanet, A

    2013-04-01

    Incidentally discovered cystic tumors of the pancreas (CTP) are an increasingly frequent entity. It is essential to differentiate lesions whose malignant potential is either nil or negligible (pseudocyst, serous cystadenoma, simple cysts) from lesions with intermediate malignant potential (intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas [IPMN] involving the secondary ducts, cystic endocrine tumor) or those with high malignant potential (mucinous cystadenoma, solid pseudopapillary tumors and IPMN involving the main pancreatic duct). The approach to defining malignant potential is based on diagnostic CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), often complemented by EUS-guided cyst puncture for biochemical and cytological analysis of cyst fluid. Surgery for diagnostic purposes should be avoided because of its significant morbidity. For pseudocysts, simple cysts and serous cystadenomas, abstention is the general rule. Resection, preserving as much pancreatic parenchyma as possible, is the rule for IPMN involving the main pancreatic duct, mucinous cystadenomas, solid and pseudopapillary tumors, and cystic endocrine tumors. Resection is rarely indicated at the outset for IPMN involving secondary pancreatic ducts; morphologic observation is the general rule and preventive excision may be indicated secondarily. Good collaboration between surgeons, radiologists and endosonographists is necessary for optimal management of CTP.

  5. Pancreas transplantation. An immunohistologic and histopathologic examination of 100 grafts.

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, R. K.; Sutherland, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined tissues obtained by biopsy, pancreatectomy, and autopsy from 100 pancreas grafts to determine the cause of dysfunction or failure of the graft. Immunohistologic examination of 42 tissues to determine the mononuclear cell phenotypes and Class I and II antigen expression was performed as well. Technical factors--infections, thrombosis, obstruction--accounted for a large number of graft losses, but immunologic-mediated mechanisms resulted in graft dysfunction and failure as well. Pleomorphic inflammatory infiltrates were present in grafts with acute rejection, as well as Silastic and Prolamine duct-obstructed grafts. Criteria useful in the identification of acute rejection from pancreatitis included a more intense, predominantly mononuclear cell infiltration of transformed lymphocytes in the exocrine pancreas and evidence of vascular rejection--endovasculitis or fibrinoid necrosis. Increased expression and/or induction of Class I and II antigens on pancreatic constituents occurred in grafts with evidence of acute rejection, but also with Silastic and prolamine duct-obstructed pancreatitis. An isletitis occurred in 25% of the grafts. Nine of the 25 grafts (36%) with isletitis also had selective loss of beta cells from the islets. Recurrent diabetes mellitus appeared to have developed in these cases, which accounted for loss of graft function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3037911

  6. Pancreas After Islet Transplantation: A First Report of the International Pancreas Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, R W G; Gruessner, A C

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas after islet (PAI) transplantation is a treatment option for patients seeking insulin independence through a whole-organ transplant after a failed cellular transplant. This report from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) studied PAI transplant outcomes over a 10-year time period. Forty recipients of a failed alloislet transplant subsequently underwent pancreas transplant alone (50%), pancreas after previous kidney transplant (22.5%), or simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplant (27.5%). Graft and patient survival rates were not statistically significantly different compared with matched primary pancreas transplants. Regardless of the recipient category, overall 1- and 5-year PAI patient survival rates for all 40 cases were 97% and 83%, respectively; graft survival rates were 84% and 65%, respectively. A failed previous islet transplant had no negative impact on kidney graft survival in the SPK category: It was the same as for primary SPK transplants. According to this IPTR/UNOS analysis, a PAI transplant is a safe procedure with low recipient mortality, high graft-function rates in both the short and long term and excellent kidney graft outcomes. Patients with a failed islet transplant should know about this alternative in their quest for insulin independence through transplantation.

  7. Important nonurgent imaging findings: use of a hybrid digital and administrative support tool for facilitating clinician communication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Evan; Sanger, Joseph; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    A departmental tool that provides a digital/administrative solution for communication of important imaging findings was evaluated. The tool allows the radiologist to click a button to mark an examination for ordering physician follow-up with subsequent fax and confirmation. The tool's log was reviewed. Of 466 entries; 99.4% were successfully faxed with phone confirmation. Most common reasons for usage were lung nodule/mass (29.2%) and osseous fracture (12.4%). Subsequent clinical action was documented in 41.0% of entries. Our data show the reliability of the tool in assisting the communication of findings, as well as providing documentation of notification, with minimal workflow disruption.

  8. Relationship Between Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Findings and Cognition Following Pediatric TBI: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rachel M.; Mathias, Jane L.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study meta-analyzed research examining relationships between diffusion tensor imaging and cognition following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from 14 studies that correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) or apparent diffusion coefficient/mean diffusivity with cognition were analyzed. Short-term (<4 weeks post-TBI) findings were inconsistent, but, in the medium to long term, FA values for numerous large white matter tracts and the whole brain were related to cognition. However, the analyses were limited by the diversity of brain regions and cognitive outcomes that have been examined; all in relatively small samples. Moreover, additional data are needed to investigate the impact of age and injury severity on these findings. PMID:27232263

  9. Relationship Between Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Findings and Cognition Following Pediatric TBI: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel M; Mathias, Jane L; Rose, Stephen E

    2016-04-01

    This study meta-analyzed research examining relationships between diffusion tensor imaging and cognition following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from 14 studies that correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) or apparent diffusion coefficient/mean diffusivity with cognition were analyzed. Short-term (<4 weeks post-TBI) findings were inconsistent, but, in the medium to long term, FA values for numerous large white matter tracts and the whole brain were related to cognition. However, the analyses were limited by the diversity of brain regions and cognitive outcomes that have been examined; all in relatively small samples. Moreover, additional data are needed to investigate the impact of age and injury severity on these findings.

  10. Serous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas: clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Choi, Hyejeong; Balci, Serdar; Akkas, Gizem; Adsay, Volkan

    2014-11-01

    We herein summarize the pathology and most recent advances in the molecular genetics of serous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. They typically present as relatively large, well-demarcated tumors (mean size, 6cm), predominantly occurring in females. Pre-operative diagnosis remains challenging; imaging findings and cyst fluid analysis often prove non-specific and fine-needle aspiration often does not yield diagnostic cells. Pathologically, they are characterized by a distinctive cytology referred to as "serous." Although they have ductal differentiation, they distinctly lack the mucin production that characterizes most other pancreatic ductal tumors, including ductal adenocarcinoma and its variants, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN). They instead produce abundant glycogen (glycogen-rich adenoma). Serous cystadenomas also lack the molecular alterations that characterize ductal neoplasms, such as mutation of KRAS (high prevalence in most mucinous ductal neoplasms), inactivation of SMAD4 (seen in ductal adenocarcinomas), and mutations in GNAS (seen in some IPMNs) and RNF43 (detected in MCNs and IPMNs). Instead, new molecular and immunohistochemical observations place serous pancreatic tumors closer to "clear cell neoplasms" seen in various other organs that are associated with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway, such as clear cell renal cell carcinomas and capillary hemangioblastomas. Patients with VHL syndrome have an increased risk of developing serous pancreatic tumors and somatic mutations of the VHL gene are common in these tumors along with modification of its downstream effectors including hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1), glucose uptake and transporter-1 (GLUT-1), a common factor in clear cell (glycogen-rich) tumors, as well as expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thought to be a factor in the striking capillarization of serous cystadenomas and other non-pancreatic clear cell tumors. VEGF may

  11. Volumetric Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Pediatric Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Fatima; Ras, Johan; Seedat, Soraya

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) studies of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are limited. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have been best studied in this regard. We systematically reviewed structural neuroimaging findings in pediatric PTSD and OCD. Methods: The literature was reviewed for all sMRI studies examining volumetric parameters using PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsychInfo databases, with no limit on the time frame of publication. Nine studies in pediatric PTSD and six in OCD were suitable for inclusion. Results: Volumetric findings were inconsistent in both disorders. In PTSD, findings suggest increased as well as decreased volumes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and corpus callosum; whilst in OCD studies indicate volumetric increase of the putamen, with inconsistent findings for the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and frontal regions. Conclusions: Methodological differences may account for some of this inconsistency and additional volume-based studies in pediatric anxiety disorders using more uniform approaches are needed. PMID:23272001

  12. Fetal neuroblastoma: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the prenatal and postnatal IV-S stage

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Davaus, Taisa

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a fetus with an ultrasonography diagnosis of a neuroblastoma during a routine third trimester fetal scan, which presented as a hyperechogenic nodule located above the right kidney. No other abnormalities were found in the ultrasonography scan; however, the follow-up ultrasonography during the 36th week of gestation revealed that the lesion had doubled in size. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a round mass in the topography of the right adrenal gland with a low signal on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal on T2-weighted images, causing a slight inferior displacement of the kidney. The liver had enlarged and had heterogeneous signal intensity, predominantly hypointense on T2-weighted sequences. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of congenital adrenal neuroblastoma with liver metastases was suggested. A newborn male was delivered by cesarean section 2 weeks later. The physical examination of the neonate revealed abdominal distention and hepatomegaly. The infant had a clinical follow-up in which no surgical or medical intervention was required. At 5 months of age, the infant was asymptomatic with a normal physical examination. PMID:27668206

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of remnants of an intradural oil-based contrast agent: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myint; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Myodil (iophendylate), an oil-based positive contrast media, now discontinued, was widely used for performing myelography 30–70 years ago. We identified this agent as the explanation for uncommon magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a patient with thoracic spinal fracture. Design Case report and literature review. Findings An 81-year-old man complained of back pain after falling down stairs. Anamnesis revealed that he had undergone myelography with an oil-based contrast agent about 60 years previously as a part of the diagnostic workup for back pain and sudden onset of gait difficulty. Plain radiography of the thoraco-lumbar spine showed a fracture of the eleventh thoracic vertebra and a radio-opaque, oval shadow at the level of the T9–T10 vertebrae. Many small radio-opaque dots with the appearance of a string of pearls were seen from T8 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed a sharply demarcated intradural extramedullary mass, of approximately 5 mm in diameter on the left side of the dura in the region of the T9–T10. The mass showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI, and low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. Conclusions Increased awareness of this rare presentation of procedures performed in the past is essential when atypical radiographic images are encountered. This case illustrates rare sequelae of Myodil use manifesting decades after administration. PMID:22333888

  14. Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and White Matter Abnormality Findings in Service Members With Persistent Cognitive Symptoms Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tate, David F; Gusman, Maria; Kini, Jonathan; Reid, Matthew; Velez, Carmen S; Drennon, Ann Marie; Cooper, Douglas B; Kennedy, Jan E; Bowles, Amy O; Bigler, Erin D; Lewis, Jeffrey D; Ritter, John; York, Gerald E

    2017-03-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a major health concern among active duty service members and Veterans returning from combat operations, and it can result in variable clinical and cognitive outcomes. Identifying biomarkers that can improve diagnosis and prognostication has been at the forefront of recent research efforts. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of abnormalities identified using more traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences such as fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) to more advanced MRI sequences such as susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) among a cohort of active duty service members experiencing persistent cognitive symptoms after mTBI. One-hundred and fifty-two active duty service members (77 mTBI, 58 orthopedically injured [OI] only, 17 post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD] only) underwent MRI and neuropsychological evaluation at a large military treatment facility. Results demonstrated that FLAIR white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were present in all three groups at statistically similar rates (41% mTBI, 49% OI, and 29% PTSD). With the exception of a single OI participant showing a small discrete SWI lesion, SWI abnormalities were overwhelmingly present in mTBI patients (22% mTBI, 1% OI, and 0% PTSD). Functionally, mTBI participants with and without SWI abnormalities did not differ in demographics, symptom reporting, or cognitive performance. However, mTBI participants with and without WMH did differ for on measures of working memory with the mTBI participants with WMH having worse cognitive performance. No other significant differences were noted for those participants with and without imaging abnormalities for either the OI or PTSD only cohorts. These results appear to illustrate the sensitivity and specificity of SWI findings though these results did not have any significant functional impact in this cohort. In contrast, WMHs noted on FLAIR imaging were not sensitive or

