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Sample records for pancreatic cancer serum

  1. Serum markers and clinical data in diagnosing pancreatic cancer: a contrastive approach.

    PubMed

    Fabris, C; Del Favero, G; Basso, D; Piccoli, A; Meggiato, T; Angonese, C; Plebani, M; Leandro, G; Burlina, A; Naccarato, R

    1988-05-01

    In order to assess the value of serum markers and simple clinical data in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, we studied 32 control subjects and 28 patients with pancreatic cancer, 26 with chronic pancreatitis, and 37 with extra-pancreatic diseases. CA 19-9 was found to be the best marker in detecting pancreatic cancer. Among the clinical data, presence and onset of pain attacks, age, and weight loss were selected as the most informative in assessing chronic pancreatic disease. Clinical data correctly classified 88.5% of chronic pancreatitis and 75.0% of pancreatic cancer; serum markers identified pancreatic tumor in 67.9% of the patients. The adjunct of serum markers to clinical data did not improve accuracy in diagnosing chronic pancreatic disease. Since clinical data and serum markers generally become positive at an advanced stage of the disease, early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is a goal still to be attained.

  2. Prognosis Relevance of Serum Cytokines in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Carolina; Linares, Ana; Alejandre, Maria José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Caba, Octavio; Prados, Jose; Aránega, Antonia; Delgado, Juan R.; Irigoyen, Antonio; Martínez-Galán, Joaquina; Ortuño, Francisco M.; Rojas, Ignacio; Perales, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is extremely low. Although gemcitabine is the standard used chemotherapy for this disease, clinical outcomes do not reflect significant improvements, not even when combined with adjuvant treatments. There is an urgent need for prognosis markers to be found. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential value of serum cytokines to find a profile that can predict the clinical outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer and to establish a practical prognosis index that significantly predicts patients' outcomes. We have conducted an extensive analysis of serum prognosis biomarkers using an antibody array comprising 507 human cytokines. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox's proportional hazard models were used to analyze prognosis factors. To determine the extent that survival could be predicted based on this index, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation model. The multivariate model showed a better performance and it could represent a novel panel of serum cytokines that correlates to poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. B7-1/CD80, EG-VEGF/PK1, IL-29, NRG1-beta1/HRG1-beta1, and PD-ECGF expressions portend a poor prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer and these cytokines could represent novel therapeutic targets for this disease. PMID:26346854

  3. Prognosis Relevance of Serum Cytokines in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina; Linares, Ana; Alejandre, Maria José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J; Caba, Octavio; Prados, Jose; Aránega, Antonia; Delgado, Juan R; Irigoyen, Antonio; Martínez-Galán, Joaquina; Ortuño, Francisco M; Rojas, Ignacio; Perales, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is extremely low. Although gemcitabine is the standard used chemotherapy for this disease, clinical outcomes do not reflect significant improvements, not even when combined with adjuvant treatments. There is an urgent need for prognosis markers to be found. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential value of serum cytokines to find a profile that can predict the clinical outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer and to establish a practical prognosis index that significantly predicts patients' outcomes. We have conducted an extensive analysis of serum prognosis biomarkers using an antibody array comprising 507 human cytokines. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox's proportional hazard models were used to analyze prognosis factors. To determine the extent that survival could be predicted based on this index, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation model. The multivariate model showed a better performance and it could represent a novel panel of serum cytokines that correlates to poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. B7-1/CD80, EG-VEGF/PK1, IL-29, NRG1-beta1/HRG1-beta1, and PD-ECGF expressions portend a poor prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer and these cytokines could represent novel therapeutic targets for this disease.

  4. Serum cytokine profile in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina; Perales, Sonia; Alejandre, María José; Iglesias, José; Palomino, Rogelio J; Martin, Miguel; Caba, Octavio; Prados, José C; Aránega, Antonia; Delgado, Juan R; Irigoyen, Antonio; Ortuño, Francisco M; Rojas, Ignacio; Linares, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly disease because of late diagnosis and chemoresistance. We aimed to find a panel of serum cytokines representing diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. A cytokine antibody array was performed to simultaneously identify 507 cytokines in sera of patients with pancreatic cancer and healthy controls. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to pairwise compare the controls, the pretreated patients, and the posttreated patients. Fold changes greater than or equal to 1.5 or less than or equal to 1/1.5 were considered significant. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the performance of the model. A leave-one-out cross-validation was used for estimating prediction error. Comparing the sera of pretreated patients against the control samples, the cytokines fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF-10/keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11 interferon inducible T cell alpha chemokine (I-TAC)/chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 11 (CXCL11), oncostatin M (OSM), osteoactivin/glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B, and stem cell factor (SCF) were found significantly overexpressed. Besides, the cytokines CD30 ligand/tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 8 (TNFSF8), chordin-like 2, FGF-10/KGF-2, growth/differentiation factor 15, I-TAC/CXCL11, OSM, and SCF were differentially expressed in response to treatment. We propose a role for FGF-10/KGF-2, I-TAC/CXCL11, OSM, osteoactivin/glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B, and SCF as novel diagnostic biomarkers. CD30 ligand/TNFSF8, chordin-like 2, FGF-10/KGF-2, growth/differentiation factor 15, I-TAC/CXCL11, OSM, and SCF might represent as predictive biomarkers for gemcitabine and erlotinib response of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  5. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using serum proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Siegel, Eric R; Petersen, Gloria M; Chari, Suresh T; Suva, Larry J; Haun, Randy S

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, mortality rates from pancreatic cancer (PCa) have not changed significantly over the past 50 years. This is due, in part, to the lack of early detection methods for this particularly aggressive form of cancer. The objective of this study was to use high-throughput protein profiling technology to identify biomarkers in the serum proteome for the early detection of resectable PCa. Using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, protein profiles were generated from sera of 49 PCa patients and 54 unaffected individuals after fractionation on an anion exchange resin. The samples were randomly divided into a training set (69 samples) and test set (34 samples), and two multivariate analysis procedures, classification and regression tree and logistic regression, were used to develop classification models from these spectral data that could distinguish PCa from control serum samples. In the test set, both models correctly classified all of the PCa patient serum samples (100% sensitivity). Using the decision tree algorithm, a specificity of 93.5% was obtained, whereas the logistic regression model produced a specificity of 100%. These results suggest that high-throughput proteomics profiling has the capacity to provide new biomarkers for the early detection and diagnosis of PCa.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  7. Serum Cadmium Levels in Pancreatic Cancer Patients from the East Nile Delta Region of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kriegel, Alison M.; Soliman, Amr S.; Zhang, Qing; El-Ghawalby, Nabih; Ezzat, Farouk; Soultan, Ahmed; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Fathy, Omar; Ebidi, Gamal; Bassiouni, Nadia; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Lacey, Michelle R.; Blake, Diane A.

