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Sample records for pancreas imaging findings

  1. Imaging findings in a case of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Chung, Won Jung; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, Seung Soo; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2010-01-01

    Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma (MAEC) of the pancreas is extremely uncommon. We report here a rare case of MAEC of the pancreas presenting as watery diarrhea. This is the first report in the English-language literature that describes the imaging findings of MAEC of the pancreas, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR cholangiopancreatography features.

  2. Circumportal pancreas: a review of the literature and image findings.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Tara M; Sakala, Michelle; Tappouni, Rafel

    2015-07-01

    Fused pancreatic tissue encasing the portal and/or superior mesenteric vein, circumportal pancreas, is a congenital anomaly that has been associated with operative complications in resections involving the head of the pancreas. We describe this anomaly and highlight its pathophysiology and surgical outcomes through a review of the literature to date, drawings and a computed tomography example. A literature search was undertaken using Pubmed and the search terms "circumportal pancreas," "annular pancreas" and "pancreatic anomaly." 91 cases of circumportal pancreas were identified in the literature. The number of reported cases increased with time. 14 were documented as having undergone surgery (11 carcinoma or suspected carcinoma/3 benign neoplasm). Surgical outcome was reported in 13. Five of 13 (38.5 %) experienced a fistula. Three cases were treated with a drain. One incident of potentially unnecessary surgery due to the misidentification of circumportal pancreas was noted. (1) The identification of circumportal pancreas is increasing but is relatively rare. (2) Varying locations of the main pancreatic duct can induce inappropriate construction during pancreaticojejunostomy and can influence the risk of fistula. In the presence of CP, distal pancreatectomy with pancreatic division in front of portal vein creates two sources of pancreatic fistula. (3) The high incidence of associated vascular variants can directly influence pancreatic resection and can affect vascular reconstruction for complete oncologic resection. Therefore, the preoperative location of the main pancreatic duct and presence of any vascular variants in CP must be systematically identified before programed surgery.

  3. Fibrosis and postoperative fistula of the pancreas: correlation with MR imaging findings--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruo; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Osada, Shinji; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Noda, Yoshifumi; Tanahashi, Yukichi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2014-03-01

    To assess the potential value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluating pancreatic fibrosis and predicting the development of postoperative pancreatic fistula. This retrospective study had institutional review board approval, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. MR images obtained in 29 consecutive patients (15 men, 14 women; mean age, 64.9 years; age range, 21-80 years) who underwent pancreatectomy were evaluated. The pancreas-to-muscle signal intensity (SI) ratio on unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted, dynamic contrast material-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted images and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the pancreas were measured. MR imaging parameters were correlated with the degrees of pancreatic fibrosis and expression of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) by using univariate and multivariate regression analyses and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The relationships between the development of postoperative pancreatic fistula and the MR imaging measurements were examined by using logistic regression analysis and the Mann-Whitney U test. Multiple regression analysis showed that pancreas-to-muscle SI ratios on T1-weighted images and ADC values were independently associated with pancreatic fibrosis (r(2) = 0.66, P < .001) and with activated PSC expression (r(2) = 0.67, P < .001). The mean pancreas-to-muscle SI ratio (± standard deviation) on T1-weighted images was higher (P = .0029) for patients with postoperative pancreatic fistula (1.6 ± 0.2) than for those without (1.2 ± 0.2), and the odds ratio for postoperative pancreatic fistula was 21.3 in patients with an SI ratio of 1.41 and higher. The pancreas-to-muscle SI ratio on T1-weighted MR images of the pancreas may be a potential biomarker for assessment of pancreatic fibrosis and prediction of postoperative pancreatic fistula. RSNA, 2013

  4. MR imaging of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Erin; Hammond, Nancy; Miller, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pancreas is useful as both a problem-solving tool and an initial imaging examination of choice. With newer imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging, MR offers improved ability to detect and characterize lesions and identify and stage tumors and inflammation. MR cholangiopancreatography can be used to visualize the pancreatic and biliary ductal system. In this article, the use of MR to evaluate the pancreas, including recent advances, is reviewed and the normal appearance of the pancreas on different imaging sequences, as well as inflammatory diseases, congenital abnormalities, and neoplasms of the pancreas, are discussed.

  5. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  6. Liver, spleen, pancreas and kidney involvement by human fascioliasis: imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Zali, Mohammad Reza; Ghaziani, Tahereh; Shahraz, Saeed; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Radmehr, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica primarily involves the liver, however in some exceptional situations other organs have been reported to be involved. The ectopic involvement is either a result of Parasite migration or perhaps eosinophilic reaction. Case presentation Here we report a known case of multiple myeloma who was under treatment with prednisolone and melphalan. He was infected by Fasciola hepatica, which involved many organs and the lesions were mistaken with metastatic ones. Discussion Presented here is a very unusual case of the disease, likely the first case involving the pancreas, spleen, and kidney, as well as the liver. PMID:15294025

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  8. Pancreas transplant imaging: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Tolat, Parag P; Foley, W Dennis; Johnson, Christopher; Hohenwalter, Mark D; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2015-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation aims to restore physiologic normoglycemia in diabetic patients with glomerulopathy and avoid or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and arteriopathy. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is the most common approach, using a cadaveric pancreas donation in conjunction with either cadaveric or live donor renal transplant. Alternative techniques include pancreas after kidney transplant, in which the pancreas transplant is performed some years after renal transplant. Pancreas transplant alone is utilized rarely in diabetic patients with compensated renal function. Pancreas grafts have vascular and enteric connections that vary in their anatomic approach, and understanding of this is critical for imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging techniques are directed to display the pancreatic transplant arterial and venous vasculature, parenchyma, and intestinal drainage pathway. Critical vascular information includes venous thrombosis (partial or complete), arterial occlusion, or aneurysm. Parenchymal abnormalities are nonspecific and occur in pancreatitis, graft rejection, and subsequent graft ischemia. Peripancreatic fluid collections include hematoma/seroma, pseudocyst, and abscess. The latter two are related to pancreatitis, duct disruption, or leak from the duodenojejunostomy. An understanding of transplant anatomy and complications will lead to appropriate use of imaging techniques to diagnose or exclude important complications.

  9. US Findings in Patients at Risk for Pancreas Transplant Failure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Tara A; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Harbell, Jack; Kornak, John; Stock, Peter G; Feldstein, Vickie A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine if ultrasonographic (US) findings, including Doppler US findings, are associated with subsequent pancreas transplant failure. Materials and Methods A cohort of adult patients who underwent pancreas transplantation at a tertiary institution over the course of 10 years (from 2003 to 2012) was retrospectively evaluated for failure, which was defined as return to insulin therapy or surgical graft removal. The institutional review board provided a waiver of informed consent. All US images obtained within the 1st postoperative year were reviewed for three findings: arterial flow (presence or absence of intraparenchymal forward diastole flow), splenic vein thrombus, and edema. These findings were correlated with pancreas graft failure within 1-year after surgery by using Cox proportional hazards models and hazard ratios. Results A total of 228 transplants were included (mean patient age, 41.6 years; range, 19-57 years; 122 men, 106 women). Absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow was identified in nine of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 45%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23, 68) and in 15 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 93% [193 of 208]; 95% CI: 89, 96). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 6.2 (95% CI: 3.1, 12.4). Splenic vein thrombus was identified in 10 of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 50%; 95% CI: 27, 73) and in 25 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 88% [183 of 208]; 95% CI: 83, 92). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.4, 7.4). Edema had the lowest specificity (Cox proportional hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.9). In the multivariate analysis, only absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow remained significantly associated with transplant failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.6; 95% CI: 1.0, 12.8; P = .045). Conclusion Absent or reversed diastolic arterial Doppler flow has a stronger association with transplant failure than does splenic vein thrombus or edema. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  10. Papillary carcinoma of the pancreas: findings of US and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.Y.; Lim, J.H.; Lee, J.D.

    1985-02-01

    Two cases of papillary carcinoma of the pancreas were evaluated by ultrasound and CT. The sonographic and CT findings were those of a well-defined oval mass with partial cystic change. There was radiologic-pathologic correlation.

  11. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  12. [Endosonography for differential diagnosis of malignant findings of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Prinz, C

    2009-02-01

    Due to recent technical innovations endosonography has attained a special importance for the examination of malignant pancreatic tumors. Modern high-resolution radial instruments with 360 degrees imaging give a very good overall view with fine resolution and contrast and allow excellent detection of solid space-occupying lesions in the region of the pancreas. In meta-analyses a very good sensitivity for tumor detection of over 90% could be demonstrated, comparable to the results of the modern CT pancreas spiral technique. Endosonography has an advantage over CT examination especially for the diagnostics of very small neuroendocrine tumors (<1 cm), for example for the detection of insulinomas. For cystic pancreas processes only endosonography allows further specific differential diagnostics by the determination of important prognostic tumor markers, such as CEA or CA-19-9 by simultaneous puncture of the lesion.

  13. Cystic tumors of the pancreas: imaging and management.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine E; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2012-05-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are a subset of rare pancreatic tumors that vary from benign to malignant. Many have specific imaging findings that allow them to be differentiated from each other. This article (1) reviews the imaging features of the common cystic pancreatic lesions, including serous microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic tumor, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor, and solid pseudopapillary tumor, and including the less common lesions such as cystic endocrine tumors, cystic metastases, cystic teratomas, and lymphangiomas; and (2) provides comprehensive algorithms on how to manage the individual lesions, with recommendations on when to reimage patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multimodality Imaging Evaluation of an Uncommon Entity: Esophageal Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Takman; Lowry, Debra; Carbone, Peter; Barbick, Brian; Kindelan, Joshua; Marks, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old male was referred to the Radiology Department with new onset of right upper quadrant and epigastric abdominal pain. He had no past medical or surgical history. Physical exam was unremarkable. The patient underwent computed tomography (CT), fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal (GI) evaluation, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation, revealing the presence of a heterogeneous esophageal mass. In light of imaging findings and clinical workup, the patient was ultimately referred for thorascopic surgery. Surgical findings and histology confirmed the diagnosis of esophageal heterotopic pancreas. PMID:24744946

  15. Intraoperative imaging of pancreas transplant allografts using indocyanine green with laser fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Chinnakotla, Srinath; Khan, Tariq; Nikitin, Dmitriy; Vasani, Sugam; Randall, Henry B.; McKenna, Greg J.; Ruiz, Richard; Onaca, Nicholas; Levy, Marlon F.; Goldstein, Robert M.; Docherty, John C.; Hurd, David K.; Klintmalm, Göran B.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular thrombosis is a cause of allograft loss after pancreas transplantation. We present the use of intraoperative fluorescence imaging with the SPY imaging device (Novadaq Technologies Inc, Toronto, Canada) in two pancreas transplants as a means to assess potency of the vascular anastomoses. Intravenous indocyanine green 2.5 mg/mL was fluoresced with the device to create the intraoperative video sequences, which were recorded. After 60-day follow-up, real-time SPY imaging on these two pancreas transplants did not demonstrate adverse effects on patients or the transplanted allografts. This method of vascular imaging could prove useful in improving short-term graft survival and possibly lowering the thrombosis rates seen with pancreas transplantation. Long-term correlation studies between intraoperative findings and graft survival must be performed to confirm the utility of this imaging method. PMID:18628923

  16. Pleomorphic carcinoma of the pancreas: computed-tomographic, sonographic, and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfman, N.T.; Karstaedt, N.; Kawamoto, E.H.

    1985-02-01

    The authors present a series of eight cases of pleomorphic carcinoma of the pancreas, an uncommon lesion that contains bizarre giant cells and resembles sarcoma histologically. To our knowledge, this entity has not been described in the radiological literature. Clinical symptoms are similar to those of the usual pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma, but at presentation the primary tumor mass is usually large, and widespread metastatic disease is present. The most striking finding is massive lymphadenopathy, which may mimic lymphoma. A combination of clinical history, imaging findings, and results of percutaneous biopsy should lead to the proper diagnosis and may help to differentiate this entity from others that may affect lymph nodes.

  17. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-12-01

    CT currently plays a vital role in pancreatic cancer staging. Continued advancements in computers, scanner technology, and 3D software have improved CT detection of smaller masses and staging. In particular, the introduction of MDCT and real-time 3D volume-rendering software have greatly improved the visualization of the pancreas and adjacent vasculature. This progress will continue as manufacturers introduce the next generation of scanners, which can acquire up to 32 slices per second with ever faster scan times. The impact of these new scanners on diagnostic accuracy will need to be carefully evaluated.

  19. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Pancreas++: Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyu; Martin, Bronwen; Cai, Huan; Fiori, Jennifer L.; Egan, Josephine M.; Siddiqui, Sana; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral, and “involuted” alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta) quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard. PMID:23293605

  1. Imaging of the pancreas using dynamic positron emission tomography with N-13 ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, N.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Adachi, H.; Senda, M.; Saji, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-05-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new imaging technique of the pancreas. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 3 normal volunteers, 9 patient without the evidence of pancreatic diseases, 2 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head and one patient with islet cell carcinoma. Immediately after the intravenous injection of 10-20mCi of N-13 ammonia, data were obtained every 150 seconds for 30 minutes using a multi-slice whole-body PET scanner. In two cases of adenocarcinoma, the pancreas was not imaged, probably because the nontumorous portion of the pancreas was also suffered from severe pancreatitis due to the duct obstruction at the pancreatic head. In the case with islet cell carcinoma, the radionuclide was accumulated in the tumor and pancreas similarly. Thus, both of them were visualized but not separated. The central necrosis of the tumor showed poor radioactivity. The mechanism of the radionuclide accumulation in the pancreas is not well understood. However, the authors also studied the biodistribution of N-13 ammonia in mice and confirmed that there is an early and high accumulation of the radionuclide in the murine pancreas. These preliminary results of this paper suggest that the dynamic PET study may be useful for the imaging of the pancreas as well as for the further study of the blood supply and metabolism of the pancreas.

  2. A hybrid method for pancreas extraction from CT image based on level set methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction.

  3. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS. PMID:26879163

  4. A Bottom-up Approach for Pancreas Segmentation using Cascaded Superpixels and (Deep) Image Patch Labeling.

    PubMed

    Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Roth, Holger R; Liu, Jiamin; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M

    2016-11-01

    Robust organ segmentation is a prerequisite for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), quantitative imaging analysis, pathology detection and surgical assistance. For organs with high anatomical variability (e.g., the pancreas), previous segmentation approaches report low accuracies, compared to well studied organs, such as the liver or heart.We present an automated bottomup approach for pancreas segmentation in abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. The method generates a hierarchical cascade of information propagation by classifying image patches at different resolutions and cascading (segments) superpixels. The system contains four steps: 1) decomposition of CT slice images into a set of disjoint boundary-preserving superpixels; 2) computation of pancreas class probability maps via dense patch labeling; 3) superpixel classification by pooling both intensity and probability features to form empirical statistics in cascaded random forest frameworks; and 4) simple connectivity based post-processing. Dense image patch labeling is conducted using two methods: efficient random forest classification on image histogram, location and texture features; and more expensive (but more accurate) deep convolutional neural network classification, on larger image windows (i.e., with more spatial contexts). Oversegmented 2D CT slices by the Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC) approach are adopted through model/parameter calibration and labeled at the superpixel level for positive (pancreas) or negative (non-pancreas or background) classes.

  5. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support.

  6. Imaging considerations in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Ivan; Boparai, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the continuous improvement in the image quality of these techniques, the diagnosis of incidental pancreatic cysts has increased dramatically in the last decades. While the vast majority of these cysts are not clinically relevant, a small percentage of them will evolve into an invasive malignant tumor making their management challenging. Mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are the most common pancreatic cystic lesions with malignant potential. Imaging findings on CT and MRI correlate tightly with the presence of malignant degeneration in these neoplasms. IPMN can be classified based on their distribution as main duct, branch duct or mixed type lesions. MRI is superior to CT in demonstrating the communication of a branch duct IPMN with the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Most branch duct lesions are benign whereas tumors involving the MPD are frequently associated with malignancy. The presence of solid nodules, thick enhancing walls and/or septae, a wide (> 1 cm) connection of a side-branch lesion with the MPD and the size of the tumor > 3 cm are indicative of malignancy in a branch and mixed type IPMN. A main pancreatic duct > 6 mm, a mural nodule > 3 mm and an abnormal attenuating area in the adjacent pancreatic parenchyma on CT correlates with malignant disease in main duct and mixed type IPMN. An accurate characterization of these neoplasms by imaging is thus crucial for selecting the best management options. In this article, we review the imaging findings of IPMN including imaging predictors of malignancy and surgical resectability. We also discuss follow-up strategies for patients with surgically resected IPMN and patients with incidental pancreatic cysts. PMID:21160838

  7. Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores for dual-channel image-guided abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hyun, Hoon; Vargas, Christina; Gravier, Julien; Park, GwangLi; Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas-related complications are some of the most serious ones in abdominal surgery. The goal of this study was to develop and validate novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores that would enable real-time pancreas imaging to avoid the intraoperative pancreatic injury. After initial screening of a large NIR fluorophore library, the performance of 3 selected pancreas-targeted 700 nm NIR fluorophores, T700-H, T700-F, and MB, were quantified in mice, rats, and pigs. Dose ranging using 25 and 100 nmol, and 2.5 µmol of T700-F, and its imaging kinetics over a 4 h period were tested in each species. Three different 800 nm NIR fluorophores were employed for dual-channel FLARE™ imaging in pigs: 2 μmol of ZW800-1 for vessels and kidney, 1 μmol of ZW800-3C for lymph nodes, and 2 μmol of ESNF31 for adrenal glands. T700-F demonstrated the highest signal to background ratio (SBR), with peak SBR at 4 h postinjection in mice. In pigs, T700-F produced an SBR≥2 against muscle, spleen, and lymph nodes for up to 8 h after a single intravenous injection. The combination of T700-F with each 800 nm NIR fluorophore provided simultaneous dual-channel intraoperative imaging of pancreas with surrounding organs in real time. Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores combined with the FLARE dual-channel imaging system enable the real-time intraoperative pancreas imaging which helps surgeons perform safer and more curative abdominal surgeries.

  8. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    ... it. Alternative Names Pancreatic divisum Images Digestive system Endocrine glands Pancreas References Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  9. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the pancreas: optimizing b-value for visualization of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Shindo, Toshikazu; Hakamada, Hiroto; Takumi, Koji; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masanori; Kamimura, Kiyoshisa; Umanodan, Aya; Ideue, Junnichi; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    To determine the optimal b-value of 3.0-T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for visualizing pancreatic adenocarcinomas Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with different b-values (b = 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 s/mm(2)) at 3.0 T. For each b-value, we retrospectively evaluated DWI findings of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (clear hyperintensity relative to the surrounding pancreas, hyperintensity with an unclear distal border, and isointensity) and image quality, and measured tumour-to-pancreas signal intensity (SI) ratios. DWI findings, image quality, and tumour-to-pancreas SI ratios were compared between the four b-values. There was a significantly higher incidence of tumours showing clear hyperintensity on DWI with b-value of 1500 s/mm(2) than on that with b-value of 1000 s/mm(2) (P < 0.001), and on DWI with b-value of 1000 s/mm(2) than on that with b-value of 500 s/mm(2) (P < 0.001). The tumour-to-distal pancreas SI ratio was higher with b-value of 1500 s/mm(2) than with b-value of 1000 s/mm(2) (P < 0.001), and with b-value of 1000 s/mm(2) than with b-value of 500 s/mm(2) (P < 0.001). A lower image quality was obtained at increasing b-values (P < 0.001); the lowest scores were observed with b-value of 2000 s/mm(2). The use of b = 1500 s/mm(2) for 3.0-T DWI can improve the delineation of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. • Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been used for diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma • The techniques for DWI, including the choice of b-values, vary considerably • DWI often fails to delineate pancreatic adenocarcinomas because of hyperintense pancreas • DWI with a higher b-value can improve the tumour delineation • The lowest image quality was obtained on DWI with b-value = 2000 s/mm (2).

  10. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis.

  11. Possible type 1 diabetes risk prediction: Using ultrasound imaging to assess pancreas inflammation in the inducible autoimmune diabetes BBDR model.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Frederick R; Hupple, Clinton; Norowski, Elaine; Walsh, Nicole C; Przewozniak, Natalia; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Van Dessel, Filia M; Jurczyk, Agata; Harlan, David M; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita; Yang, Chaoxing

    2017-01-01

    Studies of human cadaveric pancreas specimens indicate that pancreas inflammation plays an important role in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. Due to the inaccessibility of pancreas in living patients, imaging technology to visualize pancreas inflammation is much in need. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of utilizing ultrasound imaging to assess pancreas inflammation longitudinally in living rats during the progression leading to type 1 diabetes onset. The virus-inducible BBDR type 1 diabetes rat model was used to systematically investigate pancreas changes that occur prior to and during development of autoimmunity. The nearly 100% diabetes incidence upon virus induction and the highly consistent time course of this rat model make longitudinal imaging examination possible. A combination of histology, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and ultrasound imaging technology was used to identify stage-specific pancreas changes. Our histology data indicated that exocrine pancreas tissue of the diabetes-induced rats underwent dramatic changes, including blood vessel dilation and increased CD8+ cell infiltration, at a very early stage of disease initiation. Ultrasound imaging data revealed significant acute and persistent pancreas inflammation in the diabetes-induced rats. The pancreas micro-vasculature was significantly dilated one day after diabetes induction, and large blood vessel (superior mesenteric artery in this study) dilation and inflammation occurred several days later, but still prior to any observable autoimmune cell infiltration of the pancreatic islets. Our data demonstrate that ultrasound imaging technology can detect pancreas inflammation in living rats during the development of type 1 diabetes. Due to ultrasound's established use as a non-invasive diagnostic tool, it may prove useful in a clinical setting for type 1 diabetes risk prediction prior to autoimmunity and to assess the effectiveness of potential therapeutics.

  12. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm–16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6–49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image. PMID:27610132

  13. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Miller, Frank H; Chen, Zongming E; Merrick, Laura; Mortele, Koenraad J; Hoff, Frederick L; Hammond, Nancy A; Yaghmai, Vahid; Vahid, Yaghmai; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly used in the detection and characterization of pancreatic lesions. Diffusion-weighted imaging may provide additional information to radiologists evaluating patients who have cystic or solid neoplasms of the pancreas. Because of greater freedom of motion of water molecules in fluid-rich environments, simple cysts in the pancreas have higher signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images with a b value of 0 sec/mm2 and lower signal intensity on high-b-value images. High apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values can be obtained on ADC maps because of the T2 “shine-through” effect. In contrast, solid neoplasms of the pancreas show increased signal intensity relative to the pancreas on diffusion-weighted images with a b value of 0 sec/mm2 and relatively high signal intensity on high-b-value images. Diffusion-weighted imaging can help detect solid pancreatic neoplasms with extremely dense cellularity or extracellular fibrosis by demonstrating significantly low ADC values, and these neoplasms may be better detected on diffusion-weighted MR images because of better contrast, although the resolution is generally worse. However, diffusion-weighted imaging may not be capable of helping definitively characterize solid lesions as inflammatory or neoplastic because of an overlap in ADC values between the two types. For example, it is difficult to distinguish poorly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma from mass-forming pancreatitis at diffusion-weighted imaging because of similarly low ADC values attributed to dense fibrosis.

  14. Abdominal sarcoidosis: cross-sectional imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Başara, Işıl; Altay, Canan; Harman, Mustafa; Rocher, Laurence; Karabulut, Nevzat; Seçil, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The lungs and the lymphoid system are the most commonly involved organs. Extrapulmonary involvement is reported in 30% of patients, and the abdomen is the most common extrapulmonary site with a frequency of 50%–70%. Although intra-abdominal sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic, its presence may affect the prognosis and treatment options. The lesions are less characteristic and may mimick neoplastic or infectious diseases such as lymphoma, diffuse metastasis, and granulomatous inflammation. The liver and spleen are the most common abdominal sites of involvement. Sarcoidosis of the gastrointestinal system, pancreas, and kidneys are extremely rare. Adenopathy which is most commonly found in the porta hepatis, exudative ascites, and multiple granulomatous nodules studding the peritoneum are the reported manifestations of abdominal sarcoidosis. Since abdominal sarcoidosis is less common and long-standing, unrecognized disease can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Imaging contributes to diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal sarcoidosis. In this report we reviewed the cross-sectional imaging findings of hepatobiliary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary sarcoidosis. PMID:25512071

  15. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of a solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    van der Vorst, Joost R; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Hutteman, Merlijn; Bosse, Tjalling; Smit, Vincent T H B M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Frangioni, John V; Bonsing, Bert A

    2012-07-27

    A 67-year-old female presented with unexplained abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of the abdomen incidentally revealed a mass in the uncinate process of the pancreas. This mass was resected and based on histopathological findings, diagnosed as a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pancreas. A SFT is an extremely rare benign mesenchymal tumor that in 65% of cases affects the visceral pleura but can also affect extra-pleural sites. The intraoperative demarcation of pancreatic tumors, such as SFTs, can be challenging. In this report, the first clear intraoperative identification of a SFT of the pancreas in a human was shown using near-infrared fluorescence and methylene blue.

  16. MR imaging findings of endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Cornelius, Rebecca; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Golnik, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is a sight-threatening ophthalmologic emergency. The clinical diagnosis is often challenging, and delayed diagnosis may exacerbate the poor visual prognosis. B-scan ultrasonography or spectral domain optical coherence tomography are imaging aids at the clinician’s office. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and particularly MRI can also help in the assessment of disease extent or complications. MR imaging findings are rarely described in the literature. Here, we discuss the spectrum of imaging findings of endophthalmitis and correlate them with key anatomic and pathophysiologic details of the globe. Early disease is often subtle on MR imaging with thick uveal enhancement, while advanced disease demonstrates retinal/choroidal detachment, vitreal exudates and peribulbar inflammation. Other noninfectious inflammatory diseases of the globe can show similar findings; however, MR diffusion-weighted images help identify infectious exudates and evaluate response to therapy. Knowledge of the spectrum of imaging findings of this disease is important for radiologists and help in the management decision process. PMID:26915896

  17. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: CT imaging features and radiologic-pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Gopinathan; Zhang, Junwei; Al-Hamar, Nawal Ebrahim; Nga, Min En

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the imaging features of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. METHODS Ten patients (all female; mean age, 32 years) with histologic or cytologic diagnosis of SPN encountered between January 2007 and December 2013 were included in this study. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images were reviewed for location, attenuation, enhancement pattern, margin, shape, size, morphology, presence of capsule and calcification. CT appearances were correlated with histopathologic findings. RESULTS Tumors in the distal pancreatic body and tail had a tendency to be larger (mean size 12.6 cm vs. 4.0 cm). Six of the nine tumors that were resected had a fibrous pseudocapsule at histology, five of which could be identified on CT scan. Eight lesions had mixed hypoenhancing solid components and cystic areas corresponding to tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. The two smallest lesions were purely solid and nonencapsulated. Varied patterns of calcification were seen in four tumors. Three of the four pancreatic tail tumors invaded the spleen. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there was no evidence of recurrence in the nine patients who underwent surgical resection of the tumor. CONCLUSION A mixed solid and cystic pancreatic mass in a young woman is suggestive of SPN. However, smaller lesions may be completely solid. Splenic invasion can occur in pancreatic tail SPNs; however, in this series it did not adversely affect the long-term outcome. PMID:28089954

  18. Gd(III)-Dithiolane Gold Nanoparticles for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Rammohan, Nikhil; Rotz, Matthew W.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Preslar, Adam T.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a 5 year survival of approximately 3% and median survival of 6 months and is among the most dismal of prognoses in all of medicine. This poor prognosis is largely due to delayed diagnosis where patients remain asymptomatic until advanced disease is present. Therefore, techniques to allow early detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are desperately needed. Imaging of pancreatic tissue is notoriously difficult, and the development of new imaging techniques would impact our understanding of organ physiology and pathology with applications in disease diagnosis, staging, and longitudinal response to therapy in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides numerous advantages for these types of investigations; however, it is unable to delineate the pancreas due to low inherent contrast within this tissue type. To overcome this limitation, we have prepared a new Gd(III) contrast agent that accumulates in the pancreas and provides significant contrast enhancement by MR imaging. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a new dithiolane-Gd(III) complex and a straightforward and scalable approach for conjugation to a gold nanoparticle. We present data that show the nanoconjugates exhibit very high per particle values of r1 relaxivity at both low and high magnetic field strengths due to the high Gd(III) payload. We provide evidence of pancreatic tissue labeling that includes MR images, post-mortem biodistribution analysis, and pancreatic tissue evaluation of particle localization. Significant contrast enhancement was observed allowing clear identification of the pancreas with contrast-to-noise ratios exceeding 35:1. PMID:27050622

  19. Non-invasive glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor imaging in pancreas with {sup 18}F-Al labeled Cys{sup 39}-exendin-4

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Baoming; Xu, Yuping; Pan, Donghui; Wang, Lizhen; Yang, Runlin; Yu, Chunjing; Wan, Weixing; Wu, Yiwei; Yang, Min

    2016-02-26

    Purpose: Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is abundantly expressed on beta cells and may be an ideal target for the pancreas imaging. Monitoring the GLP-1R of pancreas could be benefit for understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes. In the present study, {sup 18}F-Al labeled exendin-4 analog, {sup 18}F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys{sup 39}-exendin-4, was evaluated for PET imaging GLP-1R in the pancreas. Methods: The targeting of {sup 18}F-Al labeled exendin-4 analog was examined in healthy and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Rats were injected with {sup 18}F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys{sup 39}-exendin-4 and microPET imaging was performed at 1 h postinjection, followed by ex vivo biodistribution. GLP-1R expression in pancreas was determined through post mortern examinations. Results: The pancreas of healthy rats was readily visualized after administration of {sup 18}F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys{sup 39}-exendin-4, whereas the pancreas of diabetic rats, as well as those from rats co-injected with excess of unlabeled peptides, was barely visible by microPET. At 60 min postinjection, the pancreatic uptakes were 1.02 ± 0.15%ID/g and 0.23 ± 0.05%ID/g in healthy and diabetic rats respectively. Under block, the pancreatic uptakes of non-diabetic rats reduced to 0.21 ± 0.07%ID/g at the same time point. Biodistribution data and IHC staining confirmed the findings of the microPET imaging. Conclusion: The favorable preclinical data indicated that {sup 18}F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys{sup 39}-exendin-4may be suitable for non-invasive monitoring functional pancreatic beta cells.

  20. Non-invasive glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor imaging in pancreas with (18)F-Al labeled Cys(39)-exendin-4.

    PubMed

    Mi, Baoming; Xu, Yuping; Pan, Donghui; Wang, Lizhen; Yang, Runlin; Yu, Chunjing; Wan, Weixing; Wu, Yiwei; Yang, Min

    2016-02-26

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is abundantly expressed on beta cells and may be an ideal target for the pancreas imaging. Monitoring the GLP-1R of pancreas could be benefit for understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes. In the present study, (18)F-Al labeled exendin-4 analog, (18)F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4, was evaluated for PET imaging GLP-1R in the pancreas. The targeting of (18)F-Al labeled exendin-4 analog was examined in healthy and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Rats were injected with (18)F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4 and microPET imaging was performed at 1 h postinjection, followed by ex vivo biodistribution. GLP-1R expression in pancreas was determined through post mortern examinations. The pancreas of healthy rats was readily visualized after administration of (18)F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4, whereas the pancreas of diabetic rats, as well as those from rats co-injected with excess of unlabeled peptides, was barely visible by microPET. At 60 min postinjection, the pancreatic uptakes were 1.02 ± 0.15%ID/g and 0.23 ± 0.05%ID/g in healthy and diabetic rats respectively. Under block, the pancreatic uptakes of non-diabetic rats reduced to 0.21 ± 0.07%ID/g at the same time point. Biodistribution data and IHC staining confirmed the findings of the microPET imaging. The favorable preclinical data indicated that (18)F-Al-NOTA-MAL-Cys(39)-exendin-4may be suitable for non-invasive monitoring functional pancreatic beta cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging findings of Pott's disease.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Garcia, Antonio; Sarria-Estrada, Silvana; Torrents-Odin, Carme; Casas-Gomila, Lourdes; Franquet, Elisa

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be an important public health problem in developed countries especially in deprived socioeconomic groups, older people, immunocompromised patients, drug-therapy resistant cases and the immigrant population. The spine is the most frequent location of musculoskeletal TB. The wide range of clinical presentations results in difficulties and delays in diagnosis. Advanced disease mimics other infections and malignancy. The diagnosis of spinal infections relies on three main factors: clinical symptoms, imaging and bacteriological culture. Advanced imaging such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and Fluor18-Deoxiglucose Positron Emission Tomography combined with CT (F-18 FDG PET-CT) demonstrate lesion extent, serve as guide for biopsy with aspiration for culture, assist surgery planning and contribute to follow-up. Diagnosis of TB cannot be established solely on the basis of clinical tests or imaging findings and biopsy may be required. Differential diagnosis between tuberculous and pyogenic spondylitis is of clinical importance, but may be difficult on the basis of radiological findings alone. Findings not pathognomonic but favoring tuberculous etiology include: slow progression of lesions with late preservation of disk space, involvement of several contiguous segments, large intraosseous and paraspinal abscesses containing calcifications, and body collapse with kyphotic deformity. In this essay the highlights of TB imaging are reviewed through published literature. In addition, we review retrospectively the radiological findings of 48 patients with tuberculous spondylitis treated from 1993 to 2010. There were 23 male and 25 female patients with a mean age of 53 years.

  2. [Histopathological studies of the rat pancreas after prolonged treatment with imuran. Preliminary findings].

    PubMed

    Mansi, C; Savarino, V; Picciotto, A; Testa, R; Dabove, L; Gismondi, C; Celle, G

    1980-01-30

    The AA. have studied the pathological effects on the pancreas of rats after chronic administration of azathioprine (AZA) in different doses. The most significant lesions are flattening of duct epitelium and the presence of protein plugs in the ducts. These pancreatic lesions are significantly more frequent in rate treated with higher doses than in controls and so are dose-dependent.

  3. Imaging findings of Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma in children.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Young Jin; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One; Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Yu Jin

    2017-01-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) is a rare, aggressive vascular tumor that typically occurs during infancy or early childhood. Though several case reports have discussed the imaging findings of KHE, larger comprehensive studies are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the imaging findings of KHE in children. A total of twelve cases of pathologically proven KHE were collected by searching our institution's pathology database for children diagnosed between January 2004 and April 2016 (6 male, 6 female; median age: 3 months; age range 7days - 18 years). CT (n=7) and MRI (n=9) findings were retrospectively evaluated. The location, morphology, enhancement, and growth pattern were analyzed. KHEs involved various locations: superficial or deep soft tissue of the extremities (n=4); abdomen (n=3; 2 cases, pancreas; 1 case, small bowel), neck and mediastinum (n=1); chest wall, diaphragm, and pericardium (n=1); abdominal wall (n=1); and head (IAC, CP angle) (n=2). Eight of 10 cases (80%) with CT/MR findings were locally invasive and involved two or more adjacent organs. Three cases presented as well-defined solid masses, and seven were associated with infiltrative lesions of the surrounding areas with (n=4) or without definite solid regions (n=3). In nine patients with MRI, all KHEs were heterogeneous and hyperintense to muscles on T2-weighted images (T2WI), while four KHEs consisted of some regions that were nearly isointense to muscle. Eight of the 10 cases with imaging exhibited heterogeneous intense enhancement, while only one demonstrated mild enhancement. Signal voids (n=2), engorged vessels (n=1), calcification (n=3), hemorrhage (n=1), or bone changes (n=4) were infrequently observed. Four patients (33%) had Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon, and recurrence was observed in two cases. KHEs occurred in various locations, affected mostly infants, and generally exhibited intense heterogeneous enhancement. In more than half of the included cases, KHEs were

  4. Pancreas imaging by computed tomography after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. [Dogs; patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; O'Leary, J.F.; Salomonowitz, E.; Stoltenberg, E.; Hutton, S.; Gedgaudas, E.

    1984-01-01

    A method using CT after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (CT-ERP) is described for pancreatic imaging. When using an ERP technique in the canine model comparable to that used in humans, small amounts of contrast material in peripheral pancreatic radicles resulted in enhancement of the pancreas on CT scans. Nine patients were also studied by CT-ERP images. The main pancreatic duct was seen on delayed images. In cases of chronic pancreatitis (n = 2), pancreatic opacification was patchy and heterogeneous. There was no contrast-material enhancement in areas of pancreatic carcimomas (n = 2). CT-ERP showed the true extent of carcinoma better than ERP alone.

  5. Painful heel: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Ortega, R; Aguilera, C; Sánchez, A; Andía, E

    2000-01-01

    Heel pain is a common and frequently disabling clinical complaint that may be caused by a broad spectrum of osseous or soft-tissue disorders. These disorders are classified on the basis of anatomic origin and predominant location of heel pain to foster a better understanding of this complaint. The disorders include plantar fascial lesions (fasciitis, rupture, fibromatosis, xanthoma), tendinous lesions (tendinitis, tenosynovitis), osseous lesions (fractures, bone bruises, osteomyelitis, tumors), bursal lesions (retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilleal bursitis), tarsal tunnel syndrome, and heel plantar fat pad abnormalities. With its superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar capability, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help determine the cause of heel pain and help assess the extent and severity of the disease in ambiguous or clinically equivocal cases. Careful analysis of MR imaging findings and correlation of these findings with patient history and findings at physical examination can suggest a specific diagnosis in most cases. The majority of patients with heel pain can be successfully treated conservatively, but in cases requiring surgery (eg, plantar fascia rupture in competitive athletes, deeply infiltrating plantar fibromatosis, masses causing tarsal tunnel syndrome), MR imaging is especially useful in planning surgical treatment by showing the exact location and extent of the lesion.

  6. Imaging and localization of islet-cell tumours of the pancreas on CT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Noone, Tara C; Hosey, Jason; Firat, Zeynep; Semelka, Richard C

    2005-06-01

    Islet-cell tumours are neuroendocrine tumours that arise from the endocrine pancreas. They may be associated with a variety of syndromes and are subclassified into functioning and non-functioning tumours. They range from benign to malignant. They demonstrate characteristic features when imaged with both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sensitivity and specificity, as well as detection of extrapancreatic extension, are generally superior with MRI. However, CT is currently still more readily available to patients. Multiphase, post-contrast series are commended for the evaluation of islet-cell tumours with either modality.

  7. Preliminary Study of MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Pancreas for the Diagnosis of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Jian; Chen, Tianwu; Li, Liangjun; Aduah, Emmanuel Ajedichiga; Hu, Jiani

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of differentiating between acute pancreatitis (AP) and healthy pancreas using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and correlate apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) /fractional anisotropy (FA) values with the severity of AP. Material and Methods 66 patients diagnosed with AP and 20 normal controls (NC) underwent DTI sequences and routine pancreatic MR sequences on a 3.0T MRI scanner. Average ADC and FA values of the pancreatic were measured. Differences of FA and ADC values between the AP group and the NC group with AP and healthy pancreas were compared by two-sample independent t-test. The severity of AP on MRI was classified into subgroups using MR severity index (MRSI), where the mean FA and ADC values were calculated. Relationship among the FA values, ADC values and MRSI were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Results The pancreatic mean ADC value in the AP group (1.68 ± 0.45×10−3mm2/s) was significantly lower than in the NC group (2.09 ± 0.55×10−3mm2/s) (P = 0.02); the same as mean FA value (0.39 ± 0.23 vs 0.54 ± 0.12, P = 0.00). In the subgroup analysis, the pancreatic ADC and FA value of edema AP patients was significantly higher than necrosis AP patients with P = 0.000 and P = 0.001respectively. In addition, as severity of pancreatitis increased according to MRSI, lower pancreatic ADC (r = -0.635) and FA value (r = -0.654) were noted. Conclusion Both FA and ADC value from DTI can be used to differentiate AP patients from NC. Both ADC and FA value of pancreas have a negative correlation with the severity of AP. PMID:27584016

  8. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  9. Development of gamma emitting receptor-binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Progress report, February 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of measuring the change in receptor concentration as a function of disease by external imaging was investigated. The structure-binding-relationship which provides optimal localization of radiolabelled antagonist of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain was studied. These relationships were also studied with respect to localization in the pancreas. (ACR)

  10. Development of gamma emitting receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Final technical progress report, March 1, 1988--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This document give paragraph synopses of results in research on brain and pancreas imaging, using radiotracers. General catagories of research included chemistry, pharmacology, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling. A list of publications is included

  11. Finding text in color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangying; Lopresti, Daniel P.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    1998-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of locating and extracting text from WWW images. A previous algorithm based on color clustering and connected components analysis works well as long as the color of each character is relatively uniform and the typography is fairly simple. It breaks down quickly, however, when these assumptions are violated. In this paper, we describe more robust techniques for dealing with this challenging problem. We present an improved color clustering algorithm that measures similarity based on both RGB and spatial proximity. Layout analysis is also incorporated to handle more complex typography. THese changes significantly enhance the performance of our text detection procedure.

  12. Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas. Can preoperative imaging distinguish this benign lesion from malignant or pre-malignant cystic pancreatic lesions?

    PubMed

    Kavuturu, Srinivas; Sarwani, Nabeel E; Ruggeiro, Fransesca M; Deshaies, Isabelle; Kimchi, Eric T; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Gusani, Niraj J

    2013-05-10

    Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas are rare true benign cystic tumors of the pancreas of uncertain etiology. Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas present a significant diagnostic dilemma in differentiating benign from premalignant or malignant variants. Since the first description of lymphoepithelial cysts in 1985, 109 cases have been reported in the literature. We describe 6 cases of this rare tumor, the preoperative imaging results, and a review the literature. Five males and one female ranging in age from 47 to 76 years underwent resection for lymphoepithelial cysts. Five patients presented with abdominal pain related to the lesion and in one patient the lesion was discovered incidentally. Four patients had elevated serum CA 19-9 levels. Pre-operative imaging with a CT scan and MRI of the abdomen typically revealed a well defined hypodense mass with Hounsfield units (HU) in the range of 15 to 20. One patient had papillary projections into the lesion. The mean size was 3.3 cm (ranging from 1.8 cm to 4 cm). All lesions were exophytic off the pancreatic parenchyma (1 cyst was located in the head of the pancreas, 2 were in the body, and 3 were in the tail region). Pre-operative EUS-guided/CT-guided needle aspiration, when performed, was not diagnostic. All patients underwent resection (one pancreaticoduodenectomy, five left pancreatectomies) to remove these cystic neoplasms. Pathology revealed a cyst lined by non-dysplastic squamous cells surrounded by sheets of benign lymphocytes. No evidence of malignancy was found. Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas are rare and are characteristically seen in men. While a hypodense mass (less than 20 HU) with papillary projections should be considered suspicious for lymphoepithelial cyst, a definitive diagnosis cannot be made solely based on preoperative imaging. EUS-guided biopsy coupled with biochemical/tumor marker studies are increasingly being used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between the various types of

  13. MRI chemical shift imaging of the fat content of the pancreas and liver of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jun; Liu, Peng; Jin, Erhu; Su, Tianhao; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Kaining; Hong, X U; Yin, Jie; Yu, Hengchi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between the content and distribution of fat in the pancreas and liver in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 70 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM (T2DM group) and 30 healthy volunteers (normal control group) were enrolled in the present study. Dual-echo magnetic resonance (MR) chemical shift imaging was used to measure the fat content of the liver and the head, body and tail regions of the pancreas. In addition, the distribution of fat in the various regions of the pancreas, as well as the average fat content of the pancreas versus the liver, were compared. The fat content of the pancreatic head, body and tail regions of the T2DM group were 5.59±4.70, 4.80±3.75 and 4.89±3.86%, respectively. The fat content of these regions in the normal control group were 3.89±2.47, 3.30±2.11 and 3.23±2.23%, respectively. The average fat content of the pancreas was 5.19±3.75% for the T2DM group and 3.47±2.00% for the normal control group. The average fat content of the liver was 9.87±3.19% for the T2DM group and 7.24±2.38% for the normal control group. Therefore, the results from MR chemical shift imaging suggested that there were no significant differences in the distribution of fat between the pancreas of patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and that from the healthy population; however, the average fat content in the pancreas of the T2DM group was significantly higher (F=3.597; P<0.05), as compared with the normal control group. In addition, there was no correlation between the fat contents in the pancreas and liver in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and the healthy population.

  14. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  15. Imaging findings in pulmonary vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Castañer, Eva; Alguersuari, Anna; Andreu, Marta; Gallardo, Xavier; Spinu, Cristina; Mata, Josep M

    2012-12-01

    Vasculitis is a destructive inflammatory process affecting blood vessels. Pulmonary vasculitis may develop secondary to other conditions or constitute a primary idiopathic disorder. Thoracic involvement is most common in primary idiopathic large-vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Behçet disease) and primary antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides (Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Primary pulmonary vasculitides are rare, and their signs and symptoms are nonspecific, overlapping with those of infections, connective tissue diseases, and malignancies. The radiologic findings in primary pulmonary vasculitis vary widely and can include vessel wall thickening, nodular or cavitary lesions, ground-glass opacities, and consolidations, among others. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage usually results from primary small-vessel vasculitis in the lungs. To diagnose vasculitis, medical teams must recognize characteristic combinations of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and histopathologic features.

  16. Magnetic resonance image-guided photodynamic therapy of xenograft pancreas tumors with verteporfin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer generally has very poor prognosis, with less than 4% survival at 5 years after diagnosis. This dismal survival rate is in part due to the aggressive nature of the adenocarcinoma, leading to a late-stage at diagnosis and exhibits resistance to most therapies. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a model cellular and vascular therapy agent, which uses light activation of the delivered drug to photosensitize the local cellular millieu. We suggest that interstitial verteporfin (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A) PDT has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy to the commonly used Gemcitabine chemotherapy. In the current study, an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (Panc-1) has undergone interstitial verteporfin PDT (40 J/cm with verteporfin and 40 J/cm without verteporfin). Prior to PDT, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to determine the location and size of the tumor within the pancreas, allowing accurate placement of the diffusing fiber. The success of therapy was monitored in vivo by assessing the total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes 24 hours pre- and 48 hours post-PDT. Total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes were determined using T2 weighted (T2W) and Gd-DTPA difference T1 weighted (T1W) turbo spin echo (TSE) MR imaging sequences, respectively. The validity of the in vivo imaging for therapeutic response was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and histological staining of frozen tissue sections. The ex vivo DiOC7(3) fluorescence analysis correlates well with the information provided from the MR images, indicating that MR imaging will be a successful surrogate marker for interstitial PDT.

  17. Cystic tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Morana, Giovanni; Guarise, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are less frequent than solid lesions and are often detected incidentally, as many of these lesions are small and asymptomatic. However, they may be associated with pancreatitis or have malignant potential. With advancements in diagnostic imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are being detected with increasing frequency. Many lesions can cause a pancreatic cyst, most being non-neoplastic while approximately 10% are cystic tumors, ranging from benign to highly malignant tumors. With increasing experience it is becoming clear that the prevalence of pseudocyst among cystic lesions of the pancreas is lower than usually presumed. A presumptive diagnosis of pseudocyst based on imaging appearance alone can cause a diagnostic error, and neoplastic cysts of the pancreas are particularly susceptible to this misdiagnosis, which can result in inappropriate treatment. Cystic tumors of the pancreas are formed by serous or mucinous structures showing all stages of cellular differentiation. According to the WHO classification, they can be subdivided on the basis of their histological type and biological behavior into benign tumors, borderline tumors, and malignant tumors. Cystic pancreatic tumors can be subdivided into peripheral (serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic tumors, solid and papillary epithelial neoplasms, cystic islet cell tumors), which do not communicate with the main pancreatic duct, and ductal tumors (mucinous tumor), according to their site of origin. On the basis of imaging criteria alone, it can be very difficult to differentiate non-tumoral cystic lesions from neoplastic ones. The management of these patients is complex, and it is important to correlate imaging findings with knowledge of the patient’s symptoms and of the natural history and predictors of malignancy in pancreatic cysts. PMID:16861136

  18. Evolution of incidental branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: A study with magnetic resonance imaging cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano; Pravisani, Riccardo; Intini, Sergio Giuseppe; Isola, Miriam; Cereser, Lorenzo; Risaliti, Andrea; Zuiani, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the type and timing of evolution of incidentally found branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (bd-IPMN) of the pancreas addressed to magnetic resonance imaging cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) follow-up. METHODS We retrospectively evaluated 72 patients who underwent, over the period 2006-2016, a total of 318 MRCPs (mean 4.4) to follow-up incidental, presumed bd-IPMN without signs of malignancy, found or confirmed at a baseline MRCP examination. Median follow-up time was 48.5 mo (range 13-95 mo). MRCPs were acquired on 1.5T and/or 3.0T systems using 2D and/or 3D technique. Image analysis assessed the rates of occurrence over the follow-up of the following outcomes: (1) imaging evolution, defined as any change in cysts number and/or size and/or appearance; and (2) alert findings, defined as worrisome features and/or high risk stigmata (e.g., thick septa, parietal thickening, mural nodules and involvement of the main pancreatic duct). Time to outcomes was described with the Kaplan-Meir approach. Cox regression model was used to investigate clinical or initial MRCP findings predicting cysts changes. RESULTS We found a total of 343 cysts (per-patient mean 5.1) with average size of 8.5 mm (range 5-25 mm). Imaging evolution was observed in 32/72 patients (44.4%; 95%CI: 32-9-56.6), involving 47/343 cysts (13.7%). There was a main trend towards small (< 10 mm) increase and/or decrease of cysts size at a median time of 22.5 mo. Alert findings developed in 6/72 patients (8.3%; 95%CI: 3.4-17.9) over a wide interval of time (13-63 mo). No malignancy was found on endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration (5/6 cases) or surgery (1/6 cases). No clinical or initial MRCP features were significantly associated with changes in bd-IPMN appearance (P > 0.01). CONCLUSION Changes in MRCP appearance of incidental bd-IPNM were frequent over the follow-up (44.4%), with relatively rare (8.3%) occurrence of non-malignant alert findings that prompted

  19. Annular pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  20. Zinc mapping and density imaging of rabbit pancreas endocrine tissue sections using nuclear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ynsa, M D; Ren, M Q; Rajendran, R; Sidhapuriwala, J N; van Kan, J A; Bhatia, M; Watt, F

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear microscopy is a suite of techniques based on a focused beam of MeV protons. These techniques have the unique ability to image density and structural variations in relatively thick tissue sections, map trace elements at the cellular level to the microgram per gram (dry weight) level, and extract quantitative information on these elements. The trace elemental studies can be carried out on unstained freeze-dried tissue sections, thereby minimizing any problems of contamination or redistribution of elements during conventional staining and fixing procedures. The pancreas is a gland with different specialized cells and a complex hormonal activity where trace elements play an important role. For example, zinc has an active role in insulin production, and calcium ions participate in the stimulation and secretion process of insulin. Using nuclear microscopy with a spatial resolution of 1 mum, we have located, using zinc mapping, the islets of Langerhans in freeze-dried normal rabbit tissue sections. The islets of Langerhans contain beta-cells responsible for insulin production. Subsequent quantitative analyses have indicated elevations in most elements within the islets of Langerhans, and significantly so for the concentrations of Zn [3,300 compared to 90 microg/g (dry weight)] and Ca [1,100 compared to 390 microg/g (dry weight)].