  15. Hyperintense vessels on acute stroke Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery imaging: Associations with clinical and other MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bastian; Ebinger, Martin; Kufner, Anna; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C.; Christensen, Soren; Warach, Steve; Luby, Marie; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fiehler, Jens; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperintense vessels (HV) have been observed in Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) imaging of patients with acute ischemic stroke and been linked to slow flow in collateral arterial circulation. Given the potential importance of HV, we used a large, multicentre dataset of stroke patients to clarify which clinical and imaging factors play a role in HV. Methods We analyzed data of 516 patients from the previously published PRE-FLAIR study. Patients were studied by MRI within 12 hours of symptom onset. HV were defined as hyperintensities in FLAIR corresponding to the typical course of a blood vessel that was not considered the proximal, occluded main artery ipsilateral to the diffusion restriction. Presence of HV was rated by two observers and related to clinical and imaging findings. Results Presence of HV was identified in 240 of all 516 patients (47%). Patients with HV showed larger initial ischemic lesion volumes (median 12.3 vs. 4.9 ml; p<0.001) and a more severe clinical impairment (median NIHSS 10.5 vs. 6; p<0.001). In 198 patients with MR-angiography, HV were found in 80% of patients with vessel occlusion and in 17% without vessel occlusion. In a multivariable logistic regression model, vessel occlusion was associated with HV (OR 21.7%; 95% CI 9.6–49.9, p < 0.001). HV detected vessel occlusion with a specificity of 0.86 (95% CI 0.80–0.90) and sensitivity of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69–0.83). Conclusions HV are a common finding associated with proximal arterial occlusions and more severe strokes. HV predict arterial occlusion with high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:22933582

  16. Presumptive acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion in 11 cats: clinical features, diagnostic imaging findings, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Brown, Frances E; De Decker, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic imaging findings, treatment and outcome in cats diagnosed with presumptive acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion. Methods Medical records and imaging studies of cats diagnosed with presumptive acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion were retrospectively reviewed. Information on long-term outcome was acquired from patient records and from either owners or referring veterinary surgeons via a telephone questionnaire. Results Eleven cats met the inclusion criteria. All cats had a peracute onset of clinical signs, with eight cats experiencing witnessed (n = 6) or suspected (n = 2) external trauma based on imaging findings. Neuroanatomical localisation included C1-C5 (n = 1), T3-L3 (n = 7) and L4-S3 (n = 3) spinal cord segments. MRI revealed acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusions located at C3-C4 (n = 1), T12-T13 (n = 1), T13-L1 (n = 1), L1-L2 (n = 1), L3-L4 (n = 3), L4-L5 (n = 1) and L5-L6 intervertebral disc spaces (n = 3). Treatment included supportive care and 10 cats were discharged with a median hospitalisation time of 10 days (range 3-26 days). One cat was euthanased during hospitalisation owing to complications unrelated to neurological disease. All cats that presented as non-ambulatory regained an ambulatory status with the median time to ambulation of 17 days (range 6-21 days). Overall, the outcome for cats diagnosed with acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion was successful, with almost 90% returning to ambulation with urinary and faecal continence. Conclusions and relevance The majority of cats diagnosed with acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion had good outcomes. Acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion should be considered as a differential diagnosis for cats presenting with peracute onset of spinal cord dysfunction, particularly if there is a clinical history or evidence of trauma.

  17. Roles of Commensal Microbiota in Pancreas Homeostasis and Pancreatic Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Lopes, Camila; Velloso, Fernando J.; Campopiano, Julia C.; Sogayar, Mari C.; Correa, Ricardo G.

    2015-01-01

    The pancreas plays a central role in metabolism, allowing ingested food to be converted and used as fuel by the cells throughout the body. On the other hand, the pancreas may be affected by devastating diseases, such as pancreatitis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC), and diabetes mellitus (DM), which generally results in a wide metabolic imbalance. The causes for the development and progression of these diseases are still controversial; therefore it is essential to better understand the underlying mechanisms which compromise the pancreatic homeostasis. The interest in the study of the commensal microbiome increased extensively in recent years, when many discoveries have illustrated its central role in both human physiology and maintenance of homeostasis. Further understanding of the involvement of the microbiome during the development of pathological conditions is critical for the improvement of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the present review, we discuss recent findings on the behavior and functions played by the microbiota in major pancreatic diseases and provide further insights into its potential roles in the maintenance of pancreatic steady-state activities. PMID:26347203

  18. Formation of Collateral Veins in a Graft Pancreas After a Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, B H; Lee, H Y; Park, Y M; Yang, K H; Ryu, J H; Chu, C W

    2015-09-01

    A graft vein thrombosis is the main cause of early graft failure after pancreas transplantation. We report a case of formation of collateral veins in a graft pancreas after transplant. A 30-year-old woman underwent simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation. She was discharged 16 days after the operation with good pancreas and kidney function. A total occlusion of the portal vein was discovered on computed tomography (CT) performed at an outpatient clinic. She had no symptoms or signs of hyperglycemia. Venography was attempted for vein thrombectomy but failed. After 2 weeks of heparinization therapy, the edema disappeared and perfusion of the graft pancreas improved. However, the thrombotic occlusion was not resolved on CT. Arteriography of the Y-graft revealed collateral veins. She was discharged with warfarin. She is currently doing well without any symptoms or signs. This is the first reported case of collateral vein formation in a grafted pancreas after pancreas transplantation.

  19. High-caloric and chocolate stimuli processing in healthy humans: an integration of functional imaging and electrophysiological findings.

    PubMed

    Asmaro, Deyar; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-10

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding how the human brain processes appetitive food cues, and knowing how such cues elicit craving responses is particularly relevant when current eating behavior trends within Westernized societies are considered. One substance that holds a special place with regard to food preference is chocolate, and studies that used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have identified neural regions and electrical signatures that are elicited by chocolate cue presentations. This review will examine fMRI and ERP findings from studies that used high-caloric food and chocolate cues as stimuli, with a focus on responses observed in samples of healthy participants, as opposed to those with eating-related pathology. The utility of using high-caloric and chocolate stimuli as a means of understanding the human reward system will also be highlighted, as these findings may be particularly important for understanding processes related to pathological overeating and addiction to illicit substances. Finally, research from our own lab that focused on chocolate stimulus processing in chocolate cravers and non-cravers will be discussed, as the approach used may help bridge fMRI and ERP findings so that a more complete understanding of appetitive stimulus processing in the temporal and spatial domains may be established.

  20. High-Caloric and Chocolate Stimuli Processing in Healthy Humans: An Integration of Functional Imaging and Electrophysiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Asmaro, Deyar; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding how the human brain processes appetitive food cues, and knowing how such cues elicit craving responses is particularly relevant when current eating behavior trends within Westernized societies are considered. One substance that holds a special place with regard to food preference is chocolate, and studies that used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have identified neural regions and electrical signatures that are elicited by chocolate cue presentations. This review will examine fMRI and ERP findings from studies that used high-caloric food and chocolate cues as stimuli, with a focus on responses observed in samples of healthy participants, as opposed to those with eating-related pathology. The utility of using high-caloric and chocolate stimuli as a means of understanding the human reward system will also be highlighted, as these findings may be particularly important for understanding processes related to pathological overeating and addiction to illicit substances. Finally, research from our own lab that focused on chocolate stimulus processing in chocolate cravers and non-cravers will be discussed, as the approach used may help bridge fMRI and ERP findings so that a more complete understanding of appetitive stimulus processing in the temporal and spatial domains may be established. PMID:24434747

  1. Postradiation changes in tissues: evaluation by imaging studies with emphasis on fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography and correlation with histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Domachevsky, Liran; Jacene, Heather A; Sakellis, Christopher G; Kim, Chun K

    2014-04-01

    Efforts have been made to minimize the damage to adjacent normal tissues during radiotherapy, primarily by shifting from the use of conventional radiotherapy to more advanced techniques. Reviewing the overall pattern on combined anatomic and functional imaging can enhance diagnostic accuracy. Several radiotracers can be used; [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose is the most common. Familiarity with the type and timing of previous radiation therapy, the spectrum of imaging findings after radiation injury, and the appropriate use of the different radiotracers can be crucial. This article summarizes postradiation histologic findings and multimodality imaging findings, with emphasis on PET/computed tomography.

  2. Assessment of atrial septal defect morphology by transthoracic three dimensional echocardiography using standard grey scale and Doppler myocardial imaging techniques: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative findings

    PubMed Central

    Lange, A.; Walayat, M.; Turnbull, C.; Palka, P.; Mankad, P.; Sutherland, G.; Godman, M.

    1997-01-01

    Objective—To determine whether transthoracic three dimensional echocardiography is an accurate non-invasive technique for defining the morphology of atrial septal defects (ASD).
Methods—In 34 patients with secundum ASD, mean (SD) age 20 (17) years (14 male, 20 female), the measurements obtained from three dimensional echocardiography were compared to those obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or surgery. Three dimensional images were constructed to simulate the ASD view as seen by a surgeon. Measured variables were: maximum and minimum vertical and horizontal ASD dimension, and distances to inferior and superior vena cava, coronary sinus, and tricuspid valve. In each patient two ultrasound techniques were used to acquire three dimensional data: standard grey scale imaging (GSI) and Doppler myocardial imaging (DMI). 
Results—Good correlation was found in maximum ASD dimension (both horizontal and vertical) between three dimensional echocardiography and both MRI (GSI r = 0.96, SEE = 0.05 cm; DMI r = 0.97, SEE = 0.04 cm) and surgery (GSI r = 0.92, SEE = 0.06 cm; DMI r = 0.95, SEE = 0.06 cm). The systematic error was similar for both three dimensional techniques when compared to both MRI (GSI = 0.40 cm (27%); DMI = 0.38 cm (25%)) and surgery (GSI = 0.50 cm (29%); DMI = 0.37 cm (22%)). A significant difference was found in both horizontal and vertical ASD dimension changes during the cardiac cycle. This change was inversely correlated with age. These findings were consistent for both DMI and GSI technique. In children (age ⩽ 17 years), the feasibility of detecting structures and undertaking measurements was similar for both echo techniques. However, in adult ASD patients (age ⩾ 18 years) this feasibility was higher for DMI than for GSI.
Conclusions—Transthoracic three dimensional imaging using both GSI and DMI accurately displayed the varying morphology, dimensions, and spatial relations of ASD. However

  3. The first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation: outcome at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Vouillarmet, J; Buron, F; Houzard, C; Carlier, M C; Chauvet, C; Brunet, M; Thivolet, C; Morelon, E; Badet, L

    2013-07-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare but life-threatening disease. Replacement therapy sometimes fails to prevent an acute adrenal crisis and most often does not lead to restoration of well-being. We report here the 1-year outcome of the first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation in a 33-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes and concomitant autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. En bloc left adrenal gland and kidney grafts were anastomosed on the left iliac vessels in normal vascular conditions and the pancreas graft was anastomosed on the right iliac vessels. The immunosuppressive regimen was not modified by the addition of the adrenal gland. We observed no additional morbidity due to the adrenal gland transplantation, as there were no surgical complications. One-year kidney and pancreas graft functions were satisfactory (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 55 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and HbA1c: 4.8%). The adrenal graft functioned well at 12 months with a normalization of cortisol and aldosterone baseline levels. Functional imaging at 3 months showed good uptake of [(123) I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine by the adrenal graft. Transplantation of the adrenal gland en bloc with the left kidney appears to be a good therapeutic option in patients with adrenal insufficiency awaiting kidney or kidney-pancreas transplantation.