    2006-01-01

    The northeast Nile Delta region exhibits a high incidence of early-onset pancreatic cancer. It is well documented that this region has one of the highest levels of pollution in Egypt. Epidemiologic studies have suggested that cadmium, a prevalent pollutant in the northeast Nile Delta region, plays a role in the development of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We aimed to assess serum cadmium levels as markers of exposure in pancreatic cancer patients and noncancer comparison subjects from the same region in Egypt. Design and Participants: We assessed serum cadmium levels of 31 newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer patients and 52 hospital comparison subjects from Mansoura, Egypt. Evaluation/Measurements: Serum cadmium levels were measured using a novel immunoassay procedure. Results: We found a significant difference between the mean serum cadmium levels in patients versus comparison subjects (mean ± SD, 11.1 ± 7.7 ng/mL vs. 7.1 ± 5.0 ng/mL, respectively; p = 0.012) but not in age, sex, residence, occupation, or smoking status. The odds ratio (OR) for pancreatic cancer risk was significant for serum cadmium level [OR = 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.23; p = 0.0089] and farming (OR = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.03–11.64; p = 0.0475) but not for age, sex, residence, or smoking status. Conclusions: The results from this pilot study suggest that pancreatic cancer in the East Nile Delta region is significantly associated with high levels of serum cadmium and farming. Relevance to Clinical Practice/Public Health: Future studies should further investigate the etiologic relationship between cadmium exposure and pancreatic carcinogenesis in cadmium-exposed populations. PMID:16393667

  8. Quantitative secretomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells in serum-containing conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Weng, Yejing; Sui, Zhigang; Wu, Yunhao; Meng, Xiangli; Wu, Mengwei; Jin, Haoyi; Tan, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly metastatic and chemo-resistant disease. Secreted proteins involved in cell-cell interactions play an important role in changing the tumor microenvironment. Previous studies generally focus on the secretome of cancer cell line from serum-free media, due to the serious interference of fetal bovine serum (FBS). However, serum-starvation may alter expression patterns of secreted proteins. Hence, efforts to decrease the interference of serum in proteomic analysis of serum-containing media have been hampered to quantitatively measure the tumor secretion levels. Recently, the metabolic labeling, protein equalization, protein fractionation and filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) strategy (MLEFF) has been successfully used to avoid the disturbance of serum on secretome analysis. Here, this efficient method was applied for comparative secretome analysis of two hamster pancreatic cancer cells with differentially metastatic potentials, enabling the observation of 161 differentially expressed proteins, including 106 proteins that had been previously reported and detected in plasma. By integrated analysis of our data and publicly available bioinformatics resources, we found that a combination panel consisting of CDH3, PLAU, and LFNG might improve the prognosis of overall pancreatic cancer survival. These secreted proteins may serve as a potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:27869176

  9. Differences in serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds by occupational social class in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, Miquel Bosch de Basea, Magda; Benavides, Fernando G.; Lopez, Tomas; Fernandez, Esteve; Marco, Esther; Alguacil, Juan; Grimalt, Joan O.; Puigdomenech, Elisa

    2008-11-15

    Background: The relationships between social factors and body concentrations of environmental chemical agents are unknown in many human populations. Some chemical compounds may play an etiopathogenic role in pancreatic cancer. Objective: To analyze the relationships between occupational social class and serum concentrations of seven selected organochlorine compounds (OCs) in exocrine pancreatic cancer: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), 3 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, and {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane. Methods: Incident cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer were prospectively identified, and interviewed face-to-face during hospital admission (n=135). Serum concentrations of OCs were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Social class was classified according to occupation. Results: Multivariate-adjusted concentrations of all seven compounds were higher in occupational social classes IV-V (the less affluent) than in classes I-II; they were higher as well in class III than in classes I-II for four compounds. Concentrations of six OCs were higher in manual workers than in non-manual workers (p<0.05 for PCBs). Social class explained statistically between 3.7% and 5.7% of the variability in concentrations of PCBs, and 2% or less variability in the other OCs. Conclusions: Concentrations of most OCs were higher in the less affluent occupational social classes. In pancreatic cancer the putative causal role of these persistent organic pollutants may not be independent of social class. There is a need to integrate evidence on the contribution of different social processes and environmental chemical exposures to the etiology of pancreatic and other cancers.

  10. Differences in serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds by occupational social class in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Porta, Miquel; Bosch de Basea, Magda; Benavides, Fernando G; López, Tomàs; Fernandez, Esteve; Marco, Esther; Alguacil, Juan; Grimalt, Joan O; Puigdomènech, Elisa

    2008-11-01

    The relationships between social factors and body concentrations of environmental chemical agents are unknown in many human populations. Some chemical compounds may play an etiopathogenic role in pancreatic cancer. To analyze the relationships between occupational social class and serum concentrations of seven selected organochlorine compounds (OCs) in exocrine pancreatic cancer: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), 3 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, and beta-hexachlorocyclohexane. Incident cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer were prospectively identified, and interviewed face-to-face during hospital admission (n=135). Serum concentrations of OCs were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Social class was classified according to occupation. Multivariate-adjusted concentrations of all seven compounds were higher in occupational social classes IV-V (the less affluent) than in classes I-II; they were higher as well in class III than in classes I-II for four compounds. Concentrations of six OCs were higher in manual workers than in non-manual workers (p<0.05 for PCBs). Social class explained statistically between 3.7% and 5.7% of the variability in concentrations of PCBs, and 2% or less variability in the other OCs. Concentrations of most OCs were higher in the less affluent occupational social classes. In pancreatic cancer the putative causal role of these persistent organic pollutants may not be independent of social class. There is a need to integrate evidence on the contribution of different social processes and environmental chemical exposures to the etiology of pancreatic and other cancers.

  11. Serum APN/CD13 as a novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Wang, Dawei; Wang, Guoqing; Meng, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N, also known as CD13, has been reported to be overexpressed in several cancers and may contribute to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether serum APN/CD13 could be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC). Serum APN/CD13 and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels were measured from 382 participants, which comprised of 204 participants with PC, 48 participants with benign pancreatic tumors (BPT), 43 participants with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 87 healthy controls (HC). We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to calculate diagnostic accuracy. The association of serum APN/CD13 levels with the clinicopathological characteristics of PC patients and their survival was investigated. Serum APN/CD13 levels were substantially higher in PC patients than in controls. ROC analysis revealed that APN/CD13 was significantly better than CA19-9 in differentiating patients with PC from controls. Similar results were noted for early-stage PC. Moreover, the combined use of APN/CD13 and CA19-9 data improved the diagnostic accuracy for PC vs. controls, compared with either test alone. High serum APN/CD13 levels were associated with tumor size, lymph nodes, and metastasis (TNM) stage. Multivariate and ROC curve analyses revealed that high serum APN/CD13 level is an independent factor for predicting mortality and overall survival (OS). Moreover, Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated an inverse correlation between increased serum APN/CD13 level and OS. Our study established that serum APN/CD13 may be a novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for PC. PMID:27788483

  12. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cell the cancer develops in. Examples include: Adenocarcinoma, the most common type of pancreatic cancer Other ... idea of what to expect. Treatment Treatment for adenocarcinoma depends on the stage of the tumor. Surgery ...