  1. Association of body mass index and risk of death from pancreas cancer in Asians: findings from the Asia Cohort Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingsong; Fu, Rong; Grant, Eric; Chen, Yu; Lee, Jung Eun; Gupta, Prakash C; Ramadas, Kunnambath; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ozasa, Kotaro; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kakizaki, Masako; Tanaka, Hideo; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yoo, Keun-Young; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Ahsan, Habibul; Pednekar, Mangesh S; Sauvaget, Catherine; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yang, Gong; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Ohishi, Waka; Watanabe, Takashi; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Matsuo, Keitaro; You, San-Lin; Park, Sue K; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Parvez, Faruque; Rolland, Betsy; McLerran, Dale; Sinha, Rashmi; Boffetta, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Thornquist, Mark; Feng, Ziding; Kang, Daehee; Potter, John D

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. The data for this pooled analysis included 883 529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5-19.9, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥ 30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5-24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and a history of diabetes. We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to the risk of mortality in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and a history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI less than 18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; hazard ratio=2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.00) (P for interaction=0.07). The data do not support an association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations.

  2. Wandering spleen with volvulus of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Karcaaltıncaba, Musturay

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal location of the spleen, which is called wandering spleen, results from laxity or absence of the splenic pedicle. In the presence of an elongated splenic pedicle, torsion of the spleen or neighboring organs may occur, which results in acute or chronic abdominal pain. In this case report, we present imaging findings of a wandering spleen that manifested with volvulus of the pancreas.

  3. A 3D-printed anatomical pancreas and kidney phantom for optimizing SPECT/CT reconstruction settings in beta cell imaging using (111)In-exendin.

    PubMed

    Woliner-van der Weg, Wietske; Deden, Laura N; Meeuwis, Antoi P W; Koenrades, Maaike; Peeters, Laura H C; Kuipers, Henny; Laanstra, Geert Jan; Gotthardt, Martin; Slump, Cornelis H; Visser, Eric P

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is challenging, especially for pancreatic beta cell imaging with (111)In-exendin due to high uptake in the kidneys versus much lower uptake in the nearby pancreas. Therefore, we designed a three-dimensionally (3D) printed phantom representing the pancreas and kidneys to mimic the human situation in beta cell imaging. The phantom was used to assess the effect of different reconstruction settings on the quantification of the pancreas uptake for two different, commercially available software packages. 3D-printed, hollow pancreas and kidney compartments were inserted into the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU2 image quality phantom casing. These organs and the background compartment were filled with activities simulating relatively high and low pancreatic (111)In-exendin uptake for, respectively, healthy humans and type 1 diabetes patients. Images were reconstructed using Siemens Flash 3D and Hermes Hybrid Recon, with varying numbers of iterations and subsets and corrections. Images were visually assessed on homogeneity and artefacts, and quantitatively by the pancreas-to-kidney activity concentration ratio. Phantom images were similar to clinical images and showed comparable artefacts. All corrections were required to clearly visualize the pancreas. Increased numbers of subsets and iterations improved the quantitative performance but decreased homogeneity both in the pancreas and the background. Based on the phantom analyses, the Hybrid Recon reconstruction with 6 iterations and 16 subsets was found to be most suitable for clinical use. This work strongly contributed to quantification of pancreatic (111)In-exendin uptake. It showed how clinical images of (111)In-exendin can be interpreted and enabled selection of the most appropriate protocol for clinical use.

  4. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ayşe; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  5. Finding curvilinear features in speckled images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samadani, Ramin; Vesecky, John F.

    1990-01-01

    A method for finding curves in digital images with speckle noise is described. The solution method differs from standard linear convolutions followed by thresholds in that it explicitly allows curvature in the features. Maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation is used, together with statistical models for the speckle noise and for the curve-generation process, to find the most probable estimate of the feature, given the image data. The estimation process is first described in general terms. Then, incorporation of the specific neighborhood system and a multiplicative noise model for speckle allows derivation of the solution, using dynamic programming, of the estimation problem. The detection of curvilinear features is considered separately. The detection results allow the determination of the minimal size of detectable feature. Finally, the estimation of linear features, followed by a detection step, is shown for computer-simulated images and for a SAR image of sea ice.

  6. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor.

  7. [Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Davies, Nestor R; Kasparian, Andres C; Viotto, Lucas E; Moreno, Walter A; Gramática, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas represents around 6-36% of mucinous cystic neoplasm. The lesions are usually found in the body and tail of the pancreas and are generally solitary with a size range of 6-36 cm. We present a clinical case of a 63 years old patient with abdominal pain and weight loss. We used radiographic imaging studies. It was treated with surgery by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colectomy. Patient was not post operative complications.

  8. Multimodality Imaging Findings of a Renal Aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Bulakçı, Mesut; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Çelenk, Erhan; Tunçer, Sena; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal aspergillosis is a rare infection that usually occurs in persons with a predisposition for this condition. Its differential diagnosis includes primary and metastatic renal malignancies, pyelonephritis and secondary abscess formation, granulomatous disorders, and renal infarction. We aim to stress the role of multimodality imaging and percutaneous biopsy in the diagnosis of this condition. Case Report We present diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings in addition to conventional imaging modalities in a 55-year-old man with secondary renal aspergilloma. Conclusion Radiological imaging methods are an integral part of diagnostic workup for renal aspergillosis. A definitive diagnosis is made by histopathological and/or microbiological examination of the material obtained via percutaneous biopsy under guidance of imaging methods. PMID:27994929

  9. Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David ER

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally treated with oral diabetic drugs and/or insulin. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with this condition increases over time, even in patients receiving intensive insulin treatment, and this is largely attributable to diabetic complications or the insulin therapy itself. Pancreas transplantation in humans was first conducted in 1966, since when there has been much debate regarding the legitimacy of this procedure. Technical refinements and the development of better immunosuppressants and better postoperative care have brought about marked improvements in patient and graft survival and a reduction in postoperative morbidity. Consequently, pancreas transplantation has become the curative treatment modality for diabetes, particularly for type I diabetes. An overview of pancreas transplantation is provided herein, covering the history of pancreas transplantation, indications for transplantation, cadaveric and living donors, surgical techniques, immunosuppressants, and outcome following pancreas transplantation. The impact of successful pancreas transplantation on the complications of diabetes will also be reviewed briefly. PMID:21253293

  10. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic.

  11. SU-E-J-226: Propagation of Pancreas Target Contours On Respiratory Correlated CT Images Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.

  12. Laparoscopic Biopsies in Pancreas Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uva, P D; Odorico, J S; Giunippero, A; Cabrera, I C; Gallo, A; Leon, L R; Minue, E; Toniolo, F; Gonzalez, I; Chuluyan, E; Casadei, D H

    2017-08-01

    As there is no precise laboratory test or imaging study for detection of pancreas allograft rejection, there is increasing interest in obtaining pancreas tissue for diagnosis. Pancreas allograft biopsies are most commonly performed percutaneously, transcystoscopically, or endoscopically, yet pancreas transplant surgeons often lack the skills to perform these types of biopsies. We have performed 160 laparoscopic pancreas biopsies in 95 patients. There were 146 simultaneous kidney-pancreas biopsies and 14 pancreas-only biopsies due to pancreas alone, kidney loss, or extraperitoneal kidney. Biopsies were performed for graft dysfunction (89) or per protocol (71). In 13 cases, an additional laparoscopic procedure was performed at the same operation. The pancreas diagnostic tissue yield was 91.2%; however, the pancreas could not be visualized in eight cases (5%) and in 6 cases the tissue sample was nondiagnostic (3.8%). The kidney tissue yield was 98.6%. There were four patients with intraoperative complications requiring laparotomy (2.5%) with two additional postoperative complications. Half of all these complications were kidney related. There were no episodes of pancreatic enzyme leak and there were no graft losses related to the procedure. We conclude that laparoscopic kidney and pancreas allograft biopsies can be safely performed with very high tissue yields. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Characterization of 5-(2- 18F-fluoroethoxy)-L-tryptophan for PET imaging of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ahmed; Beamish, Christine; McGirr, Rebecca; Demarco, John; Cockburn, Neil; Krokowski, Dawid; Lee, Ting-Yim; Kovacs, Michael; Hatzoglou, Maria; Dhanvantari, Savita

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In diabetes, pancreatic beta cell mass declines significantly prior to onset of fasting hyperglycemia. This decline may be due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the system L amino acid transporter LAT1 may be a biomarker of this process. In this study, we used 5-(2- 18F-fluoroethoxy)-L-tryptophan ( 18F-L-FEHTP) to target LAT1 as a potential biomarker of beta cell function in diabetes. Procedures: Uptake of 18F-L-FEHTP was determined in wild-type C57BL/6 mice by ex vivo biodistribution. Both dynamic and static positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired in wild-type and Akita mice, a model of ER stress-induced diabetes, as well as in mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ). LAT1 expression in both groups of mice was evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Uptake of 18F-L-FEHTP was highest in the pancreas, and static PET images showed highly specific pancreatic signal. Time-activity curves showed significantly reduced 18F-L-FEHTP uptake in Akita mice, and LAT1 expression was also reduced. However, mice treated with STZ, in which beta cell mass was reduced by 62%, showed no differences in 18F-L-FEHTP uptake in the pancreas, and there was no significant correlation of 18F-L-FEHTP uptake with beta cell mass. Conclusions: 18F-L-FEHTP is highly specific for the pancreas with little background uptake in kidney or liver. We were able to detect changes in LAT1 in a mouse model of diabetes, but these changes did not correlate with beta cell function or mass. Therefore, 18F-L-FEHTP PET is not a suitable method for the noninvasive imaging of changes in beta cell function during the progression of diabetes. PMID:27909574

  14. Vein of foramen caecum: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Onur; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Yildirim, Duzgun; Memis, Emine Sebnem; Bakan, Selim

    2016-07-01

    Vein of foramen caecum has been classically described as a vein that connects nasal mucosa to the superior sagittal sinus in classic anatomy textbooks. However, its existence is controversial in literature. Herein, we demonstrated computed tomography and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings of a tubular vascular structure extending to nasal mucosa and superior sagittal sinus.

  15. Parasitic diseases in the abdomen: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic diseases of the liver and biliary tract include echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, toxocariasis, clonorchiasis, and opisthorchiasis, affecting millions people in some endemic areas. Amebiasis and ascariasis are believed to be the most common bowel lumen indwelling parasitic diseases, affecting billions people worldwide, but sometimes these parasites migrate inadvertently to the liver and biliary tract, resulting in liver abscess or obstructive jaundice. Imaging findings of these parasitic diseases are fairly characteristic and easy to recognize if radiologists are aware of the findings, especially in endemic areas. Because of increased immigration and frequent travelling, some patients with "exotic" parasitic diseases may be encountered in non-endemic areas, and the diagnosis may be delayed or difficult, and it is often made only after operation. This feature section was designed to provide the detailed imaging features of common parasitic diseases affecting the abdominal organs and peritoneal cavity, based on pathology-image correlation.

  16. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  17. Preoperative Computerized Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pancreas Predicts Pancreatic Mass and Functional Outcomes After Total Pancreatectomy and Islet Autotransplant.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael C; Theis, Jake R; Hodges, James S; Dunn, Ty B; Pruett, Timothy L; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Walker, Sidney P; Freeman, Martin L; Trikudanathan, Guru; Arain, Mustafa; Robertson, Paul R; Wilhelm, Joshua J; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J; Bland, Barbara; Beilman, Gregory J; Bellin, Melena D

    2016-08-01

    Approximately two thirds of patients will remain on insulin therapy after total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplant (TPIAT) for chronic pancreatitis. We investigated the relationship between measured pancreas volume on computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and features of chronic pancreatitis on imaging, with subsequent islet isolation and diabetes outcomes. Computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was reviewed for pancreas volume (Vitrea software) and presence or absence of calcifications, atrophy, and dilated pancreatic duct in 97 patients undergoing TPIAT. Relationship between these features and (1) islet mass isolated and (2) diabetes status at 1-year post-TPIAT were evaluated. Pancreas volume correlated with islet mass measured as total islet equivalents (r = 0.50, P < 0.0001). Mean islet equivalents were reduced by more than half if any one of calcifications, atrophy, or ductal dilatation were observed. Pancreatic calcifications increased the odds of insulin dependence 4.0 fold (1.1, 15). Collectively, the pancreas volume and 3 imaging features strongly associated with 1-year insulin use (P = 0.07), islet graft failure (P = 0.003), hemoglobin A1c (P = 0.0004), fasting glucose (P = 0.027), and fasting C-peptide level (P = 0.008). Measures of pancreatic parenchymal destruction on imaging, including smaller pancreas volume and calcifications, associate strongly with impaired islet mass and 1-year diabetes outcomes.

  18. Finding corners in images by foveated search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnow, Thomas L.; Bovik, Alan C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a new approach to finding corners in images that combines foveated edge detection and curvature calculation with saccadic placement of foveal fixations. Each saccade moves the fovea to a location of high curvature combined with high edge gradient. Edges are located using a foveated Canny edge detector with spatial constant that increases with eccentricity. Next, we calculate a measure of local corner strength, based on a product of curvature and gradient. An inhibition factor based on previous visits to a region of the image prevents the system from repeatedly returning to the same locale. A long saccade is move thes fovea to previously unexplored areas of the image. Subsequent short saccades improve the accuracy of the location of the corner approximated by the long saccade. The system is tested on two natural scenes and the results compared against subjects observing the same test images through an eyetracker. Results show that the algorithm is a good locator of corners.

  19. Deconstructing Pancreas Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Cecil M.; Goodyer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless nature and increasing prevalence of human pancreatic diseases, in particular, diabetes mellitus and adenocarcinoma, has motivated further understanding of pancreas organogenesis. The pancreas is a multifunctional organ whose epithelial cells govern a diversity of physiologically vital endocrine and exocrine functions. The mechanisms governing the birth, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, maturation, and maintenance of the endocrine and exocrine components in the pancreas have been discovered recently with increasing tempo. This includes recent studies unveiling mechanisms permitting unexpected flexibility in the developmental potential of immature and mature pancreatic cell subsets, including the ability to interconvert fates. In this article, we describe how classical cell biology, genetic analysis, lineage tracing, and embryological investigations are being complemented by powerful modern methods including epigenetic analysis, time-lapse imaging, and flow cytometry-based cell purification to dissect fundamental processes of pancreas development. PMID:22587935

  20. Possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kin, Tatsuya; Korbutt, Gregory S; Shapiro, A M James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the incidental observation of ectopic pancreas in a donor for islet cell transplantation. The donor's clinical and imaging presentation was definitive for holoprosencephaly. This case report discusses a possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly.

  1. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Han, Joungho; Kwon, O Jung; Kim, Tae Sung

    2006-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  2. Pneumoconiosis: Comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.; Lee, K.S.; Chung, M.J.; Han, J.H.; Kwon, O.J.; Kim, T.S.

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  3. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Semin Chong; Kyung Soo Lee; Myung Jin Chung; Joungho Han; O. Jung Kwon; d Tae Sung Kim

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  4. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  5. Imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Ghadirpour, Ali; Ataie-Oskuie, Reza; Kontzialis, Marinos; Nezami, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl was referred to a dentist complaining of parageusia, bad taste in the mouth, which started 9 months ago. Panoramic X-ray and non-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple bilateral unilocular cysts in the mandible and maxilla, along with calcification of anterior part of the falx cerebri. She was eventually diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome based on imaging and histopathologic finding of keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

  6. Insulin-like genes in ascidians: findings in Ciona and hypotheses on the evolutionary origins of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin plays an extensively characterized role in the control of sugar metabolism, growth and homeostasis in a wide range of organisms. In vertebrate chordates, insulin is mainly produced by the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas, while in non-chordate animals insulin-producing cells are mainly found in the nervous system and/or scattered along the digestive tract. However, recent studies have indicated the notochord, the defining feature of the chordate phylum, as an additional site of expression of insulin-like peptides. Here we show that two of the three insulin-like genes identified in Ciona intestinalis, an invertebrate chordate with a dual life cycle, are first expressed in the developing notochord during embryogenesis and transition to distinct areas of the adult digestive tract after metamorphosis. In addition, we present data suggesting that the transcription factor Ciona Brachyury is involved in the control of notochord expression of at least one of these genes, Ciona insulin-like 2. Lastly, we review the information currently available on insulin-producing cells in ascidians and on pancreas-related transcription factors that might control their expression. PMID:25378051

  7. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  8. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  9. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  10. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... risky. Each person needs to carefully weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You ...

  11. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:511-5. Gruessner AC, Gruessner RWG. Pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic nephropathy. In: Morris PJ, Knechtle SJ, eds. Kidney Transplantation: ...

  12. Gallbladder metastasis: spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barretta, Maria Luisa; Catalano, Orlando; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Granata, Vincenza; Marone, Ugo; D'Errico Gallipoli, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study is to report the diagnostic features of hematogenous gallbladder metastasis using various imaging modalities. We carried out a single-center retrospective analysis of 13 patients with gallbladder metastasis. The primary malignancy was cutaneous melanoma (11 cases), hepatocellular carcinoma (1 case), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1 case). All patients underwent sonography (US), with color-power-Doppler assessment in 11 cases. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) was performed in 8 patients, MDCT in 8, and MR imaging in 1. Four subjects studied by whole-body PET. The gallbladder lesions were first detected with US in 9 cases and with MDCT in 3 cases. The remaining patient was investigated because of hepatic fluorodeoxyglucose uptake at PET; CEUS failed to detect any liver metastasis in this subject but identified a gallbladder lesion. Typical findings included multiplicity of gallbladder vegetations, broad base, limited mural thickening, presence of contrast enhancement, absence of gallstones and gallbladder bed infiltration, presence of combined lesions within other organs. Only two patients presented an isolated location in the gallbladder and were successfully treated with surgery. Gallbladder metastasis is a rare but possible occurrence. Knowledge of the typical imaging features and careful evaluation of the gallbladder may avoid an incorrect or false negative diagnosis.

  13. Image Findings in Brain Developmental Venous Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are benign anatomic variations; therefore, they are usually discovered incidentally. The aim of this article was to describe radiological findings of DVAs. Methods A retrospective search for DVAs of the brain was performed in 1899 patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast enhancement between January 1, 2005 and April 25, 2011. We also reviewed the results of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), CT angiography, and transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) studies performed in patients with DVAs. Results Thirty-two DVAs were identified in 31 of the 1899 patients (1.63%). These 31 patients underwent five enhanced CTs, three MRAs, two CT angiographies, and two TFCAs. Thirty of the 32 DVAs were supratentorial (ST) and two were infratentorial (IT). All enhanced MRI studies exhibited excellent resolution of DVAs. All DVAs had only one draining vein. The venous drainage system was an IT vein in three DVAs and an ST vein in 29 DVAs. Two out of five enhanced CTs presented good visualization of the draining vein. None of the MRAs, including the source image, revealed the presence of DVAs. The two CT angiographies exhibited good resolution of DVAs. One of the two TFCAs yielded an excellent illustration of the DVA. Conclusion CT angiography and MRI with contrast enhancement yielded detailed findings of DVAs. In contrast, MRA did not identify the DVAs. Enhanced CT presented only the draining vein of DVAs. PMID:23210028

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of musculoskeletal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Aglamis, Serpil; Bozdag, Pinar Gundogan; Denk, Affan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of patients with musculoskeletal brucellosis. Sixty-eight among 304 patients with musculoskeletal brucellosis, aged 12-82 years (average, 50.2 years), were included in the study. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical findings, Brucella agglutination tests, and MRI findings. MRI was performed to all of the patients with sacroiliitis, spondylitis-spondylodiscitis, and peripheral arthritis. Brucella serum agglutination test was >1/160 in all cases and blood cultures were positive in twelve cases. The most commonly affected site was the spine (57.3%), wherein lumbar vertebrae were found to be most commonly affected. The second most common affected site was sacroiliac joint (26.4%), whereas peripheral joints were affected in 11 cases (16.1%). Brucellosis may affect various sites in musculoskeletal system. The spine was the most frequently affected site in our study. Sacroiliac joints and the other peripheral joints were less commonly involved sites. Brucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a patient with arthralgia or symptoms of musculoskeletal system disorders especially in endemic areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiovascular manifestations of Williams syndrome: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Gray, J Cranston; Krazinski, Aleksander W; Schoepf, U Joseph; Meinel, Felix G; Pietris, Nicholas P; Suranyi, Pal; Hlavacek, Anthony M

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a relatively common (1 in 10,000 live births) genetic disorder caused by a deletion involving chromosome 7 that results in a variety of clinically significant abnormalities, including developmental delay, behavioral changes, hypercalcemia, and a distinct "elfin" facial appearance. Congenital cardiovascular disease that presents in childhood is responsible for most of the morbidity and mortality associated with this disorder. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review imaging findings of some of the more common cardiovascular manifestations of Williams syndrome and to highlight some of the unique anatomic variations that can be seen in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. (Development of gamma emitting, receptor-binding, radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to Feb. 28, 1988. In studies to better understand the nature of the m-AChR receptor subtypes, we have generated a manuscript which has been submitted for publication in Life sciences entitled: The effect of chronic atropine and diisopropylfluorophosphate on rat brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype concentrations. We have also developed a more direct synthesis of 3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate and its analogues. During this contract period, we have been involved with the synthesis of analogues 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). We have determined the affinity constants of various compounds synthesized this year for the muscarinic receptor from rat corpus striatum. We have continued our investigation of the m-AChR in pancreas. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Kidney/Pancreas Facts The kidneys are a pair of reddish- ... the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five to six inch gland located ...

  18. In vivo visualization of epidermal growth factor receptor and survivin expression in porcine pancreas using endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle imaging with confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Y; Shinoura, S; Ahluwalia, A; Tarnawski, A S; Chang, K J

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to establish a principle of molecular imaging of the pancreas and determine in vivo expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and survivin using a novel endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle imaging (EUS-FNI) technique, which incorporates needle based confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy (nCLE) after intrapancreatic injection of FTIC-labeled antibodies. Studies were performed in anesthetized pigs. FITC-labeled specific antibodies against EGF-R and survivin were injected into the tail and neck of the pancreas using a 19 gauge needle introduced under EUS guidance. Thirty minutes later, nCLE was performed using a prototype needle-based confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy probe (Cellvizio AQ-Flex-19, Mauna Kea Technologies, Paris, France) to determine cellular and tissue localization of EGF-R and survivin in the pancreas. Then pigs were euthanized and specimens of pancreas from areas injected with antibodies were obtained for histologic examination under epifluorescence microscope. EUS-guided nCLE enabled visualization of EGF-R and survivin in pancreatic tissue. Expression of EGF-R and survivin in pancreas was confirmed by histology. EGF-R immunoreactivity was localized to majority of duct-lining cells and to the surface and cytoplasm of many acinar cells. Survivin was localized mainly to the acinar cells. This study demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo, real time visualization of EGF-R and survivin in the pancreas by local injection of FITC-labeled antibodies via EUS-guided fine needle injection, followed by EUS-guided needle based confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy.

  19. Development of gamma-emitting, receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This progress report covers period from Nov. 1, 1989 to Aug. 31, 1990. The long term objective was to develop receptor-binding radiotracers for SPECT or PET imaging of CNS or peripheral nervous system. The specific chemistry aims, as understood on the basis of past findings, were: to synthesize and develop a more polar analogs of 4IQNB, possessing similar binding characteristics but eliminated more rapidly from the surrounding tissues and the target organ, to design a method of introducing a technetium chelating group onto a molecule or cholinergic agent without drastic lowering of its apparent affinity, to synthesize and develop radiotracers based on m-AChR antagonists selective for one of the subtypes of the receptor. The chemistry service aims were to prepare and characterize (R,R)- and (R,S)-4IQNB and derivatives, to provide the triazene intermediate to other investigators, and to provide ({sup 123}I)4IQNB for in vivo imaging. The biochemistry aims were to characterize the vitro and in vivo properties of novel compounds and to perform the pharmacokinetic studies. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Radiological imaging findings of scheuermann disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Erkan; Beyhan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find accompanying anomalies of typical and atypical Scheuermann’s disease (SD) is reported in the present study. METHODS Study included 20 patients (16 men and 4 women) who had radiological imaging radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, if available, due to back pain, curved back and low back pain in November 2011-February 2016 period. Patients were categorized into typical and atypical patterns based on the region involved. Thoracic kyphosis values were measured using real Cobb angle. Accompanying disc degeneration, herniations and spinal cord pathologies were studied using MRI. RESULTS Age of the patients ranged from 11.0 to 23.0 (mean 17.2 ± 3.0). Typical pattern of SD were detected in 15 patients while atypical pattern were detected in 5 patients. Cobb angle range was 40.2-67.2 (mean 55.5 ± 8.7) in typical Scheuermann’s patients and 24.7-49.9 (mean 36.7 ± 10.8) in atypical ones. Intervertebral level was affected and had the measures of 3-8 (mean 5.3 ± 1.6) and 7-9 (mean 8.2 ± 0.8) in typical and atypical Scheuermann’s patients, respectively. Level of degenerative disc disease in MRI was 1-7 discs (mean 4.1 ± 1.7) in typical patients and 5-10 discs (mean 7.6 ± 1.9) in atypical patients. CONCLUSION SD can be seen in typical and atypical patterns, typical being more frequent. Because degenerative disc diseases, herniations and cord pathologies such as syringomyelia can accompany SD (albeit more common in atypical pattern), it is necessary to evaluate these patients with plain radiography and MRI together. PMID:27928471

  1. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Johannes H. M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3–5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. PMID:20725831

  2. MR Imaging Findings in Heel Pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Di; Wu, Jim S

    2017-02-01

    Heel pain is common and due to a variety of osseous and soft tissue disorders. Causes of heel pain can be classified by the anatomic structure in which they arise and include disorders of the (1) Achilles tendon, (2) plantar fascia, (3) calcaneus, (4) bursae, (5) nerves in the hindfoot, (6) and heel pad. Although careful history taking and physical examination are important, imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of heel pain. MR imaging is the best imaging test to assess pain in the heel. This review discusses the common causes of heel pain, focusing on MR imaging appearances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis: Findings on non-enhanced MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Zhi-Song; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Xiao, Chun-Ming; Mitchell, Donald-G; Shu, Jian; Zeng, Nan-Lin; Xu, Xiao-Xue; Lei, Jun-Yang; Tian, Xiao-Bing

    2006-09-28

    To study the appearances of acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IEP) on non-enhanced MR imaging. A total of 53 patients with IEP diagnosed by clinical features and laboratory findings were underwent MR imaging. MR imaging sequences included fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR) fat saturation axial T1-weighted imaging, gradient echo T1-weighted (in phase), single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) T2-weighted, respiratory triggered (R-T) T2-weighted with fat saturation, and MR cholangiopancreatography. Using the MR severity score index, pancreatitis was graded as mild (0-2 points), moderate (3-6 points) and severe (7-10 points). Among the 53 patients, IEP was graded as mild in 37 patients and as moderate in 16 patients. Forty-seven of 53 (89%) patients had at least one abnormality on MR images. Pancreas was hypointense relative to liver on FSPGR T1-weighted images in 18.9% of patients, and hyperintense in 25% and 30% on SSFSE T2-weighted and R-T T2-weighted images, respectively. The prevalences of the findings of IEP on R-T T2-weighted images were, respectively, 85% for pancreatic fascial plane, 77% for left renal fascial plane, 55% for peripancreatic fat stranding, 42% for right renal fascial plane, 45% for perivascular fluid, 40% for thickened pancreatic lobular septum and 25% for peripancreatic fluid, which were markedly higher than those on in-phase or SSFSE T2-weighted images (P<0.001). IEP primarily manifests on non-enhanced MR images as thickened pancreatic fascial plane, left renal fascial plane, peripancreatic fat stranding, and peripancreatic fluid. R-T T2-weighted imaging is more sensitive than in-phase and SSFSE T2-weighted imaging for depicting IEP.

  4. Computer Vision Tools for Finding Images and Video Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Computer vision offers a variety of techniques for searching for pictures in large collections of images. Appearance methods compare images based on the overall content of the image using certain criteria. Finding methods concentrate on matching subparts of images, defined in a variety of ways, in hope of finding particular objects. These ideas…

  5. Computer Vision Tools for Finding Images and Video Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Computer vision offers a variety of techniques for searching for pictures in large collections of images. Appearance methods compare images based on the overall content of the image using certain criteria. Finding methods concentrate on matching subparts of images, defined in a variety of ways, in hope of finding particular objects. These ideas…

  6. NASA Technology Finds Uses in Medical Imaging

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA software has been incorporated into a new medical imaging device that could one day aid in the interpretation of mammograms, ultrasounds, and other medical imagery. The new MED-SEG system, dev...

  7. Document imaging finding niche in petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cisco, S.L.

    1992-11-09

    Optical disk-based document imaging systems can reduce operating costs, save office space, and improve access to necessary information for petroleum companies that have extensive records in various formats. These imaging systems help solve document management problems to improve technical and administrative operations. Enron Gas Pipeline Group has installed a document imaging system for engineering applications to integrate records stored on paper, microfilm, or computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems. BP Exploration Inc. recently implemented a document imaging system for administrative applications. The company is evaluating an expansion of the system to include engineering and technical applications. The petroleum industry creates, acquires, distributes, and retrieves enormous amounts of data and information, which are stored on multiple media, including paper, microfilm, and electronic formats. There are two main factors responsible for the immense information storage requirements in the petroleum industry.

  8. Emphysematous cholecystitis: Imaging findings in nine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sunnapwar, Abhijit; Raut, Abhijit A; Nagar, Arpit M; Katre, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Emphysematous cholecystitis is a severe form of acute cholecystitis and can be rapidly fatal. We present the imaging features of nine patients with proven emphysematous cholecystitis. PMID:21799598

  9. Portal Annular Pancreas: A Rare and Overlooked Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Ahmed, Arshad

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic developmental anomaly which is often overlooked at imaging, and often diagnosed retrospectively when it is detected incidentally at the time of surgery. Although the anomaly itself is asymptomatic, it becomes important in cases where pancreatic resection/anastomosis is planned, because of varying ductal anatomy, risk of ductal injury and increased risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. Case Report We present imaging findings in a case of portal annular pancreas in a 45-year-old male patient. Conclusions Portal annular pancreas is a rare and often neglected pancreatic anomaly due to a lack of awareness of this entity. With the advent of MDCT and MRI, accurate preoperative diagnosis of this condition is possible. PMID:28203311

  10. Pancreatic endometrial cyst mimics mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mederos, Michael A; Villafañe, Nicole; Dhingra, Sadhna; Farinas, Carlos; McElhany, Amy; Fisher, William E; Van Buren Ii, George

    2017-02-14

    Pancreatic cysts include a variety of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Endometrial cysts in the pancreas are exceedingly rare lesions that are difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This report describes the findings in a 43-year-old patient with a recent episode of acute pancreatitis who presented with a large cyst in the tail of the pancreas. Imaging demonstrated a loculated pancreatic cyst, and cyst fluid aspiration revealed an elevated amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen. The patient experienced an interval worsening of abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, and a 15-pound weight loss 3 mo after the initial episode of pancreatitis. With concern for a possible pre-malignant lesion, the patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, which revealed a 16 cm × 12 cm × 4 cm lesion. Final histopathology was consistent with an intra-pancreatic endometrial cyst. Here we discuss the overlapping imaging and laboratory features of pancreatic endometrial cysts and mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

  11. Pulmonary diseases with imaging findings mimicking aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Fernando Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; Marchiori, Edson; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Garcia, Tiago Severo; Irion, Klaus L; Camargo, José Jesus; Felicetti, José Carlos; de Mattos Oliveira, Flavio; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Patients with preexisting lung cavities are at risk of developing intracavitary fungal colonization. Because Aspergillus spp. are the most commonly implicated fungi, these fungal masses are called aspergillomas. Their characteristic "ball-in-hole" appearance, however, may be found in a variety of other conditions that can produce radiologic findings mimicking aspergilloma. In this paper, we review the main diseases that may mimic the radiographic findings of aspergilloma, with brief descriptions of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings.

  12. Blunt diaphragmatic lesions: Imaging findings and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bonatti, Matteo; Lombardo, Fabio; Vezzali, Norberto; Zamboni, Giulia A; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Blunt diaphragmatic lesions (BDL) are uncommon in trauma patients, but they should be promptly recognized as a delayed diagnosis increases morbidity and mortality. It is well known that BDL are often overlooked at initial imaging, mainly because of distracting injuries to other organs. Sonography may directly depict BDL only in a minor number of cases. Chest X-ray has low sensitivity in detecting BDL and lesions can be reliably suspected only in case of intra-thoracic herniation of abdominal viscera. Thanks to its wide availability, time-effectiveness and spatial resolution, multi-detector computed tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing BDL; several direct and indirect CT signs are associated with BDL. Given its high tissue contrast resolution, magnetic resonance imaging can accurately depict BDL, but its use in an emergency setting is limited because of longer acquisition times and need for patient’s collaboration. PMID:27843541

  13. Post-transplant hepatic complications: Imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Drudi, F.M.; Pagliara, E.; Cantisani, V.; Arduini, F.; D'Ambrosio, U.; Alfano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation is considered definitive therapy for acute or chronic irreversible pathologies of the liver, and the increased survival rates are mainly due to improved immunosuppressive therapies and surgical techniques. However, early diagnosis of possible graft dysfunction is crucial to liver graft survival. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of the liver before and after transplant and in the detection of complications such as vascular and biliary diseases, acute and chronic rejection and neoplastic recurrence. Integrated imaging using color-Doppler, CT, MRI and traditional x-ray reach a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the management of transplanted patients. PMID:23395917

  14. Find Your Image between the Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel Singer

    2004-01-01

    Librarians' unfortunate fixation on image as a defining generational characteristic also makes them just as guilty of promoting misconceptions as nonlibrarians. Can the profession stand another article in the general press that trumpets the amazing new discovery that librarians can be young, trendy, stylish? The level of our colleagues'…

  15. Find Your Image between the Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel Singer

    2004-01-01

    Librarians' unfortunate fixation on image as a defining generational characteristic also makes them just as guilty of promoting misconceptions as nonlibrarians. Can the profession stand another article in the general press that trumpets the amazing new discovery that librarians can be young, trendy, stylish? The level of our colleagues'…

  16. Giant infantile gliosarcoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Onguru, Onder; Chen, Lina

    2008-08-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma multiforme, which is composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous elements. The tumor is rarely encountered in childhood. This case report presents the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of a giant gliosarcoma in a 3-year-old girl. Size and location of the tumor are described.

  17. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... Providing hope to those suffering from pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Support Pancreatic Research Slide2 Providing hope to those ...

  18. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 761x736 ... View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  19. Imaging of haemodialysis: renal and extrarenal findings.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Ferruccio; Quaia, Emilio; Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-06-01

    Electrolyte alterations and extra-renal disorders are quite frequent in patients undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The native kidneys may be the site of important pathologies in patients undergoing dialysis, especially in the form of acquired renal cystic disease with frequent malignant transformation. Renal neoplasms represents an important complication of haemodialysis-associated acquired cystic kidney disease and imaging surveillance is suggested. Extra-renal complications include renal osteodistrophy, brown tumours, and thoracic and cardiovascular complications. Other important fields in which imaging techniques may provide important informations are arteriovenous fistula and graft complications. Teaching points • Renal neoplasms represent a dreaded complication of haemodialysis.• In renal osteodystrophy bone resorption typically manifests along the middle phalanges.• Brown tumours are well-defined lytic lesions radiographically, possibly causing bone expansion.• Vascular calcifications are very common in patients undergoing haemodialysis.• Principal complications of the AV fistula consist of thrombosis, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms.

  20. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases.

  1. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses*

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases. PMID:27141135

  2. MR imaging findings in diabetic muscle infarction.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Gitanjali; Nicholas, Richard; Pandey, Tarun; Montgomery, Corey; Jambhekar, Kedar; Ram, Roopa

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, often unrecognized complication seen in patients with poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus. The diagnosis is often missed and leads to unnecessary invasive investigations and inappropriate treatment. The patients usually present with unilateral thigh pain and swelling. MRI typically demonstrates diffuse swelling and increased T2 signal intensity within the affected muscles. The condition is self-limiting and is treated conservatively with bed rest and analgesics. Recurrences have been reported in the same or contralateral limb. We report a case of diabetic muscle infarction with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and imaging abnormality with recurrence on the contralateral side.

  3. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis.

  4. Pigmented villonodular synovitis: dedicated PET imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Amber, Ian Blake; Clark, Brian J; Greene, Gary Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is an uncommon entity, which has the potential to cause severe pain. The gold standard for evaluation is MRI, and previous PET findings associated with PVNS have only been documented in the setting of concurrent malignancy. In the setting of recurrent disease, PET is being used to evaluate prebiological and postbiological treatment responses. Recurrent PVNS demonstrates greater hypermetabolic activity than previously documented, supporting the case as a potential mimic of malignant/metastatic disease. Post-treatment evaluations demonstrate decreased metabolic activity, which suggests response to treatment. This behaviour further supports the contention that there is a neoplastic origin to PVNS. PMID:23598941

  5. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  6. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects.

  7. Generating new pancreas from old.

    PubMed

    Hardikar, Anandwardhan A

    2004-07-01

    Pancreas regeneration after tissue damage is a key response to pancreatic injury, involving pancreatic duct progenitor cells and intra-islet precursor cells. Surgical removal of the pancreas, duct obstruction by cellophane wrapping and bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation act as inductive stimuli, leading to pancreas regeneration. The exact role of growth and differentiation factors regulating pancreatic beta-cell mass remains unknown. Here, I will attempt to integrate recent findings and speculate on the factors that trigger this fascinating response, wherein the pancreas responds to a deficit in cell mass and undergoes new islet formation, leading to restoration of normal beta-cell mass. I will also discuss recent advances in regenerating endocrine pancreatic cells, which could affect stem cell-based approaches to treating diabetes mellitus.

  8. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features of lipid-rich neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Shindo, Toshikazu; Higashi, Michiyo; Takumi, Koji; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Yoneyama, Tomohide; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2015-09-14

    To clarify the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of lipid-rich pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). Enhanced CT and MRI performed before pancreatectomy in 29 patients with 34 histologically-confirmed PanNETs was retrospectively reviewed. Tumor attenuation on CT and signal intensities on conventional (T1- and T2-weighted) and chemical shift MRI were qualitatively analyzed and compared alongside adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) immunostaining (ADRP-positive: lipid-rich; ADRP-negative: non-lipid-rich) results using Fisher's exact test or the Mann-Whitney U test. Signal intensity index on chemical shift MRI was quantitatively assessed. There were 15 lipid-rich PanNETs (44.1%) in 12 patients (41.4%). Tumor attenuation during the early, portal venous, and delayed phases of enhanced CT (P = 0.888, 0.443, and 0.359, respectively) and signal intensities on conventional MRI (P = 0.698 and 0.798, respectively) were not significantly different between lipid-rich and non-lipid-rich PanNETs. Four of the 15 lipid-rich PanNETs exhibited high signal intensity on subtraction chemical shift MRI, and the association of high signal intensity on subtraction imaging with lipid-rich PanNETs was significant (4 of 15 lipid-rich PanNETs, 26.73%, vs 0 of 19 non-lipid-rich PanNETs, 0%, P = 0.029). Lipid-rich PanNETs showed a significantly higher signal intensity index than non-lipid-rich PanNETs (0.6% ± 14.1% vs -10.4% ± 14.4%, P = 0.004). Eight of 15 lipid-rich PanNETs, vs 0 of 19 non-lipid-rich PanNETs, had positive signal intensity index values in concordance with lipid contents. CT contrast enhancement and conventional MR signal intensities are similar in lipid-rich and non-lipid-rich PanNETs. Chemical shift MRI can demonstrate cytoplasmic lipids in PanNETs.

  9. Utility of preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in diagnosing tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and tumor-forming pancreatitis remains difficult, and this situation can cause serious problems because the management and prognosis of these two focal pancreatic masses are entirely different. We herein report a case of tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic carcinoma in an 80-year-old woman. Computed tomography showed a solid mass in the head of the pancreas, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a complete obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. Dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a time-signal intensity curve (TIC) with a slow rise to a peak (1 min after the administration of the contrast material), followed by a slow decline at the pancreatic mass, indicating a fibrotic pancreas. Under the diagnosis of tumor-forming pancreatitis, the patient underwent a segmental pancreatectomy instead of a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathology of the pancreatic mass was chronic pancreatitis without malignancy. The pancreatic TIC obtained from dynamiccontrast MRI can be helpful to differentiate tumor-forming pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma and to avoid any unnecessary major pancreatic surgery.

  10. SU-E-J-42: Evaluation of Fiducial Markers for Ultrasound and X-Ray Images Used for Motion Tracking in Pancreas SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, SK; Armour, E; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Wong, J; Ding, K; Iordachita, I; Sen, H Tutkun; Kazanzides, P; Bell, M Lediju

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Ultrasound tracking of target motion relies on visibility of vascular and/or anatomical landmark. However this is challenging when the target is located far from vascular structures or in organs that lack ultrasound landmark structure, such as in the case of pancreas cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate visibility, artifacts and distortions of fusion coils and solid gold markers in ultrasound, CT, CBCT and kV images to identify markers suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment. Methods Two fusion coils (1mm × 5mm and 1mm × 10 mm) and a solid gold marker (0.8mm × 10mm) were embedded in a tissue–like ultrasound phantom. The phantom (5cm × 12cm × 20cm) was prepared using water, gelatin and psyllium-hydrophilic-mucilloid fiber. Psylliumhydrophilic mucilloid acts as scattering medium to produce echo texture that simulates sonographic appearance of human tissue in ultrasound images while maintaining electron density close to that of water in CT images. Ultrasound images were acquired using 3D-ultrasound system with markers embedded at 5, 10 and 15mm depth from phantom surface. CT images were acquired using Philips Big Bore CT while CBCT and kV images were acquired with XVI-system (Elexta). Visual analysis was performed to compare visibility of the markers and visibility score (1 to 3) were assigned. Results All markers embedded at various depths are clearly visible (score of 3) in ultrasound images. Good visibility of all markers is observed in CT, CBCT and kV images. The degree of artifact produced by the markers in CT and CBCT images are indistinguishable. No distortion is observed in images from any modalities. Conclusion All markers are visible in images across all modalities in this homogenous tissue-like phantom. Human subject data is necessary to confirm the marker type suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis pain pattern and severity are independent of abdominal imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Ye, Tian; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S; Lewis, Michele D; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A; Forsmark, Christopher E; Guda, Nalini M; Conwell, Darwin L; Banks, Peter A; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Whitcomb, David C; Anderson, Michelle A

    2015-03-01

    clinically relevant groups of imaging findings. Mechanisms that determine patterns and severity of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis are largely independent of structural variants observed by abdominal imaging techniques. Pancreas-relevant quantitative and qualitative pain measures should be included in the evaluation of patients with chronic pancreatitis to assess pain severity independently of imaging findings. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Pancreatitis Pain Pattern and Severity are Independent of Abdominal Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C. Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Tian, Ye; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Lewis, Michele D.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, David C.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    differ among clinically relevant groups of imaging findings. Conclusions Mechanisms that determine patterns and severity of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis are largely independent of structural variants observed by abdominal imaging techniques. Pancreas-relevant quantitative and qualitative pain measures should be included in the evaluation of patients with chronic pancreatitis, to assess pain severity independently of imaging findings. PMID:25424572

  13. MR imaging findings in delayed reversible myelopathy from lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Cynthia B; Goyal, Mayank; Bourque, Pierre R

    2004-05-01

    Delayed spinal cord injury following high-voltage electrical injury is a rare but well-documented phenomenon. The MR imaging features of this entity, however, have not been well documented. We report the MR imaging findings in a case of delayed sensory and motor deficits following a lightning strike. MR imaging revealed hyperintense signal within the cord on T2-weighted and STIR images extending from C1 to C3. Axial images localized the hyperintense signal to the posterolateral region of the spinal cord bilaterally. Follow-up MR imaging 6 weeks later demonstrated resolution of abnormal cord signal intensity.

  14. Reduction of iodine load in CT imaging of pancreas acquired with low tube voltage and an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yoshifumi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanahashi, Yukichi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively assess the contrast enhancement, image quality, radiation dose, and detectability of malignant pancreatic tumors with pancreatic computed tomography (CT) obtained at an 80-kilovolt (peak) (kV[p]) tube voltage setting and reduced iodine dose. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. During a recent 10-month period, 136 patients (66 men and 70 women; age range, 21-86 years; mean ± SD age, 65.9 ± 11.0 years) with suspected pancreatic disease were randomized into 3 groups according to the following iodine-load and tube-voltage protocols: 600 mg of iodine per kilogram body weight (mg/kg) and 120 kV(p) (600-120 group), 500 mg/kg and 80 kV(p) (500-80 group), and 400 mg/kg and 80 kV(p) (400-80 group). Analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate differences in CT number, background noise, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dose, lesion-to-pancreas contrast-to-noise ratio, and figure of merit. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve were compared to assess the detectability of malignant pancreatic tumors. The signal-to-noise ratios in vessels were greater (P < 0.05) in the 400-80 and 500-80 groups than in the 600-120 group, and those in pancreas were comparable between the 400-80 and 600-120 groups. No significant difference was found in effective dose, image quality, lesion-to-pancreas contrast-to-noise ratio, or figure of merit between the groups. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve for detecting malignant pancreatic tumors were comparable between the groups. Pancreatic CT with an 80-kV(p) setting and 400-mg iodine per kilogram contrast material load facilitates the reduction of iodine dose while maintaining image quality and the detectability of malignant pancreatic tumors.

  15. Precocious puberty in children: A review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Faizah, MZ; Zuhanis, AH; Rahmah, R; Raja, AA; Wu, LL; Dayang, AA; Zulfiqar, MA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This review was aimed at determining the imaging findings in patients with precocious puberty. Results: Within a period of 8 years (from 2002 to 2010) there were 53 patients diagnosed with precocious puberty. Out of the 53 patients, 37 had undergone diagnostic imaging to detect the possible organic causes of precocious puberty. Imaging findings were positive in 31 patients and out of that, 3 patients had 2 findings each (34 abnormalities). Of the patients with positive imaging findings, central precocious puberty (gonadotrophin-dependent) was more common (81%; 25/31) and the causes included: tuber cinereum hamartoma (n = 10), glioma (n = 6), pineal gland tumour (n = 4), hydrocephalous (n = 3), arachnoid cyst (n = 2) and others (n = 3). Peripheral precocious puberty (gonadotrophin-independent) causes included: testicular adrenal rest tumour (n = 3), adrenal carcinoma (n = 1), ovarian granulosa thecal cell tumour (n = 1), and tuberous sclerosis (n = 1). Conclusion: Positive imaging findings were observed in 84% (31/37) of the subjects. Hypothalamic hamartoma was the most common imaging finding in central precocious puberty while testicular adrenal rest tumour was the most common imaging finding in peripheral precocious puberty. PMID:22970062

  16. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1, 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of ... represent the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get ...

  17. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  18. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gafă, R; Grandi, E; Cavazzini, L

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is reported. Microscopically the cyst content consisted of keratinous material and the walls were lined by mature squamous epithelium surrounded by dense lymphoid tissue. Immunohistochemistry showed diffuse reactivity for CD20 and CD3 in the lymphoid tissue and uniform positivity for cytokeratins in the squamous epithelium. Although the histogenesis of lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas is not understood, awareness of this lesion is helpful in differentiating it from other pancreatic cystic lesions. Images PMID:9389985

  19. Intra-islet lesions and lobular variations in β-cell mass expansion in ob/ob mice revealed by 3D imaging of intact pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Saba; Kostromina, Elena; Nord, Christoffer; Eriksson, Maria; Lindström, Per; Ahlgren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The leptin deficient ob/ob mouse is a widely used model for studies on initial aspects of metabolic disturbances leading to type 2 diabetes, including insulin resistance and obesity. Although it is generally accepted that ob/ob mice display a dramatic increase in β-cell mass to compensate for increased insulin demand, the spatial and quantitative dynamics of β-cell mass distribution in this model has not been assessed by modern optical 3D imaging techniques. We applied optical projection tomography and ultramicroscopy imaging to extract information about individual islet β-cell volumes throughout the volume of ob/ob pancreas between 4 and 52 weeks of age. Our data show that cystic lesions constitute a significant volume of the hyperplastic ob/ob islets. We propose that these lesions are formed by a mechanism involving extravasation of red blood cells/plasma due to increased islet vessel blood flow and vessel instability. Further, our data indicate that the primary lobular compartments of the ob/ob pancreas have different potentials for expanding their β-cell population. Unawareness of the characteristics of β-cell expansion in ob/ob mice presented in this report may significantly influence ex vivo and in vivo assessments of this model in studies of β-cell adaptation and function. PMID:27713548

  20. Imaging findings of mucinous type of cholangiocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Makiko; Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Kazuhiko

    1996-05-01

    To demonstrate the imaging findings seen in two cases of mucinous type of cholangiocellular carcinoma of the liver. The CT and MR findings of two patients with pathologically proven mucinous type of cholangiocellular carcinoma were analyzed. Results: One of them showed calcification, both cases had no enhancing on the arterial dominant phase of dynamic CT, but showed enhancement in the periphery and internal septations on the equilibrium phase. The internal signal intensity was homogenous, and extremely hypo- and hyperintense on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Imaging findings were unique reflecting the characteristic pathological features that cancer cell nests are suspended in a large mucinous lake, and the specific diagnosis was considered to be possible by the integrated imaging diagnosis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  1. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer The Pancreas Parts of ...

  2. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  3. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group which was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  4. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  5. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-08-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings.

  6. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings. PMID:27761192

  7. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  8. Clinical implications of fatty pancreas: Correlations between fatty pancreas and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Seok; Kim, Sang Heum; Jun, Dae Won; Han, Jee Hye; Jang, Eun Chul; Park, Ji Young; Son, Byung Kwan; Kim, Seong Hwan; Jo, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Sook; Kim, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical implications of lipid deposition in the pancreas (fatty pancreas). METHODS: The subjects of this study were 293 patients who had undergone abdominal computed tomography (CT) and sonography. Fatty pancreas was diagnosed by sonographic findings and subdivided into mild, moderate, and severe fatty pancreas groups comparing to the retroperitoneal fat echogenicity. RESULTS: Fatty pancreas was associated with higher levels for visceral fat, waist circumference, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, free fatty acid, γ-GTP, insulin, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) than the control group (P < 0.05). HOMA-IR, visceral fat, triglyceride, and ALT also tended to increase with the degree of fat deposition in the pancreas on sonography. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, HOMA-IR, visceral fat, and ALT level were independently related to fatty pancreas after adjustment for age, body mass index, and lipid profile. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the fatty pancreas group was significantly higher than in the control group, and the numbers of metabolic syndrome parameters were significantly higher in the fatty pancreas group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Sonographic fatty pancrease showed higher insulin resistance, visceral fat area, triglyceride, and ALT levels than normal pancreases. Fatty pancreas also showed a strong correlation with metabolic syndrome. PMID:19370785

  9. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  10. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Dillman, Jonathan R; Mody, Rajen J; Strouse, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function.

  11. Imaging findings of primary gastric plasmacytoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Yang, Jian-Feng; Wang, Jin-Dao; Wei, Jian-Guo; Liu, Fang; Wang, Bo-Yin

    2014-08-07

    Primary gastric plasmacytoma (GP) is a rare extramedullary plasmacytoma with clinical and imaging features that are common among other gastric tumors, such as gastric adenocarcinomas, gastric stromal tumors, and lymphomas. Here, we present a histologically confirmed case of primary GP examined with biphasic computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endosonography. A well-circumscribed extraluminal mass appearing as homogeneous attenuation/intensity with gradual enhancement was identified on biphasic enhancement CT and MRI. This mass was hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging and hypointense on the apparent diffusion coefficient map, implying that water diffusion in the mass was restricted. In addition, endosonography indicated a low echogenic mass in the gastric wall. These imaging findings increase the available knowledge about imaging of this disease and provide valuable information for differentiating primary GP from common gastric tumors.