  4. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of human pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n = 12) with storage phosphor autoradiography using radioligands. CCK-B receptors, present in control pancreata, were not detected in any of the pancreatic cancers. BBS receptors were visualized in control pancreata, but they were absent in 10 of 12 pancreatic cancers. In 5 of 12 pancreatic cancers, receptors for secretin were visualized, while binding for secretin was present in all tumour-free pancreata. Conversely, no specific binding of VIP was detected in control pancreata but was identified in 3 of 12 pancreatic cancer specimens. It is concluded that the expression of gut peptide receptors in pancreatic cancer differs from that in tumour-free pancreas. Receptors for these peptides are present in only a minority of pancreatic cancer specimens. Images Figure 1 PMID:9166939

  5. Cystic dystrophy of the gastric and duodenal wall developing in heterotopic pancreas: an unrecognised entity.

    PubMed Central

    Fléjou, J F; Potet, F; Molas, G; Bernades, P; Amouyal, P; Fékété, F

    1993-01-01

    Ten patients in whom cystic dystrophy developed in a heterotopic pancreas of the duodenal (nine patients) or gastric (one patient) wall are reported. All were young or middle aged white men, only two of whom were alcoholic. The symptoms were caused by intestinal or biliary stenosis, or both, secondary to the inflammation and fibrosis. Only endosonography provided strong evidence for the diagnosis in three patients. All patients underwent surgery: a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in eight patients. The surgical specimen showed cystic lesions of the gut wall, occurring in inflammatory and fibrous heterotopic pancreatic tissue. The pancreas proper was normal in all patients. It is suggested that cystic dystrophy is an uncommon and serious complication of heterotopic pancreas. Similar cases associated with chronic pancreatitis of the pancreas have been observed and it is suggested that this process could be responsible for some of the chronic pancreatitis encountered in young, non-alcoholic patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8097180

  6. Incidental finding of an extensive oropharyngeal mass in magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with temporomandibular disorder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Omolehinwa, Temitope T.; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe the incidental finding of an oropharyngeal mass in a patient who presented with a chief complaint of temporomandibular pain. The patient was initially evaluated by an otorhinolaryngologist for complaints of headaches, earache, and sinus congestion. Due to worsening headaches and trismus, he was further referred for the management of temporomandibular disorder. The clinical evaluation was uneventful except for limited mouth opening (trismus). An advanced radiological evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal region. The mass occupied the masticatory space and extended superioinferiorly from the skull base to the mandible. A diagnostic biopsy of the lesion revealed a long-standing human papilloma virus (HPV-16)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. This case illustrates the need for the timely radiological evaluation of seemingly innocuous orofacial pain. PMID:28035308

  7. [Intracranial chondroma arising from the skull base: two case reports featuring the image findings for differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Sakata, Katsumi; Kanno, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-05-01

    We reported two cases of intracranial skull base chondroma and discussed the differential diagnosis and the treatment strategies. The first case was a 39-year-old male who presented with left exophtalmos, visual loss and oculomotor disturbance. MRI showed a huge tumor occupying the bilateral cavernous sinus. Partial removal of the tumor was performed through the left orbitozygomatic subtemporal approach. The second case was a 54-year-old male who presented with left hemiparesis. MRI showed a brain stem infarction with a huge tumor located at the right middle fossa. Partial removal was performed through the right orbitozygomatic subtemporal approach. In these two cases, the histopathological diagnosis of the tumors was benign chondroma and the size of residual tumors have not changed for one year without any additional therapy. Although preoperative definite diagnosis for skull base chondromas is difficult, strategies for diagnosis and treatment without any complication are essential. In our cases, chondromas showed low uptake in PET images, which might be useful for differentiation between chondromas and chordomas. The current popular surgical approach for parasellar tumors is transcranial such as the orbitozygomatic subtemporal approach. In surgical removal of skull base chondromas, it is advisable to try to confirm the diagnosis preoperatively with characteristic image findings and to consider the best approach in each case to decompress the involved nerves without any complications.

  8. An integrated multivariable artificial pancreas control system.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system.

  9. Multiple Intraglandular Metastases in a Patient with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shinichi; Onaya, Hiroaki; Kishi, Yoji; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Arai, Yasuaki

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for an evaluation of pancreatic lesions. Computed tomography revealed a hypoattenuating tumor in the head of the pancreas, with three other tumors detected in the body and tail. Magnetic resonance imaging showed similar enhancement patterns and signal intensities in all four lesions. The patient underwent total pancreatectomy based on a preoperative diagnosis of multiple invasive ductal carcinomas. Histopathologically, the lesion in the pancreatic head was considered to be the primary lesion, while the others were diagnosed as metastases. This is a rare case of pancreatic cancer with intraglandular metastases. The possibility of this differential diagnosis should thus be considered when imaging shows multiple hypovascular lesions in the pancreas.

  10. Bamboo Leaf Sign as a Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding in Spinal Subependymoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yukari; Kinoshita, Keita; Hirai, Satoshi; Takai, Hiroki; Hara, Keijiro; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Matsubara, Shunji; Uno, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Importance. Subependymoma occurs very rarely in the spinal cord. We report another case of spinal subependymoma along with a review of the literature and discussion of a radiological finding that is useful for preoperative diagnosis of this tumor. Clinical Presentation. A 51-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of progressive muscle weakness in the right lower extremity. Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed spinal cord expansion at the Th7–12 vertebral level. Surgical resection was performed and the tumor was found to involve predominantly subpial growth. Histological diagnosis was subependymoma, classified as Grade I according to criteria of World Health Organization. We made an important discovery of what seems to be a characteristic appearance for spinal subependymoma on sagittal MRI. Swelling of the spinal cord is extremely steep, providing unusually large fusiform dilatation resembling a bamboo leaf. We have termed this characteristic MRI appearance as the “bamboo leaf sign.” This characteristic was apparent in 76.2% of cases of spinal subependymoma for which MRI findings were reported. Conclusion. The bamboo leaf sign on spinal MRI is useful for differentiating between subependymoma and other intramedullary tumors. Neurosurgeons encountering the bamboo leaf sign on spinal MRI should consider the possibility of subependymoma. PMID:28074165

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with delusional disorder due to diffuse cerebrovascular disease: a report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Su, K P; Hsu, C Y; Hsieh, S C; Shen, W W

    2001-04-01

    Delusions associated with cerebrovascular diseases have been sporadically reported. Although both psychiatrists and neurologists attempted to link delusions with anatomical locations of the brain lesion, comorbid psychiatric and neurological disorders make the interpretation of delusions difficult. The purpose of the present paper is to report the clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics in patients with delusional disorder due to diffuse cerebrovascular diseases, and to redefine the concept of 'vascular delusion'. The clinical features and MRI findings were reviewed retrospectively in a series of seven patients with 'delusional disorder due to cerebrovascular disease' as defined in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSMIV). The average age of onset is 64. No patient had a prior personal or family history of major psychiatric illness. The illness is presented as acute, subacute or stepwise course. Hypertension was present in all patients. Two had diabetes mellitus, and one had atrial fibrillation. Three had clinical evidence of previous cerebrovascular attacks, only one showed minor neurological deficits. Three had diffuse cortical slow wave in electroencephalogram. No patient had significant cognitive impairment but had multiple cortical and subcortical cerebrovascular lesions in MRI, with white-matter lesions (WML) in bilateral frontal areas. Delusional disorder due to diffuse cerebrovascular change is characterized by late-onset, stepwise course, and comorbid medical and neurological diseases. The results of vascular changes in the present study did not establish a cause-effect relationship and should be considered as multifactorial in pathogenesis. The findings suggested the hypothesis of neural circuit theory. Further studies in larger numbers of patients and newer neuroimaging techniques are needed to expand the knowledge learned from these findings.

  12. Endoscopic findings using narrow-band imaging to distinguish between basal cell hyperplasia and carcinoma of the pharynx.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Atsushi; Fujii, Satoshi; Yano, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Narrow-band imaging (NBI) has been reported to be useful for detecting superficial-type esophageal or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and in the present study we have used NBI to detect non-carcinomatous lesions, such as basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) accompanied by microvascular irregularities; these non-carcinomatous lesions were pathologically discriminated from squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx. The aim of the present study was to clarify the endoscopic characteristics of BCH that contribute to the discrimination of superficial-type head and neck SCC (HNSCC). We examined the key endoscopic findings capable of distinguishing BCH from SCC using 26 BCH and 37 superficial-type SCC of the pharynx that had been pathologically diagnosed at our institution between January 2008 and July 2012. The clinicopathological factors were also compared. The size of the BCH lesions was significantly smaller (P < 0.001), and their intervascular transparency was more clearly observed (P < 0.001). Intra-epithelial papillary capillary loop (IPCL) shapes were less variable and monotonous (P < 0.001), and the distribution of the IPCL was more regular with an interval comparable to that of SCC (P < 0.001), although no significant differences in the sharpness of the lesion border, dilatation of IPCL and tortuosity of the IPCL were seen between the BCH and SCC lesions. This study revealed that BCH was an independent entity in terms of not only pathological findings, but also endoscopic findings observed using NBI, such as the regular distribution of IPCL and the preserved intervascular transparency.

  13. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature. PMID:27358679

  14. Pancreatic hamartoma, a rare benign disease of the pancreas: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANWEI; WANG, HUI; TANG, XIAOLONG; JIANG, QINGLONG; WANG, CHENGFENG

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic hamartoma is an extremely rare, non-neoplastic, mass-forming lesion that may be mistaken for malignancy, and the pre-operative diagnosis is particularly challenging. The published literature contains only 23 cases of pancreatic hamartoma. The majority of the cases reported patients with a single benign tumor-like disease that received a pancreatectomy. Immunohistochemical findings confirmed the diagnosis following surgery. The current study reports the case of a 53-year-old female who presented to the Department of Abdominal Surgery, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Cancer Hospital (Beijing, China), due to abdominal pain. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 22×14-mm mass in the head of the pancreas. The patient was pre-operatively diagnosed with a pancreatic space-occupying lesion, and subsequently underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The post-operative course was uneventful. Histological examination of the resected lesion resulted in a diagnosis of pancreatic hamartoma. There were no signs of recurrence at 55 months post-surgery. PMID:27313718

  15. ADAPTATION OF GROUP B COXSACKIE VIRUS TO ADULT MOUSE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    Dalldorf, Gilbert; Gifford, Rebecca

    1952-01-01

    An alteration of tissue tropism of a Coxsackie virus has been observed following different methods of propagation of the virus in animals. Tropism for the adult mouse pancreas, as described by Pappenheimer, appeared to be irrevocably lost following prolonged brain-to-brain transfer. It was present in the same strain on reisolation from human feces, was intensified following pancreas transfers, and suppressed by brain transfers. Pancreatotropism may be correlated with the titer of virus in the pancreas. PMID:13000059

  16. Inflammation, regeneration, and transformation in the pancreas: results of the Collaborative Research Center 518 (SFB 518) at the University of Ulm.