  13. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  14. Development of serum parameters panels for the early detection of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengjun; Zou, Meng; Wen, Xinyu; Gu, Feng; Li, Juan; Liu, Gaixia; Dong, Jingxiao; Deng, Xinxin; Gao, Jing; Li, Xiaolong; Jia, Xingwang; Dong, Zhennan; Chen, Luonan; Wang, Yong; Tian, Yaping

    2014-06-01

    Early detection of pancreatic cancer is promising for improving clinical outcome; however, no effective biomarker has yet been identified. Here, we detected 61 clinical serum parameters in 200 healthy controls (Ctrls), 163 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 109 benign pancreatitis patients (Benign) in the training group. A metropolis algorithm with Monte Carlo simulation was used for identifying parameter panels. Sera from 183 Ctrl, 129 PDAC and 95 Benign individuals were used for cross-validation. Samples from 77 breast, 72 cervical, 101 colorectal, 138 gastric, 108 prostate and 132 lung cancer patients were collected for evaluating cancer selectivity. A panel consisting of carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9, albumin (ALB), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-8 had the highest diagnostic value for discriminating between PDAC and Ctrl. The sensitivity (SN) was 99.39% for all-stage, 96.10% for early-stage and 98.80% for advanced-stage PDAC at 90% specificity (SP). In the validation group, the sensitivities were 93.80, 93.10 and 94.40%, respectively, at 90% SP. This panel also identified 80.52% of the breast cancer, 66.67% cervical cancer, 86.14% colorectal cancer, 89.86% gastric cancer, 71.30% prostate cancer and 93.85% lung cancer samples as non-PDAC. The panel consisting of CA19-9, carbon dioxide, CRP and IL-6 panel had the highest diagnostic value for discriminating between PDAC and Benign. The SN was 74.23% for all-stage, 75.30% for early-stage and 74.40% for advanced-stage PDAC at 90% SP. In the validation group, the sensitivities were 72.10, 76.10 and 67.20%, respectively, at 90% SP. Our parameter panels may aid in the early detection of PDAC to improve clinical outcome.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Single Amino Acid Variant Peptides Associated with Pancreatic Cancer in Serum by an Isobaric Labeling Quantitative Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single amino acid variations are highly associated with many human diseases. The direct detection of peptides containing single amino acid variants (SAAVs) derived from nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in serum can provide unique opportunities for SAAV associated biomarker discovery. In the present study, an isobaric labeling quantitative strategy was applied to identify and quantify variant peptides in serum samples of pancreatic cancer patients and other benign controls. The largest number of SAAV peptides to date in serum including 96 unique variant peptides were quantified in this quantitative analysis, of which five variant peptides showed a statistically significant difference between pancreatic cancer and other controls (p-value < 0.05). Significant differences in the variant peptide SDNCEDTPEAGYFAVAVVK from serotransferrin were detected between pancreatic cancer and controls, which was further validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. The novel biomarker panel obtained by combining α-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1) and this variant peptide showed an excellent diagnostic performance in discriminating pancreatic cancer from healthy controls (AUC = 0.98) and chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.90). These results suggest that large-scale analysis of SAAV peptides in serum may provide a new direction for biomarker discovery research. PMID:25393578

  16. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Randall E.

    2007-01-01

    Despite improvements in the clinical and surgical management of pancreatic cancer, limited strides have been made in the early detection of this highly lethal malignancy. The majority of localized pancreatic tumors are asymptomatic, and the recognized presenting symptoms of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are often vague and heterogeneous in nature. These factors, coupled with the lack of a sensitive and noninvasive screening method, have made population-based screening for pancreatic cancer impossible. Nevertheless, at least two large institutions have performed multimodality-screening protocols for individuals with high risk of pancreatic cancer based on genetic predisposition and strong family history. Abnormalities noted during these screening protocols prompted further investigation or surgery that resulted in the discovery of benign, potentially malignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions. In addition to ductal epithelial pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, greater sensitivity has recently been achieved in the identification and characterization of precancerous mucinous pancreatic tumors. Advancements in proteomics and DNA microarray technology may confirm serum-based biomarkers that could be incorporated into future screening algorithms for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21960811

  17. Serum Pepsinogen level, Atrophic Gastritis and the Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer – a Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Kamangar, Farin; Marcus, Pamela M.; Taylor, Philip R.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a highly fatal disease without screening tests. Studies have suggested possible etiologic similarities between gastric and pancreatic cancers. Atrophic gastritis, a pre-malignant condition for gastric cancer, is characterized by low serum pepsinogen I (SPGI) level. We hypothesized that low SPGI level may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and be a useful biomarker for the disease. Methods Our analytic cohort included 20,962 participants in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC) who had SPGI level measured. Of these, 1,663 (7.9%) subjects had low SPGI levels (<25 μg/l) and were invited for gastroscopy which was completed in 1,059 (63.7%) participants. Atrophic gastritis was histologically-confirmed in 1,006 (95.0%) subjects. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pancreatic cancer. Results During follow-up of up to 16.3 years (mean=10.8 years; 226,325 person-years), 227 incident pancreatic cancers were diagnosed. The incidence rates were 9.9, 11.3, and 12.7 per 10,000 person-years of follow-up for participants with normal pepsinogen level (≥25 μg/l), low pepsinogen level and histologically-confirmed atrophic gastritis, respectively. Compared to subjects with normal pepsinogen levels, there was no statistically significant increased risk of pancreatic cancer among subjects with low pepsinogen level (Adjusted HR=1.01; 95%CI: 0.63–1.62) or those with histologically-confirmed atrophic gastritis (Adjusted HR=1.13; 95%CI: 0.66–1.95). Conclusions Atrophic gastritis, serological or histological, is not associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These findings do not provide any evidence for potential usefulness of SPGI for pancreatic cancer screening. PMID:19800305

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  19. Definitive Characterization of CA 19-9 in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Using a Reference Set of Serum and Plasma Specimens.

    PubMed

    Haab, Brian B; Huang, Ying; Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Partyka, Katie; Tang, Huiyuan; Anderson, Michelle; Allen, Peter; Sasson, Aaron; Zeh, Herbert; Kaul, Karen; Kletter, Doron; Ge, Shaokui; Bern, Marshall; Kwon, Richard; Blasutig, Ivan; Srivastava, Sudhir; Frazier, Marsha L; Sen, Subrata; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Rinaudo, Jo Ann; Killary, Ann M; Brand, Randall E

    2015-01-01

    The validation of candidate biomarkers often is hampered by the lack of a reliable means of assessing and comparing performance. We present here a reference set of serum and plasma samples to facilitate the validation of biomarkers for resectable pancreatic cancer. The reference set includes a large cohort of stage I-II pancreatic cancer patients, recruited from 5 different institutions, and relevant control groups. We characterized the performance of the current best serological biomarker for pancreatic cancer, CA 19-9, using plasma samples from the reference set to provide a benchmark for future biomarker studies and to further our knowledge of CA 19-9 in early-stage pancreatic cancer and the control groups. CA 19-9 distinguished pancreatic cancers from the healthy and chronic pancreatitis groups with an average sensitivity and specificity of 70-74%, similar to previous studies using all stages of pancreatic cancer. Chronic pancreatitis patients did not show CA 19-9 elevations, but patients with benign biliary obstruction had elevations nearly as high as the cancer patients. We gained additional information about the biomarker by comparing two distinct assays. The two CA 9-9 assays agreed well in overall performance but diverged in measurements of individual samples, potentially due to subtle differences in antibody specificity as revealed by glycan array analysis. Thus, the reference set promises be a valuable resource for biomarker validation and comparison, and the CA 19-9 data presented here will be useful for benchmarking and for exploring relationships to CA 19-9.