  12. Imaging findings after fascial injection of tetanus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Duzgun; Gurses, Bengi; Tamam, Cuneyt; Karaaslan, Ercan; Ersen, Atilla; Ince, Umit

    2011-06-01

    Adverse reactions to vaccines vary from mild to fatal. Local reactions are often due to hypersensitivity to the adjuvant substances in the vaccine. This case report aims at illustrating the imaging findings of a fascial injection of the tetanus vaccine. A 14 year-old boy, vaccinated 6 months previously presented with a mass lesion in the left deltoid area. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonographic evaluations were performed and the findings were characteristic for fascial granuloma. The histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis. In our knowledge, this is the first case of granuloma post intrafascial injection of tetanus vaccine which was MRI and ultrasonographic evaluated and histopathologicly confirmed.

  13. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Man, Fengyuan; Deng, Kai; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Hao, Dapeng; Xu, Wenjian

    2014-03-01

    To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n=8), defect or destruction (n=7), and hyperostosis (n=6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n=10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n=10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n=7). CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging findings of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw with emphasis on early magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anant; Arslanoglu, Atilla; Yildirm, Nadir; Silbergleit, Richard; Aygun, Nafi

    2009-01-01

    To describe the imaging findings of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) with emphasis on early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The medical records and computed tomography, MRI, and bone scintigraphy images of 5 female and 1male patients (n = 6) between the ages of 49 and 79 years (mean age, 70 years) who had a diagnosis of BRONJ were retrospectively reviewed, and temporal changes in imaging features were noted. The earliest MRI finding was the loss of the normal T1 hyperintensity of fatty marrow in the mandible and maxilla. The MRI findings of more advanced BRONJ included bone destruction, soft tissue edema and enhancement, inferior alveolar nerve thickening, and pterygoid muscle swelling and enhancement. On computed tomography, sclerosis and subtle lucencies (widening) of the periodontal ligament and cortex and around the apices of the teeth in the early stage, and osteolytic bone lesions, cortical disruption, and frank bone fragmentation in the later stages were observed. Bone scintigraphy showed increased uptake early in the disease. Osteonecrosis of the mandible and maxilla occurs as a complication of bisphosphonate treatment of bone metastasis and osteoporosis and typically manifests after a dental procedure. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy findings may precede clinical symptoms and mimic metastatic disease.

  15. Spleen in haematological malignancies: spectrum of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Saboo, S S; Krajewski, K M; O'Regan, K N; Giardino, A; Brown, J R; Ramaiya, N; Jagannathan, J P

    2012-01-01

    Imaging morphology and metabolic activity of splenic lesions is of paramount importance in patients with haematological malignancies; it can alter tumour staging, treatment protocols and overall prognosis. CT, MRI and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT have been shown to be powerful tools for the non-invasive assessment of splenic involvement in various haematological malignancies. Since many haematological malignancies and non-neoplastic conditions can involve the spleen and imaging manifestations can overlap, imaging and clinical findings outside of the spleen should be looked for to narrow the differential diagnosis; confirmation can be obtained by pathological findings. Radiologists should be familiar with the cross-sectional imaging patterns of haematological malignancies involving the spleen as well as non-neoplastic splenic findings common in these patients to facilitate their care and follow-up. This pictorial review provides the common and uncommon imaging appearances and complications of various haematological malignancies involving the spleen on CT, MRI and PET/CT, and common pitfalls in diagnosis. PMID:22096219

  16. [Celiac sprue: A pictorial revision of main imaging findings].

    PubMed

    Constanza Damm, Araneda; Matías Molina, Villagra; Giancarlo Schiappacasse, Faúndez; Claudio Cortés, Arriagada

    2014-01-01

    Celiac sprue (CS) is an autoinmune desease caused by gliadin intake. The exposure to this protein produces damage of the intestinal mucosae, primarily of the duodenum and yeyunum, causing different symptoms and diverse imaging findings. The objective of this review is to show a pictorial essay of the main findings of CS and its complications in barited fluroscopy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. We show different images of patients with certified diagnosis of CS. In summary, these imaging modalities are useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with CS, as well as for the detection of complications. We believe that they are useful complementary exams that aid to the existing diagnosis criteria.

  17. Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Children With Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Aydin, Kursad; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Havali, Cengiz

    2015-08-01

    Increased intracranial hypertension is defined as elevated intracranial pressure with absence of hydrocephalus, vascular or structural abnormalities, and normal cerebrospinal fluid content. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities of the optic nerve and sheath that have been described in adults include increased nerve tortuosity, flattening in posterior aspect of globe, intraocular protrusion of the optic nerve, and enlarged optic nerve sheath. We evaluated accuracy of those proposed markers on magnetic resonance imaging in children with increased intracranial hypertension that are described in adults. Eleven patients between 3 and 15 years of age with intracranial hypertension were selected for re-evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging that had been previously described as normal to determine the presence of: (1) increased tortuosity and elongation of the optic nerve; (2) enlargement of the optic nerve sheath on axial and coronal T2 so called by us "target sign" and postcontrast T1 sequences; (3) flattening in posterior aspect of the globe; and (4) intraocular protrusion of the optic nerve head. Of the 11 patients, tortuosity of the optic nerve (10/11, 90.9%) and enlarged optic nerve sheath--target sign (7/11, 63.6%)--were the most common findings. Flattening in the posterior aspect of globe (5/11, 45.5%) and intraocular protrusion (3/11, 27.3%) were also detected as a novel magnetic resonance imaging findings. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the optic nerve and sheath include valuable signs of intracranial hypertension not only in adults but also in children. This is the first detailed analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with increased intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT on the surgical management of primary neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas or ileum.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, Harun; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Cyran, Clemens C; Spitzweg, Christine; Auernhammer, Christoph J; Gildehaus, Franz-Josef; Bartenstein, Peter; Angele, Martin K; Haug, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Resection is the only curative treatment in patients suffering from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the ileum or the pancreas. Accurate preoperative imaging is critical for surgical planning, as even findings of small and distant metastases may profoundly influence surgical management. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT was performed preoperatively in 44 patients suffering from NET of the ileum (n = 26) or the pancreas (n = 18) before surgery at our University Hospital. Data were analyzed retrospectively by an interdisciplinary team of nuclear medicine and visceral surgery specialists. Intended surgical management was documented before and after availability of PET/CT findings. The team judged whether the imaging findings provided additional information relevant to surgical planning. Imaging results altered surgical management in 9 of 44 (20 %) patients, more specifically in 3 of 26 (12 %) patients with NET of the ileum and in 6 of 18 (33 %) patients with NET of the pancreas. PET/CT findings led to a more invasive surgical approach in 6 cases (3 each of ileum and pancreas) and to a less invasive strategy in 3 patients with NET of the pancreas. Although PET/CT results did not alter management in 35 of 44 patients, somatostatin receptor imaging still provided additional information for surgery planning in more than 95 % of the cases. Additional information provided by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in the preoperative workup significantly influences surgical management in one-fifth of our NET patients and, notably, one-third of those suffering from NET of the pancreas.

  19. Congenital salivary fistula of accessory parotid gland: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Gadodia, A; Seith, A; Sharma, R; Thakar, A

    2008-03-01

    We report the imaging findings in a rare case of an accessory parotid gland fistula. An eight-year-old boy was presented with complaints of serous discharge from his left cheek since birth. As part of the radiological investigation, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography sialography with fistulography, and digital sialography with fistulography were performed. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the exact location of an accessory parotid gland but failed to demonstrate the accessory duct. The presence of an accessory gland was well delineated on computed tomography fistulography and computed tomography sialography. Fistulography revealed a small accessory parotid duct and gland. No communication between the ductal systems of both glands was demonstrated. In such cases, pre-operative imaging (with sialography, magnetic resonance sialography and computed tomography sialography with fistulography) is helpful for exact delineation of the ductal anatomy. To the best of our knowledge, only four previous cases of congenital accessory parotid gland fistula have been reported in the English literature.

  20. Alveolar echinococcosis: spectrum of findings at cross-sectional imaging.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Mecit; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Karabulut, Nevzat; Aydinli, Bulent; Ogul, Hayri; Yuce, Ihsan; Calik, Muhammet; Eren, Suat; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Oto, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, which is endemic in many parts of the world. Without timely diagnosis and therapy, the prognosis is dismal, with death the eventual outcome in most cases. Diagnosis is usually based on findings at radiologic imaging and in serologic analyses. Because echinococcal lesions can occur almost anywhere in the body, familiarity with the spectrum of cross-sectional imaging appearances is advantageous. Echinococcal lesions may produce widely varied imaging appearances depending on the parasite's growth stage, the tissues or organs affected, and the presence of associated complications. Although the liver is the initial site of mass infestation by E multilocularis, the parasite may disseminate from there to other organs and tissues, such as the lung, heart, brain, bones, and ligaments. In severe infestations, the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels may be invaded. Disseminated parasitic lesions in unusual locations with atypical imaging appearances may make it difficult to narrow the differential diagnosis. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with standard and diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR cholangiopancreatography all provide useful information and play complementary roles in detecting and characterizing echinococcal lesions. Cross-sectional imaging is crucial for differentiating echinococcosis from malignant processes: CT is most useful for depicting the peripheral calcifications surrounding established echinococcal cysts, and MR imaging is most helpful for identifying echinococcosis of the central nervous system.

  1. The Feasibility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Quantification of Liver, Pancreas, Spleen, Vertebral Bone Marrow, and Renal Cortex R2* and Proton Density Fat Fraction in Transfusion-Related Iron Overload.

    PubMed

    İdilman, İlkay S; Gümrük, Fatma; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-03-05

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of quantification of liver, pancreas, spleen, vertebral bone marrow, and renal cortex R2* and magnetic resonance imaging-proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) and to evaluate the correlations among them in patients with transfusion-related iron overload. A total of 9 patients (5 boys, 4 girls) who were referred to our clinic with suspicion of hepatic iron overload were included in this study. All patients underwent T1-independent volumetric multi-echo gradient-echo imaging with T2* correction and spectral fat modeling. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5 T MRI system. All patients had hepatic iron overload. Severe hepatic iron overload was recorded in 5/9 patients (56%), and when we evaluated the PDFF maps of these patients, we observed an extensive patchy artifact in the liver in 4 of 5 patients (R2* greater than 671 Hz). When we performed MRI-PDFF measurements despite these artifacts, we observed artifactual high MRI-PDFF values. There was a close correlation between average pancreas R2* and average pancreas MRI-PDFF (p=0.003, r=0.860). There was a significant correlation between liver R2* and average pancreas R2* (p=0.021, r=0.747), liver R2* and renal cortex R2* (p=0.020, r=0.750), and average pancreas R2* and renal cortex R2* (p=0.003, r=0.858). There was a significant negative correlation between vertebral bone marrow R2* and age (p=0.018, r=-0.759). High iron content of the liver, especially with a T2* value shorter than the first echo time can spoil the efficacy of PDFF calculation. Fat deposition in the pancreas is accompanied by pancreatic iron overload. There is a significant correlation between hepatic siderosis and pancreatic siderosis. Renal cortical and pancreatic siderosis are correlated, too.

  2. Idiopathic Chronic Parotitis: Imaging Findings and Sialendoscopic Response.

    PubMed

    Heineman, Thomas E; Kacker, Ashutosh; Kutler, David I

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate imaging and sialendoscopic findings to therapeutic response in patients with idiopathic chronic parotitis. We retrospectively reviewed 122 consecutive sialendoscopies performed in an academic medical center by two surgeons between 2008 and 2013. Forty-one (34%) and 54 (44%) patients were excluded on the basis of having parotid or submandibular sialolith, respectively. Nineteen cases were included in the study with idiopathic chronic parotitis. There was a median follow-up of 5 months. Computed tomography (CT) imaging had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.0 and 71.4%, respectively, for predicting abnormal findings on sialendoscopy, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had 100% accuracy in a small set of cases. In glands with noticeable pathology present on preoperative imaging or sialendoscopy, 11 out of 12 glands (92%) treated experienced symptomatic improvement, while 3 out of 7 glands (43%) without pathology on imaging or endoscopy experienced symptomatic improvement (p = 0.038). Sialendoscopy for the treatment of idiopathic chronic parotid disease can improve pain and swelling with a higher frequency of success in patients with abnormalities noted on endoscopy. CT and MRI have a moderate degree of accuracy in predicting which patients will benefit from therapeutic sialendoscopy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. PYNPOINT: an image processing package for finding exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Adam; Quanz, Sascha P.

    2012-12-01

    We present the scientific performance results of PYNPOINT, our Python-based software package that uses principal component analysis to detect and estimate the flux of exoplanets in two-dimensional imaging data. Recent advances in adaptive optics and imaging technology at visible and infrared wavelengths have opened the door to direct detections of planetary companions to nearby stars, but image processing techniques have yet to be optimized. We show that the performance of our approach gives a marked improvement over what is presently possible using existing methods such as LOCI. To test our approach, we use real angular differential imaging (ADI) data taken with the adaptive optics-assisted high resolution near-infrared camera NACO at the VLT. These data were taken during the commissioning of the apodizing phase plate (APP) coronagraph. By inserting simulated planets into these data, we test the performance of our method as a function of planet brightness for different positions on the image. We find that in all cases PYNPOINT has a detection threshold that is superior to that given by our LOCI analysis when assessed in a common statistical framework. We obtain our best improvements for smaller inner working angles (IWAs). For an IWA of ˜0.29 arcsec we find that we achieve a detection sensitivity that is a factor of 5 better than LOCI. We also investigate our ability to correctly measure the flux of planets. Again, we find improvements over LOCI, with PYNPOINT giving more stable results. Finally, we apply our package to a non-APP data set of the exoplanet β Pictoris b and reveal the planet with high signal-to-noise. This confirms that PYNPOINT can potentially be applied with high fidelity to a wide range of high-contrast imaging data sets.

  4. [Mucinous papillary cystadenoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ledezma, G; Salloum, S; de Sulbarán, Y; de Armas, L

    1992-01-01

    The case of a 15-years-old female patient is presented, who referred pain and presence of a mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Diagnostic imaging showed a 9 cm diameter cystic lesion in the tail of the pancreas which was removed surgically. Histology demonstrated a pancreatic mucinous cystadenoma with borderline biological behaviour. A review of the literature related to cystic neoplasms of the pancreas is realized.

  5. Primary osteosarcoma of the breast: pathological and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Conde, Délio Marques; Morais, Larissa Cunha; Pacheco, Cristiane Fagundes; Ferreira, Rogério Bizinoto; Sousa-e-Silva, Érika Pereira de; Nunes, Aline Regina; Pinto, Sebastião Alves; Fonseca, Paulo Sérgio Peres

    2015-01-01

    Primary osteosarcoma of the breast (POB) is an extremely rare and aggressive tumor. Differential diagnosis of POB includes osteosarcoma of the chest wall and metaplastic breast carcinoma. Imaging tests that exclude the existence of a direct connection between the tumor and chest wall, as well as histopathological and immunohistochemical studies that rule out the presence of an epithelial component are required for the diagnosis of POB. We report a case of a 69-year old woman with POB. Imaging and pathological findings are presented. Therapeutic approach is discussed in the light of current knowledge, including potential complications.

  6. Imaging and clinical findings in segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM).

    PubMed

    Alhalabi, Kinan; Menias, Christine; Hines, Robert; Mamoun, Ihsan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-02-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory arteriopathy that tends to affect the medium-sized splanchnic branches of the aorta along with renal, carotid, cerebral, and coronary arteries. The clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhage and shock. SAM overlaps clinically and radiologically with other inflammatory vasculitides. This article describes the pathologic-radiologic correlation, imaging findings, and the management of the disease. Radiologists should be familiar with this disease entity as imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis.

  7. Uremic Encephalopathy: MR Imaging Findings and Clinical Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kim, D M; Lee, I H; Song, C J

    2016-09-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a metabolic disorder in patients with renal failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of uremic encephalopathy. This study retrospectively reviewed MR imaging findings in 10 patients with clinically proved uremic encephalopathy between May 2005 and December 2014. Parameters evaluated were lesion location and appearance; MR signal intensity of the lesions on T1WI, T2WI, and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images; the presence or absence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps; and the reversibility of documented signal-intensity abnormalities on follow-up MR imaging. MR imaging abnormalities accompanying marked elevation of serum creatinine (range, 4.3-11.7 mg/dL) were evident in the 10 patients. Nine patients had a history of chronic renal failure with expansile bilateral basal ganglia lesions, and 1 patient with acute renal failure had reversible largely cortical lesions. Two of 6 patients with available arterial blood gas results had metabolic acidosis. All basal ganglia lesions showed expansile high signal intensity (lentiform fork sign) on T2WI. Varied levels of restricted diffusion and a range of signal intensities on DWI were evident and were not correlated with serum Cr levels. All cortical lesions demonstrated high signal intensity on T2WI. Four patients with follow-up MR imaging after hemodialysis showed complete resolution of all lesions. The lentiform fork sign is reliable in the early diagnosis of uremic encephalopathy, regardless of the presence of metabolic acidosis. Cytotoxic edema and/or vasogenic edema on DWI/ADC maps may be associated with uremic encephalopathy. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. QUININE TOXICITY: MULTIMODAL RETINAL IMAGING AND ELECTRORETINOGRAPHY FINDINGS.

    PubMed

    Su, Daniel; Robson, Anthony G; Xu, David; Lightman, Susan; Sarraf, David

    2017-01-01

    To report the multimodal retinal imaging and electroretinography (ERG) findings of two cases with quinine toxicity. Retrospective case series describing the retinal imaging and ERG findings in two patients with retinal toxicity due to remote quinine exposure. Color fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and full-field ERG findings are described. Two patients with longstanding decreased vision were found to have bilateral optic disk pallor and retinal vascular attenuation indicative of chronic sequela after acute quinine toxicity. Inner retinal atrophy was identified on spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and full-field ERG was consistent with generalized inner retinal dysfunction in both patients. Fundus autofluorescence failed to demonstrate any evidence of outer retinal or retinal pigment epithelial abnormalities. Quinine toxicity may be associated with vision loss secondary to inner retinal atrophy. We report two cases with a clear history of acute quinine exposure leading to similar retinal imaging findings and distinctive ERG abnormalities. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon condition as ingestion history may be remote.

  9. Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas presenting as diffuse pancreatic enlargement: Two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yaping; Hu, Guilan; Ma, Yanru; Guo, Ning; Li, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant tumor of exocrine pancreas. It is typically a well-marginated large solid mass arising in a certain aspect of the pancreas. Diffuse involvement of ACC in the pancreas is very rare, and may simulate pancreatitis in radiological findings. We report 2 cases of ACC presenting as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas due to tumor involvement without formation of a distinct mass. The patients consisted of a 41-year-old man with weight loss and a 77-year-old man who was asymptomatic. Computed tomography (CT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas forming a sausage-like shape with homogenously increased FDG activity. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the pancreatic lesion was performed. Histopathology results from the pancreas confirmed the diagnosis of pancreatic ACC. Because diffuse enlargement of the pancreas is a common imaging feature of pancreatitis, recognition of this rare morphologic pattern of ACC is important for radiological diagnosis of this tumor.

  10. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging findings of prostatic pure leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Mussi, Thais Caldara; Costa, Yves Bohrer; Obara, Marcos Takeo; Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes de; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; Longo, José Antonio Domingos Cianciarulo; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    To describe the imaging findings of prostatic tumors nonadenocarcinoma on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 200 patients underwented multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate for screening for prostate cancer, from August 2013 to September 2014, followed by biopsy with ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging fusion. We found three pathologic proved cases of prostatic pure leiomyomas (0.02%) in our series and described the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging features of these prostatic leiomyomas. The imaging findings had similar features to lesions with moderate or high suspicion for significant cancer (Likert 4 or 5) when localized both in the transitional zone or in the peripheral zone of the gland. Pure prostatic leiomyomas had imaging findings on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging that mimicked usual adenocarcinomas on this test. Radiologists, urologists and pathologists must be aware of this entity and its imaging features. Descrever os achados de imagem de tumores prostáticos não adenocarcinoma na ressonância magnética multiparamétrica. Realizaram ressonância magnética multiparamétrica da próstata para detecção de câncer de próstata 200 pacientes de agosto de 2013 a setembro de 2014, seguida por biópsia com fusão de imagens de ultrassonografia/ressonância magnética. Encontramos três casos confirmados histologicamente de leiomiomas prostáticos puros (0,02%) em nossa casuística e descrevemos os achados da ressonância magnética multiparamétrica destes casos de leiomiomas. Os achados de imagem foram semelhantes aos de lesões com moderada ou alta suspeição para neoplasia clinicamente significante (Likert 4 ou 5) quando localizados na zona de transição ou zona periférica da próstata. Leiomiomas puros da próstata tiveram achados de imagem na ressonância magnética multiparamétrica que mimetizaram adenocarcinomas. Radiologistas, urologistas e patologistas devem estar cientes destas

  11. Incidental extraspinal findings on magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Turanlı, Sevim; Saltas, Hakan; Karabacak, Osman Raif; Damar, Cagrı; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2014-08-29

    We aimed to evaluate pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations that were incidentally detected on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of intervertebral discs, to find the frequencies of these incidental findings, and to emphasise the clinical importance of them. A retrospective study including 1031 consecutive patients (730 females and 301 males, with a median age of 46 years) was conducted by evaluating a total of 1106 MRI examinations of intervertebral discs. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T MRI unit. Incidental findings were classified as pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations. The percentages of incidental extraspinal pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations were 16.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.4-18.8) and 3.7% (95% CI: 2.6-4.3), respectively. The percentage of incidental extraspinal pathological findings on cervical spinal MRI was 25.7% (95% CI: 20.1-31.7), thyroid nodules being the most common incidental findings. On thoracic spinal MRI (n = 19), inferior pole thyroid nodules were demonstrated as incidental extraspinal pathological findings, with a percentage of 10.5% (95% CI: 9.6-11.5). On lumbar spinal MRI, incidental pathological findings were detected with a percentage of 14.2% (95% CI: 11.9-16.6), while the percentage of congenital anomalies/anatomical variations was 4.8% (95% CI: 3.4-6.3). Eventually, 6.5% (95% CI: 2.6-9.4) of all cases with incidental extraspinal pathological findings underwent surgery. On MRI examination of intervertebral discs, paying attention to incidentally detected pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations is very important due to the fact that they can alter the treatment of the patient or affect the patient's life.

  12. Incidental extraspinal findings on magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Turanlı, Sevim; Saltas, Hakan; Karabacak, Osman Raif; Damar, Cagrı; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to evaluate pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations that were incidentally detected on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of intervertebral discs, to find the frequencies of these incidental findings, and to emphasise the clinical importance of them. Material and methods A retrospective study including 1031 consecutive patients (730 females and 301 males, with a median age of 46 years) was conducted by evaluating a total of 1106 MRI examinations of intervertebral discs. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T MRI unit. Incidental findings were classified as pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations. Results The percentages of incidental extraspinal pathological findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations were 16.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.4–18.8) and 3.7% (95% CI: 2.6–4.3), respectively. The percentage of incidental extraspinal pathological findings on cervical spinal MRI was 25.7% (95% CI: 20.1–31.7), thyroid nodules being the most common incidental findings. On thoracic spinal MRI (n = 19), inferior pole thyroid nodules were demonstrated as incidental extraspinal pathological findings, with a percentage of 10.5% (95% CI: 9.6–11.5). On lumbar spinal MRI, incidental pathological findings were detected with a percentage of 14.2% (95% CI: 11.9–16.6), while the percentage of congenital anomalies/anatomical variations was 4.8% (95% CI: 3.4–6.3). Eventually, 6.5% (95% CI: 2.6–9.4) of all cases with incidental extraspinal pathological findings underwent surgery. Conclusions On MRI examination of intervertebral discs, paying attention to incidentally detected pathological extraspinal findings and congenital anomalies/anatomical variations is very important due to the fact that they can alter the treatment of the patient or affect the patient's life. PMID:25276162

  13. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of equine solar penetration wounds.

    PubMed

    del Junco, Carolina I Urraca; Mair, Tim S; Powell, Sarah E; Milner, Peter I; Font, Alex F; Schwarz, Tobias; Weaver, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, signalment, clinical history and outcome of 55 horses with a penetrating sole injury were evaluated. Our aim was to describe MR imaging findings within the hoof capsule, assess the utility of the technique and give recommendations for the optimal MR imaging protocol to evaluate such injuries. Data from five equine hospitals were analyzed retrospectively. The tract was more likely to be visualized in animals scanned within the first week postinjury. There was no significant predisposition based on breed, age, or gender. T2*W transverse sequences were the most useful for assessment of solar penetrations due to their orientation perpendicular to the deep digital flexor tendon, the reduced scanning time, and the T2* capability of enhancing magnetic susceptibility caused by hemorrhage.

  15. Imaging findings in arthrofibrosis of the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Linklater, James M; Fessa, Chris K

    2012-07-01

    Arthrofibrosis is defined as joint pain and stiffness that does not allow functional range of motion and is due to adhesions or contracture of the joint. Arthrofibrosis is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of fibrous tissue that may be focal or diffuse and intra-articular or extra-articular. Trauma and surgery are the most common etiological factors. In the ankle and foot symptomatic arthrofibrosis is not uncommonly seen in the talocrural joint, posterior subtalar joint, and the metatarsophalangeal joints. Imaging can assist with diagnosis and planning treatment, most commonly using MRI and occasionally ultrasound. Typical imaging findings consist of capsular and pericapsular thickening and scarring, best demonstrated on proton-density MR images but also demonstrable on ultrasound. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Incidental findings in imaging diagnostic tests: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, B; Donat, L; Hernández-Aguado, I

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to summarise the available evidence on the frequency and management of incidental findings in imaging diagnostic tests. Original articles were identified by a systematic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library Plus databases using appropriate medical headings. Extracted variables were study design; sample size; type of imaging test; initial diagnosis; frequency and location of incidental findings; whether clinical follow-up was performed; and whether a definitive diagnosis was made. Study characteristics were assessed by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Any disagreement was solved by consensus. The relationship between the frequency of incidental findings and the study characteristics was assessed using a one-way ANOVA test, as was the frequency of follow-up of incidental findings and the frequency of confirmation. 251 potentially relevant abstracts were identified and 44 articles were finally included in the review. Overall, the mean frequency of incidental findings was 23.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 15.8–31.3%). The frequency of incidental findings was higher in studies involving CT technology (mean 31.1%, 95% CI 20.1–41.9%), in patients with an unspecific initial diagnosis (mean 30.5, 95% CI 0–81.6) and when the location of the incidental findings was unspecified (mean 33.9%, 95% CI 18.1–49.7). The mean frequency of clinical follow-up was 64.5% (95% CI 52.9–76.1%) and mean frequency of clinical confirmation was 45.6% (95% CI 32.1–59.2%). Although the optimal strategy for the management of these abnormalities is still unclear, it is essential to be aware of the low clinical confirmation in findings of moderate and major importance. PMID:20335439

  17. Castleman disease of the neck: CT and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin-Hua; Song, Hao-Ming; Liu, Qing-Yu; Cao, Yun; Li, Guo-Hong; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2014-11-01

    To characterize the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Castleman disease of the neck. The imaging findings of 21 patients with Castleman disease of the neck were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 21 patients, 16 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT scans; 5 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI scans. The unenhanced CT images showed isolated or multiple well-defined homogenous mild hypodensity lesions in fifteen cases, and a heterogeneous nodule with central areas of mild hypodensity in one case. Calcification was not observed in any of the patients. In five patients, MR T1-weighted images revealed well-defined, homogeneous isointense or mild hyperintense lesions to the muscle; T2-weighted images showed these as intermediate hyperintense. Sixteen cases showed intermediate to marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT or MR T1-weighted images. Of the other five cases that underwent double-phase CT scans, four showed mild or intermediate heterogeneous enhancement at the arterial phase, and homogeneous intermediate or marked enhancement at the venous phase; the remaining case showed mild and intermediate ring-enhancement with a central non-enhanced area at the arterial and venous phases, respectively. Castleman disease of the neck can be characterized as solitary or multiple well-defined, mild hypodensity or homogeneous intense lesions on plain CT/MR scans, and demonstrates intermediate and marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. On double-phase CT scans, Castleman disease often demonstrates mild enhancement at the arterial phase, and gradually uniform enhancement at venous phase. Double-phase enhanced CT or MRI may help to differentiate Castleman disease from other diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings for dyslexia: a review.

    PubMed

    Elnakib, Ahmed; Soliman, Ahmed; Nitzken, Matthew; Casanova, Manuel F; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a brain disorder that is associated with a disability to read, which affects both the behavior and the learning abilities of children. Recent advances in MRI techniques have enabled imaging of different brain structures and correlating the results to clinical findings. The goal of this paper is to cover these imaging studies in order to provide a better understanding of dyslexia and its associated brain abnormalities. In addition, this survey covers the noninvasive MRI-based diagnostics methods that can offer early detection of dyslexia. We focus on three MRI techniques: structural MRI, functional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging. Structural MRI reveals dyslexia-associated volumetric and shape-based abnormalities in different brain structures (e.g., reduced grey matter volumes, decreased cerebral white matter gyrifications, increased corpus callosum size, and abnormal asymmetry of the cerebellum and planum temporale structures). Functional MRI reports abnormal activation patterns in dyslexia during reading operations (e.g., aggregated studies observed under-activations in the left hemisphere fusiform and supramarginal. gyri and over-activation in the left cerebellum in dyslexic subjects compared with controls). Finally, diffusion tensor imaging reveals abnormal orientations in areas within the white matter micro-structures of dyslexic brains (e.g., aggregated studies reported a reduction of the fraction anisotropy values in bilateral areas within the white matter). Herein, we will discuss all of these MRI findings focusing on various aspects of implemented methodologies, testing databases, as well as the reported findings. Finally, the paper addresses the correlation between the MRI findings in the literature, various aspects of research challenges, and future trends in this active research field.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of paracoccidioidomycosis in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Leonor G; Monsignore, Lucas M; de Andrade Hernandes, Mateus; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2015-10-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Retrospective case series study after IRB approval. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed in consensus the MRI findings of 11 patients with microbiologically and/or pathologically proven osteoarticular PCM. The MRI evaluation included discrimination of abnormalities in joints, bones and soft tissues. Mean age of patients was 29 years (10-55 years), eight men and three women. Musculoskeletal involvement was the only or the primary presentation of the disease in seven patients (63%). Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, with seven cases (63%). Primary arthritis was found in one patient (9%). Isolated extra-articular soft tissue PCM was found in three patients: myositis (2) and subcutaneous infection (1). All cases showed regions with signal intensity higher than or similar to the signal of muscle on T1-weighted images. Penumbra sign was present in five cases (45%). T2-weighted images showed reactive soft tissue oedema in eight cases (72%). Post-gadolinium images showed peripheral (8/9) or heterogeneous (1/9) enhancement. Synovial enhancement was present in all cases of joint involvement (6/6). Lipomatosis arborescens was documented in one case of chronic knee involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first case series describing MRI findings of musculoskeletal PCM. Musculoskeletal involvement was the primary presentation of the disease in most cases, and therefore, neoplasms were initially in the differential diagnosis. Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, often with secondary involvement of joint and or soft tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Diagnosis and management of solid pseudopapillary tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M M; Khan, Z R; Hossain, M S

    2010-10-01

    The finding of a solid or cystic mass in the pancreas is becoming more common secondary to the increasing use of cross-sectional imaging and the improved sensitivity of such studies for the detection of pancreatic abnormalities. Because of the aggressive natural history of pancreatic cancer, this has caused concern that all pancreatic abnormalities may be cancer as well as confusion over proper diagnostic and treatment algorithms. This review provides an overview of the natural history, diagnostic considerations, and treatment recommendations for the less common tumor of the pancreas which can be misinterpreted as pancreatic cancer: solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT). A Medline search was conducted to identify studies investigating the clinicopath-ologic features, molecular genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of SPT. It is often possible to obtain an accurate pretreatment diagnosis for this unusual pancreatic tumor and to successfully differentiate them from the more common pancreatic malignancies.

  1. Finding the Secret of Image Saliency in the Frequency Domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Duan, Ling-Yu; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Tiejun; Tian, Yonghong

    2015-12-01

    There are two sides to every story of visual saliency modeling in the frequency domain. On the one hand, image saliency can be effectively estimated by applying simple operations to the frequency spectrum. On the other hand, it is still unclear which part of the frequency spectrum contributes the most to popping-out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, this paper tentatively explores the secret of image saliency in the frequency domain. From the results obtained in several qualitative and quantitative experiments, we find that the secret of visual saliency may mainly hide in the phases of intermediate frequencies. To explain this finding, we reinterpret the concept of discrete Fourier transform from the perspective of template-based contrast computation and thus develop several principles for designing the saliency detector in the frequency domain. Following these principles, we propose a novel approach to design the saliency detector under the assistance of prior knowledge obtained through both unsupervised and supervised learning processes. Experimental results on a public image benchmark show that the learned saliency detector outperforms 18 state-of-the-art approaches in predicting human fixations.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, E; Acu, B; Beyhan, M; Celikyay, F; Celikyay, R

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated morphological features of developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The study also evaluated the factors affecting the visibility of DVAs on MRI. We reviewed contrast-enhanced MRIs of 75 patients with DVA. The images were selected from 1,165 consecutive cranial MRIs. The images were examined for the DVA location, the number of collecting veins, the collecting vein diameter, drainage veins and sinuses, any accompanying parenchymal abnormalities or lesions, and the DVA visibility on MRI. DVAs prevalence was determined as 6.4 %. A total of 88 DVAs were observed. Single DVAs were observed in 65 patients, two were observed in 7 patients and three were observed in 3 patients. The DVA caputs had deep localization most frequently in 54.5 % of patients. A total of 98 collecting veins were identified, with a single vein identified in 80 DVAs. A statistically significant difference (p = 0.000) was found in the diameter of the collecting veins between DVAs that were the visible and nonvisible on noncontrast MRI. Most frequently, a single DVA was observed in the patients. A DVA caput could be located in the deep, subcortical, juxtacortical or deep + subcortical and juxtacortical + subcortical regions. Increasing collecting vein diameter increased visibility on noncontrast MRI, and small DVAs could be overlooked, even with contrast-enhanced MRI series if the images were not examined carefully.

  3. Thrombotic and nonthrombotic pulmonary arterial embolism: spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Franquet, Tomas; Müller, Nestor L; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2003-01-01

    Along with clinical examination and laboratory tests, imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Multi-detector row helical computed tomography (CT) is particularly helpful in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) owing to its capacity to directly show emboli as intravascular filling defects. Although parenchymal abnormalities at CT are nonspecific for acute PTE, they may contribute to a correct diagnosis of chronic PTE, the characteristic helical CT features of which are similar to its angiographic features and include webs or bands, intimal irregularities, abrupt narrowing or complete obstruction of the pulmonary arteries, and "pouching defect." Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon condition but is sometimes associated with specific imaging findings, including discrete nodules with cavitation (septic embolism), widespread homogeneous and heterogeneous areas of increased opacity or attenuation that typically appear 12-24 hours after trauma (fat embolism), and fine miliary nodules that subsequently coalesce into large areas of increased opacity or attenuation (talcosis). Knowledge of appropriate imaging methods and familiarity with the specific imaging features of pulmonary embolism should facilitate prompt, effective diagnosis.

  4. Surgical transposition of the ovaries: Imaging findings in 14 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.; Chambers, S.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Pelvic radiation therapy for cervical or vaginal cancer often leads to ovarian failure. To remove the ovaries from the radiation portal and preserve their function, they can be transposed to the lateral abdomen. Serial imaging studies in 14 patients who had undergone ovarian transposition (five bilateral, nine unilateral) were reviewed. Images obtained included 32 CT scans, 20 sonograms, and one MR image. Most transposed ovaries were located along the paracolic gutters near the iliac crests, creating an extrinsic mass effect on adjacent bowel. Detection of surgical clips on the ovary on CT scans allowed confident recognition of all 19 transposed ovaries. Cysts in the transposed ovaries, noted on most imaging studies, did not correlate with complications of pain or hormonal dysfunction. In one case, a large physiologic cyst in a transposed ovary distorted the cecum and was mistaken for a mucocele of the appendix. In another case, a large ovarian cyst was thought to be tumor recurrence or a lymphocele. These findings indicate that although the transposed ovaries can be recognized on CT scans by the surgical clips attached to the ovaries, the appearance of the ovary does not predict reliably the development of complications.

  5. Pulmonary Cryptococcosis: Imaging Findings in 23 Non-AIDS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Chung, Man Pyo; Kwon, O Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yi, Chin A; Chung, Myung Jin

    2010-01-01

    Objective We aimed to review the patterns of lung abnormalities of pulmonary cryptococcosis on CT images, position emission tomography (PET) findings of the disease, and the response of lung abnormalities to the therapies in non-AIDS patients. Materials and Methods We evaluated the initial CT (n = 23) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (n = 10), and follow-up (n = 23) imaging findings of pulmonary cryptococcosis in 23 non-AIDS patients. Lung lesions were classified into five patterns at CT: single nodular, multiple clustered nodular, multiple scattered nodular, mass-like, and bronchopneumonic patterns. The CT pattern analyses, PET findings, and therapeutic responses were recorded. Results A clustered nodular pattern was the most prevalent and was observed in 10 (43%) patients. This pattern was followed by solitary pulmonary nodular (n = 4, 17%), scattered nodular (n = 3, 13%), bronchopneumonic (n = 2, 9%), and single mass (n = 1, 4%) patterns. On PET scans, six (60%) of 10 patients showed higher FDG uptake and four (40%) demonstrated lower FDG uptake than the mediastinal blood pool. With specific treatment of the disease, a complete clearance of lung abnormalities was noted in 15 patients, whereas a partial response was noted in seven patients. In one patient where treatment was not performed, the disease showed progression. Conclusion Pulmonary cryptococcosis most commonly appears as clustered nodules and is a slowly progressive and slowly resolving pulmonary infection. In two-thirds of patients, lung lesions show high FDG uptake, thus simulating a possible malignant condition. PMID:20592924

  6. Spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings in clinical glenohumeral instability

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Sharma, Raju; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Nag, Hiralal; Mittal, Ravi; Upadhyay, Ashish Dutt

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body, and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Depending on the etiology and the age of the patient, there may be associated injuries, for example, to the anterior-inferior labro-ligamentous structures (in young individuals with traumatic instability) or to the bony components (commoner in the elderly), which are best visualized using MRI and MR arthrography. Anterior instability is associated with a Bankart lesion and its variants and abnormalities of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL), whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesions. Cases of multidirectional instability often have no labral pathology on imaging but show specific osseous changes including increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief and describes the MRI findings in each type, with the imaging features of the common abnormalities. PMID:21799591

  7. Gene expression profiles for the human pancreas and purified islets in Type 1 diabetes: new findings at clinical onset and in long-standing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Planas, R; Carrillo, J; Sanchez, A; Ruiz de Villa, M C; Nuñez, F; Verdaguer, J; James, R F L; Pujol-Borrell, R; Vives-Pi, M

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by the selective destruction of the insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas by an autoimmune response. Due to ethical and practical difficulties, the features of the destructive process are known from a small number of observations, and transcriptomic data are remarkably missing. Here we report whole genome transcript analysis validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR) and correlated with immunohistological observations for four T1D pancreases (collected 5 days, 9 months, 8 and 10 years after diagnosis) and for purified islets from two of them. Collectively, the expression profile of immune response and inflammatory genes confirmed the current views on the immunopathogenesis of diabetes and showed similarities with other autoimmune diseases; for example, an interferon signature was detected. The data also supported the concept that the autoimmune process is maintained and balanced partially by regeneration and regulatory pathway activation, e.g. non-classical class I human leucocyte antigen and leucocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B1 (LILRB1). Changes in gene expression in islets were confined mainly to endocrine and neural genes, some of which are T1D autoantigens. By contrast, these islets showed only a few overexpressed immune system genes, among which bioinformatic analysis pointed to chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) and chemokine (CXC motif) receptor 4) (CXCR4) chemokine pathway activation. Remarkably, the expression of genes of innate immunity, complement, chemokines, immunoglobulin and regeneration genes was maintained or even increased in the long-standing cases. Transcriptomic data favour the view that T1D is caused by a chronic inflammatory process with a strong participation of innate immunity that progresses in spite of the regulatory and regenerative mechanisms. PMID:19912253

  8. Iniencephaly Clausus: A New Case With Clinical and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Alireza; Hasanzadeh, Mohsen; Norouzi, Hedayat; Esfandiari, Ehasn; Mehrafarin, Mastooreh

    2015-07-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare kind of neural tube defect that is classified into two types of iniencephaly apertus and iniencephaly clausus. This anomaly could be diagnosed prenatally by obstetric ultrasonography and terminated by therapeutic abortion; however, it could be undiagnosed until birth similar to our case due to the abnormal position of the fetus or lack of experience of the sonographer. Due to abnormality of the neural tube, which causes abnormal head and neck position, all these cases will die shortly after birth. We hereby introduce the photos and imaging findings of a case of an alive neonate with iniencephaly clausus.

  9. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen: the imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong

    2010-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  10. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations. PMID:27761175

  11. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-05-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations.

  12. Primary hyperoxaluria: spectrum of clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Sara B; Waltuch, Temima; Bivin, William; Kaskel, Frederick; Levin, Terry L

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism with three known subtypes. In primary hyperoxaluria type 1, the most common of the subtypes, a deficiency in the hepatic enzymes responsible for the metabolism of glycoxylate to glycine, leads to excessive levels of glyoxylate, which is converted to oxalate. The resultant elevation in serum and urinary oxalate that characterizes primary hyperoxaluria leads to calcium oxalate crystal deposition in multiple organ systems (oxalosis). We review the genetics, pathogenesis, variable clinical presentation and course of this disease as well as its treatment. Emphasis is placed on the characteristic imaging findings before and after definitive treatment with combined liver and renal transplantation.

  13. Iniencephaly Clausus: A New Case With Clinical and Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Alireza; Hasanzadeh, Mohsen; Norouzi, Hedayat; Esfandiari, Ehasn; Mehrafarin, Mastooreh

    2015-01-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare kind of neural tube defect that is classified into two types of iniencephaly apertus and iniencephaly clausus. This anomaly could be diagnosed prenatally by obstetric ultrasonography and terminated by therapeutic abortion; however, it could be undiagnosed until birth similar to our case due to the abnormal position of the fetus or lack of experience of the sonographer. Due to abnormality of the neural tube, which causes abnormal head and neck position, all these cases will die shortly after birth. We hereby introduce the photos and imaging findings of a case of an alive neonate with iniencephaly clausus. PMID:26528385

  14. Pancreatic endometrial cyst mimics mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mederos, Michael A; Villafañe, Nicole; Dhingra, Sadhna; Farinas, Carlos; McElhany, Amy; Fisher, William E; Van Buren II, George

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cysts include a variety of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Endometrial cysts in the pancreas are exceedingly rare lesions that are difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This report describes the findings in a 43-year-old patient with a recent episode of acute pancreatitis who presented with a large cyst in the tail of the pancreas. Imaging demonstrated a loculated pancreatic cyst, and cyst fluid aspiration revealed an elevated amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen. The patient experienced an interval worsening of abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, and a 15-pound weight loss 3 mo after the initial episode of pancreatitis. With concern for a possible pre-malignant lesion, the patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, which revealed a 16 cm × 12 cm × 4 cm lesion. Final histopathology was consistent with an intra-pancreatic endometrial cyst. Here we discuss the overlapping imaging and laboratory features of pancreatic endometrial cysts and mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. PMID:28246486

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Small Patella Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Noh-Hyuck; Chang, Jun-Hee; Ban, Yun-Seong; Song, Sang-Heon

    2016-03-01

    Small patella syndrome (SPS) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the patella and pelvic girdle abnormalities, including bilateral absence or delayed ossification of the ischiopubic junction and infra-acetabular axe-cut notches. Here, we report a case of SPS in a 26-year-old female. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed a small patella with thick eccentric non-ossified patellar cartilage and femoral trochlear dysplasia with hypoplastic patellar undersurface. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MRI findings in SPS. MRI findings could be clinically relevant because elongation of the medial patellofemoral ligament and trochlear dysplasia with eccentric non-ossified patellar cartilage might lead to patellofemoral maltracking with an osteochondral lesion or acute dislocation or an extensor mechanism injury. Though the patient presented in this case report only had a gastrocnemius injury at the origin site, physicians should carefully examine abnormalities with MRI when an SPS patient has a trauma to the knee.

  16. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas--evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Horton, Karen H; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fishman, Elliot K

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is a rare cystic pancreatic tumor. In this case report we provide the imaging perspective of the lesion including the role of multidetector CT (MDCT) and CT angiography and 3D imaging.

  17. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes.

  18. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Muglia, Valdair F.; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes. PMID:26185343

  19. Abdominopelvic actinomycosis: spectrum of imaging findings and common mimickers

    PubMed Central

    der Molen, Aart Van; Es, Ad CMG Van; Giannila, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Actinomycosis is a rare suppurative disease that may mimic other inflammatory conditions on imaging. Its invasive nature may lead to mass formation and atypical presentation thus making accurate diagnosis quite difficult. Purpose To describe the different aspects of abdominopelvic actinomycosis on cross-sectional imaging and indicate discriminative findings from other inflammatory or neoplastic diseases. Material and Methods In our study we analyzed 18 patients (15 women, 3 men; age range, 25–75 years; mean age, 50 years) with pathologically proved abdominopelvic actinomycosis. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) had been performed in all patients. Eleven patients had a history of using intrauterine contraceptive devices. Bowel site, wall thickness and enhancement degree, inflammatory infiltration, and features of peritoneal or pelvic mass were evaluated at CT. Results The sigmoid colon was most commonly involved. Most patients showed concentric bowel wall-thickening, enhancing homogenously and inflammatory infiltration of pericolonic fat was mostly diffuse. In 11 patients, one or more pelvic abscesses were revealed, while a peritoneal or pelvic mass adjacent to the involved bowel segment was seen in three cases. Infiltration into the abdominal wall was seen in three cases while in one case there was thoracic dissemination. Conclusion Actinomycosis is related not only to long-term use of intrauterine contraceptive devices and should be included in the differential diagnosis when cross-sectional imaging studies show concentric bowel wall-thickening, intense contrast enhancement, regional pelvic or peritoneal masses, and extensive inflammatory fat infiltration with abscess formation. PMID:24778807

  20. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, E R; De Gregorio, M A; Mateo, P; Escó, R; Bascón, N; Morales, F; Bellosta, R; López, P; Gimeno, M; Roca, M; Villavieja, J L

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the "open-neck" (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase ( < 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis.

  1. Overview of the investigation and management of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Spence, Robert A J; Dasari, Bobby; Love, Mark; Kelly, Barry; Taylor, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas contribute to 10-20% of pancreatic tumours. Malignant cystic tumours of the pancreas behave similar to adenocarcinomas and thus warrant aggressive management. However, certain benign cystic neoplasms do not require operative intervention. It is, therefore, important to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions and from those with malignant potential. To provide an overview of the role of radiological investigations in the management of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, with emphasis on the characteristic features of aggressive tumours. The role of different imaging modalities is discussed, and an investigative algorithm suggested. A literature review was carried out on Medline, Cochrane library, and PubMed using the MeSH terms 'pancreas' and 'cysts' to source relevant papers. Search criteria were limited to English literature, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, prospective and retrospective case series, published during or after 1998. Each pancreatic cystic lesion has characteristic radiological findings. However, the diagnostic accuracy of individual imaging techniques is still limited. A combination of imaging modalities is essential for preoperative diagnosis. CT complemented by endoscopic ultrasound and cyst fluid analysis appears to be the most promising investigation in diagnosing cystic neoplasms. Follow-up with serial imaging is useful for lesions of uncertain aetiology. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  3. Radiological imaging findings of Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Erkan; Beyhan, Murat; Sade, Recep

    2017-04-03

    Radiological findings of Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) in patients with different etiologies are presented in our study. The study included 12 patients (seven females, five males) for whom radiological examinations were requested due to reasons such as epilepsy, mental retardation, and/or hemiplegia. CT was performed in 12, MRI in 6, MRA in 1, and DSA in 1 patient. Following imaging findings were evaluated: cerebral and cerebellar involvement (laterality, encephalomalacia), affected territories, ventricular enlargement, sulcal enlargement, calvarial thickening, and paranasal sinus enlargement hyperaeration. Age range of the patients was 5-62 (mean 34.1 ± 21.7). Left hemicrania was affected in eight patients, right hemicrania in four. Ipsilateral calvarial thickening and lateral ventricular dilatation were observed in all patients. 11 patients had ipsilateral frontal sinus hyperaeration, sulcal enlargement and encephalomalacia. Wallerian degeneration of the mesencephalon and middle fossa hypoplasia was seen in ten patients, mastoid hyperaeration, third ventricular enlargement and thalamic involvement in nine, and corpus callosum, basal ganglion injury, and sphenoid sinus hyperaeration in eight. MCA, ACA, and PCA territories were involved in six patients. Only MCA territory involvement was seen in four patients. Cerebellar atrophy was contralateral in two patients. Symmetric bilateral atrophy was observed in one patient. DDMS can be encountered with different radiological findings based on cerebral damage formation process and the extent of damage. Patients may have different levels of cerebral hemiatrophy, ipsilateral carvarial thickening, and lateral ventricular dilatation.

  4. Findings from Structural MR Imaging in Military Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Riedy, Gerard; Senseney, Justin S; Liu, Wei; Ollinger, John; Sham, Elyssa; Krapiva, Pavel; Patel, Jigar B; Smith, Alice; Yeh, Ping-Hong; Graner, John; Nathan, Dominic; Caban, Jesus; French, Louis M; Harper, Jamie; Eskay, Victoria; Morissette, John; Oakes, Terrence R

    2016-04-01

    To describe the initial neuroradiology findings in a cohort of military service members with primarily chronic mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from blast by using an integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol. This study was approved by the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center institutional review board and is compliant with HIPAA guidelines. All participants were military service members or dependents recruited between August 2009 and August 2014. There were 834 participants with a history of TBI and 42 participants in a control group without TBI (not explicitly age- and sex-matched). MR examinations were performed at 3 T primarily with three-dimensional volume imaging at smaller than 1 mm(3) voxels for the structural portion of the examination. The structural portion of this examination, including T1-weighted, T2-weighted, before and after contrast agent administrtion T2 fluid attenuation inversion recovery, and susceptibility-weighted images, was evaluated by neuroradiologists by using a modified version of the neuroradiology TBI common data elements (CDEs). Incident odds ratios (ORs) between the TBI participants and a comparison group without TBI were calculated. The 834 participants were diagnosed with predominantly chronic (mean, 1381 days; median, 888 days after injury) and mild (92% [768 of 834]) TBI. Of these participants, 84.2% (688 of 817) reported one or more blast-related incident and 63.0% (515 of 817) reported loss of consciousness at the time of injury. The presence of white matter T2-weighted hyperintense areas was the most common pathologic finding, observed in 51.8% (432 of 834; OR, 1.75) of TBI participants. Cerebral microhemorrhages were observed in a small percentage of participants (7.2% [60 of 834]; OR, 6.64) and showed increased incidence with TBI severity (P < .001, moderate and severe vs mild). T2-weighted hyperintense areas and microhemorrhages did not collocate by visual inspection. Pituitary abnormalities were

  5. Two synchronous malignant tumors of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Silva, W S L; Pathirana, A A; Prematilleke, I; Rajapakse, S A P D; Hettiarachchi, P S H; Manawasinghe, D S; Dassanayake, B K

    2017-03-28

    Only a limited number of multiple synchronous primary malignancies of the pancreas have been reported in the medical literature. We report a case of two solid malignant tumors of the pancreas diagnosed preoperatively. We describe a 65-year-old Sri Lankan woman who presented with progressive obstructive jaundice. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging detected a malignant tumor at the tail of her pancreas. A second tumor of the pancreatic head was detected with integrated imaging using multidetector computed tomography and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging. She underwent total pancreaticoduodenectomy and splenectomy. Gross examination of the specimen confirmed the presence of two separate tumors. Histology of the ampullary tumor showed pancreatic-type adenocarcinoma and the tumor in the tail of her pancreas showed a colloid-type adenocarcinoma. The possibility of multiple primary malignant solid tumors of different types with malignant potential has to be considered even without background pathology when managing multiple tumors in the pancreas.