    PubMed

    Giehl, Klaudia; Bachem, Max; Beil, Michael; Böhm, Bernhard O; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fulda, Simone; Gress, Thomas M; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Kestler, Hans A; Kornmann, Marko; Menke, Andre; Möller, Peter; Oswald, Franz; Schmid, Roland M; Schmidt, Volker; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz; Wagner, Martin; Walther, Paul; Wirth, Thomas; Adler, Guido

    2011-05-01

    The primary diseases of the pancreas include diabetes mellitus, acute and chronic pancreatitis, as well as pancreatic carcinoma. This review presents findings and emerging questions on the diseases of the pancreas obtained by the consortium of the Collaborative Research Center 518 (SFB 518), "Inflammation, Regeneration, and Transformation in the Pancreas" at the University of Ulm. During the last 12 years, the SFB 518 contributed considerably to the understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of pancreatic diseases and established the basis for the development of new strategies for prevention and causal therapy for diabetes, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

  17. Granulocytic sarcoma of the pancreas on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akira; Kondo, Tadakazu; Oka, Tomomi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) is defined as leukemia infiltration in any organ other than the bone marrow. GS rarely occurs in the pancreas. Here, we present the first report of GS in the pancreas on 18F-fluorodexyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). Patient concerns: A 19-year-old male patient with acute myeloid leukemia received a human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical stem cell transplant as a second transplant while in second complete remission. Interventions: After a second stem cell transplant, obstructive pancreatitis accompanied by a mass in the pancreatic head was observed. FDG-PET/CT revealed abnormal activity in the head of the pancreas and the skin in the patient's left breast area. Diagnoses: Pathological examination demonstrated relapsed acute myeloid leukemia in both the lesions. Outcomes: This is the first report showing the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings of GS in the pancreas. Lessons: 18F-FDG PET/CT may help determine the stage of GS. PMID:27930567

  18. Disposal of replaced common hepatic artery coursing within the pancreas during pancreatoduodenectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kubota, Keiichi; Rokkaku, Kyu; Nemoto, Takehiko; Sakuma, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    A replaced common hepatic artery (RCHA) originating from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare anomaly. We herein report such a case in a 62-year-old man who was scheduled to undergo a pancreatoduodenectomy for lower bile duct cancer. Computed tomography (CT) showed the RCHA to run along the ventral side of the pancreas. Abdominal angiography showed an RCHA originating from the SMA, which communicated with an aberrant left hepatic artery from the left gastric artery. No gastroduodenal artery was observed, but instead a direct ramification of a right gastroepiploic artery was seen. Similar cases from the English literature were reviewed. The RCHA was confirmed to course first along the ventral side of, and then within, the pancreas. Clamping of the RCHA did not influence the arterial flow in the liver, and the RCHA was subsequently divided without reconstruction. In three of the five reviewed cases in which the RCHA coursed either within or along the ventral side of the pancreas, no gastroduodenal artery was found, but instead a direct ramification of a right gastroepiploic artery was observed. A combination of CT and angiographic findings can help in both the diagnosis of an anomalous RCHA coursing either within or along the ventral side of the pancreas as well as in selecting optimal operative procedures. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed with a curative resection according to our usual practice except for the fact that we preserved the aberrant left hepatic artery.

  19. Progress of artificial pancreas devices toward clinical use: the first outpatient studies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This article describes recent progress in the automated control of glycemia in type 1 diabetes with artificial pancreas devices that combine continuous glucose monitoring with automated decision-making and insulin delivery. Recent findings After a gestation period of closely supervised feasibility studies in research centers, the last 2 years have seen publication of studies testing these devices in outpatient environments, and many more such studies are ongoing. The most basic form of automation, suspension of insulin delivery for actual or predicted hypoglycemia, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated, and a first-generation device has actually reached the market. Artificial pancreas devices that actively dose insulin fall into two categories, those that dose insulin alone and those that also use glucagon to prevent and treat hypoglycemia (bihormonal artificial pancreas). Initial outpatient clinical trials have shown that both strategies can improve glycemic management in comparison with patient-controlled insulin pump therapy, but only the bihormonal strategy has been tested without restrictions on exercise. Summary Artificial pancreas technology has the potential to reduce acute and chronic complications of diabetes and mitigate the burden of diabetes self-management. Successful outpatient studies bring these technologies one step closer to availability for patients. PMID:25692927

  20. Psychosocial Impact of the Bionic Pancreas During Summer Camp

    PubMed Central

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Hessler, Danielle; Polonsky, William H.; Fisher, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of the bionic pancreas (BP) was assessed among children attending diabetes camp. Methods: Nineteen children were randomly assigned for 5 days to the BP condition and 5 days to the control condition in a crossover design. Results: Significant reductions in hypoglycemic fear and regimen burden were found. Children felt less burdened or worried about diabetes and felt freer to do things they enjoyed while using the BP. Children wished the BP responded to out of range numbers faster and expressed annoyance about carrying around the necessary equipment. Conclusions: Children may experience improved psychosocial outcomes following use of BP while expressing key areas of user concern. Future studies in less controlled environments with larger sample sizes can determine if these findings are generalizable to other groups. PMID:26993252

  1. Effects of pancreas transplantation on late complications of diabetes and metabolic effects of pancreas and islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caldara, R; La Rocca, E; Maffi, P; Secchi, A

    1999-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation has become an accepted therapeutic approach to treat insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, successfully restoring normoglycemia. In contrast, islet transplantation is still in the experimental phase, only a few operations having being performed world-wide. The aim of this review is to analyze the effects of pancreas transplantation on the late complications of diabetes and to report the endocrino-metabolic effects of pancreas and islet transplantation.

  2. Maximum intensity projection with magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating synovitis of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with clinical and ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Daigo; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Ikeda, Takumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Kishida, Aiko; Yamasaki, Tetsuro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Seno, Takahiro; Ito, Hirotoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with maximum intensity projection (MIP) is used to evaluate the hand in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MIP yields clear visualization of synovitis over the entirety of the bilateral hands with a single image. In this study, we assessed synovitis with MIP images, clinical findings, and power Doppler (PD) findings to examine the clinical usefulness of MIP images for RA in the hand. Thirty RA patients were assessed for swelling and tenderness in the joints included in the DAS28, and both contrast-enhanced MRI for bilateral hands and ultrasonography for bilateral wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were performed. Articular synovitis was scored in MIP images, and the scores were compared with those for PD. The agreement on synovitis between MIP and conventional MR images was excellent. Palpation showed low sensitivity and high specificity compared with both MIP and PD images. There were joints that were positive in MIP images only, but there were no joints that were positive in PD images only. A statistically significant correlation between the scores of MIP and PD images was found. Furthermore, the agreement between grade 2 on MIP images and positive on PD images was 0.87 (κ = 0.73) for the wrist and 0.92 (κ = 0.57) for MCP joints. Using MIP images together with palpation makes detailed evaluation of synovitis of the hand in RA easy. MIP images may predict further joint damage, since they allow semiquantitative estimation of the degree of thickening of the synovial membrane.

  3. Molecular imaging of late somatostatin receptor-positive metastases of renal cell carcinoma in the pancreas by 68Ga DOTATOC PET/CT: a rare differential diagnosis to multiple primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Peter, Luisa; Sänger, Jörg; Hommann, Merten; Baum, Richard Paul; Kaemmerer, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT, currently the most sensitive imaging modality for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, is based on the molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) that are expressed in different tumor entities such as neuroendocrine neoplasms, lymphomas, meningiomas, or renal cell cancer (RCC). Most neuroendocrine neoplasms show a high expression of SSTR subtypes 2A and 5, whereas the overexpression of SSTR2A in RCC is mainly seen in peritumoral vessels. Here we report a case with strongly SSTR-positive pancreatic lesions detected by Ga DOTATOC PET/CT, which histologically turned out to be ultralate metastases of a RCC.

  4. Current Perspectives on Laparoscopic Robot-Assisted Pancreas and Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boggi, Ugo; Signori, Stefano; Vistoli, Fabio; Amorese, Gabriella; Consani, Giovanni; De Lio, Nelide; Perrone, Vittorio; Croce, Chiara; Marchetti, Piero; Cantarovich, Diego; Mosca, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas transplant recipients continue to suffer high surgical morbidity. Current robotic technology provides a unique opportunity to test whether laparoscopy can improve the post-operative course of pancreas transplantation (PT). Current knowledge on robotic pancreas and renal transplantation was reviewed to determine feasibility and safety of robotic PT. Information available from literature was included in this review, together with personal experience including three PT, and two renal allotransplants. As of April 2011, the relevant literature provides two case reports on robotic renal transplantation. The author’s experience consists of one further renal allotransplantation, two solitary PT, and one simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation. Information obtained at international conferences include several other renal allotransplants, but no additional PT. Preliminary data show that PT is feasible laparoscopically under robotic assistance, but raises concerns regarding the effects of increased warm ischemia time on graft viability. Indeed, during construction of vascular anastomoses, graft temperature progressively increases, since maintenance of a stable graft temperature is difficult to achieve laparoscopically. There is no proof that progressive graft warming produces actual damage to transplanted organs, unless exceedingly long. However, this important question is likely to elicit a vibrant discussion in the transplant community. PMID:21720670

  5. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  6. Finding a Cold Needle in a Warm Haystack: Infrared Imaging Applied to Locating Cryocooled Crystals in Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M. J.; Miller, M. D.; Deacon, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of inbred imaging to locate crystals mounted in cryoloops and cryopreserved in a nitrogen gas stream at 100K. In the home laboratory crystals are clearly seen in the infrared images with light transmitting through the sample while irradiating the crystal from behind, and with illumination from a direction perpendicular to the direction of view. The crystals transmit and reflect infrared radiation differently from the surrounding mother liquor and loop. Because of differences in contrast between crystals and their surrounding mother liquor, it is possible to clearly identify the crystal position. In use at the synchrotron, with robotically mounted crystals the small depth of field of the lens required the recording of multiple images at different focal points. Image processing techniques were then used to produce a clear image of the crystal. The resulting infrared images and intensity profiles show that infrared imaging can be a powerful complement to visual imaging in locating crystals in cryocooled loops.

  7. Periosteal chondroma of the distal tibia: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and correlation with histological findings.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Jun; Arashiro, Yasuharu; Mori, Shun; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Naito, Masatoshi

    2015-05-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a rare benign hyaline cartilage neoplasm situated on the bone surface. This is the presentation of a unique case of periosteal chondroma arising in the left distal tibial metaphysis of a 25-year-old female patient with a history of antecedent trauma. The physical examination revealed swelling and tenderness in the anterolateral aspect of the left distal lower limb. Plain radiographs revealed a discernible soft tissue lesion with peripheral foci of mineralization. Computed tomography scans confirmed the presence of a surface-based mass with peripheral ossification and a thin rim of calcification. On magnetic resonance imaging, the well-circumscribed mass exhibited intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted sequences and high signal intensity with foci of decreased signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences revealed predominantly peripheral enhancement without intramedullary involvement. Following an open biopsy, marginal excision with curettage of the underlying bone cortex was performed. Histologically, the tumor consisted of mature hyaline cartilage arranged in distinct lobules. Foci of ossification with mature bone trabeculae forming a thin shell-like structure were identified in the periphery of the tumor. The mindbomb E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 labeling index was <1%. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as periosteal chondroma. There has been no evidence of local recurrence at 4 months following surgery. Despite its rarity, periosteal chondroma must be considered as a possible diagnosis when confronted with a surface-based, mineralized lesion in the metaphysis of long bones.