  20. Definitive Characterization of CA 19-9 in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Using a Reference Set of Serum and Plasma Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Haab, Brian B.; Huang, Ying; Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Partyka, Katie; Tang, Huiyuan; Anderson, Michelle; Allen, Peter; Sasson, Aaron; Zeh, Herbert; Kaul, Karen; Kletter, Doron; Ge, Shaokui; Bern, Marshall; Kwon, Richard; Blasutig, Ivan; Srivastava, Sudhir; Frazier, Marsha L.; Sen, Subrata; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Rinaudo, Jo Ann; Killary, Ann M.; Brand, Randall E.

    2015-01-01

    The validation of candidate biomarkers often is hampered by the lack of a reliable means of assessing and comparing performance. We present here a reference set of serum and plasma samples to facilitate the validation of biomarkers for resectable pancreatic cancer. The reference set includes a large cohort of stage I-II pancreatic cancer patients, recruited from 5 different institutions, and relevant control groups. We characterized the performance of the current best serological biomarker for pancreatic cancer, CA 19–9, using plasma samples from the reference set to provide a benchmark for future biomarker studies and to further our knowledge of CA 19–9 in early-stage pancreatic cancer and the control groups. CA 19–9 distinguished pancreatic cancers from the healthy and chronic pancreatitis groups with an average sensitivity and specificity of 70–74%, similar to previous studies using all stages of pancreatic cancer. Chronic pancreatitis patients did not show CA 19–9 elevations, but patients with benign biliary obstruction had elevations nearly as high as the cancer patients. We gained additional information about the biomarker by comparing two distinct assays. The two CA 9–9 assays agreed well in overall performance but diverged in measurements of individual samples, potentially due to subtle differences in antibody specificity as revealed by glycan array analysis. Thus, the reference set promises be a valuable resource for biomarker validation and comparison, and the CA 19–9 data presented here will be useful for benchmarking and for exploring relationships to CA 19–9. PMID:26431551

  1. Extracellular matrix specific protein fingerprints measured in serum can separate pancreatic cancer patients from healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive disease with an urgent need for biomarkers. Hallmarks of PC include increased collagen deposition (desmoplasia) and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether protein fingerprints of specific MMP-generated collagen fragments differentiate PC patients from healthy controls when measured in serum. Methods The levels of biomarkers reflecting MMP-mediated degradation of type I (C1M), type III (C3M) and type IV (C4M, C4M12a1) collagen were assessed in serum samples from PC patients (n = 15) and healthy controls (n = 33) using well-characterized and validated competitive ELISAs. Results The MMP-generated collagen fragments were significantly elevated in serum from PC patients as compared to controls. The diagnostic power of C1M, C3M, C4M and C4M12 were ≥83% (p < 0.001) and when combining all biomarkers 99% (p < 0.0001). Conclusions A panel of serum biomarkers reflecting altered MMP-mediated collagen turnover is able to differentiate PC patients from healthy controls. These markers may increase the understanding of mode of action of the disease and, if validated in larger clinical studies, provide an improved and additional tool in the PC setting. PMID:24261855

  2. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  3. Increased serum levels of betatrophin in pancreatic cancer-associated diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Purnomo, Jerry D.T.; Chen, Shu-Fan; Wang, Chih-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Long-standing diabetes or glucose intolerance is recognized as a crucial event in the process of pancreatic cancer. Betatrophin, a novel liver-derived hormone, promotes β-cell proliferation and improves glucose intolerance. However, the relationship between betatrophin and PDAC-associated diabetes is not fully understood. To evaluate the serum betatrophin levels in PDAC-associated diabetes, a total 105 Taiwanese subjects including 15 healthy subjects, and 12 patients having PDAC with normal glucose tolerance (PDAC-NGT), 12 patients having PC with impaired glucose tolerance (PDAC-IGT), and 66 patients having PC with diabetes mellitus (PDAC-DM) were enrolled for this study. Serum betatrophin and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared to healthy subjects, PDAC patients had higher levels of betatrophin and CA19-9. Consistently, betatrophin protein was significantly expressed in pancreatic ductal of PDAC-associated DM patients using immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis showed the betatrophin was significantly and positively independent with T category (β= 0.605, P=0.010), serum albumin (β= 0. 423, P=0.021), lipase (β= 0.292, P=0.039), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (β= 0.303, P=0.040). Further, the betatrophin was three folds of having PDAC-associated diabetes with the highest odds ratio [OR=3.39; 95% CI (1.20–9.57); P=0.021) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that AUC value of betarophin was 0.853 which is slightly larger than AUC value of CA19-9 (0.792) in PDAC-DM patients. Interestingly, AUC value of betarophin plus CA19-9 was 0.988 in PDAC-DM patients. Therefore, betatrophin combined CA19-9 may serve as a potential biomarker for PDAC-associated diabetes. PMID:27276680

  4. Increased serum levels of betatrophin in pancreatic cancer-associated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Susanto, Hendra; Liu, Ta-Yu; Chen, Chang-Chiang; Purnomo, Jerry D T; Chen, Shu-Fan; Wang, Chih-Hong

    2016-07-05

    Long-standing diabetes or glucose intolerance is recognized as a crucial event in the process of pancreatic cancer. Betatrophin, a novel liver-derived hormone, promotes β-cell proliferation and improves glucose intolerance. However, the relationship between betatrophin and PDAC-associated diabetes is not fully understood. To evaluate the serum betatrophin levels in PDAC-associated diabetes, a total 105 Taiwanese subjects including 15 healthy subjects, and 12 patients having PDAC with normal glucose tolerance (PDAC-NGT), 12 patients having PC with impaired glucose tolerance (PDAC-IGT), and 66 patients having PC with diabetes mellitus (PDAC-DM) were enrolled for this study. Serum betatrophin and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared to healthy subjects, PDAC patients had higher levels of betatrophin and CA19-9. Consistently, betatrophin protein was significantly expressed in pancreatic ductal of PDAC-associated DM patients using immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis showed the betatrophin was significantly and positively independent with T category (β= 0.605, P=0.010), serum albumin (β= 0. 423, P=0.021), lipase (β= 0.292, P=0.039), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (β= 0.303, P=0.040). Further, the betatrophin was three folds of having PDAC-associated diabetes with the highest odds ratio [OR=3.39; 95% CI (1.20-9.57); P=0.021) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that AUC value of betarophin was 0.853 which is slightly larger than AUC value of CA19-9 (0.792) in PDAC-DM patients. Interestingly, AUC value of betarophin plus CA19-9 was 0.988 in PDAC-DM patients. Therefore, betatrophin combined CA19-9 may serve as a potential biomarker for PDAC-associated diabetes.