  6. Imaging findings of swallowed dentures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome; Subramanian, Manickam; Chokkapan, Kabilan; Shenoy, Jagadish; Lim, Tze Chwan

    2015-12-01

    Dental prosthesis is an uncommon ingested non-food foreign body in adults. Once swallowed, it can lead to serious complications and morbidity. Hence, early localization of the offending foreign body is crucial for timely management. As the dentures are usually made up of non-metallic material and often impacted at or below the level of C7 vertebra, conventional radiograph has limited role in their evaluation. We describe the clinical history and imaging findings of swallowed partial dentures in four patients who presented to the emergency department. The dentures were localized using unenhanced CT of the neck that showed the characteristic mildly hyperdense curvilinear or irregular appearance of the dentures within the upper esophagus. Multiplanar CT reconstructions provide an orientation of the ingested denture within the esophagus, thus guiding the endoscopist.

  7. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with “rapid wash-in and slow wash-out” or “progressive enhancement” enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  8. Sprengel deformity: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yaşar; Damar, Cagrι; Ersan, Onder; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of Sprengel deformity, which is also called congenital high scapula, are malposition and dysplasia of the affected scapula, with possible omovertebral connection. The aim of the present study was mainly to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of two pediatric cases of Sprengel deformity. A 7-year-old girl and a 9-year-old boy with deformities in their right shoulder were studied. Plain radiographs were obtained. MRI was performed for both children. The fibrous omovertebral connection is depicted in its longest form in one plane. Omovertebral band is best screened in coronal and axial cross sections. We are introducing a new MRI sign which we named as "Ra's eye" to define the appearance of omovertebral band within the surrounding fat tissue.

  9. Sprengel Deformity: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Two Pediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yaşar; Damar, Çagrι; Ersan, Önder; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of Sprengel deformity, which is also called congenital high scapula, are malposition and dysplasia of the affected scapula, with possible omovertebral connection. The aim of the present study was mainly to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of two pediatric cases of Sprengel deformity. A 7-year-old girl and a 9-year-old boy with deformities in their right shoulder were studied. Plain radiographs were obtained. MRI was performed for both children. The fibrous omovertebral connection is depicted in its longest form in one plane. Omovertebral band is best screened in coronal and axial cross sections. We are introducing a new MRI sign which we named as “Ra's eye” to define the appearance of omovertebral band within the surrounding fat tissue. PMID:21977386

  10. Dermoid cyst of the pancreas: presentation and management

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Gianfranco; Muzi, Marco Gallinella; Nigro, Casimiro; Cadeddu, Federica; Amabile, Dalia; Servadei, Francesca; Farinon, Attilio M

    2007-01-01

    Background Dermoid cyst of the pancreas is a benign, well-differentiated, extremely rare germ cell neoplasm. Published data indicate that differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the pancreas is challenging and although ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance may be useful, radiological findings are often inconclusive and the diagnosis is intraoperative. We report a case of a dermoid cyst of the tail of the pancreas intraoperatively diagnosed and successfully treated with left pancreatectomy. Further, characteristics, preoperative detection and differential diagnosis of this rare pathology are also discussed. Case presentation This report documents the findings of a 64-year-old male presenting with a well defined echogenic pancreatic mass on ultrasonography. Computerized Tomography (CT) showed a 5 cm cystic tumor arising from pancreatic tail and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) suggested a tumor extension to the middle side of the stomach without defined margins. A left pancreatectomy was performed. On surgical specimen, histological evaluation revealed a dermoid cyst of the tail of the pancreas measuring 8.5 × 3.0 cm. Conclusion Given the benign nature of the dermoid cyst, surgical resection most likely represents the definitive treatment and cure. In addition, resection is indicated in consideration of the difficulty in diagnosing dermoid cyst preoperatively. However, endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle aspiration cytology have recently been shown to be effective, safe, reliable and cost-saving preoperative diagnostic tools. Therefore, until more cases of dermoid cyst are identified to further elucidate its natural history and improve the reliability of the preoperative diagnostic tools, surgical resection should be considered the standard therapy in order to exclude malignancy. PMID:17683548

  11. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Güneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Acar, Türker; Savaş, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 1–68 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings. PMID:25010372

  12. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas. PMID:27695176

  13. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    Barragán-Campos, Héctor Manuel; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Lô, Daouda; Barrera-Ramírez, Carlos Felipe; Argote-Greene, Marcelo; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Estañol, Bruno; Guillevin, Rémy; Chiras, Jacques

    2005-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytopathies (MCs) are a heterogeneous group of clinical entities, some of which have classic phenotypes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been reported to be helpful in the diagnosis of MC. To correlate the most common brain MRI findings reported in patients with MC with the clinical findings in patients in different MC subgroups. Case series. Patients with MCs seen at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubiran, Mexico City, Mexico. Twenty-one patients with MC with the following phenotypes: chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (n = 7), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (n = 7), mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (n = 6), and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fiber myopathy (n = 1). Brain MRI abnormalities were found in 20 (95%) of 21 patients. The most frequent abnormalities were widespread white matter hyperintensity in 19 patients (90%), supratentorial cortical atrophy in 18 patients (86%), and cerebellar atrophy in 13 patients (62%). Widespread white matter hyperintensity (P<.001) and supratentorial cortical atrophy (P = .001) were each correlated significantly with MC. Subsequent subgroup analyses showed that the absence of basal ganglia hyperintensity was correlated with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (P < .001) and the presence of supratentorial cortical atrophy was correlated with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (P = .005). The presence of widespread white matter hyperintensity and/or supratentorial cortical atrophy in brain MRI may help to establish the diagnosis of MC. The radiologist has a role to play in the workup of MC by confirming the diagnosis and possibly distinguishing different subgroups of MC.

  14. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hulya; Pourbagher, Aysin; Colakoglu, Tamer

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) is a rare benign breast disease with unknown etiology which can mimic breast carcinoma, both clinically and radiologically. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of IGM have been previously described; however there is no study evaluating diffusion-weighted MRI findings of IGM. To analyze conventional, dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted MRI signal characteristics of IGM by comparing it with the contralateral normal breast parenchyma. A total of 39 patients were included in the study. On dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the distribution and enhancement patterns of the lesions were evaluated. We also detected the frequencies of involving quadrants, retroareolar involvement, accompanying abscess, and skin edema. T2-weighted (T2W) and STIR signal intensities and both mean and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared with the contralateral normal parenchyma. IGM showed significantly lower mean and minimum ADC values when compared with the normal parenchyma. Signal intensities on T2W and STIR sequences of the lesion were significantly higher than the normal parenchyma. On dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, 7.7% of the patients had mass-like contrast enhancement, 92.3% of the patients had non-mass-like contrast enhancement. Abscess was positive in 33.3% of the patients. As a result, IGM showed commonly non-mass-like lesions with restricted diffusion. Although it is a benign pathology, it may show clustered ring-like enhancement like malignant lesions. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  15. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  16. Von Hippel-Lindau disease involving pancreas and biliary system

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu-Ting; Bo, Qi-Yu; Zhao, Feng; Sun, Dong; Li, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare inherited, autosomal-dominant syndrome caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the VHL gene. VHL patients are prone to develop benign and malignant tumors and cysts in multiple organ systems involving kidneys, pancreas and central nervous system (CNS). The varied and complex clinical manifestations and radiological findings of VHL are of interest. Patient concerns: We report a 38-year-old woman with a ten-year history of VHL disease involving both pancreas and biliary system. To the best of our knowledge, direct involvement of the biliary system in VHL disease has never been reported. Diagnoses: The diagnosis was established via computed tomography scan and was confirmed by genetic testing. Interventions: The patient chose to receive conservative treatment and was followed up by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Outcomes: Renal angiomas and cysts were found during follow-up and there were no evidence of malignant change of the pancreas and biliary system. Lessons: We described the first case of VHL-associated choledochal cysts and may present new visceral manifestations of VHL disease. Gastroenterologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of this rare disease for early detection of its life-threatening manifestations. PMID:28072736

  17. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Childhood headaches and brain magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ünsal; Çeleğen, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Gürçınar, Müge; Ünalp, Aycan

    2014-03-01

    Headaches are common in children and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are widely used in everyday clinical practice because of increasing demands by parents. To determine headache types and to evaluate the frequency and clinical significance of brain MRI abnormalities in children with headache. A total of 449 children (261 male and 188 female with a mean age of 11.16 ± 3.22 years) with headache were included into the study. The criteria defined by International Headache Society were used to classify the headache types. The causes of headache were migraine in 247 (55.0%), tension-type in 133 (29.6%), secondary in 48 (10.7%), and unspecified headaches in 21 (4.7%) patients. Overall, 324 (72.2%) patients underwent cerebral MRI, which revealed abnormalities in 68 (21.0%) patients. Two (0.6%) patients had cerebral MRI abnormalities relevant to headache, including tumor and hydrocephalus each 1 (0.3%). Twenty-nine (8.9%) patients had incidental cerebral MRI abnormalities including 14 (4.3%) white-matter hyperintensities, 4 (1.2%) old infarcts, 3 (0.9%) Chiari malformations, arachnoid cysts and demyelinating lesions each 2 (0.6%), and subdural hygroma, fibrous dysplasia, pineal cyst and perivascular widening, each 1 (0.3%). Remaining 36 (11.1%) patients had extra-cerebral MRI abnormalities including 34 (10.5%) sinus disease, and 2 (0.6%) adenoid vegetation. Indications for brain MRI were atypical headache pattern or presence of neurologic abnormalities in 59 (18.2%) patients and parents' concerns in 265 (81.8%) patients. The rates of abnormal MRI findings were similar between these 2 groups. The most frequent cause of headache in children is migraine. Despite the high rate of imaging abnormalities, the yield of brain MRI is not contributory to the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cartilage imaging in children: current indications, magnetic resonance imaging techniques, and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ho-Fung, Victor M; Jaramillo, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of hyaline cartilage in pediatric patients requires in-depth understanding of normal physiologic changes in the developing skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a powerful tool for morphologic and functional imaging of the cartilage. In this review article, current imaging indications for cartilage evaluation pertinent to the pediatric population are described. In particular, novel surgical techniques for cartilage repair and MR classification of cartilage injuries are summarized. The authors also provide a review of the normal anatomy and a concise description of the advances in quantitative cartilage imaging (ie, T2 mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage, and T1rho). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Healthcare reform for imagers: finding a way forward now.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Picard, Michael H

    2013-03-01

    The changing healthcare environment presents many challenges to cardiovascular imagers. This perspective paper uses current trends to propose strategies that cardiovascular imagers can follow to lead in managing change and developing the imaging laboratory of the future. In the area of quality, imagers are encouraged to follow guidelines and standards, implement structured reporting and laboratory databases, adopt ongoing quality improvement programs, and use benchmarks to confirm imaging quality. In the area of access, imagers are encouraged to enhance availability of testing, focus on patient and referring physician value and satisfaction, collaboratively implement new technologies and uses of imaging, integrate health information technology in the laboratory, and work toward the appropriate inclusion of imaging in new healthcare delivery models. In the area of cost, imagers are encouraged to minimize laboratory operating expenses without compromising quality, and to take an active role in care redesign initiatives to ensure that imaging is utilized appropriately and at proper time intervals. Imagers are also encouraged to learn leadership and management skills, undertake strategic planning exercises, and build strong, collaborative teams. Although it is difficult to predict the future of cardiovascular imaging delivery, a reasonable sense of the likely direction of many changes and careful attention to the fundamentals of good health care (quality, access, and cost) can help imagers to thrive now and in the future.

  1. Sublingual Epidermoid Cyst Presenting with Distinctive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Kodama, Kozue; Iino, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    A case of sublingual epidermoid cyst presenting distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is described. A 39-year-old man presented to our hospital with a three months progressive left submandibular swelling, difficulty moving his tongue, and snoring. Preoperative evaluation with MRI and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) revealed that the heterogeneous cystic lesion contained the squamous cells, which is compatible with ectodermal tissue. The mass was located above the mylohyoid muscle and spread to the pharyngeal space. By considering the size, infection history, patient age, and location, the cyst was completely resected under general anesthesia via cervical approach without any complication. Histopathologically, the cyst wall was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with no skin appendage, suggesting an epidermoid cyst. Ultrasound (US), MRI and FNAC were very useful of the preoperative diagnosis for oral and sublingual lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful and without recurrence after 24 months. This case showed that epidermoid cysts formed the rarely heterogeneous cystic tumor and it underlined usefulness of preoperative diagnosis, such as US, MRI and FNAC for oral and sublingual tumor. PMID:25332766

  2. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  3. Torsion of wandering spleen and distal pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Sheflin, J.R.; Lee, C.M.; Kretchmar, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Wandering spleen is the term applied to the condition in which a long pedicle allows the spleen to lie in an abnormal location. Torsion of a wandering spleen is an unusual cause of an acute abdomen and is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Associated torsion of the distal pancreas is even more uncommon. The authors describe a patient with torsion of a wandering spleen and distal pancreas, who was correctly diagnosed, and define the merits of the imaging methods used. The initial examination should be /sup 99//sup m/Tc-sulfur colloid liner-spleen scanning.

  4. Imaging of plantar fascia disorders: findings on plain radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Gitto, Salvatore; Bortolotto, Chandra; Draghi, Anna Guja; Ori Belometti, Gioia

    2017-02-01

    Plantar fascia (PF) disorders commonly cause heel pain and disability in the general population. Imaging is often required to confirm diagnosis. This review article aims to provide simple and systematic guidelines for imaging assessment of PF disease, focussing on key findings detectable on plain radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sonographic characteristics of plantar fasciitis include PF thickening, loss of fibrillar structure, perifascial collections, calcifications and hyperaemia on Doppler imaging. Thickening and signal changes in the PF as well as oedema of adjacent soft tissues and bone marrow can be assessed on MRI. Radiographic findings of plantar fasciitis include PF thickening, cortical irregularities and abnormalities in the fat pad located deep below the PF. Plantar fibromatosis appears as well-demarcated, nodular thickenings that are iso-hypoechoic on ultrasound and show low-signal intensity on MRI. PF tears present with partial or complete fibre interruption on both ultrasound and MRI. Imaging description of further PF disorders, including xanthoma, diabetic fascial disease, foreign-body reactions and plantar infections, is detailed in the main text. Ultrasound and MRI should be considered as first- and second-line modalities for assessment of PF disorders, respectively. Indirect findings of PF disease can be ruled out on plain radiography. Teaching Points • PF disorders commonly cause heel pain and disability in the general population.• Imaging is often required to confirm diagnosis or reveal concomitant injuries.• Ultrasound and MRI respectively represent the first- and second-line modalities for diagnosis.• Indirect findings of PF disease can be ruled out on plain radiography.

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal pancreas: reproducibility and variations of apparent diffusion coefficient measurement at 1.5- and 3.0-Tesla.

    PubMed

    Barral, M; Soyer, P; Ben Hassen, W; Gayat, E; Aout, M; Chiaradia, M; Rahmouni, A; Luciani, A

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate reproducibility and variations in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement in normal pancreatic parenchyma at 1.5- and 3.0-Tesla and determine if differences may exist between the four pancreatic segments. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the pancreas was performed at 1.5-Tesla in 20 patients and at 3.0-Tesla in other 20 patients strictly matched for gender and age using the same b values (0, 400 and 800s/mm(2)). Two independent observers placed regions of interest within the four pancreatic segments to measure ADC at both fields. Intra- and inter-observer agreement in ADC measurement was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and comparison between ADC values obtained at both fields using non-parametrical tests. There were no significant differences in ADC between repeated measurements and between ADC obtained at 1.5-Tesla and those at 3.0-Tesla. The 95% limits of intra-observer agreement between ADC were 2.3%-22.7% at 1.5-Tesla and 1%-24.2% at 3.0-Tesla and those for inter-observer agreement between 1.9%-14% at 1.5-Tesla and 8%-25% at 3.0-Tesla. ADC values were similar in all pancreatic segments at 3.0-T whereas the tail had lower ADC at 1.5-Tesla. ADC measurement conveys high degrees of intra- and inter-observer reproducibility. ADC have homogeneous distribution among the four pancreatic segments at 3.0-Tesla. Copyright © 2012 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  7. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Uchida, Hiroki; Sasahira, Naoki; Kawada, Natsuko; Itoh, Yuya; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a relatively new diagnostic technique for measuring the elasticity (hardness) of tissue. Eleven years have passed since the debut of elastography. Various elastography devices are currently being marketed by manufacturers under different names. Pancreatic elastography can be used not only with transabdominal ultrasonography but also with endoscopic ultrasonography, but some types of elastography are difficult to perform for the pancreas. These guidelines aim to classify the various types of elastography into two major categories depending on the differences in the physical quantity (strain, shear wave), and to present the evidence for pancreatic elastography and how to use pancreatic elastography in the present day. But the number of reports on ultrasound elastography for the pancreas is still small, and there are no reports on some elastography devices for the pancreas. Therefore, these guidelines do not recommend methods of imaging and analysis by elastography device.

  8. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: (1) describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, (2) outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, (3) illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and (4) highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory, and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with brain

  9. Giant mucinous cystic adenoma with pancreatic atrophy mimicking dorsal agenesis of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Dupré, Aurélien; Ines, David Da; Tixier, Lucie; Pezet, Denis; Buc, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mucinous cystic adenoma (MCA) of the pancreas is a rare benign cystic tumor with ovarian-like stroma and lack of communication with the pancreatic ductal system. The ovarian tissue is incorporated from the left gonad within the dorsal pancreas during embryogenesis. Consequently, congenital dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) cannot be associated with MCA. We report the case of a giant MCA associated with atrophy of the dorsal pancreas mimicking complete DAP. Pancreato-magnetic resonance imaging failed to identify the dorsal pancreas but the absence of diabetes mellitus and compression of the splenic vein with major tributaries rectified the diagnosis of secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. Unusual proximal location of the cyst in the pancreas may have induced chronic obstruction of both the dorsal pancreatic duct and the splenic vein, with secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. PMID:24672649

  10. Central nervous system tuberculosis: pathophysiology and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Deepak; Narang, Jayant; Yanamandala, Rama; Lawande, Malini; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    With the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic, the incidence of tuberculosis, including central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis, has increased in developed countries. It is no longer a disease confined to underdeveloped and developing countries. The imaging appearance has become more complex with the onset of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Imaging plays an important role in the early diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. This article presents an extensive review of typical and atypical imaging appearances of intracranial tuberculosis, and discusses pathogenesis, patterns of involvement, and advances in imaging of intracranial tuberculosis.

  11. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Up About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas NPF ... here . About Us Board of Directors Newsletter Partners Financial & Privacy Policy Contact Us Patient Information About the Pancreas Genetics & ...

  12. Placental Imaging: Normal Appearance with Review of Pathologic Findings.

    PubMed

    Fadl, Shaimaa; Moshiri, Mariam; Fligner, Corinne L; Katz, Douglas S; Dighe, Manjiri

    2017-01-01

    The placenta plays a crucial role throughout pregnancy, and its importance may be overlooked during routine antenatal imaging evaluation. Detailed systematic assessment of the placenta at ultrasonography (US), the standard imaging examination during pregnancy, is important. Familiarity with the normal and abnormal imaging appearance of the placenta along with the multimodality and methodical approach for evaluation of its related abnormalities is necessary, so that radiologists can alert clinicians regarding appropriate prompt management decisions. This will potentially decrease fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. This article reviews early placental formation and the expected imaging appearance of the placenta during pregnancy, as well as variations in its morphology. It also discusses various placental diseases and their potential clinical consequences. Placental pathologic conditions include abnormalities of placental size, cord insertion, placental and cord location, and placental adherence. Other conditions such as bleeding in and around the placenta, as well as trophoblastic and nontrophoblastic tumors of the placenta, are also discussed. US with Doppler imaging is the initial imaging modality of choice for placental evaluation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is reserved for equivocal cases or when additional information is needed. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in evaluation of placental abnormalities because of the ionizing radiation exposure and the relatively limited assessment of the placenta; however, CT can provide important information in specific circumstances, particularly evaluation of trauma and staging of choriocarcinoma. This article also addresses recent techniques and updates in placental imaging, including elastography, diffusion-weighted MR imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging. These advanced imaging techniques may provide additional information in evaluation of abnormal placental adherence and

  13. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  14. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in acute canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bathen-Noethen, A; Stein, V M; Puff, C; Baumgaertner, W; Tipold, A

    2008-09-01

    Demyelination is the prominent histopathological hallmark in the acute stage of canine distemper virus infection. Magnetic resonance imaging is an important diagnostic tool in human beings to determine demyelination in the brain, for example in multiple sclerosis. Five young dogs with clinically suspected canine distemper virus infection were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Hyperintense lesions and loss of contrast between grey and white matter were detected in T2-weighted images in the cerebellum and/or in the brainstem of three dogs, which correlated with demyelination demonstrated in histopathological examination. Furthermore, increased signal intensities in T2-weighted images were seen in the temporal lobe of four dogs with no evidence of demyelination. Magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a sensitive tool for the visualisation of in vivo myelination defects in dogs with acute canine distemper virus infection. Postictal oedema and accumulation of antigen positive cells have to be considered an important differential diagnosis.

  16. Finding corner point correspondence from wavelet decomposition of image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohar, Mareboyana; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    A time efficient algorithm for image registration between two images that differ in translation is discussed. The algorithm is based on coarse-fine strategy using wavelet decomposition of both the images. The wavelet decomposition serves two different purposes: (1) its high frequency components are used to detect feature points (corner points here) and (2) it provides coarse-to-fine structure for making the algorithm time efficient. The algorithm is based on detecting the corner points from one of the images called reference image and computing corresponding points from the other image called test image by using local correlations using 7x7 windows centered around the corner points. The corresponding points are detected at the lowest decomposition level in a search area of about 11x11 (depending on the translation) and potential points of correspondence are projected onto higher levels. In the subsequent levels the local correlations are computed in a search area of no more than 3x3 for refinement of the correspondence.

  17. An image feature-based approach to automatically find images for application to clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Stanley, R Joe; De, Soumya; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George R

    2011-07-01

    The illustrations in biomedical publications often provide useful information in aiding clinicians' decisions when full text searching is performed to find evidence in support of a clinical decision. In this research, image analysis and classification techniques are explored to automatically extract information for differentiating specific modalities to characterize illustrations in biomedical publications, which may assist in the evidence finding process. Global, histogram-based, and texture image illustration features were compared to basis function luminance histogram correlation features for modality-based discrimination over a set of 742 manually annotated images by modality (radiological, photo, etc.) selected from the 2004-2005 issues of the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Using a mean shifting supervised clustering technique, automatic modality-based discrimination results as high as 95.57% were obtained using the basis function features. These results compared favorably to other feature categories examined. The experimental results show that image-based features, particularly correlation-based features, can provide useful modality discrimination information.

  18. Twelve-Month Pancreas Graft Function Significantly Influences Survival Following Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Andrew S.; Smits, Gerard; Wiseman, Alexander C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) is regarded as the treatment of choice for type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and kidney dysfunction, despite the morbidity associated with pancreas transplantation. These morbidities often influence selection of SPK versus living-donor kidney alone (LD KA) transplant. This study quantifies the impact of pancreas graft function on outcomes following SPK. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Using the SRTR database, SPK wait-listed patients transplanted from 1997 to 2005 were evaluated and segregated as: (1) SPK recipients with functioning pancreas graft 12 mo posttransplant (SPK, P+); (2) SPK recipients with loss of pancreas graft function within 12 mo posttransplant (SPK, P-); (3) recipients of deceased donor (DD) KA; (4) recipients of LD KA. The study compared patient and kidney graft survival to 84 mo posttransplant. Results: Patient survival for SPK, P+ was significantly better than the LD KA; SPK, P-; and DD KA cohorts (88.6% versus 80.0%, 73.9% and 64.8%, respectively [P < 0.001]), a finding confirmed by multivariate analysis and not influenced by pancreas-after-kidney transplantation (PAK) rates and outcomes. Unadjusted graft survival was also highest in the SPK, P+ cohort (72.0% versus 63.6%, 59.8%, 49.7%, P = 0.015 versus LD KA). Conclusions: SPK recipients with functioning pancreas grafts have superior survival compared with LD KA and DD KA, including in the setting of PAK. Early pancreas graft failure results in kidney and patient survival rates similar to KA. These data help further clarify the decision-making of SPK versus KA transplant options for patients and providers. PMID:19406961

  19. Twelve-month pancreas graft function significantly influences survival following simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Andrew S; Smits, Gerard; Wiseman, Alexander C

    2009-05-01

    Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) is regarded as the treatment of choice for type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and kidney dysfunction, despite the morbidity associated with pancreas transplantation. These morbidities often influence selection of SPK versus living-donor kidney alone (LD KA) transplant. This study quantifies the impact of pancreas graft function on outcomes following SPK. Using the SRTR database, SPK wait-listed patients transplanted from 1997 to 2005 were evaluated and segregated as: (1) SPK recipients with functioning pancreas graft 12 mo posttransplant (SPK, P+); (2) SPK recipients with loss of pancreas graft function within 12 mo posttransplant (SPK, P-); (3) recipients of deceased donor (DD) KA; (4) recipients of LD KA. The study compared patient and kidney graft survival to 84 mo posttransplant. Patient survival for SPK, P+ was significantly better than the LD KA; SPK, P-; and DD KA cohorts (88.6% versus 80.0%, 73.9% and 64.8%, respectively [P < 0.001]), a finding confirmed by multivariate analysis and not influenced by pancreas-after-kidney transplantation (PAK) rates and outcomes. Unadjusted graft survival was also highest in the SPK, P+ cohort (72.0% versus 63.6%, 59.8%, 49.7%, P = 0.015 versus LD KA). SPK recipients with functioning pancreas grafts have superior survival compared with LD KA and DD KA, including in the setting of PAK. Early pancreas graft failure results in kidney and patient survival rates similar to KA. These data help further clarify the decision-making of SPK versus KA transplant options for patients and providers.

  20. [Electronic documentation of findings and image in ultrasound diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, K

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art for computer-based generation and documentation of ultrasonography reports is described. Arguments for standard nomenclature and structured data collection are given. Remarks concerning system integration, data privacy, and image archiving follow.

  1. Intraocular Lymphoma after Cardiac Transplantation: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging. PMID:23323042

  2. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  3. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J; Powers, Alvin C

    2016-01-01

    This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas.

  4. Traumatic neuropathies: spectrum of imaging findings and postoperative assessment.

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Altafini, Luisa; Garello, Isabella; Marchetti, Alessandra; Gennaro, Sergio; Martinoli, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    Traumatic injury to peripheral nerves is a significant cause of morbidity and disability. Until reinnervation occurs, electrodiagnostic studies cannot differentiate severe axonotmetic lesions (Sunderland class 4) from complete nerve transection or neurotmesis (Sunderland class 5). This limitation is relevant clinically because in cases of neurotmesis an improved outcome may be achieved with an early surgical repair (within 1 week after trauma). High-resolution ultrasound (US) is an efficient modality to visualize injured nerves and is becoming increasingly important among radiologists and surgeons. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to high-resolution US, especially in evaluating deep-seated and proximal nerve segments. This article describes the imaging features of traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. The role of diagnostic imaging in stretching injuries, contusion trauma, penetrating wounds, and after surgery is discussed. A multimodality diagnostic approach including physical examination, electrophysiology, and US and MR imaging allows an accurate evaluation of most peripheral nerves. Imaging assessment of peripheral nerves trauma is useful for the diagnosis, follow-up, and postoperative evaluation. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  5. Dropped gallstones: spectrum of imaging findings, complications and diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Nayak, L; Menias, C O; Gayer, G

    2013-08-01

    Spillage of gallstones into the abdominal cavity, referred to as "dropped gallstones" (DGs), occurs commonly during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The majority of these spilled stones remain clinically silent; however, if uncomplicated DGs are not correctly identified on subsequent imaging, they may mimic peritoneal implants and cause unduly concern. A small percentage of DGs cause complications, including abscess and fistula formation. Recognising the DG within the abscess is critical for definitive treatment. This pictorial review illustrates the imaging appearances and complications of DGs on CT, MRI and ultrasound and emphasises pitfalls in diagnosis.

  6. Practicing the Code of Ethics, finding the image of God.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The Code of Ethics for Nurses gives a professional obligation to practice in a compassionate and respectful way that is unaffected by the attributes of the patient. This article explores the concept "made in the image of God" and the complexities inherent in caring for those perceived as exhibiting distorted images of God. While the Code provides a professional standard consistent with a biblical worldview, human nature impacts the ability to consistently act congruently with the Code. Strategies and nursing interventions that support development of practice from a biblical worldview and the Code of Ethics for Nurses are presented.

  7. Statistical techniques to find similar objects in images

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K

    2003-10-16

    One problem in similarity-based object retrieval (SBOR) is how to define and estimate the similarity between two objects. In this paper we present a shape similarity measure based on thin-plate splines, and compare its performance with several other measures used in SBOR. We evaluate the methods on both artificial and real images.

  8. Iliac vein compression syndrome: Clinical, imaging and pathologic findings

    PubMed Central

    Brinegar, Katelyn N; Sheth, Rahul A; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bautista, Jemianne; Oklu, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is the pathologic compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery, resulting in left lower extremity pain, swelling, and deep venous thrombosis. Though this syndrome was first described in 1851, there are currently no standardized criteria to establish the diagnosis of MTS. Since MTS is treated by a wide array of specialties, including interventional radiology, vascular surgery, cardiology, and vascular medicine, the need for an established diagnostic criterion is imperative in order to reduce misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Although MTS has historically been diagnosed by the presence of pathologic features, the use of dynamic imaging techniques has led to a more radiologic based diagnosis. Thus, imaging plays an integral part in screening patients for MTS, and the utility of a wide array of imaging modalities has been evaluated. Here, we summarize the historical aspects of the clinical features of this syndrome. We then provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature on the efficacy of imaging tools available to diagnose MTS. Lastly, we provide clinical pearls and recommendations to aid physicians in diagnosing the syndrome through the use of provocative measures. PMID:26644823

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jeong A; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection. PMID:27587946

  10. Splenic Involvement in Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Clark, Haley; Khatri, Gaurav; Kapur, Payal; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-07-13

    We report the imaging findings of a patient with disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex presenting with multiple splenic lesions incompletely characterized on computed tomography in whom magnetic resonance imaging helped narrow the differential diagnosis. We discuss the magnetic resonance imaging findings suggesting the diagnosis, including the presence of focal susceptibility artifact within the lesions (ie, signal drop on T1 in-phase imaging), marked hypointensity on diffusion-weighted imaging, and faint progressive peripheral enhancement after contrast administration. We provide pathologic correlation to explain these imaging characteristics and a review of the literature of imaging characteristics in splenic involvement of M. avium-intracellulare complex infection.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas.

  13. Journals Find Many Images in Research Are Faked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Kristin Roovers was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania with a bright career ahead of her--a trusted member of a research laboratory at the medical school studying the role of cell growth in diabetes. When an editor of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" did a spot-check on one of her images for an article in 2005, Roovers'…

  14. Pituitary imaging findings in male patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Dania; Benbassat, Carlos; Toledano, Yoel; S'chigol, Irena; Tsvetov, Gloria; Shraga-Slutzky, Ilana; Eizenberg, Yoav; Shimon, Ilan

    2015-08-01

    Data on pituitary imaging in adult male patients presenting with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HH) and no known pituitary disease are scarce. To assess the usefulness of pituitary imaging in the evaluation of men presenting with HH after excluding known pituitary disorders and hyperprolactinemia. A historical prospective cohort of males with HH. Men who presented for endocrine evaluation from 2011 to 2014 with testosterone levels <10.4 nmol/L (300 ng/mL), normal LH and FSH levels and no known pituitary disease. Seventy-five men were included in the analysis. Their mean age and BMI were 53.4 ± 14.8 years and 30.7 ± 5.2 kg/m2, respectively. Mean total testosterone, LH, and FSH were 6.2 ± 1.7 nmol/L, 3.4 ± 2 and 4.7 ± 3.1 mIU/L, respectively. Prolactin level within the normal range was obtained in all men (mean 161 ± 61, range 41-347 mIU/L). Sixty-two men had pituitary MRI and 13 performed CT. In 61 (81.3%) men pituitary imaging was normal. Microadenoma was found in 8 (10.7%), empty sella and thickened pituitary stalk in one patient (1.3%) each. In other four patients (5.3%) a small or mildly asymmetric pituitary gland was noted. No correlation was found between testosterone level and the presence of pituitary anomalies. This study suggests that the use of routine hypothalamic-pituitary imaging in the evaluation of IHH, in the absence of clinical characteristics of other hormonal loss or sellar compression symptoms, will not increase the diagnostic yield of sellar structural abnormalities over that reported in the general population.

  15. Journals Find Many Images in Research Are Faked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Kristin Roovers was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania with a bright career ahead of her--a trusted member of a research laboratory at the medical school studying the role of cell growth in diabetes. When an editor of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" did a spot-check on one of her images for an article in 2005, Roovers'…

  16. Postictal spectroscopy and imaging findings mimicking brain tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Franz, Kea; Pilatus, Ulrich; Weidauer, Stefan; Lanfermann, Heiner

    2006-07-01

    (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) was performed on a patient with an admission diagnosis of recurrent astrocytoma. The patient had undergone surgical resection and radiation therapy for a left occipital astrocytoma WHO grade III 12 years previously, and presented with aphasia, right-sided hemiparesis, and severe headache. Postcontrast T1-weighted images showed cortical enhancement of the left parietotemporal lobe near the post-resection cavity. MRSI revealed a marked increase of trimethylamines (TMA), elevated creatine/creatinephosphate (tCr), and reduced N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA) in the same brain region. The spectroscopic data were consistent with tumor recurrence. However, the pattern of contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evidence of an epileptic focus on electroencephalography (EEG), and spontaneous regression of the symptoms argued against tumor recurrence. In a 4-week follow-up, the contrast enhancement disappeared on MRI and the EEG abnormalities and neurological symptoms resolved. Follow-up spectroscopic data showed a decrease in TMA compared to normal values. The tCr signal remained elevated but returned to normal values after 5 months. In conclusion, postictal neurological deficits with a temporary increase in TMA and tCr were diagnosed. This is the first report of seizure-induced MRS abnormalities mimicking tumor recurrence. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Pancreas Volume and Fat Deposition in Diabetes and Normal Physiology: Consideration of the Interplay Between Endocrine and Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is comprised of exocrine and endocrine components. Despite the fact that they are derived from a common origin in utero, these two compartments are often studied individually because of the different roles and functions of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas. Recent studies have shown that not only type 1 diabetes (T1D), but also type 2 diabetes (T2D), is characterized by a deficit in beta-cell mass, suggesting that pathological changes in the pancreas are critical events in the natural history of diabetes. In both patients with T1D and those with T2D, pancreas mass and exocrine function have been reported to be reduced. On the other hand, pancreas volume and pancreatic fat increase with obesity. Increased beta-cell mass with increasing obesity has also been observed in humans, and ectopic fat deposits in the pancreas have been reported to cause beta-cell dysfunction. Moreover, neogenesis and transdifferentiation from the exocrine to the endocrine compartment in the postnatal period are regarded as a source of newly formed beta-cells. These findings suggest that there is important interplay between the endocrine and exocrine pancreas throughout life. This review summarizes the current knowledge on physiological and pathological changes in the exocrine and endocrine pancreas (i.e., beta-cell mass), and discusses the potential mechanisms of the interplay between the two compartments in humans to understand the pathophysiology of diabetes better. PMID:28012279

  18. Intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma of the pancreas associated with pancreas divisum: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Takeshi; Kawabata, Yasunari; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Araki, Asuka; Yano, Seiji; Maruyama, Riruke; Tajima, Yoshitsugu

    2015-07-08

    Pancreas divisum, the most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas, is caused by failure of the fusion of the ventral and dorsal pancreatic duct systems during embryological development. Although various pancreatic tumors can occur in patients with pancreas divisum, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm is rare. A 77-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because she was incidentally found to have a cystic tumor in her pancreas at a regular health checkup. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography images demonstrated a cystic tumor in the head of the pancreas measuring 40 mm in diameter with slightly enhancing mural nodules within the cyst. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography via the major duodenal papilla revealed a cystic tumor and a slightly dilated main pancreatic duct with an abrupt interruption at the head of the pancreas. The orifice of the major duodenal papilla was remarkably dilated and filled with an abundant extrusion of mucin, and the diagnosis based on pancreatic juice cytology was "highly suspicious for adenocarcinoma". Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography depicted a normal, non-dilated dorsal pancreatic duct throughout the pancreas. The patient underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy under the diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with suspicion of malignancy arising in the ventral part of the pancreas divisum. A pancreatography via the major and minor duodenal papillae on the surgical specimen revealed that the ventral and dorsal pancreatic ducts were not connected, and the tumor originated in the ventral duct, i.e., the Wirsung's duct. Microscopically, the tumor was diagnosed as intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma with microinvasion. In addition, marked fibrosis with acinar cell depletion was evident in the ventral pancreas, whereas no fibrotic change was noted in the dorsal pancreas. Invasive ductal carcinomas of the pancreas associated with pancreas divisum usually arise from the dorsal

  19. Incidental Findings on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Vincent, Steven D.; Hellstein, John W.; Qian, Fang; Smoker, Wendy R. K.; Ruprecht, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained widespread acceptance in dentistry for a variety of applications. Most dentists who are not radiologists/trained in radiology are generally not familiar with interpretation of anatomical structures and/or pathosis outside their area of primary interest, as often this was not within the scope of their training. Objectives. To assess that the number of incidental findings on a CBCT scan is high both within and outside of the primary area of interest, thereby emphasizing the importance of interpretation of all areas visualized on the scan. Materials and Methods. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist reviewed 1000 CBCT scans (382 males and 618 females) for findings both in- and outside the area of interest. Results. Of the 1000 subjects that were reviewed, 943 scans showed findings in the primary regions of interest and/or outside the regions of interest, and 76 different conditions were visualized in these scans both in and outside the areas of interest. Conclusion. From the wide scope of findings noted on these scans, it can be concluded that it is essential that a person trained in advanced interpretation techniques in radiology interprets cone beam computed tomography scans. PMID:23304148

  20. Pineal region masses--imaging findings and surgical approaches.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Forrester D; Abele, Travis A; Sivakumar, Walavan; Taussky, Philipp; Shah, Lubdha M; Salzman, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the pineal region is complex. Despite advances in surgical techniques since the first reported successful pineal region surgery in the early 20th century, pineal region surgery remains challenging owing to the proximity of deep cerebral veins and dorsal midbrain structures critical for vision. In this article, we review the relevant surgical anatomy of the pineal region and discuss historically important and current surgical approaches. We describe specific imaging features of pineal region masses that may affect surgical planning and review neoplastic and nonneoplastic masses that occur in the pineal region.

  1. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  3. Pancreas-Specific Deletion of Prox1 Affects Development and Disrupts Homeostasis of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    WESTMORELAND, JOBY J.; KILIC, GAMZE; SARTAIN, CAROLINE; SIRMA, SEMA; BLAIN, JENNIFER; REHG, JEROLD; HARVEY, NATASHA; SOSA–PINEDA, BEATRIZ

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The exocrine portion of the pancreas functions in digestion and preserves pancreatic homeostasis. Learning how this tissue forms during embryogenesis could improve our understanding of human pancreatic diseases. Expression of the homeo-box gene Prox1 in the exocrine pancreas changes throughout development in mice. We investigated the role of Prox1 in development of the exocrine pancreas in mice. METHODS Mice with pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 (Prox1ΔPanc) were generated and their pancreatic tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, histologic techniques, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and morphometric analysis. RESULTS Loss of Prox1 from the pancreas led to multiple exocrine alterations, most notably premature acinar cell differentiation, increased ductal cell proliferation, altered duct morphogenesis, and imbalanced expression of claudin proteins. Prox1ΔPanc mice also had some minor alterations in islet cells, but beta-cell development was not affected. The exocrine congenital defects of Prox1ΔPanc pancreata appeared to initiate a gradual process of deterioration that resulted in extensive loss of acinar cells, lipomatosis, and damage to ductal tissue in adult mice. CONCLUSIONS Pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 causes premature differentiation of acinar cells and poor elongation of epithelial branches; these defects indicate that Prox1 controls the expansion of tip progenitors in the early developing pancreas. During later stages of embryogenesis, Prox1 appears to regulate duct cell proliferation and morphogenesis. These findings identify Prox1 as an important regulator of pancreatic exocrine development. PMID:22178591

  4. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Le, Wei-Jie; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Qiang; Shi, Hui-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Eight subjects with PVNS were examined with both pre and post contrast CT scans. All lesions were histopathologically confirmed through surgery. CT appearances of the lesions were reviewed. Among the eight subjects, 8 (100%) demonstrated soft tissue mass and enhancement after contrast administration, 6 (75%) appeared as all or focal areas of noncontrast hyperdensity, 6 (75%) had widening of the joint spaces. Bony erosion of the mandibular condyles and articular surfaces were found in 7 (87.5%) and 6 (75%) subjects, respectively. Based on the CT findings, PVNS of the TMJ is characterized by hyperdensity soft tissue mass and further increase in density after contrast administration, bony destruction of the mandibular condyles and skull base, and intracranial extension. © 2014.

  5. Retroperitoneal Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma: Imaging Findings and Transarterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Huojun Yang Jijin Lu Jianping; Sheng Jin; Yuan Min; Jiang Xu; Li Yuxiao; Gupta, Sanjay

    2010-04-15

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (EOS) is an uncommon and usually highly aggressive mesenchymal tumor. Retroperitoneal extraskeletal osteosarma (REOS) is exceedingly rare. Due to the rare nature of the disease, both the diagnosis and the management of REOS can be challenging. We present the clinical history, CT findings, angiographic manifestations, and use of transarterial chemoembolization for treatment in a case of REOS. To our knowledge, the angiographic features of and attempt at transarterial treatment of REOS have not been reported in the literature.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Image findings of Spinal Tuberclosis at first presentation.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Raees, Aisha; Khan Rehmani, Muhammad Asim; Aslam, Hafiz Muhammad; Saleem, Shafaq; Ashraf, Junaid

    2014-03-22

    Spinal tuberculosis presents in various pathological patterns. The clinical presentation and often the management depend on exact pathological findings. Objective of study was to evaluate the Pathology of spinal tuberculosis as depicted by MRI findings in 119 consecutive cases of spinal TB. It was a cross sectional and observational study conducted at Civil Hospital, Karachi from July 2010 to December 2012.Total numbers of participants were 119. Diagnosis was based on positive histopathology results along with the supportive evidence in MRI. A pre-structured questionnaire was constructed to record the data. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. Sample size was calculated by using Open-EPI software. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. There were 119 patients who participated in this study out of which 52 were males and 67 were females. Most common level was Dorso-lumbar (33.6%) and 87.5% of them had spondylodiscitis while 90% had cord compression. All 6 (100%) patients who had their upper- dorsal region affected had gibbus formation while all those patients having lumbosacral region involved had thecal compression 4 (100%). Most common mode of treatment used in patients having Spinal TB at Lumbar region was conservative (86.2%). MRI findings were mostly shadowed with features such as disc destruction and thecal or cord compression. MRI scan could be used for early detection of spinal TB which can reduce disability and deaths in patients. Major clinical findings in spinal TB were fever, Para paresis and back pain.

  7. Pathways of extrapelvic spread of pelvic disease: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Heng; Vikram, Raghunandan; Boonsirikamchai, Piyaporn; Faria, Silvana C; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Bhosale, Priya R

    2011-01-01

    The complex extraperitoneal anatomy of the pelvis includes various outlets for the transit of organs and neurovascular structures to the rest of the body. These outlets include the greater sciatic foramen, lesser sciatic foramen, inguinal canal, femoral triangle, obturator canal, anal and genitourinary hiatuses of the pelvic floor, prevesical space, and iliopsoas compartment. All of these structures serve as conduits for the dissemination of malignant and benign inflammatory diseases from the pelvic cavity and into the soft-tissue structures of the abdominal wall, buttocks, and upper thigh. Knowledge of the pelvic anatomy is crucial to understand these patterns of disease spread. Cross-sectional imaging provides important anatomic information and depicts the extent of disease and its involvement of surrounding extrapelvic structures, information that is important for planning surgery and radiation therapy. RSNA, 2011

  8. Cerebellar disorders: clinical/radiologic findings and modern imaging tools.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar disorders, also called cerebellar ataxias, comprise a large group of sporadic and genetic diseases. Their core clinical features include impaired control of coordination and gait, as well as cognitive/behavioral deficits usually not detectable by a standard neurologic examination and therefore often overlooked. Two forms of cognitive/behavioral syndromes are now well identified: (1) the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, which combines an impairment of executive functions, including planning and working memory, deficits in visuospatial skills, linguistic deficiencies such as agrammatism, and inappropriate behavior; and (2) the posterior fossa syndrome, a very acute form of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome occurring essentially in children. Sporadic ataxias include stroke, toxic causes, immune ataxias, infectious/parainfectious ataxias, traumatic causes, neoplasias and paraneoplastic syndromes, endocrine disorders affecting the cerebellum, and the so-called "degenerative ataxias" (multiple system atrophy, and sporadic adult-onset ataxias). Genetic ataxias include mainly four groups of disorders: autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal-dominant ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias and episodic ataxias), mitochondrial disorders, and X-linked ataxias. In addition to biochemical studies and genetic tests, brain imaging techniques are a cornerstone for the diagnosis, clinicoanatomic correlations, and follow-up of cerebellar ataxias. Modern radiologic tools to assess cerebellar ataxias include: functional imaging studies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, volumetric studies, and tractography. These complementary methods provide a multimodal appreciation of the whole long-range cerebellar network functioning, and allow the extraction of potential biomarkers for prognosis and rating level of recovery after treatment. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Venous compression syndromes: clinical features, imaging findings and management

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R; Oliveira, G R; Ganguli, S; Kalva, S

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic venous compression is caused by compression of the veins in tight anatomic spaces by adjacent structures, and is seen in a number of locations. Venous compression syndromes, including Paget–Schroetter syndrome, Nutcracker syndrome, May–Thurner syndrome and popliteal venous compression will be discussed. These syndromes are usually seen in young, otherwise healthy individuals, and can lead to significant overall morbidity. Aside from clinical findings and physical examination, diagnosis can be made with ultrasound, CT, or MR conventional venography. Symptoms and haemodynamic significance of the compression determine the ideal treatment method. PMID:23908347

  10. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Prenatal Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Sanín-Blair, José Enrique; Gutiérrez-Márquez, Carolina; Herrera, Diego A; Vossough, Arastoo

    2017-03-14

    Brain lesions and malformations have been described on ultrasonography of prenatal Zika infection; however, there are scarce reports about fetal magnetic resonance (MR) findings. We report 3 cases of fetuses with confirmed intrauterine Zika virus infection evaluated by ultrasound and fetal MR. Various morphometric measurements were assessed and brain maturation was calculated with the fetal total maturation score. Fetuses with prenatal Zika virus infection showed retardation in brain maturation indexes evaluated by fetal MR. Brain calcifications were demonstrated by neurosonography in all cases, while fetal MR characterized the specific type of cortical development malformation.

  11. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  12. The left-sided pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, G.D.; Gibson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) performed in nine patients (two with pancreatic carcinoma, one with hepatomegaly), six with no relevant abdominal disease) showed the pancreas to lie wholly to the left of the aorta. This not uncommon location may give rise to difficulty in demonstrating the pancreas on real-time US scans. The superior mesenteric vessels and splenic vein remain useful land-marks for locating the head of the pancreas in this position.

  13. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Hunter, Jill V.; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R.; Wu, Trevor C.; McCauley, Stephen R.; Vogt, Gregory S.; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p < 0.04). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by tractography did not significantly differ between groups. However, DTI metrics were significantly correlated with declarative memory (e.g., left ventral striatum ADC with delayed recall, r = −0.74; p = 0.02) and with RT to the repeating number sequence (r = 0.70; p = 0.04) in the boxers. Years of boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from −0.65 for the right ventral striatum to −0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = −0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = −0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed. PMID:26414735

  14. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hunter, Jill V; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R; Wu, Trevor C; McCauley, Stephen R; Vogt, Gregory S; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian; Levin, Harvey S

    2016-04-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p < 0.04). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by tractography did not significantly differ between groups. However, DTI metrics were significantly correlated with declarative memory (e.g., left ventral striatum ADC with delayed recall, r = -0.74; p = 0.02) and with RT to the repeating number sequence (r = 0.70; p = 0.04) in the boxers. Years of boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from -0.65 for the right ventral striatum to -0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = -0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = -0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed.

  15. Second malignancies in pediatric patients: imaging findings and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Elida; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Ortuno, Pedro; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Nogués, Pere; Lucaya, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic advances in the treatment of pediatric neoplasms have improved the prognosis but have also increased the risk of developing rare second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). Primary neoplasms that are often associated with SMNs include lymphoma, retinoblastoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, and leukemia. The most common SMNs are central nervous system (CNS) tumors, sarcomas, thyroid and parotid gland carcinomas, and leukemia, particularly acute myeloblastic leukemia. Genetic predisposition, chemotherapy, and especially radiation therapy are implicated as pathogenic factors in SMN. All survivors of childhood cancer should have lifelong follow-up, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging, which does not require ionizing radiation and provides greater anatomic detail and resolution in the head and neck region and the CNS. A new or progressive lesion may represent recurrence of the primitive neoplastic process, late radiation injury, or, more infrequently, an SMN. Differential diagnosis can be very difficult, and outcome is often fatal. Treatment protocols should be modified to reduce the risk for SMN without compromising the effectiveness of initial therapy. Clinicians should individualize treatment for patients who are genetically predisposed to SMN. In addition, radiologists should be familiar with the long-term consequences of antineoplastic therapy to facilitate diagnosis and anticipate adverse outcomes.

  16. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  17. Stereological analyses of the whole human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Ananta; Fowler, Jonas L.; Zielinski, Mark C.; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami

    2016-01-01

    The large size of human tissues requires a practical stereological approach to perform a comprehensive analysis of the whole organ. We have developed a method to quantitatively analyze the whole human pancreas, as one of the challenging organs to study, in which endocrine cells form various sizes of islets that are scattered unevenly throughout the exocrine pancreas. Furthermore, the human pancreas possesses intrinsic characteristics of intra-individual variability, i.e. regional differences in endocrine cell/islet distribution, and marked inter-individual heterogeneity regardless of age, sex and disease conditions including obesity and diabetes. The method is built based on large-scale image capture, computer-assisted unbiased image analysis and quantification, and further mathematical analyses, using widely-used software such as Fiji/ImageJ and MATLAB. The present study includes detailed protocols of every procedure as well as all the custom-written computer scripts, which can be modified according to specific experimental plans and specimens of interest. PMID:27658965

  18. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X; Cooper, D; Lachaine, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  19. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN SMALL RUMINANTS WITH BRAIN DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, Katrin; Oevermann, Anna; Precht, Christina; Lauper, Josiane; Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Brain disease is an important cause of neurologic deficits in small ruminants, however few MRI features have been described. The aim of this retrospective, case series study was to describe MRI characteristics in a group of small ruminants with confirmed brain disease. A total of nine small ruminants (six sheep and three goats) met inclusion criteria. All had neurologic disorders localized to the brain and histopathologic confirmation. In animals with toxic-metabolic diseases, there were bilaterally symmetric MRI lesions affecting either the gray matter (one animal with polioencephalomalacia) or the white matter (two animals with enterotoxemia). In animals with suppurative inflammation, asymmetric focal brainstem lesions were present (two animals with listeric encephalitis), or lesions typical of an intra-axial (one animal) or dural abscess (one animal), respectively. No MRI lesions were detected in one animal with suspected viral cerebellitis and one animal with parasitic migration tracts. No neoplastic or vascular lesions were identified in this case series. Findings from the current study supported the use of MRI for diagnosing brain diseases in small ruminants.