  8. Association between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and magnetic resonance imaging findings and intelligence in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ashtari, Fereshteh; Emami, Parisa; Akbari, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease in which demyelination and axonal loss leads to progressive disability. Cognition impairment is among the most common complication. Studying axonal loss in the retina is a new marker for MS. The main goal of our study is to search for correlations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness at the macula and head of the optic nerve and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Scores that assess multiple domains of intelligence, and to explore the relationship between changes in the RNFL thickness with intellectual and cognitive dysfunction. Materials and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the University Hospital of Kashani, Isfahan, Iran, from September to December 2013. All patients were assessed with a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) on the WAIS-R. An optical coherence tomography study and brain MRI were performed in the same week for all the patients. Statistical analysis was conducted by using a bivariate correlation, by utilizing SPSS 20.0. A P value ≤ 0.05 was the threshold of statistical significance. Results: Examination of a 100 patients showed a significant correlation between the average RNFL thickness of the macula and the verbal IQ (P value = 0.01) and full IQ (P value = 0.01). There was a significant correlation between brain atrophy and verbal IQ. Conclusion: The RNFL loss was correlated with verbal IQ and full IQ. PMID:26682201

  9. Annular pancreas associated with duodenal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Enrico; Potthast, Silke; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Oertli, Daniel; Heizmann, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    Annular pancreas (AP) is a rare congenital anomaly. Coexisting malignancy has been reported only in a few cases. We report what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case in the English literature of duodenal adenocarcinoma in a patient with AP. In a 55-year old woman with duodenal outlet stenosis magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed an aberrant pancreatic duct encircling the duodenum. Duodenojejunostomy was performed. Eight weeks later she presented with painless jaundice. Duodenopancreatectomy revealed a duodenal adenocarcinoma, surrounded by an incomplete AP. Thus, co-existent malignancy with AP can be present without obstructive jaundice and without being visible through preoperative diagnostics. PMID:20593508

  10. The Cystic Fibrosis of Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is highly expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelia, and permits anions and water to enter the ductal lumen. This results in an increased volume of alkaline fluid allowing the highly concentrated proteins secreted by the acinar cells to remain in a soluble state. This work will expound on the pathophysiology and pathology caused by the malfunctioning CFTR protein with special reference to ion transport and acid-base abnormalities both in humans and animal models. We will also discuss the relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatitis, and outline present and potential therapeutic approaches in CF treatment relevant to the pancreas. PMID:23637307

  11. Find Good Sources of Online Images: A Picture Doesn't Have to Be a Thousand Searches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    The Internet is a natural place to look for images that teachers can use in lessons and students can use in projects and assignments. Google, Yahoo, AltaVista--many of these popular search engines offer image searching. Usually there is a tab to click at the top of the page to select image searching; just enter a search term and go! However, this…

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: experience of one single institution from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Solid pseudopapillary neoplasia (SPN) of the pancreas is an extremely rare epithelial tumor of low malignant potential. SPN accounts for less than 1% to 2% of exocrine pancreatic tumors. The aim of this study is to report our experience with SPN of the pancreas. It includes a summary of the current literature to provide a reference for the management of this rare clinical entity. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients diagnosed and treated for SPN in our hospital over the past 15 years (1998 to 2013). A database of the characteristics of these patients was developed, including age, gender, tumor location and size, treatment, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Results During this time period, 255 patients with pancreatic malignancy (which does not include ampulla vateri, distal choledocal and duodenal tumor) were admitted to our department, only 10 of whom were diagnosed as having SPN (2.5%). Nine patients were women (90%) and one patient was a man (10%). Their median age was 38.8 years (range 18 to 71). The most common symptoms were abdominal pain and dullness. Seven patients (70%) presented with abdominal pain or abdominal dullness and three patient (30%) were asymptomatic with the diagnosis made by an incidental finding on routine examination. Abdominal computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging showed the typical features of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm in six (60%) of the patients. Four patients underwent distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, one patient underwent a total mass excision, and one patient underwent total pancreatic resection. Two required extended distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy. Two underwent spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. Conclusions SPN is a rare neoplasm that primarily affects young women. The prognosis is favorable even in the presence of distant metastasis. Although surgical resection is generally curative, a close follow-up is advised in order to

  13. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Pancreas: Mystery and Facts.

    PubMed

    Raghavapuram, Saikiran; Vaid, Arjun; Rego, Rayburn F

    2015-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is very rare as pancreas does not have any squamous cells. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. We describe such a case where in the patient presented with painless jaundice. CT and EUS confirmed the pancreatic mass biopsy of which showed squamous cell cancer.

  14. [Ectopic pancreas mimicking advanced gastric malignancy--case report].

    PubMed

    Zawada, Iwona; Lewosiuk, Agnieszka; Hnatyszyn, Krzysztof; Patalan, Michał; Woyke, Stanisław; Kostyrka, Roman; Marlicz, Krzysztof; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the most common type of ectopic tissue in gastrointestinal tract. It is typically asymptomatic, presenting as a small submucosal lesion in prepyloric region of stomach. The diagnosis is usually incidental, during gastroscopy. The patient with symptomatic heterotropic pancreas, mimicking gastric malignancy was described.

  15. Pregnancy following Radical Resection of Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, James M.; Hagopian, Ellen; Matulewicz, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas is a rare tumor seen in predominately young women and carries a low malignant potential. We discuss a patient, who presented to our high risk clinic, with a clinical history of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas, predating her pregnancy. The patient had undergone previous surgery and imaging which had excluded recurrence of disease; however, increased attention was paid to the patient during her pregnancy secondary to elevated hormonal levels of progesterone, which any residual disease would have a heightened sensitivity to. In cases of pregnant patients with a history of pancreatic tumors, a multidisciplinary approach with maternal fetal medicine, medicine, and general surgery is appropriate and can result in a healthy mother and healthy term infant. PMID:25349752

  16. Insulitis in transgenic mice expressing tumor necrosis factor beta (lymphotoxin) in the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Picarella, D E; Kratz, A; Li, C B; Ruddle, N H; Flavell, R A

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta) (lymphotoxin) may play an important role in the immune response and pathologic inflammatory diseases. Insulitis is an important early step in the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. To understand better the role of TNF-beta in the regulation of inflammation and type 1 diabetes, we produced transgenic mice in which the murine TNF-beta gene was regulated by the rat insulin II promoter. The transgene was expressed in the pancreas, kidney, and skin of transgenic mice. The expression of TNF-beta in the pancreas of transgenic mice resulted in a leukocytic inflammatory infiltrate consisting primarily of B220+ IgM+ B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The insulitis is reminiscent of the early stages of diabetes, though the mice did not progress to diabetes. Images PMID:1279667

  17. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade.

  18. Design Considerations for Artificial Pancreas Pivotal Studies.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steven J; Beck, Roy W

    2016-07-01

    The development of artificial pancreas systems has evolved to the point that pivotal studies designed to assess efficacy and safety are in progress or soon to be initiated. These pivotal studies are intended to provide the necessary data to gain clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, coverage by payers, and adoption by patients and clinicians. Although there will not be one design that is appropriate for every system, there are certain aspects of protocol design that will be considerations in all pivotal studies designed to assess efficacy and safety. One key aspect of study design is the intervention to be used by the control group. A case can be made that the control group should use the currently available best technology, which is sensor-augmented pump therapy. However, an equally, if not more, compelling case can be made that the control intervention should be usual care. In this Perspective, we elaborate on this issue and provide a pragmatic approach to the design of clinical trials of artificial pancreas systems.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports

    PubMed Central

    Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Kang, Jeansol V.; Marzo, John M.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. Purpose: To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Results: Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Conclusion: Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and

  20. [Tuberculosis of the pancreas--a clinical rarity].

    PubMed

    Heitmann, P; Kratsch, B; Löschke, S; Klempa, I

    2001-06-01

    Pancreas tuberculosis is a rare diagnosis and is usually associated with miliary spread. Only a few cases are reported in the literature. A female patient was admitted with a history of uncharacteristic abdominal pain, weight loss, weakness, and intermittent fever. CA 19-9 was increased and the CT scan showed an irregular mass in the pancreatic tail. Suspecting the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, a pancreas tail resection with splenectomy was performed. The histological examination showed pancreas tuberculosis. Mimicking pancreatic cancer or presenting with acute/chronic pancreatitis or obstructive jaundice, the diagnosis of pancreas tuberculosis is very difficult to make and is usually established after surgical treatment. Although pancreas tuberculosis is rare, it should be considered when evaluating a pancreatic mass.

  1. Pancreas development is promoted by cyclopamine, a hedgehog signaling inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Melton, D A

    1998-10-27

    Exposure to cyclopamine, a steroid alkaloid that blocks Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, promotes pancreatic expansion in embryonic chicks. Heterotopic development of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine structures occurs in regions adjacent to the pancreas including stomach and duodenum, and insulin-producing islets in the pancreas are enlarged. The homeodomain transcription factor PDX1, required for pancreas development, is expressed broadly in the posterior foregut but pancreas development normally initiates only in a restricted region of PDX1-expressing posterior foregut where endodermal Shh expression is repressed. The results suggests that cyclopamine expands the endodermal region where Shh signaling does not occur, resulting in pancreatic differentiation in a larger region of PDX1-expressing foregut endoderm. Cyclopamine reveals the capacity of a broad region of the posterior embryonic foregut to form pancreatic cells and provides a means for expanding embryonic pancreas development.

  2. Purinergic signalling in the pancreas in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G; Novak, I

    2012-05-01

    Pancreatic cells contain specialised stores for ATP. Purinergic receptors (P2 and P1) and ecto-nucleotidases are expressed in both endocrine and exocrine calls, as well as in stromal cells. The pancreas, especially the endocrine cells, were an early target for the actions of ATP. After the historical perspective of purinergic signalling in the pancreas, the focus of this review will be the physiological functions of purinergic signalling in the regulation of both endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Next, we will consider possible interaction between purinergic signalling and other regulatory systems and their relation to nutrient homeostasis and cell survival. The pancreas is an organ exhibiting several serious diseases - cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and diabetes - and some are associated with changes in life-style and are increasing in incidence. There is upcoming evidence for the role of purinergic signalling in the pathophysiology of the pancreas, and the new challenge is to understand how it is integrated with other pathological processes.

  3. Are temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients? A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Sousa, Soraia Ale; Fernandes, Artur Rocha Corrêa; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to perform a comprehensive clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to investigate the association between the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the TMJs of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventy-five patients with JIA participated in this study. All patients underwent a rheumatological examination performed by a paediatric rheumatologist, a TMJ examination performed by a single dentist and an MRI with contrast of the TMJs. These examinations were scheduled on the same date. The patients were examined again 1 year later. Twenty-eight (37.3 %) patients reported symptoms at the first evaluation and 11 (14.7 %) patients at the second evaluation. In relation to signs, 35 (46.7 %) of the patients presented at least one sign at the first evaluation and 29 (38.7 %) at the second. Intense contrast enhancement of TMJ was significantly associated with disease activity (p < 0.001) at the first evaluation and a trend to significance was observed at the second (p = 0.056), with poly/systemic subtypes (p = 0.028 and p = 0.049, respectively), with restricted mouth opening capacity (p = 0.013 and p = 0.001, respectively), with the presence of erosions at both evaluations (p = 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and with altered condylar shape at the second evaluation (p = 0.0005). TMJ involvement is highly prevalent in JIA patients, with asymptomatic children presenting severe structural alterations of the TMJ. The TMJ should always be evaluated in JIA patients, even in the absence of signs and symptoms.

