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Sample records for pancreas imaging findings

  1. MR imaging of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Erin; Hammond, Nancy; Miller, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pancreas is useful as both a problem-solving tool and an initial imaging examination of choice. With newer imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging, MR offers improved ability to detect and characterize lesions and identify and stage tumors and inflammation. MR cholangiopancreatography can be used to visualize the pancreatic and biliary ductal system. In this article, the use of MR to evaluate the pancreas, including recent advances, is reviewed and the normal appearance of the pancreas on different imaging sequences, as well as inflammatory diseases, congenital abnormalities, and neoplasms of the pancreas, are discussed.

  2. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  4. Clinical imaging of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    May, G.; Gardiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Featuring more than 300 high-quality radiographs and scan images, clinical imaging of the pancreas systematically reviews all appropriate imaging modalities for diagnosing and evaluating a variety of commonly encountered pancreatic disorders. After presenting a succinct overview of pancreatic embryology, anatomy, and physiology, the authors establish the clinical indications-including postoperative patient evaluation-for radiologic examination of the pancreas. The diagnostic capabilities and limitations of currently available imaging techniques for the pancreas are thoroughly assessed, with carefully selected illustrations depicting the types of images and data obtained using these different techniques. The review of acute and chronic pancreatitis considers the clinical features and possible complications of their variant forms and offers guidance in selecting appropriate imaging studies.

  5. Pancreas transplant imaging: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Tolat, Parag P; Foley, W Dennis; Johnson, Christopher; Hohenwalter, Mark D; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2015-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation aims to restore physiologic normoglycemia in diabetic patients with glomerulopathy and avoid or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and arteriopathy. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is the most common approach, using a cadaveric pancreas donation in conjunction with either cadaveric or live donor renal transplant. Alternative techniques include pancreas after kidney transplant, in which the pancreas transplant is performed some years after renal transplant. Pancreas transplant alone is utilized rarely in diabetic patients with compensated renal function. Pancreas grafts have vascular and enteric connections that vary in their anatomic approach, and understanding of this is critical for imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging techniques are directed to display the pancreatic transplant arterial and venous vasculature, parenchyma, and intestinal drainage pathway. Critical vascular information includes venous thrombosis (partial or complete), arterial occlusion, or aneurysm. Parenchymal abnormalities are nonspecific and occur in pancreatitis, graft rejection, and subsequent graft ischemia. Peripancreatic fluid collections include hematoma/seroma, pseudocyst, and abscess. The latter two are related to pancreatitis, duct disruption, or leak from the duodenojejunostomy. An understanding of transplant anatomy and complications will lead to appropriate use of imaging techniques to diagnose or exclude important complications.

  6. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  7. Microendoscopes for imaging of the pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Angelique L.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Kroto, Shona M.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2004-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have a 5-year survival rate of only 3%. Endoscopic imaging of the pancreas is limited by the small size of the pancreatic duct, which has an average size of 3 mm. To improve imaging capabilities for the pancreatic duct, two small catheter-based imaging systems have been developed that will fit through the therapeutic channel of a clinical endoscope and into the pancreatic duct. One is a miniature endoscope designed to provide macro-imaging of tissue with both white light reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. The 1.75 mm diameter catheter consists of separate illumination and imaging channels. At a nominal focal distance of 10 mm, the field of view of the system is ~ 10 mm, and the corresponding in-plane resolution is 60 microns. To complement the broadfield view of the tissue, a confocal microendoscope with 2 micron lateral resolution over a field of view of 450 microns and 25 micron axial resolution has been developed. With an outer diameter of 3 mm, the catheter in this system will also fit through the therapeutic channel and into the pancreatic duct. Images of tissue with both the miniature endoscope and confocal microendoscope are presented.

  8. Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Prentice, M A; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Even though pancreas transplant numbers have steadily declined over the past decade, new listings increased in 2014 compared with the previous year, notably for pancreas transplant alone (PTA) and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant. The number of new PTAs also increased over the past two years. Whether this is a sustainable trend remains to be seen. Significant events in 2014 included implementation of a new pancreas allocation system and development of a proposed uniform definition of pancreas graft failure. Meanwhile, overall pancreas transplant rates and outcomes continued to improve. Substantial decline in pancreas after kidney transplants remains a serious concern. SRTR has not published pancreas graft failure data in the program-specific reports for the past two years. While this will not change in the near future, the acceptance of a uniform definition of graft failure is a crucial first step toward resuming graft failure reporting. Continued improvements and innovation, both surgical and immunological, will be critical to keep pancreas transplant as a viable option for treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. As alternative therapies for diabetes such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas are evolving, improved outcomes with minimizations of complications are more important than ever. PMID:26755263

  9. Imaging spectrum after pancreas transplantation with enteric drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Ling; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Sing-E; Tseng, Hsiuo-Shan; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Huang, Shan-Su; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of pancreas transplantation more than 40 years ago, surgical techniques and immunosuppressive regiments have improved and both have contributed to increase the number and success rate of this procedure. However, graft survival corresponds to early diagnosis of organ-related complications. Thus, knowledge of the transplantation procedure and postoperative image anatomy are basic requirements for radiologists. In this article, we demonstrate the imaging spectrum of pancreas transplantation with enteric exocrine drainage.

  10. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  11. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Asymptomatic leukemic-cell infiltration of the pancreas: US findings.

    PubMed

    Collado, Laura; Dardanelli, Esteban; Sierre, Sergio; Moguillansky, Silvia; Lipsich, José

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic infiltration of leukemic cells is a very rare manifestation at the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood. Pancreatic enlargement in this situation is unusual and pancreatic involvement is often associated with biliary obstruction, cholestasis and pancreatitis. We report a 3-month-old girl who presented with asymptomatic leukemic infiltration of the pancreas, demonstrated by US with heterogeneous pancreatic enlargement associated with multiple hypoechogenic lesions, without cholestasis. Although these manifestations are rare, ALL should be considered a cause of pancreatic enlargement.

  13. A Hybrid Method for Pancreas Extraction from CT Image Based on Level Set Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction. PMID:24066016

  14. A hybrid method for pancreas extraction from CT image based on level set methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Tan, Hanqing; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel semiautomatic method to extract the pancreas from abdominal CT images. Traditional level set and region growing methods that request locating initial contour near the final boundary of object have problem of leakage to nearby tissues of pancreas region. The proposed method consists of a customized fast-marching level set method which generates an optimal initial pancreas region to solve the problem that the level set method is sensitive to the initial contour location and a modified distance regularized level set method which extracts accurate pancreas. The novelty in our method is the proper selection and combination of level set methods, furthermore an energy-decrement algorithm and an energy-tune algorithm are proposed to reduce the negative impact of bonding force caused by connected tissue whose intensity is similar with pancreas. As a result, our method overcomes the shortages of oversegmentation at weak boundary and can accurately extract pancreas from CT images. The proposed method is compared to other five state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods based on a CT image dataset which contains abdominal images from 10 patients. The evaluated results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods by achieving higher accuracy and making less false segmentation in pancreas extraction.

  15. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS. PMID:26879163

  16. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS.

  17. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm–16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6–49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image.

  18. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm–16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6–49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image. PMID:27610132

  19. Giant Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas (⩾10 cm): The Clinical Features and CT Findings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Min, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the clinical features and CT manifestations of giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma (≥10 cm). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features and CT findings of 6 cases of this entity. Results. All 6 patients were symptomatic. The tumors were 10.2 cm-16.5 cm (median value, 13.0 cm). CT imaging revealed that all 6 cases showed microcystic appearances (n = 5) or mixed microcystic and macrocystic appearances (n = 1). Five patients with tumors at the distal end of the pancreas received distal pancreatectomy. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients underwent partial transverse colon resection or omentum resection due to close adhesion. One patient whose tumor was located in the pancreatic head underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, due to encasement of the portal and superior mesenteric veins, the tumor was incompletely resected. One patient had abundant draining veins on the tumor surface and suffered large blood loss (700 mL). After 6-49 months of follow-up the 6 patients showed no tumor recurrence or signs of malignant transformation. Conclusions. Giant pancreatic serous cystadenoma necessitates surgical resection due to large size, symptoms, uncertain diagnosis, and adjacent organ compression. The relationship between the tumors and the neighboring organs needs to be carefully assessed before operation on CT image. PMID:27610132

  20. Abdominal sarcoidosis: cross-sectional imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Başara, Işıl; Altay, Canan; Harman, Mustafa; Rocher, Laurence; Karabulut, Nevzat; Seçil, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The lungs and the lymphoid system are the most commonly involved organs. Extrapulmonary involvement is reported in 30% of patients, and the abdomen is the most common extrapulmonary site with a frequency of 50%–70%. Although intra-abdominal sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic, its presence may affect the prognosis and treatment options. The lesions are less characteristic and may mimick neoplastic or infectious diseases such as lymphoma, diffuse metastasis, and granulomatous inflammation. The liver and spleen are the most common abdominal sites of involvement. Sarcoidosis of the gastrointestinal system, pancreas, and kidneys are extremely rare. Adenopathy which is most commonly found in the porta hepatis, exudative ascites, and multiple granulomatous nodules studding the peritoneum are the reported manifestations of abdominal sarcoidosis. Since abdominal sarcoidosis is less common and long-standing, unrecognized disease can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Imaging contributes to diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal sarcoidosis. In this report we reviewed the cross-sectional imaging findings of hepatobiliary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary sarcoidosis. PMID:25512071

  1. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of a solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    van der Vorst, Joost R; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Hutteman, Merlijn; Bosse, Tjalling; Smit, Vincent T H B M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Frangioni, John V; Bonsing, Bert A

    2012-07-27

    A 67-year-old female presented with unexplained abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of the abdomen incidentally revealed a mass in the uncinate process of the pancreas. This mass was resected and based on histopathological findings, diagnosed as a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pancreas. A SFT is an extremely rare benign mesenchymal tumor that in 65% of cases affects the visceral pleura but can also affect extra-pleural sites. The intraoperative demarcation of pancreatic tumors, such as SFTs, can be challenging. In this report, the first clear intraoperative identification of a SFT of the pancreas in a human was shown using near-infrared fluorescence and methylene blue.

  2. Gd(III)-Dithiolane Gold Nanoparticles for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Rammohan, Nikhil; Rotz, Matthew W.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Preslar, Adam T.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a 5 year survival of approximately 3% and median survival of 6 months and is among the most dismal of prognoses in all of medicine. This poor prognosis is largely due to delayed diagnosis where patients remain asymptomatic until advanced disease is present. Therefore, techniques to allow early detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are desperately needed. Imaging of pancreatic tissue is notoriously difficult, and the development of new imaging techniques would impact our understanding of organ physiology and pathology with applications in disease diagnosis, staging, and longitudinal response to therapy in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides numerous advantages for these types of investigations; however, it is unable to delineate the pancreas due to low inherent contrast within this tissue type. To overcome this limitation, we have prepared a new Gd(III) contrast agent that accumulates in the pancreas and provides significant contrast enhancement by MR imaging. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a new dithiolane-Gd(III) complex and a straightforward and scalable approach for conjugation to a gold nanoparticle. We present data that show the nanoconjugates exhibit very high per particle values of r1 relaxivity at both low and high magnetic field strengths due to the high Gd(III) payload. We provide evidence of pancreatic tissue labeling that includes MR images, post-mortem biodistribution analysis, and pancreatic tissue evaluation of particle localization. Significant contrast enhancement was observed allowing clear identification of the pancreas with contrast-to-noise ratios exceeding 35:1. PMID:27050622

  3. Pancreas imaging by computed tomography after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. [Dogs; patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; O'Leary, J.F.; Salomonowitz, E.; Stoltenberg, E.; Hutton, S.; Gedgaudas, E.

    1984-01-01

    A method using CT after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (CT-ERP) is described for pancreatic imaging. When using an ERP technique in the canine model comparable to that used in humans, small amounts of contrast material in peripheral pancreatic radicles resulted in enhancement of the pancreas on CT scans. Nine patients were also studied by CT-ERP images. The main pancreatic duct was seen on delayed images. In cases of chronic pancreatitis (n = 2), pancreatic opacification was patchy and heterogeneous. There was no contrast-material enhancement in areas of pancreatic carcimomas (n = 2). CT-ERP showed the true extent of carcinoma better than ERP alone.

  4. Preliminary Study of MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Pancreas for the Diagnosis of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Jian; Chen, Tianwu; Li, Liangjun; Aduah, Emmanuel Ajedichiga; Hu, Jiani

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of differentiating between acute pancreatitis (AP) and healthy pancreas using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and correlate apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) /fractional anisotropy (FA) values with the severity of AP. Material and Methods 66 patients diagnosed with AP and 20 normal controls (NC) underwent DTI sequences and routine pancreatic MR sequences on a 3.0T MRI scanner. Average ADC and FA values of the pancreatic were measured. Differences of FA and ADC values between the AP group and the NC group with AP and healthy pancreas were compared by two-sample independent t-test. The severity of AP on MRI was classified into subgroups using MR severity index (MRSI), where the mean FA and ADC values were calculated. Relationship among the FA values, ADC values and MRSI were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Results The pancreatic mean ADC value in the AP group (1.68 ± 0.45×10−3mm2/s) was significantly lower than in the NC group (2.09 ± 0.55×10−3mm2/s) (P = 0.02); the same as mean FA value (0.39 ± 0.23 vs 0.54 ± 0.12, P = 0.00). In the subgroup analysis, the pancreatic ADC and FA value of edema AP patients was significantly higher than necrosis AP patients with P = 0.000 and P = 0.001respectively. In addition, as severity of pancreatitis increased according to MRSI, lower pancreatic ADC (r = -0.635) and FA value (r = -0.654) were noted. Conclusion Both FA and ADC value from DTI can be used to differentiate AP patients from NC. Both ADC and FA value of pancreas have a negative correlation with the severity of AP. PMID:27584016

  5. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  6. Xenopus pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Esther J; Bilogan, Cassandra K; Mukhi, Sandeep; Brown, Donald D; Horb, Marko E

    2009-06-01

    Understanding how the pancreas develops is vital to finding new treatments for a range of pancreatic diseases, including diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Xenopus is a relatively new model organism for the elucidation of pancreas development, and has already made contributions to the field. Recent studies have shown benefits of using Xenopus for understanding both early patterning and lineage specification aspects of pancreas organogenesis. This review focuses specifically on Xenopus pancreas development, and covers events from the end of gastrulation, when regional specification of the endoderm is occurring, right through metamorphosis, when the mature pancreas is fully formed. We have attempted to cover pancreas development in Xenopus comprehensively enough to assist newcomers to the field and also to enable those studying pancreas development in other model organisms to better place the results from Xenopus research into the context of the field in general and their studies specifically. Developmental Dynamics 238:1271-1286, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Development of gamma emitting receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas. Final technical progress report, March 1, 1988--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This document give paragraph synopses of results in research on brain and pancreas imaging, using radiotracers. General catagories of research included chemistry, pharmacology, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling. A list of publications is included

  8. Imaging findings in pulmonary vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Castañer, Eva; Alguersuari, Anna; Andreu, Marta; Gallardo, Xavier; Spinu, Cristina; Mata, Josep M

    2012-12-01

    Vasculitis is a destructive inflammatory process affecting blood vessels. Pulmonary vasculitis may develop secondary to other conditions or constitute a primary idiopathic disorder. Thoracic involvement is most common in primary idiopathic large-vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Behçet disease) and primary antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides (Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Primary pulmonary vasculitides are rare, and their signs and symptoms are nonspecific, overlapping with those of infections, connective tissue diseases, and malignancies. The radiologic findings in primary pulmonary vasculitis vary widely and can include vessel wall thickening, nodular or cavitary lesions, ground-glass opacities, and consolidations, among others. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage usually results from primary small-vessel vasculitis in the lungs. To diagnose vasculitis, medical teams must recognize characteristic combinations of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and histopathologic features. PMID:23168065

  9. MRI chemical shift imaging of the fat content of the pancreas and liver of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    CHAI, JUN; LIU, PENG; JIN, ERHU; SU, TIANHAO; ZHANG, JIE; SHI, KAINING; HONG, XU; YIN, JIE; YU, HENGCHI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between the content and distribution of fat in the pancreas and liver in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 70 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM (T2DM group) and 30 healthy volunteers (normal control group) were enrolled in the present study. Dual-echo magnetic resonance (MR) chemical shift imaging was used to measure the fat content of the liver and the head, body and tail regions of the pancreas. In addition, the distribution of fat in the various regions of the pancreas, as well as the average fat content of the pancreas versus the liver, were compared. The fat content of the pancreatic head, body and tail regions of the T2DM group were 5.59±4.70, 4.80±3.75 and 4.89±3.86%, respectively. The fat content of these regions in the normal control group were 3.89±2.47, 3.30±2.11 and 3.23±2.23%, respectively. The average fat content of the pancreas was 5.19±3.75% for the T2DM group and 3.47±2.00% for the normal control group. The average fat content of the liver was 9.87±3.19% for the T2DM group and 7.24±2.38% for the normal control group. Therefore, the results from MR chemical shift imaging suggested that there were no significant differences in the distribution of fat between the pancreas of patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and that from the healthy population; however, the average fat content in the pancreas of the T2DM group was significantly higher (F=3.597; P<0.05), as compared with the normal control group. In addition, there was no correlation between the fat contents in the pancreas and liver in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and the healthy population. PMID:26893633

  10. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  11. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes.

  12. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  13. Magnetic resonance image-guided photodynamic therapy of xenograft pancreas tumors with verteporfin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer generally has very poor prognosis, with less than 4% survival at 5 years after diagnosis. This dismal survival rate is in part due to the aggressive nature of the adenocarcinoma, leading to a late-stage at diagnosis and exhibits resistance to most therapies. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a model cellular and vascular therapy agent, which uses light activation of the delivered drug to photosensitize the local cellular millieu. We suggest that interstitial verteporfin (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A) PDT has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy to the commonly used Gemcitabine chemotherapy. In the current study, an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (Panc-1) has undergone interstitial verteporfin PDT (40 J/cm with verteporfin and 40 J/cm without verteporfin). Prior to PDT, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to determine the location and size of the tumor within the pancreas, allowing accurate placement of the diffusing fiber. The success of therapy was monitored in vivo by assessing the total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes 24 hours pre- and 48 hours post-PDT. Total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes were determined using T2 weighted (T2W) and Gd-DTPA difference T1 weighted (T1W) turbo spin echo (TSE) MR imaging sequences, respectively. The validity of the in vivo imaging for therapeutic response was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and histological staining of frozen tissue sections. The ex vivo DiOC7(3) fluorescence analysis correlates well with the information provided from the MR images, indicating that MR imaging will be a successful surrogate marker for interstitial PDT.

  14. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  15. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreas Function of the Pancreas What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a long flattened gland located ... controller of blood sugar levels. Where is the pancreas? The pancreas is located deep in the abdomen. ...

  16. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor. PMID:20616180

  17. [Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Davies, Nestor R; Kasparian, Andres C; Viotto, Lucas E; Moreno, Walter A; Gramática, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas represents around 6-36% of mucinous cystic neoplasm. The lesions are usually found in the body and tail of the pancreas and are generally solitary with a size range of 6-36 cm. We present a clinical case of a 63 years old patient with abdominal pain and weight loss. We used radiographic imaging studies. It was treated with surgery by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colectomy. Patient was not post operative complications.

  18. SU-E-J-226: Propagation of Pancreas Target Contours On Respiratory Correlated CT Images Using Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory Correlated CT (RCCT) scans to assess intra-fraction motion among pancreatic cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy allow for dose sparing of normal tissues, in particular for the duodenum. Contour propagation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from one reference respiratory phase to 9 other phases is time consuming. Deformable image registration (DIR) has been successfully used for high contrast disease sites but lower contrast for pancreatic tumors may compromise accuracy. This study evaluates the accuracy of Fast Free Form (FFF) registration-based contour propagation of the GTV on RCCT scans of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Twenty-four pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively studied; 20 had tumors in the pancreatic head/neck, 4 in the body/tail. Patients were simulated with RCCT and images were sorted into 10 respiratory phases. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the GTV for 5 phases (0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). The FFF algorithm was used to map deformations between the EE (50%) phase and each of the other 4 phases. The resultant deformation fields served to propagate GTV contours from EE to the other phases. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which measures agreement between the DIR-propagated and manually-delineated GTVs, was used to quantitatively examine DIR accuracy. Results: Average DSC over all scans and patients is 0.82 and standard deviation is 0.09 (DSC range 0.97–0.57). For GTV volumes above and below the median volume of 20.2 cc, a Wilcoxon rank-sum test shows significantly different DSC (p=0.0000002). For the GTVs above the median volume, average +/− SD is 0.85 +/− 0.07; and for the GTVs below, the average +/− SD is 0.75 +/−0.08. Conclusion: For pancreatic tumors, the FFF DIR algorithm accurately propagated the GTV between the images in different phases of RCCT, with improved performance for larger tumors.

  19. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  20. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Semin Chong; Kyung Soo Lee; Myung Jin Chung; Joungho Han; O. Jung Kwon; d Tae Sung Kim

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  1. Pneumoconiosis: Comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.; Lee, K.S.; Chung, M.J.; Han, J.H.; Kwon, O.J.; Kim, T.S.

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  2. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    ... to form the pancreas. Each part has a tube, called a duct. When the parts join together, a final duct, called the pancreatic duct, is formed. Fluid and digestive juices (enzymes) produced by the pancreas normally flow through this duct. If the ducts do not ...

  3. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... evidence that the complications of diabetes, such as diabetic retinopathy, may not get worse and may even improve after a pancreas-kidney transplant. More than 95% of people survive ... of the donated pancreas and kidney for the rest of your life.

  4. FIND: Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J

    2005-02-14

    This document examines the potential use of Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray (T-REX) sources for Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain (FIND) of special nuclear materials. A back-of-the-envelope, relative comparison of T-REX sources vs. Bremsstrahlung sources for this application is presented. It is estimated that use of T-REX for FIND could be as much as 5 x 10{sup 12} more effective than the use of anode based sources. Furthermore it is estimated that illumination of samples of dimension 1 cm on a side could produce up to {approx}10{sup 9} detectable photons per second.

  5. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  6. Imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Ghadirpour, Ali; Ataie-Oskuie, Reza; Kontzialis, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl was referred to a dentist complaining of parageusia, bad taste in the mouth, which started 9 months ago. Panoramic X-ray and non-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple bilateral unilocular cysts in the mandible and maxilla, along with calcification of anterior part of the falx cerebri. She was eventually diagnosed with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome based on imaging and histopathologic finding of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:25610614

  7. Imaging and Treatment Features of Idiopathic Pancreatitis and Pancreas Divisum in a Young Man: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Venesmaa, Sari VenesmaaSari; Heikkinen, Markku; Kainulainen, Sakari; Manninen, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Some patients with pancreas divisum (PD) develop symptoms of recurrent pancreatitis. This is probably caused by insufficient drainage of the pancreatic duct. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a non-invasive test reported to be highly accurate in diagnosing PD. Endoscopic minor papilla sphincterotomy is most effective in the treatment of patients with PD and pancreatic stones. We report a case of 17-year-old boy who has suffered from several abdominal pain attacks throughout his childhood without a specific diagnosis. Radiological findings after the first episode of pancreatitis were typical for PD and led to specific treatment and cure.

  8. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  9. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, François; Meuli, Reto

    2015-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. PMID:26255159

  10. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  11. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  12. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  13. Organ Facts: Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Pancreas Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Pancreas Facts The pancreas is a five to six inch ...

  14. Optical Range-Finding from Image Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckler, Paul Reese

    Scope of the study. Much of the labor-intensive work in agriculture consists of reaching out, grasping an object, and then placing the object in a desired position. This repetitious work exploits the unsurpassed hand-eye coordination in human beings. Substitution of machines for manual labor will require simulation of human hand-eye coordination. Most robots in agricultural applications will need the ability to recognize and manipulate three-dimensional objects. With present technology, this requirement makes agricultural robotic systems uneconomical, except for special applications. A method for gauging the distance from a video camera to an object of interest was investigated. By using a calibrated camera-lens system, range was related to focus. Optimum focus of the image was determined by maximizing the high -frequency content of the Fourier transform of the object image. The Walsh-Hadamard transform was investigated as an alternative focusing function. Software was developed to determine optimum image focus and control a motorized camera lens. Findings and conclusions. Range values from the video camera to target objects were calculated by the system. Calculated values were compared with measured distances. Differences between calculated and actual distance averaged less than 0.5%. The Walsh-Hadamard transform provided focus information comparable to the Fourier transform. Using double precision floating-point arithmetic, the Walsh-Hadamard transform executed more than three times faster than the Fourier transform. Distance values calculated using the Walsh -Hadamard transform differed from values calculated with the Fourier transform by less than 1%. This system used a passive, non-triangulation technique to obtain the distance from the machine vision camera to the object of interest. A passive non-triangulation system was the simplest image acquisition requirements, since it does not require a second camera, structured lighting, camera movement, or time

  15. (Development of gamma emitting, receptor-binding, radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to Feb. 28, 1988. In studies to better understand the nature of the m-AChR receptor subtypes, we have generated a manuscript which has been submitted for publication in Life sciences entitled: The effect of chronic atropine and diisopropylfluorophosphate on rat brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype concentrations. We have also developed a more direct synthesis of 3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate and its analogues. During this contract period, we have been involved with the synthesis of analogues 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). We have determined the affinity constants of various compounds synthesized this year for the muscarinic receptor from rat corpus striatum. We have continued our investigation of the m-AChR in pancreas. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Development of gamma-emitting, receptor binding radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This progress report covers period from Nov. 1, 1989 to Aug. 31, 1990. The long term objective was to develop receptor-binding radiotracers for SPECT or PET imaging of CNS or peripheral nervous system. The specific chemistry aims, as understood on the basis of past findings, were: to synthesize and develop a more polar analogs of 4IQNB, possessing similar binding characteristics but eliminated more rapidly from the surrounding tissues and the target organ, to design a method of introducing a technetium chelating group onto a molecule or cholinergic agent without drastic lowering of its apparent affinity, to synthesize and develop radiotracers based on m-AChR antagonists selective for one of the subtypes of the receptor. The chemistry service aims were to prepare and characterize (R,R)- and (R,S)-4IQNB and derivatives, to provide the triazene intermediate to other investigators, and to provide ({sup 123}I)4IQNB for in vivo imaging. The biochemistry aims were to characterize the vitro and in vivo properties of novel compounds and to perform the pharmacokinetic studies. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Johannes H. M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3–5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. PMID:20725831

  18. Computer Vision Tools for Finding Images and Video Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Computer vision offers a variety of techniques for searching for pictures in large collections of images. Appearance methods compare images based on the overall content of the image using certain criteria. Finding methods concentrate on matching subparts of images, defined in a variety of ways, in hope of finding particular objects. These ideas…

  19. Document imaging finding niche in petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cisco, S.L.

    1992-11-09

    Optical disk-based document imaging systems can reduce operating costs, save office space, and improve access to necessary information for petroleum companies that have extensive records in various formats. These imaging systems help solve document management problems to improve technical and administrative operations. Enron Gas Pipeline Group has installed a document imaging system for engineering applications to integrate records stored on paper, microfilm, or computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems. BP Exploration Inc. recently implemented a document imaging system for administrative applications. The company is evaluating an expansion of the system to include engineering and technical applications. The petroleum industry creates, acquires, distributes, and retrieves enormous amounts of data and information, which are stored on multiple media, including paper, microfilm, and electronic formats. There are two main factors responsible for the immense information storage requirements in the petroleum industry.

  20. NASA Technology Finds Uses in Medical Imaging

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA software has been incorporated into a new medical imaging device that could one day aid in the interpretation of mammograms, ultrasounds, and other medical imagery. The new MED-SEG system, dev...

  1. Post-transplant hepatic complications: Imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Drudi, F.M.; Pagliara, E.; Cantisani, V.; Arduini, F.; D'Ambrosio, U.; Alfano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation is considered definitive therapy for acute or chronic irreversible pathologies of the liver, and the increased survival rates are mainly due to improved immunosuppressive therapies and surgical techniques. However, early diagnosis of possible graft dysfunction is crucial to liver graft survival. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of the liver before and after transplant and in the detection of complications such as vascular and biliary diseases, acute and chronic rejection and neoplastic recurrence. Integrated imaging using color-Doppler, CT, MRI and traditional x-ray reach a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the management of transplanted patients. PMID:23395917

  2. Find Your Image between the Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel Singer

    2004-01-01

    Librarians' unfortunate fixation on image as a defining generational characteristic also makes them just as guilty of promoting misconceptions as nonlibrarians. Can the profession stand another article in the general press that trumpets the amazing new discovery that librarians can be young, trendy, stylish? The level of our colleagues'…

  3. A Preliminary Investigation of Normal Pancreas and Acute Pancreatitis Elasticity Using Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Juan; Zou, Liling; Yao, Minghua; Xu, Guang; Zhao, Lixia; Xu, Huixiong; Wu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the use of elastometry in healthy volunteers and patients with acute pancreatitis using virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) imaging technology performed on the pancreas. Material/Methods We enrolled 210 healthy volunteers and 44 acute pancreatitis patients in the study between March 2012 and June 2013. Healthy subjects were divided into 3 groups: young (18–30 years), middle-aged (30–50 years), and elderly (>50 years). VTQ was performed on the pancreatic head and body regions to obtain shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements, which were used to evaluate the elasticity values of tissues. Results The pancreatic head SWV value in the whole healthy group was 1.18±0.23 m/s, and that in the pancreatic body was 1.21±0.20 m/s. In patients with acute pancreatitis, the mean SWV measurements at the head were 1.18±0.20 m/s, compared to 1.25±0.19 m/s in the pancreatic body. There was no statistically significant difference between whole healthy volunteers and the acute pancreatitis group. Conclusions VTQ is a new method that shows promise for the quantification of pancreatic elasticity, but further studies are warranted. PMID:26062803

  4. Imaging of haemodialysis: renal and extrarenal findings.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Ferruccio; Quaia, Emilio; Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-06-01

    Electrolyte alterations and extra-renal disorders are quite frequent in patients undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The native kidneys may be the site of important pathologies in patients undergoing dialysis, especially in the form of acquired renal cystic disease with frequent malignant transformation. Renal neoplasms represents an important complication of haemodialysis-associated acquired cystic kidney disease and imaging surveillance is suggested. Extra-renal complications include renal osteodistrophy, brown tumours, and thoracic and cardiovascular complications. Other important fields in which imaging techniques may provide important informations are arteriovenous fistula and graft complications. Teaching points • Renal neoplasms represent a dreaded complication of haemodialysis.• In renal osteodystrophy bone resorption typically manifests along the middle phalanges.• Brown tumours are well-defined lytic lesions radiographically, possibly causing bone expansion.• Vascular calcifications are very common in patients undergoing haemodialysis.• Principal complications of the AV fistula consist of thrombosis, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25680325

  5. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases. PMID:27141135

  6. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases.

  7. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses*

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases. PMID:27141135

  8. MR imaging findings in diabetic muscle infarction.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Gitanjali; Nicholas, Richard; Pandey, Tarun; Montgomery, Corey; Jambhekar, Kedar; Ram, Roopa

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, often unrecognized complication seen in patients with poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus. The diagnosis is often missed and leads to unnecessary invasive investigations and inappropriate treatment. The patients usually present with unilateral thigh pain and swelling. MRI typically demonstrates diffuse swelling and increased T2 signal intensity within the affected muscles. The condition is self-limiting and is treated conservatively with bed rest and analgesics. Recurrences have been reported in the same or contralateral limb. We report a case of diabetic muscle infarction with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and imaging abnormality with recurrence on the contralateral side.

  9. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1586x1534 View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows ...

  10. [Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas. A case report].

    PubMed

    Chatti, Kais; Nouira, Kais; Ben Reguigua, Meher; Bedioui, Haykel; Oueslati, Saddik; Laabidi, Besma; Alaya, Mohamed; Ben Abdallah, Nejmeddine

    2006-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT), a rare mesenchymal neoplasm usually arising from the pleura, may also occur in many other extra pleural sites. It has exceptionally been described in the pancreas. This report describes the case of a benign SFT of the pancreas occurring in a 41-year-old man who presented with a solid epigastric mass. Pathological and immunohistochemical findings are presented. Imaging features on ultrasonography, CT, MRI, and arteriography are widely detailed. Surgical resection of the tumour was performed, and the patient died from postoperative complications.

  11. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Shah; Qari, Hasina; Banday, Tanveer; Altaf, Asma; Para, Mah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst” and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the MCN of the pancreas. In total, 16,322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analyzed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs.

  12. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects. PMID:26743286

  13. Utility of preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in diagnosing tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and tumor-forming pancreatitis remains difficult, and this situation can cause serious problems because the management and prognosis of these two focal pancreatic masses are entirely different. We herein report a case of tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic carcinoma in an 80-year-old woman. Computed tomography showed a solid mass in the head of the pancreas, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a complete obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. Dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a time-signal intensity curve (TIC) with a slow rise to a peak (1 min after the administration of the contrast material), followed by a slow decline at the pancreatic mass, indicating a fibrotic pancreas. Under the diagnosis of tumor-forming pancreatitis, the patient underwent a segmental pancreatectomy instead of a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathology of the pancreatic mass was chronic pancreatitis without malignancy. The pancreatic TIC obtained from dynamiccontrast MRI can be helpful to differentiate tumor-forming pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma and to avoid any unnecessary major pancreatic surgery.

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis Pain Pattern and Severity are Independent of Abdominal Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C. Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Tian, Ye; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Lewis, Michele D.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, David C.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    differ among clinically relevant groups of imaging findings. Conclusions Mechanisms that determine patterns and severity of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis are largely independent of structural variants observed by abdominal imaging techniques. Pancreas-relevant quantitative and qualitative pain measures should be included in the evaluation of patients with chronic pancreatitis, to assess pain severity independently of imaging findings. PMID:25424572

  15. SU-E-J-42: Evaluation of Fiducial Markers for Ultrasound and X-Ray Images Used for Motion Tracking in Pancreas SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, SK; Armour, E; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Wong, J; Ding, K; Iordachita, I; Sen, H Tutkun; Kazanzides, P; Bell, M Lediju

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Ultrasound tracking of target motion relies on visibility of vascular and/or anatomical landmark. However this is challenging when the target is located far from vascular structures or in organs that lack ultrasound landmark structure, such as in the case of pancreas cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate visibility, artifacts and distortions of fusion coils and solid gold markers in ultrasound, CT, CBCT and kV images to identify markers suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment. Methods Two fusion coils (1mm × 5mm and 1mm × 10 mm) and a solid gold marker (0.8mm × 10mm) were embedded in a tissue–like ultrasound phantom. The phantom (5cm × 12cm × 20cm) was prepared using water, gelatin and psyllium-hydrophilic-mucilloid fiber. Psylliumhydrophilic mucilloid acts as scattering medium to produce echo texture that simulates sonographic appearance of human tissue in ultrasound images while maintaining electron density close to that of water in CT images. Ultrasound images were acquired using 3D-ultrasound system with markers embedded at 5, 10 and 15mm depth from phantom surface. CT images were acquired using Philips Big Bore CT while CBCT and kV images were acquired with XVI-system (Elexta). Visual analysis was performed to compare visibility of the markers and visibility score (1 to 3) were assigned. Results All markers embedded at various depths are clearly visible (score of 3) in ultrasound images. Good visibility of all markers is observed in CT, CBCT and kV images. The degree of artifact produced by the markers in CT and CBCT images are indistinguishable. No distortion is observed in images from any modalities. Conclusion All markers are visible in images across all modalities in this homogenous tissue-like phantom. Human subject data is necessary to confirm the marker type suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment.

  16. Precocious puberty in children: A review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Faizah, MZ; Zuhanis, AH; Rahmah, R; Raja, AA; Wu, LL; Dayang, AA; Zulfiqar, MA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This review was aimed at determining the imaging findings in patients with precocious puberty. Results: Within a period of 8 years (from 2002 to 2010) there were 53 patients diagnosed with precocious puberty. Out of the 53 patients, 37 had undergone diagnostic imaging to detect the possible organic causes of precocious puberty. Imaging findings were positive in 31 patients and out of that, 3 patients had 2 findings each (34 abnormalities). Of the patients with positive imaging findings, central precocious puberty (gonadotrophin-dependent) was more common (81%; 25/31) and the causes included: tuber cinereum hamartoma (n = 10), glioma (n = 6), pineal gland tumour (n = 4), hydrocephalous (n = 3), arachnoid cyst (n = 2) and others (n = 3). Peripheral precocious puberty (gonadotrophin-independent) causes included: testicular adrenal rest tumour (n = 3), adrenal carcinoma (n = 1), ovarian granulosa thecal cell tumour (n = 1), and tuberous sclerosis (n = 1). Conclusion: Positive imaging findings were observed in 84% (31/37) of the subjects. Hypothalamic hamartoma was the most common imaging finding in central precocious puberty while testicular adrenal rest tumour was the most common imaging finding in peripheral precocious puberty. PMID:22970062

  17. Imaging findings of congenital tuberculosis in three infants.

    PubMed

    Neyaz, Z; Gadodia, A; Gamanagatti, S; Sarthi, M

    2008-02-01

    Congenital tuberculosis is a rare entity and diagnosis is usually delayed due to the nonspecific nature of the signs and symptoms. Imaging studies facilitate the early diagnosis of the disease and institution of appropriate therapy. We describe three cases of congenital tuberculosis along with the imaging features. Imaging findings of the chest included multiple pulmonary nodules, consolidation with cavitation, extensive bronchopneumonia and necrotic mediastinal adenopathy. Abdominal imaging findings included hepatomegaly with or without splenomegaly, multiple focal lesions in the spleen and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. PMID:18301825

  18. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  19. MR imaging findings of uterine pyomyoma: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiromi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Toyoki, Hiroshi; Hayasaki, Yoh; Furui, Tatsuro; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Hatano, Yuichiro

    2014-08-01

    A 69-year-old postmenopausal female with a spontaneously occurring uterine pyomyoma was described with emphasis on the MR imaging findings. On unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted MR images, a huge mottled mass suspected to contain blood products, necrotic tissue, or purulent or viscous fluid was demonstrated within anterior myometrial wall of uterine body. The mass was surrounded by a peripheral rim that was hyperintense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2-weighted images. On gadolinium-enhanced MR images, most of the mass was unenhanced, but the peripheral rim was equally enhanced with the surrounding myometrium. Pathological examination revealed an intramural uterine pyomyoma surrounded by fibrous capsules with abundant lymphocytes and neutrophils. Our findings indicate that pyomyoma should be considered when MR images demonstrate a myometrial cystic lesion accompanied by a peripheral rim. PMID:24615512

  20. Pancreas transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders (diabetic neuropathy), and kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy). Diabetic patients must take insulin everyday. ... on life support, is surgically implanted into a diabetic patient. This operation is most often done in combination ...

  1. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get a ...

  2. Intra-islet lesions and lobular variations in β-cell mass expansion in ob/ob mice revealed by 3D imaging of intact pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Saba; Kostromina, Elena; Nord, Christoffer; Eriksson, Maria; Lindström, Per; Ahlgren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The leptin deficient ob/ob mouse is a widely used model for studies on initial aspects of metabolic disturbances leading to type 2 diabetes, including insulin resistance and obesity. Although it is generally accepted that ob/ob mice display a dramatic increase in β-cell mass to compensate for increased insulin demand, the spatial and quantitative dynamics of β-cell mass distribution in this model has not been assessed by modern optical 3D imaging techniques. We applied optical projection tomography and ultramicroscopy imaging to extract information about individual islet β-cell volumes throughout the volume of ob/ob pancreas between 4 and 52 weeks of age. Our data show that cystic lesions constitute a significant volume of the hyperplastic ob/ob islets. We propose that these lesions are formed by a mechanism involving extravasation of red blood cells/plasma due to increased islet vessel blood flow and vessel instability. Further, our data indicate that the primary lobular compartments of the ob/ob pancreas have different potentials for expanding their β-cell population. Unawareness of the characteristics of β-cell expansion in ob/ob mice presented in this report may significantly influence ex vivo and in vivo assessments of this model in studies of β-cell adaptation and function. PMID:27713548

  3. [Pancreas pseudocyst or metastasis?].

    PubMed

    Gyorffy, Hajnalka; Tihanyi, Tibor; Gyökeres, Tibor; Zsirka-Klein, Attila; Kádár, Péter; Kaszás, Ilona; Kovács, Margit

    2005-10-23

    The authors review a case of a 24-year-old male patient hospitalised for repeated acute abdominal symptoms. His medical history included no diseases worth of mentioning. By imaging techniques (abdominal US and CT scan) a cystic lesion, measuring 40 x 35 x 30 mm in diameter was found, and was diagnosed as pseudocyst in the region of the tail of the pancreas. Jejunal feeding was introduced. The lesion did not improve and the second CT scan suggested a suspicion of pancreatic cystadenoma. Three months after first presentation the surgical resection was performed. The tumour, however, was found independent of the pancreas (90 x 80 x 50 mm). Both histologically and immunohistochemically the lesion proved to be the metastasis of a germ cell (yolk-sac) tumour. Following the morphological diagnosis, detailed urological and medical check up was performed. A previously nonpalpable small tumour was found in the left testis which was radically resected. The testicular tumour measuring 9 x 9 x 5 mm in diameter was diagnosed as embryonal carcinoma. Later on the patient underwent chemotherapy. He has been undergoing close oncological followup. Clinically, he is disease free. Authors emphasize the importance of imaging techniques and fine needle aspiration cytology in the case of retroperitoneal masses in young males. The possibility of a metastasis, especially of germ cell origin, should be excluded (not only by physical examination, but by ultrasound of testis also) in case of retroperitoneal cystic tumours even with unusual morphology.

  4. Brain CT and MRI: differential diagnosis of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C; Gadhia, Rajan; Faridar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Following a traditional approach, in Chapters 5 and 14-29 in the previous volume, diverse brain diseases are listed and their imaging findings described in detail. In this chapter the approach is from the imaging finding to the disease: for instance, what list of diseases can give rise to a contrast-enhancing mass in the cerebellopontine angle? Imaging findings that are reviewed in succession include the location of the lesion, its multiplicity and symmetry, its volume, ranging from atrophy to mass effect, its homogeneity, its density, measurable by computed tomography (CT), its appearance on T1, T2, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, finally, its characteristics after the infusion of intravenous contrast. A differential diagnosis for each finding is provided. While the approach adopted in this chapter is unconventional, we hope that it will be most helpful to anyone reading images. Furthermore, it could serve as the basis to create or complete image databases to guide in the interpretation of brain CT and MRI. PMID:27430457

  5. Intracranial hydatid cyst: imaging findings of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Darwish, Houssein

    2016-09-12

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting for a few months. The mass was totally excised, with no postoperative complications. We present MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this operatively proven case of hydatid cyst of the brain. We discuss imaging findings, in particular the findings on MRS, which is rarely reported in the literature.

  6. Intracranial hydatid cyst: imaging findings of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Darwish, Houssein

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting for a few months. The mass was totally excised, with no postoperative complications. We present MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this operatively proven case of hydatid cyst of the brain. We discuss imaging findings, in particular the findings on MRS, which is rarely reported in the literature. PMID:27620198

  7. The breadth of imaging findings of groove pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, John P; Neill Magarik, Meaghan Anne; Hardie, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of groove pancreatitis involves progressive cystic degeneration of hamartomatous pancreas rests which lie within the duodenal wall. Hamartomatous pancreatic rests can occur in other locations, but when located within the pancreaticoduodenal groove can lead to a particular clinical presentation following the development of fibrotic and inflammatory tissue. Although this is not a disease of the pancreas itself, the pancreatic duct and biliary system is frequently secondarily involved in this regional process. Identification of this entity and its varied appearances as a distinct pathology is essential given the unique management issues of groove pancreatitis.

  8. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group which was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future. PMID:26078050

  9. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p < 0.05). The ratios of the fluorescence intensity (RFI) analysis showed an accumulation rate of MSCs in the pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  10. Pancreas transplantation: review.

    PubMed

    Meirelles Júnior, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone.