  20. CT Imaging Findings after Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Olga R.; Thornton, Eavan; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Mahadevan, Anand; Raptopoulos, Vassilious; Brook, Alexander; Najarian, Robert; Sheiman, Robert; Siewert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study radiological response to stereotactic radiotherapy for focal liver tumors. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study CTs of 68 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy for liver tumors between 01/2006 and 01/2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Two independent reviewers evaluated lesion volume and enhancement pattern of the lesion and of juxtaposed liver parenchyma. Results. 36 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 25 with liver metastases, and seven with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) were included in study. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 ± 7.1 months for HCC, 6.4 ± 5.1 months for metastases, and 10.1 ± 4.8 months for the CCC. Complete response was seen in 4/36 (11.1%) HCCs and 1/25 (4%) metastases. Partial response (>30% decrease in long diameter) was seen in 25/36 (69%) HCCs, 14/25 (58%) metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Partial response followed by local recurrence (>20% increase in long diameter from nadir) occurred in 2/36 (6%) HCCs and 4/25 (17%) metastases. Liver parenchyma adjacent to the lesion demonstrated a prominent halo of delayed enhancement in 27/36 (78%) of HCCs, 19/21 (91%) of metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Conclusion. Sustainable radiological partial response to stereotactic radiotherapy is most frequent outcome seen in liver lesions. Prominent halo of delayed enhancement of the adjacent liver is frequent finding. PMID:26221135

  1. (Development of gamma-emitting, receptor-binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas): Progress report, October 1, 1987--October 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Our objectives as stated in the last removal submission were to synthesize a radioiodinated derivative of 4IQNB with a partition coefficient 10-fold less than that of 4IQNB, i.e., similar to that of QNB; to characterize the interaction of 4IQNB with the m-AChR isolated from pancreas; and to synthesize a high affinity analogue of QNB radiolabeled with F-18. Since the submission of the competitive renewal, we have prepared and submitted three manuscripts relating to studies on the muscarinic receptor. 2 tabs.

  2. Correlation between Clinical Features and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Lumbar Disc Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Thapa, S S; Lakhey, R B; Sharma, P; Pokhrel, R K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is routinely done for diagnosis of lumbar disc prolapse. Many abnormalities of disc are observed even in asymptomatic patient.This study was conducted tocorrelate these abnormalities observed on Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical features of lumbar disc prolapse. A This prospective analytical study includes 57 cases of lumbar disc prolapse presenting to Department of Orthopedics, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital from March 2011 to August 2012. All patientshad Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spine and the findings regarding type, level and position of lumbar disc prolapse, any neural canal or foraminal compromise was recorded. These imaging findings were then correlated with clinical signs and symptoms. Chi-square test was used to find out p-value for correlation between clinical features and Magnetic resonance imaging findings using SPSS 17.0. This study included 57 patients, with mean age 36.8 years. Of them 41(71.9%) patients had radicular leg pain along specific dermatome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed 104 lumbar disc prolapselevel. Disc prolapse at L4-L5 and L5-S1 level constituted 85.5%.Magnetic resonance imaging findings of neural foramina compromise and nerve root compression were fairly correlated withclinical findings of radicular pain and neurological deficit. Clinical features and Magnetic resonance imaging findings of lumbar discprolasehad faircorrelation, but all imaging abnormalities do not have a clinical significance.

  3. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  4. Combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Alzaraa, Ahmed; Udom, Valeri; Mousa, Husam; Alzein, Abdulhalem; Benhamida, Abduljalil; Dalal, Neha

    2007-09-14

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas comprise 10%-15% of pancreatic cystic lesions, with the serous cystadenoms being the commonest. The association of exocrine and endocrine tumours of the pancreas unrelated to Von Hipple Lindau disease is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. We present another case of both these tumours in one patient. A female patient was seen in the surgical clinic for a pain in the right groin. Clinical examination and investigations confirmed a diagnosis of combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. She underwent surgery and is under regular follow-up in the surgical clinic. Biphasic differentiation of pancreatic stem cell during embryological development could happen and may result in combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. Imaging studies are excellent in diagnosing theses lesions. Surgery has a central role and could be curative.

  5. Combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Alzaraa, Ahmed; Udom, Valeri; Mousa, Husam; Alzein, Abdulhalem; Benhamida, Abduljalil; Dalal, Neha

    2007-01-01

    Background Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas comprise 10%–15% of pancreatic cystic lesions, with the serous cystadenoms being the commonest. The association of exocrine and endocrine tumours of the pancreas unrelated to Von Hipple Lindau disease is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. We present another case of both these tumours in one patient. Case presentation A female patient was seen in the surgical clinic for a pain in the right groin. Clinical examination and investigations confirmed a diagnosis of combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. She underwent surgery and is under regular follow-up in the surgical clinic. Conclusion Biphasic differentiation of pancreatic stem cell during embryological development could happen and may result in combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. Imaging studies are excellent in diagnosing theses lesions. Surgery has a central role and could be curative. PMID:17868437

  6. Granular cell tumor of the pancreas: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Atsushi; Satoh, Kennichi; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Shin; Umino, Jun; Itoh, Hiromichi; Masamune, Atsushi; Egawa, Shinichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-01-01

    Granular cell tumors, also called Abrikossof’s tumors, were originally described by Abrikossof A in 1926. The first case of a pancreatic granular cell tumor was described in 1975 and only 6 cases have been reported. We describe a case of granular cell tumor in the pancreas showing pancreatic duct obstruction. Because imaging studies showed findings compatible with those of pancreatic carcinoma, the patient underwent distal pancreatectomy. Histological examination showed that the tumor consisted of a nested growth of large tumor cells with ample granular cytoplasm and small round nuclei. The tumor cells expressed S-100 protein and were stained with neuron-specific enolase and periodic acid-Schiff, but were negative for desmin, vimentin, and cytokeratin. The resected tumor was diagnosed as a granular cell tumor. To our knowledge, this is the seventh case of Granular cell tumor of the pancreas to be reported. PMID:21160931

  7. Miracle of an Artificial Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes, the realization of a successful, fully automated artificial pancreas is a dearly held dream. It signifies a life freer from nightly wake-up calls to check blood glucose or deliver insulin, a life freer from ... successful artificial pancreas would mark another huge step toward better ...

  8. Leveraging Terminologies for Retrieval of Radiology Reports with Critical Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Graham I.; Lacson, Ronilda; Khorasani, Ramin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Communication of critical imaging findings is an important component of medical quality and safety. A fundamental challenge includes retrieval of radiology reports that contain these findings. This study describes the expressiveness and coverage of existing medical terminologies for critical imaging findings and evaluates radiology report retrieval using each terminology. Methods: Four terminologies were evaluated: National Cancer Institute Thesaurus (NCIT), Radiology Lexicon (RadLex), Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED-CT), and International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM). Concepts in each terminology were identified for 10 critical imaging findings. Three findings were subsequently selected to evaluate document retrieval. Results: SNOMED-CT consistently demonstrated the highest number of overall terms (mean=22) for each of ten critical findings. However, retrieval rate and precision varied between terminologies for the three findings evaluated. Conclusion: No single terminology is optimal for retrieving radiology reports with critical findings. The expressiveness of a terminology does not consistently correlate with radiology report retrieval. PMID:22195212

  9. A historical perspective on the discovery of the accessory duct of the pancreas, the ampulla 'of Vater' and pancreas divisum.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, C D

    1986-01-01

    The discovery of the accessory duct of the pancreas is usually ascribed to Giovanni Domenico Santorini (1681-1737), after whom this structure is named. The papilla duodeni (ampulla 'of Vater', or papilla 'of Santorini') is named after Abraham Vater (1684-1751) or after GD Santorini. Pancreas divisum, a persistence through non-fusion of the embryonic dorsal and ventral pancreas is a relatively common clinical condition, the discovery of which is usually ascribed to Joseph Hyrtl (1810-1894). In this review I report that pancreas divisum, the accessory duct and the papilla duodeni (ampulla 'of Vater') had all been observed and the observations published during the 17th century by at least seven anatomists before Santorini, Vater, and Hyrtl. I further suggest, in the light of frequent anatomical misattributions in common usage, that anatomical structures be referred to only by their proper anatomical names. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3512385

  10. Gorham disease of the craniocervical junction: X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Z Gamze; Kizildemir Kis, Naciye; Vardar Aker, Fügen; Berkman, M Zafer; Simsek, M Masum

    2013-05-01

    Gorham disease of massive osteolysis is a spontaneous, idiopathic, and progressive form of primary osteolysis. It has no age, sex, or race predilection, and patients are mostly asymptomatic until severe deformity or pathological fracture becomes evident. A patient with craniocervical involvement is presented, describing imaging findings with a review of the literature to provide an insight into the disorder. Case report and review of the literature. X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a patient with findings related to the site of involvement. All images demonstrate osteolysis typically described for the disease. Differential diagnosis and key features are indicated. Operative findings and pathological analysis were also consistent with the findings. Patient's follow-up is also reported. This benign appearing yet disabling disease may become fatal in relation to the site involved. Acknowledging imaging findings may provide early diagnosis for timely intervention or supportive management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kellogg, Benjamin; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Whereas pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a well-studied (but still poorly understood) disease with a dismal prognosis, cystic neoplasms of the pancreas form a more recently recognized group of pancreatic tumors. They are diverse and variable in their pathologic characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes,1–3 although all portend a better overall prognosis than PDA. In recent years, with the improved sensitivity and increasing use of cross-sectional imaging in clinical practice, these lesions are more commonly identified,4 with many being discovered incidentally. Indeed, large radiological series using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have reported detection rates of pancreatic cystic lesions between 1.2% and almost 20%,5,6 approaching the 24.3% prevalence rate in an autopsy series by Kimura and colleagues.7 Although most of these lesions are pseudocysts, a significant portion consist of cystic neoplasms, which are estimated to represent 10% to 15% of all primary pancreatic cystic lesions.8 Given the growing clinical relevance of these tumors, a keen understanding of their natural history and pathophysiology is needed. This article reviews pancreatic cystic neoplasms, with a focus on the challenges encountered in their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20159515

  12. Can imaging findings help differentiate spinal neuropathic arthropathy from disk space infection? Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S C; Schweitzer, M E; Morrison, W B; Przybylski, G J; Parker, L

    2000-03-01

    To determine if radiographic, computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings can help differentiate spinal neuropathic arthropathy from disk space infection. Imaging studies in 33 patients were evaluated, including 14 patients with spinal neuropathic arthropathy (12 radiographic, seven CT, and six MR studies) and 19 with disk space infection (13 radiographic, nine CT, and 12 MR studies). Potential imaging discriminators, including endplate sclerosis or erosions, osteophytes, spondylolisthesis, facet involvement (narrowing or erosions), vacuum disk, paraspinal soft-tissue mass, joint disorganization, and osseous joint debris, were recorded, as were MR imaging signal intensity and gadolinium-enhancement characteristics. The most helpful findings for diagnosis of spinal neuropathic arthropathy were vacuum disk on radiographs and CT images, debris on radiographs and CT and MR images, disorganization on radiographs and CT and MR images, facet involvement on radiographs and CT and MR images, spondylolisthesis on CT and MR images, diffuse signal intensity patterns in vertebral bodies on MR images, and rim enhancement of disks on gadolinium-enhanced MR images. Findings that were not helpful included endplate sclerosis and erosions, osteophytes, paraspinal soft-tissue mass, and decreased disk height. Vacuum disk, facet involvement, vertebral body spondylolisthesis, joint disorganization and debris, and gadolinium-enhancement patterns of vertebral bodies and disks may help differentiate spinal neuropathic arthropathy from infection.

  13. [Artificial pancreas for automated glucose control].

    PubMed

    Blauw, Helga; van Bon, Arianne C; de Vries, J H Hans

    2013-01-01

    Strict glucose control is important for patients with diabetes mellitus in order to prevent complications. However, many patients find it difficult to achieve the recommended HbA1c level. The possibility of hypoglycaemia plays an important role in this. The artificial pancreas automates glucose control, improving glucose levels without increasing hypoglycaemic events. The required insulin dose is calculated and administered on the basis of continuous glucose measurements, taking over a large part of the treatment from the patient. Several research groups are working on making this technique suitable for home use. It is expected that the artificial pancreas will become available in the near future. However, effectiveness and safety will have to be investigated in long-term studies. A large number of insulin-dependent patients with diabetes could be eligible for this treatment.

  14. MR Imaging Findings of Painful Type II Accessory Navicular Bone: Correlation with Surgical and Pathologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Tai; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone and to correlate these with the surgical and pathologic findings. Materials and Methods The MR images of 17 patients with medial foot pain and surgically proven type II accessory navicular abnormalities were reviewed. The changes of signal intensity in the accessory navicular, synchondrosis and adjacent soft tissue, the presence of synchondrosis widening, and posterior tibial tendon (PTT) pathology on the T1-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images were analyzed. The MR imaging findings were compared with the surgical and pathologic findings. Results The fat-suppressed T2-weighted images showed high signal intensity in the accessory navicular bones and synchondroses in all patients, and in the soft tissue in 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients, as well as synchondrosis widening in 3 (17.6%) of the 17 patients. The MR images showed tendon pathology in 12 (75%) of the 16 patients with PTT dysfunction at surgery. The pathologic findings of 16 surgical specimens included areas of osteonecrosis with granulomatous inflammation, fibrosis and destruction of the cartilage cap. Conclusion The MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone are a persistent edema pattern in the accessory navicular bone and within the synchondrosis, indicating osteonecrosis, inflammation and destruction of the cartilage cap. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction was clinically evident in most patients. PMID:15637478

  15. MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone: correlation with surgical and pathologic studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Kyung Tai; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone and to correlate these with the surgical and pathologic findings. The MR images of 17 patients with medial foot pain and surgically proven type II accessory navicular abnormalities were reviewed. The changes of signal intensity in the accessory navicular, synchondrosis and adjacent soft tissue, the presence of synchondrosis widening, and posterior tibial tendon (PTT) pathology on the T1-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images were analyzed. The MR imaging findings were compared with the surgical and pathologic findings. The fat-suppressed T2-weighted images showed high signal intensity in the accessory navicular bones and synchondroses in all patients, and in the soft tissue in 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients, as well as synchondrosis widening in 3 (17.6%) of the 17 patients. The MR images showed tendon pathology in 12 (75%) of the 16 patients with PTT dysfunction at surgery. The pathologic findings of 16 surgical specimens included areas of osteonecrosis with granulomatous inflammation, fibrosis and destruction of the cartilage cap. The MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone are a persistent edema pattern in the accessory navicular bone and within the synchondrosis, indicating osteonecrosis, inflammation and destruction of the cartilage cap. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction was clinically evident in most patients.

  16. Tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kircher, C H; Nielsen, S W

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the pancreas occur most commonly in dogs and cats and only rarely in other domestic species. The incidence of neoplasms, both exocrine and endocrine, increases with age. Exocrine adenocarcinomas are the most common malignant tumours and have three fairly distinct morphological patterns: small tubular, large tubular, and acinar cell (rare). They readily metastasize, usually before clinical signs are apparent. A "starry sky" pattern with clear histiocytes scattered among tumour cells is a regular feature of poorly differentiated areas of small tubular adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Islet cell tumours occur in a significant number only in dogs. Metastases are found in about half of the tumours, but malignancy cannot always be predicted by the morphological appearance. Slightly more than half of the islet cell tumours reported in the dog have been associated with clinical signs of hypoglycaemia. Nodular hyperplasia and exocrine adenomas are sometimes difficult to differentiate. Adenomas are considered rare while nodular hyperplasia is common in old animals.

  17. Surgery for pancreas divisum.

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Subodh; Johnson, Colin D.

    2002-01-01

    We present our experience of open surgical treatment in 5 patients with symptomatic pancreas divisum (PD). Choice of therapy was based on allocation of patients to one of five clinical presentation groups: (i) with minor symptoms (no operation); (ii) with recurrent acute pancreatitis or upper abdominal pain (RAP/RUAP)--3 patients; (iii) with radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CP)--1 patient; (iv) chronic pancreatic pain without radiological evidence of chronic pancreatitis (CPP); and (v) other pancreatic complications--1 patient. This classification helps to decide management and predict possible outcome. Various types of operation were performed as indicated (open surgical accessory sphincteroplasty [2 also had distal pancreatectomy], n = 3; Puestow's operation, n = 1; or Beger's pancreatectomy, n = 1). All patients improved significantly and are now leading normal personal, professional, and social lives. We conclude that, with careful selection of patients and appropriate therapy, the response to surgical treatment is good. PMID:12092866

  18. Neurilemmoma of the glans penis: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dae Chul; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2006-01-01

    Neurilemmoma of the glans penis is rare, and no imaging findings have been reported. A case of neurilemmoma of the glans penis is presented. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined small mass in the glans penis. The mass appeared hypoechoic on gray-scale US and hypervascular on color Doppler US. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensity of the mass on a T2-weighted image and strong enhancement on a contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image.

  19. Post-mortem CT imaging of the lungs: pathological versus non-pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Laura; Thali, Michael J

    2017-08-23

    Nowadays, the modern computed tomography techniques are more and more applied in forensic investigations. The detection of abnormalities in post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) imaging of the lungs is very common. As in clinical imaging, also in post-mortem imaging the right interpretation of alterations has an extreme importance for the assessment of correct conclusions. This is even crucial when the radiologist who approaches the PMCT images is not routinely involved in forensic cases. The aim of this article is to provide radiologists who approach PMCT imaging cases with some indications for a proper and correct interpretation of pulmonary findings, to avoid misleading forensic conclusions. Particularly, the following issues will be addressed: PMCT imaging of post-mortem changes of the lungs; PMCT imaging of pathological lungs [(a) in thoracic trauma cases, (b) in cases without thoracic trauma]. Finally, the possible pitfalls in interpretation of PMCT imaging of the lungs will be also discussed.

  20. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  1. A Review of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shenton, ME; Hamoda, HM; Schneiderman, JS; Bouix, S; Pasternak, O; Rathi, Y; M-A, Vu; Purohit, MP; Helmer, K; Koerte, I; Lin, AP; C-F, Westin; Kikinis, R; Kubicki, M; Stern, RA; Zafonte, R

    2013-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also referred to as concussion, remains a controversial diagnosis because the brain often appears quite normal on conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Such conventional tools, however, do not adequately depict brain injury in mTBI because they are not sensitive to detecting diffuse axonal injuries (DAI), also described as traumatic axonal injuries (TAI), the major brain injuries in mTBI. Furthermore, for the 15 to 30% of those diagnosed with mTBI on the basis of cognitive and clinical symptoms, i.e., the “miserable minority,” the cognitive and physical symptoms do not resolve following the first three months post-injury. Instead, they persist, and in some cases lead to long-term disability. The explanation given for these chronic symptoms, i.e., postconcussive syndrome, particularly in cases where there is no discernible radiological evidence for brain injury, has led some to posit a psychogenic origin. Such attributions are made all the easier since both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are frequently co-morbid with mTBI. The challenge is thus to use neuroimaging tools that are sensitive to DAI/TAI, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in order to detect brain injuries in mTBI. Of note here, recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, such as DTI, make it possible to characterize better extant brain abnormalities in mTBI. These advances may lead to the development of biomarkers of injury, as well as to staging of reorganization and reversal of white matter changes following injury, and to the ability to track and to characterize changes in brain injury over time. Such tools will likely be used in future research to evaluate treatment efficacy, given their enhanced sensitivity to alterations in the brain. In this article we review the incidence of mTBI and the importance of characterizing this patient population using objective radiological measures. Evidence

  2. An annular pancreas associated with carcinoma of the papilla of Vater: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Naoki; Imaizumi, Toshihide; Furukawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Masahiro; Gunji, Hisashi; Kato, Kenichiro; Tobita, Kosuke; Nakagohri, Toshio; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Ogoshi, Kyoji

    2012-05-01

    An annular pancreas is an uncommon congenital anomaly that usually presents early in childhood. Malignancy in the setting of an annular pancreas is unusual. We herein report a case of annular pancreas with carcinoma of the papilla of Vater. A 59-year-old man presented with epigastric discomfort and was referred to us after gastroduodenal endoscopy showed a tumor of the papilla of Vater. Preoperative imaging showed the pancreatic parenchyma encircling the descending duodenum and a tumor at the papilla of Vater. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed for the annular pancreas and the ampullary tumor. Histological examination confirmed a complete annular pancreas and carcinoma in situ of the papilla of Vater. We also provide a review of the reported cases of an annular pancreas with periampullary neoplasms and discuss the clinical characteristics of this anomaly.

  3. Fluconazole Penetration into the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shrikhande, Shailesh; Friess, Helmut; Issenegger, Claudia; Martignoni, Marcus E.; Yong, Huang; Gloor, Beat; Yeates, Rodney; Kleeff, Jörg; Büchler, Markus W.

    2000-01-01

    Because of antibiotic prophylaxis for necrotizing pancreatitis, the frequency of fungal superinfection in patients with pancreatic necrosis is increasing. In this study we analyzed the penetration of fluconazole into the human pancreas and in experimental acute pancreatitis. In human pancreatic tissues, the mean fluconazole concentration was 8.19 ± 3.38 μg/g (96% of the corresponding concentration in serum). In experimental edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis, 88 and 91% of the serum fluconazole concentration was found in the pancreas. These data show that fluconazole penetration into the pancreas is sufficient to prevent and/or treat fungal contamination in patients with pancreatic necrosis. PMID:10952621

  4. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP. In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.

  5. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP.more » In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.« less

  6. Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury: case report with magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lam, Justin Chak Yiu; Lee, Ka Lok Ryan; Griffith, James F

    2016-11-01

    Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury is an uncommon injury occurring in young children. The injury may be misinterpreted or overlooked because of misleading or subtle radiological findings. A case of 7-year-old child with post-traumatic elbow pain and subtle findings on elbow radiography is presented. The injury was initially misinterpreted as an avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle. Following radiological review, a diagnosis of brachialis periosteal avulsion injury was made. The radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of this injury are presented to stress the value of comparing the radiographic findings with previous imaging and to increase awareness of this uncommon injury.

  7. Melorheostosis involving the cervical and upper thoracic spine: radiographic, CT, and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Motimaya, A M; Meyers, S P

    2006-01-01

    Melorheostosis, an uncommon mesenchymal dysplasia, rarely affects the axial skeleton. We describe the imaging findings of melorheostosis involving the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Radiographs and CT showed unilateral well-marginated undulating zones of cortical hyperostosis involving multiple vertebrae that were contiguous with a coalescent ossified right paravertebral mass. MR imaging showed zones of signal intensity void on all pulse sequences without contrast enhancement. Conservative management was elected because of lack of interval clinical and imaging changes for 8 years.

  8. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  9. Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation: current trends and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Robert R.; Scalea, Joseph R.; Odorico, Jon S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Important trends are being observed in pancreas transplantation in the USA. We will describe recent trends in simultaneous pancreas kidney (SPK) transplantation related to immunosuppression, treatment of rejection, and transplantation for patients of advanced age and C-peptide positive diabetes. Recent findings Rates of pancreas transplantation have declined, despite improved pancreatic graft outcomes. Regarding immunosuppression, trends in SPK transplantation include T-cell depletion induction therapy, waning mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor use and steroid use in greater than 50% of pancreas transplant recipients with few patients undergoing late steroid weaning. Rejection of the pancreas may be discordant with the kidney after SPK and there is a greater appreciation of antibody-mediated rejection of the pancreas allograft. De-novo donor-specific antibody without graft dysfunction remains an active area of study, and the treatment for this condition is unclear. SPKs are being performed with greater frequency in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and in patients of advanced age, with exemplary results. Summary The current state of the art in SPK transplantation is yielding superb and improving results. PMID:25565444

  10. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: preoperative diagnosis and molecular alterations.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yujiro; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sasaki, Masaru; Morifuji, Masahiko; Sueda, Taijiro

    2003-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which has a less favorable prognosis than common ductal cell carcinoma of the pancreas, and a definite preoperative diagnosis of this tumor is quite difficult. We herein report two cases of this rare variant. The patients were a 41-year-old man (patient 1) and a 67-year-old woman (patient 2). Patient 1 had a hypoechoic mass measuring 3 cm in the uncus of the pancreas, while patient 2 had a huge mass, measuring 8 cm, in the tail of the pancreas. Patient 2 was successfully diagnosed preoperatively as having an adenosquamous carcinoma, by cytological examination of the pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic retrograde pancreatic juice aspiration. A pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed for patient 1, and a distal pancreatectomy with resection of the spleen and the left kidney was performed for patient 2. Subsequent pathological findings of these two tumors revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas. K- ras point mutation, p53 overexpression, and telomerase activity in both tumor specimens were detected by the mutant allele specific amplification method, immunohistochemical staining, and telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay, respectively. The two patients died of recurrent disease 5 and 4 months, respectively, after surgery. Cytological examination of pure pancreatic juice is a useful modality for the preoperative diagnosis of this tumor, and frequent molecular alterations may be associated with the poor prognosis of adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas.

  11. Testicular adrenal rest tissue in congenital adrenal hyperplasia: comparison of MR imaging and sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Avila, N A; Premkumar, A; Merke, D P

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the MR features of testicular adrenal rest tissue in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to compare the usefulness of MR imaging with that of sonography for the detection of testicular adrenal rest tissue. Nineteen patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia underwent MR imaging and gray-scale and color Doppler sonography of the testicles during the same visit to our institution. Findings were compared. MR features of testicular adrenal rest tissue included the following: isointensity (71% of the masses) and slight hyperintensity (29% of the masses) relative to normal testicular tissue on T1-weighted images; hypointensity relative to normal testicular tissue on T2-weighted images (100% of the masses); and diffuse enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (85% of the masses). MR imaging and sonography revealed the testicular lesions equally well. Eleven (58%) of 19 patients had normal findings on MR imaging and sonography. Eight (42%) of 19 patients had 14 intratesticular masses detected by both imaging techniques. MR imaging and sonography are equally useful in the detection of testicular adrenal rest tissue. Because sonography is more accessible to most institutions and is less expensive, it is the imaging technique of choice for the detection of testicular adrenal rest tissue.

  12. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... States is chronic alcohol consumption. Additional causes include cystic fibrosis and other hereditary disorders ofthe pancreas. For a ... inherited disorder that leads to chronic pancreatitis is cystic fibrosis. Recent research demonstrates genetic testing can be a ...

  13. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  14. Current status of pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D W; Sasaki, T

    1989-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation for the treatment of diabetes mellitus is being done with increasing frequency. Refined operative techniques, an improved immunosuppression regimen, and an earlier recognition of rejection have led to dramatic increases in both graft and patient survival rates. Preliminary data suggest that a functioning pancreatic allograft may arrest or reverse most of the complications of diabetes, although the effects on retinopathy remain controversial. Patients also acquire a strong sense of well-being after successful pancreas transplantation. PMID:2660412

  15. Perforation of jejunal diverticulum with ectopic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shintani, Yukako; Murono, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Perforation of jejunal diverticulum is a rare complication. Here, we report a case of jejunal diverticulum penetration with surrounding ectopic pancreas. An 83-year-old female patient was admitted to our department with acute onset of severe abdominal pain lasting for half a day. Abdominal computed tomography showed outpouching of the small intestine that contained air/fluid, with multiple surrounding air bubbles in the mesentery of the small intestine. She was diagnosed with penetration of the small intestine, and an emergency laparotomy was indicated. The penetrated jejunal diverticulum was identified ~20-cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed, and her postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological findings confirmed diverticulum penetration into the mesentery and severe inflammation at the site, with surrounding ectopic pancreas. Furthermore, the pancreatic ducts were opened through the penetrated diverticulum. This rare case shows that the ectopic pancreas might have caused penetration of jejunal diverticulum owing to the pancreatic duct opening through the diverticulum.

  16. Pancreas survival in simultaneous pancreas-kidney and pancreas-after-kidney transplantations: a five-year follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Dinckan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoglu, Ibrahim; Kocak, Huseyin; Sari, Ramazan; Erdogan, Okan; Ertug, Zeki; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Gurkan, Alihan

    2012-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation methods, such as simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantation and pancreas-after-kidney (PAK) transplantation, have become the most important treatments for patients with type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM)-related end-stage renal diseases (ESRD). The purpose of the study was to compare the clinical results of the pancreas graft in patients after SPK and PAK transplantations and to present the findings of our 5-year follow-up. A total of 55 patients who had kidney and pancreas transplantation between February 2003 and December 2010 were included in the study. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on the timing of the pancreas transplantation: SPK (n=21) and PAK (n=34). The patients in the SPK group consisted of 13 males and 8 females, with a mean age of 33.6±6.8 years; whereas 25 males and 9 females formed the PAK group, with a mean age of 32.0±6.0 years. In the early postoperative period, the SPK group had 3 patients with vascular thrombosis (2 venous, 1 arterial) and the PAK group had 7 patients with thrombosis (4 venous, 3 arterial) (p=0.319). At the end of the 5-year follow-up, the patient, kidney and pancreas survival rates in the SPK group were 95.2%, 95.2%, and 61.9% respectively, and the corresponding values in the PAK group were 97%, 91.2%, 61.8% (p=0.382, p=0.504, p=0.927). We concluded that PAK is just as effective as SPK to prevent the destructive effects of DM when the waiting time for SPK is long and a potential live donor is present.

  17. Total artificial heart implantation: clinical indications, expected postoperative imaging findings, and recognition of complications.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mark S; Fahrner, Lester J; Deuell, Brian P F; Olsen, Kathryn M; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Shah, Keyur B; Medina, Angel E; Doolin, Kelly R; de Groot, Patricia M; de Groot, Patti Ann; Goodman, William C

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this article are to review the treatment options for late-stage biventricular heart failure, discuss the clinical indications for total artificial heart (TAH) implantation, illustrate the expected imaging findings after uncomplicated TAH implantation, and highlight the radiologic findings of common and uncommon complications associated with TAH implantation through case examples. TAH implantation is an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. The duration of implantation varies depending on a particular patient's medical condition and the eventual availability of a human heart for orthotopic transplantation. TAH recipients often undergo imaging with conventional radiography, CT, or both for the assessment of device-related issues, many of which are life-threatening and require emergency management. As the clinical use of the TAH increases and becomes more commonplace, it is imperative that radiologists interpreting imaging studies recognize both the expected and the unexpected imaging findings that affect patient care.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with otitis.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Coke, Rob L; Kochunov, Peter; Davis, M Duff

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on an adult, male Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with a history of nonspecific neurologic signs and acute discharge from the left ear. MRI revealed findings consistent with otitis and possible osteomyelitis of the temporal and mastoid bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of otitis and MRI findings in a kangaroo.

  19. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schlarb, Haley C; Schlarb, Alexander C; Ubert, H Adam; Schlarb, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor is a rare tumor accounting for 1-2% of exocrine neoplasms involving the pancreas. This typically benign tumor is predominately found in young females of non-Caucasian descent between the second and fourth decades of life. Despite the reported increasing incidence of this neoplasm, many physicians are unfamiliar with this tumor, which may lead to uncertainty of diagnosis and treatment. While further delineating the clinical and imaging features of this tumor, we present two cases with review of the literature.

  20. Giant serous microcystic pancreas adenoma.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Kursat; Bostanci, Hasan; Yildirim, Ali Cihat; Sakrak, Omer; Kerem, Mustafa

    2012-10-10

    Serous cystadenomas are rare tumors comprising 1-2% of exocrine pancreas tumors. They are mostly known as benign conditions but malign transformation as serous cystadenocarcinoma is also reported. It is usually seen in females. Non-specific symptoms, such as abdominal pain or symptoms due to mass affect, are usually seen. A 64-year old female patient was investigated for abdominal pain. Physical and laboratory findings were normal. Abdomen ultrasonography confirmed an 11×9.5 cm solid cystic lesion and abdomen computed tomography scan confirmed a 12×11 cm lobulated cystic solid lesion which had central cystic necrotic areas extending from liver hilus inferiorly. Fine needle biopsy confirmed benign cytology and trucut biopsy of the pancreatic mass reported chronic inflamation. Nevertheless, this mass could have malignant contents and transformation potential. A laparatomy was decided due to patient's symptoms and mass effect. Due to vascular invasion of the tumor, Whipple procedure was performed. The pathology report confirmed serous microcystic adenoma. These rare tumors are usually benign but pre-operative malignity criterias are not identified. There are few differential diagnostic tools for excluding malignity. We suggest surgical resection as best treatment approach for selected cases.

  1. Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pancreas after bone marrow transplant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Xian; Liao, Jun-Lin; Zhang, Dong; Wen, Li

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the pancreas is rare. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who experienced a relapse of ALL in the pancreas after a bone marrow transplant. Clinical data, including course of illness, laboratory results, and imaging studies are included. The patient presented with acute pancreatitis, suspected to be secondary to gallstones, with ampullary obstruction. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a distended gallbladder and intra- and extra-hepatic biliary dilatation with a cutoff at the pancreatic head, but with no evidence of gallstones. Ultrasound-guided biopsy of the pancreas revealed ALL in the pancreas. Systematic chemotherapy was recommended, but was declined by the parents. The patient died one week later. Relapse of ALL in the pancreas is rare, but when a history of ALL is present, it should be considered in patients with pancreatic enlargement, obstructive jaundice, and pancreatitis.

  2. Biomarkers and Imaging Findings of Anderson-Fabry Disease-What We Know Now.

    PubMed

    Beirão, Idalina; Cabrita, Ana; Torres, Márcia; Silva, Fernando; Aguiar, Patrício; Laranjeira, Francisco; Gomes, Ana Marta

    2017-06-11

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by deficiency or absence of the alpha-galactosidase A activity, with a consequent glycosphingolipid accumulation. Biomarkers and imaging findings may be useful for diagnosis, identification of an organ involvement, therapy monitoring and prognosis. The aim of this article is to review the current available literature on biomarkers and imaging findings of AFD patients. An extensive bibliographic review from PubMed, Medline and Clinical Key databases was performed by a group of experts from nephrology, neurology, genetics, cardiology and internal medicine, aiming for consensus. Lyso-GB3 is a valuable biomarker to establish the diagnosis. Proteinuria and creatinine are the most valuable to detect renal damage. Troponin I and high-sensitivity assays for cardiac troponin T can identify patients with cardiac lesions, but new techniques of cardiac imaging are essential to detect incipient damage. Specific cerebrovascular imaging findings are present in AFD patients. Techniques as metabolomics and proteomics have been developed in order to find an AFD fingerprint. Lyso-GB3 is important for evaluating the pathogenic mutations and monitoring the response to treatment. Many biomarkers can detect renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular involvement, but none of these have proved to be important to monitoring the response to treatment. Imaging features are preferred in order to find cardiac and cerebrovascular compromise in AFD patients.

  3. Intrapancreatic Splenule in a Pancreas Allograft: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, K; Serrano, O K; Kandaswamy, R

    2016-11-01

    A 16-year-old white man was involved in a motor vehicle collision and suffered head, chest, and abdominal trauma. Despite initial resuscitative efforts, he progressed to brain death and was designated to be an organ donor by his family. He had no earlier medical or surgical history and no high-risk behaviors. Blood work revealed normal creatinine, liver function tests, lipase, and amylase. Viral serologies were negative except for cytomegalovirus IgG and Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acid. Imaging revealed a right kidney contusion, a manubrial fracture, and fractures of right first rib and bilateral scapulae. No other abdominal trauma was identified, specifically to the pancreas, duodenum, or spleen. Our transplant center accepted the pancreas from this donor. During back-table inspection of the pancreas, a 1.5 × 1.5 cm dark purple rubbery mass was identified within the parenchyma of the pancreas in the tail. An incisional biopsy of the lesion was sent for frozen section, which yielded a mixed inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils and lymphocytes and an overlying fibrous capsule. The diagnosis of lymphoma or another neoplasm could not be definitely ruled out. Owing to uncertainty in diagnosis, the entire lesion was excised along with the distal pancreas with the use of a linear stapler. The staple line was oversewn with running 4-0 polypropylene suture, and the pancreas was transplanted. After surgery, the pancreas allograft functioned well with a small pancreatic leak, which had resolved by the first postoperative outpatient visit. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Automated detection using natural language processing of radiologists recommendations for additional imaging of incidental findings.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sayon; Long, William J; Brown, David F M; Reisner, Andrew T

    2013-08-01

    As use of radiology studies increases, there is a concurrent increase in incidental findings (eg, lung nodules) for which the radiologist issues recommendations for additional imaging for follow-up. Busy emergency physicians may be challenged to carefully communicate recommendations for additional imaging not relevant to the patient's primary evaluation. The emergence of electronic health records and natural language processing algorithms may help address this quality gap. We seek to describe recommendations for additional imaging from our institution and develop and validate an automated natural language processing algorithm to reliably identify recommendations for additional imaging. We developed a natural language processing algorithm to detect recommendations for additional imaging, using 3 iterative cycles of training and validation. The third cycle used 3,235 radiology reports (1,600 for algorithm training and 1,635 for validation) of discharged emergency department (ED) patients from which we determined the incidence of discharge-relevant recommendations for additional imaging and the frequency of appropriate discharge documentation. The test characteristics of the 3 natural language processing algorithm iterations were compared, using blinded chart review as the criterion standard. Discharge-relevant recommendations for additional imaging were found in 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5% to 5.5%) of ED radiology reports, but 51% (95% CI 43% to 59%) of discharge instructions failed to note those findings. The final natural language processing algorithm had 89% (95% CI 82% to 94%) sensitivity and 98% (95% CI 97% to 98%) specificity for detecting recommendations for additional imaging. For discharge-relevant recommendations for additional imaging, sensitivity improved to 97% (95% CI 89% to 100%). Recommendations for additional imaging are common, and failure to document relevant recommendations for additional imaging in ED discharge instructions occurs

  5. Posterior epidural migration of a sequestrated lumbar disk fragment: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Chuang, Y L; Yao, M S; Chiu, W T; Chen, C L; Chan, W P

    2006-08-01

    We present a 75-year-old man who, for 2 weeks, had progressive pain in both of his thighs when standing straight. MR imaging showed a sequestrated disk fragment, which had a signal intensity similar to that of a herniated disk with a rim enhancement in the posterior epidural space and a ruptured outermost annulus of the intervertebral disk at L2-3. Awareness of these MR imaging findings can help in the diagnosis of posterior epidural disk migration.

  6. Start Your Search Engines. Part 2: When Image is Everything, Here are Some Great Ways to Find One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Anna; Mowers, Helen

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that Google is great for finding images. Simply head to its home page, click the "Images" link, enter criteria in the search box, and--voila! In this article, the authors share some of their other favorite search engines for finding images. To make sure the desired images are available for educational use, consider searching for…

  7. Start Your Search Engines. Part 2: When Image is Everything, Here are Some Great Ways to Find One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Anna; Mowers, Helen

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that Google is great for finding images. Simply head to its home page, click the "Images" link, enter criteria in the search box, and--voila! In this article, the authors share some of their other favorite search engines for finding images. To make sure the desired images are available for educational use, consider searching for…

  8. The Small Bodies Imager Browser --- finding asteroid and comet images without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, E.; Sykes, M.; Davis, D.; Neese, C.

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate accessing and downloading spatially resolved imagery of asteroids and comets in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS), we have created the Small Bodies Image Browser. It is a HTML5 webpage that runs inside a standard web browser needing no installation (http://sbn.psi.edu/sbib/). The volume of data returned by spacecraft missions has grown substantially over the last decade. While this wealth of data provides scientists with ample support for research, it has greatly increased the difficulty of managing, accessing and processing these data. Further, the complexity necessary for a long-term archive results in an architecture that is efficient for computers, but not user friendly. The Small Bodies Image Browser (SBIB) is tied into the PDS archive of the Small Bodies Asteroid Subnode hosted at the Planetary Science Institute [1]. Currently, the tool contains the entire repository of the Dawn mission's encounter with Vesta [2], and we will be adding other datasets in the future. For Vesta, this includes both the level 1A and 1B images for the Framing Camera (FC) and the level 1B spectral cubes from the Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, providing over 30,000 individual images. A key strength of the tool is providing quick and easy access of these data. The tool allows for searches based on clicking on a map or typing in coordinates. The SBIB can show an entire mission phase (such as cycle 7 of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit) and the associated footprints, as well as search by image name. It can focus the search by mission phase, resolution or instrument. Imagery archived in the PDS are generally provided by missions in a single or narrow range of formats. To enhance the value and usability of this data to researchers, SBIB makes these available in these original formats as well as PNG, JPEG and ArcGIS compatible ISIS cubes [3]. Additionally, we provide header files for the VIR cubes so they can be read into ENVI without additional processing. Finally

  9. Second-look US: how to find breast lesions with a suspicious MR imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2013-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has high sensitivity in breast cancer diagnosis. The probability of malignancy for additional detected lesions is higher in patients with breast cancer than in the population without malignancy, which is why biopsy or further study should be considered for additional detected lesions. Because of the shortcomings of MR imaging-guided biopsy, second-look ultrasonography (US) may be the preferred next step. Detecting target lesions at second-look US and correlating lesions between the two modalities may be challenging. Using axial MR imaging to localize the lesion with respect to the nipple and the lesion-to-nipple distance can narrow the scan range at US. Evaluating the lesion's location relative to the mammary zones and surrounding tissues, as well as noting its depth, characteristics, and nearby landmarks, will aid in lesion correlation. Doppler imaging, tissue harmonic imaging, and other US techniques can be used to identify subtle lesions. Although malignant breast lesions may appear probably benign at second-look US, decision making for biopsy must be based primarily on MR imaging findings. In sonographically occult, MR imaging-detected lesions with suspicious MR imaging features, the probability of malignancy is much higher than 2%, and MR imaging-guided biopsy must be performed. © RSNA, 2013.

  10. Electromagnetic breast imaging: average tissue property values in women with negative clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Poplack, Steven P; Paulsen, Keith D; Hartov, Alexander; Meaney, Paul M; Pogue, Brian W; Tosteson, Tor D; Grove, Margaret R; Soho, Sandra K; Wells, Wendy A

    2004-05-01

    Representative data are provided for three electromagnetic breast imaging techniques-near-infrared spectroscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, and microwave imaging spectroscopy-to serve as potential benchmarks for future investigation. The breasts of 23 women without clinical or mammographic findings of disease were imaged in the coronal plane with nonionizing radiation of varying frequencies. Average electromagnetic property values were reconstructed at each frequency on the basis of computational models of light diffusion, current flow, and microwave propagation. Electromagnetic properties were correlated with subject characteristics and between techniques. Each technique yielded information on breast tissue features (eg, conductivity, permittivity, light scattering, and absorption) that had not previously all been measured in the same individuals.

  11. PET and PET-CT imaging findings of peritoneal and omental involvement in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali D; Butros, Selim R; Scott, James; Blake, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective institutional-review-board-approved study was performed evaluating positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of peritoneal and omental involvement of lymphoma. Twelve patients were identified with a wide spectrum of imaging findings on PET-CT including but not limited to peritoneal thickening, ascites, and serosal involvement. Lymphoma is among the rare causes of malignant peritoneal or omental involvement. The most common manifestations of peritoneal lymphomatosis are peritoneal 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake with corresponding peritoneal thickening and nonobstructive serosal masses on CT. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lumbar spine after surgery for herniated disk: imaging findings in the early postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Dina, T S; Boden, S D; Davis, D O

    1995-03-01

    Imaging the lumbar spine after surgery for disk herniation is all too often an unrewarding challenge. A constellation of findings is inevitable, and determining their significance is often impossible. The challenge is greatest during the first few months following surgery, when the rules of scar enhancement, deformity, and mass effect do not apply to differentiation of the abnormal from the normal. A clear understanding of normal postoperative healing is necessary to avoid overreaction to misleading findings. This report reviews imaging of the lumbar spine in the early postoperative period (i.e., the first 6 months after surgery), focusing on the normal healing process that so often mimics complicating or recurrent disease.

  13. Periorbital dirofilariasis—Clinical and imaging findings: Live worm on ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Thandre N; Lakshmi, K P; Shaji, P C; Rajalakshmi, P C

    2013-01-01

    Ocular dirofilariasis is a zoonotic filariasis caused by nematode worm,Dirofilaria. We present a case of dirofilariasis affecting the upper eyelid in a 2-year-old child presenting as an acutely inflammed cyst, from southern Indian state of Kerala. Live adult worm was surgically removed and confirmed to be Dirofilaria repens. Live worm showing continuous movement was seen on the pre-operative high-resolution ultrasound. Ultrasound can be helpful in pre-operative identification of live worm. Imaging findings reported in literature are very few. We describe the clinical, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. PMID:23803483

  14. Fibromatosis associated with silicone breast implant: ultrasonography and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyun Seok; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Kim, Ok Hwa; Jung, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Suk Jung; Kim, Woogyeong; Kim, Woon Won

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid type fibromatosis is an uncommon benign disease entity of which its etiology is currently unknown. It constitutes 0.3% of all solid neoplasms, but it is rarely seen in the breast and even more scarcely reported to develop in association with breast implant. We present ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 29-year-old female patient with fibromatosis after breast implant surgery. Knowledge of imaging findings of breast fibromatosis associated with implant will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  15. Overuse of imaging the male breast-findings in 557 patients.

    PubMed

    Lapid, Oren; Siebenga, Pieter; Zonderland, Harmien M

    2015-01-01

    Gynecomastia is the most common abnormality of the male breast. However, breast cancer may occur, albeit with a significantly lower incidence than in females. Imaging is often used as part of the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the utilization and outcome of imaging with mammography or ultrasound of the male breast in a university hospital's department of radiology. A retrospective study assessing the imaging of the male breast in 557 patients over a 10-year period. Referral was done mainly by general surgeons and general practitioners. The most common indication was enlargement of the breast, described as gynecomastia or swelling in 74% of patients, followed by pain in 24% and "lumps" in 10%. The modalities used were mammography in 65%, ultrasound in 51% and both in 26%. Most examinations, 519, were BI-RADS 1 or 2, and 38 were BI-RADS 3 or higher. Altogether 160 patients had additional fine-needle aspiration or biopsy. Malignancies were diagnosed in five patients (0.89%). Imaging had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 99%. The positive predictive value was 44% and the negative predictive value 99.8%. Malignancies are rare in the male breast. The probability of finding cancer when performing imaging of clinically benign findings in the male breast is negligible. Imaging is not warranted unless there are suspicious abnormalities. Routine imaging of gynecomastia should be discouraged. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Molecular pathogenesis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Thosani, Nirav; Dasari, Chandra S; Bhutani, Manoop S; Raimondo, Massimo; Guha, Sushovan

    2010-11-01

    Over the last 3 decades, there have been substantial improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques to evaluate pancreatic diseases. The modern technology has helped us to recognize premalignant conditions of pancreas including mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Differentiation between benign and malignant lesions and early detection of any malignant transformation in premalignant lesion are extremely important for further management decisions. Diagnostic cytology has limited sensitivity to further differentiate between benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the pancreas. There is limited information about the epidemiological risk factors and molecular mechanisms leading to development and further progression to malignancy of IPMNs. Several studies have shown that pancreatic juice and pancreatic tissue from the lesion can be tested for molecular markers including K-ras, p53, and p16 to differentiate between cancer and chronic inflammatory process. We review cellular signaling pathways that contribute to pathogenesis of IPMNs of the pancreas to further identify potential biomarkers and molecular targets.

  17. Radiological imaging findings of a case with vertebral osteoid osteoma leading to brachial neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Erkan; Ayan, Erdoğan; Celikyay, Fatih; Acu, Berat

    2013-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms.

  18. Radiological Imaging Findings of a Case with Vertebral Osteoid Osteoma Leading to Brachial Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Erkan; Ayan, Erdoğan; Çelikyay, Fatih; Acu, Berat

    2013-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms. PMID:24404413

  19. An Integrated Centroid Finding and Particle Overlap Decomposition Algorithm for Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An integrated algorithm for decomposing overlapping particle images (multi-particle objects) along with determining each object s constituent particle centroid(s) has been developed using image analysis techniques. The centroid finding algorithm uses a modified eight-direction search method for finding the perimeter of any enclosed object. The centroid is calculated using the intensity-weighted center of mass of the object. The overlap decomposition algorithm further analyzes the object data and breaks it down into its constituent particle centroid(s). This is accomplished with an artificial neural network, feature based technique and provides an efficient way of decomposing overlapping particles. Combining the centroid finding and overlap decomposition routines into a single algorithm allows us to accurately predict the error associated with finding the centroid(s) of particles in our experiments. This algorithm has been tested using real, simulated, and synthetic data and the results are presented and discussed.

  20. Imaging findings in 14 domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Suran, Jantra Ngosuwan; Wyre, Nicole Rene

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common malignant neoplasia in domestic ferrets, Mustela putorius furo. However, imaging findings in ferrets with lymphoma have primarily been described in single case reports. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe imaging findings in a group of ferrets with confirmed lymphoma. Medical records were searched between 2002 and 2012. A total of 14 ferrets were included. Radiographs (n = 12), ultrasound (n = 14), computed tomography (CT; n = 1), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n = 1) images were available for review. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 5.2 years (range 3.25-7.6 years). Clinical signs were predominantly nonspecific (8/14). The time between the first imaging study and lymphoma diagnosis was 1 day or less in most ferrets (12). Imaging lesions were predominantly detected in the abdomen, and most frequently included intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy (12/14), splenomegaly (8/14), and peritoneal effusion (11/14). Lymphadenopathy and mass lesions were typically hypoechoic on ultrasound. Mild peritoneal effusion was the only detected abnormality in two ferrets. Mild pleural effusion was the most common thoracic abnormality (3/12). Expansile lytic lesions were present in the vertebrae of two ferrets with T3-L3 myelopathy and the femur in a ferret with lameness. Hyperattenuating, enhancing masses with secondary spinal cord compression were associated with vertebral lysis in CT images of one ferret. The MRI study in one ferret with myelopathy was inconclusive. Findings indicated that imaging characteristics of lymphoma in ferrets are similar to those previously reported in dogs, cats, and humans. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Hind brain agenesis a rare imaging findings in cerebro cerebellar lissencephalic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mundaganur, Praveen M; Solwalkar, Pradeep; Nimbal, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    A case report of cerebro cerebellar lissencephaly shows complete agenesis of cerebellum and brainstem which is rare imaging finding of group lissencephaly (type I lissencephaly). Though agenesis of cerebellum and brainstem were included in literature, in most of the cases we saw a hypoplasia or atrophy of cerebellum in lissencephaly syndrome. The CT scan findings of this patient shows features of lissencephaly with complete agenesis of brain stem and cerebellum associated with multiple congenital abnormalities.