  5. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  6. Isoenzymes A and B of N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase in serum and urine of patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Snarska, Jadwiga; Jankowska, Anna; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent malignant tumor of the pancreas. Biochemical diagnostics of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is based on determination of carcinoma antigen (CA 19-9) in the blood. Determination of N-acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase (HEX) in the serum and urine was used in diagnosis of renal and gastric cancers. Therefore the aim of our research was to estimate N-acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase (HEX) and its isoenzymes (HEX A and HEX B) in the serum and urine as potential markers of pancreatic cancer. Serum and urine samples were collected from 15 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and 15 healthy persons. The activity of N-acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase and its isoenzymes (A and B) was determined by a colorimetric method of Zwierz et al. Absorbancy of the yellow product of the colorimetric reaction was determined on the microplate reader EL(x)800 produced by BIO-TEK. The concentration of HEX, HEX A and B was expressed in pKat/mL, and the specific activity in pKat/mg of protein. Protein concentration was determined in the serum by the biuret and in the urine by the Lowry method, respectively, and expressed in mg/mL. The concentration and specific activity of HEX and its isoenzyme A were significantly higher in the serum and urine of pancreatic cancer patients in comparison with the concentration and specific activity in the serum and urine of healthy people. The results suggest that the activity of HEX and its isoenzyme A determined in the serum and urine can be used as a potential marker of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  7. Carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and the sixth in Europe. Pancreatic cancer is more frequent in males than females. Worldwide, following diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, <2% of patients survive for 5 years, 8% survive for 2 years and <50% survive for only approx. 3 months. The biggest risk factor in pancreatic cancer is age, with a peak of morbidity at 65 years. Difficulty in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer causes a delay in its detection. It is one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose and therefore to treat successfully. Additional detection of carbohydrate markers may offer a better diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate markers of cancer may be produced by the cancer itself or by the body in response to cancer, whose presence in body fluids suggests the presence and growth of the cancer. The most widely used, and best-recognized, carbohydrate marker of pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9 [CA (carbohydrate antigen) 19-9]. However, the relatively non-specific nature of CA 19-9 limits its routine use in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but it may be useful in monitoring treatment of pancreatic cancer (e.g. the effectiveness of chemotherapy), as a complement to other diagnostic methods. Some other carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer may be considered, such as CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), CA 50 and CA 242, and the mucins MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC, but enzymes involved in the processing of glycoconjugates could also be involved. Our preliminary research shows that the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases, including HEX (N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase), GAL (β-D-galactosidase), FUC (α-L-fucosidase) and MAN (α-D-mannosidase), in serum and urine may be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with 4% survival 5 years after diagnosis. Biomarkers are desperately needed to improve earlier, more curable cancer diagnosis and to develop new effective therapeutic targets. The development of quantitative proteomics technologies in recent years offers great promise for understanding the complex molecular events of tumorigenesis at the protein level, and has stimulated great interest in applying the technology for pancreatic cancer studies. Proteomic studies of pancreatic tissues, juice, serum/plasma, and cell lines have recently attempted to identify differentially expressed proteins in pancreatic cancer to dissect the abnormal signaling pathways underlying oncogenesis, and to detect new biomarkers. It can be expected that the continuing evolution of proteomics technology with better resolution and sensitivity will greatly enhance our capability in combating pancreatic cancer. PMID:18633454

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  10. Characterization of apolipoprotein and apolipoprotein precursors in pancreatic cancer serum samples via two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Anderson, Michelle; Misek, David E.; Simeone, Diane M.; Lubman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Major advances in cancer control depend upon early detection, early diagnosis and efficacious treatment modalities. Current existing markers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, generally incurable by available treatment modalities, are inadequate for early diagnosis or for distinguishing between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. We have used a proteomic approach to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in sera from pancreatic cancer patients, as compared to control. Normal, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer serum samples were depleted of high molecular weight proteins by acetonitrile precipitation. Each sample was separated by chromatofocusing, and then further resolved by reversed-phase (RP)-HPLC. Effluent from the RP-HPLC column was split into two streams with one directly interfaced to an electrospray time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometer for MW determination of the intact proteins. The remainder went through a UV detector with the corresponding peaks collected with a fraction collector, subsequently used for MS/MS analysis. The ion intensities of proteins with the same MW obtained from ESI-TOF-MS analysis were compared, with the differentially expressed proteins determined. An 8915 Da protein was found to be up-regulated while a 9422 Da protein was down-regulated in the pancreatic cancer sera. Both proteins were identified by MS and MS/MS as proapolipoprotein C-II and apolipoprotein C-III1, respectively. The MS/MS data of proapolipoprotein C-II was searched using “semi-trypsin” as the search enzyme, thus confirming that the protein at 8915 Da was proapolipoprotein C-II. In order to confirm the identity of the protein at 9422 Da, we initially identified a protein of 8765 Da with a similar mass spectral pattern. Based on MS and MS/MS, its intact molecular weight and “semi-trypsin” database search, the protein at 8765 Da was identified as apolipoprotein C-III0. The MS and MS/MS data of the proteins at 8765 Da and 9422

  11. Serum Concentrations of Selenium and Copper in Patients Diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lener, Marcin R.; Scott, Rodney J.; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Serrano-Fernández, Pablo; Baszuk, Piotr; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Marciniak, Wojciech; Muszyńska, Magdalena; Kładny, Józef; Gromowski, Tomasz; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is still insufficient. This study evaluated the associations between concentrations of selenium (Se) and copper (Cu) in the serum of PaCa patients. Materials and Methods The study included 100 PaCa patients and 100 control subjects from the same geographical region in Poland. To determine the average concentration of Se, Cu, and ratio Cu:Se in the Polish population, assay for Se and Cu was performed in 480 healthy individuals. Serum levels of Se and Cu were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results In the control group, the average Se level was 76 µg/L and Cu 1,098 µg/L. The average Se level among PaCa patients was 60 µg/L and the mean Cu level was 1,432 µg/L. The threshold point at which any decrease in Se concentration was associated with PaCa was 67.45 µg/L. The threshold point of Cu level above which there was an increase in the prevalence of PaCa was 1,214.58 µg/L. In addition, a positive relationship was observed between increasing survival time and Se plasma level. Conclusion This retrospective study suggests that low levels of Se and high levels of Cu might influence development of PaCa and that higher levels of Se are associated with longer survival in patients with PaCa. The results suggest that determining the level of Se and Cu could be incorporated into a risk stratification scheme for the selection and surveillance control examination to complement existing screening and diagnostic procedures. PMID:26727715

  12. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  13. Relationships between occupational history and serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds in exocrine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bosch de Basea, Magda; Porta, Miquel; Alguacil, Joan; Puigdomènech, Elisa; Gasull, Magda; Garrido, José A; López, Tomàs

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies investigating associations between occupational history and risk of exocrine pancreatic cancer (EPC) did not use biomarkers of exposure. The only two studies that measured internal concentrations of organochlorine compounds (OCs) in EPC did not analyse their relationship with occupation. To analyse the relationship between occupational history and blood concentrations of seven OCs in patients with EPC. Incident cases of EPC were prospectively identified, and during hospital admission were interviewed face-to-face on occupational history and life-style factors (n = 135). Occupations were coded according to the International Standard of Occupations 1988. Some occupational exposures were also assessed with the Finnish job-exposure matrix (Finjem). Serum concentrations of OCs were analysed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Craftsmen and related trades workers had significantly higher concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners 138, 153 and 180. Years worked in agriculture did not influence concentrations of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, hexachlorobenzene or β-hexachlorocyclohexane. Subjects who ever worked in agriculture had lower concentrations of PCBs (all p < 0.05). Occupational exposure to lead, nickel and low frequency magnetic fields was significantly associated with higher concentrations of PCBs. Certain occupations were associated with higher concentrations of PCBs, suggesting that these compounds may account for some increased risks found in previous studies. The lack of association between work in agriculture and concentrations of OC pesticides is consistent with occupation playing a lesser role than diet in influencing OC concentrations. Occupational studies on the relationships among exposure to industrial agents and EPC risk may need to consider adjusting for exposure to PCBs.