  11. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  12. Nodular Elastosis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Whitney; Talmon, Geoffrey; Sasson, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Elastofibromatous change is a benign process that has been increasingly recognized in the tubular gastrointestinal tract. These changes can present as a colonic polyp or be seen in conjunction with inflammatory changes. Similar lesions have been noted in the liver, apparently associated with vascular injury. We describe a case in which multiple circumscribed nodules of elastofibromatous change within the pancreas had a similar morphology to nodular elastosis of the liver. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a finding occurring within the pancreas. PMID:26346767

  13. Enlarged pancreas: not always a cancer.

    PubMed

    Calculli, Lucia; Festi, Davide; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic fat accumulation has been described with various terms including pancreatic lipomatosis, pancreatic steatosis, fatty replacement, fatty infiltration, fatty pancreas, lipomatous pseudohypertrophy and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease. It has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula. The real incidence of this condition is still unknown. We report a case of pancreatic steatosis in a non-obese female patient initially diagnosed with a mass in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out to define the characteristics of the pancreatic mass. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of fat pancreas. Enlarged pancreas is not always a cancer, but pancreatic steatosis is characterized by pancreatic enlargement. MRI could give a definite diagnosis of pancreatic steatosis or cancer.

  14. Mirror-Image Reversals in Children's Printing: Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simner, Marvin L.

    Children from kindergarten through grade 2 were asked to copy, then print from memory, each of the 41 reversible letters and numbers administered individually on slides presented in random order. The main findings of an experiment with 179 children drawn from two elementary schools show that mirror-image reversals and other errors (1) take place…

  15. Clinical and Imaging Findings of True Hemifacial Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhuta, Bansari A.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Bansal, Shivani P.; Chemburkar, Vipul V.; Dev, Prashant V.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia is a rare developmental disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by a marked unilateral facial asymmetry. It involves the hard (bones and teeth) and soft tissues of the face. We report an interesting case of true hemifacial hyperplasia in a 25-year-old male highlighting the clinical and computed tomography imaging findings. PMID:24349801

  16. [Celiac sprue: A pictorial revision of main imaging findings].

    PubMed

    Constanza Damm, Araneda; Matías Molina, Villagra; Giancarlo Schiappacasse, Faúndez; Claudio Cortés, Arriagada

    2014-01-01

    Celiac sprue (CS) is an autoinmune desease caused by gliadin intake. The exposure to this protein produces damage of the intestinal mucosae, primarily of the duodenum and yeyunum, causing different symptoms and diverse imaging findings. The objective of this review is to show a pictorial essay of the main findings of CS and its complications in barited fluroscopy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. We show different images of patients with certified diagnosis of CS. In summary, these imaging modalities are useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with CS, as well as for the detection of complications. We believe that they are useful complementary exams that aid to the existing diagnosis criteria. PMID:26753388

  17. Establishment and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Model for In Vivo Imaging of Bmp4 Expression in the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Oumi, Nao; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Sato, Kenzo

    2011-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes results from the development of insulin resistance and a concomitant impairment of insulin secretion. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4)-Bmp receptor 1A signaling in β cells has recently been reported to be required for insulin production and secretion. In addition, Bmp4 blocks the differentiation and promotes the expansion of endocrine progenitor cells. Bmp4 therefore regulates the maintenance of homeostasis in the pancreas. In this study, we constructed a reporter plasmid carrying 7-kb enhancer and promoter region of the Bmp4 gene upstream of the firefly luciferase gene. We used this construct to produce transgenic mice by pro-nuclear microinjection, for subsequent in vivo monitoring of Bmp4 expression. The bioluminescent signal was detected mainly in the pancreas in three independent lines of transgenic mice. Furthermore, the bioluminescent signal was enhanced in association with the autophagy response to 24-h fasting. These results suggest that pancreatic expression of Bmp4 is involved in responding to the physiological environment, including through autophagy. These mouse models represent useful tools for toxicological screening, and for investigating the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic Bmp4 functions in vivo, with relevance to improving our understanding of pancreatic diseases. PMID:21949805

  18. Renal Allograft Torsion: US and CT Imaging Findings of a Rare Posttransplant Complication.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Rohit; Dasyam, Anil K; Tan, Henke; Furlan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Vascular torsion is a rare renal transplant complication which requires prompt diagnosis and surgery to salvage allograft function. We report here a case of renal allograft torsion with interesting imaging findings on unenhanced CT and color Doppler ultrasound. A 60-year-old woman with a history of pancreas and kidney transplant presented to the emergency room with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and minimal urine output. Unenhanced CT of the abdomen demonstrated an enlarged and malrotated renal allograft with moderate hydronephrosis. Color Doppler ultrasound demonstrated lack of vascularity within the allograft. The patient was taken urgently to the operating room where the renal allograft was found twisted 360 degrees around the vascular pedicle. After the allograft was detorsed, the color of the kidney returned and the Doppler signals for arterial flow improved. Intraoperative biopsy showed no evidence of infarct or acute cellular rejection. The detorsed kidney was surgically fixed in position in its upper and lower poles. Follow-up ultrasound 1 day later demonstrated normal blood flow to the renal allograft and the serum level of creatinine returned to normal.

  19. Imaging findings of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Sabriye Sennur; Toprak, Huseyin; Seker, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    In our study, in a 52-year-old man, specific and nonspecific findings of Schistosoma infestation were examined using ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. On computed tomography, capsular and septal calcifications and contrast enhancement of the liver capsule were seen. On T1-weighted magnetic resonance images diffuse hypointensity was seen in periportal spaces; on T2-weighted images in the same spaces, diffuse hyperintensity was seen. On dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, in these same spaces marked contrast enhancement was manifested in the late venous phase. These signal changes indicate edema due to periportal fibrotic tissue inflammation and are accepted as pathognomonic for a liver infested by Schistosoma. PMID:27594939

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in horses with septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Easley, Jeremiah T; Brokken, Matthew T; Zubrod, Chad J; Morton, Alison J; Garrett, Katherine S; Holmes, Shannon P

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen horses with septic arthritis underwent high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on results from historical and clinical findings, synovial fluid analyses and culture, and radiographic, ultrasonographic, arthroscopic, and histopathologic findings. MR findings included diffuse hyperintensity within bone and extracapsular tissue on fat-suppressed images in 14/14 horses (100%), joint effusion, synovial proliferation, and capsular thickening in 13/14 horses (93%), bone sclerosis in 11/14 horses (79%), and evidence of cartilage and subchondral bone damage in 8/14 horses (57%). Intravenous gadolinium was administered to five of the 14 horses and fibrin deposition was noted in all horses. Other findings after gadolinium administration included synovial enhancement in 4/5 (80%) horses, and bone enhancement in 1/5 (20%) horses. The MR findings of septic arthritis in horses were consistent with those reported in people. MRI may allow earlier and more accurate diagnosis of septic arthritis in horses as compared with other imaging modalities, especially when the clinical diagnosis is challenging. It also provides additional information not afforded by other methods that may influence and enhance treatment.

  1. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated.

  2. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated. PMID:26614136

  3. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Qing-yu; Cao, Yun; Zhong, Jin-shuang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP), with a view to improving the diagnosis of this kind of tumor. A total of 27 cases of histopathologically confirmed DFSP were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 18 patients underwent a CT scan and 9 patients underwent an MRI. All patients underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations; 1 patient underwent multiphrase CT enhancement examination. Imaging characteristics, including location, shape, size, number, edge, and attenuation or intensity of each lesion, both unenhanced and contrast enhanced, were analyzed. Of the 27 cases, 24 were solitary, 2 had 2 nodules, and 1 had multiple confluent tumors. The lesion with multiple confluent tumors was ill defined and irregular; the other lesions were oval or round, well-defined nodules or masses. The unenhanced CT images showed 19 homogenous isodense lesions. There was no calcification in any of the patients. The contrast-enhanced CT images showed intermediate and marked nonhomogeneous enhancement in 13 lesions, intermediate homogeneous enhancement in 4 lesions, and a mild heterogeneous enhancement in 2 lesions. MR T1-weighted images revealed 1 ill-defined and 9 well-defined homogeneous isointense lesions. T2-weighted images showed homogeneous hyperintensity to the muscles in 6 lesions, 3 mild hyperintense lesions with hypointense lesions, and 1 mixed, mild hyperintense and isointense lesion. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated intermediate and marked nonhomogeneous enhancement in 9 lesions and intermediate homogeneous enhancement in 1 lesion. DFSP is characterized by a subcutaneous well-defined soft tissue nodule or mass on plain CT/MR scans, and shows intermediate-to-marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. The imaging findings for DFSP are nonspecific, but may help to define the diagnosis in an appropriate clinical setting

  4. Breast MR Imaging for Equivocal Mammographic Findings: Help or Hindrance?

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Chikarmane, Sona A; Sippo, Dorothy A; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2016-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, because of its extremely high sensitivity in detecting invasive breast cancers, is sometimes used as a diagnostic tool to evaluate equivocal mammographic findings. However, breast MR imaging should never substitute for a complete diagnostic evaluation or for biopsy of suspected, localizable suspicious mammographic lesions, whenever possible. The modality's high cost, in addition to only moderate specificity, mandate that radiologists use it sparingly and with discrimination for problematic mammographic findings. It is rare that the reality or significance of a noncalcified mammographic finding remains equivocal or problematic at diagnostic mammography evaluation, which usually includes targeted ultrasonography (US). There are several reasons for this infrequent occurrence: (a) an asymmetry may persist on diagnostic views but be visible only on craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique projections, precluding three-dimensional localization for US or biopsy, or a lesion may persist on some diagnostic spot views but dissipate or efface on others; (b) uncertainty may exist as to whether apparent change is clinically important or owing to technical factors such as compression or positioning differences; or (c) a lesion may be suspected but biopsy options are limited owing to lack of a US correlate and lesion inaccessibility for stereotactic biopsy, or biopsy of a vague or questionably real lesion has been attempted unsuccessfully. This article will discuss the indications for problem-solving MR imaging for equivocal mammographic findings, present cases illustrating appropriate and inappropriate uses of problem-solving MR imaging, and present false-positive and false-negative cases affecting the specificity of breast MR imaging. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27284757

  5. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings during deep brain stimulation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Olivia O.; Watson, Robert E.; Bernstein, Matt A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Stead, S. Matt; Gorman, Debb A.; Lee, Kendall H.; Huston, John

    2012-01-01

    Object Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established neurosurgical technique used to treat a variety of neurological disorders, including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, dystonia, epilepsy, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study reports on the use of intraoperative MR imaging during DBS surgery to evaluate acute hemorrhage, intracranial air, brain shift, and accuracy of lead placement. Methods During a 46-month period, 143 patients underwent 152 DBS surgeries including 289 lead placements utilizing intraoperative 1.5-T MR imaging. Imaging was supervised by an MR imaging physicist to maintain the specific absorption rate below the required level of 0.1 W/kg and always included T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo and T2* gradient echo sequences with selected use of T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2 fast spin echo (FSE). Retrospective review of the intraoperative MR imaging examinations was performed to quantify the amount of hemorrhage and the amount of air introduced during the DBS surgery. Results Intraoperative MR imaging revealed 5 subdural hematomas, 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 1 intra-parenchymal hemorrhage in 9 of the 143 patients. Only 1 patient experiencing a subarachnoid hemorrhage developed clinically apparent symptoms, which included transient severe headache and mild confusion. Brain shift due to intracranial air was identified in 144 separate instances. Conclusions Intraoperative MR imaging can be safely performed and may assist in demonstrating acute changes involving intracranial hemorrhage and air during DBS surgery. These findings are rarely clinically significant and typically resolve prior to follow-up imaging. Selective use of T2 FLAIR and T2 FSE imaging can confirm the presence of hemorrhage or air and preclude the need for CT examinations. PMID:21699482

  6. Radiohybridization PET imaging of KRAS G12D mRNA expression in human pancreas cancer xenografts with [(64)Cu]DO3A-peptide nucleic acid-peptide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, A; Zhang, K; Aruva, M R; Cardi, C A; Opitz, A W; Wagner, N J; Thakur, M L; Wickstrom, E

    2007-06-01

    There is a compelling need to image pancreas cancer at an early stage. Human pancreas cancer cells display elevated levels of KRAS protein due to high copy numbers of KRAS mRNA, and elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. Therefore we hypothesized that pancreas cancer could be detected in vivo with a single probe that targets both KRAS mRNA and IGF1R. Because positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive imaging technique, we designed a probe incorporating the positron-emitting nuclide (64)Cu. The KRAS-specific hybridization probe consisted of 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethylaza)cyclododecane-10-aza-acetyl (DO3A) on the N-terminus of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) hybridization sequence (GCCATCAGCTCC) linked to a cyclized IGF1 peptide analog (d-Cys-Ser-Lys-Cys) on the C-terminus, for IGF1R-mediated endocytosis. A series of such KRAS radiohybridization probes with 0, 1, 2 or 3 mismatches to KRAS G12D mRNA, including exact matches to wild type KRAS mRNA and KRAS G12V mRNA, along with a double d(Ala) replacement IGF1 peptide control, were assembled by continuous solid phase synthesis. To test the hypothesis that KRAS-IGF1 dual probes could specifically image KRAS mRNA expression noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing AsPC1 pancreas cancer xenografts in immunocompromised mice, [(64)Cu]PNA radiohybridization probes and controls were administered by tail vein. The [(64)Cu]KRAS-IGF1 radiohybridization probe yielded strong tumor contrast in PET images, 8.6 +/- 1.4-fold more intense in the center of human pancreas cancer xenografts than in the contralateral muscle at 4 h post-injection. Control experiments with single base KRASmismatches, an IGF1 peptide mismatch, and a breast cancer xenograft lacking KRAS activation yielded weak tumor contrast images. These experiments are consistent with our hypothesis for noninvasive PET imaging of KRAS oncogene expression in pancreas cancer xenografts. Imaging oncogene m

  7. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399242

  8. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  9. A comprehensive review of imaging findings in human cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Bargavee; Aggarwal, Neeti; Makhaik, Sushma; Sood, Ramgopal

    2016-04-01

    Cysticercosis is a zoonotic disease most commonly affecting brain, eye and muscles, causing significant morbidity. Transmitted by faeco-oral route, this disease was endemic in many developing countries; it is now seen worldwide due to globalisation. Manifestations are produced by the mass effect of the parasite and by the immune response mounted by the host on the parasite. There are myriad clinical features and imaging findings. Radiological features depend on the number, stage and location of the parasite and associated complications. Knowledge of radiological findings is necessary to make an accurate diagnosis of this pleomorphic disease. PMID:26903229

  10. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, C; O'Connor, O J; O'Regan, K N; Keohane, C; Dineen, J; Hinchion, J; Sweeney, B; Maher, M M

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy. PMID:21088084

  11. A comprehensive review of imaging findings in human cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Bargavee; Aggarwal, Neeti; Makhaik, Sushma; Sood, Ramgopal

    2016-04-01

    Cysticercosis is a zoonotic disease most commonly affecting brain, eye and muscles, causing significant morbidity. Transmitted by faeco-oral route, this disease was endemic in many developing countries; it is now seen worldwide due to globalisation. Manifestations are produced by the mass effect of the parasite and by the immune response mounted by the host on the parasite. There are myriad clinical features and imaging findings. Radiological features depend on the number, stage and location of the parasite and associated complications. Knowledge of radiological findings is necessary to make an accurate diagnosis of this pleomorphic disease.

  12. Imaging findings in arthrofibrosis of the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Linklater, James M; Fessa, Chris K

    2012-07-01

    Arthrofibrosis is defined as joint pain and stiffness that does not allow functional range of motion and is due to adhesions or contracture of the joint. Arthrofibrosis is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of fibrous tissue that may be focal or diffuse and intra-articular or extra-articular. Trauma and surgery are the most common etiological factors. In the ankle and foot symptomatic arthrofibrosis is not uncommonly seen in the talocrural joint, posterior subtalar joint, and the metatarsophalangeal joints. Imaging can assist with diagnosis and planning treatment, most commonly using MRI and occasionally ultrasound. Typical imaging findings consist of capsular and pericapsular thickening and scarring, best demonstrated on proton-density MR images but also demonstrable on ultrasound.

  13. Incidental Findings in Imaging Research: Evaluating Incidence, Benefit and Burden

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Nicholas M.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Siddiki, Hassan A.; Harmsen, W. Scott; O’Byrne, Megan M.; Port, John D.; Tremaine, William J.; Pitot, Henry C.; McFarland, Beth; Robinson, Marguerite E.; Koenig, Barabara A.; King, Bernard F.; Wolf, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Context Little information exists concerning the frequency of clinically significant incidental findings (IFs) identified in the course of imaging research across a broad spectrum of imaging modalities and body regions. Objective To estimate the frequency with which research imaging IFs generate further clinical action, and the medical benefit/burden of identifying these IFs. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective review of subjects undergoing a research imaging exam that was interpreted by a radiologist for IFs in the first quarter of 2004, with 3-year clinical follow-up. An expert panel reviewed IFs generating clinical action to determine medical benefit/burden based on predefined criteria. Main Outcome Measures Frequency of (1) IFs that generated further clinical action by modality, body part, age, gender, and (2) IFs resulting in clear medical benefit or burden. Results 1376 patients underwent 1426 research imaging studies. 40% (567/1426) of exams had at least one IF (1055 total). Risk of an IF increased significantly by age (OR=1.5; [1.4–1.7=95% C.I.] per decade increase). Abdominopelvic CT generated more IFs than other exams (OR=18.9 compared with ultrasound; 9.2% with subsequent clinical action), with CT Thorax and MR brain next (OR=11.9 and 5.9; 2.8% and 2.2% with action, respectively). Overall 6.2% of exams (35/567) with an IF generated clinical action, resulting in clear medical benefit in 1.1% (6/567) and clear medical burden in 0.5% (3/567). In most instances, medical benefit/burden was unclear (4.6%; 26/567). Conclusions The frequency of IFs in imaging research exams varies significantly by imaging modality, body region and age. Research imaging studies at high risk for generating IFs can be identified. Routine evaluation of research images by radiologists may result in identification of IFs in a substantial number of cases and subsequent clinical action to address them in much smaller number. Such clinical action can result in medical

  14. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Domen, Hiromitsu; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Takahashi, Mizuna; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu; Ishizaka, Masanori

    2012-09-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas can be divided into true cysts, pseudocysts, and cystic neoplasms. Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) are a type of true cyst that can mimic pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. LECs are rare lesions; fewer than 90 cases have been reported in the English language literature. The case of a 60-year-old man with an LEC of the pancreas is reported. He was admitted with upper abdominal discomfort. Computed tomography showed a 64 × 39 mm cystic mass in the retroperitoneum behind the duodenum and inferior caval vein. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right-sided mass on T1-weighted imaging, with a clear boundary between the mass and its surroundings, except for the pancreas. The mass had an inhomogeneous intensity on T2-weighted imaging. Within the mass, small floating nodules with low intensity were seen. Endoscopic ultrasound showed many high-echoic nodules and smaller grains scattered everywhere in the mass. Fine needle aspiration and cytologic examination were performed. Characteristic chylaceous fluid was obtained in which anucleate squamous cells were found. There were also a few atypical large cells with irregularly shaped marked nucleoli and degenerative cytoplasm. Cytologic diagnosis was suspicious for malignancy. The lesion was diagnosed as a retroperitoneal cyst, probably of pancreatic origin. Since a neoplastic lesion could not be ruled out, surgery was performed. The lesion was palpable on the dorsal side of the second portion of the duodenum. The mass was completely resected. Macroscopically, the lesion was a multilocular cyst with a thin septal wall. The cyst was filled with cottage cheese-like substance. Microscopically, the cyst wall was composed of stratified squamous epithelium and dense subepithelial lymphatic tissue with developed lymph follicles. The epithelial cells had no atypia. The histopathologic diagnosis was LEC of the pancreas. The patient's postoperative course was good.

  15. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations. PMID:27761175

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Small Patella Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Noh-Hyuck; Chang, Jun-Hee; Ban, Yun-Seong; Song, Sang-Heon

    2016-03-01

    Small patella syndrome (SPS) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the patella and pelvic girdle abnormalities, including bilateral absence or delayed ossification of the ischiopubic junction and infra-acetabular axe-cut notches. Here, we report a case of SPS in a 26-year-old female. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed a small patella with thick eccentric non-ossified patellar cartilage and femoral trochlear dysplasia with hypoplastic patellar undersurface. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MRI findings in SPS. MRI findings could be clinically relevant because elongation of the medial patellofemoral ligament and trochlear dysplasia with eccentric non-ossified patellar cartilage might lead to patellofemoral maltracking with an osteochondral lesion or acute dislocation or an extensor mechanism injury. Though the patient presented in this case report only had a gastrocnemius injury at the origin site, physicians should carefully examine abnormalities with MRI when an SPS patient has a trauma to the knee. PMID:26955616

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Small Patella Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Noh-Hyuck; Chang, Jun-Hee; Ban, Yun-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Small patella syndrome (SPS) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the patella and pelvic girdle abnormalities, including bilateral absence or delayed ossification of the ischiopubic junction and infra-acetabular axe-cut notches. Here, we report a case of SPS in a 26-year-old female. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed a small patella with thick eccentric non-ossified patellar cartilage and femoral trochlear dysplasia with hypoplastic patellar undersurface. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MRI findings in SPS. MRI findings could be clinically relevant because elongation of the medial patellofemoral ligament and trochlear dysplasia with eccentric non-ossified patellar cartilage might lead to patellofemoral maltracking with an osteochondral lesion or acute dislocation or an extensor mechanism injury. Though the patient presented in this case report only had a gastrocnemius injury at the origin site, physicians should carefully examine abnormalities with MRI when an SPS patient has a trauma to the knee. PMID:26955616

  18. Imaging findings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Leonor; Vial, Yvan; Gengler, Carole; Meuli, Reto

    2016-03-01

    Congenital lung malformations are increasingly detected before birth. However, bronchial atresia is rarely identified in utero and not always recognized in neonates. There are two types of atresia: 1) proximal, located at the level of the mainstem or the proximal lobar bronchi, which is extremely rare and usually lethal during pregnancy, causing a tremendous volume increase of the distal involved lung with secondary hypoplasia of the normal lung, and 2) peripheral, located at the segmental/subsegmental bronchial level, which may present as an isolated lesion or as part of a complex congenital malformation. Prenatal findings are mostly nonspecific. Postnatal exams show overinflated lung areas and focal bronchial dilations. The typical fluid-filled bronchoceles are not always observed in neonates but develop progressively in the first months of life. This pictorial essay describes the spectrum of imaging findings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants. PMID:26646151

  19. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Valdair F; Prando, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes.

  1. Human pancreas scintigraphy using iodine-123-labeled HIPDM and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, K.; Shibata, T.; Saji, H.; Kubo, S.; Aoki, E.; Fujita, T.; Yonekura, Y.; Konishi, J.; Yokoyama, A. )

    1990-06-01

    The pancreatic affinity of iodine-123-labeled HIPDM (N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propane diamine) (({sup 123}I)HIPDM) was studied in 18 cases (5 normal volunteers, 7 cases with pancreas cancer, and 6 with chronic pancreatitis). In the normal cases, the pancreas was visualized in the planar images as early as 3 hr, and again at 20 hr postinjection. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed following 3-hr planar scintigraphy, provided excellent pancreas images without an overlap of activity in the liver or spleen. The mean pancreas-to-liver (P/L) ratio was 1.26 +/- 0.22 in normal controls. With the exception of one case of massive calcification in the pancreas, the entire pancreas could be observed in the cases with chronic pancreatitis, but the P/L ratio was 0.74 +/- 0.15, significantly lower than that of normal cases. Defective areas of the distal portion of the pancreas were clearly seen in those with cancer of the pancreas. The results of our study indicate that ({sup 123}I) HIPDM may have clinical potential as a human pancreas imaging agent.

  2. Acute non-traumatic pancreatitis in a patient with pancreas divisum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Anyfantakis, D; Partalis, N; Polimili, G; Kastanakis, S

    2013-09-15

    Pancreas divisum is a frequent congenital anatomical anomaly characterized by the failure of fusion of the ducts of Santorini and Wirsung during fetal development. Although the condition usually remains asymptomatic, it has been reported to be a predisposing factor of chronic and recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis. We report a case of acute non-traumatic pancreatitis in a 54-year-old Caucasian male with pancreas divisum. Diagnosis was established based on the findings from magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The patient was managed conservatively and was discharged home having an uneventful clinical course after five days of hospitalization. Although the role of the pancreas in the induction of acute pancreatitis is still a matter of debate, physicians have to be aware about this prevalent pancreatic anatomic abnormality. Timely detection may help in the prevention of potential recurrent pancreatic reaction.

  3. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  4. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with “rapid wash-in and slow wash-out” or “progressive enhancement” enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  5. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Güneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Acar, Türker; Savaş, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 1-68 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings.

  6. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Güneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Acar, Türker; Savaş, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 1–68 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings. PMID:25010372

  7. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  8. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys is to remove waste from the body through the production of urine. They also help to regulate blood pressure, blood volume and the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five ...

  9. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to NPF Contact Us Newsletter Sign Up Social Networking Button – Medium Search: Main menu Skip to primary ... 20814 1.866.726.2737 | Contact Us Social Networking Button – Medium © 2014 The National Pancreas Foundation | Health ...

  10. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas. PMID:27695176

  11. Partial annular pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gunjan; Mittal, Amit; Singal, Rikki; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a developmental anomaly that can be associated with other conditions such as Down syndrome, duodenal atresia, and Hirschsprung disease. A band of pancreatic tissue, in continuity with the pancreatic head, completely or incompletely encircles the descending duodenum, sometimes assuming a “crocodile jaw” configuration. We present the case of an adult who presented with epigastric pain and vomiting and was found to have annular pancreas.

  12. Healthcare reform for imagers: finding a way forward now.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Picard, Michael H

    2013-03-01

    The changing healthcare environment presents many challenges to cardiovascular imagers. This perspective paper uses current trends to propose strategies that cardiovascular imagers can follow to lead in managing change and developing the imaging laboratory of the future. In the area of quality, imagers are encouraged to follow guidelines and standards, implement structured reporting and laboratory databases, adopt ongoing quality improvement programs, and use benchmarks to confirm imaging quality. In the area of access, imagers are encouraged to enhance availability of testing, focus on patient and referring physician value and satisfaction, collaboratively implement new technologies and uses of imaging, integrate health information technology in the laboratory, and work toward the appropriate inclusion of imaging in new healthcare delivery models. In the area of cost, imagers are encouraged to minimize laboratory operating expenses without compromising quality, and to take an active role in care redesign initiatives to ensure that imaging is utilized appropriately and at proper time intervals. Imagers are also encouraged to learn leadership and management skills, undertake strategic planning exercises, and build strong, collaborative teams. Although it is difficult to predict the future of cardiovascular imaging delivery, a reasonable sense of the likely direction of many changes and careful attention to the fundamentals of good health care (quality, access, and cost) can help imagers to thrive now and in the future.

  13. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  14. Myocardial Fatty Foci in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Rop, Baiywo; Derrick, Edward; Armaly, Jamil; Siddiqui, Usman

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic syndrome. The hallmark of the disease is multiple hamartomatous lesions in multiple organ systems. Common cardiac manifestations of TSC are rhabdomyomas, which are a benign tumor of striated muscle. In some patients with TSC, myocardial fatty foci (MFF) deposition has been described with or without the presence of rhabdomyomas. We present the case of a 24-year-old female with TSC and refractory seizures, who was evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for an intracardiac right ventricular mass thought to be rhabdomyoma on echocardiography and for multiple areas of myocardial fatty deposition. Myocardial fatty deposition is a common finding in patients at cardiac imaging. In patients with TSC, it is critical that fatty deposits and lipomas are clearly distinguished from rhabdomyoma. CMR is an integral part of characterizing cardiac masses as it has superior soft tissue characterization and a wider field of view compared to echocardiography. A positive correlation has been shown between the number of MFF and the degree of extracardiac tuberous sclerosis (TS) manifestations suggesting that MFF may indicate more severe multiorgan disease in patients with TSC. Cardiac MR is superior to echocardiogram in evaluating and distinguishing intracardiac lipomas and fatty deposits from rhabdomyomas. Published studies have indicated that in patients with TSC, the presence of MFF correlates with the severity of multiorgan disease as was seen in our case. PMID:27555991

  15. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings.

    PubMed

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  16. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents.

  17. Fetal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings In Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection With Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Averill, Lauren W; Kandula, Vinay V R; Akyol, Yakup; Epelman, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection, requiring a detailed search for specific features. A combination of anterior temporal lobe abnormalities, white matter lesions, and polymicrogyria is especially predictive. Fetal MRI may provide a unique opportunity to detect anterior temporal cysts and occipital horn septations, as dilation of these areas may decrease later in development. Cortical migration abnormalities, white matter abnormalities, cerebellar dysplasia, and periventricular calcifications are often better depicted on postnatal imaging but can also be detected on fetal MRI. We present the prenatal brain MRI findings seen in congenital cytomegalovirus infection and provide postnatal imaging correlation, highlighting the evolution of findings at different times in prenatal and postnatal developments. PMID:26614131

  18. Is a fatty pancreas a banal lesion?

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    So far, a fatty pancreas has been related to obesity and the ageing processes in the body. The current list of pathogenetic factors of the condition is clearly extended with genetically conditioned diseases (cystic fibrosis, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome), pancreatitis, especially hereditary and obstructive, metabolic and hormonal disorders (hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypercortisolemia), alcohol overuse, taking some medicines (especially adrenal cortex hormones), disease of the liver and visceral adiposis. As regards lipomatosis of that organ resulting mainly from dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, the term "nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease" was introduced. Experimental studies on animals and histological preparations of the pancreatic fragments show that the lipotoxicity of the collected adipocytes collected ion the organ release a cascade of proinflammatory phenomena, and even induces the processes of carcinogenesis. Pancreas adiposis is best defined in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, a series of works proved the usefulness in the diagnostics of that pathology of transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasonography. In that method, the degree of adiposis was based on the comparison of echogenicity of the pancreas and the liver, renal parenchyma, spleen and/or retroperitoneal adipose. Recently, the evaluation was expanded by the evaluation of the degree of pancreatic adipose with the pancreas-to-liver index, utilizing to that end a special computer program. According to our experience, the simplest solution is the method utilized by us. On one crosssection of the body of the pancreas, its echogenicity is assessed in comparison to retroperitoneal adipose and the visibility of the splenic vein, pancreatic duct and the major retroperitoneal vessels. Depending on the visualization of these structures, it is possible to determine the degree of pancreas adiposis. Such a study applies

  19. Is a fatty pancreas a banal lesion?

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    So far, a fatty pancreas has been related to obesity and the ageing processes in the body. The current list of pathogenetic factors of the condition is clearly extended with genetically conditioned diseases (cystic fibrosis, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome), pancreatitis, especially hereditary and obstructive, metabolic and hormonal disorders (hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypercortisolemia), alcohol overuse, taking some medicines (especially adrenal cortex hormones), disease of the liver and visceral adiposis. As regards lipomatosis of that organ resulting mainly from dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, the term “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” was introduced. Experimental studies on animals and histological preparations of the pancreatic fragments show that the lipotoxicity of the collected adipocytes collected ion the organ release a cascade of proinflammatory phenomena, and even induces the processes of carcinogenesis. Pancreas adiposis is best defined in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, a series of works proved the usefulness in the diagnostics of that pathology of transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasonography. In that method, the degree of adiposis was based on the comparison of echogenicity of the pancreas and the liver, renal parenchyma, spleen and/or retroperitoneal adipose. Recently, the evaluation was expanded by the evaluation of the degree of pancreatic adipose with the pancreas-to-liver index, utilizing to that end a special computer program. According to our experience, the simplest solution is the method utilized by us. On one crosssection of the body of the pancreas, its echogenicity is assessed in comparison to retroperitoneal adipose and the visibility of the splenic vein, pancreatic duct and the major retroperitoneal vessels. Depending on the visualization of these structures, it is possible to determine the degree of pancreas adiposis. Such a study

  20. Is a fatty pancreas a banal lesion?

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    So far, a fatty pancreas has been related to obesity and the ageing processes in the body. The current list of pathogenetic factors of the condition is clearly extended with genetically conditioned diseases (cystic fibrosis, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome), pancreatitis, especially hereditary and obstructive, metabolic and hormonal disorders (hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypercortisolemia), alcohol overuse, taking some medicines (especially adrenal cortex hormones), disease of the liver and visceral adiposis. As regards lipomatosis of that organ resulting mainly from dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, the term “nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease” was introduced. Experimental studies on animals and histological preparations of the pancreatic fragments show that the lipotoxicity of the collected adipocytes collected ion the organ release a cascade of proinflammatory phenomena, and even induces the processes of carcinogenesis. Pancreas adiposis is best defined in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, a series of works proved the usefulness in the diagnostics of that pathology of transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasonography. In that method, the degree of adiposis was based on the comparison of echogenicity of the pancreas and the liver, renal parenchyma, spleen and/or retroperitoneal adipose. Recently, the evaluation was expanded by the evaluation of the degree of pancreatic adipose with the pancreas-to-liver index, utilizing to that end a special computer program. According to our experience, the simplest solution is the method utilized by us. On one crosssection of the body of the pancreas, its echogenicity is assessed in comparison to retroperitoneal adipose and the visibility of the splenic vein, pancreatic duct and the major retroperitoneal vessels. Depending on the visualization of these structures, it is possible to determine the degree of pancreas adiposis. Such a study

  1. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: (1) describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, (2) outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, (3) illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and (4) highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory, and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with brain

  2. Osteoma of long bone: an expanding spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Barry Glenn; Pytel, Peter; Moore, Drew D; Stacy, Gregory Scott

    2015-05-01

    Osteoma of long bone is an extremely rare, benign bone-forming surface lesion with the largest published case series consisting of only 14 patients. The most important and often most difficult lesion to differentiate from osteoma of long bone radiographically is parosteal osteosarcoma, which is a rare, low-grade surface osteosarcoma with the potential for dedifferentiation. Reports of imaging studies of osteoma of long bone depict a well-defined ossified mass arising from the surface of the diaphysis or metadiaphysis of a long bone. A characteristic feature is the homogeneity of the mass, with uniform density near or equal to that of cortical bone from the base of the lesion to its periphery. The 45-year-old female in this case presented with left hip fullness and was subsequently found to have a proximal femoral osteoma, which was unique in that it contained large fatty marrow spaces that corresponded to bands of relatively low density on plain radiography and computed tomography, giving it a heterogeneous appearance atypical of osteoma of long bone. Furthermore, the osteoma reported here was associated with a small but separate nodular focus of ossification in the adjacent soft tissue. These findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of parosteal osteosarcoma with a local soft tissue metastasis or satellite nodule resulting in radical resection of the tumor. Definitive diagnosis of osteoma was made on histology of both the parent lesion and ossified nodule as no neoplastic spindle cell proliferation was present to establish a diagnosis of low-grade osteosarcoma. This represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first such presentation of osteoma of long bone.

  3. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  4. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  5. Advances in pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Shamik; Oskrochi, Youssof; Easton, Graham; Papalois, Vassilios

    2016-04-01

    The potential to reverse diabetes has to be balanced against the morbidity of long-term immunosuppression associated with transplantation. For a patient with renal failure, the treatment of choice is often a simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney or pancreas after kidney. For a patient with glycaemic instability, choices between a solid organ or islet transplant have to be weighed against benefits and risks of remaining on insulin. Results of simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney transplantation are comparable to other solid-organ transplants, and there is evidence of improved quality of life and life expectancy. There is some evidence of benefit with respect to the progression of secondary diabetic complications in patients with functioning transplants for several years.

  6. Finding Bright-Spot Coordinates in Television Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, T. E.; Tietz, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides data for computer to calculate coordinates of bright spot of light in video image. Calculation performed while image being scanned, and results available immediately at end of video frame. Video-processing circuit has variety of potential uses in commerce and industry. For example, locates tagged-parts on factory assembly line or track airplane landing lights.

  7. [Injuries of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Vasiutkov, V Ia; Murasheva, Z M; Sukhov, D V; Burakov, M B

    1989-08-01

    Trauma of the pancreas was studied in 48 patients. It has a typical mechanisms and is characterized by intensity of the exerted force. Due to the last named circumstance, extensive retroperitoneal hematomas, ruptures of the parenchymatous organs, ligaments, veins, and large arteries often occur A severe condition of the patients with fall of arterial pressure and the development of shock is characteristic. It is difficult to establish the diagnosis of trauma of the pancreas before the operation. The most frequent complication is traumatic pancreatitis which is often attended by the development of cysts, fistulas, and peritonitis. The surgeon's tactics is determined by the character of the injury and is individual in each patient.

  8. Finding corner point correspondence from wavelet decomposition of image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohar, Mareboyana; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    A time efficient algorithm for image registration between two images that differ in translation is discussed. The algorithm is based on coarse-fine strategy using wavelet decomposition of both the images. The wavelet decomposition serves two different purposes: (1) its high frequency components are used to detect feature points (corner points here) and (2) it provides coarse-to-fine structure for making the algorithm time efficient. The algorithm is based on detecting the corner points from one of the images called reference image and computing corresponding points from the other image called test image by using local correlations using 7x7 windows centered around the corner points. The corresponding points are detected at the lowest decomposition level in a search area of about 11x11 (depending on the translation) and potential points of correspondence are projected onto higher levels. In the subsequent levels the local correlations are computed in a search area of no more than 3x3 for refinement of the correspondence.

  9. Giant mucinous cystic adenoma with pancreatic atrophy mimicking dorsal agenesis of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Dupré, Aurélien; Ines, David Da; Tixier, Lucie; Pezet, Denis; Buc, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mucinous cystic adenoma (MCA) of the pancreas is a rare benign cystic tumor with ovarian-like stroma and lack of communication with the pancreatic ductal system. The ovarian tissue is incorporated from the left gonad within the dorsal pancreas during embryogenesis. Consequently, congenital dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) cannot be associated with MCA. We report the case of a giant MCA associated with atrophy of the dorsal pancreas mimicking complete DAP. Pancreato-magnetic resonance imaging failed to identify the dorsal pancreas but the absence of diabetes mellitus and compression of the splenic vein with major tributaries rectified the diagnosis of secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. Unusual proximal location of the cyst in the pancreas may have induced chronic obstruction of both the dorsal pancreatic duct and the splenic vein, with secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. PMID:24672649

  10. Intraocular lymphoma after cardiac transplantation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging. PMID:23323042

  11. Uterine cervical carcinoma after therapy: CT and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Tae Woong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2003-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is one of the most frequent causes of death in women. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the primary modalities for follow-up of treated cervical carcinoma. A normal vaginal cuff after hysterectomy appears as a smooth, low-signal-intensity muscular wall on T2-weighted MR images. Early (2-3 months after treatment) and significant decreases in the signal intensity and volume of the tumor at MR imaging indicate a good response to radiation therapy. Sites of recurrence are the pelvis, lymph nodes, and distant sites. Pelvic recurrence appears as a heterogeneously enhancing mass at contrast material-enhanced CT and often appears as a heterogeneous, high-signal-intensity mass at T2-weighted MR imaging. Lymph node recurrence ranges from scattered, minimally enlarged nodes to large, conglomerate nodal masses. Determination of neoplastic infiltration of lymph nodes is based on size; most researchers consider nodes greater than 1 cm in short-axis diameter to be metastatic. Distant metastases are usually due to recurrent disease and occur in the abdomen, thorax, and bone. Knowledge of the normal therapeutic changes and the spectrum of recurrent tumor in patients with cervical carcinoma is important for accurate interpretation of follow-up CT and MR images.

  12. Practicing the Code of Ethics, finding the image of God.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The Code of Ethics for Nurses gives a professional obligation to practice in a compassionate and respectful way that is unaffected by the attributes of the patient. This article explores the concept "made in the image of God" and the complexities inherent in caring for those perceived as exhibiting distorted images of God. While the Code provides a professional standard consistent with a biblical worldview, human nature impacts the ability to consistently act congruently with the Code. Strategies and nursing interventions that support development of practice from a biblical worldview and the Code of Ethics for Nurses are presented.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jeong A; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection. PMID:27587946

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jeong A; Lee, In Sook; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection. PMID:27587946

  15. [Imaging findings of muscle traumas in sports medicine].

    PubMed

    Carrillon, Y; Cohen, M

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic muscular pathology is frequent in the athlete. Usually, these lesions heal spontaneously leaving no sequelae. One must be able to predict how long the healing process will last in order to avoid a long period of inactivity and to protect the patient from a recurrent tear. Medical imaging can define the precise location and severity of muscle traumas and detect critical elements that will delay complete repair. Sonography is the most useful and the least expensive imaging technique for analyzing muscular trauma. It provides a good study of muscle fibers, tendons, and aponeurosis but is limited in its poor visualization of the deep structures such as hamstring tendons and the difficulty in detecting muscular scar. MRI is the most sensitive imaging technique for analyzing muscular trauma. However, muscular fibers themselves are not visualized with MRI. It remains a secondary technique, adapted to the insufficiencies of sonography. Nevertheless, the exact place of medical imaging in traumatic muscular pathology remains and leaves the door open to many later studies.

  16. Iliac vein compression syndrome: Clinical, imaging and pathologic findings

    PubMed Central

    Brinegar, Katelyn N; Sheth, Rahul A; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bautista, Jemianne; Oklu, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is the pathologic compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery, resulting in left lower extremity pain, swelling, and deep venous thrombosis. Though this syndrome was first described in 1851, there are currently no standardized criteria to establish the diagnosis of MTS. Since MTS is treated by a wide array of specialties, including interventional radiology, vascular surgery, cardiology, and vascular medicine, the need for an established diagnostic criterion is imperative in order to reduce misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Although MTS has historically been diagnosed by the presence of pathologic features, the use of dynamic imaging techniques has led to a more radiologic based diagnosis. Thus, imaging plays an integral part in screening patients for MTS, and the utility of a wide array of imaging modalities has been evaluated. Here, we summarize the historical aspects of the clinical features of this syndrome. We then provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature on the efficacy of imaging tools available to diagnose MTS. Lastly, we provide clinical pearls and recommendations to aid physicians in diagnosing the syndrome through the use of provocative measures. PMID:26644823

  17. Statistical techniques to find similar objects in images

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K

    2003-10-16

    One problem in similarity-based object retrieval (SBOR) is how to define and estimate the similarity between two objects. In this paper we present a shape similarity measure based on thin-plate splines, and compare its performance with several other measures used in SBOR. We evaluate the methods on both artificial and real images.

  18. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pericardium: normal and pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Higgins, C.B.; Lanzer, P.; Lipton, M.J.; Schiller, N.; Crooks, L.E.; Botvinick, E.B.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-02-01

    Twenty normal subjects and ten patients with pericardial abnormalities underwent ECG-gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thorax using a 0.35-tesla superconducting system. The patients with pericardial abnormalities were also evaluated with serial chest radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, and/or angiography. ECG gating was necessary to identify the normal pericardium, which was visualized as a 1- to 2-mm-wide curvilinear structure of low signal intensity. Pericardial thickening in constrictive pericarditis was clearly delineated on gated MR images. Pericardial inflammation caused a marked increase in signal intensity as well as thickening of the pericardium. Pericardial effusions and pericardial adhesions were also demonstrated. A simple pericardial cyst and a complex pericardial mass were identified and differentiated from pericardial fat and diaphragmatic eventration. MR appears to be an important modality for the evaluation of pericardial disease.