  4. Morphological and functional investigations of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Philippe L; Wiskirchen, Jakub

    2003-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas are rare neoplasms arising predominantly from the pancreatic islets of Langerhans and are thus known as islet cell tumors. More than the half of all neuroendocrine tumors are called functioning islet cell tumors because they secrete one or more biologically active peptides that may produce clinical symptoms. Clinical diagnosis of non-functioning, i.e., biologically inactive, tumors is often delayed and patients tend to present with advanced tumors (size greater than 5 cm) that are easily localized by using conventional imaging modalities. On the other hand, symptoms of functioning islet cell tumors usually appear early in the clinical course, rendering the preoperative localization of these small hormone-producing tumors (size less than 2 cm) difficult with non-invasive methods. Since functioning islet cell tumors can often be cured by surgical resection, invasive procedures are warranted when necessary for localization diagnosis. Failure to search for, detect, and resect these small tumors will invariably result in persistent symptoms. Regarding the unsatisfactory results of morphological imaging methods, functional studies, especially arterial stimulation with hepatic venous samplings, may provide a preoperative regionalization of the pancreatic adenoma, regardless of its size.

  5. Fluid collections in and around the pancreas in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alexander; Agarwal, Nanakram; Pitchumoni, C S

    2011-08-01

    The advent of computed tomographic scan with its wide use in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis has opened up a new topic in pancreatology i.e. fluid collections. Fluid collections in and around the pancreas occur often in acute pancreatitis and were defined by the Atlanta Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis in 1992. Two decades since the Atlanta Conference additional experience has brought to light the inadequacy and poor understanding of the terms used by different specialists involved in the care of patients with acute pancreatitis when interpreting imaging modalities and the need for a uniformly used classification system. The deficiencies of the Atlanta definitions and advances in medicine have led to a proposed revision of the Atlanta classification promulgated by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. The newly used terms "acute peripancreatic fluid collections," "pancreatic pseudocyst," "postnecrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections," and "walled-off pancreatic necrosis" are to be clearly understood in the interpretation of imaging studies. The current treatment methods for fluid collections are diverse and depend on accurate interpretations of radiologic tests. Management options include conservative treatment, percutaneous catheter drainage, open and laparoscopic surgery, and endoscopic drainage. The choice of treatment depends on a correct diagnosis of the type of fluid collection. In this study we have attempted to clarify the management and clinical features of different types of fluid collections as they have been initially defined under the 1992 Atlanta Classification and revised by the Working Group's proposed categorization.

  6. Dual-phase 99mTc-MIBI imaging findings in sporadic primary hyperplasia of parathyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Chang-Yin; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Primary hyperplasia of parathyroid is uncommon and rarely documented in literatures. We report an 18-year-old female patient with hyperparathyroidism due to unifocal primary hyperplasia of parathyroid glands. Dual-phase Tc-MIBI imaging was performed for this patient. We found remarkably increased MIBI uptake in the hyperplastic lesion in early imaging and no extinction of the uptake in delayed imaging. These results suggest that the dual-phase Tc-MIBI imaging is useful in localizing the hyperfunctioning lesions of primary hyperplasia of parathyroid glands.

  7. Multimodal imaging findings of SAPHO syndrome with no skin lesions: A report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Duan, Na; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2016-10-01

    Synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) is a rare syndrome that affects the skin, bones and joints. Diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome is established on clinical appearance and imaging features. The present case report described the imaging features of three cases of SAPHO with sternoclavicular joint arthritis but without skin manifestations using multiple imaging modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy. The first case was a 52-year-old male who suffered from progressive sternoclavicular arthritis for 2 years. The second case was a 62-year-old female with arthritis in the larger joints for 5 years, particularly on the right thoracic area. The third case was a 44-year-old male who exhibited a slight bulge accompanied by pain in the upper anterior chest wall for 4 years. All of them lacked cutaneous lesions. CT demonstrated sclerosis and hyperostosis with subchondral erosions in the sternocostoclavicular joints. MRI revealed bone marrow edema that was slightly hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. Typical 'bull head' signs were observed in bone scintigraphy images. The present case study demonstrated that SAPHO syndrome should be suspected in patients with multifocal osteitis or arthritis affecting the chest wall that lack skin manifestations. Multimodal imaging modalities in combination are helpful for SAPHO diagnosis.

  8. Multimodal imaging findings of SAPHO syndrome with no skin lesions: A report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Na; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2016-01-01

    Synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) is a rare syndrome that affects the skin, bones and joints. Diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome is established on clinical appearance and imaging features. The present case report described the imaging features of three cases of SAPHO with sternoclavicular joint arthritis but without skin manifestations using multiple imaging modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy. The first case was a 52-year-old male who suffered from progressive sternoclavicular arthritis for 2 years. The second case was a 62-year-old female with arthritis in the larger joints for 5 years, particularly on the right thoracic area. The third case was a 44-year-old male who exhibited a slight bulge accompanied by pain in the upper anterior chest wall for 4 years. All of them lacked cutaneous lesions. CT demonstrated sclerosis and hyperostosis with subchondral erosions in the sternocostoclavicular joints. MRI revealed bone marrow edema that was slightly hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. Typical ‘bull head’ signs were observed in bone scintigraphy images. The present case study demonstrated that SAPHO syndrome should be suspected in patients with multifocal osteitis or arthritis affecting the chest wall that lack skin manifestations. Multimodal imaging modalities in combination are helpful for SAPHO diagnosis. PMID:27698770

  9. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tourlakis, Marina E.; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S.; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15Ink4b and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  10. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tourlakis, Marina E; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S; Guidos, Cynthia J; Durie, Peter R; Rommens, Johanna M

    2015-06-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15(Ink4b) and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  11. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application.

  12. Acinar neoplasms of the pancreas-A summary of 25 years of research.

    PubMed

    Klimstra, David S; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding about the family of acinar neoplasms of the pancreas has grown substantially over the past 25 years. The prototype is acinar cell carcinoma, an uncommon variant of pancreatic carcinoma that demonstrates production of pancreatic exocrine enzymes, verifiable using immunohistochemistry, and exhibits characteristic histologic features. Related neoplasms include mixed acinar carcinomas such as mixed acinar neuroendocrine carcinoma and mixed acinar ductal carcinoma. In the pediatric age group, pancreatoblastoma is also closely related. Cystic and extrapancreatic forms have been described. These neoplasms share molecular alterations that are distinct from the more common ductal and neuroendocrine neoplasms of the pancreas. Although there is a broad range of genetic findings, a number of potential therapeutic targets have emerged. This review explores the clinical and pathologic features of pancreatic acinar neoplasms along with their more common molecular phenotypes. The differential diagnosis with other pancreatic neoplasms is explored as well.

  13. Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas on fine needle aspiration: case report with differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hui; Gurda, Grzegorz; Lennon, Anne Marie; Hruban, Ralph H; Erozan, Yener S

    2014-02-01

    Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm (ITPN) is a rare primary pancreatic neoplasm accounting for less than 1% of all pancreatic exocrine neoplasms and 3% of intraductal neoplasms of the pancreas. Data on this entity are still limited. Here, we report a case of ITPN with cytopathologic and histopathologic findings. A 41-year-old woman with a 2.2 cm cyst in the head of the pancreas for five years was referred to our institution. The endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration produced cytospins were moderately cellular with a few fragments of markedly atypical epithelium. The neoplastic cells displayed high-grade nuclear atypia with enlarged, eccentric nuclei, anisonucleosis and prominent nucleoli, irregular nuclear membranes, high nucleus to cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios, and a moderate amount of cytoplasm with no intracytoplasmic mucin. Histologically, the lesion was found to be an ITPN with focal high-grade dysplasia. No invasive carcinoma was identified. The neoplastic cells exhibited luminal immunolabeling for MUC-1, but were negative for MUC-2, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and P53. Approximately 5% of the neoplastic cells showed Ki-67 immunoreactivity. ITPN of pancreas may be a source of markedly atypical epithelial cells in pancreatic cystic aspiration. Clinical and radiographic findings, molecular mutational analysis, in combination with cytological features are essential to differentiate it from other disease entities.

  14. Remarkable Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Sellar Xanthogranuloma: Report of Three First Cases in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, Mario Tapia; Vargas, Jaime Pinto; Yañez, Fernando Andrade; León, Loreto Spencer; Arancibia, Pablo Álvarez; Putz, Thomas Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    The sellar xanthogranuloma is a rare lesion of the sellar–parasellar region difficult to differentiate from other tumors such as craniopharyngiomas or Rathke's cleft cyst in the preoperative evaluation. As they are recently recognized as a separate entity and the few number of reports in the literature, its etiology is unknown and its impact remains uncertain. This article will describe the first three cases reported in Latin America, identified in one of them an imaging feature that may be helpful to elucidate an imaging growth pattern. Current evidence will be described regarding to the clinicopathological features, imaging diagnosis, and etiology origin theories. PMID:28286725

  15. Pig Pancreas Anatomy: Implications for Pancreas Procurement, Preservation, and Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Joana; Scott, William E; Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2009-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is emerging as a treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes. The limited human islet supply from cadavers and poor islet yield and quality remain substantial impediments to progress in the field. Use of porcine islets holds great promise for large-scale application of islet transplantation. Consistent isolation of porcine islets is dependent on advances in pancreas procurement and preservation, and islet isolation requiring detailed knowledge of the porcine pancreatic anatomy. The primary aim of this study was to describe the vascular and ductal anatomy of the porcine pancreas in order to guide and improve organ preservation and enzyme perfusion. Methods Pancreata were removed by en bloc viscerectomy from 65 female Landrace pigs. Results 15% of organs exhibited inconsistent vascular branching from the celiac trunk. All organs had uniform patterns of branching at the superior mesenteric artery. The superior and inferior mesenteric veins (IMV) merged to become the portal vein in all but one case in which the IMV drained into the splenic vein. 97% of pancreata had three lobes: duodenal (DL), connecting (CL), and splenic (SL); 39% demonstrated ductal communication between the CL and the other two lobes; 50% had ductal communication only between the CL and DL; and 11% presented other types of ductal delineation. Conclusions Accounting for the variations in vascular and ductal anatomy, as detailed in this study, will facilitate development of protocols for preservation, optimal enzyme administration, and pancreas distention and digestion, and ultimately lead to substantial improvements in isolation outcomes. PMID:19077881

  16. Exocrine Pancreas in Cats With Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Ferro, S; Lunardi, F; Zanetti, R; Heller, R S; Coppola, L M; Guscetti, F; Osto, M; Lutz, T A; Cavicchioli, L; Reusch, C E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis has been described in cats with diabetes mellitus, although the number of studies currently available is very limited. In addition, ketoacidosis has been hypothesized to be associated with pancreatitis in diabetic cats. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether diabetic cats have pancreatitis and to determine if pancreatitis is more frequent with ketoacidosis. Samples of pancreas were collected postmortem from 37 diabetic cats, including 15 with ketoacidosis, and 20 control cats matched for age, sex, breed, and body weight. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, double-labeled for insulin/CD3, insulin/CD20, insulin/myeloperoxidase, insulin/PCNA, and glucagon/Ki67, and single-labeled for Iba1. A previously proposed semiquantitative score was used to characterize pancreatitis, along with counts of inflammatory cells. Scores of pancreatitis and the number of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes in the exocrine pancreas did not differ between diabetic and control cats or between diabetic cats with and without ketoacidosis. Of note, PCNA-positive acinar cells were increased (P = .002) in diabetic cats, particularly near islets (P < .001). Ki67-positive acinar cells were increased only near islets (P = .038). Ketoacidosis was not linked to proliferation. The results suggest that histopathologic evidence of pancreatitis may not be more frequent in diabetic cats and that ketoacidosis may not be associated with it at the time of death. Augmented PCNA-positive acinar cells might indicate increased proliferation due to chronic pancreatitis. The reason behind the prevalent proliferation of acinar cells surrounding pancreatic islets deserves further investigation.