  14. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  15. Automated electrorotation shows electrokinetic separation of pancreatic cancer cells is robust to acquired chemotherapy resistance, serum starvation, and EMT.

    PubMed

    Lannin, Timothy; Su, Wey-Wey; Gruber, Conor; Cardle, Ian; Huang, Chao; Thege, Fredrik; Kirby, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We used automated electrorotation to measure the cytoplasmic permittivity, cytoplasmic conductivity, and specific membrane capacitance of pancreatic cancer cells under environmental perturbation to evaluate the effects of serum starvation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and evolution of chemotherapy resistance which may be associated with the development and dissemination of cancer. First, we compared gemcitabine-resistant BxPC3 subclones with gemcitabine-naive parental cells. Second, we serum-starved BxPC3 and PANC-1 cells and compared them to untreated counterparts. Third, we induced the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in PANC-1 cells and compared them to untreated PANC-1 cells. We also measured the electrorotation spectra of white blood cells isolated from a healthy donor. The properties from fit electrorotation spectra were used to compute dielectrophoresis (DEP) spectra and crossover frequencies. For all three experiments, the median crossover frequency for both treated and untreated pancreatic cancer cells remained significantly lower than the median crossover frequency for white blood cells. The robustness of the crossover frequency to these treatments indicates that DEP is a promising technique for enhancing capture of circulating cancer cells.

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1200 View Download Large: 2400x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  18. Serum B6 vitamers (pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxal, and 4-pyridoxic acid) and pancreatic cancer risk: two nested case-control studies in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Joyce Y; Butler, Lesley M; Midttun, Øivind; Koh, Woon-Puay; Ueland, Per M; Wang, Renwei; Jin, Aizhen; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin B6 is an important enzymatic cofactor in pathways relevant for the development of pancreatic cancer. In order to evaluate vitamin B6 as a preventive factor for pancreatic cancer, a biomarker approach is needed to overcome the limitations inherent in self-reported dietary information. To determine whether levels of serum B6 vitamers, including pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), pyridoxal (PL), 4-pyridoxic acid (PA), and the PA/(PLP + PL) ratio (PAr), were associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, two nested case-control studies of 187 incident pancreatic cancer cases and 258 individually matched controls were conducted within two prospective cohorts of 81,501 participants in Shanghai, China, and Singapore. PLP, PL, and PA were quantified in pre-diagnostic serum samples. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. The median (5th-95th percentiles) concentrations of serum PLP among control subjects of the Shanghai and Singapore cohorts were 25.7 (10.0-91.7) nmol/L and 58.1 (20.8-563.0) nmol/L, respectively. In pooled analyses, high serum PLP was associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (P for trend = 0.048); the adjusted odds ratio for the highest category of PLP (>52.4 nmol/L) was 0.46 (95% CI 0.23, 0.92) compared to vitamin B6 deficiency (<20 nmol/L). No associations were found for serum PL, PA, or PAr with pancreatic cancer risk. Higher concentrations of PLP may protect against the development of pancreatic cancer. The protective effect may be more apparent in populations with low concentrations of circulating vitamin B6.

  19. Glycosylation of serum ribonuclease 1 indicates a major endothelial origin and reveals an increase in core fucosylation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barrabés, Sílvia; Pagès-Pons, Lluís; Radcliffe, Catherine M; Tabarés, Glòria; Fort, Esther; Royle, Louise; Harvey, David J; Moenner, Michel; Dwek, Raymond A; Rudd, Pauline M; De Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2007-04-01

    Human pancreatic ribonuclease 1 (RNase 1) is a glycoprotein expressed mainly by the pancreas and also found in endothelial cells. The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PaC) remains difficult and therefore the search for sensitive and specific markers is required. Previous studies showed that RNase 1 from human healthy pancreas contained only neutral glycans, whereas RNase 1 from PaC cell lines contained sialylated structures. To determine whether these glycan tumor cell-associated changes were also characteristic of serum RNase 1 and could be used as a marker of PaC, we have analyzed the glycosylation of serum RNase 1. The origin of serum RNase 1 was also investigated. Serum RNase 1 from two PaC patients and two controls was purified and the glycans analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based sequencing and mass spectrometry. Although normal and tumor serum RNase 1 contained the same glycan structures, there was an increase of 40% in core fucosylation in the main sialylated biantennary glycans in the PaC serum RNase 1. This change in proportion would be indicative of a subset of tumor-associated glycoforms of RNase 1, which may provide a biomarker for PaC. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of the RNase 1 from several endothelial cell lines, EA.hy926, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), human mammary microvessel endothelial cells (HuMMEC), and human lung microvessel endothelial cells (HuLEC), showed basically the same pattern and was also very similar to that of serum RNase 1. RNase 1 from EA.hy926 was then purified and presented a glycosylation profile very similar to that from serum RNase 1, suggesting that endothelial cells are the main source of this enzyme.

  20. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  1. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, T; Chari, S T

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is complex. Diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance is present in more than 2/3rd of pancreatic cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown a modest increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes, with an inverse relationship to duration of disease. Additionally, recent studies suggest that anti-diabetic medications may modulate the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes. Subjects >50 years of age with new onset diabetes are at higher risk of having pancreatic cancer. However, to screen new-onset diabetes for pancreatic cancer, additional markers are needed that can distinguish pancreatic cancer-associated diabetes from type 2 diabetes.

  2. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Das, Koushik K; Early, Dayna

    2017-09-06

    This review describes the rationale for pancreatic cancer screening, outlines groups that are at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer, and summarizes the relative risk in each setting. We also review the methods available for performing pancreatic cancer screening and the recommended screening intervals. Several genetic mutations have been identified that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Most are rare, however, and at-risk individuals are most often those with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer (with multiple family members affected) but no identifiable genetic mutation. Known genetic syndromes that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer include hereditary pancreatitis, familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Lynch syndrome, BRCA mutations, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic testing should be performed in conjunction with genetic counseling, and testing of an affected family member is preferred if possible.The goal of pancreatic cancer screening is to identify pancreatic cancer at an early, curable stage or, ideally, to identify precancerous lesions that can be resected to prevent the development of cancer. Imaging can be performed with either endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). These techniques are generally considered to be complementary, although an advantage of EUS is that cysts or solid lesions can be sampled at the time of the procedure. Published results of small cohorts of high-risk patients in pancreatic cancer screening programs have demonstrated a high prevalence of small cystic lesions identified on EUS or MRCP, which often represent side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Knowledge of conditions and syndromes that increase pancreatic cancer risk allows one to identify those patients that may benefit from pancreatic cancer screening. As we gather evidence from large, international, multicenter cohorts of patients at high-risk for pancreatic

  4. Serum soluble fas levels and superoxide dismutase activity and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer: A nested case-control study within the Japanese Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingsong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Ishibashi, Teruo; Kurosawa, Michiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    In a search for novel circulating biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we examined the association between serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer in a nested case-control study within the Japanese Collaborative Cohort Study. Case subjects were 68 persons who were free of morbidity, had provided a blood sample at baseline (1988-1990), and subsequently died from pancreatic cancer before December 31, 1997. Control subjects were 199 matched persons who were selected from the remaining participants in the cohort. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No statistically significant differences were noted in mean sFas levels (p=0.11) and SOD activity (p=0.42) between cases and controls. Overall, neither serum sFas levels nor SOD activity were associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer deaths, after adjustment for area, BMI, cigarette smoking, and history of diabetes. Furthermore, no significant risk trends were noted. Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum sFas levels and SOD activity are associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics.