  20. Journals Find Many Images in Research Are Faked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Kristin Roovers was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania with a bright career ahead of her--a trusted member of a research laboratory at the medical school studying the role of cell growth in diabetes. When an editor of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" did a spot-check on one of her images for an article in 2005, Roovers'…

  1. Magnetic Resonance Sialography Findings of Submandibular Ducts Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karaca Erdoğan, Nezahat; Altay, Canan; Özenler, Nesibe; Bozkurt, Tuğba; Uluç, Engin; Dirim Mete, Berna; Özdemir, İsmail

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to assess the problem solving capability of magnetic resonance sialography (MR sialography), a noninvasive method for imaging submandibular gland ducts and determining duct-related pathologies, by comparing diseased and healthy cases. Materials and Methods. We conducted radiological assessment on a total of 60 submandibular glands (mean age 44.7) in 20 cases and 10 volunteers. MR sialography examinations were conducted with single-shot fast spin-echo sequence by using a surface coil placed on the submandibular gland. Each gland was evaluated in terms of the length, width and stricture of the main duct, as well as the difference between the intraparenchymal duct width, and the main duct width. Statistical analysis was performed. Results. In the MR sialography the primary duct mean length was determined as 51 mm (40–57 mm) in all submandibular glands. On the MR sialography imaging, the visualization ratio of the ductal system of submandibular gland was evaluated in the cases and volunteers. Conclusion. MR sialography is an effective and a noninvasive method in imaging submandibular gland ducts, demonstrating the presence, location and degree of stricture/dilatation, and elucidating the disease etiology. PMID:23984362

  2. Incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Vincent, Steven D; Hellstein, John W; Qian, Fang; Smoker, Wendy R K; Ruprecht, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained widespread acceptance in dentistry for a variety of applications. Most dentists who are not radiologists/trained in radiology are generally not familiar with interpretation of anatomical structures and/or pathosis outside their area of primary interest, as often this was not within the scope of their training. Objectives. To assess that the number of incidental findings on a CBCT scan is high both within and outside of the primary area of interest, thereby emphasizing the importance of interpretation of all areas visualized on the scan. Materials and Methods. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist reviewed 1000 CBCT scans (382 males and 618 females) for findings both in- and outside the area of interest. Results. Of the 1000 subjects that were reviewed, 943 scans showed findings in the primary regions of interest and/or outside the regions of interest, and 76 different conditions were visualized in these scans both in and outside the areas of interest. Conclusion. From the wide scope of findings noted on these scans, it can be concluded that it is essential that a person trained in advanced interpretation techniques in radiology interprets cone beam computed tomography scans.

  3. Cerebellar disorders: clinical/radiologic findings and modern imaging tools.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar disorders, also called cerebellar ataxias, comprise a large group of sporadic and genetic diseases. Their core clinical features include impaired control of coordination and gait, as well as cognitive/behavioral deficits usually not detectable by a standard neurologic examination and therefore often overlooked. Two forms of cognitive/behavioral syndromes are now well identified: (1) the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, which combines an impairment of executive functions, including planning and working memory, deficits in visuospatial skills, linguistic deficiencies such as agrammatism, and inappropriate behavior; and (2) the posterior fossa syndrome, a very acute form of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome occurring essentially in children. Sporadic ataxias include stroke, toxic causes, immune ataxias, infectious/parainfectious ataxias, traumatic causes, neoplasias and paraneoplastic syndromes, endocrine disorders affecting the cerebellum, and the so-called "degenerative ataxias" (multiple system atrophy, and sporadic adult-onset ataxias). Genetic ataxias include mainly four groups of disorders: autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal-dominant ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias and episodic ataxias), mitochondrial disorders, and X-linked ataxias. In addition to biochemical studies and genetic tests, brain imaging techniques are a cornerstone for the diagnosis, clinicoanatomic correlations, and follow-up of cerebellar ataxias. Modern radiologic tools to assess cerebellar ataxias include: functional imaging studies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, volumetric studies, and tractography. These complementary methods provide a multimodal appreciation of the whole long-range cerebellar network functioning, and allow the extraction of potential biomarkers for prognosis and rating level of recovery after treatment. PMID:27432679

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Childhood Period Nasopharynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Elif; Sahin, Burcu; Ciledag, Nazan; Arda, Kemal Niyazi; Caglar, Emrah; Ilhan, Inci Ergurhan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a rarely seen tumor in childhood. It is mostly detected late as the clinical features are similar to other childhood tumors which affect the nasopharynx and adenoidal hypertrophy. Therefore, the radiological features of childhood tumors of the nasopharynx must be well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of MR imaging features of childhood nasopharynx cancer. Material/Methods The study included 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients under the age of 18 years who presented at hospital between February 2008 and March 2014 and who had tissue diagnosis and MRI of the nasopharynx region. The MRI scans were evaluated by two radiologists. Loco-regional spread, asymmetry, signal intensity of the tumors, and lymph nodes were evaluated. Results In all the patients there was a mass which narrowed the nasopharynx. In all cases, unilateral mastoid opacification was observed. In 9 cases (90%), parapharyngeal extension was found. In 8 cases (80%), the mass showed an extension into the nasal cavity or oropharynx. In 5 cases (50%), there was an involvement of the skull base. In 3 patients (30%), an extension to the masticator space and pterygopalatine fossa was found. There were enlarged cervical lymph nodes bilaterally in 10 cases (100%). In 4 cases (40%), a lateral retropharyngeal lymph node was detected. Conclusions Childhood nasopharyngeal cancers are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. MR imaging can be helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of childhood nasopharynx cancer from other diseases of the nasopharynx. PMID:26767071

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  6. Retroperitoneal Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma: Imaging Findings and Transarterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Huojun Yang Jijin Lu Jianping; Sheng Jin; Yuan Min; Jiang Xu; Li Yuxiao; Gupta, Sanjay

    2010-04-15

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (EOS) is an uncommon and usually highly aggressive mesenchymal tumor. Retroperitoneal extraskeletal osteosarma (REOS) is exceedingly rare. Due to the rare nature of the disease, both the diagnosis and the management of REOS can be challenging. We present the clinical history, CT findings, angiographic manifestations, and use of transarterial chemoembolization for treatment in a case of REOS. To our knowledge, the angiographic features of and attempt at transarterial treatment of REOS have not been reported in the literature.

  7. Clinical and Imaging Findings in an Infant With Zika Embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Culjat, Marko; Darling, Stephen E; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Ching, Natascha; Kumar, Mukesh; Min, Sarah K; Wong, Rupa; Grant, Leon; Melish, Marian E

    2016-09-15

    Recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks have been associated with an increased incidence of neonatal microcephaly. Subsequently, tropism for the brain was established in human fetal brain tissue. We present the first congenital ZIKV infection in the United States, confirmed by high ZIKV immunoglobulin M antibody titers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The phenotypic characteristics of the patient fall within fetal brain disruption sequence, suggesting impaired brain development in the second half of gestation. Brain imaging revealed an almost agyric brain with diffuse parenchymal calcifications, hydrocephalus ex vacuo, and cerebellar hypoplasia. Ophthalmologic examination revealed macular pigment stippling and optic nerve atrophy. Liver, lungs, heart, and bone marrow were not affected. The patient had progressive neurologic deterioration in the first month of life. The discovery of ZIKV infection in human fetal brain tissue along with serologic confirmation proves the vertical transmission of ZIKV. Therefore, ZIKV has joined the group of congenital infections.

  8. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  9. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications.

    PubMed

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Yong Eun; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction.

  10. Imaging Findings of a Patient with Incomplete Phenotypical Expression of the PHACES Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, B.; Altugan, F.S.; Firat, M.; Lasjaunias, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We present imaging findings of a patient with an incomplete form of the PHACES syndrome with dolichosegmental intracranial arteries as the predominant component, and discuss the etiopathological and clinical significance of this finding. PMID:20557791

  11. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hunter, Jill V; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R; Wu, Trevor C; McCauley, Stephen R; Vogt, Gregory S; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian; Levin, Harvey S

    2016-04-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p < 0.04). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by tractography did not significantly differ between groups. However, DTI metrics were significantly correlated with declarative memory (e.g., left ventral striatum ADC with delayed recall, r = -0.74; p = 0.02) and with RT to the repeating number sequence (r = 0.70; p = 0.04) in the boxers. Years of boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from -0.65 for the right ventral striatum to -0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = -0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = -0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed. PMID:26414735

  12. Fetus-in-fetu: imaging and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junjie; VongPhet, Soulithon; Zhang, Zhichong; Mo, Jiacong

    2012-02-01

    A 3.5-month-old boy was hospitalized because of an abdominal mass found accidentally. On physical examination, a smooth, firm, nontender mass was present in the right upper quadrant. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a large, hyperechoic, heterogenous mass with clear boundaries, and scarce blood flow. Abdominal CT scan showed a bulky right retroperitoneal mass. Three-dimensional CT imaging demonstrated spine, iliac bone, and long bones of limbs. The mass was excised successfully. After opening the sac it was noted to contain an incompletely developed fetus with grossly visible limbs, clearly discernible male genitalia, hairs, and a poorly formed head. The fetus was connected to the sac via an 8 cm cord-like structure. Microscopic examination of the mass revealed the presence of skin, cartilage, bone, intestine, and cysts with simple cuboidal epithelium. The use of CT scans enhanced the accuracy of pre-operative diagnosis. Identification of the vertebral column and the long bones of limbs are important indications for the diagnosis. Pathologically, fetus in fetu has many characteristics different from teratoma.

  13. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Sakai, Shinya; Aono, Shoji; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Inoue, Takeshi; Ohta, Koji; Tanada, Minoru; Teramoto, Norihiro

    2010-07-01

    A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) originating in the pancreas is rare. We report a 55-year-old woman with an asymptomatic pancreatic mass incidentally discovered on abdominal ultrasonography. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed a well-demarcated exophytic mass in the pancreatic head with prolonged and delayed enhancement. The mass showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images and heterogeneous hypointensity with spotty hyperintensity foci on T2-weighted images. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT showed no significant FDG uptake. The resected mass was composed of spindle cells that were positive for CD34; and hemangiopericytomatous vessels were focally detected. The mass was finally diagnosed as an SFT of the pancreas.

  14. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  15. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  16. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN SMALL RUMINANTS WITH BRAIN DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, Katrin; Oevermann, Anna; Precht, Christina; Lauper, Josiane; Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Brain disease is an important cause of neurologic deficits in small ruminants, however few MRI features have been described. The aim of this retrospective, case series study was to describe MRI characteristics in a group of small ruminants with confirmed brain disease. A total of nine small ruminants (six sheep and three goats) met inclusion criteria. All had neurologic disorders localized to the brain and histopathologic confirmation. In animals with toxic-metabolic diseases, there were bilaterally symmetric MRI lesions affecting either the gray matter (one animal with polioencephalomalacia) or the white matter (two animals with enterotoxemia). In animals with suppurative inflammation, asymmetric focal brainstem lesions were present (two animals with listeric encephalitis), or lesions typical of an intra-axial (one animal) or dural abscess (one animal), respectively. No MRI lesions were detected in one animal with suspected viral cerebellitis and one animal with parasitic migration tracts. No neoplastic or vascular lesions were identified in this case series. Findings from the current study supported the use of MRI for diagnosing brain diseases in small ruminants.

  17. Stereological analyses of the whole human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Ananta; Fowler, Jonas L.; Zielinski, Mark C.; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami

    2016-01-01

    The large size of human tissues requires a practical stereological approach to perform a comprehensive analysis of the whole organ. We have developed a method to quantitatively analyze the whole human pancreas, as one of the challenging organs to study, in which endocrine cells form various sizes of islets that are scattered unevenly throughout the exocrine pancreas. Furthermore, the human pancreas possesses intrinsic characteristics of intra-individual variability, i.e. regional differences in endocrine cell/islet distribution, and marked inter-individual heterogeneity regardless of age, sex and disease conditions including obesity and diabetes. The method is built based on large-scale image capture, computer-assisted unbiased image analysis and quantification, and further mathematical analyses, using widely-used software such as Fiji/ImageJ and MATLAB. The present study includes detailed protocols of every procedure as well as all the custom-written computer scripts, which can be modified according to specific experimental plans and specimens of interest. PMID:27658965

  18. Strategy to differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takuma, Kensuke; Kamisawa, Terumi; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Egawa, Naoto; Igarashi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly described entity of pancreatitis in which the pathogenesis appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms. Based on histological and immunohistochemical examinations of various organs of AIP patients, AIP appears to be a pancreatic lesion reflecting a systemic “IgG4-related sclerosing disease”. Clinically, AIP patients and patients with pancreatic cancer share many features, such as preponderance of elderly males, frequent initial symptom of painless jaundice, development of new-onset diabetes mellitus, and elevated levels of serum tumor markers. It is of uppermost importance not to misdiagnose AIP as pancreatic cancer. Since there is currently no diagnostic serological marker for AIP, and approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult, AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. Findings suggesting AIP rather than pancreatic cancer include: fluctuating obstructive jaundice; elevated serum IgG4 levels; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; delayed enhancement of the enlarged pancreas and presence of a capsule-like rim on dynamic computed tomography; low apparent diffusion coefficient values on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image; irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; less upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, presence of other organ involvement such as bilateral salivary gland swelling, retroperitoneal fibrosis and hilar or intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis; negative work-up for malignancy including endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration; and steroid responsiveness. Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy, accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection. PMID:22416175

  19. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X; Cooper, D; Lachaine, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  20. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  1. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas arising in an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FUJII, KENSUKE; NITTA, TOSHIKATSU; KAWASAKI, HIROSHI; KATAOKA, JUN; TOMINAGA, TOMO; INOUE, YOSHIHIRO; KADOTA, EIJI; ISHIBASHI, TAKASHI; UCHIYAMA, KAZUHISA

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas arising in an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). A 68-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of fatigue. Computed tomography revealed an irregular mass in the pancreatic head, which displayed high-signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathological findings revealed intraductal papillary proliferative changes involving the main and branch ducts of the pancreatic head. Based on the immunohistochemistry results, the intraductal lesion was diagnosed as IPMN. The pathological diagnosis for the invasive carcinoma was anaplastic giant-cell carcinoma of the pancreas (ACP), and the focus of IPMN dedifferentiation to ACP was found to be located at the periphery of the IPMN. At 18 months postoperatively, the patient remains disease-free. PMID:26870354

  2. [A case of solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Makoto; Kuroiwa, Ganji; Sato, Yasushi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi; Kato, Junji

    2009-07-01

    A 58-year-old woman without any clinical symptoms had a routine health check-up, during which a mass in the head of the pancreas was detected by US. Abdominal US showed a round, hypoechogenic nodule of the pancreatic head. The tumor measured 3cm in diameter and contained an anechoic area. CT revealed a well-demarcated tumor in the pancreatic head. The tumor was partially enhanced by contrast medium, but the left portion of the tumor, which US had shown to be an anechoic area was not enhanced. Imaging findings suggested an endocrine tumor with cystic changes. A pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. The tumor was composed of spindle-shaped cells. There was a typical patternless growth of short fascicles and a short storiform arrangement of cells in the stroma with varying degrees of collagenization. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CD34 and Bcl-2. Based on the light microscopic morphology and immunostaining profile, the tumor was classified as a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pancreas.

  3. Management of mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Testini, Mario; Gurrado, Angela; Lissidini, Germana; Venezia, Pietro; Greco, Luigi; Piccinni, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumour”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst”, and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. In total, 16 322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analysed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis, and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs. PMID:21128317

  4. [Prophylactic pancreas surgery].

    PubMed

    Langer, P; Rothmund, M; Bartsch, D K

    2006-01-01

    The goal of prophylactic surgery is to prevent malignant growth in patients with hereditary tumor predisposition. The pancreas presents as particularly challenging, due to the difficulty of operation and comparatively high risk of morbidity and even mortality. In addition, partial operative procedures and, more significantly, total resection lead to exocrine pancreas insufficiency and secondary diabetes, with grave consequences for the patient. Hereditary tumor predisposition syndromes that can result in pancreaticoduodenal endocrine tumors (PET) include multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. As penetrance is maximally 70-80% and the 10-year survival rate over 80%, prophylactic pancreatic resection without evidence of a tumor is not indicated. However, prophylactic extension of a resection would be advised, should a PET be diagnosed. Patients predisposed to developing ductal pancreatic carcinoma (PC) are at risk of familial pancreatic cancer syndrome (FPC), hereditary pancreatitis, and other hereditary tumor predisposition syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and familial atypical multiple mole-melanoma syndrome. As the gene defect responsible for FPC has yet to be identified and the penetrance of PC in the other tumor predisposition syndromes is low or unknown, a prophylactic pancreatectomy based on today's knowledge is not indicated. Prophylactic extension of the resection is advisable should PC or high-grade PanIN lesions be diagnosed, as these patients often present with multifocal dysplasia and even carcinoma.

  5. Primary hepatocellular lesions: imaging findings on state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Indra C; Hussain, Shahid M; de Man, Robert A; Zondervan, Pieter E; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is routinely used for the workup of patients with focal or diffuse liver disease, including primary hepatocellular lesions, storage diseases, metastatic liver disease, and diseases of the hepatobiliary tree. The most important magnetic resonance imaging sequences used for diagnostic imaging of the liver consist of T1-weighted sequences, T2-weighted sequences, and at least the arterial and delayed phases of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced imaging. This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging of primary hepatocellular lesions and will describe the following: (1) the classification and etiology of primary hepatocellular lesions, including focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatocellular adenoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma; (2) the stepwise carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis on magnetic resonance imaging; and (3) the typical imaging findings of primary hepatocellular lesions on magnetic resonance imaging, with differential diagnoses. PMID:18436110

  6. Bilateral renal lymphangiectasia: radiological findings by ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Elbanna, Khaled Youssef; Almutairi, Badr M; Zidan, Ahmed Touni

    2015-01-01

    Renal lymphangiectasia is a rare benign condition of the kidney without specific clinical presentations. Classic imaging findings are described in literature. Here, we present a case of renal lymphangiectasia with history of bilateral flank pain and abnormal renal function tests. The radiological appearance on ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) showed features of bilateral renal lymphangiectasia but the patient refused invasive procedure for aspiration of the cysts. So, follow-up of the patient was done by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings of our case on US, CT, and MRI are discussed along with details of the additional finding of dilated retroperitoneal lymphatic channels, cisterna chyli, as well as the thoracic duct.

  7. Severe neurologic impairment and uncommon magnetic resonance imaging findings after carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Clément; Bouix, Julien; Poyat, Chrystelle; Alhanati, Laure; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Falzone, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of fatal poisoning worldwide and can lead to severe brain damages. We report a delayed encephalopathy after a severe carbon monoxide poisoning with uncommon magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:26078257

  8. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP.more » In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.« less

  9. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP. In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.

  10. Severe neurologic impairment and uncommon magnetic resonance imaging findings after carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Clément; Bouix, Julien; Poyat, Chrystelle; Alhanati, Laure; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Falzone, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of fatal poisoning worldwide and can lead to severe brain damages. We report a delayed encephalopathy after a severe carbon monoxide poisoning with uncommon magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  11. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  12. Molecular Pathways Controlling Pancreas induction

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Wells, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in generating pancreatic cell types from human pluripotent stem cells has depended on our knowledge of the developmental processes that regulate pancreas development in vivo. The developmental events between gastrulation and formation of the embryonic pancreatic primordia are both rapid and dynamic and studies in frog, fish, chick, and mouse have identified the molecular basis of how the pancreas develops from multipotent endoderm progenitors. Here, we review the current status of our understanding of molecular mechanisms that control endoderm formation, endoderm patterning, and pancreas specification and highlight how these discoveries have allowed for the development of robust methods to generate pancreatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22743233

  13. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Katsourakis, Anastasios; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Noussios, Georgios; Chatzis, Iosiph; Chatzitheoclitos, Efthimios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  14. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Noussios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  15. Pathologic and imaging findings of an oncocytoma in the deep lobe of the left parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Sakai, E; Yoda, T; Shimamoto, H; Hirano, Y; Kusama, M; Enomoto, S

    2003-10-01

    Oncocytoma is a rare salivary gland tumour consisting of oncocytes with many hyperplastic mitochondria. It usually occurs in the parotid gland. Because the features of oncocytoma resemble those of other benign and low-grade-malignant salivary gland tumours, clinical diagnosis is often challenging. This report presents the pathologic and imaging findings of an oncocytoma arising in the deep lobe of the left parotid gland in a 66-year-old man. Oncocytoma was diagnosed on the basis of histological, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic findings. The tumour showed accumulation of technetium-99m pertechnetate and decreased signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with otitis.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Coke, Rob L; Kochunov, Peter; Davis, M Duff

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on an adult, male Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with a history of nonspecific neurologic signs and acute discharge from the left ear. MRI revealed findings consistent with otitis and possible osteomyelitis of the temporal and mastoid bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of otitis and MRI findings in a kangaroo.

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma: conventional MRI findings including gadolinium-enhanced dynamic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    A great variety of MR pulse sequences for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are now available. In this article, we reviewed the current MR imaging techniques that are routinely used for hepatic imaging, and described the optimization of these sequences as well as the utility and characteristics of each sequence for the accurate diagnosis of HCCs. Then, we reviewed various MR imaging findings of advanced and early HCCs with emphasis on signal intensity and hemodynamic patterns. Finally, we described the value of multi-arterial-phase contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging of the whole liver with excellent temporal resolution for evaluating transitional hemodynamics of hepatic lesions during the six arterial phases.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of empyema necessitatis in a child with a group A streptococcus infection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Rebecca; Manson, David

    2012-01-01

    Empyema necessitatis is a process defined and characterized by the transpleural spread of an infected pleural collection into the adjacent chest wall. Symptoms may be referable to the associated pleural and consolidative infection, but sometimes are associated with chest wall involvement. To our knowledge, the magnetic resonance imaging findings of this process have not yet been previously described in children. We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a rare case of a child with empyema necessitatis due to a group A streptococcal agent. The aggressive findings make differentiating infection from a tumor difficult.

  19. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease becomes more chronic, patients can develop malnutrition and weight loss. If the pancreas becomes destroyed ... with these disorders may have chronic pain, diarrhea, malnutrition, or diabetes. Treatment focuses on pain control and ...

  20. Pancreas transplantation in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Pozza, G; Di Carlo, V

    1989-01-01

    After a brief historical background on pancreas transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, this review deals with the major surgical, pharmacological and functional aspects of this approach. In the Authors' opinion pancreas transplantation should be proposed only when the end-stage renal failure (ESRF), due to diabetic nephropathy, needs kidney transplantation. By using injection of polymers (mainly neoprene) into the pancreatic ducts, or urinary diversion of pancreatic juice and appropriate immunosuppressive therapy (cyclosporin, corticosteroids and azathioprine), dramatic advantages have been achieved in the last years, so that a satisfactory segmental or total pancreas graft survival on one hand, and the early graft rejection recognition on the other have been presently obtained. A prompt and good functional activity of pancreas graft has also been demonstrated by the Authors in successfully transplanted patients. As far as chronic diabetic complications are concerned, no conclusive results have been reported up to now; it is noteworthy, however, that pancreas transplantation may preserve the transplanted kidney from a relapse of diabetic nephropathy. The combined pancreas-kidney transplantation may actually be considered as a correct solution to the problem of diabetic patients with ESRF. Moreover, careful selection of patients, appropriate surgical technique and experienced immunosuppressive treatment are the major prerequisites to achieve a satisfactory improvement of diabetic status in addition to that of renal failure.

  1. Start Your Search Engines. Part 2: When Image is Everything, Here are Some Great Ways to Find One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Anna; Mowers, Helen

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that Google is great for finding images. Simply head to its home page, click the "Images" link, enter criteria in the search box, and--voila! In this article, the authors share some of their other favorite search engines for finding images. To make sure the desired images are available for educational use, consider searching for…

  2. C5 and C6 human dermatomes: a clinical, electromyographical, imaging and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Faleiros, Antonio Tadeu de Souza; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima; Zanini, Marco Antonio; Castro, Heloisa Amélia de Lima; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2009-06-01

    There is substantial controversy in literature about human dermatomes. In this work, C5 and C6 superior limb dermatomes were studied. The method consisted of comparing clinical signs and symptoms with conduction studies, electromyographical data, neurosurgical findings, and imaging findings obtained by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), for each patient. Data analysis from superior members in 18 patients suggests that C5 is located in the lateral aspect of the shoulder and arm, and C6 in the lateral aspect of the forearm and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd fingers. To our knowledge this is the first time that C5 and C6 human dermatomes have been studied by all the following methods together: clinical, electromyographical, CT and MR imaging, and surgical findings.

  3. Quantification of neuropathological findings by image data for the diagnosis of dementia in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mio; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Matsusue, Aya; Waters, Brian; Hara, Kenji; Ikematsu, Natsuki; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify neuropathological findings using image analysis software for the diagnosis of dementia in deceased who underwent forensic autopsy. Of the autopsies performed within 48 hours of death and excluding those of patients with head injury, thermal injury, heat stroke, or intracranial lesions, 8 were of autopsy cases clinically diagnosed with dementia and thus included in the dementia group (D). The non-dementia group (non-D) consisted of 6 deceased without dementia. To compare the D and non-D groups, 6 regions and 7 types of pathological findings were observed semi-quantitatively using 4 conventional stainings. Quantitative analysis of collected image data was performed using image analysis software. Semiquantitative analysis of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles was performed with Bielschowsky-Hirano's silver staining image data. An easy, simple, and effective quantification method of the pathological findings was achieved. However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups, and diagnosis of dementia by the quantification of pathological findings was not successful. Diagnosis of dementia using image data may be possible in future studies with an increased number of autopsies, and by utilizing staining techniques with higher specificity and sensitivity, such as immunohistochemical staining. PMID:27040064

  4. Small-bowel Diverticulosis:Imaging Findings and Review of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    De Peuter, B.; Box, I.; Vanheste, R.; Dymarkowski, S.

    2009-01-01

    Complicated small-bowel diverticulosis is a rather uncommon cause of upper abdominal pain. It may lead to symptoms presenting with an acute onset or to chronic and nonspecific complaints. As the presentation is often similar to other pathologies (acute appendicitis, pancreatitis, or acute cholecystis) and in many cases diagnosis is made on basis of surgical findings, careful analysis of the imaging landmarks may be warranted to aid in the early stages of detection. In this report, we present clinical and morphological findings in three patients where small-bowel diverticulitis was surgically proven. The relevant literature is reviewed, and typical imaging properties are discussed. PMID:19657452

  5. Panner's disease: X-ray, MR imaging findings and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stoane, J M; Poplausky, M R; Haller, J O; Berdon, W E

    1995-01-01

    Panner's disease, avascular necrosis of the capitellum, was first described on X-ray examination of the elbow. It represents a major threat to the elbow joint integrity, and it is important to diagnose early. Panner's disease occurs most commonly in young children who play baseball, and in competitive gymnasts. Although considered a rare entity, it probably is underdiagnosed. We present the X-ray and MR imaging findings in a young boy with Panner's disease. The MR imaging findings in Panner's disease have not been previously reported.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thorsten R C; Pedrosa, Ivan; Goldsmith, Jeffrey; Dewolf, William C; Rofsky, Neil M

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging findings in a patient with a large solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the kidney originating in the renal capsule are presented. SFT of the kidney is a rare, usually benign tumor with indolent clinical behavior. MRI revealed a diffusely hypointense mass on T2-weighted images without central necrosis despite the large size of the lesion. These imaging features, atypical for renal cell carcinoma, can suggest the diagnosis of SFT and may be an indication for attempting nephron-sparing surgery.

  7. Overuse of imaging the male breast-findings in 557 patients.

    PubMed

    Lapid, Oren; Siebenga, Pieter; Zonderland, Harmien M

    2015-01-01

    Gynecomastia is the most common abnormality of the male breast. However, breast cancer may occur, albeit with a significantly lower incidence than in females. Imaging is often used as part of the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the utilization and outcome of imaging with mammography or ultrasound of the male breast in a university hospital's department of radiology. A retrospective study assessing the imaging of the male breast in 557 patients over a 10-year period. Referral was done mainly by general surgeons and general practitioners. The most common indication was enlargement of the breast, described as gynecomastia or swelling in 74% of patients, followed by pain in 24% and "lumps" in 10%. The modalities used were mammography in 65%, ultrasound in 51% and both in 26%. Most examinations, 519, were BI-RADS 1 or 2, and 38 were BI-RADS 3 or higher. Altogether 160 patients had additional fine-needle aspiration or biopsy. Malignancies were diagnosed in five patients (0.89%). Imaging had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 99%. The positive predictive value was 44% and the negative predictive value 99.8%. Malignancies are rare in the male breast. The probability of finding cancer when performing imaging of clinically benign findings in the male breast is negligible. Imaging is not warranted unless there are suspicious abnormalities. Routine imaging of gynecomastia should be discouraged.

  8. The Small Bodies Imager Browser --- finding asteroid and comet images without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, E.; Sykes, M.; Davis, D.; Neese, C.

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate accessing and downloading spatially resolved imagery of asteroids and comets in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS), we have created the Small Bodies Image Browser. It is a HTML5 webpage that runs inside a standard web browser needing no installation (http://sbn.psi.edu/sbib/). The volume of data returned by spacecraft missions has grown substantially over the last decade. While this wealth of data provides scientists with ample support for research, it has greatly increased the difficulty of managing, accessing and processing these data. Further, the complexity necessary for a long-term archive results in an architecture that is efficient for computers, but not user friendly. The Small Bodies Image Browser (SBIB) is tied into the PDS archive of the Small Bodies Asteroid Subnode hosted at the Planetary Science Institute [1]. Currently, the tool contains the entire repository of the Dawn mission's encounter with Vesta [2], and we will be adding other datasets in the future. For Vesta, this includes both the level 1A and 1B images for the Framing Camera (FC) and the level 1B spectral cubes from the Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, providing over 30,000 individual images. A key strength of the tool is providing quick and easy access of these data. The tool allows for searches based on clicking on a map or typing in coordinates. The SBIB can show an entire mission phase (such as cycle 7 of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit) and the associated footprints, as well as search by image name. It can focus the search by mission phase, resolution or instrument. Imagery archived in the PDS are generally provided by missions in a single or narrow range of formats. To enhance the value and usability of this data to researchers, SBIB makes these available in these original formats as well as PNG, JPEG and ArcGIS compatible ISIS cubes [3]. Additionally, we provide header files for the VIR cubes so they can be read into ENVI without additional processing. Finally

  9. An Integrated Centroid Finding and Particle Overlap Decomposition Algorithm for Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An integrated algorithm for decomposing overlapping particle images (multi-particle objects) along with determining each object s constituent particle centroid(s) has been developed using image analysis techniques. The centroid finding algorithm uses a modified eight-direction search method for finding the perimeter of any enclosed object. The centroid is calculated using the intensity-weighted center of mass of the object. The overlap decomposition algorithm further analyzes the object data and breaks it down into its constituent particle centroid(s). This is accomplished with an artificial neural network, feature based technique and provides an efficient way of decomposing overlapping particles. Combining the centroid finding and overlap decomposition routines into a single algorithm allows us to accurately predict the error associated with finding the centroid(s) of particles in our experiments. This algorithm has been tested using real, simulated, and synthetic data and the results are presented and discussed.

  10. Solitary fibrous tumors in the extremities: imaging findings for six patients.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Ryota; Komada, Tomohiro; Takada, Akira; Kawai, Hisashi; Ito, Shinji; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) findings for solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) in the extremities in correlation with histopathological findings. Between 2006 and 2013, 6 consecutive patients with SFT in an extremity were studied with MRI (6 patients) and CT (4 patients). Diffusion-weighted images were also performed in 3 patients and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in 2 patients. All 6 tumors were diagnosed after surgical excision, and the pre-surgical imaging findings were correlated with the histopathological findings. As a result, all 6 patients were female, and each had a clearly palpable, well-circumscribed, round or oval mass adjacent to fascia in an extremity, of less than 10 cm maximum diameter in 5 patients. On MRI, the tumors were iso-intense with muscle on T1-weighted image, and appeared heterogeneous and high-intensity on T2-weighted image. After injection of a contrast agent, the tumors demonstrated strong enhancement. A vascular pedicle was detected in 4 patients with tumors having a maximum diameter more than 5 cm. Diffusion-weighted images demonstrated high signal intensities, and apparent diffusion coefficient values were iso to high compared to muscle (from 1.41-2.10×10(-3) mm(2)/s). All the tumors were benign histopathologically and clinically. In 1 patient, the imaging appearance revealed underlying histopathological components, including fibrous-rich, cellular-rich, and myxoid change areas. In conclusion, a SFT in an extremity comprises a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to fascia having a fibrous-dominant area, strong contrast enhancement, and a vascular pedicle.

  11. Solitary fibrous tumors in the extremities: imaging findings for six patients.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Ryota; Komada, Tomohiro; Takada, Akira; Kawai, Hisashi; Ito, Shinji; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) findings for solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) in the extremities in correlation with histopathological findings. Between 2006 and 2013, 6 consecutive patients with SFT in an extremity were studied with MRI (6 patients) and CT (4 patients). Diffusion-weighted images were also performed in 3 patients and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in 2 patients. All 6 tumors were diagnosed after surgical excision, and the pre-surgical imaging findings were correlated with the histopathological findings. As a result, all 6 patients were female, and each had a clearly palpable, well-circumscribed, round or oval mass adjacent to fascia in an extremity, of less than 10 cm maximum diameter in 5 patients. On MRI, the tumors were iso-intense with muscle on T1-weighted image, and appeared heterogeneous and high-intensity on T2-weighted image. After injection of a contrast agent, the tumors demonstrated strong enhancement. A vascular pedicle was detected in 4 patients with tumors having a maximum diameter more than 5 cm. Diffusion-weighted images demonstrated high signal intensities, and apparent diffusion coefficient values were iso to high compared to muscle (from 1.41-2.10×10(-3) mm(2)/s). All the tumors were benign histopathologically and clinically. In 1 patient, the imaging appearance revealed underlying histopathological components, including fibrous-rich, cellular-rich, and myxoid change areas. In conclusion, a SFT in an extremity comprises a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to fascia having a fibrous-dominant area, strong contrast enhancement, and a vascular pedicle. PMID:25797981

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteoarthrosis and effusion in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandimaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of osteoarthrosis (OA), and effusion. The study comprised 112 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of unilateral pain near the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function, and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ OA, and/or effusion. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ OA (P=0.000), and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Further, there was a significant relationship between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (K=0.22), TMJ effusion (K=0.29), and TMJ 'OA and effusion' (K=0.30). The study's findings suggest that while clinical pain is correlated to TMJ-related MR imaging findings, clinical pain in and of itself, is not reliable for predicting the presence of TMJ OA and/or effusion. Validation of MR imaging diagnoses would involve the investigation of cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence to assess decisive differences in terms of prognosis and/or treatment outcome. PMID:12521314

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteoarthrosis and effusion in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandimaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of osteoarthrosis (OA), and effusion. The study comprised 112 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of unilateral pain near the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function, and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ OA, and/or effusion. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ OA (P=0.000), and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Further, there was a significant relationship between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (K=0.22), TMJ effusion (K=0.29), and TMJ 'OA and effusion' (K=0.30). The study's findings suggest that while clinical pain is correlated to TMJ-related MR imaging findings, clinical pain in and of itself, is not reliable for predicting the presence of TMJ OA and/or effusion. Validation of MR imaging diagnoses would involve the investigation of cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence to assess decisive differences in terms of prognosis and/or treatment outcome.

  14. Hind brain agenesis a rare imaging findings in cerebro cerebellar lissencephalic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mundaganur, Praveen M; Solwalkar, Pradeep; Nimbal, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    A case report of cerebro cerebellar lissencephaly shows complete agenesis of cerebellum and brainstem which is rare imaging finding of group lissencephaly (type I lissencephaly). Though agenesis of cerebellum and brainstem were included in literature, in most of the cases we saw a hypoplasia or atrophy of cerebellum in lissencephaly syndrome. The CT scan findings of this patient shows features of lissencephaly with complete agenesis of brain stem and cerebellum associated with multiple congenital abnormalities.

  15. Attempted suicide by insulin injection treated with artificial pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gin, H; Larnaudie, B; Aubertin, J

    1983-01-01

    An elderly woman with longstanding insulin dependent diabetes tried to commit suicide by injecting 400 units of insulin subcutaneously (usual total daily dose 56 units). She was admitted to hospital within the hour and treated with the aid of an artificial pancreas. This avoided the usual difficulty of the physician having to cope with rapid and substantial fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations and 67 hours after the overdose insulin was reinstituted. Using an artificial pancreas in insulin overdose is an important advance in management and may avoid the need for surgical intervention such as excising the site of injection. Images p250-a PMID:6409269

  16. In Vitro Pancreas Organogenesis from Dispersed Mouse Embryonic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells 1. The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development 2-4. These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  17. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-07-19

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity.

  18. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  19. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  20. Pelvis: normal variants and benign findings in FDG-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Andres; Avril, Norbert E

    2014-04-01

    With the widespread use of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography as a diagnostic tool in patients with cancer, incidental findings are of increasing importance. This is particularly true within the pelvis, where several benign findings might present with increased FDG uptake. In addition, physiologic excretion of radiotracer by way of the urinary tract can complicate image analysis. This article reviews potential incidental benign findings in the pelvis that one should be aware of when interpreting FDG-PET/computed tomography scans.

  1. Additional Resection of the Pancreas Body Prevents Postoperative Pancreas Fistula in Patients with Portal Annular Pancreas Who Undergo Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Jun; Mano, Yohei; Harada, Noboru; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is a rare variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body and surrounds the portal vein or superior mesenteric vein. Upon pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), when the pancreas is cut at the neck, two cut surfaces are created. Thus, the cut surface of the pancreas becomes larger than usual and the dorsal cut surface is behind the portal vein, therefore pancreatic fistula after PD has been reported frequently. We planned subtotal stomach-preserving PD in a 45-year-old woman with underlying insulinoma of the pancreas head. When the pancreas head was dissected, the uncinate process was extended and fused to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body. Additional resection of the pancreas body 1 cm distal to the pancreas tail to the left side of the original resection line was performed. The new cut surface became one and pancreaticojejunostomy was performed as usual. No postoperative complications such as pancreatic fistula occurred. Additional resection of the pancreas body may be a standardized procedure in patients with PAP in cases of pancreas cut surface reconstruction. PMID:22532811

  2. Antithrombin therapy in pancreas retransplantation and pancreas-after-kidney/pancreas-transplantation-alone patients.

    PubMed

    Fertmann, Jan M; Arbogast, Helmut P; Illner, Wolf-Dieter; Tarabichi, Anwar; Dieterle, Christoph; Land, Walter; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hoffmann, Johannes N

    2011-01-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a coagulatory inhibitor with pleiotropic activities. AT reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury and has been successfully used in patients with simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation. This study retrospectively analyzes prophylactic high-dose AT application in patients with solitary pancreas transplantation traditionally related to suboptimal results. In our center, 31 patients received solitary pancreas transplantation between 7/1994 and 7/2005 (pancreas retransplantation, PAK/PTA). The perioperative treatment protocol was modified in 5/2002 now including application of 3000 IU. AT was given intravenously before pancreatic reperfusion (AT, n = 18). Patients receiving standard therapy served as controls (n = 13). Daily blood sampling was performed during five postoperative days. Standard coagulatory parameters and number of transfused red blood cell units were not altered by AT. In AT patients serum amylase (p < 0.01) and lipase (p < 0.01) on postoperative days 1, 2 and 3 were significantly reduced. Our actual perioperative management protocol including high dose AT application in human solitary pancreas transplantation reduced postoperative liberation of pancreatic enzymes in this pilot study. Prophylactic AT application should deserve further clinical testing in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:21999781

  3. Collection protocol for human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L; Montgomery, Emily L; Foss, Robin M; Kolheffer, Kerwin M; Phipps, Gerald; Schneider, Lynda; Atkinson, Mark A

    2012-05-23

    This dissection and sampling procedure was developed for the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) program to standardize preparation of pancreas recovered from cadaveric organ donors. The pancreas is divided into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by serial transverse sections throughout the medial to lateral axis. Alternating sections are used for fixed paraffin and fresh frozen blocks and remnant samples are minced for snap frozen sample preparations, either with or without RNAse inhibitors, for DNA, RNA, or protein isolation. The overall goal of the pancreas dissection procedure is to sample the entire pancreas while maintaining anatomical orientation. Endocrine cell heterogeneity in terms of islet composition, size, and numbers is reported for human islets compared to rodent islets. The majority of human islets from the pancreas head, body and tail regions are composed of insulin-containing β-cells followed by lower proportions of glucagon-containing α-cells and somatostatin-containing δ-cells. Pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells and ghrelin-containing epsilon cells are also present but in small numbers. In contrast, the uncinate region contains islets that are primarily composed of pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells. These regional islet variations arise from developmental differences. The pancreas develops from the ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds in the foregut and after rotation of the stomach and duodenum, the ventral lobe moves and fuses with the dorsal. The ventral lobe forms the posterior portion of the head including the uncinate process while the dorsal lobe gives rise to the rest of the organ. Regional pancreatic variation is also reported with the tail region having higher islet density compared to other regions and the dorsal lobe-derived components undergoing selective atrophy in type 1 diabetes. Additional organs and tissues are often recovered from the organ donors and include pancreatic lymph

  4. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  5. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered.

  6. Collection Protocol for Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L.; Montgomery, Emily L.; Foss, Robin M.; Kolheffer, Kerwin M.; Phipps, Gerald; Schneider, Lynda; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissection and sampling procedure was developed for the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) program to standardize preparation of pancreas recovered from cadaveric organ donors. The pancreas is divided into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by serial transverse sections throughout the medial to lateral axis. Alternating sections are used for fixed paraffin and fresh frozen blocks and remnant samples are minced for snap frozen sample preparations, either with or without RNAse inhibitors, for DNA, RNA, or protein isolation. The overall goal of the pancreas dissection procedure is to sample the entire pancreas while maintaining anatomical orientation. Endocrine cell heterogeneity in terms of islet composition, size, and numbers is reported for human islets compared to rodent islets 1. The majority of human islets from the pancreas head, body and tail regions are composed of insulin-containing β-cells followed by lower proportions of glucagon-containing α-cells and somatostatin-containing δ-cells. Pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells and ghrelin-containing epsilon cells are also present but in small numbers. In contrast, the uncinate region contains islets that are primarily composed of pancreatic polypeptide-containing PP cells 2. These regional islet variations arise from developmental differences. The pancreas develops from the ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds in the foregut and after rotation of the stomach and duodenum, the ventral lobe moves and fuses with the dorsal 3. The ventral lobe forms the posterior portion of the head including the uncinate process while the dorsal lobe gives rise to the rest of the organ. Regional pancreatic variation is also reported with the tail region having higher islet density compared to other regions and the dorsal lobe-derived components undergoing selective atrophy in type 1 diabetes4,5. Additional organs and tissues are often recovered from the organ donors and include pancreatic

  7. Finding regions of interest in pathological images: an attentional model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Francisco; Villalón, Julio; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduces an automated method for finding diagnostic regions-of-interest (RoIs) in histopathological images. This method is based on the cognitive process of visual selective attention that arises during a pathologist's image examination. Specifically, it emulates the first examination phase, which consists in a coarse search for tissue structures at a "low zoom" to separate the image into relevant regions.1 The pathologist's cognitive performance depends on inherent image visual cues - bottom-up information - and on acquired clinical medicine knowledge - top-down mechanisms -. Our pathologist's visual attention model integrates the latter two components. The selected bottom-up information includes local low level features such as intensity, color, orientation and texture information. Top-down information is related to the anatomical and pathological structures known by the expert. A coarse approximation to these structures is achieved by an oversegmentation algorithm, inspired by psychological grouping theories. The algorithm parameters are learned from an expert pathologist's segmentation. Top-down and bottom-up integration is achieved by calculating a unique index for each of the low level characteristics inside the region. Relevancy is estimated as a simple average of these indexes. Finally, a binary decision rule defines whether or not a region is interesting. The method was evaluated on a set of 49 images using a perceptually-weighted evaluation criterion, finding a quality gain of 3dB when comparing to a classical bottom-up model of attention.