  2. Design of a bioartificial pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Farney, Alan C; Opara, Emmanuel C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Islet transplantation has been shown to be a viable treatment option for patients afflicted with Type 1 diabetes. However, the severe shortage of human pancreas and the need to use risky immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection remain two major obstacles to routine use of islet transplantation in diabetic patients. Successful development of a bioartificial pancreas using the approach of microencapsulation with perm-selective coating of islets in hydrogels for graft immunoisolation holds tremendous promise for diabetic patients because it has great potential to overcome these two barriers. In this review article, we will discuss the need for bioartificial pancreas, provide a detailed description of the microencapsulation process, and review the status of the technology in clinical development. We will also critically review the various factors that need to be taken into consideration in order to achieve the ultimate goal of routine clinical application. PMID:23652283

  3. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  4. Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Schaffler, Gottfried J; Tirman, Phillip F J; Stoller, David W; Genant, Harry K; Ceballos, Cecar; Dillingham, Michael F

    2003-06-01

    Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue

  5. Non-cardiovascular findings in clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi; Morani, Ajaykumar C; Lu, Jimmy C; Dehkordy, Soudabeh Fazeli; Jeph, Sunil; Dorfman, Adam L; Agarwal, Prachi P

    2016-04-01

    With increasing use of pediatric cardiovascular MRI, it is important for all imagers to become familiar with the spectrum of non-cardiovascular imaging findings that can be encountered. This study aims to ascertain the prevalence and nature of these findings in pediatric cardiovascular MRIs performed at our institution. We retrospectively evaluated reports of all cardiovascular MRI studies performed at our institute from January 2008 to October 2012 in patients younger than18 years. Most studies (98%) were jointly interpreted by a pediatric cardiologist and a radiologist. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all cases with non-cardiovascular findings, defined as any imaging finding outside the cardiovascular system. Non-cardiovascular findings were classified into significant and non-significant, based on whether they were known at the time of imaging or they required additional workup or a change in management. In 849 consecutive studies (mean age 9.7 ± 6.3 years), 145 non-cardiovascular findings were found in 140 studies (16.5% of total studies). Overall, 51.0% (74/145) of non-cardiovascular findings were in the abdomen, 30.3% (44/145) were in the chest, and 18.6% (27/145) were in the spine. A total of 19 significant non-cardiovascular findings were observed in 19 studies in individual patients (2.2% of total studies, 47% male, mean age 5.9 ± 6.7 years). Significant non-cardiovascular findings included hepatic adenoma, arterially enhancing focal liver lesions, asplenia, solitary kidney, pelvicaliectasis, renal cystic diseases, gastric distention, adrenal hemorrhage, lung hypoplasia, air space disease, bronchial narrowing, pneumomediastinum and retained surgical sponge. Non-cardiovascular findings were seen in 16.5% of cardiovascular MRI studies in children, of which 2.2% were clinically significant findings. Prevalence and nature of these non-cardiovascular findings are different from those reported in adults. Attention to these findings is

  6. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered.

  7. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  8. Case Report: Zika Virus Meningoencephalitis and Myelitis and Associated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Faruq; Burns, Joseph D; Agameya, Ahmed; Patel, Avignat; Alfaqih, Mohammad; Small, Juan E; Ooi, Winnie

    2017-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has a wide clinical spectrum of associated neurologic disease including microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome but, despite its known neurotropism, ZIKV meningoencephalitis and myelitis have been rare complications. We describe a case of ZIKV meningoencephalitis and probable myelitis and its associated magnetic resonance imaging findings that rapidly resolved during recovery in a previously healthy adult.

  9. MRI Features of Mucinous Cancer of the Breast: Correlation With Pathologic Findings and Other Imaging Methods.

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Almir G V; Graziano, Luciana; Osório, Cynthia A B T; Guatelli, Camila S; Souza, Juliana A; Mendonça, Maria Helena S; Marques, Elvira F

    2016-02-01

    Mucinous breast carcinoma is an uncommon histologic type of invasive breast carcinoma that can be differentiated in pure and mixed forms, which have different prognosis and treatment. MRI features of both types of mucinous breast carcinomas are discussed, illustrated, and compared with pathologic findings and with other imaging methods, including mammography, ultrasound, and PET/CT.

  10. Clinical Factors Associated With Chest Imaging Findings in Hospitalized Infants With Bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Nazif, Joanne M; Taragin, Benjamin H; Azzarone, Gabriella; Rinke, Michael L; Liewehr, Sheila; Choi, Jaeun; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora

    2017-10-01

    Despite recommendations against routine imaging, chest radiography (CXR) is frequently performed on infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis. We conducted a review of 811 infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis to identify clinical factors associated with imaging findings. CXR was performed on 553 (68%) infants either on presentation or during hospitalization; 466 readings (84%) were normal or consistent with viral illness. Clinical factors significantly associated with normal/viral imaging were normal temperature (odds ratio = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.03-2.67) and normal oxygen saturation (odds ratio = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.1-2.83) on presentation. Afebrile patients with normal oxygen saturations were nearly 3 times as likely to have a normal/viral CXR as patients with both fever and hypoxia. Our findings support the limited role of radiography in the evaluation of hospitalized infants with bronchiolitis, especially patients without fever or hypoxia.

  11. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities.

    PubMed

    Bronoosh, Pegah; Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-12-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  12. Incidental parenchymal magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Wendy S.; Heier, Linda A.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Bergner, Amanda; Yohay, Kaleb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whereas T2 hyperintensities known as NF-associated bright spots are well described in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), there is a paucity of data on incidental findings in patients with neurofibromatosis type II (NF-2). We aim to characterize unexplained imaging findings in the brains of patients with NF-2. Materials and methods This study is retrospective, HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. 34 patients with NF-2 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2000 and December 2012. T2 and T1-weighted imaging characteristics, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) characteristics, and enhancement patterns were analyzed by visual inspection. Clinical information at time of imaging was available for all patients. Neuropathologic data was available for one patient. Results We found unexplained T2 hyperintensities present on initial imaging in 23/34 patients (67%). Of the 23 patients with unexplained MRI findings, 15 (65%) had wedge-shaped T2 hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter extending to the cortex suggestive of a cortical dysplasia. 3 additional cases (17%) had a lesion within the cerebellum suggestive of a neuronal migration anomaly. In one patient where the MRI was suggestive of focal cortical dysplasia, histopathologic analysis revealed dysplastic glial foci without other alterations of cortical architecture or other cytologic abnormalities. Conclusion Unexplained T2 hyperintensities occur frequently in patients with NF-2. While they may not be the NF-2 equivalent of NF-associated bright spots seen in NF-1, some of these T2 hyperintensities in patients with NF-2 may represent underlying disorders of neuronal migration. Further studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:24501699

  13. Current Update on Interstitial Lung Disease of Infancy: New Classification System, Diagnostic Evaluation, Imaging Algorithms, Imaging Findings, and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Paul G; Vargas, Sara O; Fishman, Martha P; Casey, Alicia M; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-11-01

    Childhood interstitial lung disease represents a rare and heterogeneous group of diseases that can result in significant morbidity and mortality, some leading to death during infancy. CT is the imaging test of choice. Although many CT findings are nonspecific and a definitive diagnosis usually cannot be reached by CT alone, the interpreting radiologist is instrumental in defining disease extent and refining the diagnosis. Chest CTs are of key importance in guiding site selection for lung biopsy and for following disease progression and response to treatment. Thus, from the radiologist's perspective, ensuring maximal quality of CT imaging and interpretation is paramount.

  14. Severe hypoglycemia associated with an illegal sexual enhancement product adulterated with glibenclamide: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lim, C C Tchoyoson; Gan, Robert; Chan, Cheng Leng; Tan, Alvin W K; Khoo, Joan J C; Chia, Su-Ynn; Kao, Shih Ling; Abisheganaden, John; Sitoh, Yih Yian

    2009-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings associated with severe hypoglycemia after consumption of an illegal sexual enhancement product (Power 1 Walnut) adulterated with glibenclamide, an oral hypoglycemic agent used to treat diabetes mellitus. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Records in eight male patients with severe hypoglycemia of unknown cause, without prior treatment for diabetes, and with positive blood toxicology results for glibenclamide were reviewed. MR imaging included diffusion-weighted imaging and, in some patients, MR angiography, dynamic contrast material-enhanced perfusion MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. In seven patients, there were hyperintense abnormalities on diffusion-weighted and T2-weighted images in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, sparing the subcortical white matter and cerebellum. Three patients had abnormalities of the splenium of the corpus callosum, and one had widespread involvement, including the caudate nucleus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule bilaterally. In three patients, unilateral cortical involvement, which did not conform to the typical cerebral arterial territories, was noted. In one patient, perfusion MR imaging showed slightly increased relative cerebral blood volume, and MR spectroscopy revealed no evidence of abnormal lactate in the affected cerebral cortex. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in patients with severe hypoglycemia showed typical lesions in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but the caudate nucleus and basal ganglia were involved in only the most severely affected patient. The splenium of the corpus callosum and internal capsule were also abnormal in three patients, and unilateral cortical lesions could be distinguished from acute ischemic stroke by the pattern of involvement and MR angiographic, perfusion, and spectroscopic findings. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  15. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions.

  16. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the head of the pancreas with anorexia and vomiting in a 69-year-old man: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Bu, Xianmin; Tian, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare condition of unclear etiology that is commonly observed in the lung but rarely in the pancreas. WHO classified IMT as a potentially malignant or aggressive tumor. In the present report, the case of a 69-year-old male patient with an IMT in the head of the pancreas, who experienced anorexia, nausea and vomiting, is presented. The patient's clinical symptoms were nonspecific, and the imaging findings revealed a hypovascularized pancreatic mass with stenosis of the descending duodenum. The electronic endoscopy findings revealed protruding lesions in the duodenal bulb and the descending duodenum. Biopsies of the mass were conducted with an electronic endoscope, but were not diagnostic. Subsequent duodenopancreatectomy aided in determining a pathological diagnosis of IMT, based on the histology and immunohistochemistry results. The patient experienced a recovery without further incident, as observed during a regular follow-up 3 years later. IMT in the head of the pancreas is rare, particularly in adults. In the present study, an extremely rare case of IMT involving the head of the pancreas in an adult patient is presented, and the therapeutic options for this condition are discussed. PMID:27446468

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging findings in hemolytic uremic syndrome with central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Toldo, Irene; Manara, Renzo; Cogo, Paola; Sartori, Stefano; Murer, Luisa; Battistella, Pier Antonio; Laverda, Anna Maria

    2009-02-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a multisystem disease that can affect central nervous system in up to 50% of cases. Central nervous system involvement can be clinically severe and its pathogenesis is not yet fully understood. Various magnetic resonance imaging findings, on conventional sequences, documenting the involvement of deep gray-matter structures, have been described. Diffusion-weighted imaging features of brain lesions have been reported only in 2 cases, but the potential role of this technique has not been considered yet. We describe a 19-month-old child affected by hemolytic uremic syndrome with basal ganglia lesions documented by diffusion-weighted imaging, with a 42-day neuroradiological follow-up and a 6-month clinical follow-up. In our case, diffusion-weighted imaging was more sensible in detecting the affected brain areas compared to T1, suggesting that reduced apparent diffusion coefficient values in the acute phase could reliably identify irreversible brain lesions in hemolytic uremic syndrome patients.

  18. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings for primary middle-ear carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Sha, Y

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of primary middle-ear carcinoma. In this retrospective study of 13 patients with primary middle-ear carcinoma, we collected pre- and post-contrast magnetic resonance images for all 13 cases, high-resolution computed tomography scans for 11 cases, and conventional computed tomography scans with contrast for 2 cases. Soft-tissue masses were mainly located in the tympanum, tympanic sinus and deep within the external auditory canal, and involved the jugular fossa (9 of 13 patients), middle cranial fossa (5/13), parotid gland (2/13) and temporomandibular joint fossa (1/13). An irregular, 'moth-eaten' bone destruction pattern was seen on high-resolution computed tomography images, most commonly in the eustachian tube (9/13), jugular foramen (9/13) and facial nerve canal (7/13). On non-contrast magnetic resonances images, masses were isointense or slightly hypointense on T1-weighted images, and isointense or slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted images. On post-contrast images, lesions were moderately and homogeneously enhanced in seven cases and inhomogeneously enhanced in six. High-resolution computed tomography precisely detects regions of bone destruction, whereas MRI can better assess soft-tissue tumour margins, intracranial extension and vessel patency. Eustachian tube erosion is an important characteristic of primary middle-ear carcinoma.

  19. Clinical and imaging findings in five dogs with intracranial blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatiditis).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B

    2011-01-01

    Fungal infections affecting the central nervous system are rare. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in dogs with intracranial blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatiditis). The radiology database was searched retrospectively for patients with a diagnosis of intracranial blastomycosis which had computed tomography performed as part of their diagnostic work-up. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed. Five dogs met the inclusion criteria. Major presenting complaints were stertor/nasal discharge (n=2), exophthalmos (n=1), and seizures (n=2). Clinical and laboratory findings were variable. Computed tomographic examination revealed a single contrast-enhancing intra-axial mass (n=1), a nasal mass disrupting the cribriform plate (n=3), and an intracranial mass extending into the orbit and nasal cavity (n=1). Findings in intracranial blastomycosis in dogs are variable, and the disease may mimic other inflammatory disorders or neoplasia.

  20. Heterotopic pancreas in excluded stomach diagnosed after gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterotopic pancreas is defined as finding of pancreatic tissue without anatomic and vascular continuity with the normal pancreas. Heterotopic pancreas is a rare condition difficult to diagnose and with controversial clinical management. Case presentation We describe a 43 year old female patient previously submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass for primary treatment of morbid obesity; 5 years later, the patient was discovered to have a mass in the antrum of the excluded stomach that was found to be heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Before gastric bypass surgery, the presence of the pancreatic mass in the gastric wall was unnoticed in the imagiologic records. Conclusion This is the first reported case of pancreatic heterotopy diagnosed in the excluded stomach after gastric bypass. A putative role of incretin hormones in mediating pancreatic cell hyperplasia of heterotopic pancreatic remnants should be considered an additional hypothesis that requires further research. PMID:24267291

  1. Heterotopic pancreas in excluded stomach diagnosed after gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta; Rodrigues, Pedro; Gonçalves, Gil; Nora, Mário; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2013-11-23

    Heterotopic pancreas is defined as finding of pancreatic tissue without anatomic and vascular continuity with the normal pancreas. Heterotopic pancreas is a rare condition difficult to diagnose and with controversial clinical management. We describe a 43 year old female patient previously submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass for primary treatment of morbid obesity; 5 years later, the patient was discovered to have a mass in the antrum of the excluded stomach that was found to be heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Before gastric bypass surgery, the presence of the pancreatic mass in the gastric wall was unnoticed in the imagiologic records. This is the first reported case of pancreatic heterotopy diagnosed in the excluded stomach after gastric bypass. A putative role of incretin hormones in mediating pancreatic cell hyperplasia of heterotopic pancreatic remnants should be considered an additional hypothesis that requires further research.

  2. The increased echogenicity of the pancreas in infants and children: the white pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Harms, K; Fendel, H

    1987-09-01

    An increased echogenicity of the pancreas ("white pancreas") was sonographically found in 25 children with various pancreatic and systemic diseases. Fifteen patients with cystic fibrosis had a small white pancreas. Five patients with haemosiderosis, two with pancreatitis and one with Shwachman-syndrome presented with a normal-sized or slightly enlarged pancreas. Fatty infiltration and calcifications of the pancreas can also increase its echogenicity.

  3. Mesentery neurilemmoma: CT, MRI and angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lao, Wilson T; Yang, Shih-Hung; Chen, Chi-Long; Chan, Wing P

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric neurilemmoma is extremely rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old man with mesenteric neurilemmoma, with CT, MRI and angiographic findings. The patient was healthy and had had no symptoms previously. CT and MRI images revealed a 2.2-cm well-defined, soft-tissue mass adjacent to the posterior border of the left lobe of the liver. The tumor mass displayed a heterogenous low signal on T2-weighted image and peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration. Angiography showed a hypervascular mass beneath the tail of pancreas, which was supplied by small branches of middle splenic artery. Histopathology revealed a mesentery neurilemmoma composed of spindle tumor cells.

  4. Finding regions of interest in pathological images: an attentional model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Francisco; Villalón, Julio; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduces an automated method for finding diagnostic regions-of-interest (RoIs) in histopathological images. This method is based on the cognitive process of visual selective attention that arises during a pathologist's image examination. Specifically, it emulates the first examination phase, which consists in a coarse search for tissue structures at a "low zoom" to separate the image into relevant regions.1 The pathologist's cognitive performance depends on inherent image visual cues - bottom-up information - and on acquired clinical medicine knowledge - top-down mechanisms -. Our pathologist's visual attention model integrates the latter two components. The selected bottom-up information includes local low level features such as intensity, color, orientation and texture information. Top-down information is related to the anatomical and pathological structures known by the expert. A coarse approximation to these structures is achieved by an oversegmentation algorithm, inspired by psychological grouping theories. The algorithm parameters are learned from an expert pathologist's segmentation. Top-down and bottom-up integration is achieved by calculating a unique index for each of the low level characteristics inside the region. Relevancy is estimated as a simple average of these indexes. Finally, a binary decision rule defines whether or not a region is interesting. The method was evaluated on a set of 49 images using a perceptually-weighted evaluation criterion, finding a quality gain of 3dB when comparing to a classical bottom-up model of attention.

  5. Imaging findings of sacroiliac joints in spondyloarthropathies and other rheumatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Cascavilla, A; Scalzo, G; Carotti, M; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2011-03-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the role of the different imaging techniques in the study of sacroiliac joints in patients with spondyloarthropathies (SpA) and other rheumatic conditions and to assess potential pitfalls in the radiological diagnosis. Forty-three consecutive patients with sacroiliitis as the predominant symptom of a rheumatic disorder were retrospectively studied. Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed. The following imaging findings were evaluated: bone marrow oedema, intra-articular effusion, synovial reaction, joint-space widening, bone sclerosis or hyperostosis, subchondral erosions and, in final stages, joint-space narrowing and ankylosis. All images were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Radiography demonstrated bone sclerosis in 10 patients (23%), subchondral erosions in 15 (34%), jointspace widening in 8 (18%), joint-space narrowing in 17 (39%) and ankylosis in 3 (6%). CT examination showed sclerosis of the sacroiliac joint in 17 patients (41%), subchondral erosions in 21 (53%), joint-space widening in 22 (53%), joint-space narrowing in 18 (43%) and ankylosis in 7 (17%). At MR, we found bone marrow oedema in 25 patients (92%), intra-articular effusion in 26 (96%), synovial reaction in 21 (77%) and joint-space widening in 5 (18%). Radiological study of the sacroiliac joints in patients with different rheumatic disorders represents a problem of difficult diagnostic evaluation due to the complexity of the anatomical region and the variability of radiographic findings. The integrated use of conventional radiography, CT and MR imaging is suggested to avoid misdiagnosis.

  6. Solitary fibrous tumors of the central nervous system: clinical features and imaging findings in 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Shi-Ting; Liao, Chen-Long; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Bi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm originating in the central nervous system (CNS), with imaging features currently not well known. The purposes were to describe and characterize clinical features and imaging findings of CNS SFT. We retrospectively reviewed computed tomographic (CT; n = 10) and magnetic resonance (MR) images (n = 18) of 22 patients with SFT (13 males and 9 females; mean, 47.6 years) with associated clinical records. Each lesion was found as a solitary, well-defined mass, ranging in size from 12 to 70 mm (mean, 38 mm). The tumor shape was roundlike in 16 cases (72.7%) and irregular in 6 cases (27.2%). The cerebellopontine angle zone was the most affected area (n = 6). On precontrast CT scans, 10 cases showed predominantly hyperattenuation (n = 9) and isoattenuation (n = 1). No lesion contained calcification, and 2 cases showed bone invasions. All 18 tumors examined by MR imaging showed homogeneous hypointensive (n = 5) or isointensive (n = 7) signal intensity and heterogeneous mixed isointense and hypointense signal intensity (n = 6) on T1-weighted images, whereas most tumors were predominantly isointense (n = 13) and hypointense (n = 4) to the cortex on T2-weighted images; on postcontrast CT and MR images, enhancement was marked homogeneous (n = 10) or heterogeneous (n = 12). Fourteen tumors had thickening of the meninges adjacent to the tumor. Although SFT is a rare neoplasm in the CNS, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis. The most affected area is the cerebellopontine angle zone. Solitary fibrous tumor tends to have some imaging features, such as high attenuation on CT, isointense to hypointense signal intensity on MR images, and marked enhancement.

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Examination and Imaging Findings for Identifying Subacromial Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of subacromial pathology is limited by the poor accuracy of clinical tests for specific pathologies. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination and imaging features for identifying subacromial pain (SAP) defined by a positive response to diagnostic injection, and to evaluate the influence of imaging findings on the clinical diagnosis of SAP. Methods and Findings In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy design, 208 consecutive patients presenting to their primary healthcare practitioner for the first time with a new episode of shoulder pain were recruited. All participants underwent a standardized clinical examination, shoulder x-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Results were compared with the response to a diagnostic block of xylocaineTM injected into the SAB under ultrasound guidance using ≥80% post-injection reduction in pain intensity as the positive anaesthetic response (PAR) criterion. Diagnostic accuracy statistics were calculated for combinations of clinical and imaging variables demonstrating the highest likelihood of a PAR. A PAR was reported by 34% of participants. In participants with no loss of passive external rotation, combinations of three clinical variables (anterior shoulder pain, strain injury, absence of symptoms at end-range external rotation (in abduction)) demonstrated 100% specificity for a PAR when all three were positive (LR+ infinity; 95%CI 2.9, infinity). A full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound increased the likelihood of a PAR irrespective of age (specificity 98% (95%CI 94, 100); LR+ 6.2; 95% CI 1.5, 25.7)). Imaging did not improve the ability to rule-out a PAR. Conclusion Combinations of clinical examination findings and a full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound scan can help confirm, but not exclude, the presence of subacromial pain. Other imaging findings were of limited value for diagnosing SAP. PMID:27936246

  8. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy in a Patient with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Law, Huong Ling; Tan, Suzet; Sedi, Rosleena

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a 3-month history of poor oral intake related to nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy. The patient later developed deep coma while receiving in-patient therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed typical findings of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. The patient was treated with thiamine injections, which resulted in subsequent partial recovery of neurological function. This paper stresses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging for prompt diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. PMID:22135604

  9. Complex venous anomalies: magnetic resonance imaging findings in a 5-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Hazirolan, Tuncay; Ozkan, Efe; Haliloglu, Mithat; Celiker, Alpay; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-10-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a very unusual venous anomaly case. A 5-year-old boy who had surgical repair of coarctation of the thoracic aorta was referred to our department for evaluation of an enlarged venous structure anterior to the aorta, which had been noted during the surgery. Contrast enhanced dynamic MRI revealed partial anomalous pulmonary venous return to the left azygos vein, double inferior and superior vena cava with the left azygos continuation of the left superior vena cava. The recognition of venous anomalies allows correct planning of surgical and interventional procedures. MRI is a valuable imaging tool providing detailed anatomical information.

  10. Imaging approaches and findings in the reconstructed breast: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Scaranelo, Anabel M; Lord, Bridgette; Eiada, Riham; Hofer, Stefan O

    2011-02-01

    Advances in breast imaging over the last 15 years have improved early breast cancer detection and management. After treatment for breast cancer, many women choose to have reconstructive surgery. In addition, with the availability of widespread genetic screening for breast cancer, an increasing number of women are choosing prophylactic mastectomies and subsequent breast reconstruction. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to present the spectrum of imaging findings in the reconstructed breast. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The imaging findings of infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nekitsing, Indima; Wu, Xing; Tang, Guangyu

    2015-12-01

    Central primitive neuroectodermal tumour (cPNET), a rare malignant neoplasm of embryonal origin, often occurs in children younger than 15 years. This is the first case report of the imaging findings of an infratentorial cPNET to be reported in a patient. Here, is reported the case of a 6-year-old boy presenting with symptoms of diplopia for 14 days. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid mass in the fourth ventricle. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was cPNET. To conclude, whenever a child is diagnosed to have an infratentorial solid tumour in the fourth ventricle, cPNET should always be considered despite its rarity.

  12. Incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory meatus performed to investigate audiovestibular symptoms.

    PubMed

    Htun, H M; Mui, S L; Williams, C; Hans, P S

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of incidental findings found on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the internal auditory meatus performed to investigate audiovestibular symptoms, and to determine how to best manage these when found. A retrospective review was conducted of internal auditory meatus magnetic resonance imaging scans during a three-month period in the radiology department at a UK district general hospital. A total of 109 scans were reviewed. Of these, 92.7 per cent showed no retrocochlear pathology, 0.9 per cent showed vestibular schwannoma, 6.4 per cent revealed vascular loops, and 2.8 per cent showed incidental findings that warranted further action and investigation. Of the scans, 40.4 per cent showed other incidental pathologies such as age-related ischaemic changes, and sinus disease that required no further intervention. Of the magnetic resonance imaging scans reviewed, 49.5 per cent were entirely normal. Almost half of the scans investigating audiovestibular symptoms showed incidental findings. Otolaryngologists should have an understanding of the significance of the most commonly encountered incidental findings, and should counsel patients appropriately and refer them onward when necessary.

  13. Floating dural sac sign is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging finding of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Hatazawa, Jun; Sato, Shinya; Kanoto, Masafumi; Fukao, Akira; Kayama, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    We would like to propose floating dural sac sign, which is observed as a hyperintense band or rim around the spinal dural sac on axial T2-weighted images, as a sensitive sign to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. One hundred patients with orthostatic headache were prospectively registered in 11 hospitals. These patients were examined by brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 89), radioisotope cisternography (n = 89), MR myelography (n = 86), axial T2-weighted imaging of the spine (n = 70), and computed tomography myelography (n = 2). In this study, we separately evaluated the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension and spinal CSF leakage. Among 100 patients, 16 patients were diagnosed as having spinal CSF leaks. Of 70 patients examined with axial T2-weighted imaging, 14 patients were diagnosed with spinal CSF leaks, and floating dural sac sign was observed in 17 patients, 13 patients with spinal CSF leaks and 4 without CSF leaks (sensitivity 92.9%, specificity 92.9%). Of 86 patients examined by MR myelography, extradural fluid was observed in only 3 patients (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). The floating dural sac sign was a sensitive sign that can be used to identify CSF leakage. Spinal axial T2-weighted imaging might be a good screening method for spinal CSF leakage that can help to avoid the need for lumbar puncture.

  14. GLP-1 and exendin-4 for imaging endocrine pancreas. A review. Labelled glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A; Sowa-Staszczak, A; Tomaszuk, M; Stefańska, A

    2015-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors expression has been found on many types of cancer cells. In case of benign insulinoma the density of those receptors is even higher than the density of somatostatin receptors. This article presents the results of clinical trials proving the utility of GLP-1 receptors imaging. Scintigraphy or positron emission tomography with the use of GLP-1 analogues labelled with appropriate radioisotopes (111In, 99mTc, 68Ga, 18F or 64Cu) seem to be superior compared with other available techniques in diagnosis of hardly detectable benign insulinoma. While surgery is the only effective therapy for insulinoma patients, therefore proper preoperative localization of the tumor allows sparing operation. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors might become also a target for imaging of other tumors such as gastrinoma, pheochromocytoma and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), which also were shown to overexpress this type of receptors. However, studies with larger groups of patients are required to prove the clinical usefulness of this indication. Moreover GLP-1 receptor imaging seems to be a potential tool to evaluate pancreatic beta cell mass (BCM). It may be useful in the early diagnosis of beta cell loss in preclinical phases of diabetes. The panceratic beta cells imaging may influence the prophylaxis of diabetes and management of diabetic patients. Presented results of clinical trials prove that glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor imaging might become helpful diagnostic strategy particularly in case of patients with benign insulinoma tumors, but also patients with gastrinoma, pheochromocytoma, medullary thyroid cancer and diabetes.

  15. Volumetric myelographic magnetic resonance imaging to localize difficult-to-find spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jonathan M; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Campeau, Norbert G; Cloft, Harry J; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    Although more prevalent in males in the 6th and 7th decade of life, spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are an uncommon cause of progressive myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and more recently Gd bolus MR angiography have been used to diagnose, radiographically define, and preprocedurally localize the contributing lumbar artery. Three-dimensional myelographic MR imaging sequences have recently been developed for anatomical evaluation of the spinal canal. The authors describe 3 recent cases in which volumetric myelographic MR imaging with a 3D phase-cycled fast imaging employing steady state acquisition (PC-FIESTA) and a 3D constructive interference steady state (CISS) technique were particularly useful not only for documenting an SDAVF, but also for providing localization when CT angiography, MR imaging, MR angiography, and spinal angiography failed to localize the fistula. In a patient harboring an SDAVF at T-4, surgical exploration was performed based on the constellation of findings on the PC-FIESTA images as well as the fact that the spinal segments leading to T-4 were the only ones that the authors were unable to catheterize. In a second patient, who harbored an SDAVF at T-6, after 2 separate angiograms failed to demonstrate the fistula, careful assessment of the CISS images led the authors to focus a third angiogram on the left T-6 intercostal artery and to perform superselective microcatheterization. In a third patient with an SDAVF originating from the lateral sacral branch, the PC-FIESTA sequence demonstrated the arterialized vein extending into the S-1 foramen, leading to a second angiogram and superselective internal iliac injections. The authors concluded that myelographic MR imaging sequences can be useful not only as an aid to diagnosis but also for localization of an SDAVF in complex cases.

  16. Diffusion-weighted and conventional MR imaging findings of neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sener, R Nuri

    2004-08-01

    Neuroaxonal dystrophy is a rare progressive disorder of childhood characterized by mental deterioration and seizures. The diffusion-weighted and conventional MR imaging findings are reported for six cases. Six patients aged 19 months to 9 years with proved neuroaxonal dystrophy (one with the infantile form, five juvenile forms) underwent imaging at 1.5 T. Echo-planar diffusion-weighted images were acquired with a trace imaging sequence in five patients and with a three-gradient protocol (4000/110) in one. Images obtained with a b value of 1000 s/mm2 and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were studied. ADCs from lesion sites and normal regions (pons and temporal and occipital lobes) were evaluated. A hyperintense cerebellum (a characteristic of the disease) was evident on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images in all cases. Four patients had associated cerebral changes. Diffusion-weighted images, especially ADC maps, showed an elevated diffusion pattern in the cerebellum in the five juvenile cases (normal images at b = 1000 s/mm2, ADCs of 1.30-2.60 x 10(-3) mm2/s). A restricted diffusion pattern was evident in the infantile case (hyperintensity at b = 1000 s/mm2, low ADCs of 0.44-0.55 x 10(-3) mm2/s). ADCs were normal in the pons and temporal and occipital lobes (0.64-1.00 x 10(-3) mm2/s). An elevated cerebellar diffusion pattern is a predominant feature of juvenile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Coexistent elevated and restricted diffusion patterns were evident in different brain regions in different forms of the disease. Dystrophic axons likely account the restricted diffusion, whereas spheroid formation (swelling) and abnormal myelination result in elevated diffusion.

  17. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 92 cats with clinical signs of spinal cord disease.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rita; Platt, Simon R; Llabrés-Díaz, Francisco J; Rogers, Katherine H; de Stefani, Alberta; Matiasek, Lara A; Adams, Vicki J

    2009-02-01

    Medical records of 92 cats presented with clinical signs of spinal cord disease, which had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were reviewed. The cats were grouped into seven categories based upon the diagnosis suggested by results of MRI, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and other diagnostic procedures: neoplastic (n=25), inflammatory or infectious (n=13), traumatic (n=8), vascular (n=6), degenerative (n=5), anomalous (n=3) and those with an unremarkable MRI (n=32). There were two independent predictors of abnormal MRI findings: severity of clinical signs and presence of spinal pain. Abnormal MRI findings and speed of onset of disease were significantly associated with survival. For the 32 cats with unremarkable MRI findings, only nine died due to spinal disease and, therefore, the median survival time (MST) was not reached (lower 95% confidence interval (CI)=970 days). For the 60 cats with abnormal MRI findings, 37 died due to their disease and the MST was 138 days (95% CI: 7-807).

  18. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon: clinical and imaging findings, with anatomic correlations.

    PubMed

    Lecouvet, Frederic E; Demondion, Xavier; Leemrijse, Thibaut; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Malghem, Jacques

    2005-11-01

    We report the clinical and imaging findings in two elderly female patients with spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon from the lesser trochanter of the femur. We emphasize the key contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to this diagnosis and provide an anatomic correlation. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute groin pain in the elderly. MR imaging enables positive diagnosis, by showing mass effect on the anterior aspect of the hip joint, proximal muscle thickening, and abnormal signal intensity, and by demonstrating interruption of the psoas tendon, whereas the distal insertion of the lateral portion of the iliacus muscle remains muscular and is preserved.

  19. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  20. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: early magnetic resonance imaging findings and neuroradiological follow-up.

    PubMed

    Toldo, I; Calderone, M; Boniver, C; Dravet, Ch; Guerrini, R; Laverda, A M

    2007-03-01

    We describe a case of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome documented by longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A two-year and nine-month-old boy had a prolonged hemiconvulsion during fever followed by right hemiparesis. Seven days later the imaging abnormality on T2 and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) was limited to the white matter of the left hemisphere. One month later severe gliosis and unilateral brain atrophy were already evident. MRI is useful in the early stages of prolonged seizures and T2 and DWI abnormalities appear to be well correlated with parenchymal damage that results from sustained ictal activity. The neuroradiological findings in our case and in the few HHE patients reported in the literature seem to be very characteristic and, if confirmed in larger series, could permit an early diagnosis.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 40 dogs with histologically confirmed intracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Marti; Gaitero, Lluís; Zamora, Angels; Añor, Sònia

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 dogs with histologically confirmed primary and secondary intracranial tumours were reviewed. Forty-one tumours were diagnosed by means of MR imaging (MRI). MRI findings allowed diagnosis of a neoplastic lesion in 37/41 cases. Based on MRI features, differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions was possible in 24/27 (89%) primary brain tumours and in 13/14 (92%) secondary brain tumours. Diagnosis of tumour type based on MRI features was correct in 19/27 (70%) primary tumours and in 13/14 secondary tumours. The results of this study show that MRI is a good diagnostic imaging modality to detect neoplastic lesions and to diagnose tumour type in dogs. However, as some neoplasms show equivocal MRI features the technique has limitations in the detection of some intracranial tumours and in predicting tumour type.

  2. Osteoarthritis and psoriatic arthritis: findings in three-dimensional biophotonics imaging.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhen; Ieong, Fong H; Jiang, Huabei; Sobel, Eric S

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to capture the quantitative optical features of degenerative finger joints based on x-ray aided three-dimensional (3D) diffuse optical tomography (DOT). It is anticipated that the fused imaging technique can be applied to identifying the significant differences between osteoarthritis (OA) and psoriatic arthritis (PA). For a case study, total 6 subjects were selected to study the distal interphalangeal (DIP) finger joints. 2 OA patients, 2 PA patients and 2 healthy subjects were examined clinically first. Their DIP finger joints were then scanned by the multimodality imaging method. Our findings suggested that the developed multimodality imaging approach may aid to contradistinguish OA patients from PA patients with the healthy control, which is essential for a better diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory arthritis in humans.

  3. Non-infected and Infected Bronchogenic Cyst: The Correlation of Image Findings with Cyst Content

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hong Gil; Park, Ju Hwan; Park, Hye Min; Kwon, Woon Jung; Cha, Hee Jeong; Lee, Young Jik; Park, Chang Ryul; Jegal, Yangjin; Ahn, Jong-Joon

    2014-01-01

    We hereby report a case on bronchogenic cyst which is initially non-infected, then becomes infected after bronchoscopic ultrasound (US)-guided transesophageal fine-needle aspiration (FNA). The non-infected bronchogenic cyst appears to be filled with relatively echogenic materials on US, and the aspirate is a whitish jelly-like fluid. Upon contrast-enhanced MRI of the infected bronchogenic cyst, a T1-weighted image shows low signal intensity and a T2-weighted image shows high signal intensity, with no enhancements of the cyst contents, but enhancements of the thickened cystic wall. The patient then undergo video-assisted thoracic surgery 14 days after the FNA. The cystic mass is known to be completely removed, and the aspirate is yellowish and purulent. To understand the image findings that pertain to the gross appearance of the cyst contents will help to diagnose bronchogenic cysts in the future. PMID:24624219

  4. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  5. Scurvy in a child with autism: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tetsu; Aida, Noriko; Tanaka, Yukichi; Tanaka, Mio; Shiomi, Masae; Machida, Jiro

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of scurvy in a 6-year-old boy with autism and an unbalanced diet. The patient was admitted with difficulties in walking. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the thigh showed diffuse signal abnormality in the bone marrow, periosteum, and the femoral muscle. A biopsy specimen of the femur showed hematoma, proliferative fibroblasts, and few collagen fibers, which suggested a deficiency of vitamin C. Although recurrent periosteal hematoma may be suggestive of scurvy, this finding was subtle in the current case. It is important to be aware of this rare disease because it is easily cured with vitamin C supplementation.

  6. Giant Lipomatosis of the Sciatic Nerve: Unique Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Sarp, Ali Firat; Pekcevik, Yeliz

    2016-04-01

    Lipomatosis of the nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is characterized by the infiltration of the nerve by fibro-fatty tissue. The affected nerve becomes thicker, and it simulates a mass lesion. Lipomatosis usually affects the median nerve and lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve is extremely rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the key to diagnosis, and it is usually pathognomonic. In this report, MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI findings of a case of a giant sciatic nerve lipomatosis without macrodactyly are presented. The MRI findings are unique, and awareness of the MRI features of this rare soft tissue mass may prevent unnecessary biopsies and surgeries.

  7. Clinical imaging findings in a girl with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Lin, D S; Liu, Y P; Hsu, L J; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    We report an 82-year-old girl with premature aging, a karyotype of 46,XX and a de novo c.1824C>T mutation encoding p.G608G in the lamin A gene. The clinical features of accelerated aging and the molecular finding were consistent with the diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). In this presentation, we demonstrate the radiological imaging findings of skeletal, oral and craniofacial phenotypes of abnormalities associated with HGPS. The oral and craniofacial abnormalities caused dental caries, severe malocclusion, and swallowing, feeding and speech problems. Dural calcification, and granulation in the ear drum and external ear canal were additionally observed.

  8. Imaging Findings in Dysgerminoma in a Case of 46 XY, Complete Gonadal Dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Khaladkar, Sanjay; Gujrati, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    A 46 XY pure gonadal dysgenesis also known as Swyer syndrome. These patients are phenotypic females with normal female external genitalia and absent testicular tissue. The patients with swyer syndrome have streak gonads and increased risk of dysgerminoma and gonadoblastoma. We present a case of dysgerminoma in dysgenetic gonads of swyer syndrome. A 23-year-old female had come with complaints of primary amenorrhea, pelvic mass and abdominal pain. Clinical findings, pathology investigation and imaging findings revealed swyer syndrome. On MRI it showed a large lobulated mass in the pelvis. Mass was excised and dysgerminoma was given on the histopathology. PMID:27790550

  9. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma after locoregional therapy: Magnetic resonance imaging findings in falsely negative exams.

    PubMed

    Becker-Weidman, David; Civan, Jesse M; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Herrine, Steven K; Parker, Laurence; Mitchell, Donald G

    2016-06-08

    To elucidate causes for false negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams by identifying imaging characteristics that predict viable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in lesions previously treated with locoregional therapy when obvious findings of recurrence are absent. This retrospective institutional review board-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study included patients who underwent liver transplantation at our center between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2012 after being treated for HCC with locoregional therapy. All selected patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI after locoregional therapy within 90 d of transplant that was prospectively interpreted as without evidence of residual or recurrent tumor. Retrospectively, 2 radiologists, blinded to clinical and pathological data, independently reviewed the pre-transplant MRIs for 7 imaging features. Liver explant histopathology provided the reference standard, with clinically significant tumor defined as viable tumor ≥ 1.0 cm in maximum dimension. Fisher's exact test was first performed to identify significant imaging features. Inclusion criteria selected for 42 patients with 65 treated lesions. Fourteen of 42 patients (33%) and 16 of 65 treated lesions (25%) had clinically significant viable tumor on explant histology. None of the 7 imaging findings examined could reliably and reproducibly determine which treated lesion had viable tumor when the exam had been prospectively read as without evidence of viable HCC. After locoregional therapy some treated lesions that do not demonstrate any MRI evidence of HCC will contain viable tumor. As such even patients with a negative MRI following treatment should receive regular short-term imaging surveillance because some have occult viable tumor. The possibility of occult tumor should be a consideration when contemplating any action which might delay liver transplant.

  11. Bone marrow reconversion in adults who are smokers: MR Imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Poulton, T B; Murphy, W D; Duerk, J L; Chapek, C C; Feiglin, D H

    1993-12-01

    Conversion of bone marrow in the extremities from red to yellow is a normal maturation process. Marrow reconversion is present when expected yellow marrow is replaced with active red marrow, and it tends to occur at times of physiologic stress. The significance of this finding on MR imaging is not always clear. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence of bone marrow reconversion in adults undergoing MR imaging of the knee for reasons other than marrow disorders. Possible relationships between marrow reconversion and age, sex, weight, and smoking were sought. Fifty-nine outpatients over 24 years of age who had no evidence of hematopoietic disorders and for whom MR images of the knee were available for review were selected for study. Patients younger than 25 years old were eliminated to ensure that all patients in the study were old enough to have achieved normal adult marrow conversion. The 59 subjects were classified according to their smoking histories. Twenty-eight were nonsmokers, 10 were intermediate smokers, and 21 were heavy smokers. The MR images were classified as showing either red marrow (reconverted from yellow to red) or yellow marrow (converted) by two independent observers who had no knowledge of the patients' smoking histories. MR images of six heavy smokers, two intermediate smokers, and one nonsmoker showed evidence of reconversion. A statistically significant association between marrow reconversion and heavy smoking (p = .02) was found. Reconversion also was found to be more prevalent in patients less than 39 years old and in obese women who smoked. No association was found between weight, sex, or obese male smokers and reconversion. Our results show marrow reconversion at the knee is most prevalent in heavy smokers, younger patients, and especially obese women who smoke heavily. In these patients, marrow reconversion can be a normal finding on MR imaging. In other patients, other causes should be considered.

  12. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  13. Unusual Malignant Solid Neoplasms of the Kidney: Cross-Sectional Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Shirkhoda, Ali; Ozmen, Mustafa; Hahn, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant kidney neoplasms are the most frequently encountered solid kidney masses. Although renal cell carcinoma is the major renal malignancy, other solid malignant renal masses should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid renal masses that do not contain a macroscopic fatty component. In this pictorial essay, we present the imaging findings of a primitive neuroectodermal tumor, primary liposarcoma of the kidney, primary neuroendocrine tumor, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, sclerosing fibrosarcoma and renal metastasis of osteosarcoma. PMID:26175585

  14. An Automatic Technique for Finding Faint Moving Objects in Wide Field CCD Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, O. R.; Meech, K. J.

    1996-09-01

    The traditional method used to find moving objects in astronomical images is to blink pairs or series of frames after registering them to align the background objects. While this technique is extremely efficient in terms of the low signal-to-noise ratio that the human sight can detect, it proved to be extremely time-, brain- and eyesight-consuming. The wide-field images provided by the large CCD mosaic recently built at IfA cover a field of view of 20 to 30' over 8192(2) pixels. Blinking such images is an enormous task, comparable to that of blinking large photographic plates. However, as the data are available digitally (each image occupying 260Mb of disk space), we are developing a set of computer codes to perform the moving object identification in sets of frames. This poster will describe the techniques we use in order to reach a detection efficiency as good as that of a human blinker; the main steps are to find all the objects in each frame (for which we rely on ``S-Extractor'' (Bertin & Arnouts (1996), A&ASS 117, 393), then identify all the background objects, and finally to search the non-background objects for sources moving in a coherent fashion. We will also describe the results of this method applied to actual data from the 8k CCD mosaic. {This work is being supported, in part, by NSF grant AST 92-21318.}

  15. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: imaging findings from birth to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Benjamin Y; Castillo, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Global hypoxic-ischemic injury (HII) to the brain is a significant cause of mortality and severe neurologic disability. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of HII, helping guide case management in the acute setting and providing valuable information about long-term prognosis. Appropriate radiologic diagnosis of HII requires familiarity with the many imaging manifestations of this injury. Factors such as brain maturity, duration and severity of insult, and type and timing of imaging studies all influence findings in HII. Severe hypoxia-ischemia in both preterm and term neonates preferentially damages the deep gray matter, with perirolandic involvement more frequently observed in the latter age group. Less profound insults result in intraventricular hemorrhages and periventricular white matter injury in preterm neonates and parasagittal watershed territory infarcts in term neonates. In the postnatal period, severe insults result in diffuse gray matter injury, with relative sparing of the perirolandic cortex and the structures supplied by the posterior circulation. Profound hypoxia-ischemia in older children and adults affects the deep gray matter nuclei, cortices, hippocampi, and cerebellum. Because findings at conventional imaging may be subtle or even absent in the acute setting, particularly in neonates, magnetic resonance spectroscopy can help establish the diagnosis of HII. Promising new neuroprotective strategies designed to limit the extent of brain injury caused by hypoxia-ischemia are currently under investigation. (c) RSNA, 2008

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, V A; Oberman, B S; Zacharia, T T; Isildak, H

    2017-07-01

    To identify and evaluate cranial magnetic resonance imaging findings associated with Ménière's disease. Seventy-eight patients with a documented diagnosis of Ménière's disease and 35 controls underwent 1.5 T or 3 T magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Patients also underwent otological, vestibular and audiometric examinations. Lack of visualisation of the left and right vestibular aqueducts was identified as statistically significant amongst Ménière's disease patients (left, p = 0.0001, odds ratio = 0.02; right, p = 0.0004, odds ratio = 0.03). Both vestibular aqueducts were of abnormal size in the Ménière's disease group, albeit with left-sided significance (left, p = 0.008, odds ratio = 10.91; right, p = 0.49, odds ratio = 2.47). Lack of vestibular aqueduct visualisation on magnetic resonance imaging was statistically significant in Ménière's disease patients compared to the general population. The study findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging can be useful to rule out retrocochlear pathology and provide radiological data to support the clinical diagnosis of Ménière's disease.

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children: its high prevalence and more extensive imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Kenji; Ikeda, Masahiro; Hamasaki, Yuko; Hataya, Hiroshi; Shishido, Seiichirou; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Gen; Hiramoto, Ryugo; Honda, Masataka

    2006-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a distinctive clinicoradiological entity observed in a variety of clinical settings, including pediatric patients. A greater prevalence of this syndrome has been suggested in kidney transplant recipients and patients with kidney disease. Although usually considered benign and reversible, characteristics of this syndrome in pediatric patients remain obscure. The objective of the present study involved disclosing details of imaging findings, as well as the clinical course and prevalence of the syndrome in this field. We investigated kidney transplant recipients and pediatric patients with kidney disease in our institution from 1990 to 2004. For these patients, clinical course, imaging findings, blood pressure, concurrent medical illnesses, and administrative condition of calcineurin inhibitors were analyzed. Twenty cases of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome were investigated in patients ranging in age from 1.9 to 18.3 years. In most patients, radiological abnormalities extended to the gray matter (17 of 20 patients), frontal and temporal lobes, and even the cerebellum (16 patients). Of 177 kidney transplant recipients (cyclosporine, 127 patients; tacrolimus, 50 patients), 6 patients administered cyclosporine (4.7%) and 4 patients administered tacrolimus (8.0%) developed the syndrome after transplantation. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be suspected in pediatric kidney transplant recipients and patients with kidney disease if they have a sudden episode of neurological symptoms, even if imaging findings are not restricted to the subcortical white matter of the occipital region.

  18. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a “distractor”. This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion’s neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found “serious lesion in children” is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses. PMID:27610341

  19. Rebound adenoid hyperplasia after chemotherapy in pediatric patients with head and neck lymphoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroki; Matsuo, Masayuki; Ozeki, Michio; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    To assess MR imaging findings of rebound adenoid hyperplasia after chemotherapy in pediatric patients with head and neck lymphoma. Eight pediatric patients with head and neck lymphoma treated with chemotherapy alone or concurrent chemoradiotherapy were included. All patients underwent pre-therapeutic assessment and post-therapeutic follow-up by MR imaging. The maximum thickness of the adenoid was assessed on transverse T2-weighted images. Rebound adenoid hyperplasia was defined as more than half of the pre-therapeutic thickness after severe atrophy. The pre-therapeutic maximum thickness of the adenoid ranged from 10 to 18 mm (mean, 15 mm). In all patients, the thickness of the adenoid dramatically decreased (mean 1 mm) within 1 year after the cessation of chemotherapy. On follow-up MR imaging, rebound adenoid hyperplasia was observed in five patients (63 %). Re-atrophy following rebound adenoid hyperplasia was observed in two patients (25 %), and no re-atrophy was observed in three patients (37 %). Rebound adenoid hyperplasia was not observed in three patients (37 %) who were in their late teens, and who had been treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Rebound adenoid hyperplasia was often observed after chemotherapy in pediatric patients with lymphoma. MR imaging was useful for the assessment of rebound adenoid hyperplasia.

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex pathology in schizophrenia as revealed by convergent findings from multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pomarol-Clotet, E; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Salvador, R; Sarró, S; Gomar, J J; Vila, F; Ortiz-Gil, J; Iturria-Medina, Y; Capdevila, A; McKenna, P J

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have found evidence of altered brain structure and function in schizophrenia, but have had complex findings regarding the localization of abnormality. We applied multimodal imaging (voxel-based morphometry (VBM), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) combined with tractography) to 32 chronic schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. At a conservative threshold of P=0.01 corrected, structural and functional imaging revealed overlapping regions of abnormality in the medial frontal cortex. DTI found that white matter abnormality predominated in the anterior corpus callosum, and analysis of the anatomical connectivity of representative seed regions again implicated fibres projecting to the medial frontal cortex. There was also evidence of convergent abnormality in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, although here the laterality was less consistent across techniques. The medial frontal region identified by these three imaging techniques corresponds to the anterior midline node of the default mode network, a brain system which is believed to support internally directed thought, a state of watchfulness, and/or the maintenance of one's sense of self, and which is of considerable current interest in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:20065955

  1. Nuclear medicine in the acute clinical setting: indications, imaging findings, and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Uliel, Livnat; Mellnick, Vincent M; Menias, Christine O; Holz, Andrew L; McConathy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging provides valuable functional information that complements information obtained with anatomic imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with specific acute clinical manifestations. Nuclear medicine studies are most often used in conjunction with other imaging modalities and as a problem-solving tool. Under certain circumstances a nuclear medicine study may be indicated as the first-line imaging modality, as in the case of renal scintigraphy for transplant dysfunction in the early postoperative period. Nuclear imaging may be preferred when a conventional first-line study is contraindicated or when it is important to minimize radiation exposure. The portability of nuclear imaging offers particular advantages for the evaluation of critically ill patients whose clinical condition is unstable and who cannot be safely transported out of the intensive care unit. The ability to visualize physiologic and pathophysiologic processes over relatively long time periods without adding to the patient's radiation exposure contributes to the high diagnostic sensitivity of several types of nuclear medicine studies. Viewing the acquired images in the cine mode adds to the value of these studies for diagnosing and characterizing dynamic abnormalities such as intermittent internal bleeding and bile or urine leakage. In this pictorial review, the spectrum of nuclear medicine studies commonly performed in the acute care setting is reviewed according to body systems and organs, with detailed descriptions of the indications, technical considerations, findings, and potential pitfalls of each type of study. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.332125098/-/DC1.