    PubMed

    Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

  7. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  8. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... or definitely will get) pancreatic cancer. Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  9. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grzeszczuk, Agnieszka; Zwierz, Zbigniew Wojciech; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Szczesiul, Jakub; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Ościłowicz, Krystyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society. PMID:28435395

  11. Prevention of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuroczycki-Saniutycz, Stefan; Grzeszczuk, Agnieszka; Zwierz, Zbigniew Wojciech; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Szczesiul, Jakub; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Ościłowicz, Krystyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  12. Serum lactate dehydrogenase predicts prognosis and correlates with systemic inflammatory response in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shu-Lin; Xu, Li-Tao; Qi, Qi; Geng, Ya-Wen; Chen, Hao; Meng, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentrations correlate with tumor progression and poor outcome. We evaluated the predictive value of serum LDH level for overall survival (OS) of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. We retrospectively enrolled 364 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were then allocated to training (n = 139) and validation cohorts (n = 225). We evaluated the association between serum LDH levels and OS as well as with markers of systemic inflammation, including neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR). Kaplan–Meier analyses revealed that low serum LDH levels in the training cohort significantly correlated with longer OS. Multivariate analysis identified the serum LDH levels as an independent prognostic predictor of OS (p = 0.005). Serum LDH levels correlated positively with NLR and PLR and correlated negatively with LMR. Similar results were obtained for the validation cohort, except that multivariate analysis identified the serum LDH level as a significant prognostic predictor and only a statistical trend for OS (p = 0.059). We conclude that serum LDH levels were associated with the systemic inflammatory response and served as a significant prognostic predictor of OS. Serum LDH levels predicted OS in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based palliative chemotherapy. PMID:28345594

  13. Immunoglobulin G4, autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bojková, Martina; Dítě, Petr; Dvořáčková, Jana; Novotný, Ivo; Floreánová, Katarina; Kianička, Bohuslav; Uvírová, Magdalena; Martínek, Arnošt

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related diseases are a group of diseases characterized by enlargement of the affected organs, elevation of serum IgG4, massive infiltration of affected organs with lymphocytes and plasma cells with IgG4 positivity and tissue fibrosis. Type I autoimmune pancreatitis is one form of IgG4-related disease. For IgG4-related diseases, various localizations are described for up to 10% of malignancies. The aim of our study was to examine IgG4 serum levels and pancreatic tissue with respect to the simultaneous presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer. IgG4 serum levels were examined In 106 patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer. The level of 135 mg/dl was considered as the normal value. Pancreatic tissue was histologically examined with respect to the presence of markers of autoimmune pancreatitis. A higher IgG4 level than the cut-off value of 135 mg/dl was proven in 11 patients with pancreatic cancer. Of these 11 patients, 7 had levels twice the normal limit (65.6%). Autoimmune pancreatitis was diagnosed in these individuals. In the case of 1 patient, it was basically an unexpected finding; another patient was initially diagnosed with autoimmune pancreatitis. Repeated biopsy of the pancreas at the time of diagnosis did not confirm the presence of tumour structures, therefore steroid therapy was started. At a check-up 6 months after starting steroid therapy, the condition of the patient improved subjectively and IgG4 levels decreased. However, endosonographically, malignancy was suspected, which was subsequently confirmed histologically. This patient also demonstrated an IgG4 level twice the normal limit. IgG4-related diseases can be accompanied by the simultaneous occurrence of malignancies, which also applies to autoimmune pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. It cannot be reliably confirmed whether this also applies to autoimmune pancreatitis. In

  14. Metabolomics evaluation of serum markers for cachexia and their intra-day variation in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takashi; Chayahara, Naoko; Imamura, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Minami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by progressive loss of weight and muscle atrophy. Using metabolomics, we investigated serum markers and their intra-day variation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients with cachexia. Patients were enrolled in two groups: those with or without cachexia. Blood samples collected at 6:30 AM, 11:30 AM, 4:30 PM, and 9:30 PM were analyzed using metabolomics, and serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and leptin were measured and compared between the two groups. Intra-day variation was then evaluated. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in total. In the cachexia group (n = 9), median body weight loss rate over 6 months was greater, performance status was poorer, and anorexia was more severe than in the non-cachexia group (n = 12). Each metabolites level showed substantial intra-day variation, and some of them displayed significant differences between the two groups. Levels of paraxanthine remained markedly lower in the cohort with cachexia at all measurement points. Besides, median IL-6 and TNF-α levels appeared higher and leptin concentration appeared lower in the cachexia group, albeit without statistical significance. Some metabolites and some serological marker levels were affected by cancer cachexia. Although paraxanthine levels were consistently lower in patients with cachexia, we identified that many metabolites indicated large intra- and inter-day variation and that it might be necessary to pay attention to intra-day variation in metabolomics research.

  15. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11th most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied considerably in the world. A known cause of pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking. This risk factor is likely to explain some of the international variations and gender differences. The overall five-year survival rate is about 6% (ranges from 2% to 9%), but this vary very small between developed and developing countries. To date, the causes of pancreatic cancer are still insufficiently known, although certain risk factors have been identified, such as smoking, obesity, genetics, diabetes, diet, inactivity. There are no current screening recommendations for pancreatic cancer, so primary prevention is of utmost importance. A better understanding of the etiology and identifying the risk factors is essential for the primary prevention of this disease. PMID:27956793

  16. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-11-28

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11(th) most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied considerably in the world. A known cause of pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking. This risk factor is likely to explain some of the international variations and gender differences. The overall five-year survival rate is about 6% (ranges from 2% to 9%), but this vary very small between developed and developing countries. To date, the causes of pancreatic cancer are still insufficiently known, although certain risk factors have been identified, such as smoking, obesity, genetics, diabetes, diet, inactivity. There are no current screening recommendations for pancreatic cancer, so primary prevention is of utmost importance. A better understanding of the etiology and identifying the risk factors is essential for the primary prevention of this disease.

  17. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  18. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  19. Obesity and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Dominique S

    Pancreatic cancer has few known risk factors, providing little in the way of prevention, and is the most rapidly fatal cancer with 7 % survival rate at 5 years. Obesity has surfaced as an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer as epidemiological studies with strong methodological designs have removed important biases and solidified the obesity associations. Moreover, studies indicate that obesity early in adulthood is strongly associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer and that abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor. There is increasing evidence suggesting long-standing diabetes type 2 and insulin resistance are important etiological factors of this disease, providing a strong mechanistic link to obesity. The challenge remains to determine whether intended weight loss in midlife will reduce risk of pancreatic cancer and to elucidate the complex underlying pathways directly involved with risk.