  8. Early diagnostic imaging findings in juvenile dogs with presumed diskospondylitis: 10 cases (2008-2014).

    PubMed

    Kirberger, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe early diagnostic imaging findings in juvenile dogs with diskospondylitis. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 10 client-owned dogs < 6 months of age. PROCEDURES Medical records were searched to identify juvenile dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of diskospondylitis. Signalment, history, examination findings, diagnostic test results, and imaging procedures were reviewed. Archived diagnostic images were retrieved and retrospectively evaluated. Data analysis was descriptive. RESULTS All dogs were evaluated for signs of vertebral pain ≤ 3 weeks after treatment for blunt trauma, bite wounds, or systemic illness. The earliest radiographic change was a narrowed intervertebral disk space (found for 28 disk spaces ≤ 2 weeks after evaluation for signs of vertebral pain); subluxation of adjacent vertebrae was identified for 8 of 28 affected disks, either initially or within the following 2 weeks. Vertebral end plate lysis was not an initial radiographic feature but was evident in follow-up radiographs. Ultrasonographic and transverse, multiformatted, volume-rendered CT images were obtained for 5 and 4 dogs, respectively. Ultrasonographic changes included ventrally bulging hypoechoic material at the affected disk site and loss of typical normal reverberation artifact in 4 dogs; these were detected prior to radiographic changes in 2 dogs. Affected disks on volume-rendered CT images had altered coloration in 3 of 4 dogs, and this was identified prior to radiographic changes in 1 dog. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Juvenile dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of diskospondylitis had early imaging findings that were atypical, compared with the changes described for adult dogs with this condition. PMID:27556268

  9. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the head of the pancreas with anorexia and vomiting in a 69-year-old man: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Bu, Xianmin; Tian, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare condition of unclear etiology that is commonly observed in the lung but rarely in the pancreas. WHO classified IMT as a potentially malignant or aggressive tumor. In the present report, the case of a 69-year-old male patient with an IMT in the head of the pancreas, who experienced anorexia, nausea and vomiting, is presented. The patient's clinical symptoms were nonspecific, and the imaging findings revealed a hypovascularized pancreatic mass with stenosis of the descending duodenum. The electronic endoscopy findings revealed protruding lesions in the duodenal bulb and the descending duodenum. Biopsies of the mass were conducted with an electronic endoscope, but were not diagnostic. Subsequent duodenopancreatectomy aided in determining a pathological diagnosis of IMT, based on the histology and immunohistochemistry results. The patient experienced a recovery without further incident, as observed during a regular follow-up 3 years later. IMT in the head of the pancreas is rare, particularly in adults. In the present study, an extremely rare case of IMT involving the head of the pancreas in an adult patient is presented, and the therapeutic options for this condition are discussed. PMID:27446468

  10. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Law, Huong Ling; Tan, Suzet; Sedi, Rosleena

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a 3-month history of poor oral intake related to nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy. The patient later developed deep coma while receiving in-patient therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed typical findings of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The patient was treated with thiamine injections, which resulted in subsequent partial recovery of neurological function. This paper stresses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging for prompt diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  11. The imaging findings of infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nekitsing, Indima; Wu, Xing; Tang, Guangyu

    2015-12-01

    Central primitive neuroectodermal tumour (cPNET), a rare malignant neoplasm of embryonal origin, often occurs in children younger than 15 years. This is the first case report of the imaging findings of an infratentorial cPNET to be reported in a patient. Here, is reported the case of a 6-year-old boy presenting with symptoms of diplopia for 14 days. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid mass in the fourth ventricle. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was cPNET. To conclude, whenever a child is diagnosed to have an infratentorial solid tumour in the fourth ventricle, cPNET should always be considered despite its rarity.

  12. A Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of the Head of Pancreas: A Rare Case Report Diagnosed by Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Archana Hemant; Chhadi, Shyam Atmaram; Kumbhalkar, Dinkar T; Raut, Waman K

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPPT) is a distinctive tumour of low malignant potential with a striking and unexplained predilection for adolescent girls and young women. Hence it is important to distinguish this rare tumour from other pancreatic tumours with similar cytomorphologic features because an accurate preoperative diagnosis is highly desirable since these patients can have long survival with adequate surgery. We report a case of the rare SPPT of the pancreas in a young girl who presented with nonspecific pain in the abdomen. Radiological investigations revealed a solid cystic mass in relation to the uncinate process of pancreas and third part of duodenum. The mass was diagnosed to be a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas on ultrasound guided FNAC. Surgical removal of the pancreatic tumour and detailed histologic study confirmed the cytologic diagnosis. We present this case because, to date, there are few case reports on the cytological diagnosis of this tumour, about 60 cases, diagnosed by Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) are reported in the literature. With widespread availability of high-quality imaging systems and a better understanding of its pathology, the number of cases reported in the literature has been steadily increasing in recent years. In our case, the cytological diagnosis was done even before the detailed imaging findings were available, the cytological features of this tumour are highly characteristic and it is possible to differentiate it from other pancreatic tumours with relative ease. PMID:27504299

  13. Pancreas transplant for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Hannah R; Hatipoglu, Betul; Krishnamurthi, Venkatesh

    2015-11-01

    Pancreas transplant is an option for patients with type 1 diabetes and for some patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced diabetic kidney disease. The procedure has a high success rate, and performing it earlier in the course of diabetes could help prevent or reverse the long-term complications of diabetes.

  14. Early characteristic findings in bowleg deformities: evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukai, S; Suzuki, S; Seto, Y; Kashiwagi, N; Hwang, E S

    2000-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate bowleg deformities in infancy. Twenty-five tibiae of 13 infants were examined and divided into two groups based on MRI findings: group A had high intensity area in the medial epiphyseal cartilage on T2-weighted images. Group B had depression of medial physis and abnormal signal in the perichondrial region in addition to the epiphyseal lesion. At the final follow-up, all cases in group A demonstrated normal lower leg alignments, whereas five cases in group B showed characteristic roentogenographic findings of Blount's disease. The improvement rate of metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was correlated with this classification. These findings suggested that abnormal findings in physis and perichondrial region might be preliminary findings in early stage of Blount's disease. The high intensity areas in the medial epiphyseal cartilage were commonly found among the cases with bowing deformities, which suggested that there might be a common pathomechanism between physiologic bowing and infantile Blount's disease. PMID:11008740

  15. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura: ultrasonographic imaging findings of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Mitsuaki; Yoshimi, Kaku; Muraki, Keiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Dambara, Takashi; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura is a rare tumor of mesenchymal origin. Although radiographic findings of thoracic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of SFTs of the pleura have been documented, the value of ultrasonography is uncertain. We presented the ultrasonographic findings of 3 pathologically proven cases of SFTs arising from the visceral pleura. In all the cases, thoracic ultrasonography demonstrated homogeneous, hypoechoic, hemicycle, extrapulmonary lesions, which showed respiratory movement with the adjacent lung, consistent with pedunculated tumors. Preoperative thoracic ultrasonography could be useful in the evaluation of patients with pleural tumors, especially SFTs.

  16. Clinical imaging findings in a girl with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Lin, D S; Liu, Y P; Hsu, L J; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    We report an 82-year-old girl with premature aging, a karyotype of 46,XX and a de novo c.1824C>T mutation encoding p.G608G in the lamin A gene. The clinical features of accelerated aging and the molecular finding were consistent with the diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). In this presentation, we demonstrate the radiological imaging findings of skeletal, oral and craniofacial phenotypes of abnormalities associated with HGPS. The oral and craniofacial abnormalities caused dental caries, severe malocclusion, and swallowing, feeding and speech problems. Dural calcification, and granulation in the ear drum and external ear canal were additionally observed.

  17. Giant Lipomatosis of the Sciatic Nerve: Unique Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Sarp, Ali Firat; Pekcevik, Yeliz

    2016-04-01

    Lipomatosis of the nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is characterized by the infiltration of the nerve by fibro-fatty tissue. The affected nerve becomes thicker, and it simulates a mass lesion. Lipomatosis usually affects the median nerve and lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve is extremely rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the key to diagnosis, and it is usually pathognomonic. In this report, MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI findings of a case of a giant sciatic nerve lipomatosis without macrodactyly are presented. The MRI findings are unique, and awareness of the MRI features of this rare soft tissue mass may prevent unnecessary biopsies and surgeries. PMID:27679695

  18. Giant Lipomatosis of the Sciatic Nerve: Unique Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sarp, Ali Firat; Pekcevik, Yeliz

    2016-01-01

    Lipomatosis of the nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is characterized by the infiltration of the nerve by fibro-fatty tissue. The affected nerve becomes thicker, and it simulates a mass lesion. Lipomatosis usually affects the median nerve and lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve is extremely rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the key to diagnosis, and it is usually pathognomonic. In this report, MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI findings of a case of a giant sciatic nerve lipomatosis without macrodactyly are presented. The MRI findings are unique, and awareness of the MRI features of this rare soft tissue mass may prevent unnecessary biopsies and surgeries.

  19. Scurvy in a child with autism: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tetsu; Aida, Noriko; Tanaka, Yukichi; Tanaka, Mio; Shiomi, Masae; Machida, Jiro

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of scurvy in a 6-year-old boy with autism and an unbalanced diet. The patient was admitted with difficulties in walking. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the thigh showed diffuse signal abnormality in the bone marrow, periosteum, and the femoral muscle. A biopsy specimen of the femur showed hematoma, proliferative fibroblasts, and few collagen fibers, which suggested a deficiency of vitamin C. Although recurrent periosteal hematoma may be suggestive of scurvy, this finding was subtle in the current case. It is important to be aware of this rare disease because it is easily cured with vitamin C supplementation.

  20. Giant Lipomatosis of the Sciatic Nerve: Unique Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sarp, Ali Firat; Pekcevik, Yeliz

    2016-01-01

    Lipomatosis of the nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is characterized by the infiltration of the nerve by fibro-fatty tissue. The affected nerve becomes thicker, and it simulates a mass lesion. Lipomatosis usually affects the median nerve and lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve is extremely rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the key to diagnosis, and it is usually pathognomonic. In this report, MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI findings of a case of a giant sciatic nerve lipomatosis without macrodactyly are presented. The MRI findings are unique, and awareness of the MRI features of this rare soft tissue mass may prevent unnecessary biopsies and surgeries. PMID:27679695

  1. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  2. Massive thrombosis of bilateral superior and inferior ophthalmic veins secondary to ethmoidal rhinosunisitis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Gedikli, Yusuf; Karaca, Leyla; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-05-01

    Ophthalmic vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare condition occurring secondary to varied etiologies that commonly presents with proptosis, globe dystopia, ophthalmoplegia, periorbital edema, and occasionally diminished visual acuity. It may be related to inflammation of the orbit or paranasal sinuses. We herein report imaging findings of thrombosed superior and inferior ophthalmic veins in bilateral involvement in a 20-year-old male patient without cavernous sinus thrombosis. He presented with pain, swelling, and blurred vision in both eyes. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, cerebral MR angiography, and susceptibility weighted imaging were performed. Bilateral superior and inferior OVT due to a complication of ethmoidal sinusitis was diagnosed in the patient. Anticoagulant and systemic broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was started. His symptoms were recorded at the end of 14 days of the treatment. PMID:24785747

  3. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  4. Imaging findings of anaplastic astrocytoma in a child with maple syrup urine disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aw-Zoretic, Jessie; Wadhwani, Nitin R; Lulla, Rishi R; Rishi, Lulla R; Ryan, Maura E

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of branched-chain amino acid metabolism, which usually presents in childhood with encephalopathy due to cerebral edema and dysmyelination. Even with treatment, metabolic stressors may precipitate later episodes of acute decompensation. Changes related to cerebral and white matter edema have been described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging can aid in both initial diagnosis and evaluation of decompensation. To date, there are no published known reports of cancer in patients with MSUD. Here, we present the first case report of an anaplastic astrocytoma in a teenager with MSUD, with a discussion of imaging findings and the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to help distinguish between tumor and metabolic changes. PMID:26084772

  5. L4-L5-S1 human dermatomes: a clinical, electromyographical, imaging and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Faleiros, Antonio Tadeu de Souza; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima; Zanini, Marco Antonio; Castro, Heloisa Amélia de Lima; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2009-06-01

    There is substantial controversy in literature about human dermatomes. We studied L4, L5, and S1 inferior limb dermatomes by comparing clinical signs and symptoms with conduction studies, electromyographical data, neurosurgical findings, and imaging data from computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After analyzing 60 patients, we concluded that L4 is probably located in the medial aspect of the leg, L5 in the lateral aspect of the leg and foot dorsus, and S1 in the posterior aspect of the backside, tight, leg and plantar foot skin. This is the first time that these human dermatomes have been evaluated by combined analysis of clinical, electromyographical, neurosurgical, and imaging data.

  6. Tailgut Cyst and Perineal Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report with Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alghofaily, Khalefa Ali

    2016-01-01

    A tailgut cyst is a rare developmental lesion and usually is located in the retrorectal or presacral space. Extrahepatic hydatid disease has been reported in several locations including the pelvis and it often poses a diagnostic challenge. There are very few reported cases of primary perineal hydatid cysts. We present the multimodality imaging findings of a tailgut cyst and concurrent perineal hydatid disease in a 32-year-old male patient. PMID:27630782

  7. Tailgut Cyst and Perineal Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report with Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alghofaily, Khalefa Ali

    2016-01-01

    A tailgut cyst is a rare developmental lesion and usually is located in the retrorectal or presacral space. Extrahepatic hydatid disease has been reported in several locations including the pelvis and it often poses a diagnostic challenge. There are very few reported cases of primary perineal hydatid cysts. We present the multimodality imaging findings of a tailgut cyst and concurrent perineal hydatid disease in a 32-year-old male patient.

  8. Tailgut Cyst and Perineal Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report with Multimodality Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Aljohani, Ibtisam Musallam; Alghofaily, Khalefa Ali; McWilliams, Sebastian R; Bin Saeedan, Mnahi

    2016-01-01

    A tailgut cyst is a rare developmental lesion and usually is located in the retrorectal or presacral space. Extrahepatic hydatid disease has been reported in several locations including the pelvis and it often poses a diagnostic challenge. There are very few reported cases of primary perineal hydatid cysts. We present the multimodality imaging findings of a tailgut cyst and concurrent perineal hydatid disease in a 32-year-old male patient. PMID:27630782

  9. Cerebral small vessel disease: cognition, mood, daily functioning, and imaging findings from a small pilot sample.

    PubMed

    Baker, John G; Williams, Amy J; Ionita, Catalina C; Lee-Kwen, Peterkin; Ching, Marilou; Miletich, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease, a leading cause of cognitive decline, is considered a relatively homogeneous disease process, and it can co-occur with Alzheimer's disease. Clinical reports of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and neuropsychology testing for a small pilot sample of 14 patients are presented to illustrate disease characteristics through findings from structural and functional imaging and cognitive assessment. Participants showed some decreases in executive functioning, attention, processing speed, and memory retrieval, consistent with previous literature. An older subgroup showed lower age-corrected scores at a single time point compared to younger participants. Performance on a computer-administered cognitive measure showed a slight overall decline over a period of 8-28 months. For a case study with mild neuropsychology findings, the MRI report was normal while the SPECT report identified perfusion abnormalities. Future research can test whether advances in imaging analysis allow for identification of cerebral small vessel disease before changes are detected in cognition.

  10. An Automatic Technique for Finding Faint Moving Objects in Wide Field CCD Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, O. R.; Meech, K. J.

    1996-09-01

    The traditional method used to find moving objects in astronomical images is to blink pairs or series of frames after registering them to align the background objects. While this technique is extremely efficient in terms of the low signal-to-noise ratio that the human sight can detect, it proved to be extremely time-, brain- and eyesight-consuming. The wide-field images provided by the large CCD mosaic recently built at IfA cover a field of view of 20 to 30' over 8192(2) pixels. Blinking such images is an enormous task, comparable to that of blinking large photographic plates. However, as the data are available digitally (each image occupying 260Mb of disk space), we are developing a set of computer codes to perform the moving object identification in sets of frames. This poster will describe the techniques we use in order to reach a detection efficiency as good as that of a human blinker; the main steps are to find all the objects in each frame (for which we rely on ``S-Extractor'' (Bertin & Arnouts (1996), A&ASS 117, 393), then identify all the background objects, and finally to search the non-background objects for sources moving in a coherent fashion. We will also describe the results of this method applied to actual data from the 8k CCD mosaic. {This work is being supported, in part, by NSF grant AST 92-21318.}

  11. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a "distractor". This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion's neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found "serious lesion in children" is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses. PMID:27610341

  12. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a “distractor”. This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion’s neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found “serious lesion in children” is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses. PMID:27610341

  13. Spectrum of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging: What clinician should know?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; White, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain continue to generate interest in healthy control, research, and clinical subjects. However, in clinical practice, the discovery of incidental findings acts as a “distractor”. This review is based on existing heterogeneous reports, their clinical implications, and how the results of incidental findings influence clinical management. This draws attention to the followings: (1) the prevalence of clinically significant incidental findings is low; (2) there is a lack of a systematic approach to classification; and discusses (3) how to deal with the detected incidental findings based a proposed common clinical profile. Individualized neurological care requires an active discussion regarding the need for neuroimaging. Clinical significance of incidental findings should be decided based on lesion’s neuroradiologic characteristics in the given clinical context. Available evidence suggests that the outcome of an incidentally found “serious lesion in children” is excellent. Future studies of intracranial incidental findings on pediatric brain MRI should be focused on a homogeneous population. The study should address this clinical knowledge based review powered by the statistical analyses.

  14. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  15. Clinical and image findings in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Farias, Diogo Silva; Zen Filho, Edson Virgilio; de Oliveira, Thais Feitosa Leitão; Tinôco-Araújo, José Endrigo; Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio da Silva; Antunes, Heliton Spíndola; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva

    2013-07-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) is characterized as exposed bone in the jaws for more than 8 weeks in patients with current or previous history of therapy with bisphosphonates (BPs) and no history of radiotherapy in the head and neck. We report a case series of 7 patients with BRONJ and analyze the variations of clinical and imaging signs, correlating them with the presence or absence of bone exposure. Among the patients, 6 were women and 1 was a man, aged 42-79 years. Five of the patients were using zoledronic acid and the other 2 alendronate. The use of BPs varied from 3 to 13 years. In 5 patients, tooth extraction was the triggering event of injuries. Panoramic radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were evaluated by a radiologist blinded to the cases. There were persistent unremodeled extraction socket even several months after tooth extraction in 3 of the cases that were consistent wit CT findings that also showed areas of osteosclerosis and osteolysis. Patients were treated according to the recommendations of the AAOMS, with surgical debridement and antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin in the symptomatic patients. The follow-up of these patients ranged from 8 to 34 months, with a good response to treatment. The image findings in this case series were not specific and showed no difference between each stages of BRONJ (AAOMS, 2009). The image features were similar in presence or absence of exposed bone.

  16. The Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign: Deep Imaging of Stars in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth A.; Wahhaj, Z.; Liu, M.; Chun, M.; Close, L.; Ftaclas, C.; Hartung, M.; Hayward, T.; Nielsen, E.; Toomey, D.; NICI Planet-Finding Campaign Team

    2010-01-01

    The novel Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) on the 8-m Gemini South telescope combines a number of techniques to attenuate starlight and suppress superspeckles for direct detection of exoplanets: 1) Lyot coronagraphic imaging, 2) dual channel imaging for Spectral Differential Imaging (SDI) and 3) operation in a fixed Cassegrain rotator mode for Angular Differential Imaging (ADI). The combination of these techniques allows unprecedented contrasts of dmag > 14 (median value) at 1" in H band. We are currently conducting a 50 night planet-finding campaign using NICI. Although the majority of our survey targets are young (<300 Myr, so as to catch young planets while they are still self-luminous), we are also observing a subset of nearby stars in the immediate solar neighborhood. While these objects are old (and hence, planetary companions will be faint), they are still desirable targets for planet searches due to the excellent physical resolution possible around these stars. Additionally, their large proper motions also mean that planet candidates can be quickly confirmed. NICI is the first instrument with achieved star-planet contrasts high enough to image supergiant planets around these stars (M > 10 MJup). Here, we report on results from observations of 3 such nearby stars. At respective distances of 1.39 pc, 2.35 pc, and 3.8 pc, Proxima Centauri, Wolf 359, and Luyten's Star are the 1st, 3rd, and 22nd closest stars to the Sun. While our search yielded numerous candidate companions, especially around Proxima Centauri, all of these candidates were found to be background in second epoch observations.

  17. Relationship between temporomandibular joint pain and magnetic resonance imaging findings of internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Innerhofer, K; Rudisch, A; Bertram, S

    2001-04-01

    In terms of clinical decision-making in instances of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain, there is controversy in the literature over the diagnostic significance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-related variable disk-condyle relationship (DCR). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether in patients with TMJ-related pain, the variable of TMJ pain may be linked to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of internal derangement (ID). The study comprised 163 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of orofacial pain referred to the TMJ, and the presence of uni- or bilateral TMJ pain during palpation, during function, and/or during unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the prevalence of TMJ ID types. Analysis of the data revealed the presence of TMJ pain to be associated with significantly more MR imaging diagnoses of ID than an absence of ID (P<0.001), and disk displacement without reduction than disk displacement with reduction (P<0.001). Using chi-square analysis, the results showed a significant relationship between the presence of TMJ-related pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ ID (P=0.001), and TMJ ID type (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of ID (K=0.16). The results suggest that the clinical variable of TMJ pain may have a significant effect on the prevalences of MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ ID. The data confirm the biological concept of DCR as a diagnostic approach in patients with signs and symptoms of TMJ-related pain.

  18. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreas carcinoma occurring in the annular pancreas: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Maki, Akira; Amemiya, Hidetake; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Ei; Sano, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    The annular pancreas is a rare congenital anomaly in which a ring of the pancreas parenchyma surrounds the second part of the duodenum. Malignant tumors are extremely rare in patients with an annular pancreas. A 64-year-old man presented with appetite loss and vomiting. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) indicated pancreas parenchyma surrounding the second part of the duodenum, and a hypovascular area occupying lesion in the annular pancreas. Subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathology showed pancreatic carcinoma occurring in the complete annular pancreas.

  19. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  20. Pancreas donation for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, M A; Ruiz, P; Mansilla, J J

    2005-04-01

    Islet transplantation, though still in the experimental phase, is a therapeutic option that has opened new expectations for the control of diabetes mellitus. Initial results are encouraging for the significant advantages compared with whole pancreas transplantation for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, with or without kidney failure. However, the success of transplantation, both at centers with more experience and others with less, is limited by the difficulty in obtaining a suitable number of donors and by laboratory isolation techniques. Significant advances require changes in donor selection, perfusion, oxygenation, and transfer of the pancreas, and in the process of isolation, purification, and culture in the laboratory. Of the 32 pancreases sent to the islet isolation laboratory from different hospitals in Andalusia, a viable percentage of islets was finally available in 19. However, in only 4 (18%) procedures were the preparations considered optimal for implantation in 2 recipients. PMID:15866673

  1. Endocrine pancreas development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Zahra; Lin, Shuo

    2011-10-15

    Type 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Current efforts to cure diabetes are aimed at replenishing damaged cells by generating a new supply of β cells in vitro. The most promising strategy for achieving this goal is to differentiate embryonic stem (ES) cells by sequentially exposing them to signaling molecules that they would normally encounter in vivo. This approach requires a thorough understanding of the temporal sequence of the signaling events underlying pancreatic β-cell induction during embryonic development. The zebrafish system has emerged as a powerful tool in the study of pancreas development. In this review, we provide a temporal summary of pancreas development in zebrafish with a special focus on the formation of pancreatic β cells.

  2. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making.

  3. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence.

  4. Body image in transgender young people: Findings from a qualitative, community based study.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jenifer K; Doty, Jennifer L; Catalpa, Jory M; Ola, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the ways in which transgender youth experience their bodies with regard to gender and body size. Ninety transgender youth and young adults completed in-depth interviews in eight metropolitan areas of the United States, Canada, and Ireland. Using a queer perspective, qualitative analyses revealed two broad conceptual categories: body dissatisfaction and body satisfaction. Within these categories, participants focused on body issues related to gender characteristics and body size. Findings revealed evidence of self-criticism and social distress related to body image dissatisfaction and self-acceptance and social acceptance related to body image satisfaction. Data demonstrated how gender, body size, and the intersection of gender and body size influenced personal perceptions of body dissatisfaction and satisfaction. Developmental processes were evident: participants further along in consolidating a gender identity described gaining a sense of social awareness, self-acceptance, and body satisfaction reflecting a sense of resilience. PMID:27352103

  5. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D’Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. PMID:26185345

  6. [Fatal familial insomnia: case presentation and discussion of typical clinical and imaging findings].

    PubMed

    Thomas, A V; Klein, J C; Brockhaus-Dumke, A; Heiss, W D; Jacobs, A H; Petereit, H F

    2006-06-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a hereditary prion disease caused by a mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein gene PRNP on chromosome 20. It is characterized by disturbed night sleep, resulting in daily vigilance perturbations and a variety of other neurological symptoms. We present the case of a 46-year-old woman deteriorating despite immunosuppressive treatment which was initiated suspecting cerebral vasculitis as the cause of her progressive neurological symptoms. The correct diagnosis was established only post mortem. Based on the case presented here, we discuss typical clinical symptoms and imaging findings. In particular, we outline how modern diagnostic methods such as positron emission tomography with [(15)O]H(2)O and [(18)F]FDG and single photon emission computed tomography can add valuable information to results from conventionally performed imaging techniques and genetic testing.

  7. Solitary synovial chondromatosis arising in the gluteus maximus bursa: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Noriko; Nambu, Atsushi; Tago, Masao; Shibuya, Isao; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Chondral tumors in soft tissue are referred to as soft-tissue chondromas or extraskeletal chondromas, or as synovial chondromatosis if they arise in synovial tissue. We report the case of a 29-year-old man with synovial chondromatosis, also called synovial osteochondromatosis, which appeared in a solitary and extra-articular form. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, the central portion of the tumor showed similar characteristics to bone marrow, despite the absence of any connection to adjacent bone. T2-weighted imaging displayed marked peripheral hyperintensity consistent with a cartilaginous area. These findings suggested the presence of enchondral ossification and were similar to those of skeletal osteochondroma, with the exception of the absence of attachment to bone. MRI is useful for distinguishing solitary synovial chondromatosis from other lesions, such as myositis ossificans, extraskeletal chondrosarcoma, and parosteal osteosarcoma. PMID:26998347

  8. The surgical anatomy of the lymphatic system of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Malefant, Jason; Patel, Swetal D; Du Plessis, Maira; Renna, Sarah; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-05-01

    The lymphatic system of the pancreas is a complex, intricate network of lymphatic vessels and nodes responsible for the drainage of the head, neck, body, and tail of the pancreas. Its anatomical divisions and embryological development have been well described in the literature with emphasis on its clinical relevance in regards to pancreatic pathologies. A thorough knowledge and understanding of the lymphatic system surrounding the pancreas is critical for physicians in providing diagnostic and treatment strategies for patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a surgeon may try to predict the routes for metastasis for pancreatic cancer, the complexity of this system presents difficulty due to variable drainage patterns. Pancreatitis also presents as another severe disease which has been shown to have an association with the lymphatics. The aim of this article is to review the literature on the lymphatics of the pancreas, pancreatic pathologies, and the available imaging methodologies used to study the pancreatic lymphatics.

  9. Case report. Peripancreatic intranodal haemangioma mimicking pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, A D; Arellano, R; Baker, G

    2011-12-01

    Haemangiomas are common benign tumours that are generally detected within the skin, mucosal surfaces and soft tissues. However, intranodal haemangiomas are extremely rare and are among the benign primary vascular abnormalities of the lymph nodes that include lymphangioma, haemangioendothelioma, angiomyomatous hamartoma and haemangiomas. In this case report, we present the imaging and pathological findings of an intranodal haemangioma in the pancreatic head simulating a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intranodal haemangioma in this location.

  10. Herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus: an accidental finding on magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Yavarian, Yousef; Bayat, Michael; Brøndum Frøkjær, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus into the ambient cistern is a very rare entity, which could be mistaken for other pathology such as tumor. To the best of our knowledge, two prior cases of this kind of herniation have been described. One of these cases was with associated symptomatology and other abnormalities, and the other was characterized as idiopathic. In this case report, we report a case of accidental finding of a herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus into the ambient cistern, without any other accompanying abnormalities, well depicted by magnetic resonance imaging without further necessity for surgical brain intervention.

  11. Cardiac Amyloidosis: Typical Imaging Findings and Diffuse Myocardial Damage Demonstrated by Delayed Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Tanaka, Kyouei; Toda, Genji

    2006-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare systemic disease. However, involvement of the heart is a common finding and is the most frequent cause of death in amyloidosis. We report the sonographic, scintigraphic, and MRI features of a pathologically proven case of cardiac amyloidosis. Delayed contrast-enhanced MR images, using an inversion recovery prepped gradient-echo sequence, revealed diffuse enhancement in the wall of both left and right ventricles. This enhancement suggested expansion of the extracellular space of the myocardium caused by diffuse myocardial necrosis secondary to deposition of amyloid.

  12. Imaging findings and cerebral perfusion in arterial ischemic stroke due to transient cerebral arteriopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Junior, Alcino Alves; Ellovitch, Saada Resende de Souza; Pincerato, Rita de Cassia Maciel

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old female child who developed an arterial ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery territory, due to a proximal stenosis of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery, most probably related to transient cerebral arteriopathy of childhood. Computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography are presented, as well as follow-up by magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography exams. Changes in cerebral perfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch call attention. As far as we know, this is the first report of magnetic resonance perfusion findings in transient cerebral arteriopathy.

  13. Late magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings in neonates with unilateral lesions on cranial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Bouza, H; Dubowitz, L M; Rutherford, M; Cowan, F; Pennock, J M

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-two neonates (11 term and 11 preterm) with predominantly unilateral hemispheric lesions on ultrasound were re-examined clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at between two and nine years of age. The aim was to correlate early ultrasound and late MRI findings with the development of hemiplegia. At follow-up, five children were normal and 15 had hemiplegia, which was mild in seven and moderate in 10. The presence or absence of hemiplegia, or its severity, could not be predicted from either early ultrasound or later MRI appearances. PMID:7958513

  14. An Unusual Case of Laryngeal Paraganglioma in a Patient with Carotid Body Paraganglioma: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Serap; Senol, Serkan; Imamoglu, Hakan; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Ekinci, Afra; Yuce, Imdat; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Multiple paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare conditions. Carotid paragangliomas are most common multiple paragangliomas. Laryngeal paragangliomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumors and usually are seen as symptomatic solitary lesions. We present multimodality imaging findings of incidentally detected laryngeal paraganglioma in a woman with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma and positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of laryngeal and carotid body paragangliomas in a patient with positive family history. Radiologists should keep in mind that paragangliomas may occur in various locations as multiple tumors. PMID:26649218

  15. The Relationship between the Progression of Kyphosis in Stable Thoracolumbar Fractures and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Deuk Soo; Shin, Won Ju; Paik, Je Won; Park, Min Ho

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To investigate the relation between the progression of kyphotic deformity and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in conservatively treated stable thoracolumbar fractures. Overview of Literature When treated conservatively, excessive progression of kyphotic deformity and vertebral compression can emerge during follow-up. We sought to identify predictors of vertebral body deformation using MR images. Methods The presence in MR images of anterior longitudinal ligament (AL) or posterior longitudinal ligament (PL) injury, superior or inferior endplate disruption, superior or inferior disc injury in fractured vertebral bodies, the existence of low signal intensity on T2 weighted images, and bone edema of intravertebral bodies were assessed. Results The presence of superior endplate disruption and a higher level of bone edema were found to cause the progressions of kyphotic angle (KA), wedge angle (WA), and anterior vertebral compression (AVC) rate. When AL or superior disc injury was observed, only KA increased meaningfully. When low signal intensity was present on T2 weighted images WA and AVC increased significantly, but PL injury, inferior endplate disruption, and inferior disc injury showed no notable correlation with kyphotic deformity progression. The risk factors found to be associated with an increase of KA to >5° were AL injury, superior endplate disruption, superior disc injury, and a bone edema level of over 1/3, and their associated risks versus no injury cases were 14.1, 3.7, 6.8, and 10.4-fold, respectively. Conclusions AL injury, superior endplate and disc injury, or a high level of bone edema, were critical factors that determine kyphotic deformity progression. PMID:25901226

  16. Findings of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy after 16 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gee-Hee; Jang, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Hyeong-Han; Hong, Solim; Eum, Sang-Hoon; Jeon, Howook; Moon, Donggyu

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man had been diagnosed with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) according to echocardiography findings 16 years ago. Echocardiography showed ischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP)-like features with decreased systolic function but a non-dilated chamber. Coronary angiography was performed but showed a normal coronary artery. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal transmural and subepicardial delayed-enhancing areas at the anteroseptal, septal, and inferoseptal left ventricular (LV) wall, and wall thinning and decreased motion of the anteroseptal LV wall. Findings of ischemic CMP-like features by echocardiography suggested microvascular dysfunction. This late stage of HCMP carries a high risk of sudden death. Cardiac MRI evaluation may be necessary in cases of ischemic CMP-like features in HCMP. In this case, the diagnosis of end-stage HCMP with microvascular dysfunction was confirmed by using cardiac MRI after a follow-up period of more than 16 years. PMID:27721955

  17. Paget disease of the breast: mammographic, US, and MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Min Ho; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2011-01-01

    Paget disease is a rare malignancy of the breast characterized by infiltration of the nipple epidermis by adenocarcinoma cells. The clinical features of Paget disease are characteristic and should increase the likelihood of the diagnosis being made. An important point is that more than 90% of cases of Paget disease are associated with an additional underlying breast malignancy. Paget disease is frequently associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the underlying lactiferous ducts of the nipple-areolar complex; it may even be associated with DCIS or invasive breast cancer elsewhere in the breast, at least 2 cm from the nipple-areolar complex. Nevertheless, mammographic findings may be negative in up to 50% of cases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in patients with Paget disease for evaluation of the nipple-areolar complex and identification of an additional underlying malignancy in the breast. The appropriate surgical treatment must be carefully selected and individualized on the basis of radiologic findings, especially those obtained with breast MR imaging.

  18. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  19. Pancreas Transplantation in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Robert R; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Odorico, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    The field of pancreas transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1980s to become a routine transplant in the modern era. With short- and long-term outcomes continuing to improve and the significant mortality, quality-of-life, and end-organ disease benefits, pancreas transplantation should be offered to more patients. In this article, we review current indications, patient selection, surgical considerations, complications, and outcomes in the modern era of pancreas transplantation.

  20. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma: A report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xi; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Huan; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic ependymomas are rare malignant tumors of the central nervous system. Few studies are available regarding their neuroradiological characteristics. The present study aimed to retrospectively review a series of patients with extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma and to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics to distinguish anaplastic ependymoma from other intracranial tumors. The clinical and pathological images of 11 patients who presented with histologically proven anaplastic ependymoma at Nanfang Hospital (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) between September 2004 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. MRI scans were obtained in all 11 cases. Computed tomography scans were obtained in only 3 cases. In total, 8 tumors were located at the supratentorial parenchyma, and 3 tumors were derived from the cerebellar hemisphere. Images displayed quasi-circular (4/11), irregularly-lobulated (7/11) variable-intensity masses. The masses presented with cysts or necrosis (8/11), hemorrhage (7/11), marked (9/11) or mild (2/11) enhancement, and moderate (4/11), mild (3/11) or absent (4/11) peritumoral edema. The tumors were also frequently closely associated with the lateral ventricle (6/11). Tumors appeared isointense to hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense or hypointense on T2WI, demonstrating wreath-like and ring-like characteristics, with intratumoral nodules (3/11) or marked flake-like inhomogeneous (6/11) enhancement on post-contrast MRI. Only 2 solid lesions showed mild enhancement (2/11). Although the MRI features of the extraventricular anaplastic ependymomas varied and were non-specific, these characteristic MRI findings, combined with the locations of the lesions, the age of onset and the short disease course, could be useful in differentiating anaplastic ependymomas from other intracranial neoplasms in the future.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma: A report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xi; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Huan; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic ependymomas are rare malignant tumors of the central nervous system. Few studies are available regarding their neuroradiological characteristics. The present study aimed to retrospectively review a series of patients with extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma and to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics to distinguish anaplastic ependymoma from other intracranial tumors. The clinical and pathological images of 11 patients who presented with histologically proven anaplastic ependymoma at Nanfang Hospital (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) between September 2004 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. MRI scans were obtained in all 11 cases. Computed tomography scans were obtained in only 3 cases. In total, 8 tumors were located at the supratentorial parenchyma, and 3 tumors were derived from the cerebellar hemisphere. Images displayed quasi-circular (4/11), irregularly-lobulated (7/11) variable-intensity masses. The masses presented with cysts or necrosis (8/11), hemorrhage (7/11), marked (9/11) or mild (2/11) enhancement, and moderate (4/11), mild (3/11) or absent (4/11) peritumoral edema. The tumors were also frequently closely associated with the lateral ventricle (6/11). Tumors appeared isointense to hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense or hypointense on T2WI, demonstrating wreath-like and ring-like characteristics, with intratumoral nodules (3/11) or marked flake-like inhomogeneous (6/11) enhancement on post-contrast MRI. Only 2 solid lesions showed mild enhancement (2/11). Although the MRI features of the extraventricular anaplastic ependymomas varied and were non-specific, these characteristic MRI findings, combined with the locations of the lesions, the age of onset and the short disease course, could be useful in differentiating anaplastic ependymomas from other intracranial neoplasms in the future. PMID:27602137

  3. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad; Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane; Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  5. ABNORMAL IMAGING FINDINGS OF THE FEMORAL THIRD TROCHANTER IN 20 HORSES.

    PubMed

    Shields, Georgette E; Whitcomb, Mary Beth; Vaughan, Betsy; Wisner, Erik R

    2015-01-01

    Injuries involving the femoral third trochanter are an uncommon but important source of equine lameness; however, clinical localization can be challenging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe ultrasonographic and scintigraphic findings in a group of horses with presumed third trochanter injury. Medical records of an equine referral hospital were searched from 2004-2014, and 20 horses met the inclusion criteria. Lesions consistent with third trochanter fracture were identified with ultrasound in 14/20 horses. Onset of lameness was acute (11), insidious (2), or unknown (1). All but one horse was lame at presentation, ranging from Grade 2-4/5. Ultrasound was the primary diagnostic modality in 5/14 horses with fragmentation, while scintigraphic findings of intense (3), moderate (5), and mild (1) increased radiopharmaceutical uptake (IRU) prompted ultrasonographic examinations in 9/14 fractured horses. A nondisplaced fracture was suspected in an additional horse with intense IRU and negative ultrasound findings. In the remaining five horses, imaging findings included only mild IRU. Lameness was localized to other regions in these cases. Six of 12 fractured horses with available outcome data were returned to function after a prolonged rehabilitation of 8-18 months. Scintigraphic findings helped to direct focused ultrasound exams in the majority of fracture cases. Horses with evidence of third trochanter fracture had similar clinical characteristics to that reported for pelvic fractures and authors therefore recommend ultrasonographic examination of both regions, especially when scintigraphy is unavailable. Prognosis for return to function in horses of the current study was less favorable than previously reported.

  6. Enhancement of the normal pancreas: comparison of manganese-DPDP and gadolinium chelate.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, U; Warshauer, D M; Brown, E D; Schlund, J F; Eisenberg, L B; Semelka, R C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare manganese-DPDP (Mn-DPDP) and gadolinium chelate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agents for enhancement of the normal pancreas. A total of 14 patients with focal liver disease underwent Mn-DPDP- and Gd-DTPA-enhanced 1.5 T MR examinations using spoiled gradient-echo (FLASH) technique at two separate times. Contrast agents were injected according to the currently recommended practices; Gd-DTPA was injected as a rapid bolus injection in a dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg, and Mn-DPDP was injected as a slow IV injection in a dosage of 5 mumol/kg. Quantitative region of interest measurements were made in 11 patients, and percent contrast enhancement of the pancreas and pancreas-fat signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were determined for each agent. Images were also evaluated qualitatively by consensus reading of two investigators and overall scan quality was rated on a scale from 1 (poor) to 4 (very good). Enhancement of the pancreas immediately post Gd-DTPA was significantly higher than 15 min post Mn-DPDP (73.3 vs 36.3%; p = 0.003). On postcontrast images the pancreas-fat SNR measurements were 7.7 (i.e., pancreas higher in signal than fat) and -6.1 for Gd-DTPA and Mn-DPDP, respectively, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). Image quality was rated as 3.1 and 2.5 for Gd-DTPA- and Mn-DPDP-enhanced images, respectively. The normal pancreas enhances significantly more with Gd-DTPA than with Mn-DPDP administered under the conditions of this study. Overall image quality is also greater on the Gd-DTPA-enhanced images.

  7. Role of Percutaneous Image Guided Biopsy in Spinal Lesions: Adequacy and Correlation with MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although, MRI has increased our understanding of spinal pathologies, accurate diagnosis of spinal lesions need biopsy, so that early treatment can be initiated. Aim To evaluate the accuracy of biopsy, safety and yield of percutaneously done image guided spinal biopsy using a large bore needle and correlate between MRI findings and biopsy as well as the importance of various MRI findings in establishing the diagnosis. Materials and Methods All spinal lesions after clinical and MRI evaluation were subjected to Jamshidi Needle biopsy using 11 gauge needles. Biopsy material was sent for culture/sensitivity, AFB smear and histopathological examination. The outcome assessment included percentage of patients in whom diagnosis was changed after biopsy, yield in biopsy and complications of biopsy. MRI findings, biopsy findings and final diagnosis were correlated to know the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and biopsy diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the importance of each of MRI findings in making a diagnosis. Results Forty five patients with spinal lesions underwent biopsy using an 11 gauge Jamshidi needle. Initial biopsy was inconclusive in 4 patients giving a positive yield in about 91.2% of cases and a repeat biopsy ensured conclusive report in all cases. Following biopsy there was a change in diagnosis in 8% cases. MRI showed sensitivity of 85.71% and specificity of 93.54% for the diagnosis of malignancy and sensitivity of 85.71% and specificity of 86.48% for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. In contrast, initial biopsy had sensitivity of 92.85% and specificity of 100% for the diagnosis of malignancy and sensitivity of 71.42% and specificity of 100 % for the diagnosis of infection. Logistic regression analysis showed good correlation between malignancy and posterior bugle in the vertebral body in the absence of a fracture (p = 0.007), involvement of pedicles and posterior elements (p = 0.001) and soft tissue extension (p = 0

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings associated with lateral cerebral ventriculomegaly in English Bulldogs.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christopher T; Glass, Eric N; Seiler, Gabriela; Zwingenberger, Allison L; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Multiple congenital or developmental anomalies associated with the central nervous system have been reported in English Bulldogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify and describe the prevalence and MRI characteristics of these anomalies and their association with presence and degree of cerebral ventriculomegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of 50 English Bulldogs were evaluated. Forty-eight dogs had some degree of cerebral ventriculomegaly, 27 of which had an otherwise normal brain. Presence of lateral ventriculomegaly was not significantly associated with presence of another intracranial lesion. Appearance of the septum pellucidum was variable, ranging from intact to incomplete or completely absent. The corpus callosum was subjectively thinned in all but three dogs, two of which had normal lateral ventricles. Fusion of the rostral colliculi was not found in any dog. A persistent craniopharyngeal canal was identified in one dog. Aqueductal stenosis caused by fusion of the rostral colliculi was not identified in any dog. Findings indicated that cerebral ventriculomegaly is a common finding in English Bulldogs with or without other intracranial lesions, aqueductal stenosis caused by fusion of the rostral colliculi is unlikely to be a common etiology leading to obstructive hydrocephalus, and a large craniopharyngeal canal is a rare finding that has unknown clinical significance at this time.

  9. Assessment of Invasive Breast Cancer Heterogeneity Using Whole-Tumor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Texture Analysis: Correlations With Detailed Pathological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun Sook; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lim, Yaeji; Han, Boo-Kyung; Cho, Eun Yoon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-01-01

    There is no study that investigates the potential correlation between the heterogeneity obtained from texture analysis of medical images and the heterogeneity observed from histopathological findings. We investigated whether texture analysis of magnetic resonance images correlates with histopathological findings.Seventy-five patients with estrogen receptor positive invasive ductal carcinoma who underwent preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included. Tumor entropy and uniformity were determined on T2- and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images under different filter levels. Two pathologists evaluated the detailed histopathological findings of the tumors including tumor cellularity, dominant stroma type, central scar, histologic grade, extensive intraductal component (EIC), and lymphovascular invasion. Entropy and uniformity values on both T2- and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images were compared with detailed pathological findings.In a multivariate analysis, entropy significantly increased only on unfiltered T2-weighted images (P = 0.013). Tumor cellularity and predominant stroma did not affect the uniformity or entropy on both T2- and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images. High histologic grades showed increased uniformity and decreased entropy on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images, whereas the opposite tendency was observed on T2-weighted images. Invasive ductal carcinoma with an EIC or lymphovascular invasion only affected the contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images, through increased uniformity and decreased entropy. The best uniformity results were recorded on T2- and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images at a filter level of 0.5. Entropy showed the best results at a filter level of 0.5 on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images. However, on T2-weighted images, an ideal model was achieved on unfiltered images.MRI texture analysis correlated with pathological

  10. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  11. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  12. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Truong, L D; Rangdaeng, S; Jordan, P H

    1987-11-01

    A rare cystic lesion of the pancreas is reported. Morphologically, this unilocular cyst was filled with keratin material and lined by mature, keratinizing squamous epithelium; it was surrounded by lymphoid tissue and also focally by pancreatic tissue. Clinically, the lesion was associated with diarrhea and abdominal pain, both of which promptly disappeared after its removal. Although the histogenesis of this lesion is not known, it can be histologically differentiated from other pancreatic and retroperitoneal cysts. We propose the name "lymphoepithelial cyst" for this lesion and note that only one similar case has been described previously.