  17. Magnetic resonance-based thermometry during laser ablation on ex-vivo swine pancreas and liver.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, G; Saccomandi, P; Giurazza, F; Caponero, M A; Frauenfelder, G; Di Matteo, F M; Beomonte Zobel, B; Silvestri, S; Schena, E

    2015-07-01

    Laser Ablation (LA) is a minimally-invasive procedure for tumor treatment. LA outcomes depend on the heat distribution inside tissues and require accurate temperature measurement during the procedure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a non-invasive and three-dimensional thermometry of the organ undergoing LA. In this study, the temperature distribution within two swine pancreases and three swine livers undergoing LA (Nd:YAG, power: 2 W, treatment time: 4 min) was monitored by a 1.5-T MR scanner, utilizing two T1-weighted sequences (IRTF and SRTF). The signal intensity in four regions of interest, placed at different distances from the laser applicator, was related to temperature variations monitored in the same regions by twelve fiber Bragg grating sensors. The relationship between the signal intensity and temperature increase was calculated to obtain the calibration curve and to evaluate accuracy, sensibility and precision of each sequence. This is the first study of MR-based thermometry during LA on pancreas. More specifically, the IRTF sequence provides the highest temperature sensitivity in both liver (1.8 ± 0.2 °C(-1)) and pancreas (1.8 ± 0.5 °C(-1)) and the lowest precision and accuracy. SRTF sequence on pancreas presents the highest accuracy and precision (MODSFRT = -0.1 °C and LOASFRT = [-2.3; 2.1] °C).

  18. Onset of cell-specific gene expression in the developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gittes, G K; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology has been the initiation of cell-specific gene expression and its temporal relationship to morphogenesis. We have coupled embryo microdissection with the exquisite sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction to define the onset of cell-specific gene expression during pancreatic organogenesis. Using the precise assignment of gestational age by the number of somites in each embryo, we determined the onset of transcription of major genes of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas during mouse development to within 2-3 hr. Somatostatin mRNA was detected at the 10-somite stage throughout the foregut, consistent with the presence of somatostatin-producing cells throughout the adult gut. Mature mRNA for insulin and glucagon first appears surprisingly early, at the 20-somite stage in the wall of the embryonic foregut and is restricted to only the area of the duodenum from which the pancreas will arise 10-12 hr later. In contrast, exocrine gene transcription begins 24 hr after formation of the pancreatic diverticulum. Thus cell-specific gene expression in the endocrine pancreas begins in a "pre-morphogenetic phase." This early expression of insulin and glucagon could reflect the initiation of an endocrine cell lineage. Images PMID:1371010

  19. Post-splenectomy intrapancreatic accessory spleen mimicking endocrine tumor of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hong-xu; Lou, Wen-hui; Kuang, Tian-tao; Wang, Dan-song

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intrapancreatic accessory spleen is an uncommon congenital abnormality of the spleen with no indication for surgical intervention. Among the few cases reported, IPAS coexisted with a normal spleen. We here report the first case of IPAS arising a couple years after splenectomy with the appearance of an endocrine tumor of the pancreas. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 62-year-old female presented with a one-week history of left upper quadrant discomfort. She had splenectomy for the treatment of hypersplenism caused by cirrhotic portal hypertension two years before this admission. Her physical examination was unremarkable and laboratory data was within the normal range. Both the ultrasonography and magnetic resonance image revealed a small oval-shaped mass in the tail of her pancreas with the diameter 2 cm or less. A distal pancreatectomy was performed for the suspection of malignant neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas. An intrapancreatic accessory spleen was confirmed by the pathologic examination. DISCUSSION Intrapancreatic accessory spleen is one kind of congenital ectopic spleen without indication for operative intervention. We present the case to support that intrapancreatic accessory spleen may enlarge through a compensatory mechanism, and raise the awareness of this intrapacreatic entity to avoid unnecessary surgical operation. CONCLUSION IPAS should be highly considered as a differential diagnosis while the lesion is no more than 2.5 cm in diameter and/or other accessory spleens show around the splenic hilum. PMID:25437661

  20. Adrenergically mediated intrapancreatic control of the glucagon response to glucopenia in the isolated rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Hisatomi, A; Maruyama, H; Orci, L; Vasko, M; Unger, R H

    1985-01-01

    Alpha adrenergic blockade with phentolamine (10 microM) reduces the glucagon response to severe glucopenia (from 150 to 25 mg/dl) to 22% of the control values in the isolated perfused rat pancreas. Propranolol (10 microM) had no significant effect. Neither alpha nor beta adrenergic blockade reduced the magnitude of glucopenic suppression of insulin secretion, but phentolamine increased insulin levels before and during glucopenia. The pattern of somatostatin secretion in these experiments resembled that of insulin. Depletion of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings by pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine lowered the pancreatic norepinephrine content to less than 20% of control values and reduced the glucagon response to glucopenia to 69% of the controls. Combined alpha and beta adrenergic blockade during less severe glucopenia (from 120 to 60 mg/dl) reduced the glucagon response to 21% of controls. However, slight glucopenia (from 100 to 80 mg/dl), which elicited only 11% increase in glucagon in the control experiments, was not altered significantly by combined alpha and beta adrenergic blockade. Morphologic studies of adrenergic nerve terminals labeled with [3H]norepinephrine revealed associations with alpha cells. It is concluded that in the isolated rat pancreas adrenergic mediation accounts for most of the glucagon but not insulin response to glucopenia. It is controlled within the pancreas itself, possibly through a direct enhancement by glucopenia of norepinephrine release from nerve endings. Images PMID:2857731

  1. Common hepatic artery aneurysm: Pseudopseudocyst of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, S.; Druy, E.M.; Friedman, A.C.

    1985-06-01

    The preoperative diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm is uncommon, and its presentation as a pancreatic mass is rare. Because of its great potential for rupture early diagnosis and treatment is essential. The authors report two cases of aneurysms of the common hepatic artery, which on CT presented as a cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. These cases illustrate the importance of using 10-mm serial sections through the pancreas after a bolus injection of intravenous contrast material in order to allow distinction between hepatic artery aneurysm and other, more common, cystic masses of the pancreas.

  2. Control of cell identity in pancreas development and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Ben Z; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The endocrine and exocrine cells in the adult pancreas are not static, but can change their differentiation state in response to injury or stress. This concept of cells in flux means that there may be ways to generate certain types of cells (such as insulin-producing β-cells) and prevent formation of others (such as transformed neoplastic cells). We review different aspects of cell identity in the pancreas, discussing how cells achieve their identity during embryonic development and maturation, and how this identity remains plastic, even in the adult pancreas.

  3. The National Pancreas Foundation fellows symposium program 2006 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Gelrud, Andres; Whitcomb, David C

    2010-04-01

    Clinical and translational research is critical for the development of improvement in care of pancreatic diseases. Major concerns are the lack of dedicated trainees in pancreatic research and the difficulty for the remaining trainees to develop independent research careers to be included into the pancreas research community. This article describes the efforts of Solvay Pharmaceuticals and American academic leaders working through the National Pancreas Foundation to facilitate the development and expansion of a new generation of pancreas-related clinical and translational researchers through a 3-year fellows symposium.

  4. Pancreatic Candidiasis That Mimics a Malignant Pancreatic Cystic Tumor on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Report in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Seong, Minjung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun

    2015-01-01

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  5. Perirenal PEComa: Computed Tomography Findings and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gkizas, Christos V; Tsili, Athina C; Katsios, Christos; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) as mesenchymal tumors and tumor-like conditions composed of epithelioid cells with a perivascular distribution. These tumors may show benign or malignant histology and/or biological behavior. However, the pathological features of malignancy may not correlate with biologic aggressiveness, and the criteria for malignancy are not clearly defined. Abdominopelvic PEComas are very rare and have been reported in various locations, including kidney, liver, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, peritoneum, and retroperitoneum. Cross-sectional imaging techniques, including computed tomography (CT) may play an important role in the accurate detection and characterization of these tumors. We present the third case of an extremely rare PEComa with perirenal location, discuss CT findings and differential diagnosis. PMID:26900493

  6. Centroacinar Cells Are Progenitors That Contribute to Endocrine Pancreas Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Delaspre, Fabien; Beer, Rebecca L.; Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangliang; Gee, Stephen; Vitery, Maria del Carmen; Wheelan, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a paucity of insulin-producing β-cells. With the goal of finding therapeutic routes to treat diabetes, we aim to find molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in β-cell neogenesis and regeneration. To facilitate discovery of such mechanisms, we use a vertebrate organism where pancreatic cells readily regenerate. The larval zebrafish pancreas contains Notch-responsive progenitors that during development give rise to adult ductal, endocrine, and centroacinar cells (CACs). Adult CACs are also Notch responsive and are morphologically similar to their larval predecessors. To test our hypothesis that adult CACs are also progenitors, we took two complementary approaches: 1) We established the transcriptome for adult CACs. Using gene ontology, transgenic lines, and in situ hybridization, we found that the CAC transcriptome is enriched for progenitor markers. 2) Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that CACs do form new endocrine cells after β-cell ablation or partial pancreatectomy. We concluded that CACs and their larval predecessors are the same cell type and represent an opportune model to study both β-cell neogenesis and β-cell regeneration. Furthermore, we show that in cftr loss-of-function mutants, there is a deficiency of larval CACs, providing a possible explanation for pancreatic complications associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:26153247

  7. Experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of the viscoelastic porcine pancreas and preliminary case study on the human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wex, C; Fröhlich, M; Brandstädter, K; Bruns, C; Stoll, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the mechanical properties of the pancreas. Up to now, the mechanical properties of the pancreas are not sufficiently characterized. The possibility of intraoperative mechanical testing of pathological pancreata will allow the classification of pancreatic diseases in the future. The application of mechanical parameters instead of the intraoperative frozen section analysis shortens waiting times in the operating room. This study proves the general applicability of shear rheology for the determination of the mechanical properties of pancreas and the assessment of graft quality for transplantation. Porcine and human pancreas samples were examined ex vivo and a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior was observed. Pancreas was found to be more viscous than liver but both abdominal organs showed a similar flow behavior. The shear deformation dependence of healthy human pancreas was similar to porcine pancreas. An increase in the post-mortem time led to an increase in the complex modulus for a post-mortem time up to 8.5 days. Histological investigations showed that an increased amount of collagen coincides with the stiffening of the pancreatic tissue.