  2. High resolution 3.0 Tesla MR imaging findings in patients with bilateral Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Stehling, Christoph; Langer, Martin; Nassenstein, Isabelle; Bachmann, Rainald; Heindel, Walter; Vieth, Volker

    2009-08-01

    Madelung deformity (MD) is a rare, normally painful abnormality of the wrist and forearm which characteristically begins in adolescence. Usually the deformity appears between the age of 8 and 14 years, often progressing from initially mild functional pain to fatigue and loss of strength and finally, reduced mobility. We present the MR-findings in three patients with bilateral MD, using a high-resolution imaging protocol adapted for 3.0 Tesla (3.0 T) examinations. Wrist images of three patients were acquired at a 3.0 T Scanner (Gyroscan Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands), using a dedicated phased array coil. The imaging protocol consisted of coronal T1-weighted Turbo-spin-echo (T1w-TSE) and coronal and sagittal T2-weighted TSE sequences (T2w-TSE). MR-images of these three girls demonstrated severe volar bayonet configuration of the forearms with a dorsal prominence of the ulnar head, also a curved distal radial articular surface with increased ulnar angulation, due to a deceleration of growth in the ulnar portion of the distal epiphysis. The proximal carpal row showed pyramidal configuration. Also visible was a prominent short radiolunate ligament, the so called Vickers ligament, which originates from the ulnar border of the radius, inserts into the volar pole of the lunate and likely contributes to carpal pyramidalization. Furthermore, the images demonstrated an anomalous hypertrophied and elongated volar radiotriquetral ligament which, to our knowledge, has been described elsewhere only in another case. High resolution imaging at 3.0 T permitted a detailed analysis of the complex pathomorphology in patients with MD. Investing the better signal-to-noise ratio at higher field strengths into spatial resolution an excellent image quality could be obtained, depicting the Vickers ligament and the anomalous volar radiotriquetral ligament in this rare disease.

  3. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  4. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreas carcinoma occurring in the annular pancreas: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Maki, Akira; Amemiya, Hidetake; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Ei; Sano, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    The annular pancreas is a rare congenital anomaly in which a ring of the pancreas parenchyma surrounds the second part of the duodenum. Malignant tumors are extremely rare in patients with an annular pancreas. A 64-year-old man presented with appetite loss and vomiting. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) indicated pancreas parenchyma surrounding the second part of the duodenum, and a hypovascular area occupying lesion in the annular pancreas. Subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathology showed pancreatic carcinoma occurring in the complete annular pancreas.

  5. Gastric pneumatosis: Laboratory and imaging findings associated with mortality in adults.

    PubMed

    Spektor, Michael; Chernyak, Victoria; McCann, Thomas E; Scheinfeld, Meir H

    2014-11-01

    To describe laboratory and imaging findings associated with mortality in patients with gastric pneumatosis. Institution review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Using radiology report databases, all patients with "gastric pneumatosis" or "emphysematous gastritis" in their CT reports were identified from two institutions during 12 or 9 year periods. Clinical parameters and laboratory values [lactic acid, white blood cell (WBC) count, and serum creatinine] were obtained from medical records and images were reviewed in consensus by two readers. Bivariate associations between continuous variables were tested by Mann-Whitney tests. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate bivariate associations between categorical variables. Of the 24 patients identified, there were five (21%) deaths. Median serum lactic acid and creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients who died compared to surviving patients [median (interquartile range, IQR): 1.95 (1.45-4.15) versus 1.5 (1.3-2.6), p = 0.001; 1.2 (1-2.8) versus 1 (0.8-1.4), p = 0.005, respectively). There was no significant difference in WBC levels between the groups. Coexistent small bowel pneumatosis and colonic pneumatosis were significantly more common in patients who died compared to surviving patients (80% versus 0%, p < 0.001; 40% versus 0%, p = 0.04, respectively). There was no significant difference for portal or mesenteric venous gas, free intraperitoneal gas, or dilated bowel. When the imaging finding of gastric pneumatosis was associated with elevated serum lactic acid, elevated serum creatinine, or concomitant small bowel or colonic pneumatosis, an association with mortality was observed. These findings suggest that more aggressive treatment may be warranted in patients with these laboratory or imaging abnormalities. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Parallel Implementation of Algorithms for Finding the Reflection Symmetry of the Binary Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotova, S.; Seredin, O.; Kushnir, O.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the exact method of searching an axis of binary image symmetry, based on brute-force search among all potential symmetry axes. As a measure of symmetry, we use the set-theoretic Jaccard similarity applied to two subsets of pixels of the image which is divided by some axis. Brute-force search algorithm definitely finds the axis of approximate symmetry which could be considered as ground-truth, but it requires quite a lot of time to process each image. As a first step of our contribution we develop the parallel version of the brute-force algorithm. It allows us to process large image databases and obtain the desired axis of approximate symmetry for each shape in database. Experimental studies implemented on "Butterflies" and "Flavia" datasets have shown that the proposed algorithm takes several minutes per image to find a symmetry axis. However, in case of real-world applications we need computational efficiency which allows solving the task of symmetry axis search in real or quasi-real time. So, for the task of fast shape symmetry calculation on the common multicore PC we elaborated another parallel program, which based on the procedure suggested before in (Fedotova, 2016). That method takes as an initial axis the axis obtained by superfast comparison of two skeleton primitive sub-chains. This process takes about 0.5 sec on the common PC, it is considerably faster than any of the optimized brute-force methods including ones implemented in supercomputer. In our experiments for 70 percent of cases the found axis coincides with the ground-truth one absolutely, and for the rest of cases it is very close to the ground-truth.

  7. Breast reconstruction: review of surgical methods and spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Pinel-Giroux, Fanny Maud; El Khoury, Mona M; Trop, Isabelle; Bernier, Christina; David, Julie; Lalonde, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is often requested by women with breast cancer who are ineligible for breast-conserving therapy and women with a high genetic risk for breast cancer. Current breast reconstruction techniques are diverse and may involve the use of an autologous tissue flap, a prosthetic implant, or both. Regardless of the technique used, cancer may recur in the reconstructed breast; in addition, in breasts reconstructed with autologous tissue flaps, benign complications such as fat necrosis may occur. To detect breast cancer recurrences at a smaller size than can be appreciated clinically and as early as possible without evidence of metastasis, radiologists must be familiar with the range of normal and abnormal imaging appearances of reconstructed breasts, including features of benign complications as well as those of malignant change. Images representing this spectrum of findings were selected from the clinical records of 119 women who underwent breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at the authors' institution between January 2009 and March 2011, after mastectomy and breast reconstruction. In 32 of 37 women with abnormal findings on MR images, only benign changes were found at further diagnostic workup; in the other five, recurrent breast cancer was found at biopsy. Four of the five had been treated initially for invasive carcinoma, and one, for multifocal ductal carcinoma; three of the five were carriers of a BRCA gene mutation. On the basis of these results, the authors suggest that systematic follow-up examinations with breast MR imaging may benefit women with a reconstructed breast and a high risk for breast cancer recurrence.

  8. Adequacy of inhale/exhale breathhold CT based ITV margins and image-guided registration for free-breathing pancreas and liver SBRT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wensha; Fraass, Benedick A; Reznik, Robert; Nissen, Nicholas; Lo, Simon; Jamil, Laith H; Gupta, Kapil; Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-09

    To evaluate use of breath-hold CTs and implanted fiducials for definition of the internal target volume (ITV) margin for upper abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). To study the statistics of inter- and intra-fractional motion information. 11 patients treated with SBRT for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) or liver cancer were included in the study. Patients underwent fiducial implantation, free-breathing CT and breath-hold CTs at end inhalation/exhalation. All patients were planned and treated with SBRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two margin strategies were studied: Strategy I uses PTV = ITV + 3 mm; Strategy II uses PTV = GTV + 1.5 cm. Both CBCT and kV orthogonal images were taken and analyzed for setup before patient treatments. Tumor motion statistics based on skeletal registration and on fiducial registration were analyzed by fitting to Gaussian functions. All 11 patients met SBRT planning dose constraints using strategy I. Average ITV margins for the 11 patients were 2 mm RL, 6 mm AP, and 6 mm SI. Skeletal registration resulted in high probability (RL = 69%, AP = 4.6%, SI = 39%) that part of the tumor will be outside the ITV. With the 3 mm ITV expansion (Strategy 1), the probability reduced to RL 32%, AP 0.3%, SI 20% for skeletal registration; and RL 1.2%, AP 0%, SI 7% for fiducial registration. All 7 pancreatic patients and 2 liver patients failed to meet SBRT dose constraints using strategy II. The liver dose was increased by 36% for the other 2 liver patients that met the SBRT dose constraints with strategy II. Image guidance matching to skeletal anatomy is inadequate for SBRT positioning in the upper abdomen and usage of fiducials is highly recommended. Even with fiducial implantation and definition of an ITV, a minimal 3 mm planning margin around the ITV is needed to accommodate intra-fractional uncertainties.

  9. Developing Asymmetry at Mammography: Correlation with US and MR Imaging and Histopathologic Findings.

    PubMed

    Chesebro, Allyson L; Winkler, Nicole S; Birdwell, Robyn L; Giess, Catherine S

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate ultrasonographic (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings, histopathologic etiologies, and outcomes for developing asymmetry at mammography. In this institutional review board-approved, informed consent-waived, HIPAA-compliant, retrospective review of a mammography database for records from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2012, 2354 consecutive diagnostic mammograms classified as showing focal asymmetry were identified. After patients with benign results, those considered stable, and those without prior mammograms were excluded, images from 521 studies were reviewed and 202 developing lesions were identified in 201 women. Patient demographics, US and MR imaging findings, and clinical and histopathologic outcomes were obtained from the electronic medical records. Equivocal US correlates of findings with developing asymmetry detected at mammography were excluded from statistical analysis. The Fisher exact test and Student t test analysis were performed and relative risk and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined. Biopsy was performed in 73 (36%) of 201 patients with developing asymmetries, with 42 (58%) benign and 31 (42%) malignant results. Of 128 patients with nonbiopsied lesions, 110 (86%) were stable at 24 months (considered benign), 12 (9.4%) were stable at less than 24 months, and six (4.7%) were lost to follow-up. Diagnostic US was performed in 186 (93%) of 201 patients, 74 (40%) with correlates. US was performed in 30 (97%) of 31 patients with malignant developing asymmetries, 17 (57%) with correlates, and in 140 (92%) of 152 patients with benign lesions, 51 (36%) with correlates (risk ratio, 1.92; 95% CI: 1.001, 3.695; two-tailed P = .064, one-tailed P = .038). MR imaging was performed in 66 (33%) of 201 patients, 26 (39%) with correlates. MR imaging was performed in 10 (32%) of 31 patients with malignant developing asymmetries, all with correlates, and 53 (35%) of 152 patients with benign lesions, 15 (28%) with correlates (P

  10. "Ductal adenocarcinoma in anular pancreas".

    PubMed

    Benassai, Giacomo; Perrotta, Stefano; Furino, Ermenegildo; De Werra, Carlo; Aloia, Sergio; Del Giudice, Roberto; Amato, Bruno; Vigliotti, Gabriele; Limite, Gennaro; Quarto, Gennaro

    2015-09-01

    The annular pancreas is a congenital anomaly in which pancreatic tissue partially or completely surrounds the second portion of the duodenum. Its often located above of papilla of Vater (85%), rarely below (15%). This pancreatic tissue is often easily dissociable to the duodenum but there is same cases where it the tissue is into the muscolaris wall of the duodenum. We describe three case of annular pancreas hospitalized in our facility between January 2004 and January 2009. There were 2 male 65 and 69 years old respectively and 1 female of 60 years old, presented complaining of repeated episodes of mild epigastric pain. Laboratory tests (including tumor markers), a direct abdomen X-ray with enema, EGDS and total body CT scan were performed to study to better define the diagnosis. EUS showed the presence of tissue infiltrating the muscle layer all around the first part of duodenum. Biopsies performed found the presence of pancreatic tissue with focal areas of adenocarcinoma. Subtotal gastrectomy with Roux was performed. The histological examinations shows an annular pancreas of D1 with multiple focal area of adenocarcinoma. (T1aN0M0). We performed a follow up at 5 years. One patients died after 36 months for cardiovascular hit. Two patients, one male and one female, was 5-years disease-free. Annular pancreas is an uncommon congenital anomaly which usually presents itself in infants and newborn. Rarely it can present in late adult life with wide range of clinical severities thereby making its diagnosis difficult. Pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. CT scan can illustrate the pancreatic tissue encircling the duodenum. ERCP and MRCP are useful in outlining the annular pancreatic duct. Surgery still remains necessary to confirm diagnosis and bypassing the obstructed segment. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of Postmortem Autopsy via Whole-Body Imaging: Initial Observations Comparing MDCT and 3.0T MRI Findings with Autopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Dae Ho; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Jai Soung; Park, Seong Jin; Lee, Hae Kyung; Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Duek Lin; Chung, Nak Eun; Lee, Bong Woo; Seo, Joong Seok

    2010-01-01

    Objective We prospectively compared whole-body multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) images with autopsy findings. Materials and Methods Five cadavers were subjected to whole-body, 16-channel MDCT and 3.0T MR imaging within two hours before an autopsy. A radiologist classified the MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings into major and minor findings, which were compared with autopsy findings. Results Most of the imaging findings, pertaining to head and neck, heart and vascular, chest, abdomen, spine, and musculoskeletal lesions, corresponded to autopsy findings. The causes of death that were determined on the bases of MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings were consistent with the autopsy findings in four of five cases. CT was useful in diagnosing fatal hemorrhage and pneumothorax, as well as determining the shapes and characteristics of the fractures and the direction of external force. MRI was effective in evaluating and tracing the route of a metallic object, soft tissue lesions, chronicity of hemorrhage, and bone bruises. Conclusion A postmortem MDCT combined with MRI is a potentially powerful tool, providing noninvasive and objective measurements for forensic investigations. PMID:20592923

  12. Clinical and image findings in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Farias, Diogo Silva; Zen Filho, Edson Virgilio; de Oliveira, Thais Feitosa Leitão; Tinôco-Araújo, José Endrigo; Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio da Silva; Antunes, Heliton Spíndola; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva

    2013-07-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) is characterized as exposed bone in the jaws for more than 8 weeks in patients with current or previous history of therapy with bisphosphonates (BPs) and no history of radiotherapy in the head and neck. We report a case series of 7 patients with BRONJ and analyze the variations of clinical and imaging signs, correlating them with the presence or absence of bone exposure. Among the patients, 6 were women and 1 was a man, aged 42-79 years. Five of the patients were using zoledronic acid and the other 2 alendronate. The use of BPs varied from 3 to 13 years. In 5 patients, tooth extraction was the triggering event of injuries. Panoramic radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were evaluated by a radiologist blinded to the cases. There were persistent unremodeled extraction socket even several months after tooth extraction in 3 of the cases that were consistent wit CT findings that also showed areas of osteosclerosis and osteolysis. Patients were treated according to the recommendations of the AAOMS, with surgical debridement and antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin in the symptomatic patients. The follow-up of these patients ranged from 8 to 34 months, with a good response to treatment. The image findings in this case series were not specific and showed no difference between each stages of BRONJ (AAOMS, 2009). The image features were similar in presence or absence of exposed bone.

  13. Whole-body vibration: is there a causal relationship to specific imaging findings of the spine?

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Choemprayong, Songphan; O'Neill, Kevin R; Devin, Clinton J; Spengler, Dan M

    2012-10-01

    Systematic review. To perform a systematic review of the available literature for those studies that evaluated the role of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spine, using imaging modalities as well as an estimation of WBV exposure. Numerous comparative studies have reported a possible association between the occurrence of spinal symptoms and exposure to WBV. These exposures have commonly been examined in the work environment largely through self-reported questionnaires only. From a scientific perspective, the majority of studies emphasize symptoms and lack objective medical evidence, such as spinal imaging, to help establish a specific spinal disorder. Because both neck and low back pain comprise symptoms that can arise from a host of factors including age, a casual link between spinal disorders and WBV cannot be affirmed. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for studies related to WBV and spinal symptoms, diagnosis, and/or disorders. Our searches were limited to studies published prior to August 2011. The resulting 700 citations (after excluding 354 duplicates) were then screened by 3 independent reviewers on the basis of the following predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria: inclusion-clinical studies with imaging evaluation (radiographs, computed tomographic scans, and/or magnetic resonance images) and documented WBV exposure (occupation, amount of WBV, and/or duration); exclusion-reliance solely on self-reporting of symptoms (neck pain, low back pain, and/or sciatica), those articles based on a clinical diagnosis without use of imaging, and in vitro/animal/biomechanical studies. Only 7 studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Included were 5 retrospective cohort and 2 cross-sectional studies. Although mixed results and conclusions were found, the majority of studies did not identify an association between WBV exposure and an abnormal spinal imaging finding indicating damage of the spine. We should also stress that each included study has

  14. Toward a hybrid artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E A

    1989-06-01

    Management of insulinopenic diabetic individuals centers on administration of insulin by means of multiple injections, a wearable or implantable insulin-infusion pump, or a whole-organ or segmental-pancreas transplant. Preliminary trials indicate that surgical implantation of a hybrid device containing living insulin-secreting tissue may function as a combined glucose sensor and insulin-infusion pump. By means of a chamber composed of a semipermeable membrane shaped into hollow fibers or a box surrounding endocrine tissue, pilot studies have shown that isolated islets of Langerhans, fragments of insulinoma, or a fetal pancreas retains function for days to weeks, as judged by the ability to sustain euglycemic conditions in chemically induced diabetic rats. Lacking clear proof that normalizing blood glucose levels will prevent vascular complications of diabetes in humans, the case for further development of a hybrid (tissue plus fabricated components) device rests mainly on optimistic extrapolation of results attained in the chemically induced diabetic rat and dog. For the minority of diabetic patients who have insulin-dependent diabetes, the benefit afforded by a bionic device establishing internal insulin release regulated by silently sensed blood glucose level is more than enough payoff for the discomfort and surgery involved in its implantation. Further trials of a hybrid artificial pancreas in the dog appear warranted as a logical extension of preliminary studies with this species.

  15. Wearable and implantable pancreas substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Dario, Paolo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-03-01

    A lifelong-implanted and completely automated artificial or bioartificial pancreas (BAP) is the holy grail for type 1 diabetes treatment, and could be a definitive solution even for other severe pathologies, such as pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Technology has made several important steps forward in the last years, providing new hope for the realization of such devices, whose feasibility is strictly connected to advances in glucose sensor technology, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal insulin pump development, the design of closed-loop control algorithms for mechatronic pancreases, as well as cell and tissue engineering and cell encapsulation for biohybrid pancreases. Furthermore, smart integration of the mentioned components and biocompatibility issues must be addressed, bearing in mind that, for mechatronic pancreases, it is most important to consider how to recharge implanted batteries and refill implanted insulin reservoirs without requiring periodic surgical interventions. This review describes recent advancements in technologies and concepts related to artificial and bioartificial pancreases, and assesses how far we are from a lifelong-implanted and self-working pancreas substitute that can fully restore the quality of life of a diabetic (or other type of) patient.

  16. Are magnetic resonance imaging or radiographic findings correlated with clinical prognosis in spinal cord neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Neshat Halati, Fatemeh; Vajhi, Alireza; Molazem, Mohammad; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Ansari, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Dogs presented to the Small Animal Hospital of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran were included in the present study if spinal or intervertebral disc involvement was suspected. Clinical signs were recorded as well as general information of the patient such as age, breed and sex. Sixty dogs were examined radiographically and two standard orthogonal lateral and ventrodorsal projections were taken from the suspected region. Then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for all patients. Agreement between MRI and radiographic findings, comparison of sex and breed with diagnostic imaging grades, comparison between diagnostic imaging grades and mean age, recovery rate after surgery or medical treatment, effects of diagnostic imaging severity grades on surgical or medical referrals were evaluated statistically. There were no significant association between age, sex and breed and frequency of the intervertebral disk disease. Intervertebral disc involvements between L2-L3 and T13-L1 were estimated as the most frequent sites of involvements. Sensitivity and specificity of radiography were evaluated 90.0% and 46.0%, respectively, by considering the MRI as a gold standard modality. There was a significant association between severity of disease in the MRI with referral to surgery and medical treatment. The recovery rate after surgery was significantly higher than medical treatment. These results can be used as a foundation for other studies with more focuses on details of injury and larger group of patients. PMID:27872724

  17. Characteristic findings of malignant melanoma in the sinonasal cavity on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing-Gang; Fu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zhen-Chang; Xian, Jun-Fang; He, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Liu, Cheng-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Malignant sinonasal melanoma (MSM) is a rare tumor with a perplexing signal intensity due to variable histopathologic components. This study was undertaken to delineate its MR imaging features. MR imaging findings of 10 patients (6 women and 4 men, mean age 61.3 years old) with pathologically confirmed MSM were retrospectively reviewed. The location, size, signal intensity, enhancement, and internal imaging characteristics of all tumors were evaluated. Signal intensity and degree of enhancement was graded in comparison with the gray matter and adjacent muscle uptake, respectively. There were 8 tumors that were pathologically confirmed to contain melanin. Compared to gray matter of the brain, 7 of them demonstrated hyperintensity on T1WI and 6 (6/7) showed hypointensity on T2WI. There was multiple linear, dark-signal intensity on T2WI within the mass in 9 of the 10 patients' tumors. Evaluated with gadolinium-enhanced imaging, all 10 patients showed moderate enhancement within the areas that were isointense in the lesion on pregadolinium T1WI. Moreover, some parts which displayed hyperintensity on T1WI within the tumors of 7 patients showed mild enhancement that was similar to muscle on a time-intensity curve (TIC). MSM shows characteristic MR signal intensity (hyperintensity on T1WI and the linear, low-signal intensity on T2WI), which may provide valuable information for clinical diagnosis. Together with conventional MRI, TIC may be useful for indicating pleomorphic patterns of MSM.

  18. Body image of children and adolescents with cancer: a metasynthesis on qualitative research findings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yin; Mu, Pei-Fan; Tsay, Shwu-Feng; Chou, Shin-Shang; Chen, Yu-Chih; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-09-01

    Children and adolescents with cancer are confronted with many challenges. This review considered studies that used qualitative methods to examine the body image experience of children and adolescents with cancer. A systematic literature search of English and Chinese databases was undertaken, covering the period between 1960 and October 2010. Qualitative research findings were extracted and pooled using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. Eight papers met the inclusion criteria. The derived four metasyntheses included being distanced from the body, loss of self-identity, self-protective strategies and support, and getting rid of the shackles of the body. In conclusion, children and adolescents with cancer also experience various problems associated with changes in their body image. Repeated courses of treatment lead to loss of a normal, orderly life, and might even result in changes in interpersonal interactions. In response to body image change, individuals with cancer develop self-protective, coping strategies. Children and adolescents who experience life-threatening cancer come to face body image change positively, and might hold a confident attitude toward their future. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Advanced imaging findings and computer-assisted surgery of suspected synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Metzger, Marc C; Böhm, Joachim; Muecke, Thomas; Schulze, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the joint occurs mainly in teenagers and young adults. Only 3% of these neoplasms are located in the head and neck region. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint is therefore a very rare disorder. Therefore, developing a working, histological confirmation is required for differential diagnosis. In this case series, the outcome of histological investigation and imaging techniques are compared. Based on clinical symptoms, five cases of suspected synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are presented. In each of the subjects, the diagnosis was confirmed by histology. Specific imaging features for each case are described. The tomography images were compared with the histological findings. All patients demonstrated preauricular swelling, dental midline deviation, and limited mouth opening. Computer-assisted surgery was performed. Histology disclosed synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in four cases. The other case was found to be a developmental disorder of the tympanic bone. The diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint can only be based on histology. Clinical symptoms are too general and the available imaging techniques only show nonspecific tumorous destruction, infiltration, and/or residual calcified bodies, they are only for advanced cases. A rare developmental disorder of the tympanic bone--persistence of foramen of Huschke--has to be differentiated.

  20. Symptomatic and complicated nonhereditary developmental liver cysts: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Rigiroli, Francesca; Bianco, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Commonly encountered in the general population, in the vast majority of cases nonhereditary developmental liver cysts are asymptomatic, not associated with altered hepatic function and confidently diagnosed on imaging studies, and do not require further workup, follow-up, or treatment. However, particularly in women, simple hepatic cysts may reach large sizes and cause symptoms and signs resulting from mass effect, vascular compression, and biliary obstruction. Furthermore, although rarely compared to the incidence observed in patients with adult polycystic kidney and liver disease, sporadic hepatic cysts sometimes undergo life-threatening complications such as intracystic hemorrhage, infection, or rupture, which require prompt imaging triage and appropriate interventional, laparoscopic, or open surgical treatment. This pictorial essay reviews with examples the cross-sectional imaging findings of symptomatic and complicated nonhereditary liver cysts, aiming to provide radiologists with an increased familiarity with these uncommon, challenging occurrences. Emphasis is placed on the role of MRI as a useful problem-solving modality to elucidate the complex imaging appearances resulting from intracystic bleeding and superinfection, and to differentiate complicated cysts from other hemorrhagic liver lesions and biliary cystic tumors.

  1. A supervised visual model for finding regions of interest in basal cell carcinoma images

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a supervised learning method for finding diagnostic regions of interest in histopathological images. The method is based on the cognitive process of visual selection of relevant regions that arises during a pathologist's image examination. The proposed strategy emulates the interaction of the visual cortex areas V1, V2 and V4, being the V1 cortex responsible for assigning local levels of relevance to visual inputs while the V2 cortex gathers together these small regions according to some weights modulated by the V4 cortex, which stores some learned rules. This novel strategy can be considered as a complex mix of "bottom-up" and "top-down" mechanisms, integrated by calculating a unique index inside each region. The method was evaluated on a set of 338 images in which an expert pathologist had drawn the Regions of Interest. The proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art methods devised to determine Regions of Interest (RoIs) in natural images. The quality gain with respect to an adaptated Itti's model which found RoIs was 3.6 dB in average, while with respect to the Achanta's proposal was 4.9 dB. PMID:21447178

  2. Epidermoid cyst in Meckel's cave with unusual computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Case report.

    PubMed

    Arai, Atsushi; Sasayama, Takashi; Koyama, Junji; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented with headache and occasional numbness over her right face. Computed tomography revealed a hypodense mass in the middle cranial fossa and another adjacent hyperdense mass in the posterior fossa with erosion of the right petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the lesion in the middle cranial fossa as iso- to hypointense on T(1)-weighted and hyperintense on T(2)-weighted imaging, with peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration, and the adjacent lesion in the posterior fossa as hyperintense on T(1)-weighted and hypointense on T(2)-weighted imaging. During surgery, these lesions mimicking two adjacent distinct tumors were revealed to connect through Meckel's cave. The hypodense lesion in the middle cranial fossa consisted of pearly-like solid contents, and the hyperdense lesion in the posterior cranial fossa consisted of viscid dark-green materials. The tumors were gross totally resected with endoscopic assistance. Histological examination confirmed that the tumor was an epidermoid cyst. The present case cyst indicates that although the diffusion-weighted imaging sequence is useful for detection of intracranial epidermoid cysts, epidermoid cysts including viscous materials with unusual radiological findings could complicate the preoperative diagnosis.

  3. Incidentally Detected Agenesis of Dorsal Pancreas on PET/CT: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kabnurkar, Rasika; Rokade, M L; Bandekar, Kalashree; Kamat, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    Agenesis of Dorsal Pancreas (ADP) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of body and tail of pancreas. We report a case of incidentally detected ADP on Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) component of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in a treated case of carcinoma (Ca) tongue with suspected local recurrence. Dependent Intestine Sign, hallmark of ADP on CECT imaging was noted in our patient. PMID:28242982

  4. The role of volume perfusion CT in the diagnosis of pathologies of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Grözinger, G; Grözinger, A; Horger, M

    2014-12-01

    The review discusses the potential role of volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in the diagnosis and follow-up of different pathologies of the pancreas. VPCT enables a differentiation of different pancreatic tumors like adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine tumors based on functional parameters like blood flow, blood volume and permeability. Furthermore, the article discusses the potential indications for VPCT imaging of inflammatory diseases of the pancreas such as acute or chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis.

  5. Adequacy of inhale/exhale breathhold CT based ITV margins and image-guided registration for free-breathing pancreas and liver SBRT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate use of breath-hold CTs and implanted fiducials for definition of the internal target volume (ITV) margin for upper abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). To study the statistics of inter- and intra-fractional motion information. Methods and materials 11 patients treated with SBRT for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) or liver cancer were included in the study. Patients underwent fiducial implantation, free-breathing CT and breath-hold CTs at end inhalation/exhalation. All patients were planned and treated with SBRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two margin strategies were studied: Strategy I uses PTV = ITV + 3 mm; Strategy II uses PTV = GTV + 1.5 cm. Both CBCT and kV orthogonal images were taken and analyzed for setup before patient treatments. Tumor motion statistics based on skeletal registration and on fiducial registration were analyzed by fitting to Gaussian functions. Results All 11 patients met SBRT planning dose constraints using strategy I. Average ITV margins for the 11 patients were 2 mm RL, 6 mm AP, and 6 mm SI. Skeletal registration resulted in high probability (RL = 69%, AP = 4.6%, SI = 39%) that part of the tumor will be outside the ITV. With the 3 mm ITV expansion (Strategy 1), the probability reduced to RL 32%, AP 0.3%, SI 20% for skeletal registration; and RL 1.2%, AP 0%, SI 7% for fiducial registration. All 7 pancreatic patients and 2 liver patients failed to meet SBRT dose constraints using strategy II. The liver dose was increased by 36% for the other 2 liver patients that met the SBRT dose constraints with strategy II. Conclusions Image guidance matching to skeletal anatomy is inadequate for SBRT positioning in the upper abdomen and usage of fiducials is highly recommended. Even with fiducial implantation and definition of an ITV, a minimal 3 mm planning margin around the ITV is needed to accommodate intra-fractional uncertainties. PMID:24401365

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with urea-cycle defects

    PubMed Central

    Gunz, Anna Catherine; Choong, Karen; Potter, Murray; Miller, Elka

    2013-01-01

    The urea-cycle functions to facilitate ammonia excretion, a disruption of which results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites. The neurological outcome of neonatal-onset urea-cycle defects (UCDs) is poor, and there are no good predictors of prognosis beyond ammonia levels at presentation. The role of neuroimaging in the prognosis of neonatal-onset UCDs is unclear. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of two patients with neonatal-onset UCDs (argininosuccinic aciduria and citrullinemia) at presentation and at 2-year follow-up, and present a review of the literature on neuroimaging in this age-group. We observed two potentially significant distinct patterns of cerebral involvement on MRI: (1) a central and focal pattern of involvement limited to the basal ganglia, perirolandic regions, and internal capsule; and (2) diffuse involvement of the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, basal ganglia, and variably thalami and brain stem. Patients with more diffuse findings tended to have higher serum glutamine peaks and worse neurological outcomes, while those with central involvement, aggressive acute management, and early liver transplantation tended to have better outcomes. We propose that MRI imaging of the brain may have prognostic value following presentation with neonatal UCDs, particularly in identifying patients at risk for poor outcome. The role and timing of follow-up neuroimaging is currently unclear. Further collaborative studies are necessary to evaluate whether patterns of MRI findings vary with specific UCD subtypes, and are predictive of clinical outcomes in neonatal UCDs. PMID:23983495

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates with urea-cycle defects.

    PubMed

    Gunz, Anna Catherine; Choong, Karen; Potter, Murray; Miller, Elka

    2013-01-01

    The urea-cycle functions to facilitate ammonia excretion, a disruption of which results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites. The neurological outcome of neonatal-onset urea-cycle defects (UCDs) is poor, and there are no good predictors of prognosis beyond ammonia levels at presentation. The role of neuroimaging in the prognosis of neonatal-onset UCDs is unclear. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of two patients with neonatal-onset UCDs (argininosuccinic aciduria and citrullinemia) at presentation and at 2-year follow-up, and present a review of the literature on neuroimaging in this age-group. We observed two potentially significant distinct patterns of cerebral involvement on MRI: (1) a central and focal pattern of involvement limited to the basal ganglia, perirolandic regions, and internal capsule; and (2) diffuse involvement of the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, basal ganglia, and variably thalami and brain stem. Patients with more diffuse findings tended to have higher serum glutamine peaks and worse neurological outcomes, while those with central involvement, aggressive acute management, and early liver transplantation tended to have better outcomes. We propose that MRI imaging of the brain may have prognostic value following presentation with neonatal UCDs, particularly in identifying patients at risk for poor outcome. The role and timing of follow-up neuroimaging is currently unclear. Further collaborative studies are necessary to evaluate whether patterns of MRI findings vary with specific UCD subtypes, and are predictive of clinical outcomes in neonatal UCDs.

  8. MR Imaging Findings in Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer According to BIRADS System.

    PubMed

    Navarro Vilar, Lidia; Alandete Germán, Salvador Pascual; Medina García, Rosana; Blanc García, Esther; Camarasa Lillo, Natalia; Vilar Samper, José

    2017-01-09

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, according to Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to relate them with molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The MRI findings were reviewed retrospectively in 201 women diagnosed of invasive breast cancer confirmed by surgery and were compared with the molecular subtypes. Following the BI-RADS, MRI findings included disease type, size, enhancement, morphology and contrast kinetics. In mass-like lesion types were studied shape, margin and enhancement, and in nonmass-like lesion types, distribution modifiers and internal enhancement. Chi-squared analysis showed significant association (p < 0.01) between molecular subtypes and lesion type on MRI and histologic grade. Shape, margin and mass enhancement (p < 0.05) also showed significant association among molecular subtypes. Triple negative were more frequently unifocal and mass-like lesion, high histologic grade, round shape, smooth margin, and rim enhancement. Luminal-A were more frequently low grade, mass-like lesion, irregular shape and spiculated or irregular margin. Luminal-B were more frequently moderate-low grade, mass-like lesion, nonirregular shape and spiculated margin. HER-2-enriched were more frequently moderate grade, nonmass-like lesion and multicentric lesions were more present than in other subtypes. There are significantly different MRI features, according to BI-RADS, between the molecular subtypes breast cancer.

  9. A study of computer-aided diagnosis for pulmonary nodule: comparison between classification accuracies using calculated image features and imaging findings annotated by radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Masami; Chen, Bin; Furukawa, Daisuke; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Koji; Kubo, Takeshi; Yakami, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Koji; Sakamoto, Ryo; Emoto, Yutaka; Aoyama, Gakuto; Iizuka, Yoshio; Nakagomi, Keita; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-05-01

    In our previous study, we developed a computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system using imaging findings annotated by radiologists. The system, however, requires radiologists to input many imaging findings. In order to reduce such an interaction of radiologists, we further developed a CADx system using derived imaging findings based on calculated image features, in which the system only requires few user operations. The purpose of this study is to check whether calculated image features (CFT) or derived imaging findings (DFD) can represent information in imaging findings annotated by radiologists (AFD). We calculate 2282 image features and derive 39 imaging findings by using information on a nodule position and its type (solid or ground-glass). These image features are categorized into shape features, texture features and imaging findings-specific features. Each imaging finding is derived based on each corresponding classifier using random forest. To check whether CFT or DFD can represent information in AFD, under an assumption that the accuracies of classifiers are the same if information included in input is the same, we constructed classifiers by using various types of information (CTT, DFD and AFD) and compared accuracies on an inferred diagnosis of a nodule. We employ SVM with RBF kernel as classifier to infer a diagnosis name. Accuracies of classifiers using DFD, CFT, AFD and CFT [Formula: see text] AFD were 0.613, 0.577, 0.773 and 0.790, respectively. Concordance rates between DFD and AFD of shape findings, texture findings and surrounding findings were 0.644, 0.871 and 0.768, respectively. The results suggest that CFT and AFD are similar information and CFT represent only a portion of AFD. Particularly, CFT did not contain shape information in AFD. In order to decrease an interaction of radiologists, a development of a method which overcomes these problems is necessary.

  10. Isolated breast vasculitis manifested as breast edema with suggestive sonographic findings: a case report with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Joo, Mee

    2017-04-01

    Early diagnosis of breast vasculitis (BV) is difficult because this condition is rare and occasionally mimics breast cancer clinically or radiologically. It may present as systemic disease or as an isolated lesion in the breast, without systemic evidence. When vasculitis appears in the breast, it also might manifest as a tumor-like lesion, and in previous cases, tissue acquisition was needed for confirmation of the diagnosis because of BV's resemblance to inflammatory breast cancer. We report a case of isolated BV that was suspected of being inflammatory breast cancer clinically, but manifested as bilateral breast edema on mammography. In this case, sonographic findings included not only nonspecific edema findings that might be seen in other cases, but also suggestive findings of hypoechoic circumferential arterial wall thickening with perivascular fat infiltrations that are similar to the halo sign in large arteries but have not been reported in the breast. These are helpful for presumptive diagnosis of BV using ultrasound.

  11. Sturge-Weber Syndrome: Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropathology Findings.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Anna L; Chen, Liam; Friedman, Rachel; Grant, Patricia E; Poduri, Annapurna; Takeoka, Masanori; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Sahin, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    We describe the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and neuropathologic findings of patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome and medically refractory epilepsy. We reviewed the clinical features, preoperative MRI studies, and pathologic findings of all patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome who underwent excisional surgery for intractable epilepsy at Boston Children's Hospital between 1993 and 2011. Eleven patients (male/female = 4/7) with Sturge-Weber syndrome were identified who underwent surgery for intractable epilepsy (mean age 13 ± 6.2 months), including hemispherectomy (n = 10) and focal cortical resection (n = 1). Mean age at seizure onset was 15 ± 11 weeks. Fifty-five percent (n = 6) of patients exhibited two different types of seizures, and 18% (n = 2) had three types of seizures. Focal clonic seizures were the most common type, occurring in nine patients; apnea was the second most common, occurring in four patients. Brain MRIs were reviewed in five patients. Histopathologic examination revealed varied degrees of cortical morphologic anomaly in seven of 11 patients. Overall, there were no abnormalities in the MRIs that corresponded directly with the pathologic findings except in one patient with polymicrogyria. In spite of pathologic findings of cortical anomalies in varied degrees, these findings could not be readily detected on brain MRIs. The failure to detect focal cortical dysplasia on MRIs may be attributable to the subtle microscopic nature of the abnormalities; in some of the older individuals, the imaging studies available for review were done during an advanced stage of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Grading of degenerative disk disease and functional impairment: imaging versus patho-anatomical findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Degenerative instability affecting the functional spinal unit is discussed as a cause of symptoms. The value of imaging signs for assessing the resulting functional impairment is still unclear. To determine the relationship between slight degrees of degeneration and function, we performed a biomechanical study with 18 multisegmental (L2-S2) human lumbar cadaveric specimens. The multidirectional spinal deformation was measured during the continuous application of pure moments of flexion/extension, bilateral bending and rotation in a spine tester. The three flexibility parameters neutral zone, range of motion and neutral zone ratio were evaluated. Different grading systems were used: (1) antero-posterior and lateral radiographs (degenerative disk disease) (2) oblique radiographs (facet joint degeneration) (3) macroscopic and (4) microscopic evaluation. The most reliable correlation was between the grading of microscopic findings and the flexibility parameters; the imaging evaluation was not as informative. PMID:18839226

  13. Intra-thoracic rheumatoid arthritis: Imaging spectrum of typical findings and treatment related complications

    PubMed Central

    Chansakul, Thanissara; Dellaripa, Paul F.; Doyle, Tracy J.; Madan, Rachna

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiac thoracic manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cause significant morbidity and mortality among RA patients. Essentially all anatomic compartments in the chest can be affected including the pleura, pulmonary parenchyma, airway, and vasculature. In addition, treatment-related complications and opportunistic infections are not uncommon. Accurate diagnosis of intra-thoracic disease in an RA patient can be difficult as the radiologic findings may be nonspecific and many of these conditions may coexist. This review article serves to highlight the multitude of RA-related intra-thoracic pathological processes, emphasize differential diagnosis, diagnostic conundrums and discuss how tailoring of CT imaging and image-guided biopsy plays a key role in the management of RA-related pulmonary disease. PMID:26210094

  14. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  15. Postpartum bilateral transient osteoporosis of the hip: MR imaging findings in three cases.

    PubMed

    Xyda, A; Mountanos, I; Natsika, M; Karantanas, A H

    2008-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), associated with pregnancy, is a self-limiting skeletal disorder affecting women, usually in the third trimester, which resolves spontaneously within few months postpartum. Bilateral involvement is rare. Involvement postpartum has not been described. We report three patients with postpartum presentation of bilateral TOH. Three pregnant women who presented with acute bilateral hip pain just after delivering their first child are reported. None of them had any past history of joint problems, recent injury, alcohol abuse or corticosteroid administration. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed on 1.5-Tesla magnets using standard protocols. Bone marrow oedema, with normal joint space and intact articular surfaces, was depicted in all six hips. MR imaging findings with clinical correlation confirmed the diagnosis of TOH. TOH associated with pregnancy does not necessarily occur in the third trimester of pregnancy and may be bilateral.

  16. Body image in transgender young people: Findings from a qualitative, community based study.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jenifer K; Doty, Jennifer L; Catalpa, Jory M; Ola, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the ways in which transgender youth experience their bodies with regard to gender and body size. Ninety transgender youth and young adults completed in-depth interviews in eight metropolitan areas of the United States, Canada, and Ireland. Using a queer perspective, qualitative analyses revealed two broad conceptual categories: body dissatisfaction and body satisfaction. Within these categories, participants focused on body issues related to gender characteristics and body size. Findings revealed evidence of self-criticism and social distress related to body image dissatisfaction and self-acceptance and social acceptance related to body image satisfaction. Data demonstrated how gender, body size, and the intersection of gender and body size influenced personal perceptions of body dissatisfaction and satisfaction. Developmental processes were evident: participants further along in consolidating a gender identity described gaining a sense of social awareness, self-acceptance, and body satisfaction reflecting a sense of resilience.

  17. Atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ at core needle biopsy of the breast: An incidental finding or are there characteristic imaging findings?

    PubMed

    Amos, Barry; Chetlen, Alison; Williams, Nicole

    2016-01-25

    Atypical lobular hyperplasia and classic-type lobular carcinoma in situ, collectively known as lobular neoplasia, are classically described as incidental findings found on breast core-needle biopsy without distinguishing imaging characteristics. The purpose of this study was to investigate concordant imaging findings of lobular neoplasia identified at core-needle biopsy after careful radiologic-pathologic correlation. The pathology database was searched from October 1, 2006 to October 1, 2013 for breast biopsies yielding lobular neoplasia not associated with a coexistent malignancy or other high risk lesion in the biopsy specimen. Of the 482 biopsies performed containing lobular neoplasia, 65 cases had lobular neoplasia as the highest risk lesion at core-needle biopsy. Of the 65 total cases in which lobular neoplasia was the highest risk lesion, 18 (28%) cases had concordant imaging correlates. 13 of 18 (72%) cases presented as calcifications on mammography and 5 of 18 (28%) presented on magnetic resonance imaging as a focus (n = 2) or non-mass enhancement (n = 3). With careful radiologic-pathologic correlation, mammographically detected calcifications and foci or non-mass enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging can be considered concordant imaging findings of lobular neoplasia after breast core-needle biopsy.

  18. Imaging patterns of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: an illustrated discussion of the International Consensus Guidelines for the Management of IPMN.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Naomi M; Katz, Seth S; Escalon, Joanna G; Do, Richard K

    2015-03-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are being diagnosed with increasing frequency, necessitating an algorithm to help stratify patients into low- and high-risk groups, for follow-up versus more invasive evaluation. New evidence concerning their natural history and overall risk of malignancy has emerged since the 2006 International Association of Pancreatology consensus guidelines, prompting an update in 2012, that distinguishes radiologic 'worrisome features' from 'high-risk stigmata'. The aim of this article is to illustrate, with case examples, the variable imaging patterns of IPMN and how their radiologic features, such as cyst size and mural nodules, are interpreted in the context of the new 2012 guidelines. The 2012 and 2006 guidelines will be compared and discussed with reference to additional studies that have since been published. Despite these guidelines, lingering uncertainty remains about the natural history of IPMN, a source of unease to both radiologists and referring clinicians alike, mandating further refinement of clinical and radiologic parameters predictive of malignancy. Emerging data regarding the risk of extrapancreatic malignancy, as well as synchronous or metachronous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remote in location from a branch duct IPMN are also reviewed. With the expanding research and evolving understanding of this clinicopathologic entity across the globe, radiologists will continue to play an important role in the management of patients with IPMN.

  19. A prospective microstructure imaging study in mixed-martial artists using geometric measures and diffusion tensor imaging: methods and findings.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Ling, Josef M; Dodd, Andrew B; Meier, Timothy B; Hanlon, Faith M; Klimaj, Stefan D

    2016-04-12

    Although diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has been widely used to characterize the effects of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI), to date no studies have investigated how novel geometric models of microstructure relate to more typical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. Moreover, few studies have evaluated the sensitivity of different registration pipelines (non-linear, linear and tract-based spatial statistics) for detecting dMRI abnormalities in clinical populations. Results from single-subject analyses in healthy controls (HC) indicated a strong negative relationship between fractional anisotropy (FA) and orientation dispersion index (ODI) in both white and gray matter. Equally important, only moderate relationships existed between all other estimates of free/intracellular water volume fractions and more traditional DTI metrics (FA, mean, axial and radial diffusivity). These findings suggest that geometric measures provide differential information about the cellular microstructure relative to traditional DTI measures. Results also suggest greater sensitivity for non-linear registration pipelines that maximize the anatomical information available in T1-weighted images. Clinically, rmTBI resulted in a pattern of decreased FA and increased ODI, largely overlapping in space, in conjunction with increased intracellular and free water fractions, highlighting the potential role of edema following repeated head trauma. In summary, current results suggest that geometric models of diffusion can provide relatively unique information regarding potential mechanisms of pathology that contribute to long-term neurological damage.

  20. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of nasal cavity hemangiomas according to histological type.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Sun-Won; Kim, Soo Chin; Lim, Myung Kwan; Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young

    2015-01-01

    To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision.

  1. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Nasal Cavity Hemangiomas According to Histological Type

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Soo Chin; Lim, Myung Kwan; Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). Materials and Methods CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. Results The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. Conclusion CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision. PMID:25995686

  2. Hoffmann sign: clinical correlation of neurological imaging findings in the cervical spine and brain.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Ray A; Hsu, Frank P K; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Tsao, Bryan E; Williams, Paul; Akpolat, Yusuf T; Cheng, Wayne K

    2015-04-01

    Retrospective validity study. To investigate the relationship between Hoffmann sign and radiographical evidence of cervical spinal cord compression and brain lesions. Clinical significance of Hoffmann sign remains controversial with conflicting reports regarding its sensitivity and specificity and its usefulness. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of Hoffmann sign on physical examination. Imaging studies were blindly examined by 2 observers for possible cervical and brain lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, as well as accuracy for Hoffmann sign as it relates to cervical spinal cord compression and brain pathology, were calculated. Of the 91 patients with a positive Hoffmann sign, 32 (35%) showed severe cervical cord compression and/or myelomalacia. Forty-seven of these patients had brain imaging studies, and 5 (10%) had positive findings. There were 80 patients in the negative Hoffmann sign or control group. Twenty-one (27%) of them had severe cervical cord compression and/or myelomalacia. Twenty-three of these control patients underwent neurological imaging of the brain, and 2 (8%) had positive findings. Hoffmann sign was found to have 59% sensitivity, 49% specificity, 35% positive predictive value, and 72% negative predictive value for cervical cord compression. For brain pathology, sensitivity was 71%, specificity 33%, positive predictive value 10%, and negative predictive value 95%. Hoffmann sign has too low a positive predictive value to be relied upon as a stand-alone physical examination finding and is not a reliable screening tool for solely predicting the presence of cervical spinal cord compression or brain pathology. 2.

  3. Multi-atlas pancreas segmentation: Atlas selection based on vessel structure.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Ken'ichi; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Chu, Chengwen; Zheng, Guoyan; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-03-31

    Automated organ segmentation from medical images is an indispensable component for clinical applications such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) and computer-assisted surgery (CAS). We utilize a multi-atlas segmentation scheme, which has recently been used in different approaches in the literature to achieve more accurate and robust segmentation of anatomical structures in computed tomography (CT) volume data. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas has large inter-patient variability in its position, size and shape. Moreover, the CT intensity of the pancreas closely resembles adjacent tissues, rendering its segmentation a challenging task. Due to this, conventional intensity-based atlas selection for pancreas segmentation often fails to select atlases that are similar in pancreas position and shape to those of the unlabeled target volume. In this paper, we propose a new atlas selection strategy based on vessel structure around the pancreatic tissue and demonstrate its application to a multi-atlas pancreas segmentation. Our method utilizes vessel structure around the pancreas to select atlases with high pancreatic resemblance to the unlabeled volume. Also, we investigate two types of applications of the vessel structure information to the atlas selection. Our segmentations were evaluated on 150 abdominal contrast-enhanced CT volumes. The experimental results showed that our approach can segment the pancreas with an average Jaccard index of 66.3% and an average Dice overlap coefficient of 78.5%.

  4. Chronological Evolution of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Children With Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Coppola, Marianna S; Shah, Namrata; Choudhri, Asim F; Morgan, Robin; Wheless, James W

    2016-02-01

    To describe and analyze the chronological evolution of the radiological findings in seven children with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome. This is a retrospective study describing the radiological findings and evolution in seven children with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome who presented from 2009 to 2013. The children all fit the defined clinical criteria for febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome; all had a history of normal psychomotor development who presented with acute-onset catastrophic partial status epilepticus associated with a febrile illness or unspecific infectious process. The children were identified from the author's weekly review of the pediatric inpatient service, and then the data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Six males and one female ranging from 3 months to 9 years of age presented with status epilepticus preceded by a febrile illness. Extensive investigations for infectious, autoimmune, and metabolic etiologies were unremarkable. Multiple antiepileptic medications were attempted, including drug-induced coma in all of them, with poor response. Immunotherapy with intravenous steroids or intravenous immunoglobulin (three patients had both) was tried in six of seven patients with a poor response. Ketogenic diet was initiated in four of seven patients with limited response. Serial magnetic resonance imaging studies, done from the initial presentation through 18 months of follow-up, showed evolution from normal imaging to severe cerebral atrophy. Progressive cytotoxic edema involving mostly bilateral hippocampi and temporal lobes was appreciated in one to three weeks. At one month from seizure onset, mild to moderate cerebral atrophy and hippocampal sclerosis was appreciated that continued to progress over the next year. After six to twelve months, most of the patients showed moderate to severe cerebral atrophy and by one year, cerebellar atrophy was also appreciated. Febrile infection-related epilepsy

  5. Cardiac Amyloidosis: Typical Imaging Findings and Diffuse Myocardial Damage Demonstrated by Delayed Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Tanaka, Kyouei; Toda, Genji

    2006-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare systemic disease. However, involvement of the heart is a common finding and is the most frequent cause of death in amyloidosis. We report the sonographic, scintigraphic, and MRI features of a pathologically proven case of cardiac amyloidosis. Delayed contrast-enhanced MR images, using an inversion recovery prepped gradient-echo sequence, revealed diffuse enhancement in the wall of both left and right ventricles. This enhancement suggested expansion of the extracellular space of the myocardium caused by diffuse myocardial necrosis secondary to deposition of amyloid.

  6. Fibromatosis in a young Bernese Mountain Dog: clinical, imaging, and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Welle, Monika M; Sutter, Esther; Malik, Yasminda; Konar, Martin; Rüfenacht, Silvia; Howard, Judith E K

    2009-11-01

    A young, intact, male Bernese Mountain Dog was presented to the animal hospital for lameness and diffuse thickening of the soft tissue in the right hind limb. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple, multilobular, space-occupying lesions within and between the muscles of the right femur. Biopsies taken from the lesions revealed an infiltrative mass composed mainly of collagen fibers and a low density of benign-appearing fibroblasts. These findings were compatible with a diagnosis of a fibromatosis. Taking the age of onset into account, infantile fibromatosis was most likely. A deep fibromatosis, similar to that seen in adults, could not be excluded based on histology.

  7. Case report. Peripancreatic intranodal haemangioma mimicking pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, A D; Arellano, R; Baker, G

    2011-12-01

    Haemangiomas are common benign tumours that are generally detected within the skin, mucosal surfaces and soft tissues. However, intranodal haemangiomas are extremely rare and are among the benign primary vascular abnormalities of the lymph nodes that include lymphangioma, haemangioendothelioma, angiomyomatous hamartoma and haemangiomas. In this case report, we present the imaging and pathological findings of an intranodal haemangioma in the pancreatic head simulating a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intranodal haemangioma in this location.