  13. Imaging Findings of Plasmacytoma of Both Breasts as a Preceding Manifestation of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Mi

    2016-01-01

    Breast plasmacytoma is an extremely rare tumor. It can occur as a primary isolated tumor or as an extramedullary manifestation in multiple myeloma. This report describes the unusual case of a primary extramedullary plasmacytoma that progressed to multiple myeloma within 15 months in a 35-year-old woman. The patient had been initially diagnosed with a primary extramedullary plasmacytoma of the epidural soft tissue at the cervical 6-thoracic 1 spine level and the stomach. The patient had received chemotherapy and the disease had been in remission. One year later, the disease recurred, affecting both breasts, right clavicle, and orbit. Three months later, the disease had progressed to multiple myeloma. I report this case, focusing on the findings of mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography of bilateral breast plasmacytoma, and provide a review of the literature. PMID:26925106

  14. Range-finding in squid using retinal deformation and image blur.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Sung; Marshall, Justin

    2014-01-20

    Squid and other cephalopods catch prey with remarkable speed and precision [1]. Before the strike occurs, they encounter the difficult task of judging an object's distance and size in the contrast-poor world of the mid-water environment [1-4]. Here we describe a solution to this common problem underwater, where a large portion of a squid's dorso-temporal retina is intentionally blurred. This apparently counter-adaptive 'retinal bump' is combined with a vertical bobbing behavior that scans objects of interest from focused to defocused retinal regions. The image focus differential changes sharply at precisely the distance equivalent to tentacle length and enables the squid, Sepioteuthis lessoniana, to capture prey. This unique range-finding mechanism is an adaptation to hunting, defense, and object size identification in an environment where the depth cues found on land are less reliable.

  15. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children.

  16. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children. PMID:25895913

  17. Structural brain imaging in children and adolescents following prenatal cocaine exposure: preliminary longitudinal findings.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Nurunisa; Kekatpure, Minal V; Liu, Jie; Sheinkopf, Stephen J; Quinn, Brian T; Lala, Meenakshi D; Kennedy, David; Makris, Nikos; Lester, Barry M; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2014-01-01

    The brain morphometry of 21 children, who were followed from birth and underwent structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at 8-10 years, was studied. This cohort included 11 children with prenatal cocaine exposure (CE) and 10 noncocaine-exposed children (NCE). We compared the CE versus NCE groups using FreeSurfer to automatically segment and quantify the volume of individual brain structures. In addition, we created a pediatric atlas specifically for this population and demonstrate the enhanced accuracy of this approach. We found an overall trend towards smaller brain volumes among CE children. The volume differences were significant for cortical gray matter, the thalamus and the putamen. Here, reductions in thalamic and putaminal volumes showed a robust inverse correlation with exposure levels, thus highlighting effects on dopamine-rich brain regions that form key components of brain circuitry known to play important roles in behavior and attention. Interestingly, head circumferences (HCs) at birth as well as at the time of imaging showed a tendency for smaller size among CE children. HCs at the time of imaging correlated well with the cortical volumes for all subjects. In contrast, HCs at birth were predictive of the cortical volume only for the CE group. A subgroup of these subjects (6 CE, 4 NCE) was also scanned at 13-15 years of age. In subjects who were scanned twice, we found that the trend for smaller structures continued into teenage years. We found that the differences in structural volumes between the CE and NCE groups are largely diminished when the HCs are controlled for or matched by study design. Participants in this study were drawn from a unique longitudinal cohort and, while the small sample size precludes strong conclusions regarding the longitudinal findings reported, the results point to reductions in HCs and in specific brain structures that persist through teenage years in children who were exposed to cocaine in utero. PMID:24994509

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging findings of white matter changes in first episode schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kuswanto, Carissa Nadia; Teh, Irvin; Lee, Tih-Shih; Sim, Kang

    2012-04-01

    Earlier structural magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia have noted smaller white matter volumes in diverse brain regions and recent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have allowed better elucidation of changes in brain white matter integrity within the illness. As white matter abnormalities have been reported to occur early in the course of schizophrenia, we systematically review extant DTI studies of anomalies of white matter integrity in first episode schizophrenia (FES) up till October 2011. Overall, disruptions of white matter integrity were found in the cortical, subcortical brain regions and white matter associative and commissural tracts, suggesting that changes of cortical-subcortical white matter integrity were found at an early stage of the disorder. These changes in white matter integrity were correlated with specific cognitive deficits (verbal and spatial working memory) as well as psychopathology (positive more than negative symptoms) in patients with FES. The correlation of these white matter integrity changes with cognitive and phenomenological factors may shed light on neurobiological substrates underlying these clinical manifestations. Future studies need to validate these findings in larger samples of subjects and in different populations as well as chart the progress of these cerebral white matter changes over time so as to better appreciate their trajectory with illness course, treatment and chronicity.

  19. High-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of human patellar cartilage: feasibility and preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Filidoro, L; Dietrich, O; Weber, J; Rauch, E; Oerther, T; Wick, M; Reiser, M F; Glaser, C

    2005-05-01

    MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to analyze the microstructural properties of articular cartilage. Human patellar cartilage-on-bone samples were imaged at 9.4T using a diffusion-weighted SE sequence (12 gradient directions, resolution = 39 x 78 x 1500 microm(3)). Voxel-based maps of the mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy (FA), and eigenvectors were calculated. The mean diffusivity decreased from the surface (1.45 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) to the tide mark (0.68 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s). The FA was low (0.04-0.28) and had local maxima near the surface and in the portion of the cartilage corresponding to the radial layer. The eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue showed a distinct zonal pattern, being oriented tangentially and radially in the upper and lower portions of the cartilage, respectively. The findings correspond to current scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data on the zonal architecture of cartilage. The eigenvector maps appear to reflect the alignment of the collagenous fibers in cartilage. In view of current efforts to develop and evaluate structure-modifying therapeutic approaches in osteoarthritis (OA), DTI may offer a tool to assess the structural properties of cartilage. PMID:15844163

  20. Cell cycle-dependent differentiation dynamics balances growth and endocrine differentiation in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Pau; Lemaire, Laurence A; Ferrer, Jorge; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine, ductal, and acinar cells but become bipotent by embryonic day 13.5, giving rise to endocrine cells and ductal cells. However, the dynamics of individual progenitors balancing self-renewal and lineage-specific differentiation has never been described. Using three-dimensional live imaging and in vivo clonal analysis, we reveal the contribution of individual cells to the global behaviour and demonstrate three modes of progenitor divisions: symmetric renewing, symmetric endocrinogenic, and asymmetric generating a progenitor and an endocrine progenitor. Quantitative analysis shows that the endocrine differentiation process is consistent with a simple model of cell cycle-dependent stochastic priming of progenitors to endocrine fate. The findings provide insights to define control parameters to optimize the generation of β-cells in vitro.

  1. Adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Fukino, Nobutada; Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kuboi, Youichi; Kida, Kazutoshi

    2015-04-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of weight loss of 6 kg in 4 mo. Imaging examinations revealed a tumor located on the third portion of the duodenum with stenosis. We suspected duodenal carcinoma and performed pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy. Adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum was finally diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Malignant transformation in the duodenum arising from a heterotopic pancreas is extremely rare; to our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported worldwide, including the present case. The most common location of malignancy is the proximal duodenum at the first and descending portion. Herein, we describe the first case of adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas, which was located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a review of the literature.

  2. Metastases to the Pancreas Encountered on Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided, Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Pang, Judy C; Roh, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic lesions in the pancreas are very uncommon and may be difficult to differentiate from the more commonly encountered primary neoplasms derived from the exocrine and endocrine pancreas because of the significant overlap in clinical presentation, imaging, and cytologic features. Metastasis to the pancreas may occur years after treatment of the primary neoplasm and is often not considered on initial evaluation because of the rarity of such events. The possibility of a metastasis to the pancreas should be entertained in patients with any prior history of malignancy because a proper diagnosis is essential in identifying surgical candidates, or avoiding potentially unnecessary surgery and facilitating triage to more appropriate nonoperative therapy. Herein, we describe intrapancreatic metastases secondary to renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and lung carcinoma, as documented by cytologic examination of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the pancreatic masses.

  3. Adenocarcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Fukino, Nobutada; Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kuboi, Youichi; Kida, Kazutoshi

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of weight loss of 6 kg in 4 mo. Imaging examinations revealed a tumor located on the third portion of the duodenum with stenosis. We suspected duodenal carcinoma and performed pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy. Adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas at the third portion of the duodenum was finally diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Malignant transformation in the duodenum arising from a heterotopic pancreas is extremely rare; to our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported worldwide, including the present case. The most common location of malignancy is the proximal duodenum at the first and descending portion. Herein, we describe the first case of adenocarcinoma arising from a heterotopic pancreas, which was located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a review of the literature. PMID:25852297

  4. On the diabetic menu: Zebrafish as a model for pancreas development and function

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Mary D.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Development of the vertebrate pancreas is a complex stepwise process comprising regionalization, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis. Studies in zebrafish are contributing to an emerging picture of pancreas development in which extrinsic signaling molecules influence intrinsic transcriptional programs to allow ultimate differentiation of specific pancreatic cell types. Zebrafish experiments have revealed roles for several signaling molecules in aspects of this process; for example our own work has shown that Retinoic Acid signals specify the pre-pancreatic endoderm. Time-lapse imaging of live zebrafish embryos has started to provide detailed information about early pancreas morphogenesis. In addition to modeling embryonic development, the zebrafish has recently begun to be used as a model for pancreas regeneration studies. Here we review the significant progress in these areas and consider the future potential of zebrafish as a diabetes research model. PMID:19204986

  5. Pancreas Transplantation: An Alarming Crisis in Confidence.

    PubMed

    Stratta, R J; Gruessner, A C; Odorico, J S; Fridell, J A; Gruessner, R W G

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade, the annual number of pancreas transplantations performed in the United States has steadily declined. From 2004 to 2011, the overall number of simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantations in the United States declined by 10%, whereas the decreases in pancreas after kidney (PAK) and pancreas transplant alone (PTA) procedures were 55% and 34%, respectively. Paradoxically, this has occurred in the setting of improvements in graft and patient survival outcomes and transplanting higher-risk patients. Only 11 centers in the United States currently perform ≥20 pancreas transplantations per year, and most centers perform <5 pancreas transplantations annually; many do not perform PAKs or PTAs. This national trend in decreasing numbers of pancreas transplantations is related to a number of factors including lack of a primary referral source, improvements in diabetes care and management, changing donor and recipient considerations, inadequate training opportunities, and increasing risk aversion because of regulatory scrutiny. A national initiative is needed to "reinvigorate" SPK and PAK procedures as preferred transplantation options for appropriately selected uremic patients taking insulin regardless of C-peptide levels or "type" of diabetes. Moreover, many patients may benefit from PTAs because all categories of pancreas transplantation are not only life enhancing but also life extending procedures. PMID:27232750

  6. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the “precision-medicine” paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  7. Abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Jin Woo; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear in most cases. This study aimed to assess abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SSNHL and evaluate the value of MRI in identifying the cause of SSNHL. A retrospective analysis of the charts and MRI findings of 291 patients with SSNHL was performed. In 291 patients, MRI abnormality, which was considered a cause of SSNHL, was detected in 13 patients. Vestibular schwannoma involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) and/or cerebellopontine angle was observed in 9 patients. All 9 patients had intrameatal tumors, and 6 of the 9 patients displayed extrameatal extension of their tumors. The tumor was small (<1 cm) or medium-sized (1.1–2.9 cm) in these 6 patients. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma, labyrinthine hemorrhage, IAC metastasis, and a ruptured dermoid cyst were each observed in 1 patient. The most commonly observed MRI abnormality in patients with SSNHL was vestibular schwannoma, and all of the lesions were small or medium-sized tumors involving the IAC. PMID:27124066

  8. Epithelioid myoepithelioma of the accessory parotid gland: pathological and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Yamada, Kei; Yamane, Hideo; Hashimoto, Shigeo

    2014-05-01

    Tumors of the accessory parotid gland (APG) are rare, and pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common benign APG tumor subtype. Myoepithelioma of the APG is much rarer than PA, and to date, only 5 cases have been sporadically reported in the English literature. We describe the clinicopathological and MRI findings of an epithelioid myoepithelioma of the APG that was treated in our hospital. The patient's only clinical symptom was a slow-growing and painless mid-cheek mass. The tumor was suspected to be PA before surgery based on the following MRI findings: (1) a well-circumscribed and lobulated contour, (2) isointensity and hyperintensity relative to the muscle on T1- and T2-weighted images (WIs), respectively, (3) good enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-WIs, (4) peripheral hypointensity on T2-WIs, and (5) a gradual time-signal intensity curve enhancement pattern on gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI. The tumor was completely resected via a standard parotidectomy approach, and the postoperative pathological examination of the tumor, including immunohistochemistry, confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioid myoepithelioma. As it is hardly possible to distinguish myoepithelioma from PA and low-grade malignant tumors preoperatively, a pathological examination using frozen sections is helpful for surgical strategy-related decisions.

  9. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  10. Surgical treatment of hydatid cysts of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ismail, K; Haluk, G I; Necati, O

    1991-01-01

    This series consists of seven patients with hydatid cysts of the pancreas; five females and two males, with an average age of 31 years. In a follow-up extending up to 33 years, about a 50% rate of correct preoperative diagnosis was recorded. The most sensitive and effective diagnostic modalities such as latex agglutination, ultrasonic, radionuclide, computerized tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques were not available till the late seventies and therefore were only used during diagnosis of the latter 3 cases. Four patients had cysts located in the head of the pancreas. Three cysts were situated in the body and tail. Two distal pancreatectomies, two cystectomies and three marsupialization and external drainage procedures were performed for the surgical management of these cases. Two of the marsupialized and externally drained patients had fistulas which eventually dried up within a month leading to a total morbidity of 29% and a mortality rate of nil. PMID:1938210

  11. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Andrew R; Newman, Elliot; Hajdu, Cristina H

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin. Most commonly they affect the pleura but they been described in other viscera. SFT of the pancreas is extremely rare, and only eight cases have been reported to date. We perform a literature review and report a ninth case. The patient is a 54-year-old African-American female who presented with several months of abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography demonstrated a lesion in the head of the pancreas, and she underwent a Whipple operation. Pathology demonstrated SFT of the pancreas. She is alive and well 1 year post-operatively. SFT of the pancreas predominately affects middle-aged women. These tumors are difficult to distinguish radiologically from neuroendocrine tumors. While SFT of the pancreas tend to have an indolent course, there is the potential for malignancy. We recommend complete surgical excision.

  12. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Andrew R; Newman, Elliot; Hajdu, Cristina H

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin. Most commonly they affect the pleura but they been described in other viscera. SFT of the pancreas is extremely rare, and only eight cases have been reported to date. We perform a literature review and report a ninth case. The patient is a 54-year-old African-American female who presented with several months of abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography demonstrated a lesion in the head of the pancreas, and she underwent a Whipple operation. Pathology demonstrated SFT of the pancreas. She is alive and well 1 year post-operatively. SFT of the pancreas predominately affects middle-aged women. These tumors are difficult to distinguish radiologically from neuroendocrine tumors. While SFT of the pancreas tend to have an indolent course, there is the potential for malignancy. We recommend complete surgical excision. PMID:26628714

  13. fibmeasure: Python/Cython module to find the center of back-illuminated optical fibers in metrology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, James

    2016-03-01

    fibmeasure finds the precise locations of the centers of back-illuminated optical fibers in images. It was developed for astronomical fiber positioning feedback via machine vision cameras and is optimized for high-magnification images where fibers appear as resolvable circles. It was originally written during the design of the WEAVE pick-and-place fiber positioner for the William Herschel Telescope.

  14. Multimodality imaging in cranial blastomycosis, a great mimicker: Case-based illustration with review of clinical and imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, Puneet S; Lath, Chinar O; Klein, Andrew P; Ulmer, John L

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of three patients who are proven cases of blastomycosis with cranial involvement. In this review, we discuss the imaging features of cranial blastomycosis with relevant clinical case examples including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and advanced MR imaging techniques like magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Literature is reviewed for modern-day diagnosis and treatment of this fatal intracranial infection, if not diagnosed promptly and managed effectively. PMID:27081235

  15. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas: Case report and literature review of reported cases in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hoshimoto, Sojun; Matsui, Junichi; Miyata, Ryohei; Takigawa, Yutaka; Miyauchi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas (ACP) with cyst formation and review 60 ACP cases reported in Japan. In 20% of cases, laboratory tests revealed severe anemia (hemoglobin level < 10.0 g/dL) and elevated leucocyte counts (> 12000/mm3), which were likely attributable to rapid tumor growth, intratumoral hemorrhage, and necrosis. Elevated serum CA19-9 levels were observed in 55% of cases. Cyst-like structures were observed on imaging in 47% of cases, and this finding appears to reflect subsequent cystic degeneration in the lesion. Macroscopically, hemorrhagic necrosis was observed in 77% of cases, and cyst formation was observed in 33% of cases. ACP should be considered when diagnosing pancreatic tumors with a cyst-like appearance, especially in the presence of severe anemia, elevated leucocyte counts, or elevated serum CA19-9 levels. PMID:27784976

  16. Acromioclavicular joint injuries and reconstructions: a review of expected imaging findings and potential complications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Andrew C; Matcuk, George; Patel, Dakshesh; Itamura, John; Forrester, Deborah; White, Eric; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries, including acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations, remain a common reason for presentation to the emergency room. Although the diagnosis can be made apparent through proper history and physical examination by the emergency medicine physician, ascertaining the degree of injury can be difficult on the basis of clinical evaluation alone. While there is consensus in the literature that low-grade AC joint injuries can be treated with conservative management, high-grade injuries will generally require surgical intervention. Furthermore, the treatment of grade 3 injuries remains controversial, making it incumbent upon the radiologist to become comfortable with distinguishing this diagnosis from lower or higher grade injuries. Imaging of AC joint injuries after clinical evaluation is generally initiated in the emergency room setting with plain film radiography; however, on occasion, an alternative modality may be presented to the emergency room radiologist for interpretation. As such, it remains important to be familiar with the appearance of AC joint separations on a variety of modalities. Another possible patient presentation in both the emergent and nonemergent setting includes new onset of pain or instability in the postsurgical shoulder. In this scenario, the onus is often placed on the radiologist to determine whether the pain or instability represents the sequelae of reinjury versus a complication of surgery. The purpose of this review is to present an anatomically based discussion of imaging findings associated with AC joint separations as seen on multiple modalities, as well as to describe and elucidate a variety of potential complications which may present to the emergency room radiologist.

  17. Angiolipoma of the labia majora: MR imaging findings with histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Jourjon, Rebecca; Dohan, Anthony; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Guerrache, Youcef; Fazel, Afchine; Soyer, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Benign soft tissue tumors of the vulva are relatively rare in adult patients. We present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of an angiolipoma of the labia majora that developed in a 58-year-old woman. MR imaging showed a well-circumscribed lesion that was hyperintense on T1-weighted and T2-weighted MR images, and hypointense on fat-suppressed MR images, consistent with fat content. High apparent diffusion coefficient was noticed on diffusion-weighted MR images. Dynamic gadolinium-chelate enhanced MR imaging showed progressive enhancement. Histopathologically, the lesion was predominantly made of mature adipose tissue and contained thin walled vascular channels consistent with angiolipoma. PMID:23849100

  18. Angiolipoma of the labia majora: MR imaging findings with histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Jourjon, Rebecca; Dohan, Anthony; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Guerrache, Youcef; Fazel, Afchine; Soyer, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Benign soft tissue tumors of the vulva are relatively rare in adult patients. We present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of an angiolipoma of the labia majora that developed in a 58-year-old woman. MR imaging showed a well-circumscribed lesion that was hyperintense on T1-weighted and T2-weighted MR images, and hypointense on fat-suppressed MR images, consistent with fat content. High apparent diffusion coefficient was noticed on diffusion-weighted MR images. Dynamic gadolinium-chelate enhanced MR imaging showed progressive enhancement. Histopathologically, the lesion was predominantly made of mature adipose tissue and contained thin walled vascular channels consistent with angiolipoma.

  19. MRI Findings of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Duodenal Abnormalities and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ayse; Ustuner, Evren; Uzun, Caglar; Bektas, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and presentation patterns of anatomical variations and various benign and malignant pathologies of the duodenum, including sphincter contraction, major papilla variation, prominent papilla, diverticulum, annular pancreas, duplication cysts, choledochocele, duodenal wall thickening secondary to acute pancreatitis, postbulbar stenosis, celiac disease, fistula, choledochoduodenostomy, external compression, polyps, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, ampullary carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. MRI is a useful imaging tool for demonstrating duodenal pathology and its anatomic relationships with adjacent organs, which is critical for establishing correct diagnosis and planning appropriate treatment, especially for surgery. PMID:26576112

  20. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  1. Pathologic findings in patients with targeted magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate needle core biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Rachel L; Nour, Sherif G; Osunkoya, Adeboye O

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the routine (non-targeted) sampling approach of transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-GB), targeted magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsies (TMRI-GB) target regions of the prostate suspicious for prostate cancer (PCa), based on findings on multiparametric MRI. We sought to examine the pathologic findings identified on TMRI-GB, due to the fact that there are limited studies on this in the Pathology literature. A search was made through our Urologic Pathology files for prostate needle core biopsies that were obtained via TMRI-GB. Forty-six patients were identified. Mean patient (PT) age was 62 years (range: 50-78 years). Twenty one of 46 PTs (46%) had a history of PCa, 10/46 PTs (22%) had a history of negative TRUS-GB and rising PSA, and the remaining 15/46 PTs (32%) had never undergone biopsy. Cancer detection rate on TMRI-GB was 57% for PTs with a prior diagnosis of PCa, 50% for PTs with a history of benign biopsy, and 67% who were biopsy naïve. An average of 3.16 cores were sampled from malignant lesions and an average of 2.74 were sampled from benign lesions (P=0.02). TMRI-GB has a higher cancer detection rate than TRUS-GB. TMRI-GB may have a critical role as a tool for active surveillance, tumor mapping, and primary detection of PCa, which will likely evolve as the ability to identify malignant lesions improve. The roles of pathologists and radiologists in the validation of this procedure will continue to be even more vital in the future. PMID:26617689

  2. SU-E-J-65: Motion Difference Between the Pancreas and Nearby Veins for Pancreas Motion Monitoring Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Erickson, B; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As it is generally difficult to outline the pancreas on an ultrasound b-mode image, visualized structures such as the portal or the splenic veins are assumed to have the same motion as the pancreas. These structures can be used as a surrogate for monitoring pancreas motion during radiation therapy (RT) delivery using ultrasound. To verify this assumption, we studied the motion difference between the head of the pancreas, the portal vein, the tail of the pancreas, and splenic vein. Methods: 4DCT data acquired during RT simulation were analyzed for a total of 5 randomly selected patients with pancreatic cancer. The data was sorted into 10 respiratory phases from 0% to 90% (0%: end of the inspiration, 50%: end of expiration) . The head of the pancreas (HP), tail of the pancreas (TP), portal vein (PV), and splenic vein (SV) were contoured on all 10 phases. The volume change and motion were measured in the left-right (LR), anterior-superior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The volume change for all patients/phases were: 1.2 ± 3% for HP, 0.78 ± 1.6% for PV, 2.5 ± 2.9% for TP, and 0.53 ± 2.1% for SV. Motion for each structure was estimated from the centroid displacements due to the uniformity of the structures and the small volume change. The measured motion between HP and PV was: LR: 0.1 ± 0.17 mm, AP: 0.04 ± 0.1 mm, SI: 0.17 ± 0.16 mm and between TP and the PV was: LR: 0.05 ± 0.3 mm, AP: 0.1 ± 0.4 mm, SI: 0.01 ± 0.022 mm. Conclusion: There are small motion differences between the portal vein and the head of the pancreas, and the splenic vein and the tail of the pancreas. This suggests the feasibility of utilizing these features for monitoring the pancreas motion during radiation therapy.

  3. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  4. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:26696517

  5. Minor papilla cannulation and dorsal ductography in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Benage, D; McHenry, R; Hawes, R H; O'Connor, K W; Lehman, G A

    1990-01-01

    Until recently, pancreas divisum represented a major technical barrier to a complete evaluation of pancreatic ductal anatomy. Technical refinements have now made it possible to achieve minor papilla cannulation and dorsal ductography in more than 90% of attempts. In 120 consecutive dorsal ductograms, structural pathology was demonstrated in 36 subjects (30%): chronic pancreatitis in 23, pancreatic stones in 10, pseudocyst(s) in 4, ductal "cut-off" in 7, pancreatic cancer in 3, and partial agenesis in 1 (some patients had more than one finding). For patients in whom alcohol abuse was excluded, ductal pathology was present in 25%. Abnormal ventral ductograms were present in only 8% of cases, demonstrating that dorsal ductography has an appreciable additional diagnostic yield. When the clinical situation indicates the need for pancreatography, minor papilla cannulation should be performed if major papilla cannulation fails or reveals only the ventral pancreatogram of pancreas divisum.

  6. [A case of pulmonary actinomycosis with a unique finding in the chest MR image].

    PubMed

    Sito, Tsuyako; Kobayashi, Makoto; Harada, Rhoji; Kubota, Tetsuya; Nakata, Hideshi; Uemura, Yoshiki; Nonami, Yoshiki; Yamashiro, Toshiyuki; Taguchi, Hirokuni

    2003-04-01

    A 57-year old man, who was complaining of a productive cough and right shoulder pain, was admitted to our hospital because of an irregularly shaped mass located at rt. S1 on a chest radiograph. Bronchoscopy revealed no evidence suggesting lung cancer or any specific infection, either pathologically or microbiologically. CT-guided biopsy revealed changes resembling lymphocytic or plasmocytic interstitial pneumonitis with thickening of the alveolar septum and with accumulations of mononuclear cells and plasma cells, indicating the proliferation of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT system). Since no definitive diagnosis was considered possible, a right upper lobectomy was performed. Histopathologic examination of tissue from the right upper lobe revealed sulfur granules and branching Gram-positive filamentous bacteria, and the condition was pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary actinomycosis. In the center of the mass lesion, the patient's chest MRI showed a very small area with a low signal intensity in T1- and a high signal in T2-weighted images, which suggested an accumulation of fluid in the actinomycotic abscess. As detailed MR findings in this condition have not been well described in the literature, the MRI evidence seen in this case may be useful for the diagnosis of actinomycosis.

  7. Predicting malignancy from mammography findings and image-guided core biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Pedro; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Dutra, Inês; Woods, Ryan; Burnside, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to produce machine learning models that predict the outcome of a mammography from a reduced set of annotated mammography findings. In the study we used a dataset consisting of 348 consecutive breast masses that underwent image guided core biopsy performed between October 2005 and December 2007 on 328 female subjects. We applied various algorithms with parameter variation to learn from the data. The tasks were to predict mass density and to predict malignancy. The best classifier that predicts mass density is based on a support vector machine and has accuracy of 81.3%. The expert correctly annotated 70% of the mass densities. The best classifier that predicts malignancy is also based on a support vector machine and has accuracy of 85.6%, with a positive predictive value of 85%. One important contribution of this work is that our model can predict malignancy in the absence of the mass density attribute, since we can fill up this attribute using our mass density predictor. PMID:26333262

  8. Iterative use of nuclear receptor Nr5a2 regulates multiple stages of liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Sahar; Weeks, Olivia; Talbot, Jared C; Hedgepeth, John W; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Swinburne, Ian; Cortes, Mauricio; Alexa, Kristen; Megason, Sean; North, Trista E; Amacher, Sharon L; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    The stepwise progression of common endoderm progenitors into differentiated liver and pancreas organs is regulated by a dynamic array of signals that are not well understood. The nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 gene nr5a2, also known as Liver receptor homolog-1 (Lrh-1) is expressed in several tissues including the developing liver and pancreas. Here, we interrogate the role of Nr5a2 at multiple developmental stages using genetic and chemical approaches and uncover novel pleiotropic requirements during zebrafish liver and pancreas development. Zygotic loss of nr5a2 in a targeted genetic null mutant disrupted the development of the exocrine pancreas and liver, while leaving the endocrine pancreas intact. Loss of nr5a2 abrogated exocrine pancreas markers such as trypsin, while pancreas progenitors marked by ptf1a or pdx1 remained unaffected, suggesting a role for Nr5a2 in regulating pancreatic acinar cell differentiation. In the developing liver, Nr5a2 regulates hepatic progenitor outgrowth and differentiation, as nr5a2 mutants exhibited reduced hepatoblast markers hnf4α and prox1 as well as differentiated hepatocyte marker fabp10a. Through the first in vivo use of Nr5a2 chemical antagonist Cpd3, the iterative requirement for Nr5a2 for exocrine pancreas and liver differentiation was temporally elucidated: chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 function during hepatopancreas progenitor specification was sufficient to disrupt exocrine pancreas formation and enhance the size of the embryonic liver, suggesting that Nr5a2 regulates hepatic vs. pancreatic progenitor fate choice. Chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 at a later time during pancreas and liver differentiation was sufficient to block the formation of mature acinar cells and hepatocytes. These findings define critical iterative and pleiotropic roles for Nr5a2 at distinct stages of pancreas and liver organogenesis, and provide novel perspectives for interpreting the role of Nr5a2 in disease.

  9. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  10. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Pancreas This booklet is about cancer of the pancreas, also called pancreatic cancer. There are two main ... care. This booklet covers: The anatomy of the pancreas and basics about cancer of the pancreas Treatments ...

  11. Clinical and Muscle Imaging Findings in 14 Mainland Chinese Patients with Oculopharyngodistal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Jiangxi; Du, Jing; Que, Chengli; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei; Sun, Weiping; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Oculopharyngodistal myopathy (OPDM) is an extremely rare, adult-onset hereditary muscular disease characterized by progressive external ocular, pharyngeal, and distal muscle weakness and myopathological rimmed vacuole changes. The causative gene is currently unknown; therefore, diagnosis of OPDM is based on clinical and histopathological features and genetic exclusion of similar conditions. Moreover, variable manifestations of this disorder are reported in terms of muscle involvement and severity. We present the clinical profile and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes of lower limb muscles in 14 mainland Chinese patients with OPDM, emphasizing the role of muscle MRI in disease identification and differential diagnosis. The patients came from 10 unrelated families and presented with progressive external ocular, laryngopharyngeal, facial, distal limb muscle weakness that had been present since early adulthood. Serum creatine kinase was mildly to moderately elevated. Electromyography revealed myogenic changes with inconsistent myotonic discharge. The respiratory function test revealed subclinical respiratory muscle involvement. Myopathological findings showed rimmed vacuoles with varying degrees of muscular dystrophic changes. All known genes responsible for distal and myofibrillar myopathies, vacuolar myopathies, and muscular dystrophies were excluded by PCR or targeted next-generation sequencing. Muscle MRI revealed that the distal lower legs had more severe fatty replacement than the thigh muscles. Serious involvement of the soleus and long head of the biceps femoris was observed in all patients, whereas the popliteus, gracilis and short head of biceps femoris were almost completely spared, even in advanced stages. Not only does our study widen the spectrum of OPDM in China, but it also demonstrates that OPDM has a specific pattern of muscle involvement that may provide valuable information for its differential diagnosis and show further evidence supporting

  12. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system.

  13. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system. PMID:27198785

  14. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of Pancreas; A Case Series and Review Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mirminachi, Babak; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Sharifi, Amir Houshang; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Information regarding solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is limited in Iran. We aimed to review the clinicocytopathological features and follow-up of patients with SPN of pancreas who were diagnosed in a single center in Iran. METHODS Seven patients with SPN of the pancreas were diagnosed during January 2010 to March 2015 at the Digestive Disease Research Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients were reviewed prospectively. RESULTS Six out of the 7 patients were female and the mean age of all the patients was 29.4 years ranging from 15 to 61 years. The most common clinical presentation was nonspecific abdominal pain (N=6). The tumors were located mostly in head and neck of the pancreas. SPN was diagnosed in all patients by fine needle aspiration through endosonography (EUS-FNA). All patients underwent surgery. Histological findings of surgical tissues were consistent with EUS-FNA. The postoperative follow-up period of about 14 months was uneventful. CONCLUSION SPN of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor which affects primarily young women. EUS-guided FNA could play an important role in preoperative diagnosis of SPN of the pancreas. PMID:27252816

  15. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:26547222

  16. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches.

  17. Temporomandibular joint internal derangement type III: relationship to magnetic resonance imaging findings of internal derangement and osteoarthrosis. An intraindividual approach.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Rudisch, A; Innerhofer, K; Bösch, R; Bertram, S

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether in patients with a clinical unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-related finding of internal derangement type (ID)-III (disk displacement without reduction) in combination with TMJ-related pain, the intraindividual variable of 'unilateral TMJ ID-III pain' may be linked to subject-related magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of TMJ ID, and TMJ osteoarthrosis (OA). The study comprised 48 consecutive TMJ pain patients, who were assigned a clinical unilateral TMJ pain side-related diagnosis of ID-III. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ ID and/or OA. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ ID-III pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ ID (P=0.000) and TMJ ID type (P=0.000). There was no correlation between the clinical finding of TMJ ID-III pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (P=0.217), nor between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and that of TMJ ID (P=0.350). Regarding the diagnostic subgroups of TMJ ID, a significant relationship was found between the presence of TMJ OA and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ ID type(P=0.002). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated a fair diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ ID-III pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of disk displacement without reduction (DDNR) (K=0.42). The results suggest that TMJ ID-III pain is related to TMJ-related MR imaging diagnoses of ID. Further, the data confirm the biological concept of 'DDNR and OA' as an underlying mechanism in the etiology of TMJ-related pain and dysfunction. PMID:11720040

  18. [Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed

    Karvar, S; Breidert, M; Nagel, M; Kirsch, C; Pinkert, J; Ehninger, G

    2001-01-01

    Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma. HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 39-year-old woman was admitted to our department of gastroenterology with recurrent epigastrical pain. Ten years previously the diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-syndrome has been established. Two years before a germ line mutation in exon 3 of the VHL-tumour suppressor gene has been detected. The patient has a healthy son with a normal VHL-gene and four healthy siblings who had refused a genetic blood test. INVESTIGATIONS: At abdominal ultrasound at the head of the pancreas three 4 2 cm large cysts and in the region of the left adrenal gland a 2,9 2,7 cm large tumor were visible. MRI of the abdomen revealed in addition a 2,2 1,5 cm large tumour of the right adrenal gland. An asymptomatic biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was detected by elevated urine catecholamines and 123I-MIBG-scintigraphy. TREATMENT AND COURSE: The cysts of the pancreas were punctured under endosonographical control and analysis of the cyst fluid was not suspicious of a malignant cystic tumour. The patient had no further abdominal complaints. After oral treatment with the alpha-blocker phentolamine the biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was treated by retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery in an organ-sparing fashion. Postoperatively ACTH-stimulating test revealed a normal cortisol response. CONCLUSION: Adrenocortical function can be preserved by la-paroscopic adrenal-sparing surgery in bilateral phaeochromocytoma.

  19. ["Second opinion" in online radiology via Internet: report on implementation and analysis of reliability of findings in sectional images].

    PubMed

    Ricke, J; van der Donk, E; Wolf, M; Ostendorf, B; Hosten, N; Zielinski, C; Liebig, T; Stroszczinski, C; Lopez-Hänninen, E; Lemke, A J; Gillessen, C; Gürvit, O; Amthauer, H; Kleinholz, L; Bartelink, H; Felix, R

    1997-01-01

    Numerous medical on-line services have already been established in the world-wide internet. In connection with the Information service TELESCAN, sponsored by the EU, a pilot project has been initiated which offers a radiological "second opinion" via the transmission of radiological findings and images that have been previously rendered anonymous. In addition to a description of the basic implementation, tests of the diagnostic certainty of the transmitted cranial computed tomographs have been performed. The CT images were digitized with a document camera, transmitted over the Internet, and then evaluated on the receiver's monitor. Both the transfer of originally generated digital image files (in ACR-NEMA or DICOM) as well as graphic files after digitization of X-ray films, for example by a document camera, is possible via electronic post (e-mail). Visualization by the receiver requires the use of current proprietary software for special medical image formats, while standard graphic formats such as GIFF or JPEG can be visualized with the usual Internet software. In an ROC analysis, 56 individual images of cranial computed tomographs, half with pathological findings such as space-occupying lesions, infarcts, or brain edema, were tested with regard to the diagnostic certainty after digitization and transmission. In comparison with the original film findings, there was a slight but statistically not significant reduction in diagnostic certainty of the images evaluated on screen after transfer via the Internet. We believe that this result is due to the low local resolution, low dynamic range, the high image noise and of CT arising from the window technique. The same parameters are probably valid for MRI. The result cannot be applied to conventional radiography including mammography because, in comparison to the mentioned image techniques, their local resolution is high and image noise is considerably lower.

  20. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Branding, Gordian; Jefferys, Laura; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Siebert, Eberhard

    2016-02-01

    To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution.

  1. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case of metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is caused by insufficiency of arylsulfatase A resulting in impaired myelination. Diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease have been rarely reported. We report diffusion MR imaging of MLD in a 12-month-old male who presented with regression of milestones and progressive spasticity.

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is caused by insufficiency of arylsulfatase A resulting in impaired myelination. Diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease have been rarely reported. We report diffusion MR imaging of MLD in a 12-month-old male who presented with regression of milestones and progressive spasticity. PMID:27606023

  3. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case of metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is caused by insufficiency of arylsulfatase A resulting in impaired myelination. Diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease have been rarely reported. We report diffusion MR imaging of MLD in a 12-month-old male who presented with regression of milestones and progressive spasticity. PMID:27606023

  4. Determining the relative importance of figures in journal articles to find representative images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Henning; Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Lin, Chang; Eggel, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    When physicians are searching for articles in the medical literature, images of the articles can help determining relevance of the article content for a specific information need. The visual image representation can be an advantage in effectiveness (quality of found articles) and also in efficiency (speed of determining relevance or irrelevance) as many articles can likely be excluded much quicker by looking at a few representative images. In domains such as medical information retrieval, allowing to determine relevance quickly and accurately is an important criterion. This becomes even more important when small interfaces are used as it is frequently the case on mobile phones and tablets to access scientific data whenever information needs arise. In scientific articles many figures are used and particularly in the biomedical literature only a subset may be relevant for determining the relevance of a specific article to an information need. In many cases clinical images can be seen as more important for visual appearance than graphs or histograms that require looking at the context for interpretation. To get a clearer idea of image relevance in articles, a user test with a physician was performed who classified images of biomedical research articles into categories of importance that can subsequently be used to evaluate algorithms that automatically select images as representative examples. The manual sorting of images of 50 journal articles of BioMedCentral with each containing more than 8 figures by importance also allows to derive several rules that determine how to choose images and how to develop algorithms for choosing the most representative images of specific texts. This article describes the user tests and can be a first important step to evaluate automatic tools to select representative images for representing articles and potentially also images in other contexts, for example when representing patient records or other medical concepts when selecting

  5. Incidental finding of elongated ventral duct in a case of pancreatic divisum mimicking double pancreatic ducts on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography—a rare normal variant

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Y. Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic variations and developmental anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are often noticed as an incidental finding on imaging. However, knowledge of these variants may prove to be crucial during surgery as it may prevent unintentional ductal injury. We report a case of pancreatic divisum with codominant ventral duct mimicking double pancreatic ducts along with the elongated uncinate process of pancreas. It was picked incidentally on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) done to rule out cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis. It is a rare anatomic variant and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported so far. PMID:26682149

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine in Children: Spinal Incidental Findings in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramadorai, Uma E.; Hire, Justin M.; DeVine, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in children: spinal incidental findings in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ramadorai, Uma E; Hire, Justin M; DeVine, John G

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  8. [Peroperative ultrasound scanning of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Alexandre, J H; Hernigou, A; Billebaud, T; Bouillot, J L; Plainfosse, M C

    1985-01-01

    Intraoperative realtime high resolution ultrasound scanning of the pancreas seems to be a new and promising procedure. We have performed it in 28 patients: the normal ultrasound picture of pancreatic ducts and parenchyma was defined in 9 patients without pancreatic disease; in 19 patients with pancreatic disease, intraoperative ultrasound was compared with preoperative ultrasound examination. Seven of 8 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 4 of 6 with calcifying chronic pancreatitis had positive findings, respectively. In 3 cancer patients, intraoperative ultrasound investigation avoided a long and unavailing dissection of the tumor by revealing extensive spread. In selected cases, intraoperative sonography allowed to characterize and to localize pancreatic carcinoma: portal vein invasion, relationship of the tumor to the duct of Wirsung and small hepatic metastases. In chronic pancreatitis, intraoperative ultrasound information concerning the dimensions of the pancreatic duct, the structure and the localization of pseudocysts was comparable to that obtained by radiological opacification. Furthermore, intraoperative ultrasound exploration guided proper incision and evacuation of pancreatic pseudocysts in two patients. Operative ultrasound seems to us to be mandatory during pancreatic surgery. Further experience with this technique is needed in a larger number of patients. However, we believe that it could replace intraoperative cholangiography and pancreaticography in the assessment of extension and complications of pancreatic disease.

  9. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  10. Endoscopic ultrasonography of duodenal aberrant pancreas: comparison with histology after endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Aoyagi, Kunihiko; Tomioka, Yoshitaka; Ishibashi, Hideki; Nimura, Satoshi; Sakisaka, Shotaro

    2015-04-01

    We present the case of a 45-year-old man with an aberrant pancreas in the duodenum. He was referred to our hospital for gastric cancer screening. On upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, a submucosal tumor was noted in the second portion of the duodenum; it was 10 mm in diameter, with a smooth surface and bridging fold. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed a hypoechoic lesion with small anechoic areas located in the third sonographic layer of the duodenum wall. To confirm the exact diagnosis, endoscopic resection was performed. The histological diagnosis was aberrant pancreas, Heinrich type II. The hypoechoic lesion and anechoic areas on EUS findings clearly corresponded with pancreatic acinus cells and duct dilation on histological findings, respectively. EUS findings are useful to diagnosis a duodenal aberrant pancreas that has ductal structures.

  11. Necrotizing encephalitis in a Yorkshire Terrier: clinical, imaging, and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Lotti, D; Capucchio, M T; Gaidolfi, E; Merlo, M

    1999-01-01

    A 5-year-old, male Yorkshire Terrier had chronic and progressive neurologic signs compatible with lesions in the right brain stem and right forebrain. In magnetic resonance images of the brain there were multifocal lesions at different stages of evolution, consistent with an inflammatory disease. The lesions were located in the white matter of the cerebrum, in the diencephalon and mesencephalon. These lesions were hypointense in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted images with no mass effect and minimal enhancement with gadolinium. Necrotizing encephalitis was confirmed post mortem.

  12. Hepatobiliary and gallium imaging findings in gallbladder perforation: A case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, E.; Chen, D.C.; Siegel, M.E.

    1989-02-01

    Gallbladder perforation is an unusual condition with a high mortality rate. Early detection with prompt surgical intervention can increase the survival rate. Hepatobiliary imaging using Technetium-99m-labeled iminodiacetic acid has been used for the diagnosis of gallbladder perforation. However, the results vary and are somewhat confusing. The authors report a case of gallbladder perforation with hepatobiliary imaging and an unusual gallium image; review the literature; and propose a classification of three different imaging patterns: (1) visualization of the gallbladder with bile leakage, (2) nonvisualization of the gallbladder with a photopenic fluid collection, and (3) nonvisualization of the gallbladder with bile leakage. These patterns may provide pathophysiologic information for the surgeon. 27 references.