  8. Characterisation of CART-containing neurons and cells in the porcine pancreas, gastro-intestinal tract, adrenal and thyroid glands

    PubMed Central

    Wierup, Nils; Gunnarsdóttir, Anna; Ekblad, Eva; Sundler, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Background The peptide CART is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons, as well as in endocrine cells. Known peripheral sites of expression include the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the pancreas, and the adrenal glands. In rodent pancreas CART is expressed both in islet endocrine cells and in nerve fibers, some of which innervate the islets. Recent data show that CART is a regulator of islet hormone secretion, and that CART null mutant mice have islet dysfunction. CART also effects GI motility, mainly via central routes. In addition, CART participates in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis. We investigated CART expression in porcine pancreas, GI-tract, adrenal glands, and thyroid gland using immunocytochemistry. Results CART immunoreactive (IR) nerve cell bodies and fibers were numerous in pancreatic and enteric ganglia. The majority of these were also VIP IR. The finding of intrinsic CART containing neurons indicates that pancreatic and GI CART IR nerve fibers have an intrinsic origin. No CART IR endocrine cells were detected in the pancreas or in the GI tract. The adrenal medulla harboured numerous CART IR endocrine cells, most of which were adrenaline producing. In addition CART IR fibers were frequently seen in the adrenal cortex and capsule. The capsule also contained CART IR nerve cell bodies. The majority of the adrenal CART IR neuronal elements were also VIP IR. CART IR was also seen in a substantial proportion of the C-cells in the thyroid gland. The majority of these cells were also somatostatin IR, and/or 5-HT IR, and/or VIP IR. Conclusion CART is a major neuropeptide in intrinsic neurons of the porcine GI-tract and pancreas, a major constituent of adrenaline producing adrenomedullary cells, and a novel peptide of the thyroid C-cells. CART is suggested to be a regulatory peptide in the porcine pancreas, GI-tract, adrenal gland and thyroid. PMID:17625001

  9. Intraductal tubular neoplasms of the pancreas: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Adeline; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal lesions of the pancreas are an uncommon but increasingly recognized group of entities mainly because of advances in imaging technology. In the past, precise categorization and understanding of true pancreatic intraduct neoplasms were hampered not only by their relative rarity but also because of the plethora of terminology and criteria used in nomenclature and diagnosis. Although significant progress has been made in the characterization of some of these lesions, as exemplified by intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, understanding of the rare intraductal tubular adenoma (ITA) and intraduct tubular carcinoma (ITC) continues to evolve. By definition, these are a group of intraductal, radiologically detectable neoplasms that can progress to or be associated with invasive adenocarcinoma and, as such, are precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Their often shared clinical and radiological features make precise histological diagnosis essential for appropriate management and optimal outcome. We provide an overview of these neoplasms and highlight recent developments in the understanding of ITA and ITC which have led to ITA being considered a variant of gastric-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and ITC being encompassed within the intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm category. We also emphasize the distinguishing histological features to aid diagnosis of these rare lesions.

  10. Epidermoid Cyst in an Intrapancreatic Accessory Spleen: Case Report and Literature Review of the Preoperative Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shin; Mori, Hideki; Zakimi, Moriya; Yamada, Koki; Chinen, Kenji; Arashiro, Masayuki; Shinoura, Susumu; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Murakami, Takahiro; Kunishima, Fumihito

    2016-01-01

    An epidermoid cyst arising within an intrapancreatic accessory spleen (ECIAS) is rare, and also difficult to correctly diagnose before surgery. It is mostly misdiagnosed as a cystic tumor, such as a mucinous cystic neoplasm or as a solid tumor with cystic degeneration, such as a neuro endocrine tumor. We herein report a case of ECIAS and also perform a literature review of 35 reports of ECIAS. Although the preoperative diagnosis of ECIAS using conventional imaging is relatively difficult to make, careful preoperative examinations of the features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis of ECIAS which might thereby reduce the number of unnecessary resections. PMID:27904107

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus associated spondyloarthropathy: pathogenic insights based on imaging findings and response to highly active antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    McGonagle, D; Reade, S; Marzo-Ortega, H; Gibbon, W; O'Connor, P; Morgan, A; Melsom, R; Morgan, E; Emery, P

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated spondyloarthropathy (SpA) is poorly understood. In this case report a patient is described with severe HIV associated reactive arthritis, who on magnetic resonance imaging and sonographic imaging of inflamed knees had extensive polyenthesitis and adjacent osteitis. The arthritis deteriorated despite conventional antirheumatic treatment, but improved dramatically after highly active antiretroviral treatment, which was accompanied by a significant rise in CD4 T lymphocyte counts. The implications of the localisation of pathology and effect of treatment for pathogenic models of SpA and rheumatoid arthritis in the setting of HIV infection are discussed.

 PMID:11406526

  12. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  13. Proteomic analysis of pancreas derived from adult cloned pig

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Young Keun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Han, Yong-Mahn; Koo, Deog-Bon Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    2008-02-08

    The potential medical applications of animal cloning include xenotransplantation, but the complex molecular cascades that control porcine organ development are not fully understood. Still, it has become apparent that organs derived from cloned pigs may be suitable for transplantation into humans. In this study, we examined the pancreas of an adult cloned pig developed through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting. Proteomic analysis revealed 69 differentially regulated proteins, including such apoptosis-related species as annexins, lamins, and heat shock proteins, which were unanimously upregulated in the SCNT sample. Among the downregulated proteins in SCNT pancreas were peroxiredoxins and catalase. Western blot results indicate that several antioxidant enzymes and the anti-apoptotic protein were downregulated in SCNT pancreas, whereas several caspases were upregulated. Together, these data suggest that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pancreas of an adult cloned pig leads to apoptosis.

  14. Post-Primary Students' Images of Mathematics: Findings from a Survey of Irish Ordinary Level Mathematics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Ciara; Stynes, Martin; O'Donoghue, John

    2016-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out as part of a PhD research study to investigate the image of mathematics held by post-primary students in Ireland. The study focused on students in fifth year of post-primary education studying ordinary level mathematics for the Irish Leaving Certificate examination--the final examination for students in…

  15. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. Conclusion: PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced. PMID:26288527

  16. Cystic degeneration of neuro endocrine tumor of pancreas and Crohn's disease: true or coincidental association?

    PubMed

    Hedfi, Mohamed; Abbasi, Imed; Intissar, Chibani; Salwa, Ammar; Chouchen, Adnen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) or islet cell tumors are rare lesions, the incidence of which is estimated to be less than 1 per 100,000 person-years in the general population. PETs can be divided into functional (exhibit a distinct clinical syndrome due to hormone hypersecretion) and non-functional tumors. The majority of PETs are non-functional. In spite of their rarity, cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are characterized by existing or potential malignancy that cannot be ignored during decisive process with regard to the choice of treatment. The purpose of this workis to find an association with Crohn's disease and cystic degeneration of a neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas. Crohn's disease may affect extraintestinal organs, including the pancreas. In such cases, It seems certain that many patients diagnosed with Crohn disease (CD) are predisposed to a wider spectrum of cancers. We present a case of pancreatic cyst with no typical features of pseudocyst in the medical interview, with history of Crohn's disease, treated by caudal pancreatectomy. We tried to evaluate the clinical and morphological features of so-called cystic neoplasms associated with inflammatory bowel disease and to define their pathological characteristics.

  17. Monolayer cultures derived from neonatal hamster pancreas. Light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheid, C R; Macchi, I A

    1974-03-01

    Cells derived by trypsinization of neonatal golden hamster pancreas were cultured in modified Eagle's medium for 120 h in the presence of glucose (0.8 mg/ml) and for an additional 48 h in medium containing glucose (0.8 or 3.1 mg/ml) or tolbutamide (1,000 microg/ml) plus glucose (0.8 mg/ml). At day 7, cultures were stained differentially for light microscopy or examined by electron microscopy. Immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) in the culture medium were measured by standard immunoassay procedures. Staining properties and ultrastructural appearance of cultured cells were comparable to those of the intact neonatal hamster pancreas. Cultures consisted predominantly of cells possessing aldehyde fuchsin positive (AF(+)) cytoplasmic granules resembling ultrastructurally those of the intact neonatal pancreatic beta cells and additionally, those of fibroblastoid, acinar, acino-insular, and aldehyde fuchsin negative (AF(-)) argyrophilic cells. IRI release rate by the cultured cells was increased in the presence of elevated glucose or tolbutamide which paralleled the loss of AF(+) granulation, but IRG release rate was suppressed by elevated glucose concentration. These findings indicate that these monolayer cultures consist of most of the cell types occurring in the neonatal pancreas, including endocrinologically competent islet cells.

  18. Pancreas-specific Pten deficiency causes partial resistance to diabetes and elevated hepatic AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zan; Fan, Yan; Zhang, Weiqi; Xu, Jun; Cheng, Jing; Ding, Mingxiao; Deng, Hongkui

    2009-06-01

    PTEN, a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT pathway, is an important modulator of insulin signaling. To determine the metabolic function of pancreatic Pten, we generated pancreas-specific Pten knockout (PPKO) mice. PPKO mice had enlarged pancreas and elevated proliferation of acinar cells. They also exhibited hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and altered amino metabolism. Notably, PPKO mice showed delayed onset of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and sex-biased resistance to high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. To investigate the mechanism for the resistance to HFD-induced hyperglycemia in PPKO mice, we evaluated AKT phosphorylation in major insulin-responsive tissues: the liver, muscle, and fat. We found that Pten loss in the pancreas causes the elevation of AKT signaling in the liver. The phosphorylation of AKT and its downstream substrate GSK3beta was increased in the liver of PPKO mice, while PTEN level was decreased without detectable excision of Pten allele in the liver of PPKO mice. Proteomics analysis revealed dramatically decreased level of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in the liver of PPKO mice, which may also contribute to the lower blood glucose level of PPKO mice fed with HFD. Together, our findings reveal a novel response in the liver to pancreatic defect in metabolic regulation, adding a new dimension to understanding diabetes resistance.

  19. Experimental assessment of CT-based thermometry during laser ablation of porcine pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schena, E.; Saccomandi, P.; Giurazza, F.; Caponero, M. A.; Mortato, L.; Di Matteo, F. M.; Panzera, F.; Del Vescovo, R.; Beomonte Zobel, B.; Silvestri, S.

    2013-08-01

    Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is employed to destroy tumors in organs, and its outcome strongly depends on the temperature distribution inside the treated tissue. The recent introduction of computed tomography (CT) scan thermometry, based on the CT number dependence of the tissue with temperature, overcomes the invasiveness of other techniques used to monitor temperature during LITT. The averaged CT number (ROI = 0.02 cm2) of an ex vivo swine pancreas is monitored during LITT (Nd:YAG laser power of 3 W, treatment time: 120 s) at different distances from the applicator (from 4 to 30 mm). The averaged CT number shows a clear decrease during treatment: it is highest at 4 mm from the applicator (mean variation in the whole treatment of -0.256 HU s-1) and negligible at 30 mm, since the highest temperature increase is present close to the applicator (i.e., 45 °C at 4 mm and 25 °C at 6 mm). To obtain the relationship between CT numbers and pancreas temperature, the reference temperature was measured by 12 fiber Bragg grating sensors. The CT number decreases as a function of temperature, showing a nonlinear trend with a mean thermal sensitivity of -0.50 HU °C-1. Results here reported are the first assessment of pancreatic CT number dependence on temperature, at the best of our knowledge. Findings can be useful to further investigate CT scan thermometry during LITT on the pancreas.

  20. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.