  8. Multifocal Eosinophilic Granuloma of Jaws and Skull with Classical and Unusual Radiographic/Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Suman; Shaik, Sameulla; Kodadala, Amrutha; Kakarla, Prashanti

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma is basically a disorder of reticuloendothelial system and is one of the variants of langerhans cell histiocytosis. Multifocal eosinophilic granuloma affecting jaws and skull is relatively a rare disorder. We hereby report a case of multifocal eosinophilic granuloma involving mandible, maxilla and several skull bones. The present case has mixture of classical floating teeth appearance and an unusual radiographic/imaging finding of periosteal remodeling, which is rarely seen in adult patients of eosinophilic granuloma and pseudo-multilocular appearance in anterior mandibular region in coronal sections and moth-eaten appearance of skull was appreciated in axial slices of Computed Tomography (CT). PMID:28274065

  9. Automated Critical Test Findings Identification and Online Notification System Using Artificial Intelligence in Imaging.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Erdal, Barbaros S; Ryu, John L; Little, Kevin J; Demirer, Mutlu; Qian, Songyue; White, Richard D

    2017-07-03

    Purpose To evaluate the performance of an artificial intelligence (AI) tool using a deep learning algorithm for detecting hemorrhage, mass effect, or hydrocephalus (HMH) at non-contrast material-enhanced head computed tomographic (CT) examinations and to determine algorithm performance for detection of suspected acute infarct (SAI). Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was completed after institutional review board approval. A training and validation dataset of noncontrast-enhanced head CT examinations that comprised 100 examinations of HMH, 22 of SAI, and 124 of noncritical findings was obtained resulting in 2583 representative images. Examinations were processed by using a convolutional neural network (deep learning) using two different window and level configurations (brain window and stroke window). AI algorithm performance was tested on a separate dataset containing 50 examinations with HMH findings, 15 with SAI findings, and 35 with noncritical findings. Results Final algorithm performance for HMH showed 90% (45 of 50) sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78%, 97%) and 85% (68 of 80) specificity (95% CI: 76%, 92%), with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.91 with the brain window. For SAI, the best performance was achieved with the stroke window showing 62% (13 of 21) sensitivity (95% CI: 38%, 82%) and 96% (27 of 28) specificity (95% CI: 82%, 100%), with AUC of 0.81. Conclusion AI using deep learning demonstrates promise for detecting critical findings at noncontrast-enhanced head CT. A dedicated algorithm was required to detect SAI. Detection of SAI showed lower sensitivity in comparison to detection of HMH, but showed reasonable performance. Findings support further investigation of the algorithm in a controlled and prospective clinical setting to determine whether it can independently screen noncontrast-enhanced head CT examinations and notify the interpreting radiologist of critical findings

  10. Prevalence of positive diffusion-weighted imaging findings and ischemic stroke recurrence in transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasufumi; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Okazaki, Shuhei; Mochizuki, Hideki; Kitagawa, Kazuo

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between transient ischemic attack (TIA) clinical etiology, positive diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, and stroke recurrence is controversial. This study aimed to clarify the prevalence of positive DWI findings and TIA recurrence in relation to TIA patient characteristics. The subjects were patients admitted to our stroke unit within 7 days after symptom onset between January 2006 and July 2013. We examined DWI findings and TIA recurrence according to etiologic subtypes. We enrolled 139 patients with lacunar TIA (n = 17), atherothrombotic TIA (n = 35), cardioembolic TIA (n = 25), TIA due to other causes (n = 32), or TIA with undetermined etiology (n = 30). The prevalence of positive DWI findings was highest among the cardioembolic TIA patients (56.0%). No association was found between the prevalence of positive DWI findings and symptom duration, motor presence, or ABCD(2) score. Plasma d-dimer level was significantly higher in the DWI-positive group than that in the DWI-negative group (P = .01). The prevalence of TIA recurrence was highest (5 of 35, 14.3%) among the atherothrombotic TIA patients, regardless of positive DWI findings. None of the patients treated with the anticoagulant and antiplatelet combination therapy experienced a recurrence. In contrast, almost all patients with cardioembolic TIA received anticoagulant treatment and none experienced recurrence. The prevalence of positive DWI findings was high among the cardiogenic TIA patients. TIA recurrence was often observed among the atherothrombotic TIA patients treated with antiplatelets. Management of patients with atherothrombotic TIA requires further aggressive antithrombotic strategy. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Features and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 7 Dogs with Central Nervous System Aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A R; Young, B D; Levine, G J; Eden, K; Corapi, W; Rossmeisl, J H; Levine, J M

    2015-01-01

    Systemic aspergillosis is a manifestation of Aspergillus sp. infection that can result in central nervous system (CNS) involvement with marked alterations in CNS function. Information regarding the clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in cases of aspergillosis with CNS involvement is lacking, resulting in a need for better understanding of this disease. The primary objectives were to describe the clinical features and MRI findings in dogs with CNS aspergillosis. The secondary objectives were to describe clinicopathologic findings and case outcome. Seven dogs with CNS aspergillosis. Archived records from 6 institutions were reviewed to identify cases with MRI of CNS aspergillosis confirmed with serum galactomannan enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing, culture, or supported by histopathology. Signalment, clinical, MRI, clinicopathologic, histopathologic, and microbiologic findings were recorded and evaluated. Aspergillosis of the CNS was identified in 7 dogs from 3 institutions. The median age was 3 years and six were German Shepherd dogs. Five dogs had signs of vestibular dysfunction as a component of multifocal neurological abnormalities. The MRI findings ranged from normal to abnormal, including hemorrhagic infarction and mass lesions. Until now, all reported MRI findings in dogs with CNS aspergillosis have been abnormal. We document that CNS aspergillosis in dogs, particularly German Shepherd dogs, can be suspected based on neurologic signs, whether MRI findings are normal or abnormal. Confirmatory testing with galactomannan EIA, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or tissue culture should be performed in cases where aspergillosis is a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Diffusion weighted MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings of central neurocytoma with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum; Mama, Nadia; Arifa, Nadia; Kadri, Khaled; Hasni, Ibtissem; Krifa, Hedi; Mokni, Moncef

    2014-10-01

    Three cases of histopathologically confirmed central neurocytoma (CN) are presented, emphasizing diagnostic imaging issues: conventional magnetic resonance imaging with Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of CN. Patients age ranged from 17 to 32 years, Imaging include a CT scan and MR examination with DWI and proton MRS on a 1.5-T system. DWI and subsequent apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were obtained in all. Single voxel MRS was performed prior to surgery using a point resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) with short 35 ms and long echotime (TE) 144 ms, associated with a two-dimensional chemical Shift Imaging (2D-CSI) with 144 ms TE (one case). Histopathological examination included immunostaining with synaptophysin. With the long TE, a variable amount of glycine with markedly increased choline, very small to almost complete loss of N-acetylaspartate and creatine, and inverted triplet of alanine-lactate were observed in all three patients. Increased glutamate and glutamine complex (Glx) was also observed in all with short TE. DWI demonstrated variable low ADC which appeared well correlated with the tumor signal intensity and cell density: the most homogeneous and highly dense cellular tumor with increased nucleus to cytoplasm ratio demonstrated the lower ADC. Histological pattern was typical in two cases and demonstrated an oligodendroglioma-like pattern in one case. Positivity for synaptophysin confirmed the neuronal origin in all. The demonstration within an intraventricular tumor of both glycine and alanine on MRS along with high choline, bulky Glx and restricted diffusion appear diagnostic of CN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Robert R; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Odorico, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

  14. Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in an Italian wolf (Canis lupus italicus) with discospondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zeira, Offer; Briola, Chiara; Konar, Martin; Plonek, Marta; Papa, Valentina

    2013-12-01

    An adult male Italian wolf (Canis lupus italicus) was presented with an abnormal gait. Neurologic examination showed thoracic kyphosis, paraparesis, decreased proprioception in the pelvic limbs, and normal spinal reflexes. Neurologic symptoms suggested a thoracolumbar spinal cord lesion. Pathologic findings included leukocytosis. Spinal radiographs revealed ventral spondylosis of T4/T5/T6, a poorly defined intervertebral disc space, and mild lysis of the vertebral margins. Multiple metallic foreign bodies were seen in the thoracic wall. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine detected increased signal intensity on fluid sensitive sequences of the vertebral bodies, the intervertebral disc, and surrounding soft tissues. These findings were interpreted as active discospondylitis at T4/T5. Medical therapy included antibiotic and analgesic treatment as well as movement restriction. Follow-up at 4 wk showed significant clinical and radiologic improvement. Discospondylitis should be included in the differential diagnosis in wolves with paresis.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Haeryoung

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients. PMID:25598674

  16. MR imaging related to p.m. findings in angiodysgenetic myelomalacia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Terwey, B; Besinger, U; Schuck, M; Vahldiek, G; Kuhn, F; Kuhn, M; Steen, H J

    1993-01-01

    In a 65-year-old patient with slowly progressive myelopathy of the lower spinal cord MRI revealed slight thickening of the conus medullaris and discrete serpiginous areas of low signal intensity in contact to the surface of the myelon. The T2-weighted axial images demonstrated a zone of high signal intensity within the center of the lumbosacral cord. These findings corresponded to the results of autopsy: cord enlargement, dilatation of wall thickened and partially thrombosed pial veins, edema, damage of the myelin sheath with development of foam cells, areas of hemorrhage and necrosis. Although myelography and spinal digital subtraction angiography had been normal in this case we assume that perhaps a spinal dural av-fistula may have been the cause of MR- and pathological findings which indicate an angiodysgenetic myelomalacia (Morbus Foix-Alajouanine). The pathogenesis of spinal dural av-fistulas is discussed in order to explain why angiography has been negative.

  17. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in young patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni without overt symptoms.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Adonis; Borba-Filho, Paulo; Brandt, Carlos T; Oliveira, Keyla

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in young patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni without overt neurologic manifestations. This study included 34 young persons (age range = 9-25 years) with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni who had been previously treated. Patients were scanned on a 1.5-T system that included multiplanar pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences, and reports were completed by two radiologists after a consensus review. Twenty (58.8%) patients had MRI signal changes that were believed to be related to schistosomiasis mansoni. Twelve of the 20 patients had small focal hyperintensities on T2WI in the cerebral white matter, and eight patients had symmetric hyperintense basal ganglia on T1WI. There was a high frequency of brain MRI signal abnormalities in this series. Although not specific, these findings may be related to schistosomiasis.

  18. Computed tomography of cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Moss, A.A.; Ohtomo, K.

    1982-11-01

    Ten cases of cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas were examined by computed tomography (CT). All but one showed characteristic findings consisting of both cystic and solid components. Innumerable small cysts producing a honeycomb appearance were noticed in serous cystadenomas. A well-defined multilocular cystic mass containing thin, straight, and/or curvilinear septa or a unilocular cystic tumor with a papillary projection and locally thickened wall was present in mucinous cystadenomas. The CT findings in cystadenocarcinomas varied depending on the relative size of the cystic and solid portions and the grade of malignancy. CT was useful in detecting and diagnosing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and differentiating benign serous cystadenomas from potentially malignant cystadenomas in typical cases. However, aspiration biopsy is recommended when findings are equivocal.

  19. Telocytes in pancreas of the Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhong, Shengwei; Ge, Tingting; Peng, Shasha; Guo, Xiaoquan; Zhou, Zuohong

    2016-11-01

    Telocytes (TCs), novel interstitial cells, have been identified in various organs of many mammals. However, information about TCs of lower animals remains rare. Herein, pancreatic TCs of the Chinese giant salamanders (Andrias davidianus) were identified by CD34 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The IHC micrographs revealed CD34(+) TCs with long telopodes (Tps) that were located in the interstitium of the pancreas. CD34(+) TCs/Tps were frequently observed between exocrine acinar cells and were close to blood vessels. The TEM micrographs also showed the existence of TCs in the interstitium of the pancreas. TCs had distinctive ultrastructural features, such as one to three very long and thin Tps with podoms and podomers, caveolae, dichotomous branching, neighbouring exosomes and vesicles. The Tps and exosomes were found in close proximity to exocrine acinar cells and α cells. It is suggested that TCs may play a role in the regeneration of acinar cells and α cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated the presence of TCs in the pancreas of the Chinese giant salamander. This finding will assist us in a better understanding of TCs functions in the amphibian pancreas. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  20. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  2. Imaging Findings in Elder Abuse: A Role for Radiologists in Detection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Natalie Z; Rosen, Tony; Sanchez, Allen M; Bloemen, Elizabeth M; Mennitt, Kevin W; Hentel, Keith; Nicola, Refky; Murphy, Kieran J; LoFaso, Veronica M; Flomenbaum, Neal E; Lachs, Mark S

    2017-02-01

    Emergency department assessment represents a critical but often missed opportunity to identify elder abuse, which is common and has serious consequences. Among emergency care providers, diagnostic radiologists are optimally positioned to raise suspicion for mistreatment when reviewing imaging of geriatric injury victims. However, little literature exists describing relevant injury patterns, and most radiologists currently receive neither formal nor informal training in elder abuse identification. We present 2 cases to begin characterisation of the radiographic findings in elder abuse. Findings from these cases demonstrate similarities to suspicious findings in child abuse including high-energy fractures that are inconsistent with reported mechanisms and the coexistence of acute and chronic injuries. Specific injuries uncommon to accidental injury are also noted, including a distal ulnar diaphyseal fracture. We hope to raise awareness of elder abuse among diagnostic radiologists to encourage future large-scale research, increased focus on chronic osseous findings, and the addition of elder abuse to differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Body Image and Sexuality in Women Survivors of Breast Cancer in India: Qualitative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Barthakur, Michelle S; Sharma, Mahendra P; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Manjunath, Suraj K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: With increasing rates of breast cancer survivors, psychosocial issues surrounding cancer survivorship have been gaining prominence. The following article reports on body image and sexuality-related issues in aftermath of the diagnosis and its treatment in the Indian context. Materials and Methods: Research design was mixed method, cross–sectional, and exploratory in nature. Quantitative sample consisted of fifty survivors while the qualitative sample size included 15 out of the 50 total breast cancer survivors who were recruited from hospitals, nongovernmental organization, and through word-of-mouth. Data was collected using quantitative measures, and in-depth interviews were done using semi-structured interview schedule that was developed for the study. Qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive phenomenological approach. Results: In body image, emerging themes were about identity (womanhood, motherhood, and attractiveness), impact of surgery, hair loss, clothes, and uncomfortable situations. In sexuality, barriers were faced due to difficulty in disclosure and themes were about adjustments made by spouses, role of age, and sexual difficulties due to treatment. Conclusions: Findings imply need to address the issues of body image and sexuality as it impacts quality of life of survivors. PMID:28216857

  4. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging.

  5. Imaging findings of breast augmentation with injected hydrophilic polyacrylamide gel: patient reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Khedher, Najoua Ben; David, Julie; Trop, Isabelle; Drouin, Suzanne; Peloquin, Laurence; Lalonde, Lucie

    2011-04-01

    Hydrophilic polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) is a nonresorbable soft tissue filler that has been used as implant material for breast augmentation in some countries, particularly from the Asian continent. Many complications associated with hydrogel use have been reported in the clinical literature including inflammation, persistent mastodynia, formation of multiple lumps, poor cosmetic results, glandular atrophy, and significant spread of hydrogel into the surrounding tissue. Data on long-term toxicity is currently unavailable. The radiologic features of PAAG injection mammoplasty frequently constitute a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Indeed, the imaging appearances of uncomplicated PAAG implants may mimic conventional implants on mammography, sonography and MRI, with some distinguishing features. The location and local spread of the injected PAAG, and the eventual detection of local inflammation, are best evaluated by ultrasonography and especially MRI, considered the most sensitive technique for assessment of PAAG mammoplasty. MRI clearly depicts the volume and the distribution of gel within the breast; contrast medium enhancement allows delineation of areas of inflammation and infection. It is important to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging findings in order to make an accurate diagnosis and offer proper management. This paper aims to review the normal and abnormal mammographic, sonographic, and MR imaging characteristics of PAAG augmentation mammoplasty through presented patient reviews of three women having undergone direct PAAG injection. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN FIVE DOGS WITH CONFIRMED AND SUSPECTED BRAIN TUMORS.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kathleen Ella; Tyrrell, Dayle; Long, Sam Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Early postoperative neuroimaging has been performed in people for over 20 years to detect residual brain tumor tissue and surgical complications. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe characteristics observed using early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in a group of dogs undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor removal. Two independent observers came to a consensus opinion for presence/absence of the following MRI characteristics: residual tumor tissue; hemorrhage and ischemic lesions; abnormal enhancement (including the margins of the resection cavity, choroid plexus, meninges) and signal intensity changes on diffusion-weighted imaging. Five dogs were included in the study, having had preoperative and early postoperative MRI acquired within four days after surgery. The most commonly observed characteristics were abnormal meningeal enhancement, linear enhancement at margins of the resection cavity, hemorrhage, and a thin rim of hyperintensity surrounding the resection cavity on diffusion-weighted imaging. Residual tumor tissue was detected in one case of an enhancing tumor and in one case of a tumor containing areas of hemorrhage preoperatively. Residual tumor tissue was suspected but could not be confirmed when tumors were nonenhancing. Findings supported the use of early postoperative MRI as a method for detecting residual brain tumor tissue in dogs.

  7. Clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of gastrocnemius musculotendinopathy in various dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Susanne M; Harms, Oliver; Konar, Martin; Staudacher, Anne; Langer, Anna; Thiel, Cetina; Kramer, Martin; Schaub, Sebastian; von Pückler, Kerstin H

    2016-11-23

    To describe clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 16 dogs diagnosed with gastrocnemius musculotendinopathy. Retrospective evaluation of medical records, radiographs, and MRI results, as well as follow-up completed by telephone questionnaire. Most dogs had chronic hindlimb lameness with no history of trauma or athletic activities. Clinical examination revealed signs of pain on palpation without stifle joint instability. Seven dogs had radiographic signs of osteophyte formation on the lateral fabella. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed T2 hyperintensity and uptake of contrast agent in the region of the origin of the gastrocnemius muscle. Changes were found in the lateral and medial heads of the gastrocnemius. Conservative treatment resulted in return to full function in 11 dogs. Two dogs showed partial restoration of normal function, one dog showed no improvement. Two dogs were lost to follow-up. Gastrocnemius musculotendinopathy is a potential cause of chronic hindlimb lameness in medium to large breed dogs. A history of athletic activity must not necessarily be present. Magnetic resonance imaging shows signal changes and uptake of contrast agent in the region of the origin of the gastrocnemius muscle. A combination of T1 pre- and post-contrast administration and T2 weighted sequences completed by a fat-suppressed sequence in the sagittal plane are well-suited for diagnosis. Conservative treatment generally results in return to normal function.

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis: spectrum of thoracic imaging findings in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Khorashadi, L; Wu, C C; Betancourt, S L; Carter, B W

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by alveolar capillary haemorrhage resulting in deposition and accumulation of haemosiderin in the lungs. Although its precise pathophysiology remains unclear, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the aetiology of the disorder, including autoimmune, environmental, allergic, and genetic theories. IPH is typically diagnosed in childhood, usually before the age of 10 years; however, this entity may be encountered in older patients given the greater awareness of the diagnosis, availability and utilization of advanced imaging techniques, and improved treatment and survival. The classic presentation of IPH consists of the triad of haemoptysis, iron-deficiency anaemia, and pulmonary opacities on chest radiography. The diagnosis is usually confirmed via bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), at which time haemosiderin-laden macrophages referred to as siderophages, considered pathognomonic for IPH, may be identified. However, lung biopsy may ultimately be necessary to exclude other disease processes. For children with IPH, the disease course is severe and the prognosis is poor. However, adults generally have a longer disease course with milder symptoms and the prognosis is more favourable. Specific imaging features, although non-specific in isolation, may be identified on thoracic imaging studies, principally chest radiography and CT, depending on the phase of disease (acute or chronic). Recognition of these findings is important to guide appropriate clinical management.

  9. Paget disease of the breast: mammographic, US, and MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Min Ho; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2011-01-01

    Paget disease is a rare malignancy of the breast characterized by infiltration of the nipple epidermis by adenocarcinoma cells. The clinical features of Paget disease are characteristic and should increase the likelihood of the diagnosis being made. An important point is that more than 90% of cases of Paget disease are associated with an additional underlying breast malignancy. Paget disease is frequently associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the underlying lactiferous ducts of the nipple-areolar complex; it may even be associated with DCIS or invasive breast cancer elsewhere in the breast, at least 2 cm from the nipple-areolar complex. Nevertheless, mammographic findings may be negative in up to 50% of cases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in patients with Paget disease for evaluation of the nipple-areolar complex and identification of an additional underlying malignancy in the breast. The appropriate surgical treatment must be carefully selected and individualized on the basis of radiologic findings, especially those obtained with breast MR imaging.

  10. The relationship between findings on magnetic resonance imaging and previous history of low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Tonosu, Juichi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Matsudaira, Ko; Higashikawa, Akiro; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and previous low back pain (LBP) in participants without current LBP. Current LBP was defined as LBP during the past month. Previous LBP was defined as a history of medical consultation for LBP. Ninety-one participants without current LBP were included. Sagittal T2-weighted MRI was used to assess the intervertebral space from T12/L1 to L5/S1. These images were classified into five grades based on the Pfirrmann grading system. Furthermore, we evaluated the presence of disk bulging, high-intensity zone, and spondylolisthesis. We compared the MRI findings between groups with (27 participants) and without (64 participants) previous LBP without current LBP. Intraobserver and interobserver kappa values were evaluated. Participants had an average age of 34.9 years; 47 were female and 44 were male; and their average body mass index was 21.8 kg/m2. Compared to the group of participants without previous LBP, the group of participants with previous LBP had a significantly higher incidence of disk degeneration such as a Pfirrmann grade ≥3, disk bulging, and high-intensity zone in the analyses adjusted by age and sex. There were no significant differences in spondylolisthesis between the groups. An odds ratio of >10 was only found for Pfirrmann grade ≥3, ie, a Pfirrmann grade ≥3 was strongly associated with a history of previous LBP in participants without current LBP. PMID:28096690

  11. Value of CT angiography in anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke: Imaging findings, pearls, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Power, Sarah; McEvoy, Sinead H; Cunningham, Jane; Ti, Joanna P; Looby, Seamus; O'Hare, Alan; Williams, David; Brennan, Paul; Thornton, John

    2015-07-01

    Hyperacute stroke imaging is playing an increasingly important role in determining management decisions in acute stroke patients, particularly patients with large vessel occlusive stroke who may benefit from endovascular intervention. CT angiography (CTA) is an important tool in the work-up of the acute stroke patient. It reliably detects large occlusive thrombi in proximal cerebral arteries and is a quick and highly accurate method in identifying candidates for endovascular stroke treatment. In this article we review the imaging findings on CTA in acute large vessel occlusive stroke using a pictorial case based approach. We retrospectively reviewed CTA studies in 48 patients presenting with acute anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke who were brought for intra-arterial acute stroke intervention. We discuss and illustrate patterns of proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, collateralization to the occluded territory, as well as reviewing some important pearls, pitfalls and teaching points in CTA assessment of the acute stroke patient. Performed from the level of the aortic arch CTA also gives valuable information regarding the state of other vessels in the acute stroke patient, identifying additional significant vascular stenoses or occlusions, and as we illustrate, can demonstrate other clinically significant findings which may impact on patient management and outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prenatal Imaging Findings of Pontine Tegmental Cap Dysplasia: Report of Four Cases.

    PubMed

    Blondiaux, Eléonore; Valence, Stéphanie; Friszer, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Diana; Burglen, Lydie; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Blouet, Marie; Garel, Catherine

    2017-07-05

    To describe the prenatal imaging findings in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD), a rare congenital malformation of the hindbrain so far reported postnatally only and characterized by a typical appearance of the pons with malformations of the vermis and the cerebellar peduncles. This retrospective multicenter study retrieved 4 cases of PTCD over a 10-year period. Prenatal ultrasonography and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were reviewed and compared to postnatal or postmortem data. In all cases, the parents were referred between 22 and 27 weeks of gestation for characterization of a small cerebellar diameter <3rd centile. The prenatal diagnosis of PTCD was suspected in 1/4 cases, while in 3/4 cases the suggested prenatal diagnosis was pontocerebellar hypoplasia. In all cases, PTCD was characterized by ventral pontine hypoplasia with absence of bulging of the pons and by the tegmental cap protruding into the fourth ventricle on prenatal MRI. Parents opted for termination of pregnancy in 1 case. In the 3 other cases, the children presented with global developmental delay and multiple cranial nerve impairment. PTCD is a differential diagnosis of pontocerebellar hypoplasia and should be discussed on prenatal MRI in the presence of the tegmental cap protruding into the fourth ventricle. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Management of incidental findings during imaging research in “healthy” volunteers: current UK practice

    PubMed Central

    Booth, T C; Waldman, A D; Wardlaw, J M; Taylor, S A; Jackson, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Incidental findings (IF) are becoming increasingly common due to the proliferation of imaging research. IFs can be life-changing for “healthy” volunteers. This study examined variation in IF management in UK research studies of healthy volunteers, including comparison with ethical and legal guidelines, thus providing baseline data and informing future practice. Methods Questionnaire of participant background [medical/non-medical; radiologist/non-radiologist; years as principal investigator (PI)], type of research (involving children or not), institutional policy, volunteer information, radiologist involvement in reporting scans and IF disclosure mechanisms. Investigator's current and perceived “ideal” practice was examined. Participants were PIs performing imaging research of healthy volunteers approved by UK ethics committees (2006–2009). Results 63/146 (43%) surveys completed. 54/61 (88.5%) had site-specific guidelines. Information commonly provided to volunteers should IF be found: personal data (51/62; 82%), contingency plans (54/62; 87%) and disclosure to general practitioner (GP)/treating physician (47/62; 76%). PIs used different strategies for image review. Commonest: radiologist reports research scans only when researcher suspicious of IF [15/57 (26%) compared with 5/28 (16%) in ideal practice]. Commonest ideal reporting strategy: routine reporting by specialist radiologists [9/28 (29%) compared with 8/57 (14%) in current practice]. 49/56 (87.5%) have a standardised disclosure contingency plan, usually involving GP. PIs most commonly disclosed IFs to volunteers when judged relevant (27/58; 47%), most commonly face to face (22/54; 41%), by volunteer's GP (26/60; 43%). Background of PI influenced consent, reporting and disclosure practice. Conclusion There is wide variation in handling IFs in UK imaging research. Much of the current practice contravenes the vague existing legal and ethical guidelines, and is unlikely to be in the best

  14. A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging findings in sports-related concussion.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Stanwell, Peter; Donnelly, James; Williams, W Huw; Hiles, Alexandra; Schofield, Peter; Levi, Christopher; Jones, Derek K

    2012-11-01

    Sports-related concussion (SRC) is typically associated with functional, as opposed to structural, injury. The results of traditional structural neuroimaging techniques used to assess SRC tend to be normal in many athletes, and are only clinically helpful in ruling out a more serious injury. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has increasingly been touted as a method offering greater clinical potential in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Despite this, the utility of DTI as a clinical tool for diagnosing and managing SRC has received considerably less attention than it has in the general TBI research literature. The aim of this article is to conduct a systematic review of DTI in SRC, and to provide a focus and overview of research findings using this MRI technique in SRC. A systematic review of articles published in the English language, up to February 2012, was retrieved via PsycINFO(®), MEDLINE(®), EMBASE, SPORTDiscus(™), Scopus, Web of Science, and Informit; using the key search terms: diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion weighted MRI, diffusion MRI, fractional anisotropy, tractography, apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetic resonance imaging, mild traumatic brain injury, mTBI, traumatic brain injury, concussion, sport, athletic and athlete. Observational, cohort, correlation, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were all included in the current review. Results of the review found eight articles that met inclusion criteria, which included data on 214 athletes and 96 controls. Seven of eight studies reported some type of DTI abnormality, although the neuroanatomical sites involved varied. Although considerable methodological variations exist across studies, the current review suggests that DTI may possess adequate diagnostic sensitivity to detect SRC in affected athletes. Further longitudinal studies are required to demonstrate its discriminate validity and prognostic capacity within this field.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma: A report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xi; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Huan; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic ependymomas are rare malignant tumors of the central nervous system. Few studies are available regarding their neuroradiological characteristics. The present study aimed to retrospectively review a series of patients with extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma and to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics to distinguish anaplastic ependymoma from other intracranial tumors. The clinical and pathological images of 11 patients who presented with histologically proven anaplastic ependymoma at Nanfang Hospital (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) between September 2004 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. MRI scans were obtained in all 11 cases. Computed tomography scans were obtained in only 3 cases. In total, 8 tumors were located at the supratentorial parenchyma, and 3 tumors were derived from the cerebellar hemisphere. Images displayed quasi-circular (4/11), irregularly-lobulated (7/11) variable-intensity masses. The masses presented with cysts or necrosis (8/11), hemorrhage (7/11), marked (9/11) or mild (2/11) enhancement, and moderate (4/11), mild (3/11) or absent (4/11) peritumoral edema. The tumors were also frequently closely associated with the lateral ventricle (6/11). Tumors appeared isointense to hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense or hypointense on T2WI, demonstrating wreath-like and ring-like characteristics, with intratumoral nodules (3/11) or marked flake-like inhomogeneous (6/11) enhancement on post-contrast MRI. Only 2 solid lesions showed mild enhancement (2/11). Although the MRI features of the extraventricular anaplastic ependymomas varied and were non-specific, these characteristic MRI findings, combined with the locations of the lesions, the age of onset and the short disease course, could be useful in differentiating anaplastic ependymomas from other intracranial neoplasms in the future. PMID:27602137

  16. Internal Hernias in the Era of Multidetector CT: Correlation of Imaging and Surgical Findings.

    PubMed

    Doishita, Satoshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawasaki, Masayasu; Shimono, Taro; Yamashita, Akiyoshi; Sugimoto, Michiko; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Shima, Hideki; Miki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of internal hernias is challenging because of their nonspecific signs and symptoms. Many types of internal hernias have been defined: paraduodenal, small bowel mesentery-related, greater omentum-related, lesser sac, transverse mesocolon-related, pericecal, sigmoid mesocolon-related, falciform ligament, pelvic internal, and Roux-en-Y anastomosis-related. An internal hernia is a surgical emergency that can develop into intestinal strangulation and ischemia. Accurate preoperative diagnosis is crucial for appropriate management. Multidetector computed tomography (CT), with its thin-section axial images, high-quality multiplanar reformations, and three-dimensional images, currently plays an essential role in preoperative diagnosis of internal hernias. The diagnostic approach to internal hernias at multidetector CT includes detecting an intestinal closed loop, identifying the hernia orifice, and analyzing abnormal displacement of surrounding structures and key vessels around the hernia orifice and hernia sac. At each step, multidetector CT can depict pathognomonic findings. A saclike appearance suggests an intestinal closed loop in several types of internal hernias. Convergence, engorgement, and twisting of mesenteric vessels in the hernia orifice can be seen clearly at multidetector CT, especially with use of multiplanar reformations. For definitive diagnosis of an internal hernia, analysis of displacement of anatomic landmarks around the hernia orifice is particularly important, and thin-section images provide the required information. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy, etiology, and imaging landmarks of the various hernia types is also necessary. Familiarity with the appearances of internal hernias at multidetector CT allows accurate and specific preoperative diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  17. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  18. Perfusion-decellularized pancreas as a natural 3D scaffold for pancreatic tissue and whole organ engineering

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Saik-Kia; Bertera, Suzanne; Olsen, Phillip; Candiello, Joe; Halfter, Willi; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Johnson, Scott; Sicari, Brian; Kollar, Elizabeth; Badylak, Stephen F.; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, with insulin supplementation as the most common treatment measure. Regenerative medicine approaches such as a bioengineered pancreas has been proposed as potential therapeutic alternatives. A bioengineered pancreas will benefit from the development of a bioscaffold that supports and enhances cellular function and tissue development. Perfusion-decellularized organs are a likely candidate for use in such scaffolds since they mimic compositional, architectural and biomechanical nature of a native organ. In this study, we investigate perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas and the feasibility to recellularize the whole pancreas scaffold with pancreatic cell types. Our result demonstrates that perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas effectively removes cellular and nuclear material while retaining intricate three-dimensional microarchitecture with perfusable vasculature and ductal network and crucial extracellular matrix (ECM) components. To mimic pancreatic cell composition, we recellularized the whole pancreas scaffold with acinar and beta cell lines and cultured up to 5 days. Our result shows successful cellular engraftment within the decellularized pancreas, and the resulting graft gave rise to strong up-regulation of insulin gene expression. These findings support biological utility of whole pancreas ECM as a biomaterials scaffold for supporting and enhancing pancreatic cell functionality and represent a step toward bioengineered pancreas using regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:23787110

  19. Histopathological changes in the pancreas of cattle with abdominal fat necrosis

    PubMed Central

    TANI, Chikako; PRATAKPIRIYA, Watanyoo; TANI, Mineto; YAMAUCHI, Takenori; HIRAI, Takuya; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; ANO, Hitoshi; KATAMOTO, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    The association between pancreatic disorder and abdominal fat necrosis in cattle remains unclear. The pancreases of 29 slaughtered cattle with or without fat necrosis were collected to investigate pathological changes. Japanese Black (JB) cattle were classified into the FN group (with abdominal fat necrosis; n=9) and N group (without fat necrosis; n=5). The pancreases were also collected from 15 Holstein Friesian (HF) cows. All JB cattle showed high body condition scores. Regarding the pathological findings, fatty pancreas which involves adipocyte infiltration into the pancreas and fat necrosis (saponification) were observed in 25 and 27 cases, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-Iba-1 antibody showed large numbers of macrophages surrounding the saponified fat in the pancreas. CD3-positive T cells were significantly more common in the pancreas of both the FN and N groups compared with the HF group (P<0.05). Furthermore, fibrosis in the pancreas exhibited a correlative tendency with the formation of necrotic fat mass in the peritoneal cavity (P<0.1). These results indicate that obesity leads to increased severity of pancreatic disorder, including fatty pancreas and pancreatitis. The pathological lesions in the pancreas may play a key role in abdominal fat necrosis through the inflammatory process. PMID:27795463

  20. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad; Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane; Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

  1. The pancreas from Aristotle to Galen.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ryoichi; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The first description of the pancreas in literature is found in Aristotle's Historia Animalium, but it is modified by "so-called". Therefore, the origin is pursued more extensively. The Greek-English Lexicon recommends three treatises as a possible original source. These three and Galen's other papers are investigated. In 2005, Sachs et al. suggested an origin of the pancreas might have derived from the intestinal divination using the avian pancreas. This report is evaluated. The avian pancreas which is the intraperitoneal organ, might have been well known by the intestinal divination, and people have called the organ pankreas or kallikreas. Anatomical dissection on human body was not accepted before the Aristotle's time. "So-called pancreas" in Historia must have been interpolated by Theophrastus. He was the most faithful and reliable disciple of Aristotle and succeeded the Aristotle's school. He and Macedonian ruler of Egypt Ptolemy I had known each other and there had been a strong link between them. The contemporary Herophilus performed many public dissections on both human and animal bodies in Alexandria. He named the various parts of the human body and designated the beginning intestine as duodenum. Yet in his extant works, the pancreas is not found. It is surmised that Herophilus may be the first to recognize the human pancreas, which is fixed with retroperitoneal tissue, and he named it "so-called pancreas". Theophrastus might have interpolated Herophilus' designation in Historia Animalium. Galen also uses "so-called pancreas" to designate the human pancreas. Galen's descriptions, that is, "Nature created 'so-called pancreas 'and spread it beneath all vessels" are not generally acceptable but propose the very rare portal vein anomalies. Since the early years of the 20th century, cases with a preduodenal portal vein or a prepancreatic portal vein have been reported. Although the incidence is very rare, its surgical importance is emphasized. Copyright © 2014

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging correlation to intraoperative findings of deeply infiltrative endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Traci E; Abi Khalil, Elias D; Taffel, Myles; Moawad, Gaby N

    2017-02-01

    To show characteristics of deeply infiltrative endometriosis (DIE) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and how they correlate with intraoperative findings. Overview of still and dynamic MRI images of four different patients with DIE. We then used videos from their surgeries to highlight the appearance of endometriosis corresponding to these images (educational video). University hospital. Four different patients with DIE were included in this video. These were all women of reproductive age who suffered from debilitating deeply infiltrative endometriosis. These patients had a pelvic MRI performed at our institution and subsequently underwent surgery with one of our minimally invasive gynecologic surgeons. The MRI endometriosis protocol includes T1-weighted fat and nonfat saturated as well as T2-weighted sequences. Images are taken along all three planes (axial, sagittal, and coronal) before and after contrast. What distinguishes the standard MRI from the endometriosis-protocol MRI is the thickness of the slices taken. For the evaluation of endometriosis, T1 nonfat saturated images are taken in 6-mm slices with no skip sections in between. Then, T1 fat saturated images and T2-weighted images are taken in 5-mm slices with a 1-mm skip section in between slices. The areas that are suspicious for lesions consistent with DIE are corroborated on videos taken during surgery. Value of accurate mapping of lesions with the use of preoperative MRI in surgical planning and complete resection of diseased tissue. Results from a previously published prospective study by Bazot et al. reported sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 90.3%, 91%, 92.1%, and 89%, respectively. Similarly to our institution, that study used a 1.5-T MRI, and the protocol of our institution closely mimicked the technique used in that study. Another prospective study published by Hottat et al. showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative

  3. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  4. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity.

  5. Imaging Findings of Fetal-Neonatal Ovarian Cysts Complicated With Ovarian Torsion and Autoamputation.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H Nursun; Balci, Serife; Ekinci, Saniye; Gunes, Altan; Oguz, Berna; Ciftci, Arbay Ozden; Haliloglu, Mithat

    2015-07-01

    Large nonresolving neonatal ovarian cysts may be a risk factor for complications such as torsion, mass effect, rupture, intracystic hemorrhage, and autoamputation. Torsed cysts and autoamputated cysts can cause a diagnostic dilemma. The objective of our study was to correlate the imaging findings of intrauterine ovarian torsion and autoamputated ovaries with their pathologic findings. We retrospectively analyzed the pre- and postnatal medical records, sonographic findings, operation notes, and pathologic reports of 15 patients with ovarian torsion. All patients had complex cysts noted on postnatal sonographic examination. A complex heterogeneous ovarian cyst was defined by the presence of a fluid-debris level indicating hemorrhage within the cyst, a retracting clot, septations with or without internal echoes, calcification, and a solid component. On ultrasound examination, four cysts had solid components, and 11 were heterogeneous and had a fluid-debris level. Calcifications were seen in two patients. The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 3.9 months. Exploratory laparotomy was performed on all patients. Torsed ovaries were identified in five patients. Ten patients had ovaries that were floating free in the peritoneal cavity at the time of surgery. Histopathologic evaluation revealed that 11 of the cysts consisted of extensive hemorrhagic, necrotic autolytic tissue with dystrophic calcification. None of the cysts contained any ovarian tissue. A complex heterogeneous ovarian cyst with a fluid-debris level indicating hemorrhage is a significant sonographic hallmark for the diagnosis of ovarian torsion. A calcified abdominal mass, with or without wandering, can be an autoamputated ovary.

  6. Cell Cycle–Dependent Differentiation Dynamics Balances Growth and Endocrine Differentiation in the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Pau; Lemaire, Laurence A.; Ferrer, Jorge; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine, ductal, and acinar cells but become bipotent by embryonic day 13.5, giving rise to endocrine cells and ductal cells. However, the dynamics of individual progenitors balancing self-renewal and lineage-specific differentiation has never been described. Using three-dimensional live imaging and in vivo clonal analysis, we reveal the contribution of individual cells to the global behaviour and demonstrate three modes of progenitor divisions: symmetric renewing, symmetric endocrinogenic, and asymmetric generating a progenitor and an endocrine progenitor. Quantitative analysis shows that the endocrine differentiation process is consistent with a simple model of cell cycle–dependent stochastic priming of progenitors to endocrine fate. The findings provide insights to define control parameters to optimize the generation of β-cells in vitro. PMID:25786211

  7. Pancreatic hardness: Correlation of surgeon’s palpation, durometer measurement and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Tae Ho; Choi, Joon-Il; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Lee, Young Joon; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Moon Hyung

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the correlation between subjective assessments of pancreatic hardness based on the palpation, objective measurements using a durometer, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for assessing pancreatic hardness. METHODS Eighty-three patients undergoing pancreatectomies were enrolled. An experienced surgeon subjectively evaluated the pancreatic hardness in the surgical field by palpation. The pancreatic hardness was also objectively evaluated using a durometer. Preoperative MRI findings were evaluated by a radiologist in terms of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, the relative signal intensity decrease (RSID) of the pancreatic parenchyma, and the diameter of the pancreatic parenchyma and duct. Durometer measurement results, ADC values, RSID, pancreatic duct and parenchyma diameters, and the ratio of the diameters of the duct and parenchyma were compared between pancreases judged to be soft or hard pancreas on the palpation. A correlation analysis was also performed between the durometer and MRI measurements. RESULTS The palpation assessment classified 44 patients as having a soft pancreas and 39 patients as having a hard pancreas. ADC values were significantly lower in the hard pancreas group. The ductal diameter and duct-to-pancreas ratio were significantly higher in the hard pancreas group. For durometer measurements, a correlation analysis showed a positive correlation with the ductal diameter and the duct-to-pancreas ratio and a negative correlation with ADC values. CONCLUSION Hard pancreases showed lower ADC values, a wider pancreatic duct diameter and a higher duct-to-pancreas ratio than soft pancreases. Additionally, the ADC values, diameter of the pancreatic duct and duct-to-pancreas ratio were closely correlated with the durometer results. PMID:28373771

  8. Pancreatic hardness: Correlation of surgeon's palpation, durometer measurement and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging features.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tae Ho; Choi, Joon-Il; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Lee, Young Joon; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Moon Hyung

    2017-03-21

    To evaluate the correlation between subjective assessments of pancreatic hardness based on the palpation, objective measurements using a durometer, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for assessing pancreatic hardness. Eighty-three patients undergoing pancreatectomies were enrolled. An experienced surgeon subjectively evaluated the pancreatic hardness in the surgical field by palpation. The pancreatic hardness was also objectively evaluated using a durometer. Preoperative MRI findings were evaluated by a radiologist in terms of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, the relative signal intensity decrease (RSID) of the pancreatic parenchyma, and the diameter of the pancreatic parenchyma and duct. Durometer measurement results, ADC values, RSID, pancreatic duct and parenchyma diameters, and the ratio of the diameters of the duct and parenchyma were compared between pancreases judged to be soft or hard pancreas on the palpation. A correlation analysis was also performed between the durometer and MRI measurements. The palpation assessment classified 44 patients as having a soft pancreas and 39 patients as having a hard pancreas. ADC values were significantly lower in the hard pancreas group. The ductal diameter and duct-to-pancreas ratio were significantly higher in the hard pancreas group. For durometer measurements, a correlation analysis showed a positive correlation with the ductal diameter and the duct-to-pancreas ratio and a negative correlation with ADC values. Hard pancreases showed lower ADC values, a wider pancreatic duct diameter and a higher duct-to-pancreas ratio than soft pancreases. Additionally, the ADC values, diameter of the pancreatic duct and duct-to-pancreas ratio were closely correlated with the durometer results.

  9. Resection for secondary malignancy of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hsia; Wang, Shin-E; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chen, Tien-Hua; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2012-01-01

    This study tried to clarify the role of pancreatic resection in the treatment of secondary malignancy with metastasis or local invasion to the pancreas in terms of surgical risk and survival benefit. Data of secondary malignancy of the pancreas from our 19 patients and cases reported in the English literature were pooled together for analysis. There were 329 cases of resected secondary malignancy of the pancreas, including 241 cases of metastasis and 88 cases of local invasion. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the pancreas and amenable to resection was renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (73.9%). More than half (52.3%) of the primary cancers with local invasion to the pancreas were colon cancer, and nearly half (40.9%) were stomach cancer. The median metastatic interval was 84 months (7 years) for overall primary tumors and 108 months (9 years) for RCC. The 5-year survival for secondary malignancy of the pancreas after resection was 61.1% for metastasis and 58.9% for local invasion, with 72.8% for RCC metastasis, 69.0% for colon cancer, and 43.8% for stomach cancer with local invasion to the pancreas. Pancreatic resection should not be precluded for secondary malignancy of the pancreas because long-term survival could be achieved with acceptable surgical risk in selected patients.

  10. Minimally Invasive Management of Ectopic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Gerardo A; Cavnar, Michael J; Hajdu, Cristina; Khaykis, Inessa; Newman, Elliot; Melis, Marcovalerio; Pachter, H Leon; Cohen, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    The management of ectopic pancreas is not well defined. This study aims to determine the prevalence of symptomatic ectopic pancreas and identify those who may benefit from treatment, with a particular focus on robotically assisted surgical management. Our institutional pathology database was queried to identify a cohort of ectopic pancreas specimens. Additional clinical data regarding clinical symptomatology, diagnostic studies, and treatment were obtained through chart review. Nineteen cases of ectopic pancreas were found incidentally during surgery for another condition or found incidentally in a pathologic specimen (65.5%). Eleven patients (37.9%) reported prior symptoms, notably abdominal pain and/or gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common locations for ectopic pancreas were the duodenum and small bowel (31% and 27.6%, respectively). Three out of 29 cases (10.3%) had no symptoms, but had evidence of preneoplastic changes on pathology, while one harbored pancreatic cancer. Over the years, treatment of ectopic pancreas has shifted from open to laparoscopic and more recently to robotic surgery. Our experience is in line with existing evidence supporting surgical treatment of symptomatic or complicated ectopic pancreas. In the current era, minimally invasive and robotic surgery can be used safely and successfully for treatment of ectopic pancreas.

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  12. Non-functioning Well Differentiated Endocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The author reports a typical but rare case of non-functioning well differentiated endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. A 67-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain. No hormone-related symptoms were recognized. He has no familiar history of pancreatic neoplasms. Various imaging modalities including US, CT and MRI revealed a tumor of the pancreatic body. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. A solid well demarcated tumor was present in the pancreatic body. Peripancreatic lymph nodes showed marked swelling suggestive of metastases. Immunohistyochemically, tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and CD56; they were negative for chromogranin, gastrin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. The pathological diagnosis was non-functioning well differentiated endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. PMID:27990210

  13. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of pancreas; second case from Asia.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Mir, Mohmad Hussain; Azaz, Sheikh Aejaz; Qadri, Sumyra Khurshid; Lone, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs) are malignant tumours composed of small round cells of neuroectodermal origin that affect soft tissue and bone. PNETs originating in the pancreas are extremely rare; previous to this report, only 14 cases were reported worldwide, making this case the fifteenth in the world and the second in Asia. We present the case of a painful pancreatic lump diagnosed as PNET of the pancreas after a thorough workup. The diagnosis of PNET is made according to the overall clinical picture, imaging, histopathology, cytogenetics, and immunohistochemistry, as in the case we present. It is essential to differentiate primary pancreatic PNET from a secondary involvement. A review of all of the cases diagnosed worldwide thus far is also provided.

  14. The relationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical manifestations of hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Arita, K; Ikawa, F; Kurisu, K; Sumida, M; Harada, K; Uozumi, T; Monden, S; Yoshida, J; Nishi, Y

    1999-08-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma is generally diagnosed based on its magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics and the patient's clinical symptoms, but the relationship between the neuroradiological findings and clinical presentation has never been fully investigated. In this retrospective study the authors sought to determine this relationship. The authors classified 11 cases of hypothalamic hamartoma into two categories based on the MR findings. Seven cases were the "parahypothalamic type," in which the hamartoma is only attached to the floor of the third ventricle or suspended from the floor by a peduncle. Four cases were the "intrahypothalamic type," in which the hamartoma involved or was enveloped by the hypothalamus and the tumor distorted the third ventricle. Six patients with the parahypothalamic type exhibited precocious puberty, which was controlled by a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog, and one patient was asymptomatic. No seizures or mental retardation were observed in this group. All patients with the intrahypothalamic type had medically intractable seizures, and precocious puberty was seen in one. Severe mental retardation and behavioral disorders including aggressiveness were seen in two patients. The seizures were controlled in only one patient, in whom stereotactically targeted irradiation of the lesion was performed. This topology/symptom relationship was reconfirmed in a review of 61 reported cases of hamartoma, in which the MR findings were clearly described. The parahypothalamic type is generally associated with precocious puberty but is unaccompanied by seizures or developmental delay, whereas the intrahypothalamic type is generally associated with seizures. Two thirds of patients with the latter experience developmental delays, and half also exhibit precocious puberty. Classification of hypothalamic hamartomas into these two categories based on MR findings resulted in a clear correlation between symptoms and the subsequent clinical

  15. Range-finding in squid using retinal deformation and image blur.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Sung; Marshall, Justin

    2014-01-20

    Squid and other cephalopods catch prey with remarkable speed and precision [1]. Before the strike occurs, they encounter the difficult task of judging an object's distance and size in the contrast-poor world of the mid-water environment [1-4]. Here we describe a solution to this common problem underwater, where a large portion of a squid's dorso-temporal retina is intentionally blurred. This apparently counter-adaptive 'retinal bump' is combined with a vertical bobbing behavior that scans objects of interest from focused to defocused retinal regions. The image focus differential changes sharply at precisely the distance equivalent to tentacle length and enables the squid, Sepioteuthis lessoniana, to capture prey. This unique range-finding mechanism is an adaptation to hunting, defense, and object size identification in an environment where the depth cues found on land are less reliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CT evaluation of appendicitis and its complications: imaging techniques and key diagnostic findings.

    PubMed

    Pinto Leite, Nuno; Pereira, José M; Cunha, Rui; Pinto, Pedro; Sirlin, Claude

    2005-08-01

    This article reviews various CT protocols for appendicitis, identifies key CT findings for diagnosing appendicitis, discusses unusual manifestations such as chronic and recurrent appendicitis, and profiles imaging features that differentiate appendicitis from other inflammatory and neoplastic ileocecal conditions. Patients were studied with helical CT. CT is a highly accurate, noninvasive test for appendicitis, but the optimal CT technique is controversial. Major complications of appendicitis (perforation, abscess formation, peritonitis, bowel obstruction, septic seeding of mesenteric vessels, gangrenous appendicitis) and their management are discussed. Abdominal CT is a well-established technique in the study of acute abdominal pain and has shown high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing and differentiating appendicitis, providing an accurate diagnosis in the early stages of disease.

  17. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma: A Report of 5 Cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with "rapid wash-in and slow wash-out" or "progressive enhancement" enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen.

  18. Identification of intestinal wall abnormalities and ischemia by modeling spatial uncertainty in computed tomography imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tsunoyama, Taichiro; Pham, Tuan D; Fujita, Takashi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal abnormalities and ischemia are medical conditions in which inflammation and injury of the intestine are caused by inadequate blood supply. Acute ischemia of the small bowel can be life-threatening. Computed tomography (CT) is currently a gold standard for the diagnosis of acute intestinal ischemia in the emergency department. However, the assessment of the diagnostic performance of CT findings in the detection of intestinal abnormalities and ischemia has been a difficult task for both radiologists and surgeons. Little effort has been found in developing computerized systems for the automated identification of these types of complex gastrointestinal disorders. In this paper, a geostatistical mapping of spatial uncertainty in CT scans is introduced for medical image feature extraction, which can be effectively applied for diagnostic detection of intestinal abnormalities and ischemia from control patterns. Experimental results obtained from the analysis of clinical data suggest the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty mapping model.

  19. Low-Func