  13. Distal Embolization After Stenting of the Vertebral Artery: Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat; Arat, Anil Cil, Barbaros E.; Turkbey, Baris; Saatci, Isil; Cekirge, Saruhan; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated our experience with stenting of the vertebral artery in an effort to determine the risk of distal embolization associated with the procedure. Methods. Between June 2000 and May 2005, 35 patients with 38 stenting procedures for atherosclerotic disease of the vertebral origin in our institution were identified. The average age of the patients was 60.3 years (range 32-76 years). Sixteen of these patients (with 18 stents) had MR imaging of the brain with diffusion-weighted imaging and an apparent diffusion coefficient map within 2 days before and after procedure. Results. On seven of the 16 postprocedural diffusion-weighted MR images, a total of 57 new hyperintensities were visible. All these lesions were focal in nature. One patient demonstrated a new diffusion-weighted imaging abnormality in the anterior circulation without MR evidence of posterior circulation ischemia. Six of 16 patients had a total of 25 new lesions in the vertebrobasilar circulation in postprocedural diffusion-weighted MR images. One patient in this group was excluded from the final analysis because the procedure was complicated by basilar rupture during tandem stent deployment in the basilar artery. Hence, new diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities were noted in the vertebrobasilar territory in 5 of 15 patients after 17 stenting procedures, giving a 29% rate of diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities per procedure. No patient with bilateral stenting had new diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities. Conclusion. Stenting of stenoses of the vertebral artery origin may be associated with a significant risk of asymptomatic distal embolization. Angiography, placement of the guiding catheter, inflation of the stent balloon, and crossing the lesion with guidewires or balloon catheters may potentially cause distal embolization. Further studies to evaluate measures to increase the safety of vertebral artery stenting, such as the use of distal protection devices or

  14. How Relevant Are Imaging Findings in Animal Models of Movement Disorders to Human Disease?

    PubMed

    Bannon, Darryl; Landau, Anne M; Doudet, Doris J

    2015-08-01

    The combination of novel imaging techniques with the use of small animal models of disease is often used in attempt to understand disease mechanisms, design potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, and develop novel methods with translatability to human clinical conditions. However, it is clear that most animal models are deficient when compared to the complexity of human diseases: they cannot sufficiently replicate all the features of multisystem disorders. Furthermore, some practical differences may affect the use or interpretation of animal imaging to model human conditions such as the use of anesthesia, various species differences, and limitations of methodological tools. Nevertheless, imaging animal models allows us to dissect, in interpretable bits, the effects of one system upon another, the consequences of variable neuronal losses or overactive systems, the results of experimental treatments, and we can develop and validate new methods. In this review, we focus on imaging modalities that are easily used in both human subjects and animal models such as positron emission and magnetic resonance imaging and discuss aging and Parkinson's disease as prototypical examples of preclinical imaging studies.

  15. Informatics in radiology: automated structured reporting of imaging findings using the AIM standard and XML.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Stefan L; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and descriptive imaging data are a vital component of the radiology report and are frequently of paramount importance to the ordering physician. Unfortunately, current methods of recording these data in the report are both inefficient and error prone. In addition, the free-text, unstructured format of a radiology report makes aggregate analysis of data from multiple reports difficult or even impossible without manual intervention. A structured reporting work flow has been developed that allows quantitative data created at an advanced imaging workstation to be seamlessly integrated into the radiology report with minimal radiologist intervention. As an intermediary step between the workstation and the reporting software, quantitative and descriptive data are converted into an extensible markup language (XML) file in a standardized format specified by the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project of the National Institutes of Health Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid. The AIM standard was created to allow image annotation data to be stored in a uniform machine-readable format. These XML files containing imaging data can also be stored on a local database for data mining and analysis. This structured work flow solution has the potential to improve radiologist efficiency, reduce errors, and facilitate storage of quantitative and descriptive imaging data for research. PMID:21357413

  16. Informatics in radiology: automated structured reporting of imaging findings using the AIM standard and XML.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Stefan L; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and descriptive imaging data are a vital component of the radiology report and are frequently of paramount importance to the ordering physician. Unfortunately, current methods of recording these data in the report are both inefficient and error prone. In addition, the free-text, unstructured format of a radiology report makes aggregate analysis of data from multiple reports difficult or even impossible without manual intervention. A structured reporting work flow has been developed that allows quantitative data created at an advanced imaging workstation to be seamlessly integrated into the radiology report with minimal radiologist intervention. As an intermediary step between the workstation and the reporting software, quantitative and descriptive data are converted into an extensible markup language (XML) file in a standardized format specified by the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project of the National Institutes of Health Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid. The AIM standard was created to allow image annotation data to be stored in a uniform machine-readable format. These XML files containing imaging data can also be stored on a local database for data mining and analysis. This structured work flow solution has the potential to improve radiologist efficiency, reduce errors, and facilitate storage of quantitative and descriptive imaging data for research.

  17. A case of a giant pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Solomou, Ekaterini; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Patriarcheas, Georgios

    2012-04-12

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign myofibroblastic process. We present the case of a 17-year-old girl who underwent diagnostic work-up due to an enlargement of her left breast. She was submitted to ultrasounds and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which depicted a 14 cm lesion in her left breast. The patient was later operated and histology revealed PASH. Although PASH may range from 0.6-12 cm, a few lesions over 12 cm have been described, the largest being 20 cm. Large series present mammographic and ultrasonographic features of PASH in the literature, but little has been reported on the MR characteristics of PASH up to today. Signal on the T1-weighted image (T1WI) and T2-weighted image (T2WI) may vary. Curves generated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) studies are mainly type I or less frequently type II. There are no reports about diffusion-weighted imaging and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for PASH in the literature. ADC values in our case lie within the range of values reported for other benign breast lesions. The presence of slit-like spaces within the lesion on MR imaging along with DCE-MRI type I curve and ADC values consistent with a benign lesion may favour the diagnosis of PASH. Tissue biopsy is necessary, however for the final diagnosis. This case report will further contribute to the understanding of MR imaging features of PASH, especially in cases where mammography is not indicated.

  18. Recovery of a missing color component in stereo images (or helping NASA find little green Martians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, Serdar; Konrad, Janusz

    2005-03-01

    The current exploration of Mars by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has produced a lot of images of its surface. Two rovers, "Spirit" and "Opportunity", are each equipped with a pair of high-resolution cameras, called "PanCam". While most commercial cameras are sensitive to three spectral bands, typically red (R), green (G) and blue (B), the "PanCam" is sensitive to many more bands since it was designed to deliver additional information to geologists. This is achieved by means of a filter wheel in front of each camera lens. It turns out that slightly different filters are used in both cameras; while the left camera is equipped with red, green and blue filters, among others, the right camera does not have a green filter on its color wheel. Therefore, since the G component of the right image is missing, currently it is not possible to view a 3D image of Mars surface in color. In this paper, we develop a method to reconstruct one missing color component of an image given its remaining color components and all three components of the other image of a stereo pair. The method relies on disparity-compensated prediction. In the first step, a disparity field is estimated using the two available components (R and B). In the second step, the missing component is recovered using disparity-compensated prediction from the same component (G) in the other image of the stereo pair. In ground-truth experiments, we have obtained high PSNR values of the reconstruction error confirming efficacy of the approach. Similar reconstructions using images transmitted by the rovers yield comfortable 3D experience when viewing with shutter glasses.

  19. Melatonin, endocrine pancreas and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin influences insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. (i) The effects are MT(1)-and MT(2)-receptor-mediated. (ii) They are specific, high-affinity, pertussis-toxin-sensitive, G(i)-protein-coupled, leading to inhibition of the cAMP-pathway and decrease of insulin release. [Correction added after online publication 4 December 2007: in the preceding sentence, 'increase of insulin release' was changed to 'decrease of insulin release'.] Furthermore, melatonin inhibits the cGMP-pathway, possibly mediated by MT(2) receptors. In this way, melatonin likely inhibits insulin release. A third system, the IP(3)-pathway, is mediated by G(q)-proteins, phospholipase C and IP(3), which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, with a resultant increase in insulin. (iii) Insulin secretion in vivo, as well as from isolated islets, exhibits a circadian rhythm. This rhythm, which is apparently generated within the islets, is influenced by melatonin, which induces a phase shift in insulin secretion. (iv) Observation of the circadian expression of clock genes in the pancreas could possibly be an indication of the generation of circadian rhythms in the pancreatic islets themselves. (v) Melatonin influences diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances. The diabetogens, alloxan and streptozotocin, lead to selective destruction of beta-cells through their accumulation in these cells, where they induce the generation of ROS. Beta-cells are very susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity. Results suggest that melatonin in pharmacological doses provides protection against ROS. (vi) Finally, melatonin levels in plasma, as well as the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity, are lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic rats and humans. In contrast, in the pineal gland, the AANAT mRNA is increased and the insulin receptor mRNA is decreased, which indicates a close interrelationship between insulin and melatonin. PMID:18078445

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease1

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Abhishek; Marine, Megan; Lu, Debao; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A.; Saxena, Romil; Zyromski, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Obesity leads to fat infiltration of multiple organs including the heart, kidneys, and liver. Under conditions of oxidative stress, fat-derived cytokines are released locally and result in an inflammatory process and organ dysfunction. In the liver, fat infiltration has been termed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. No data are available, however, on the influence of obesity on pancreatic fat and cytokines, and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) has not been described. Therefore, we designed a study to determine whether obesity is associated with increased pancreatic fat and cytokines. Materials and methods. Thirty C57BL/6J lean control and 30 leptin-deficient obese female mice were fed a 15% fat diet for 4 weeks. At 12 weeks of age all animals underwent total pancreatectomy. Pancreata from each strain were pooled for measurement of a) wet and dry weight, b) histologic presence of fat, c) triglycerides, free fatty acids (FFAs), cholesterol, phospholipids, and total fat, and d) interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Data were analyzed by Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Results. Pancreata from obese mice were heavier (p<0.05) and had more fat histologically (p<0.05). Pancreata from obese mice had more triglycerides, FFAs, cholesterol, and total fat (p<0.05). Triglycerides represented 11% of pancreatic fat in lean mice compared with 67% of pancreatic fat in obese mice (p<0.01). Cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α also were elevated in the pancreata of obese mice (p<0.05). Conclusions. These data suggest that obese mice have 1) heavier pancreata, 2) more pancreatic fat, especially triglycerides and FFAs, and 3) increased cytokines. We conclude that obesity leads to nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease. PMID:18345311

  1. Pheochromocytoma of the pancreas: A report of three cases and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Ding, Hui; Cai, Min; He, Yan-An; Cai, Yu; Zeng, Yong; Tian, Bo-Le

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is primarily derived from the adrenal medulla. The majority of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma cases occur in the superior para-aortic region and para-adrenal area. However, pheochromocytoma originating from the pancreas is rare. The present study reports the cases of three patients who had no history of hypertension but were post-operatively diagnosed with pheochromocytoma located in the pancreas. Of the three patients, two were admitted to hospital due to abdominal pain, and imaging examinations revealed a soft-tissue lesion in the head of pancreas. Local resection of the pancreatic tumor was successfully performed and a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma derived from the pancreas was subsequently made by pathologists. The third patient was admitted to hospital for surgical treatment due to the identification of a continuously growing lesion in the tail of pancreas during physical examinations. Distal resection of the pancreas was stopped during surgery when the patient's blood pressure and heart rate suddenly increased to 180/110 mmHg and 140 beats/min, respectively. Due to a marked rise in noradrenaline and adrenaline levels in the blood subsequent to surgery, the patient was diagnosed with pancreatic pheochromocytoma. The present study additionally reviewed the associated literature concerning pheochromocytoma in order to improve the understanding of this rare clinical phenomenon. The aim of the present study is to highlight to surgeons that although patients may not present with typical clinical manifestations due to the non-functional status of the tumor, undiagnosed pheochromocytoma of the pancreas should be considered when surgeons observe an unexpected hypertensive crisis during pancreatic tumor surgery. PMID:27446377

  2. Diagnostic imaging and endoscopic finding in dogs and cats with gastric tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Terragni, R; Vignoli, M; van Bree, H J; Gaschen, L; Saunders, J H

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging is an essential part of the diagnostic workup of many gastrointestinal disorders. This paper reviews imaging and endoscopy of gastric tumors in dogs and cats and the techniques used. The appearance of the normal as well as the various aspects of gastric tumors are described for these different modalities. Plain radiography is widely available but has limited diagnostic value. Contrast radiography has higher sensitivity but is laborious and time-consuming. Ultrasonography (if an adequate acoustic window is available), endosonography and endoscopy are the most appropriate modalities for diagnosing gastric tumors. They are especially useful when obtaining samples for cytologic or histopathologic examination, because the imaging modalities do not always differentiate between inflammatory or infectious conditions and neoplastic disorders. Hydro-helical CT was found helpful for evaluating the location and local invasiveness of the lesion. Ultrasonography and endoscopy are useful modalities for taking adequate biopsies.

  3. Congenital gluteus maximus contracture syndrome - a case report with review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, Vamshi Krishna; Reddy, Rajasekhar; Reddy, M. Venkateshwar; Moorthy, Rangubatla Sathyanrayana; Kishan, Tatikonda Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Although the clinical features of gluteus maximus contracture syndrome have been frequently described, imaging features have been seldom described. Most commonly reported cases are those following intramuscular injection in the gluteal region although congenital contracture is an uncommon but important occurrence. This condition has most often been reported in children of school going age. These patients often present with difficulty in squatting, limitation of hip motion or specific deformities and often require surgical correction. We describe the plain radiography, ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of this condition in a patient with no previous known history of intramuscular injections. PMID:24967033

  4. HSI-Find: A Visualization and Search Service for Terascale Spectral Image Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Smith, A. T.; Castano, R.; Palmer, E. E.; Xing, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers are remote sensing instruments commonly deployed on aircraft and spacecraft. They provide surface reflectance in hundreds of wavelength channels, creating data cubes known as hyperspecrtral images. They provide rich compositional information making them powerful tools for planetary and terrestrial science. These data products can be challenging to interpret because they contain datapoints numbering in the thousands (Dawn VIR) or millions (AVIRIS-C). Cross-image studies or exploratory searches involving more than one scene are rare; data volumes are often tens of GB per image and typical consumer-grade computers cannot store more than a handful of images in RAM. Visualizing the information in a single scene is challenging since the human eye can only distinguish three color channels out of the hundreds available. To date, analysis has been performed mostly on single images using purpose-built software tools that require extensive training and commercial licenses. The HSIFind software suite provides a scalable distributed solution to the problem of visualizing and searching large catalogs of spectral image data. It consists of a RESTful web service that communicates to a javascript-based browser client. The software provides basic visualization through an intuitive visual interface, allowing users with minimal training to explore the images or view selected spectra. Users can accumulate a library of spectra from one or more images and use these to search for similar materials. The result appears as an intensity map showing the extent of a spectral feature in a scene. Continuum removal can isolate diagnostic absorption features. The server-side mapping algorithm uses an efficient matched filter algorithm that can process a megapixel image cube in just a few seconds. This enables real-time interaction, leading to a new way of interacting with the data: the user can launch a search with a single mouse click and see the resulting map in seconds

  5. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment. PMID:24333829

  6. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  7. Giant gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobara, Hideki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-09-01

    A 57-year-old man developed haematemesis and was referred to our institution. His discomfort had begun 3 weeks earlier and localised to the upper abdomen. Abdominal CT showed a defect of gastric mucosa and gastric wall thickening. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed that he had an active gastric ulcer, 40 mm in diameter, on the lesser curvature in the upper third of the corpus and the presence of a pancreatic body at the ulcer base, penetration to the pancreas. Open gastrectomy was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of localised peritonitis caused by penetration of the stomach into the pancreas. Histopathology of resected specimens showed a benign peptic ulcer, 40×40 mm in size, was found on the lesser curvature in the antrum, and this had penetrated through the pancreas. The most serious complications of PUD include haemorrhage, perforation, penetration, and gastric outlet obstruction. Approximately 7% of patients experience perforation, which occurs when an ulcer erodes through the wall and leaks air and digestive contents into the peritoneal cavity. Antral and duodenal ulcers can penetrate into the pancreas. We report a case of gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

  8. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M.; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  9. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs.

    PubMed

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed.

  10. Complications of sporadic, hereditary, and acquired renal cysts: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Rigiroli, Francesca; Villa, Federica; Bianco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Commonly encountered in the general adult and elderly population, in most cases simple renal cysts are confidently diagnosed on imaging studies and do not require further workup or treatment. However, large or growing renal cysts sometimes cause symptoms or signs such as hypertension, palpable mass, flank or abdominal pain, obstructive uropathy, and hematuria, which may indicate the need for minimally invasive percutaneous or laparoscopic treatment. Furthermore, severe complications such as cystic hemorrhage, rupture, or superinfection may occur, particularly in patients with polycystic renal disorders, either hereditary (namely adult polycystic kidney diseases) or acquired in chronic renal failure. This pictorial essay reviews and discusses the cross-sectional imaging appearances of symptomatic and complicated sporadic, hereditary, and acquired renal cysts. Early cross-sectional imaging with multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging or both, including contrast enhancement unless contraindicated by renal dysfunction, is warranted to investigate clinical and laboratory signs suggesting retroperitoneal hemorrhage or infection in patients with pre-existent renal cysts, particularly if large, multiple, or hereditary.

  11. How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classification Techniques for Difference Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Aragon, C.; Romano, R.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2007-08-01

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to difference images in the context of the Nearby Supernova Factory supernova search. Most current supernova searches subtract reference images from new images, identify objects in these difference images, and apply simple threshold cuts on parameters such as statistical significance, shape, and motion to reject objects such as cosmic rays, asteroids, and subtraction artifacts. Although most static objects subtract cleanly, even a very low false-positive detection rate can lead to hundreds of nonsupernova candidates that must be vetted by human inspection before triggering additional follow-up. In comparison with simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination. At the Nearby Supernova Factory, we reduced the number of nonsupernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false-positive rate in the automated transient-alert pipelines of upcoming projects such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  12. Pleomorphic adenoma of the buccal salivary gland: magnetic resonance imaging findings with differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj

    2012-08-01

    The majority of minor salivary gland tumors are malignant. Of the benign tumors, pleomorphic adenomas are most common. The cheeks, lips, and gingiva are rarely sites of occurrence. A case of pleomorphic adenoma of the buccal salivary gland is presented here with a discussion of the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in demonstrating the extent of the lesion and establishing a differential diagnoses.

  13. Histology of Type 1 Diabetes Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Abby; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans play a critical role in glucose homeostasis. Islets are predominantly composed of insulin-secreting beta cells and glucagon-secreting alpha cells. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells are destroyed by autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta cells resulting in hyperglycemia. This is a gradual process, taking from several months to decades. Much of the beta cell destruction takes place during a silent, asymptomatic phase. Type 1 diabetes becomes clinically evident upon destruction of approximately 70-80 % of beta cell mass. Studying the decline in beta cell mass and the cells which are responsible for their demise is difficult as pancreatic biopsies are not feasible in patients with type 1 diabetes. The relative size of islets and their dispersed location throughout the pancreas means in vivo imaging of human islets is currently not manageable. At present, there are no validated biomarkers which accurately track the decline in beta cell mass in individuals who are at risk of developing, or have already developed, type 1 diabetes. Therefore, studies of pancreatic tissue retrieved at autopsy from donors with type 1 diabetes, or donors with high risk markers of type 1 diabetes such as circulating islet-associated autoantibodies, is currently the best method for studying beta cells and the associated inflammatory milieu in situ. In recent years, concerted efforts have been made to source such tissues for histological studies, enabling great insights to be made into the relationship between islets and the inflammatory insult to which they are subjected. This article describes in detail, a robust immunohistochemical method which can be utilized to study both recent, and archival human pancreatic tissue, in order to examine islet endocrine cells and the surrounding immune cells. PMID:26801316

  14. Evolution of pancreas in aging: degenerative variation or early changes of disease?

    PubMed

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic changes in aging have been described for many decades. They involve not only pancreatic parenchyma but also pancreatic ductal, microscopic, and exocrine functional changes. There have been many studies of these changes based on pathology and various imaging modalities, as well as functional studies. The pancreatic volume was found to decrease with advancing age, with a higher incidence of pancreatic steatosis, as demonstrated in autopsy and imaging studies. The pancreatic ductal structure has been described with wide ranges of normal variation, but many studies have shown a tendency toward enlargement with advancing age. By endoscopic ultrasound imaging, the aging pancreas may exhibit abnormal findings similar to chronic pancreatitis. Microscopically, there has been evidence of patchy lobular fibrosis and papillary hyperplasia and demonstrable k-ras mutation in both normal and dysplastic ductal mucosa. The evidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency has yielded conflicting results, but most studies have shown a tendency toward decreased pancreatic exocrine function in the elderly. Differentiating pancreatic change in the elderly from early chronic pancreatitis may be difficult as there are limited studies to compare these two conditions in terms of structural and functional changes.

  15. A region finding method to remove the noise from the images of the human hand gesture recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Jibran; Mahmood, Waqas

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems depends on the quality of the images presented to the system. Since these systems work in real time environment the images may be corrupted by some environmental noise. By removing the noise the performance of the system can be enhanced. So far different noise removal methods have been presented in many researches to eliminate the noise but all have its own limitations. We have presented a region finding method to deal with the environmental noise that gives better results and enhances the performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems so that the recognition rate of the system can be improved.

  16. CT and MR imaging findings of systemic complications occurring during pregnancy and puerperal period, adversely affected by natural changes

    PubMed Central

    Himoto, Yuki; Kido, Aki; Moribata, Yusaku; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Okumura, Ryosuke; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic physiological and anatomical changes for delivery may adversely induce various specific non-obstetric complications during pregnancy and puerperal period. These complications can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus, thus a precise and early diagnosis ensued by an early treatment is essential. Along with ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have assumed an increasing role in the diagnosis. This article aims to discuss the pathophysiology of these complications, the indications for CT and MRI, and the imaging findings. PMID:26937442

  17. The human GLP-1 analogs liraglutide and semaglutide: absence of histopathological effects on the pancreas in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Thorup, Inger; Nyborg, Niels C Berg; Salanti, Zaki; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Larsen, Marianne O

    2014-07-01

    Increased pancreas mass and glucagon-positive adenomas have been suggested to be a risk associated with sitagliptin or exenatide therapy in humans. Novo Nordisk has conducted extensive toxicology studies, including data on pancreas weight and histology, in Cynomolgus monkeys dosed with two different human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. In a 52-week study with liraglutide, a dose-related increase in absolute pancreas weight was observed in female monkeys only. Such dose-related increase was not found in studies of 4, 13, or 87 weeks' duration. No treatment-related histopathological abnormalities were observed in any of the studies. Quantitative histology of the pancreas from the 52-week study showed an increase in the exocrine cell mass in liraglutide-dosed animals, with normal composition of endocrine and exocrine cellular compartments. Proliferation rate of the exocrine tissue was low and comparable between groups. Endocrine cell mass and proliferation rates were unaltered by liraglutide treatment. Semaglutide showed no increase in pancreas weight and no treatment-related histopathological findings in the pancreas after 13 or 52 weeks' dosing. Overall, results in 138 nonhuman primates showed no histopathological changes in the pancreas associated with liraglutide or semaglutide, two structurally different GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  18. QUILT-2.014: Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  19. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas. PMID:27575268

  20. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-12-26

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  1. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  2. Three-dimensional pancreas organogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Grapin-Botton, A

    2016-09-01

    A rediscovery of three-dimensional culture has led to the development of organ biogenesis, homeostasis and disease models applicable to human tissues. The so-called organoids that have recently flourished serve as valuable models bridging between cell lines or primary cells grown on the bottom of culture plates and experiments performed in vivo. Though not recapitulating all aspects of organ physiology, the miniature organs generated in a dish are useful models emerging for the pancreas, starting from embryonic progenitors, adult cells, tumour cells and stem cells. This review focusses on the currently available systems and their relevance to the study of the pancreas, of β-cells and of several pancreatic diseases including diabetes. We discuss the expected future developments for studying human pancreas development and function, for developing diabetes models and for producing therapeutic cells. PMID:27615129

  3. MR Imaging Findings in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease. PMID:25050351

  4. "Finding a Voice": Imaging Features after Phonosurgical Procedures for Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Vachha, B A; Ginat, D T; Mallur, P; Cunnane, M; Moonis, G

    2016-09-01

    Altered communication (hoarseness, dysphonia, and breathy voice) that can result from vocal fold paralysis, secondary to numerous etiologies, may be amenable to surgical restoration. In this article, both traditional and cutting-edge phonosurgical procedures targeting the symptoms resulting from vocal fold paralysis are reviewed, with emphasis on the characteristic imaging appearances of various injectable materials, implants, and augmentation procedures used in the treatment of vocal fold paralysis. In addition, complications of injection laryngoplasty and medialization laryngoplasty are illustrated. Familiarity with the expected imaging changes following treatment of vocal fold paralysis may prevent the misinterpretation of posttreatment changes as pathology. Identifying common complications related to injection laryngoplasty and localization of displaced implants is crucial in determining specific management in patients who have undergone phonosurgical procedures for the management of vocal fold paralysis.

  5. Relationship between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings: aneurysm wall thickness on high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and contact with surrounding tissue on steady-state free precession imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenjin, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Seisuke; Takadou, Michiko; Ogawa, Takahiro; Mandai, Ayako; Nanto, Masataka; Osaka, Yasuhiko; Nakahara, Yoshikazu; Umeda, Masahiro; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the aneurysm wall thickness by high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and the contact between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue by steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging. The surgical findings were prospectively compared with these preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in 35 consecutive patients with 37 unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs). The aneurysm wall was not visible in 13 UCAs, but was visible in 23. Subarachnoid space between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue was visible in 16 UCAs, a visible layer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue in 12, and no visible layer in 7. MR imaging predicted the surgical findings in 29 UCAs (78%), showed different findings in six UCAs (16%), and two (5%) could not be evaluated due to insufficient quality of preoperative MR images. Among the UCAs with different findings, five UCAs had a partially thin wall even though high-resolution T1-weighted imaging had shown a visible wall, and one UCA showed less contact with the surrounding tissue even though the SSFP imaging had shown no visible CSF layer. In conclusion, high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and SSFP imaging provided significant additional preoperative information regarding UCAs and the surrounding tissue.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-operative imaging findings in presumed clinical T1a renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, KAZUFUMI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; IZUMI, KOUJI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; GABATA, TOSHIFUMI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of recent imaging modalities, certain pathological misdiagnoses remain for surgical specimens of presumed small renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In the present study, a retrospective analysis of benign pathological lesions diagnosed as small RCC prior to surgery was performed. In total, the cases of 196 sporadic renal tumors that was surgically treated as clinical T1a RCCs were reviewed, and the accuracy of the pathological diagnoses was calculated. The pre-operative findings for benign pathological lesions was investigated, and the lesions were observed in 13 (6.63%) of the 196 tumors. Pre-operative computed tomography images were obtained in all cases, and magnetic resonance images were available in 10 cases. The diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities was significantly lower in the tumors with a diameter of ≤20 mm. In all cases, the possible pathological diagnosis of RCC could not be excluded even by retrospective imaging analysis. Several benign pathological lesions were found in small renal masses presumed to be clinical T1a RCC. In conclusion, there may be limitations to the pre-operative imaging for certain types of small renal mass. PMID:27123087

  7. How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object ClassificationTechniques for Difference Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, RollinC.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Wong, Daniel

    2007-05-02

    We present the results of applying new object classificationtechniques to difference images in the context of the Nearby SupernovaFactory supernova search. Most current supernova searches subtractreference images from new images, identify objects in these differenceimages, and apply simple threshold cuts on parameters such as statisticalsignificance, shape, and motionto reject objects such as cosmic rays,asteroids, and subtraction artifacts. Although most static objectssubtract cleanly, even a very low false positive detection rate can leadto hundreds of non-supernova candidates which must be vetted by humaninspection before triggering additional followup. In comparison to simplethreshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as Boosted DecisionTrees, Random Forests, and Support Vector Machines provide dramaticallybetter object discrimination. At the Nearby Supernova Factory, we reducedthe number of non-supernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasingour supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will becrucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automatedtransient alert pipelines of upcoming projects such as PanSTARRS andLSST.

  8. Spontaneous external auditory canal cholesteatoma in a young male: Imaging findings and differential diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Aswani, Yashant; Varma, Ravi; Achuthan, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    A cholesteatoma is a non-neoplastic lesion of the petrous temporal bone commonly described as “skin in the wrong place.” It typically arises within the middle ear cavity, may drain externally via tympanic membrane (mural type), or may originate in the external auditory canal (EAC). The latter type is rarely encountered and typically affects the elderly. EAC cholesteatoma poses diagnostic challenges because it has numerous differential diagnoses. The present case describes a 19-year-old male who presented with gradually progressive diminution of hearing in a previously naïve right ear since 8 months. A soft tissue attenuation lesion confined to the right EAC with erosion of the canal on computed tomography prompted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The lesion showed restricted diffusion on MRI. Thus, a diagnosis of spontaneous EAC cholesteatoma was established. The case elucidates the rarity of spontaneous EAC cholesteatoma in a young male. In addition, it describes the role of imaging to detect, delineate the extent, and characterize lesions of petrous temporal bone. The case also discusses common differential diagnoses of EAC cholesteatoma, as well as the importance of diffusion weighted imaging in EAC cholesteatoma similar to its middle ear counterpart. PMID:27413272

  9. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: A classical presentation with unique paranuclear dot like immunostaining with CD 99.

    PubMed

    Nair Anila, Kunjulekshmi Amma Raveendran; Nayak, Nileena; Muralee, Madhu; Venugopal, Bhaskaran Pillai; Mony, Rari P

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and upper abdominal discomfort of 3 months duration. Her imaging studies done at a local hospital showed a solid-cystic mass involving head of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our surgical oncology department. On examination, there was a nontender mass in the epigastrium. An ultrasound scan guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was done which was showing classical features of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. With this preoperative diagnosis patient was taken up for surgery. Per operatively, there was a solid-cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was done. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed the diagnosis of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. Apart from the routine IHC panel, CD 99 immunostain was also done which demonstrated the characteristic paranuclear dot-like staining observed in previous studies in the literature.

  10. F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m sulfur colloid SPECT imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of a case of dual solitary fibrous tumors of the retroperitoneum and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Javad; Subhawong, Andrea; Durand, Daniel James

    2012-03-01

    Although FDG PET is increasingly used for the staging of many types of sarcoma, little has been written regarding the FDG PET imaging characteristics of solitary fibrous tumor. We report a patient undergoing FDG PET/CT surveillance for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue who was incidentally found to have two soft tissue masses in the retroperitoneum and pancreatic tail. Due to their low degree of FDG avidity, they were followed conservatively for approximately one year as they gradually increased in size. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid SPECT helped confirm that the pancreatic tail mass was not a splenule, after which both lesions were surgically resected and found to be extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors without malignant features. These findings suggest that, as with other low-grade sarcomas, benign extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors exhibit relatively little glycolytic metabolism in vivo.

  11. Circumportal pancreas with retroportal main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Ross, Andrew S; Traverso, L William

    2009-08-01

    There have been 6 cases of circumportal pancreas reported, and 2 of them had the main pancreatic duct in a retroportal dorsal portion. This extremely uncommon anomaly is asymptomatic and therefore incidentally discovered. For the surgeon, it is important to discover this during pancreatic resection so the pancreatic duct can be closed and fistula is avoided. We describe the third case where a circumportal pancreas had its main pancreatic duct passing under the portal vein. The duct was identified and ligated. A fistula did not occur.

  12. Spectrum of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Murakami, Koji; Kaji, Yasushi; Kita, Masato; Suzuki, Kayo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a variety of benign, malignant, and borderline malignant ovarian tumors. It is advantageous to become familiar with the wide variety of FDG-PET/CT findings of this entity. Benign ovarian tumors generally have faint uptake, whereas endometriomas, fibromas, and teratomas show mild to moderate uptake. Malignant ovarian tumors generally have intense uptake, whereas tumors with a small solid component often show minimal uptake.

  13. Variability Is Not the Villain: Finding Patterns in Complex Natural Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinton, Brigette Adair; Curran, Mary Carla

    2015-01-01

    Everyone needs strong observational skills to solve challenging problems and make informed decisions. However, many students expect to find exact answers to their questions by using the internet and do not understand the role of uncertainty, especially in decision making and scientific research. Humans and other animals choose among many options…

  14. Finding an optimal method for imaging lymphatic vessels of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Susan; Rose, Sarah L; Chilvers, Alison J; Ballinger, James R; Solanki, Chandra K; Barber, Robert W; Mortimer, Peter S; Purushotham, Arnie D; Peters, A Michael

    2004-04-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy involves interstitial injection of radiolabelled particulate materials or radioproteins. Although several variations in the technique have been described, their place in clinical practice remains controversial. Traditional diagnostic criteria are based primarily on lymph node appearances but in situations such as breast cancer, where lymph nodes may have been excised, these criteria are of limited use. In these circumstances, lymphatic vessel morphology takes on greater importance as a clinical endpoint, so a method that gives good definition of lymphatic vessels would be useful. In patients with breast cancer, for example, such a method, used before and after lymph node resection, may assist in predicting the development of breast cancer-related lymphoedema. The aim of this study was to optimise a method for the visualisation of lymphatic vessels. Subcutaneous (sc) and intradermal (id) injection sites were compared, and technetium-99m nanocolloid, a particulate material, was compared with (99m)Tc-human immunoglobulin (HIG), which is a soluble macromolecule. Twelve normal volunteers were each studied on two occasions. In three subjects, id (99m)Tc-HIG was compared with sc (99m)Tc-HIG, in three id (99m)Tc-nanocolloid was compared with sc (99m)Tc-nanocolloid, in three id (99m)Tc-HIG was compared with id (99m)Tc-nanocolloid and in three sc (99m)Tc-HIG was compared with sc (99m)Tc-nanocolloid. Endpoints were quality of lymphatic vessel definition, the time after injection at which vessels were most clearly visualised, the rate constant of depot disappearance ( k) and the systemic blood accumulation rate as measured by gamma camera imaging over the liver or cardiac blood pool. Excellent definition of lymphatic vessels was obtained following id injection of either radiopharmaceutical, an injection route that was clearly superior to sc. Differences between radiopharmaceuticals were less clear, although after id injection, (99m)Tc-HIG gave images that

  15. Tumors and Tumorlike Conditions of the Anal Canal and Perianal Region: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, Venkateswar R; Menias, Christine O; Amer, Ahmed M; Elshikh, Mohamed; Katabathina, Venkata S; Hara, Amy K; Baughman, William C; Kielar, Ania; Elsayes, Khaled M; Siegel, Cary L

    2016-01-01

    Tumors and tumorlike conditions of the anus and perianal region originate from the anal canal and anal margin or result from direct extension of tumors from adjacent organs. The anatomy of the anal canal is complex, and its different histologic characteristics can lead to diverse pathologic conditions. The anal canal extends from the anorectal junction to the anal verge. The World Health Organization classification of anal canal tumors includes (a) anal intraepithelial neoplasia, the precursor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and (b) invasive tumors. Invasive tumors are further classified on the basis of cell type as epithelial tumors (SCC, adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma), nonepithelial tumors, carcinoid tumors, melanoma, and secondary tumors (direct spread from rectal, cervical, or prostate carcinoma). The anal margin, or perianal skin, lies outside the anal verge and encompasses a radius of 5 cm from the anal verge. Tumors in the anal margin are classified according to the World Health Organization classification of skin tumors. Anal margin tumors include SCC, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, also known as Bowen disease, adenocarcinoma and its precursor Paget disease, basal cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma (Buschke-Löwenstein tumor), which is a rare variant of SCC. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation, staging, and follow-up of patients with anal and perianal tumors. However, because of the overlap in imaging features among these diverse entities, a definitive diagnosis is best established at histopathologic examination. Nevertheless, familiarity with the pathogenesis, imaging features, and treatment of these tumors can aid radiologic diagnosis and guide appropriate patient treatment. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618320

  16. Effects of prolonged ethanol intake and malnutrition on rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    López, J M; Bombi, J A; Valderrama, R; Giménez, A; Parés, A; Caballería, J; Imperial, S; Navarro, S

    1996-01-01

    Nutritional factors, especially the protein and fat content of the diet, may change pancreatic morphology after ethanol induced injury. This study was performed to delineate the combined effects of a low fat diet and longterm ethanol ingestion on the rat pancreas. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained with five different diets for 12 weeks and the pancreas removed on the day they were killed. Rats fed a very low fat diet without ethanol (5% of total calories as lipid) developed malnutrition, pancreatic steatosis, and reduction in zymogen granules content. Animals fed a 35% lipid diet with ethanol also developed pancreatic steatosis but changes in zymogen granules content were not detected. Both malnutrition and longterm ethanol consumption increased pancreatic cholesterol ester content, and their effects were additive. Pancreatic steatosis was accompanied with hypercholesterolaemia. Amylase, lipase, and cholesterol esterase content were reduced in malnourished rats; but longterm ethanol ingestion, regardless of the nutritional state, increased lipase content and decreased amylase. It is suggested that high serum cholesterol concentrations and increased pancreatic lipase activity could cause accumulation of cholesterol esters in acinar cells. Fat accumulation in the pancreas has been reported as the earliest histopathological feature in alcoholic patients and may be responsible for cytotoxic effects on the acinar cells at the level of the cell membrane. Although it is difficult to extrapolate results in this animal study to the human situation, the results presented in this work might explain the higher incidence of pancreatitis is malnourished populations as well as in alcoholic subjects that is reported in dietary surveys. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8801213

  17. Imaging findings of spinal brown tumors: a rare but important cause of pathologic fracture and spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Philip G; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Saab, Jad; Lavi, Ehud; Chazen, J Levi

    2016-01-01

    Brown tumors rarely develop in the spine, and neurological compromise is exceedingly uncommon. There is a growing body of literature describing brown tumors that involve the spine, but few emphasize the radiographic findings. In the present case, we illustrate the development and progression of biopsy-proven brown tumors leading to neurological compromise through radiographs, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and nuclear imaging acquired over a 4-year span. PMID:27179153

  18. Reversible encephalopathy associated with cholesterol embolism syndrome: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, F; Marro, B; Khoury, N EI; Seilhean, D; Alamowitch, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a patient found to have acute diffuse and reversible encephalopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with cholesterol emboli syndrome (CES). The initial MRI showed extensive white matter, basal ganglia and cortical damage without evidence of brain infarction. Dramatic clinical and MRI improvement was observed with corticosteroids. Pathologically, cholesterol crystal emboli were found in the lumen of skin and brain arteries and were associated with varying degrees of inflammation of the arteriole wall. This case suggests that CES may be responsible for extensive, acute and reversible encephalopathy underlined by an inflammation of brain arteries. PMID:17229746

  19. Imaging Finding of Malignant Melanoma of Eustachian Tube with Extension to Middle Ear Cavity: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Chul; Jang, Han Won

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of malignant melanoma of Eustachian tube with extension to the middle ear cavity and nasopharynx in a 51-year-old woman who presented with right ear fullness. Computed tomography showed a soft tissue mass in the middle ear cavity and causedthe widening and eroding of the bony eustachian tube. Magnetic resonance imaging showed well enhancing mass in eustachian tube extending nasopharynx to middle ear cavity. A biopsy of the middle ear cavity mass revealed a malignant amelanotic melanoma. PMID:23118582

  20. Modified Bi-Rads Scoring of Breast Imaging Findings Improves Clinical Judgment.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Howard; Sheth, Pulin A; Parisky, Yuri R; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J; Sheth, Sindu; Tripathy, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    In contrast with the reporting requirements currently mandated under the Federal Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), we propose a modification of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (Bi-Rads) in which a concluding assessment category is assigned, not to the examination as a whole, but to every potentially malignant abnormality observed. This modification improves communication between the radiologist and the attending clinician, thereby facilitating clinical judgment leading to appropriate management. In patients with breast cancer eligible for breast conserving therapy, application of this modification brings to attention the necessity for such patients to undergo pretreatment biopsies of all secondary, synchronous ipsilateral lesions scored Bi-Rads 3-5. All contralateral secondary lesions scored Bi-Rads 3-5 also require pretreatment biopsies. The application of this modification of the MSQA demonstrates the necessity to alter current recommendations ("short-interval follow-up") for secondary, synchronous Bi-Rads 3 ("probably benign") image-detected abnormalities prior to treatment of the index malignancy.

  1. [Resection of the remnant pancreas for recurrent pancreatic cancer after distal pancreatectomy-a case report].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shoichi; Sho, Masayuki; Akahori, Takahiro; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Hokutoh, Daisuke; Yasuda, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    The standard treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy. The effect of surgical resection for localized recurrence in the remnant pancreas after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer is unknown, but is reported to have a moderately good outcome in a few reports. We herein report a case of curative resection for recurrence in the remnant pancreas, 24 months after distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer. A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with pancreas tail cancer. Neoadjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy[ weekly full-dose gemcitabine(GEM) and radiation therapy 50 Gy/25 Fr] was followed by distal pancreatectomy. Postoperative adjuvant therapy with hepatic arterial infusion of 5-FU and systemic GEM therapy was completed. Twenty-four months after surgery, follow-up computed tomography scan results showed a lesion of 15-mm diameter in the remnant pancreas. Resection of the remnant pancreas was performed. The pathological findings showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, morphologically similar to the primary pancreatic cancer. Six months following surgery, there are no signs of recurrence at present.

  2. Choledochal cyst and biliary atresia in the neonate: Imaging findings in five cases

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, J.M.; Haller, J.O.; Velcek, F.T. )

    1990-12-01

    The radiologic findings in five neonates with choledochal cyst associated with extra-hepatic biliary atresia are described. All five patients (age range, 13-72 days) presented with jaundice and acholic stools. In all four patients who underwent sonographic examination, a cystic structure separate from the gallbladder representing the choledochal cyst was shown. The diagnosis of atresia of the distal common bile duct was made preoperatively in all cases by hepatobiliary scintigraphy. Diagnosis was confirmed by surgical findings and was demonstrated by intraoperative cholangiography in four cases. All patients were successfully treated with surgical intervention within 1 month from the time of diagnosis. Early detection of this rare disorder, which may be distinct from choledochal cyst found in children and adults, is important to prevent fatal complications of biliary obstruction. The combined use of sonography and hepatobiliary scintigraphy can correctly identify this subset of patients with persistent neonatal jaundice and provide valuable information for prompt surgical management.

  3. Presumed prepatellar fibrosis in collegiate wrestlers: imaging findings and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Northam, Meredith C; Gaskin, Cree M

    2015-02-01

    Knee pain and injury are common complaints of athletes presenting to the orthopedic clinic. Wrestlers are no exception, and may present more commonly with anterior knee pain because of the nature of their sport. Morel-Lavallée lesions and prepatellar bursitis have been described in the prepatellar region of wrestlers. We report a distinctly different prepatellar finding on MRI, focally prominent and discrete fibrosis in three collegiate wrestlers. This characteristic appearance and clinical setting have already been repeated in our clinical practice; thus, other MRI readers are also likely to encounter this finding, which in our experience can be considered a "don't touch" lesion of no clinical significance. PMID:24997159

  4. OPTN/SRTR 2013 Annual Data Report: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Tyler, K H; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas listings and transplants decreased during the past decade, most notably pancreas after kidney transplants. Center-reported outcomes of pancreas transplant across all groups, short-term and long-term, improved during the same period. Changes to the pancreas allocation system creating an efficient, uniform national system will be implemented in late 2014. Pancreas-alone and simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) candidates will form a single match-run list with priority to most SPK candidates ahead of kidney-alone candidates to decrease waiting times for SPK candidates, given their higher waitlist mortality compared with nondiabetic kidney transplant candidates. The changes are expected to eliminate local variability, providing more consistent pancreas allocation nationwide. Outcomes after pancreas transplant are challenging to interpret due to lack of a uniform definition of graft failure. Consequently, SRTR has not published data on pancreas graft failure for the past 2 years. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Pancreas Transplantation Committee is working on a definition that could provide greater validity for future outcomes analyses. Challenges in pancreas transplantation include high risk of technical failures, rejection (early and late), and surgical complications. Continued outcome improvement and innovation has never been more critical, as alternatives such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas move closer to clinical application.

  5. [Endoscopic ultrasonography in diagnosis of surgical treatment of pancreas].

    PubMed

    Starkov, Iu G; Solodinina, E N; Shishin, K V; Plotnikova, L S

    2008-01-01

    Results of endoscopic ultrasonography at 137 patients suspected for pancreas pathology are analyzed. Methodology of endoscopic ultrasonography, semiotics of pancreas surgical diseases, advantages over other diagnostic methods are described. Endosonography is informative method for final diagnosis of different disease of pancreas. Diagnostic value of method and area of its clinical application are described.

  6. Incidental findings arising with cone beam computed tomography imaging of the orthodontic patient.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sheelagh A; Drage, Nicholas; Durning, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of orthodontic patients is a diagnostic tool used increasingly in hospital and primary care settings. It offers a high-diagnostic yield, short scanning times, and a lower radiation dose than conventional computed tomography. This article reports on four incidental findings-that appear unrelated to the scan's original purpose-arising in patients for whom CBCT was carried out for orthodontic purposes. It underlines the need for complete reporting of the data set. PMID:21208090

  7. Blind-ending branch of a bifid ureter: multidetector CT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E; Santillan, C; O'Boyle, M K

    2011-01-01

    A bifid ureter with a blind-ending branch is a rare congenital anomaly. Although typically found incidentally, this anomaly can be symptomatic and radiologists should be aware of this important variant. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this anomaly as seen on multidetector CT urography. We present a patient with haematuria and review the clinical significance, radiological findings and embryological aetiology of this anomaly. PMID:21257834

  8. High-pressure paint gun injury: clinical presentation and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Peters, Greg; Learch, Thomas; White, Eric; Forrester, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure paint gun injuries are potentially devastating injuries that require emergent surgical incision and drainage. They result from erroneous equipment operation and accidental injection of a variety of substances at pressures high enough to breach the skin. The largely benign superficial appearance masks the extent of the underlying injury. In the absence of an appropriate history, the radiologist must recognize the characteristic radiographic findings and suggest the diagnosis to the clinician. PMID:24570121

  9. High-pressure paint gun injury: clinical presentation and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Peters, Greg; Learch, Thomas; White, Eric; Forrester, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure paint gun injuries are potentially devastating injuries that require emergent surgical incision and drainage. They result from erroneous equipment operation and accidental injection of a variety of substances at pressures high enough to breach the skin. The largely benign superficial appearance masks the extent of the underlying injury. In the absence of an appropriate history, the radiologist must recognize the characteristic radiographic findings and suggest the diagnosis to the clinician.

  10. The prevalence of positive imaging findings on MRI scans ordered by chiropractic versus medical providers

    PubMed Central

    Morries, Larry; Yochum, Terry; Barry, Michael; Slizeski, John; Freuden, Donald; Danielson, Clark

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if there is a greater yield of pathological findings identified on MRI scans of patients referred by chiropractors as compared to those referred by allopathic providers. Methods MRI reports authored by medical radiologists from two independent MRI centers in the Denver metropolitan area were analyzed retrospectively for pathological data related to the spinal regions studied. A pathological report data sheet was used to record pathological findings in 22 different categories. A total of 150 reports from each provider group were reviewed. Results Of the 22 pathological conditions studied, a statistically significant difference between doctor of chiropractic and medical doctor referrers was identified in 4 categories: central spinal canal stenosis, lateral stenosis, facet arthrosis, and negative report. The most common primary diagnoses given for MRI referral were low back pain/sciatica, neck pain, and extremity pain. Seventy-four percent of the reports evaluated were performed on patients referred with a diagnosis of pain. In 3 of the 22 categories (14%), the medical doctors had a statistically higher pathological yield than the chiropractors. However, in 4 of the 22 categories (18%), the chiropractors had a statistically higher pathological yield. In 18 of the 22 categories (82%), there was no statistical difference between the two provider groups. Conclusion The data presented in this study suggests chiropractic and medical providers are compeer at ordering MRI for suspected pathological findings. PMID:19674677

  11. Efficacy of Repeat Review with Flexible Spectral Imaging Color Enhancement in Patients with no Findings by Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Minami-Kobayashi, Yuka; Yamada, Atsuo; Watabe, Hirotsugu; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: The efficacy of flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) ch. 1 (F1) for the detection of ulcerative lesions and angioectasias in the small intestine with capsule endoscopy (CE) has been reported. In the present study, we evaluated whether F1 could detect incremental findings in patients with no findings in a standard review mode. Patients and Methods: In total, 52 patients (age: 60.1 ± 15.3 years; 30 males) with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent CE and in whom no lesion was detected in the small intestine in the standard mode (first review) were enrolled. Two experienced endoscopists independently reviewed CE videos again by F1 (second review). The following findings were defined to be significant: Ulcers, erosions, aphthas, angioectasias, tumors, and bleeding. Incremental findings at the second review were checked at F1 and in standard mode by the two reviewers (third review). Finally, the findings were confirmed by the agreement of the two reviewers at the third review. Results: F1 detected five significant lesions in three patients with overt OGIB; three erosions, one aphtha, and one angioectasia. For nonsignificant lesions, F1 detected 12 red mucosas and 16 red spots. Moreover, 29 patients with 71 findings were considered false positives. Conclusion: F1 detected incremental significant findings in a small percentage of patients with no findings in the standard review mode. In addition, F1 showed many false-positive findings. The incremental effect of a repeated review by F1 in patients with no findings in the first review is limited.

  12. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Findings Following Pediatric Non-Penetrating TBI: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R. M.; Mathias, J. L.; Rose, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    This study meta-analyzed research examining Diffusion Tensor Imaging following pediatric non-penetrating traumatic brain injury to identify the location and extent of white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) data from 20 studies were analyzed. FA increased and ADC decreased in most white matter tracts in the short-term (moderate-to-large effects), and FA decreased and ADC increased in the medium- to long-term (moderate-to-very-large effects). Whole brain (short-term), cerebellum and corpus callosum (medium- to long-term) FA values have diagnostic potential, but the impact of age/developmental stage and injury severity on FA/ADC, and the predictive value, is unclear. PMID:25470224

  13. [Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the brain in adult HIV and AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Kloska, S P; Husstedt, I W; Schlegel, P M; Anneken, K; Evers, S; Fischbach, R; Heindel, W

    2008-01-01

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) includes not only the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection itself but also opportunistic infections and tumors secondary to AIDS. Despite progress in antiretroviral therapy and the subsequent decrease in the incidence of associated diseases, opportunistic infections and tumors secondary to the HIV infection continue to be the limiting factor in terms of survival with AIDS. Therefore, the therapeutic aim is permanent antiretroviral therapy as well as early diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections. Magnetic resonance imaging is often the diagnostic method of choice in suspected CNS pathology of HIV patients. In the following, the typical clinical and radiological features of several AIDS-related pathologies are presented and discussed.

  14. Susceptibility-weighted imaging findings of subacute delayed carbon monoxide intoxication: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jin-Won; Cha, Seong-Yi; Kang, Tae-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Hak-Jin; Jung, Dae Soo; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2012-01-15

    Brain injury from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning occurs due to tissue hypoxia and direct CO-mediated histotoxicity. Recently developed susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is sensitive for the detection of accumulated hemosiderin and iron secondary to cerebral hemorrhage. Therefore, we hypothesized that SWI may be helpful for identifying petechial hemorrhagic transformation secondary to acute hypoxic damage during subacute CO intoxication. Our case series with subacute CO intoxication revealed that the SWIs of all patients showed low signal intensities in the globus pallidus, representing the accumulation of iron or calcium secondary to hypoxic damage from acute CO intoxication. These results suggest that SWI may be a useful MR technique for illustrating brain damage in subacute delayed CO intoxication. PMID:21914555

  15. The flail mitral valve: echocardiographic findings by precordial and transesophageal imaging and Doppler color flow mapping.

    PubMed

    Himelman, R B; Kusumoto, F; Oken, K; Lee, E; Cahalan, M K; Shah, P M; Schiller, N B

    1991-01-01

    To determine the echocardiographic and Doppler characteristics of mitral regurgitation associated with a flail mitral valve, precordial and transesophageal echocardiography with pulsed wave and Doppler color flow mapping was performed in 17 patients with a flail mitral valve leaflet due to ruptured chordae tendineae (Group I) and 22 patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation due to other causes (Group II). Echocardiograms were performed before or during cardiac surgery; cardiac catheterization was also performed in 28 patients (72%). Mitral valve disease was confirmed at cardiac surgery in all patients. By echocardiography, the presence of a flail mitral valve leaflet was defined by the presence of abnormal mitral leaflet coaptation or ruptured chordae. Using these criteria, transesophageal imaging showed a trend toward greater sensitivity and specificity than precordial imaging in the diagnosis of flail mitral valve leaflet. By Doppler color flow mapping, a flail mitral valve leaflet was also characterized by an eccentric, peripheral, circular mitral regurgitant jet that closely adhered to the walls of the left atrium. The direction of flow of the eccentric jet in the left atrium distinguished a flail anterior from a flail posterior leaflet. By transesophageal echocardiography with Doppler color flow mapping, the ratio of mitral regurgitant jet arc length to radius of curvature was significantly higher in Group I than Group II patients (5.0 +/- 2.3 versus 0.7 +/- 0.6, p less than 0.001); all of the Group I patients and none of the Group II patients had a ratio greater than 2.5.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Evaluation of symptomatic uterine fibroids in candidates for uterine artery embolization: comparison between ultrasonographic and MR imaging findings in 68 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Malartic, Cécile; Morel, Olivier; Rivain, Anne-Laure; Placé, Vinciane; Le Dref, Olivier; Dohan, Anthony; Gayat, Etienne; Barranger, Emmanuel; Soyer, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations of 68 women with uterine fibroids were reviewed to determine whether MR imaging may alter the therapeutic approach based on ultrasonography alone before uterine embolization. Therapeutic decisions based on ultrasonography alone were compared to those obtained after MR imaging. Discordant findings between both examinations involved 51 women (75%), and 19 (28%) had their therapeutic approaches based on ultrasonography alone altered by MR imaging. Ultrasonography and MR imaging showed concordant findings in 17 women (25%) for whom no changes in therapeutic option were made. MR imaging alters the therapeutic approach based on ultrasonography alone in 28% of candidates for uterine artery embolization. PMID:23206612

  17. TU-F-BRF-06: 3D Pancreas MRI Segmentation Using Dictionary Learning and Manifold Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, S; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recent advent of MRI guided radiotherapy machines has lent an exciting platform for soft tissue target localization during treatment. However, tools to efficiently utilize MRI images for such purpose have not been developed. Specifically, to efficiently quantify the organ motion, we develop an automated segmentation method using dictionary learning and manifold clustering (DLMC). Methods: Fast 3D HASTE and VIBE MR images of 2 healthy volunteers and 3 patients were acquired. A bounding box was defined to include pancreas and surrounding normal organs including the liver, duodenum and stomach. The first slice of the MRI was used for dictionary learning based on mean-shift clustering and K-SVD sparse representation. Subsequent images were iteratively reconstructed until the error is less than a preset threshold. The preliminarily segmentation was subject to the constraints of manifold clustering. The segmentation results were compared with the mean shift merging (MSM), level set (LS) and manual segmentation methods. Results: DLMC resulted in consistently higher accuracy and robustness than comparing methods. Using manual contours as the ground truth, the mean Dices indices for all subjects are 0.54, 0.56 and 0.67 for MSM, LS and DLMC, respectively based on the HASTE image. The mean Dices indices are 0.70, 0.77 and 0.79 for the three methods based on VIBE images. DLMC is clearly more robust on the patients with the diseased pancreas while LS and MSM tend to over-segment the pancreas. DLMC also achieved higher sensitivity (0.80) and specificity (0.99) combining both imaging techniques. LS achieved equivalent sensitivity on VIBE images but was more computationally inefficient. Conclusion: We showed that pancreas and surrounding normal organs can be reliably segmented based on fast MRI using DLMC. This method will facilitate both planning volume definition and imaging guidance during treatment.

  18. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1(-/-) embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1(-/-) microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1(-/-) epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis.

  19. MR defecography in patients with dyssynergic defecation: spectrum of imaging findings and diagnostic value

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, C S; Tutuian, R; Solopova, A E; Pohl, D; Marincek, B; Weishaupt, D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We describe the spectrum of findings and the diagnostic value of MR defecography in patients referred with suspicion of dyssynergic defecation. Methods 48 patients (34 females, 14 males; mean age 48 years) with constipation and clinically suspected dyssynergic defecation underwent MR defecography. Patients were divided into patients with dyssynergic defecation (n = 18) and constipated patients without dyssynergic defecation (control group, n = 30). MRIs were analysed for evacuation ability, time to initiate evacuation, time of evacuation, changes in the anorectal angle (ARA-change), presence of paradoxical sphincter contraction and presence of additional pelvic floor abnormalities. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation were calculated. Results The most frequent finding was impaired evacuation, which was seen in 100% of patients with dyssynergic defecation and in 83% of the control group, yielding a sensitivity for MR defecography for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation of 100% (95% confidence interval (CI) 97–100%), but a specificity of only 23% (95% CI 7–40%). A lower sensitivity (50%; 95% CI 24–76%) and a high specificity (97%; 95% CI 89–100%) were seen with abnormal ARA-change. The sensitivity of paradoxical sphincter contraction was relatively high (83%; 95% CI 63–100%). A combined analysis of abnormal ARA-change and paradoxical sphincter contraction allowed for the detection of 94% (95% CI 81–100%) of the patients with dyssynergic defecation. Conclusion MR defecography detects functional and structural abnormal findings in patients with clinically suspected dyssynergic defecation. Impaired evacuation is seen in patients with functional constipation owing to other pelvic floor abnormalities than dyssynergic defecation. PMID:21257836

  20. New variant for whole pancreas grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kootstra, G.; van Hooff, J.P.; Joerning, P.J.L.; Leunissen, K.M.; van der Linden, C.J.; Beukers, E.; Buurman, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    A new variant for whole pancreas grafting is described in which a segment of the duodenum and the spleen is included in the graft. The graft is placed extraperitoneally as in kidney transplantation. The exocrine drainage is with side-to-side anastomosis between duodenum and bladder. The spleen is irradiated to prevent the occurrence of GVHD, as is reported in splenic transplantation.

  1. [Sonographic topography of the pancreas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Triller, J

    1978-07-01

    Vascular abdominal structures can be demonstrated by the gray-scale-B-scan-technique. These vascular anatomical structures are important to differentiate pathological lesions from normal structures and to evaluate the localisation of space occupying lesions within the pancreas, liver and retroperitoneal space.

  2. Evaluation of Wedged Arterial Injection as a New Technique for Delivery of Experimental Therapeutic Sustances into the Porcine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Rafael; Hernández, Wendy; Sun, Fei; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco; Gil, Francisco; López-Albors, Octavio; Vázquez, Jose M.; Usón, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To prospectively evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of wedged arterial injection (WAI) as a potential route for experimental selective therapy to the pancreas of healthy pigs. Materials and Methods. Selective angiographies were completed in ten pigs under general anaesthesia. By superselective angiography, the catheter was inserted and wedged into the major pancreatic artery, blocking the blood flow. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the WAI method, a DNA-specific fluorescent dye (Hoechst 33258) was used. Results. Histological study revealed a uniform distribution of the fluorescent dye within the nuclei of the endocrine and exocrine pancreatic cells. Pancreatic and liver enzymes as well as histopathology of the pancreas were normal. Conclusion. WAI is a highly effective minimally invasive methodology to target the porcine pancreas. The findings suggest that WAI may contribute to developing preclinical assays of pancreas gene or cell-transfer therapies in swine model. PMID:22007190

  3. Distinct enhancers of ptf1a mediate specification and expansion of ventral pancreas in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pashos, Evanthia; Park, Joon Tae; Leach, Steven; Fisher, Shannon

    2013-09-15

    Development of the pancreas and cerebellum require Pancreas-specific transcription factor-1a (Ptf1a), which encodes a subunit of the transcription factor complex PTF1. Ptf1a is required in succession for specification of the pancreas, proper allocation of pancreatic progenitors to endocrine and exocrine fates, and the production of digestive enzymes from the exocrine acini. In several neuronal structures, including the cerebellum, hindbrain, retina and spinal cord, Ptf1a is transiently expressed and promotes inhibitory neuron fates at the expense of excitatory fates. Transcription of Ptf1a in mouse is maintained in part by PTF1 acting on an upstream autoregulatory enhancer. However, the transcription factors and enhancers that initially activate Ptf1a expression in the pancreas and in certain structures of the nervous system have not yet been identified. Here we describe a zebrafish autoregulatory element, conserved among teleosts, with activity similar to that described in mouse. In addition, we performed a comprehensive survey of all non-coding sequences in a 67kb interval encompassing zebrafish ptf1a, and identified several neuronal enhancers, and an enhancer active in the ventral pancreas prior to activation of the autoregulatory enhancer. To test the requirement for autoregulatory control during pancreatic development, we restored ptf1a function through BAC transgenesis in ptf1a morphants, either with an intact BAC or one lacking the autoregulatory enhancer. We find that ptf1a autoregulation is required for development of the exocrine pancreas and full rescue of the ptf1a morphant phenotype. Similarly, we demonstrate that a ptf1a locus lacking the early enhancer region is also capable of rescue, but only supports formation of a hypoplastic exocrine pancreas. Through our dissection of the complex regulatory control of ptf1a, we identified separate cis-regulatory elements that underlie different aspects of its expression and function, and further demonstrated

  4. Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions with Spherical Harmonics: Comparison of MR Imaging and Pathologic Findings1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Shalmon, Bruria; Zou, Kelly H.; Azhari, Haim; Nass, Dvora; Achiron, Anat

    2005-01-01

    Spherical harmonics (SH) were used to approximate the volume and three-dimensional geometry of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in deceased patients. The institutional ethical committee does not require its approval for studies involving pathologic specimens. Pathologic findings were used as the reference standard. In addition, lesion volume was measured with cylindrical approximation (CA). Volumetric comparisons of biases were based on summary statistics, Spearman correlation, Wilcoxon test, and two-way analysis of variance. Shape comparison metrics included mean distance and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Eight of 11 lesions had smaller biases with SH method (P < .001). Median biases with SH and CA did not differ significantly, as compared with pathologic findings (r = 1.00 vs 0.99, respectively). Variances of the biases were significantly smaller for SH (P =.04). Ranges of normalized distance and DSC were 0.1%–2.5% and 75%–96%, respectively. Mean DSC was significantly higher than 70% (P < .001). SH method provided unbiased lesion volume and added geometric information that may enable a better understanding of the pathogenesis and lesion evolution over time. PMID:15833980

  5. Pancreas After Islet Transplantation: A First Report of the International Pancreas Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, R W G; Gruessner, A C

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas after islet (PAI) transplantation is a treatment option for patients seeking insulin independence through a whole-organ transplant after a failed cellular transplant. This report from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) studied PAI transplant outcomes over a 10-year time period. Forty recipients of a failed alloislet transplant subsequently underwent pancreas transplant alone (50%), pancreas after previous kidney transplant (22.5%), or simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplant (27.5%). Graft and patient survival rates were not statistically significantly different compared with matched primary pancreas transplants. Regardless of the recipient category, overall 1- and 5-year PAI patient survival rates for all 40 cases were 97% and 83%, respectively; graft survival rates were 84% and 65%, respectively. A failed previous islet transplant had no negative impact on kidney graft survival in the SPK category: It was the same as for primary SPK transplants. According to this IPTR/UNOS analysis, a PAI transplant is a safe procedure with low recipient mortality, high graft-function rates in both the short and long term and excellent kidney graft outcomes. Patients with a failed islet transplant should know about this alternative in their quest for insulin independence through transplantation.

  6. European experts consensus statement on cystic tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline; Salvia, Roberto; Klöppel, Gunter; Werner, Jens; McKay, Colin; Friess, Helmut; Manfredi, Riccardo; Van Cutsem, Eric; Löhr, Matthias; Segersvärd, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are increasingly recognized. While some lesions show benign behaviour (serous cystic neoplasm), others have an unequivocal malignant potential (mucinous cystic neoplasm, branch- and main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm). European expert pancreatologists provide updated recommendations: diagnostic computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging are indicated in all patients with cystic lesion of the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis may be used but there is no evidence to suggest this as a routine diagnostic method. The role of pancreatoscopy remains to be established. Resection should be considered in all symptomatic lesions, in mucinous cystic neoplasm, main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm as well as in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodules, dilated main pancreatic duct >6mm and possibly if rapidly increasing in size. An oncological partial resection should be performed in main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and in lesions with a suspicion of malignancy, otherwise organ preserving procedures may be considered. Frozen section of the transection margin in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm is suggested. Follow up after resection is recommended for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm and invasive cancer.

  7. Pulmonary blood volume imaging with dual-energy computed tomography: spectrum of findings.

    PubMed

    Hagspiel, K D; Flors, L; Housseini, A M; Phull, A; Ali Ahmad, E; Bozlar, U; Norton, P T; Bonatti, H J R

    2012-01-01

    Dual-energy (DE) pulmonary blood volume (PBV) computed tomography (CT) has recently become available on clinical CT systems. The underlying physical principle of DECT is the fact that the photoelectric effect is strongly dependent on the CT energies resulting in different degrees of x-ray attenuation for different materials at different energy levels. DECT thus enables the characterization and quantification of iodine within tissues via imaging at different x-ray energies and analysis of attenuation differences. Technical approaches to DECT include dual-source scanners acquiring two scans with different energy levels simultaneously, and single-source CT scanners using sandwich detectors or rapid voltage switching. DE PBV CT enables the creation of iodine maps of the pulmonary parenchyma. Experience to date shows that these studies can provide additional physiological information in patients with acute or chronic pulmonary embolism beyond the pure morphological assessment a standard CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) provides. It appears also to be promising for the evaluation of patients with obstructive airways disease. This article reviews the physics and technical aspects of DE PBV CT as well as the appearance of normal and abnormal lung tissue on these studies. Special consideration is given to pitfalls and artefacts.

  8. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis: unique symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings: case report.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomohiro; Koyanagi, Izumi; Kaneko, Takahisa; Yoneta, Akihiro; Keira, Yoshiko; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Hyperhidrosis is caused by a sympathetic dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Intramedullary spinal cord lesions can be a cause of hyperhidrosis. The authors report a rare case of intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis. This 16-year-old boy presented with abnormal sweating on the right side of the neck, chest, and the right arm that had been occurring for 6 years. Neurological examination revealed mild motor weakness of the right lower extremity and slightly decreased sensation in the left lower extremity. Hyperhidrosis was observed in the right C3-T8 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intramedullary tumor at the right side of the spinal cord at the T2-3 level. The tumor showed partial enhancement after Gd administration. The patient underwent removal of the tumor via hemilaminectomy of T2-3. Only subtotal resection was achieved because the margins of the tumor were unclear. Histopathological examination revealed ganglioglioma. Hyperhidrosis gradually improved after surgery. Hyperhidrosis is a rare clinical manifestation of intramedullary spinal cord tumors, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The location of the tumor origin, around the right gray matter of the lateral spinal cord, may account for the hyperhidrosis as the initial symptom in this patient. Physicians should examine the spinal cord using MRI studies when a patient has hyperhidrosis with some motor or sensory symptoms of the extremities.

  9. Novel finding of optic nerve central T2 hypointensity utilizing 3 Tesla MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Riascos, Roy; Heymann, John C; Hakimelahi, Reza; Hasan, Khader; Sargsyan, Ashot; Barr, Yael R; Tom, James; Alperin, Noam; Kramer, Larry A

    2015-04-01

    We sought to report a central T2 hypointensity within the optic nerve on 3 T MRI studies obtained as part of the NASA Flight Medicine Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Protocol that had not been described previously. Twenty-one astronauts, who had undergone MRI of both orbits with direct coronal T2 sequences between 2010 and 2012, were retrospectively included. Two of the astronauts did not have previous exposure to microgravity at the time of their scans. A central T2 hypointensity was observed in 100% of both right and left eyes. It was completely visualized throughout the nerve course in 15 right eyes (71.4%) and in 19 left eyes (90.5%).We describe a new finding seen in all study participants: a central T2 hypointensity in the epicenter of the optic nerve. We speculate that this T2 hypointensity may represent flow voids caused by the central retinal vessels.

  10. Novel finding of optic nerve central T2 hypointensity utilizing 3 Tesla MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Riascos, Roy; Heymann, John C; Hakimelahi, Reza; Hasan, Khader; Sargsyan, Ashot; Barr, Yael R; Tom, James; Alperin, Noam; Kramer, Larry A

    2015-04-01

    We sought to report a central T2 hypointensity within the optic nerve on 3 T MRI studies obtained as part of the NASA Flight Medicine Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Protocol that had not been described previously. Twenty-one astronauts, who had undergone MRI of both orbits with direct coronal T2 sequences between 2010 and 2012, were retrospectively included. Two of the astronauts did not have previous exposure to microgravity at the time of their scans. A central T2 hypointensity was observed in 100% of both right and left eyes. It was completely visualized throughout the nerve course in 15 right eyes (71.4%) and in 19 left eyes (90.5%).We describe a new finding seen in all study participants: a central T2 hypointensity in the epicenter of the optic nerve. We speculate that this T2 hypointensity may represent flow voids caused by the central retinal vessels. PMID:25923682

  11. Finding Imaging Patterns of Structural Covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA. PMID:25497684

  12. Finding imaging patterns of structural covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA.

  13. Post-primary students' images of mathematics: findings from a survey of Irish ordinary level mathematics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Ciara; Stynes, Martin; O'Donoghue, John

    2016-10-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out as part of a PhD research study to investigate the image of mathematics held by post-primary students in Ireland. The study focused on students in fifth year of post-primary education studying ordinary level mathematics for the Irish Leaving Certificate examination - the final examination for students in second-level or post-primary education. At the time this study was conducted, ordinary level mathematics students constituted approximately 72% of Leaving Certificate students. Students were aged between 15 and 18 years. A definition for 'image of mathematics' was adapted from Lim and Wilson, with image of mathematics hypothesized as comprising attitudes, beliefs, self-concept, motivation, emotions and past experiences of mathematics. A questionnaire was composed incorporating 84 fixed-response items chosen from eight pre-established scales by Aiken, Fennema and Sherman, Gourgey and Schoenfeld. This paper focuses on the findings from the questionnaire survey. Students' images of mathematics are compared with regard to gender, type of post-primary school attended and prior mathematical achievement.

  14. Extraction of structural and chemical information from high angle annular dark-field image by an improved peaks finding method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenhao; Huang, Rong; Qi, Ruijuan; Duan, Chungang

    2016-09-01

    With the development of spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high angle annular dark filed (HAADF) imaging technique has been widely applied in the microstructure characterization of various advanced materials with atomic resolution. However, current qualitative interpretation of the HAADF image is not enough to extract all the useful information. Here a modified peaks finding method was proposed to quantify the HAADF-STEM image to extract structural and chemical information. Firstly, an automatic segmentation technique including numerical filters and watershed algorithm was used to define the sub-areas for each atomic column. Then a 2D Gaussian fitting was carried out to determine the atomic column positions precisely, which provides the geometric information at the unit-cell scale. Furthermore, a self-adaptive integration based on the column position and the covariance of statistical Gaussian distribution were performed. The integrated intensities show very high sensitivity on the mean atomic number with improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Consequently, the polarization map and strain distributions were rebuilt from a HAADF-STEM image of the rhombohedral and tetragonal BiFeO3 interface and a MnO2 monolayer in LaAlO3 /SrMnO3 /SrTiO3 heterostructure was discerned from its neighbor TiO2 layers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:820-826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27324521

  15. Predictive performance of BI-RADS magnetic resonance imaging descriptors in the context of suspicious (category 4) findings*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, João Ricardo Maltez; Gomes, André Boechat; Barros, Thomas Pitangueiras; Fahel, Paulo Eduardo; Rocha, Mário de Seixas

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the positive predictive value (PPV) and likelihood ratio for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of category 4 lesions, as described in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS®) lexicon, as well as to test the predictive performance of the descriptors using multivariate analysis and the area under the curve derived from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Materials and Methods This was a double-blind review study of 121 suspicious findings from 98 women examined between 2009 and 2013. The terminology was based on the 2013 edition of the BI-RADS. Results Of the 121 suspicious findings, 53 (43.8%) were proven to be malignant lesions, with no significant difference between mass and non-mass enhancement (p = 0.846). The PPVs were highest for masses with a spiculated margin (71%) and round shape (63%), whereas segmental distribution achieved a high PPV (80%) for non-mass enhancement. Kinetic analyses performed poorly, except for type 3 curves applied to masses (PPV of 73%). Logistic regression models were significant for both patterns, although the results were better for masses, particularly when kinetic assessments were included (p = 0.015; pseudo R2 = 0.48; area under the curve = 90%). Conclusion Some BI-RADS MRI descriptors have high PPV and good predictive performance-as demonstrated by ROC curve and multivariate analysis-when applied to BI-RADS category 4 findings. This may allow future stratification of this category. PMID:27403012

  16. Myocardial tagging with MR imaging: overview of normal and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Jeung, Mi-Young; Germain, Philippe; Croisille, Pierre; El ghannudi, Soraya; Roy, Catherine; Gangi, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance tagging is used to evaluate the dynamic deformation of lines or grids superimposed on the myocardium during the cardiac cycle. From these data, a specific postprocessing procedure provides two kinds of metrics: (a) three orthogonal components of myocardial motion (longitudinal, circumferential, and radial), and (b) rotation and torsion. Strain expresses the local myocardial deformation and is prone to important physiologic heterogeneities. Peak systolic strain is in the range of -15% to -20% for the longitudinal and circumferential components (fiber shortening) and 30%-40% for the radial component (wall thickening). The helical arrangement of myofibers that run in opposite directions at the epicardium and endocardium explains systolic twist (~15°). This torsion may be enhanced during the early stage of several diseases (eg, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) or in heart failure with a normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Strain is generally impaired in ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, but the most diagnostically significant finding is the early identification of contractile dysfunction on the basis of longitudinal and circumferential strain reduction in patients with apparently preserved systolic function. Thus, strain impairment appears to be a sensitive and promising marker of subclinical disease, with the potential for improving patient management. PMID:22977026

  17. Lumbar disc herniation: Is there an association between histological and magnetic resonance imaging findings?

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Shiju A; Seshadrinath, N Arun Kumar; Binoy, Kavitha Ravi; Raji, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although validated radiological scoring systems and histological scoring system of surgically removed degenerated disc are used in assessment of progression of intervertebral disc degeneration, there have not been many studies that integrate these two aspects of assessments. The data available in this respect are very limited. This clinical study was designed to find the correlation between quantitative radiological score (Pfirmann grading system and Modic changes [MC]) and quantitative histological degeneration score (HDS). Materials and Methods: A cohort of 77 patients (45 males, 32 females; mean age of 38 years [range 18–58 years]) who presented with complaints of discogenic pain or radiculopathy at single level were assessed radiologically. They were graded according to the radiological pattern. The surgically excised disc specimen was graded according to HDS. The degree of radiological changes were correlated with the degree of histological changes. Results: Though the overall HDS (0–15) did not show statistically significant correlation with Pfirmann grading system, there were positive association found between mucoid degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation with the Pfirmann grading and mucoid degeneration, which were statistically significant. Female sex also had a higher association with instability pattern. Conclusion: The study shows that the Pfirmann grading system, MCs and HDS can reliably be used as scoring systems for assessing lumbar disc degeneration. The radiological assessment can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess the probable change in content rather than the microstructure of a disc undergoing degeneration. PMID:27293282

  18. Methodology for the assessment of the relationship between structural and functional imaging findings in neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Griselda J.; Furuie, Sergio S.; Busatto, Geraldo F.

    2003-05-01

    Using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), we have implemented methods to investigate the relation between findings from structural MRI and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) SPECT performed in groups of subjects with neuropsychiatric disorders and healthy controls. Using a MATLAB program developed and integrated into SPM, suited means of gray matter values (MGM) were calculated in regions relevant to the disorder in question, and linearly correlated with rCBF values from the same patients. In a study of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), patients showed a focus of increased MGM in the right putamen relative to controls. MGM from the putamen were significantly inversely correlated with rCBF measures in regions critical to OCD, mainly the anterior cingulate gyrus. These results are consistent with the notion that an imbalance of cortico-striatal circuits is relevant to OCD pathophysiology. In a study of Alzheimer's disease (AD), foci of decreased gray matter in patients relative to controls were identified bilaterally in the hippocampus. In AD patients, reduced hippocampal MGM correlated significantly with decreased rCBF during a memory task, in a network of regions usually involved in memory processes. An inverse correlation with frontal rCBF was also observed, suggesting compensatory efforts of executive regions during the memory task.

  19. Intra-Hepatic Spillage of Gallstones as a Late Complication of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: MR Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ragozzino, Alfonso; Puglia, Marta; Romano, Federica; Imbriaco, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Spillage of gallstones in the abdominal cavity may rarely occur during the course of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Dropped gallstones in the peritoneal and extra-peritoneal cavity are usually asymptomatic. However, they may lead to abscess formation with an estimated incidence of about 0.3%. Common locations of the abscess are in the abdominal wall followed by the intra-abdominal cavity, usually in the sub-hepatic or retro-peritoneum inferior to the sub-hepatic space. Case Report We hereby describe an unusual case of infected spilled gallstones in the right sub-phrenic space, prospectively detected on abdominal MRI performed two years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, in a patient with only a mild right-sided abdominal complaint. Conclusions This case highlights the role of MRI in suggesting the right diagnosis in cases with vague or even absent symptomatology. In our case the patient’s history together with high quality abdomen MRI allowed the correct diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware of this rare and late onset complication, even after many years from surgery as an incidental finding in almost asymptomatic patients. PMID:27471576

  20. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of gastric cancer: X-ray versus MRI anatomic findings].

    PubMed

    Portnoĭ, L M; Denisova, L B; Stashuk, G A; Nefedova, V O

    2000-01-01

    The paper assesses the present-day role of MRI in the diagnosis of gastric cancer. The authors consider the major prerequisites for the main aim of their study to be: 1) a dramatic incidence of diffuse (endophytic) gastric carcinoma, which requires significant correction of today's approaches to its diagnosis and 2) a rather biased and, in the authors' opinion, present-day mainly negative attitude towards MRI of the stomach as a diagnostic method for its tumor lesions. By applying the X-ray-MRI anatomic principle to the comparative study of MRI findings in 50 patients with predominantly gastric intramural carcinoma and in 25 patients without gastric tumors (controls), the authors present their methods for gastric MRI, the MRI semiotics of gastric cancer by concurrently touching upon a variety of problems that characterize the potentialities of MRI of the stomach in the diagnosis of its tumor lesions, including their differential diagnosis. As a result, the authors highly appreciate gastric MRI and consider this method to be included into the diagnostic algorithm of radiation techniques used in the diagnosis of gastric cancer, which should occupy its definite diagnostic place.

  1. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of primary intracranial histiocytic sarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Park, Chul; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Gu, Su-Hyun; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Young-Bo; Woo, Eung-Je; Kim, Dae-Young; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2009-10-01

    A 10-year-old, neutered male, Maltese dog presented with a three week history of intention tremor, right hind limb rigidity, poor coordination, and occasional circling to the left. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, a mass was identified in the right occipital lobe and cerebellum. Three weeks after the initial MRI scan, we performed an (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) of the brain. The FDG-PET demonstrated areas of hypermetabolism in the right occipital lobe, cerebellum, pons, and medulla oblongata. When the standardized uptake value was calculated, the hypermetabolic lesion was higher than the gray matter values. The anatomical location of the hypermetabolic lesion was more precisely identified by the PET-MRI fusion images. The dog was definitively diagnosed as a primary histiocytic sarcoma of the brain. This is the first report of PET findings of an intracranial histiocytic sarcoma in a dog.

  2. SPECT imaging of Moyamoya disease using /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO. Comparison with computed tomography findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mountz, J.M.; Foster, N.L.; Ackermann, R.J.; Bluemlein, L.; Petry, N.A.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1988-10-01

    /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO was used to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in a 26-year-old woman with Moyamoya disease. This patient had an 18-month history of recurrent neurologic deficits and had angiographic evidence of Moyamoya disease. She had used oral contraceptives and cigarettes, but had no other risk factors for stroke. Single photon emission computed tomographic images showed bilateral and asymmetric reductions in blood flow to anterior and lateral brain regions. These findings correlated better with clinical symptomatology and suggested more extensive brain involvement than did computed tomography.

  3. Prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with sciatica.

    PubMed

    El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Peul, Wilco C; Verhagen, Arianne P; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; Koes, Bart W; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M

    2016-06-01

    follow-up, irrespective of a surgical or conservative treatment. MRI findings seem not to be helpful in determining which patients might fare better with early surgery compared with a strategy of prolonged conservative care. Clinical trial registration no.: ISRCTN26872154 ( controlled-trials.com ). PMID:26871651

  4. Roles of Commensal Microbiota in Pancreas Homeostasis and Pancreatic Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Lopes, Camila; Velloso, Fernando J.; Campopiano, Julia C.; Sogayar, Mari C.; Correa, Ricardo G.

    2015-01-01

    The pancreas plays a central role in metabolism, allowing ingested food to be converted and used as fuel by the cells throughout the body. On the other hand, the pancreas may be affected by devastating diseases, such as pancreatitis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC), and diabetes mellitus (DM), which generally results in a wide metabolic imbalance. The causes for the development and progression of these diseases are still controversial; therefore it is essential to better understand the underlying mechanisms which compromise the pancreatic homeostasis. The interest in the study of the commensal microbiome increased extensively in recent years, when many discoveries have illustrated its central role in both human physiology and maintenance of homeostasis. Further understanding of the involvement of the microbiome during the development of pathological conditions is critical for the improvement of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the present review, we discuss recent findings on the behavior and functions played by the microbiota in major pancreatic diseases and provide further insights into its potential roles in the maintenance of pancreatic steady-state activities. PMID:26347203

  5. Elucidation of cell secretion: pancreas led the way.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Constantin

    2004-01-01

    Secretion is a basic process in all cells and is required for several important functions such as neurotransmission, the secretion of digestive juices from the exocrine pancreas and the release of hormones from endocrine and neuroendocrine cells. Due to these important functions, the mechanism of cell secretion has been intensely investigated for over half a century. However, it is only in the last decade, with the discovery of a new cellular structure, the 'porosome' or 'fusion pore', and the elucidation of SNARE-induced membrane fusion, that has finally provided us with an understanding of cell secretion at the molecular level. The 'porosome', a supramolecular structure at the cell plasma membrane, was first discovered in the exocrine pancreas, and subsequently in endocrine/neuroendocrine cells and in neurons. The structure and dynamics of the 'porosome' in live cells at nanometer resolution and in real-time, its composition and functional reconstitution in lipid membrane, have all been determined. These findings have fundamentally changed our understanding of cell secretion and provide a clear understanding of this highly regulated process in cells.

  6. Important nonurgent imaging findings: use of a hybrid digital and administrative support tool for facilitating clinician communication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Evan; Sanger, Joseph; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    A departmental tool that provides a digital/administrative solution for communication of important imaging findings was evaluated. The tool allows the radiologist to click a button to mark an examination for ordering physician follow-up with subsequent fax and confirmation. The tool's log was reviewed. Of 466 entries; 99.4% were successfully faxed with phone confirmation. Most common reasons for usage were lung nodule/mass (29.2%) and osseous fracture (12.4%). Subsequent clinical action was documented in 41.0% of entries. Our data show the reliability of the tool in assisting the communication of findings, as well as providing documentation of notification, with minimal workflow disruption.

  7. Relationship Between Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Findings and Cognition Following Pediatric TBI: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rachel M.; Mathias, Jane L.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study meta-analyzed research examining relationships between diffusion tensor imaging and cognition following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from 14 studies that correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) or apparent diffusion coefficient/mean diffusivity with cognition were analyzed. Short-term (<4 weeks post-TBI) findings were inconsistent, but, in the medium to long term, FA values for numerous large white matter tracts and the whole brain were related to cognition. However, the analyses were limited by the diversity of brain regions and cognitive outcomes that have been examined; all in relatively small samples. Moreover, additional data are needed to investigate the impact of age and injury severity on these findings. PMID:27232263

  8. Formation of Collateral Veins in a Graft Pancreas After a Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, B H; Lee, H Y; Park, Y M; Yang, K H; Ryu, J H; Chu, C W

    2015-09-01

    A graft vein thrombosis is the main cause of early graft failure after pancreas transplantation. We report a case of formation of collateral veins in a graft pancreas after transplant. A 30-year-old woman underwent simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation. She was discharged 16 days after the operation with good pancreas and kidney function. A total occlusion of the portal vein was discovered on computed tomography (CT) performed at an outpatient clinic. She had no symptoms or signs of hyperglycemia. Venography was attempted for vein thrombectomy but failed. After 2 weeks of heparinization therapy, the edema disappeared and perfusion of the graft pancreas improved. However, the thrombotic occlusion was not resolved on CT. Arteriography of the Y-graft revealed collateral veins. She was discharged with warfarin. She is currently doing well without any symptoms or signs. This is the first reported case of collateral vein formation in a grafted pancreas after pancreas transplantation.

  9. Endocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Meko, J B; Norton, J A

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare, yet can cause significant morbidity due to excessive secretion of hormones. Octreotide is effective in reducing the plasma concentrations of many of these hormones. The availability of potent H2-receptor antagonists and omeprazole has altered the emphasis in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome away from total gastrectomy and towards resection of the gastrinoma for potential cure. Fifty percent of insulinomas and gastrinomas are not evident on preoperative imaging studies, despite their sophistication. Calcium angiography, endoscopic ultrasonography, isotope-labeled octreotide scanning, and injection of methylene blue during secretin angiography are recent imaging modalities that have shown promise in the localization of these tumors. Intraoperative ultrasound has emerged as the best method for operative detection of insulinomas. Duodenotomy and intraoperative endoscopic transillumination are especially important in the surgical management of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome because 30% to 40% of gastrinomas are located in the duodenum. The management of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome continues to be controversial. Some advocate an aggressive surgical approach, whereas others have had little success in rendering patients eugastrinemic.

  10. Overuse injuries of the upper extremity in the competitive athlete: magnetic resonance imaging findings associated with repetitive trauma.

    PubMed

    Banks, Kevin P; Ly, Justin Q; Beall, Douglas P; Grayson, David E; Bancroft, Laura W; Tall, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    Overuse injuries are a very common cause of pain in athletes, accounting for a significant loss of training time and missed competitions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasing role in facilitating the expeditious and safe return of these individuals to their preinjury level of physical performance by allowing accurate diagnosis. Sports physicians are increasingly relying on the exquisite anatomic detail afforded by this technique to formulate diagnoses that assist with the optimal management of these athletic injuries. Some upper extremity overuse entities are well recognized; two examples are medial epicondylitis, classically appearing in baseball pitchers, and lateral epicondylitis, in tennis players. Other less well-known injuries of the upper extremity, such as intersection syndrome in rowers and distal clavicular stress fractures in weightlifters, are frequent occurrences in certain circles of athletes. The following article is a pictorial review of the MRI findings of upper extremity overuse injuries encountered in the competitive athlete, with an emphasis on the sports scenarios in which they occur. We will depict mechanisms of injury and applicable anatomy and show characteristic imaging findings. A wide range of entities are addressed, including but not limited to overuse injuries occurring in baseball, swimming, gymnastics, weightlifting, bowling, and cycling.

  11. Fetal neuroblastoma: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the prenatal and postnatal IV-S stage.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Davaus, Taisa; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a fetus with an ultrasonography diagnosis of a neuroblastoma during a routine third trimester fetal scan, which presented as a hyperechogenic nodule located above the right kidney. No other abnormalities were found in the ultrasonography scan; however, the follow-up ultrasonography during the 36th week of gestation revealed that the lesion had doubled in size. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a round mass in the topography of the right adrenal gland with a low signal on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal on T2-weighted images, causing a slight inferior displacement of the kidney. The liver had enlarged and had heterogeneous signal intensity, predominantly hypointense on T2-weighted sequences. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of congenital adrenal neuroblastoma with liver metastases was suggested. A newborn male was delivered by cesarean section 2 weeks later. The physical examination of the neonate revealed abdominal distention and hepatomegaly. The infant had a clinical follow-up in which no surgical or medical intervention was required. At 5 months of age, the infant was asymptomatic with a normal physical examination.

  12. Fetal neuroblastoma: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the prenatal and postnatal IV-S stage

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Davaus, Taisa

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a fetus with an ultrasonography diagnosis of a neuroblastoma during a routine third trimester fetal scan, which presented as a hyperechogenic nodule located above the right kidney. No other abnormalities were found in the ultrasonography scan; however, the follow-up ultrasonography during the 36th week of gestation revealed that the lesion had doubled in size. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a round mass in the topography of the right adrenal gland with a low signal on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal on T2-weighted images, causing a slight inferior displacement of the kidney. The liver had enlarged and had heterogeneous signal intensity, predominantly hypointense on T2-weighted sequences. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of congenital adrenal neuroblastoma with liver metastases was suggested. A newborn male was delivered by cesarean section 2 weeks later. The physical examination of the neonate revealed abdominal distention and hepatomegaly. The infant had a clinical follow-up in which no surgical or medical intervention was required. At 5 months of age, the infant was asymptomatic with a normal physical examination. PMID:27668206

  13. Fetal neuroblastoma: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the prenatal and postnatal IV-S stage.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Davaus, Taisa; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a fetus with an ultrasonography diagnosis of a neuroblastoma during a routine third trimester fetal scan, which presented as a hyperechogenic nodule located above the right kidney. No other abnormalities were found in the ultrasonography scan; however, the follow-up ultrasonography during the 36th week of gestation revealed that the lesion had doubled in size. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a round mass in the topography of the right adrenal gland with a low signal on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal on T2-weighted images, causing a slight inferior displacement of the kidney. The liver had enlarged and had heterogeneous signal intensity, predominantly hypointense on T2-weighted sequences. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of congenital adrenal neuroblastoma with liver metastases was suggested. A newborn male was delivered by cesarean section 2 weeks later. The physical examination of the neonate revealed abdominal distention and hepatomegaly. The infant had a clinical follow-up in which no surgical or medical intervention was required. At 5 months of age, the infant was asymptomatic with a normal physical examination. PMID:27668206

  14. Oesophageal carcinoma: comparison of ex vivo high-resolution 3.0 T MR imaging with histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; Wu, Sen; Shi, Dapeng; Dou, Shewei; Sun, Tingyi; Ning, Peigang; Zhao, Cuihua; Li, Ziyuan; Li, Xiaodong; Gao, Feifei; Li, Linlin; Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Shaocheng

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images clearly depict the normal oesophageal wall as consisting of eight layers, which correlates well with histopathological findings. In 56 (91.8%) of 61 lesions, the depth of oesophageal wall invasion determined through MR imaging was consistent with histopathological staging (r = 0.975, P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the mucosa were 71.4%, 98.1%, and 95.1%, respectively, and the corresponding values for the submucosa were 82.4%, 95.5%, and 91.8%; for the muscularis propria, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100%, 95.7%, and 96.7%, respectively, and for the adventitia, these values were 100%, 100%, and 100%. The Cohen k values for interobserver agreement were excellent: K = 0.839, P < 0.001 (observer 1 vs. observer 2); K = 0.908, P < 0.001 (observer 1 vs. observer 3); and K = 0.885, P < 0.01 (observer 2 vs. observer 3). High-resolution ex vivo MR images obtained with a 3.0 T scanner can be used to precisely evaluate oesophageal carcinoma invasion and provide good diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. PMID:27725771

  15. Fetal neuroblastoma: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the prenatal and postnatal IV-S stage

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Davaus, Taisa

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a fetus with an ultrasonography diagnosis of a neuroblastoma during a routine third trimester fetal scan, which presented as a hyperechogenic nodule located above the right kidney. No other abnormalities were found in the ultrasonography scan; however, the follow-up ultrasonography during the 36th week of gestation revealed that the lesion had doubled in size. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a round mass in the topography of the right adrenal gland with a low signal on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal on T2-weighted images, causing a slight inferior displacement of the kidney. The liver had enlarged and had heterogeneous signal intensity, predominantly hypointense on T2-weighted sequences. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of congenital adrenal neuroblastoma with liver metastases was suggested. A newborn male was delivered by cesarean section 2 weeks later. The physical examination of the neonate revealed abdominal distention and hepatomegaly. The infant had a clinical follow-up in which no surgical or medical intervention was required. At 5 months of age, the infant was asymptomatic with a normal physical examination.

  16. Total pancreatectomy combined with partial pancreas autotransplantation for recurrent pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sato, Y; Hirukawa, H; Soeno, M; Shimoda, T; Matsuoka, H; Kobayashi, Y; Tada, T; Hatakeyama, K

    2012-05-01

    We describe a patient presenting with a resectable carcinoma of the remnant pancreas at 3 years after undergoing a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreatic head. We also performed a distal pancreas autotransplantation using a part of the resected pancreas to preserve endocrine function. Final histologic findings showed the second tumor to be an invasive ductal carcinoma consisting of a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma with similar histopathologic findings as the first tumor. There were no microscopic lymph node metastases and no evidence of microvascular invasion (pStage IA [pT1, pN0, M0] and R0 according to the International Union Against Cancer TNM classification). The patient was discharged at 20 days after surgery without any trouble and followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 value was again normalized after the second surgery. Twenty months after the second operation, the patient is alive without cancer recurrence. The pancreas graft is functioning with a blood glucose of 108 mg/dL, HbA1C of 6.2%, and serum C-peptide of 1.4 ng/mL.

  17. Iterative use of nuclear receptor Nr5a2 regulates multiple stages of liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Sahar; Weeks, Olivia; Talbot, Jared C; Hedgepeth, John W; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Swinburne, Ian; Cortes, Mauricio; Alexa, Kristen; Megason, Sean; North, Trista E; Amacher, Sharon L; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    The stepwise progression of common endoderm progenitors into differentiated liver and pancreas organs is regulated by a dynamic array of signals that are not well understood. The nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 gene nr5a2, also known as Liver receptor homolog-1 (Lrh-1) is expressed in several tissues including the developing liver and pancreas. Here, we interrogate the role of Nr5a2 at multiple developmental stages using genetic and chemical approaches and uncover novel pleiotropic requirements during zebrafish liver and pancreas development. Zygotic loss of nr5a2 in a targeted genetic null mutant disrupted the development of the exocrine pancreas and liver, while leaving the endocrine pancreas intact. Loss of nr5a2 abrogated exocrine pancreas markers such as trypsin, while pancreas progenitors marked by ptf1a or pdx1 remained unaffected, suggesting a role for Nr5a2 in regulating pancreatic acinar cell differentiation. In the developing liver, Nr5a2 regulates hepatic progenitor outgrowth and differentiation, as nr5a2 mutants exhibited reduced hepatoblast markers hnf4α and prox1 as well as differentiated hepatocyte marker fabp10a. Through the first in vivo use of Nr5a2 chemical antagonist Cpd3, the iterative requirement for Nr5a2 for exocrine pancreas and liver differentiation was temporally elucidated: chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 function during hepatopancreas progenitor specification was sufficient to disrupt exocrine pancreas formation and enhance the size of the embryonic liver, suggesting that Nr5a2 regulates hepatic vs. pancreatic progenitor fate choice. Chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 at a later time during pancreas and liver differentiation was sufficient to block the formation of mature acinar cells and hepatocytes. These findings define critical iterative and pleiotropic roles for Nr5a2 at distinct stages of pancreas and liver organogenesis, and provide novel perspectives for interpreting the role of Nr5a2 in disease. PMID:27474396

  18. Pancreas sparing duodenectomy as an emergency procedure

    PubMed Central

    Paluszkiewicz, Piotr; Dudek, Wojciech; Lowery, Kathryn; Hart, Colin A

    2009-01-01

    Background The operative techniques to close extensive wounds to the duodenum are well described. However, postoperative morbidity is common and includes suture line leak and the formation of fistulae. The aim of this case series is to present pancreas sparing duodenectomy as a safe and viable alternative procedure in the emergency milieu. Methods Five patients underwent emergency pancreas sparing duodenal excisions. Re-implantation of the papilla of Vater or the papilla with a surrounding mucosal patch was performed in two patients. In one, the procedure was further supplemented with a duodenocholangiostomy, stapled pyloric exclusion and enterogastrostomy to defunction the pylorus. In another three patients, distal duodenal excisions were done. Results In four patients, an uneventful recovery was made. One patient died following a myocardial infarction. The surgery lasted meanly 160 minutes with average blood loss of approximately 500 milliliters. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. Enteral nutrition was introduced within the 20 hours after the surgery. Long term follow-up of all surviving patients confirmed a good outcome and normal nutritional status. Conclusion Based on the presented series of patients, we suggest that pancreas-sparing duodenectomy can be considered in selected patients with laceration of the duodenum deemed unsuitable for surgical reconstruction. PMID:19445694

  19. Bringing the Artificial Pancreas Home: Telemedicine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lanzola, Giordano; Capozzi, Davide; Serina, Nadia; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    The design and implementation of telemedicine systems able to support the artificial pancreas need careful choices to cope with technological requirements while preserving performance and decision support capabilities. This article addresses the issue of designing a general architecture for the telemedicine components of an artificial pancreas and illustrates a viable solution that is able to deal with different use cases and is amenable to support mobile-health implementations. The goal is to enforce interoperability among the components of the architecture and guarantee maximum flexibility for the ensuing implementations. Thus, the design stresses modularity and separation of concerns along with adoption of clearly defined protocols for interconnecting the necessary components. This accounts for the implementation of integrated telemedicine systems suitable as short-term monitoring devices for supporting validation of closed-loop algorithms as well as devices meant to provide a lifelong tighter control on the patient state once the artificial pancreas has become the preferred treatment for patients with diabetes. PMID:22226255

  20. Pancreas Transplantation: Solid Organ and Islet

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shruti; Johnson, Paul; Friend, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas, either as a solid organ or as isolated islets of Langerhans, is indicated in a small proportion of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes in whom severe complications develop, particularly severe glycemic instability and progressive secondary complications (usually renal failure). The potential to reverse diabetes has to be balanced against the morbidity of long-term immunosuppression. For a patient with renal failure, the treatment of choice is often a simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney (SPK), whereas for a patient with glycemic instability, specifically hypoglycemic unawareness, the choice between a solid organ and an islet transplant has to be individual to the patient. Results of SPK transplantation are comparable to other solid-organ transplants (kidney, liver, heart) and there is evidence of improved quality of life and life expectancy, but the results of solitary pancreas transplantation and islets are inferior with respect to graft survival. There is some evidence of benefit with respect to the progression of secondary diabetic complications in patients with functioning transplants for several years. PMID:24616200

  1. An Integrated Multivariable Artificial Pancreas Control System

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T.; Littlejohn, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system. PMID:24876613

  2. An integrated multivariable artificial pancreas control system.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system.

  3. The first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation: outcome at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Vouillarmet, J; Buron, F; Houzard, C; Carlier, M C; Chauvet, C; Brunet, M; Thivolet, C; Morelon, E; Badet, L

    2013-07-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare but life-threatening disease. Replacement therapy sometimes fails to prevent an acute adrenal crisis and most often does not lead to restoration of well-being. We report here the 1-year outcome of the first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation in a 33-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes and concomitant autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. En bloc left adrenal gland and kidney grafts were anastomosed on the left iliac vessels in normal vascular conditions and the pancreas graft was anastomosed on the right iliac vessels. The immunosuppressive regimen was not modified by the addition of the adrenal gland. We observed no additional morbidity due to the adrenal gland transplantation, as there were no surgical complications. One-year kidney and pancreas graft functions were satisfactory (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 55 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and HbA1c: 4.8%). The adrenal graft functioned well at 12 months with a normalization of cortisol and aldosterone baseline levels. Functional imaging at 3 months showed good uptake of [(123) I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine by the adrenal graft. Transplantation of the adrenal gland en bloc with the left kidney appears to be a good therapeutic option in patients with adrenal insufficiency awaiting kidney or kidney-pancreas transplantation.

  4. Cystic dystrophy of the gastric and duodenal wall developing in heterotopic pancreas: an unrecognised entity.

    PubMed Central

    Fléjou, J F; Potet, F; Molas, G; Bernades, P; Amouyal, P; Fékété, F

    1993-01-01

    Ten patients in whom cystic dystrophy developed in a heterotopic pancreas of the duodenal (nine patients) or gastric (one patient) wall are reported. All were young or middle aged white men, only two of whom were alcoholic. The symptoms were caused by intestinal or biliary stenosis, or both, secondary to the inflammation and fibrosis. Only endosonography provided strong evidence for the diagnosis in three patients. All patients underwent surgery: a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in eight patients. The surgical specimen showed cystic lesions of the gut wall, occurring in inflammatory and fibrous heterotopic pancreatic tissue. The pancreas proper was normal in all patients. It is suggested that cystic dystrophy is an uncommon and serious complication of heterotopic pancreas. Similar cases associated with chronic pancreatitis of the pancreas have been observed and it is suggested that this process could be responsible for some of the chronic pancreatitis encountered in young, non-alcoholic patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8097180

  5. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient's quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist's role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients' life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  6. High-Caloric and Chocolate Stimuli Processing in Healthy Humans: An Integration of Functional Imaging and Electrophysiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Asmaro, Deyar; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding how the human brain processes appetitive food cues, and knowing how such cues elicit craving responses is particularly relevant when current eating behavior trends within Westernized societies are considered. One substance that holds a special place with regard to food preference is chocolate, and studies that used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have identified neural regions and electrical signatures that are elicited by chocolate cue presentations. This review will examine fMRI and ERP findings from studies that used high-caloric food and chocolate cues as stimuli, with a focus on responses observed in samples of healthy participants, as opposed to those with eating-related pathology. The utility of using high-caloric and chocolate stimuli as a means of understanding the human reward system will also be highlighted, as these findings may be particularly important for understanding processes related to pathological overeating and addiction to illicit substances. Finally, research from our own lab that focused on chocolate stimulus processing in chocolate cravers and non-cravers will be discussed, as the approach used may help bridge fMRI and ERP findings so that a more complete understanding of appetitive stimulus processing in the temporal and spatial domains may be established. PMID:24434747

  7. Early Gastric Cancer Just above a Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Murabayashi, Toji; Kawaguchi, Shinya; Okuda, Naoko; Oyamada, Jun; Yabana, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of early gastric cancer just above a heterotopic pancreas for which the differential diagnosis was carcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas. Routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in an 83-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer revealed a gastric cancer in the lesser curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for evaluating the depth of tumor invasion revealed a hypoechoic mass in the submucosal layer. The depth of tumor invasion was diagnosed as muscularis propria. Distal gastrectomy and sigmoidectomy were performed. Histologically, the resected specimen of the stomach unexpectedly revealed a heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. They were not linked, and the heterotopic pancreas had no dysplasia. The gastric cancer had slightly invaded the submucosa. The hypoechoic mass on EUS was not the invasive tumor but the heterotopic pancreas. The preoperative staging of the gastric cancer on EUS was confounded by the presence of the heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. PMID:27482189

  8. Preoperative Lateralization Modalities for Cushing Disease: Is Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Cavernous Sinus Sampling More Predictive of Intraoperative Findings?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai; Yedinak, Chris; Ozpinar, Alp; Anderson, Jim; Dogan, Aclan; Delashaw, Johnny; Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze whether cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) are consistent with intraoperative findings in Cushing disease (CD) patients. Design Retrospective outcomes study. Setting Oregon Health & Science University; 2006 and 2013. Participants A total of 37 CD patients with preoperative dMRI and CSS to confirm central adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) hypersecretion. Patients were 78% female; mean age was 41 years (at diagnosis), and all had a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Main Outcome Measures Correlations among patient characteristics, dMRI measurements, CSS results, and intraoperative findings. Results All CSS indicated presence of CD. Eight of 37 patients had no identifiable tumor on dMRI. Three of 37 patients had no tumor at surgery. dMRI tumor size was inversely correlated with age (rs = − 0.4; p = 0.01) and directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.3; p < 0.05). Preoperative dMRI was directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.5; p < 0.002). CSS lateralization showed no correlation with intraoperative findings (rs = 0.145; p = 0.40) or lateralization observed on preoperative dMRI (rs = 0.17; p = 0.29). Postoperative remission rate was 68%. Conclusion dMRI localization was most consistent with intraoperative findings; CSS results were less reliable. Results suggest that small ACTH-secreting tumors continue to pose a challenge to reliable preoperative localization. PMID:26225305

  9. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-06-27

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature. PMID:27358679

  10. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-06-27

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature.

  11. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Bangeas, Petros; Tsiompanou, Fani; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Basdanis, George

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal tumor typically located in the pleura, but can also be found as an asymptomatic mass in other areas, including the liver, peritoneum, kidney and salivary glands. However, SFT rarely locates in the pancreas. We present such a case of pancreatic SFT, along with a review of all reported cases. A 55-year-old man was treated surgically for an asymptomatic pancreatic mass after a rigorous preoperative control. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed characteristics of an SFT. As only 15 cases of pancreatic SFT have been reported so far, an attempt to compare the cases was considered intriguing. We found that patients with pancreatic SFT were mainly women (81.25%), with a median age of 54 years at the time of diagnosis and a median tumor size of 5.83 cm. Pancreatic SFTs were revealed incidentally in 50% of cases, and all of them showed an enhancement through arterial computed tomography. All tumors were positive for CD34, ten were positive for Bcl-2, and twelve were negative for S100. The diagnosis of this pancreatic tumor is established by a combination of clinical suspicion, imaging procedures and histological findings, and is confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Although the behavior of SFTs is rather benign, close clinical follow-up is recommended due to a potentially malignant nature. PMID:27358679

  12. [AIDS in a woman having had sexual relations with a patient with hemophilia A. Characteristic findings in DNA image cytometry].

    PubMed

    Schaar, H; Auffermann, W; Böcking, A; Franke, P; Pusztai-Markos, Z; Reininghaus, A; Schmitt, H

    1986-12-19

    A 37-year-old female patient reported marked weight loss, prolonged alopecia, recurrent infections and watery diarrhoea. Examination revealed Salmonella infection, candidiasis and immunological signs of previous toxoplasmosis. Between 1978 and 1981, the patient had had close sexual relations to a patient with haemophilia A. Due to this fact, AIDS was suspected. Serological tests for HIV were not available at the time. The findings in DNA image cytometry (nuclear DNA inclusion bodies, polyploid lymphocyte nuclei and binuclear lymphocytes) suggested a viral infection of the lymphoid cells. Electron microscopy revealed in hepatocytes and cerebral cells intranuclear inclusion bodies whose size and contents were not compatible with an infection caused by cytomegalovirus, herpes virus or Epstein-Barr virus. In autopsy, infections of various organ systems such as pneumonia, tracheobronchitis, urocystitis, pyelonephritis, Candida oesophagitis and enteritis were found.

  13. Pseudogout in the temporomandibular joint with imaging, arthroscopic, operative, and pathologic findings. Report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Amir; Sadow, Peter M; Keith, David A

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a destructive painful condition in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that proved to be calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposits at subsequent biopsy examination. The patient presented with the chief complaints of pain and limitation that had not resolved with splint therapy, medications, and habit control. Magnetic resonance imaging studies showed internal derangement without reduction. Right TMJ arthroscopy with manipulation of the jaw under anesthesia showed unique findings of fronds of synovial tissue in the posterior joint space and areas of white matter. Because there was no long-term improvement in her clinical symptoms, she subsequently underwent arthroplasty of the right joint, with the white material clearly seen at surgery, and the biopsy examination confirmed the clinical and arthroscopic impression of pseudogout. The presentation, diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of pseudogout of the TMJ are discussed.

  14. Inflammation, regeneration, and transformation in the pancreas: results of the Collaborative Research Center 518 (SFB 518) at the University of Ulm.

    PubMed

    Giehl, Klaudia; Bachem, Max; Beil, Michael; Böhm, Bernhard O; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fulda, Simone; Gress, Thomas M; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Kestler, Hans A; Kornmann, Marko; Menke, Andre; Möller, Peter; Oswald, Franz; Schmid, Roland M; Schmidt, Volker; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz; Wagner, Martin; Walther, Paul; Wirth, Thomas; Adler, Guido

    2011-05-01

    The primary diseases of the pancreas include diabetes mellitus, acute and chronic pancreatitis, as well as pancreatic carcinoma. This review presents findings and emerging questions on the diseases of the pancreas obtained by the consortium of the Collaborative Research Center 518 (SFB 518), "Inflammation, Regeneration, and Transformation in the Pancreas" at the University of Ulm. During the last 12 years, the SFB 518 contributed considerably to the understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of pancreatic diseases and established the basis for the development of new strategies for prevention and causal therapy for diabetes, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

  15. Dynamic MR imaging and stress testing in glenohumeral instability: comparison with normal shoulders and clinical/surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Hodge, D K; Beaulieu, C F; Thabit, G H; Gold, G E; Bergman, A G; Butts, R K; Dillingham, M F; Herfkens, R J

    2001-05-01

    Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that: 1) during shoulder motion, glenohumeral alignment differs between asymptomatic shoulders and those with symptomatic instability; 2) during magnetic resonance (MR)-monitored physical exam or stress testing, glenohumeral alignment differs between asymptomatic shoulders and those with instability; and 3) glenohumeral translation during MR stress testing correlates with findings of shoulder instability by clinical exam and exam under anesthesia (EUA). Using an open-configuration 0.5 T MR imaging (MRI) system, we studied symptomatic shoulders in 11 subjects and compared them to their contralateral asymptomatic shoulders. Each shoulder was studied during abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation to determine the humeral head position on the glenoid. An examiner also performed the MR stress test on each shoulder by applying manual force on the humeral head during imaging. All shoulders were assigned an instability grade from the MR stress test, and this grade was correlated with: 1) clinical exam grade assigned during preoperative assessment by an orthopedic surgeon and 2) intraoperative instability grade by EUA immediately preceding arthroscopy. With dynamic abduction and internal/external rotation, the humeral head remained centered on the glenoid in 9 of 11 shoulders, but in two subjects there were dramatic demonstrations of subluxation. With stress testing, a trend toward more joint laxity was demonstrated in symptomatic than in asymptomatic joints (P = 0.11). MR grading of instability correlated directly with clinical grading in six cases and underestimated the degree of instability relative to clinical exam in the other cases. MR instability grading systematically underestimated instability compared with EUA in 7 of the 10 cases that underwent surgical repair. We concluded that dynamic MR evaluation of glenohumeral alignment did not demonstrate abnormalities in symptomatic shoulders in 8 of 10 patients

  16. Clinical Features, Image Findings, and Prognosis of Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Liver: A Multicenter Experience of 45 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Young; Lim, Young-Suk; Park, Jang Won; Kim, Seung Up; Min, Yang Won; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong-Han; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare disease characterized by chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells. However, the clinical characteristics and outcomes of IPT remain uncertain. Methods Clinical features, image findings, and outcomes of 55 patients with histologically proven IPT were evaluated. Results They consisted of 26 men and 19 women with median age of 65 years. Serum carcinoembryonal antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were normal in 42 patients (93.3%). Enhanced CT scans indicated poorly defined peripheral enhancement (82.5%) at the arterial phase and poorly defined hyperattenuating lesions with internal hypoattenuating areas at the equilibrium phase (77.0%). Gadolinium-enhancement MRI revealed poorly defined peripheral rim-like enhancement (77.8%). Ten patients underwent surgical resection and 35 were treated conservatively with or without antibiotics. No recurrence was noted after surgical resection during follow-up (1 to 48 months). In all patients who received conservative treatment, complete resolution or size reduction was noted during follow-up (1 to 192 months). Conclusions CT and MRI provide clues to the diagnosis of IPT in patients with liver masses and normal tumor markers. However, due to the lack of pathognomonic findings, the clinician's suspicion and histological diagnosis are necessary to make an accurate diagnosis of IPT. PMID:24516702

  17. Endoscopic findings using narrow-band imaging to distinguish between basal cell hyperplasia and carcinoma of the pharynx.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Atsushi; Fujii, Satoshi; Yano, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Narrow-band imaging (NBI) has been reported to be useful for detecting superficial-type esophageal or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and in the present study we have used NBI to detect non-carcinomatous lesions, such as basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) accompanied by microvascular irregularities; these non-carcinomatous lesions were pathologically discriminated from squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx. The aim of the present study was to clarify the endoscopic characteristics of BCH that contribute to the discrimination of superficial-type head and neck SCC (HNSCC). We examined the key endoscopic findings capable of distinguishing BCH from SCC using 26 BCH and 37 superficial-type SCC of the pharynx that had been pathologically diagnosed at our institution between January 2008 and July 2012. The clinicopathological factors were also compared. The size of the BCH lesions was significantly smaller (P < 0.001), and their intervascular transparency was more clearly observed (P < 0.001). Intra-epithelial papillary capillary loop (IPCL) shapes were less variable and monotonous (P < 0.001), and the distribution of the IPCL was more regular with an interval comparable to that of SCC (P < 0.001), although no significant differences in the sharpness of the lesion border, dilatation of IPCL and tortuosity of the IPCL were seen between the BCH and SCC lesions. This study revealed that BCH was an independent entity in terms of not only pathological findings, but also endoscopic findings observed using NBI, such as the regular distribution of IPCL and the preserved intervascular transparency.

  18. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  19. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  20. Expression and misexpression of members of the FGF and TGFbeta families of growth factors in the developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dichmann, Darwin S; Miller, Christopher P; Jensen, Jan; Scott Heller, R; Serup, Palle

    2003-04-01

    We have performed a high-capacity, semiquantitative, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction screen for expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) family genes as well as their cognate receptors. By using cDNA prepared from embryonic day 12 to postnatal day 0 embryonic mouse pancreas, we have identified several factors potentially involved in the development of the endocrine pancreas. We find high-level early expression of TGFbeta-1 and -2, and constitutive expression of TGFbeta-3 and their receptors. Of the Inhibin/Activin members, we found exclusively Inhibin-alpha and Activin-betaB to be expressed, and the BMP family was represented by BMP4, BMP5, and BMP7. The predominant forms of the BMP and Activin type II receptors were ActR-IIB and BMPR-II and of the type I receptors, BMPR-1A and -1B were the highest expressed. FGF1, FGF7, FGF9, FGF10, FGF11, and FGF18 were also expressed in the pancreas at varying time points and levels, as well as FGF receptor forms FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, and FGFR4. To gain insight into the biological function, we misexpressed members of these families in the pancreas by using the early pancreas promoter Pdx1. Misexpression of FGF4 results in disruption of the pancreas morphology with epithelial structures interspersed in stroma tissue. The endocrine compartment was reduced to scattered single cells, and the exocrine consisted of unbranched ductal epithelia with acinar structures budding off. In contrast, misexpression of BMP-6 resulted in complete agenesis of the pancreas and reduced the size of the stomach and spleen dramatically and caused fusion of the liver and duodenum.

  1. Eosinophilic pancreatitis and increased eosinophils in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Susan C; Leach, Steven; Yeo, Charles J; Cameron, John L; Murakata, Linda A; Boitnott, John K; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Hruban, Ralph H

    2003-03-01

    Prominent eosinophilic infiltrates are an unusual finding in the pancreas. Eosinophilic pancreatitis is one rare etiology of pancreatic eosinophilia, but other described causes of eosinophilic infiltrates have also included pancreatic allograft rejection, pancreatic pseudocyst, lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and histiocytosis X. In this study we describe the clinicopathologic features of three new cases of eosinophilic pancreatitis and conduct a retrospective 18-year institutional review of the myriad disease processes associated with pancreatic eosinophilia. In the files of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, <1% of all pancreatic specimens had been noted to show increased numbers of eosinophils. Eosinophilic pancreatitis itself was a rare etiology for pancreatic eosinophilia, with only one in-house case over the 18-year study period and two additional referral cases. Other disease processes associated with prominent eosinophilic infiltrates were more common and included pancreatic allograft rejection (14 cases), LPSP (5 of 24 total LPSP cases evaluated), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (4 cases), and systemic mastocytosis (1 case). Patients with eosinophilic pancreatitis showed two distinct histologic patterns: 1) a diffuse periductal, acinar, and septal eosinophilic infiltrate with eosinophilic phlebitis and arteritis; and 2) localized intense eosinophilic infiltrates associated with pseudocyst formation. All three patients with eosinophilic pancreatitis had peripheral eosinophilia, and all had multiorgan involvement. One patient with LPSP also had marked peripheral eosinophilia, and 5 of 24 LPSP cases demonstrated prominent eosinophilic infiltrates in the gallbladder, biliary tree, and/or duodenum. Notably, not all of these patients with LPSP with prominent eosinophils in other organs had increased eosinophils in the pancreas itself. These results emphasize the infrequent nature of pancreatic eosinophilia and

  2. Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Wang, Huamin; Bhosale, Priya R; Evans, Harry L; Abraham, Susan C

    2015-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) arising in the pancreas is exceedingly rare, with only 11 cases reported in the English literature. All cases described thus far have exhibited benign histology. We report the first case of malignant SFT of the pancreas. The patient was a 52-year-old woman who presented with obstructive jaundice and a 15-cm pancreatic head mass. The mass showed areas with typical histologic features for SFT including small fibroblastlike cells arranged in the well-characterized "patternless pattern" of architecture, hemangiopericytomalike vessels, areas with dense collagen and infrequent mitoses (0-2 per 10 high-power fields [HPFs]). In addition, multiple areas with an overtly sarcomatous morphology were present, containing large spindle and epithelioid cells with nuclear pleomorphism, marked cellularity, up to17 mitoses per 10 HPFs, and necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for CD34 and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in both benign and malignant components and showed strong, diffuse p53 and p16 staining in the malignant component. At last follow-up (40 months), the patient was alive and well without evidence of disease. However, given that the presence of a malignant component in extrapancreatic SFT has been associated with recurrence/metastasis and death, complete surgical resection and close long-term follow-up is required.

  3. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade.

  4. Malignant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Wang, Huamin; Bhosale, Priya R; Evans, Harry L; Abraham, Susan C

    2015-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) arising in the pancreas is exceedingly rare, with only 11 cases reported in the English literature. All cases described thus far have exhibited benign histology. We report the first case of malignant SFT of the pancreas. The patient was a 52-year-old woman who presented with obstructive jaundice and a 15-cm pancreatic head mass. The mass showed areas with typical histologic features for SFT including small fibroblastlike cells arranged in the well-characterized "patternless pattern" of architecture, hemangiopericytomalike vessels, areas with dense collagen and infrequent mitoses (0-2 per 10 high-power fields [HPFs]). In addition, multiple areas with an overtly sarcomatous morphology were present, containing large spindle and epithelioid cells with nuclear pleomorphism, marked cellularity, up to17 mitoses per 10 HPFs, and necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for CD34 and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in both benign and malignant components and showed strong, diffuse p53 and p16 staining in the malignant component. At last follow-up (40 months), the patient was alive and well without evidence of disease. However, given that the presence of a malignant component in extrapancreatic SFT has been associated with recurrence/metastasis and death, complete surgical resection and close long-term follow-up is required. PMID:26166470

  5. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; TORREZ, Franz Robert Apodaca; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; TRIVIÑO, Tarcisio; HERANI-FILHO, Benedito; GOLDENBERG, Alberto; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; LOBO, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. Aim: To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Results: Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. PMID:27438034

  6. Cholecystitis Associated with Heterotopic Pancreas, Pseudopyloric Metaplasia, and Adenomyomatous Hyperplasia: A Rare Combination.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Chander, Bal; Kaur, Harjit; Kaul, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the gall bladder is an uncommon incidental finding in most cases. We hereby describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of acalculous cholecystitis. Pathological examination detected heterotopic pancreatic tissue, pseudopyloric metaplasia, and adenomyomatous hyperplasia in the gall bladder. This is a rare combination of three entities which is being reported for the first time. This case emphasizes that heterotopic pancreas might be the causative factor for cholecystitis. PMID:27365925

  7. Purinergic signalling in the pancreas in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G; Novak, I

    2012-05-01

    Pancreatic cells contain specialised stores for ATP. Purinergic receptors (P2 and P1) and ecto-nucleotidases are expressed in both endocrine and exocrine calls, as well as in stromal cells. The pancreas, especially the endocrine cells, were an early target for the actions of ATP. After the historical perspective of purinergic signalling in the pancreas, the focus of this review will be the physiological functions of purinergic signalling in the regulation of both endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Next, we will consider possible interaction between purinergic signalling and other regulatory systems and their relation to nutrient homeostasis and cell survival. The pancreas is an organ exhibiting several serious diseases - cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and diabetes - and some are associated with changes in life-style and are increasing in incidence. There is upcoming evidence for the role of purinergic signalling in the pathophysiology of the pancreas, and the new challenge is to understand how it is integrated with other pathological processes.

  8. State-of-the-art HR-US imaging findings of the most frequent musculoskeletal soft-tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Gerlig; Riedl, Andreas; Schoepf, Daniel; Glodny, Bernhard; Peer, Siegfried; Gruber, Hannes

    2009-07-01

    High resolution ultrasound (HR-US) including color Doppler ultrasound (CD-US), power Doppler ultrasound (PD-US), and spectral wave analysis (SWA), is a broadly available, non-invasive and relatively low-cost modality without ionizing radiation. It is increasingly used for initial assessment of an ambiguous musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesion and for sonographically guided core biopsy. The aim of this review is to provide sonographic findings of the most frequent benign and malign soft-tissue lesions. By this essay, we can show that combined with clinical features, with information on tumor-localization and patient age, many musculoskeletal lesions may be successfully characterized by HR-US. In contrast, a mere morphologic assignment of some fibrous tumors and malignant lesions remains often impossible; however, certain CD-US signs such as anarchic vascular architecture or arteriovenous shunting may be very helpful indicators for malignancy. HR-US offers a simple, quick, and reliable first-line examination of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions and may have an important role in the diagnostic work-up followed by magnetic resonance or multimodality imaging and guided core biopsy.

  9. Finding a Cold Needle in a Warm Haystack: Infrared Imaging Applied to Locating Cryocooled Crystals in Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M. J.; Miller, M. D.; Deacon, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of inbred imaging to locate crystals mounted in cryoloops and cryopreserved in a nitrogen gas stream at 100K. In the home laboratory crystals are clearly seen in the infrared images with light transmitting through the sample while irradiating the crystal from behind, and with illumination from a direction perpendicular to the direction of view. The crystals transmit and reflect infrared radiation differently from the surrounding mother liquor and loop. Because of differences in contrast between crystals and their surrounding mother liquor, it is possible to clearly identify the crystal position. In use at the synchrotron, with robotically mounted crystals the small depth of field of the lens required the recording of multiple images at different focal points. Image processing techniques were then used to produce a clear image of the crystal. The resulting infrared images and intensity profiles show that infrared imaging can be a powerful complement to visual imaging in locating crystals in cryocooled loops.

  10. Find Good Sources of Online Images: A Picture Doesn't Have to Be a Thousand Searches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    The Internet is a natural place to look for images that teachers can use in lessons and students can use in projects and assignments. Google, Yahoo, AltaVista--many of these popular search engines offer image searching. Usually there is a tab to click at the top of the page to select image searching; just enter a search term and go! However, this…

  11. Diagnosis of early pancreas graft failure via antibody-mediated rejection: single-center experience with 256 pancreas transplantations.

    PubMed

    de Kort, H; Mallat, M J K; van Kooten, C; de Heer, E; Brand-Schaaf, S H; van der Wal, A M; Roufosse, C; Roelen, D L; Bruijn, J A; Claas, F H; de Fijter, J W; Bajema, I M

    2014-04-01

    Early pancreas graft loss is usually attributed to technical failure while the possibility of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is generally overlooked. To investigate the role of AMR in early pancreas graft loss, we retrospectively assessed 256 patients with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) between 1985 and 2010 at our institute. We included 33 SPK patients who lost their pancreas graft <1 year after transplantation. AMR was diagnosed based on donor-specific antibodies, C4d and histology in 7 cases, 8 cases were suspicious for AMR and 18 pancreas graft losses were not due to AMR. Acute AMR occurred >1 month after transplantation in 6/7 cases, whereas all other causes typically led to loss <1 month after transplantation. Thrombotic lesions occurred equally among the 33 cases. In 12/18 concurrent kidney specimens, the diagnostic results paralleled those of the pancreas graft. All patients with acute AMR of the pancreas graft lost their renal grafts <1 year after transplantation. In the setting of a thrombotic event, histopathological analysis of early pancreas graft loss is advisable to rule out the possibility of AMR, particularly because a diagnosis of acute AMR has important consequences for renal graft outcomes.

  12. Subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas combined with ductal obliteration of the distal pancreas in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerremans, R P; Penninckx, F M; De Groote, J; Fevery, J

    1987-01-01

    Subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas combined with duct obliteration of the distal pancreas by prolamine was performed in 12 selected patients who had chronic alcohol-induced pancreatitis with most destruction in the proximal pancreas. The main indication for operation was intractable pain. There was no postoperative mortality but morbidity was high when no pancreaticojejunostomy was constructed. After a follow-up period of 32 months, lasting pain relief was obtained in 10 patients; pseudocyst formation occurred in three patients; calcification of the distal pancreas, absent before operation, was demonstrated in four of six patients; six of 11 nondiabetic patients became hyperglycemic either abruptly (1 patient) or progressively (5 patients); quality of life improved in most patients. This procedure preserves the stomach, duodenum, spleen, distal pancreas and common bile duct if possible. However, pancreatic ductal obliteration with prolamine does not prevent relapses of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:3827358

  13. Clinical findings and white matter abnormalities seen on diffusion tensor imaging in adolescents with very low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Skranes, J; Vangberg, T R; Kulseng, S; Indredavik, M S; Evensen, K A I; Martinussen, M; Dale, A M; Haraldseth, O; Brubakk, A-M

    2007-03-01

    Very low birth weight (VLBW) children are at high risk of perinatal white matter injury, which, when subtle, may not be seen using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship between clinical findings and fractional anisotropy (FA) measurements in white matter of adolescents born prematurely with VLBW was studied in 34 subjects (age = 15 years, birth weight imaging (DTI). Perceptual and cognitive functions were evaluated by visual motor integration (VMI) with supplementary tests and sub-tests from WISC-III, motor function by movement ABC and Grooved Pegboard test and psychiatric symptoms by the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school-age children semistructured interview, the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale IV. Overall functioning was scored on the children's global assessment scale. DTI scans were performed for calculation of FA maps and areas of significant differences in mean FA values between subjects and controls were compared with their clinical data. The VLBW children had reduced FA values in the internal and external capsule, corpus callosum and superior, middle superior and inferior fasciculus. Within this group of children, visual motor and visual perceptual deficits were associated with low FA values in the external capsule, posterior part of the internal capsule and in the inferior fasciculus. Children with low IQ had low FA values in the external capsule and inferior and middle superior fasciculus. Fine motor impairment was related to low FA values in the internal and external capsule and superior fasciculus. Eight VLBW children with inattention symptoms or a diagnosis of ADHD had significantly lower FA values in several areas. Mild social deficits correlated with reduced FA values in the external capsule and superior fasciculus. We

  14. Clinical findings and white matter abnormalities seen on diffusion tensor imaging in adolescents with very low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Skranes, J; Vangberg, T R; Kulseng, S; Indredavik, M S; Evensen, K A I; Martinussen, M; Dale, A M; Haraldseth, O; Brubakk, A-M

    2007-03-01

    Very low birth weight (VLBW) children are at high risk of perinatal white matter injury, which, when subtle, may not be seen using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship between clinical findings and fractional anisotropy (FA) measurements in white matter of adolescents born prematurely with VLBW was studied in 34 subjects (age = 15 years, birth weight imaging (DTI). Perceptual and cognitive functions were evaluated by visual motor integration (VMI) with supplementary tests and sub-tests from WISC-III, motor function by movement ABC and Grooved Pegboard test and psychiatric symptoms by the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school-age children semistructured interview, the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale IV. Overall functioning was scored on the children's global assessment scale. DTI scans were performed for calculation of FA maps and areas of significant differences in mean FA values between subjects and controls were compared with their clinical data. The VLBW children had reduced FA values in the internal and external capsule, corpus callosum and superior, middle superior and inferior fasciculus. Within this group of children, visual motor and visual perceptual deficits were associated with low FA values in the external capsule, posterior part of the internal capsule and in the inferior fasciculus. Children with low IQ had low FA values in the external capsule and inferior and middle superior fasciculus. Fine motor impairment was related to low FA values in the internal and external capsule and superior fasciculus. Eight VLBW children with inattention symptoms or a diagnosis of ADHD had significantly lower FA values in several areas. Mild social deficits correlated with reduced FA values in the external capsule and superior fasciculus. We

  15. Investigation of vascularization of human pancreas using method of selective arteriography with insight into significance to a surgical approach for this organ.

    PubMed

    Kulenovic, Amela; Sarac Hadzihalilovic, Aida

    2010-02-01

    This study explored arterial vascularisation of celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery using method of selective arteriography in series of arteriogram which were done in 39 patients of Institute for Radiology. There were no pathological findings in a single case at pancreas or duodenum. Arteries which arise for vascularization of pancreas had a common spot of arising, flow and ramification. Pancreatic duodenal arteries arcade, which supply blood to the duodenum and the body of the pancreas, were shown in arteriogram. The branches which provide blood supply to the body and the tail of the pancreas were found. There was one case where lower pancreatic artery arose from gastroduodenal artery and in one case a direct anastomosis for celiac trunk and superior mesenteric arteries, better known as Tandler's anastomosis.

  16. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tourlakis, Marina E; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S; Guidos, Cynthia J; Durie, Peter R; Rommens, Johanna M

    2015-06-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15(Ink4b) and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  17. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tourlakis, Marina E; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S; Guidos, Cynthia J; Durie, Peter R; Rommens, Johanna M

    2015-06-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15(Ink4b) and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  18. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tourlakis, Marina E.; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S.; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15Ink4b and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports

    PubMed Central

    Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Kang, Jeansol V.; Marzo, John M.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. Purpose: To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Results: Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Conclusion: Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and

  20. The complex of myxomas, spotty skin pigmentation and endocrine overactivity (Carney complex): imaging findings with clinical and pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Courcoutsakis, Nikos A; Tatsi, Christina; Patronas, Nicholas J; Lee, Chiy-Chia Richard; Prassopoulos, Panos K; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2013-02-01

    The complex of myxomas, spotty skin pigmentation and endocrine overactivity, or Carney complex (CNC), is a familial multiple endocrine neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome. CNC is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and is genetically heterogeneous. Its features overlap those of McCune-Albright syndrome and other multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes. Spotty skin pigmentation is the major clinical manifestation of the syndrome, followed by multicentric heart myxomas, which occur at a young age and are the lethal component of the disease. Myxomas may also occur on the skin (eyelid, external ear canal and nipple) and the breast. Breast myxomas, when present, are multiple and bilateral among female CNC patients, an entity which is also described as "breast-myxomatosis" and is a characteristic feature of the syndrome. Affected CNC patients often have tumours of two or more endocrine glands, including primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), an adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-independent cause of Cushing's syndrome, growth hormone (GH)-secreting and prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas, thyroid adenomas or carcinomas, testicular neoplasms (large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumours [LCCSCT]) and ovarian lesions (cysts and cancinomas). Additional infrequent but characteristic manifestations of CNC are psammomatous melanotic schwannomas (PMS), breast ductal adenomas (DAs) with tubular features, and osteochondromyxomas or "Carney bone tumour". Teaching Points • Almost 60 % of the known CNC kindreds have a germline inactivating mutations in the PRKAR1A gene. • Spotty skin pigmentation is the major clinical manifestation of CNC, followed by heart myxomas. • Indicative imaging signs of PPNAD are contour abnormality and hypodense spots within the gland. • Two breast tumours may present in CNC: myxoid fibroadenomas (breast myxomatosis) and ductal adenomas. • Additional findings of CNC are psammomatous melanotic schwannomas