  20. Metabolomics Evaluation of Serum Markers for Cachexia and Their Intra-Day Variation in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takashi; Chayahara, Naoko; Imamura, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Minami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by progressive loss of weight and muscle atrophy. Using metabolomics, we investigated serum markers and their intra-day variation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients with cachexia. Methods Patients were enrolled in two groups: those with or without cachexia. Blood samples collected at 6:30 AM, 11:30 AM, 4:30 PM, and 9:30 PM were analyzed using metabolomics, and serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and leptin were measured and compared between the two groups. Intra-day variation was then evaluated. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled in total. In the cachexia group (n = 9), median body weight loss rate over 6 months was greater, performance status was poorer, and anorexia was more severe than in the non-cachexia group (n = 12). Each metabolites level showed substantial intra-day variation, and some of them displayed significant differences between the two groups. Levels of paraxanthine remained markedly lower in the cohort with cachexia at all measurement points. Besides, median IL-6 and TNF-α levels appeared higher and leptin concentration appeared lower in the cachexia group, albeit without statistical significance. Conclusion Some metabolites and some serological marker levels were affected by cancer cachexia. Although paraxanthine levels were consistently lower in patients with cachexia, we identified that many metabolites indicated large intra- and inter-day variation and that it might be necessary to pay attention to intra-day variation in metabolomics research. PMID:25411961

  1. Pancreatic groove cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Shih-Chin; Shyr, Bor-Uei; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Shin-E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic groove cancer is very rare and can be indistinguishable from groove pancreatitis. This study is to clarify the characteristics, clinical features, managements, and survival outcomes of this rare tumor. Brief descriptions were made for each case of pancreatic groove cancer encountered at our institute. Individualized data of pancreatic groove cancer cases described in the literature were extracted and added to our database to expand the study sample size for a more complete analysis. A total of 33 patients with pancreatic groove cancer were included for analysis, including 4 cases from our institute. The median tumor size was 2.7 cm. The most common symptom was nausea or vomiting (89%), followed by jaundice (67%). Duodenal stenosis was noted by endoscopy in 96% of patients. The histopathological examination revealed well differentiated tumor in 43%. Perineural invasion was noted in 90%, and lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement in 83%. Overall 1-year survival rate was 93.3%, and 3- or 5-year survival rate was 62.2%, with a median survival of 11.0 months. Survival outcome for the well-differentiated tumors was better than those of the moderate/poorly differentiated ones. Early involvement of duodenum causing vomiting is often the initial presentation, but obstructive jaundice does not always happen until the disease progresses. Tumor differentiation is a prognostic factor for survival outcome. The possibility of pancreatic groove cancer should be carefully excluded before making the diagnosis of groove pancreatitis for any questionable case. PMID:28079795

  2. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain vaccines because the spleen will be removed. Palliative surgery If the cancer has spread too far ... removed completely, any surgery being considered would be palliative (intended to relieve or prevent symptoms). Because pancreatic ...

  3. Ct-Guided Pancreatic Percutaneous Fine-needle Biopsy in Differential Diagnosis Between Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zerbi, Alessandro; Parolini, Danilo; Sironi, Sandro; Vanzulli, Angelo; Staudacher, Carlo; Faravelli, Agostino; Garancini, Paola; del Maschio, Alessandro; di Carlo, Valerio

    1989-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is still difficult to establish. In 63 patients with suspected pancreatic neoplasm we performed: serum CA 19-9 assessment, abdominal ultrasound, CT scan and CT-guided pancreatic percutaneous fine-needle biopsy. The conclusive diagnosis was pancreatic cancer in 40 patients and chronic pancreatitis in 23 patients. With regard to the differential diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were respectively 80% and 78% for serum CA 19-9, 75% and 65% for abdominal US, 85% and 70% for CT scan, 00% and 87% for percutaneous fine-needle biopsy. We conclude that CT-guided percutaneous fine-needle biopsy is the most reliable method for differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. PMID:2487070

  4. Detection of a Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Antigen (DU-PAN-2 Antigen) in Serum and Ascites of Patients with Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzgar, Richard S.; Rodriguez, Ned; Finn, Olivera J.; Lan, Michael S.; Daasch, Vicki N.; Fernsten, Philip D.; Meyers, William C.; Sindelar, William F.; Sandler, Robert S.; Seigler, H. F.

    1984-08-01

    A competition radioimmunoassay was developed, utilizing a murine monoclonal antibody to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Immunoblotting of a standard antigen preparation from either serum or ascites fluid after electrophoresis in 1% agarose showed that the specific DUPAN-2 activity resided in two major high molecular weight bands. DU-PAN-2 antigen levels were expressed as arbitrary units based on a standard partially purified antigen preparation. The inhibition curve with standard antigen was reproducible (SD < 10%) and essentially linear from 25 to 200 units/ml. The mean DU-PAN-2 antigen concentration for the sera from 126 normal individuals was 81 units/ml. Sera from pediatric patients with malignancy had a mean of 127 units/ml, while nasopharyngeal, stage III melanoma, and ovarian carcinoma patients had means of 89, 92, and 119 units/ml, respectively. All values in normal subjects as well as the melanoma, nasopharyngeal, ovarian, and pediatric cancer patients were less than 400 units/ml. Intermediate antigen levels were detected in patients with alimentary tract malignancies. Eight of 20 gastric cancer and 8 of 76 colorectal carcinoma patients and 3 patients with benign or nonmalig nant gastrointestinal tract disease had DU-PAN-2 values exceeding 400 units/ml. Ascites fluids from 6/6 and pancreatic juice from 2/2 pancreatic cancer patients had values greater than 750 units/ml. Serum from 68% of the 89 pancreatic cancer patients tested had DU-PAN-2 antigen levels greater than 400 units/ml. The mean serum value in this patient population was 4888 units/ml.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  8. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J.-Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes. PMID:28241470

  9. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Burney, Saira; Irfan, Khadija; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Masud, Faisal

    2014-07-28

    Research suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes and several malignancies. Animal models have shown that hyperinsulinemic state underlying diabetes promotes tumor formation through stimulation of insulin-IGF-1 pathway; a possible role of inflammation is also proposed. One such link which has been under considerable study for years is that between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Although epidemiological evidence points towards a reciprocal link between the two, the cause-effect relationship still remains unclear. This link was the subject of a large German epidemiological study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract #1604), which underscored the link between diabetes and some cancers. Schmidt et al. performed a retrospective database analysis over a 12 year period and reported an increased risk of certain types of cancer in diabetic patients. The most significant association (HR 2.17) was found for pancreatic cancer. Given the high mortality of pancreatic cancer, prevention through timely screening could play an important role in improving prognosis. Older subjects with recent-onset diabetes represent a high-risk group and hence are potential targets for pancreatic cancer screening thereby enabling its early diagnosis at a curable stage.

  10. Pancreatic cancer screening: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Helmstädter, Lars; Riemann, Jürgen F

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a median survival of approximately 6 months after diagnosis. Many factors are associated with a worse outcome; examples include late diagnosis, low resection rate, aggressive tumor behavior and a lack of an effective chemotherapy regimen. Owing to the low prevalence of pancreatic cancer relative to the diagnostic accuracy of present detection methods and the absence of promising treatment modalities, even in early stages, it is currently neither advisable nor cost effective to screen the general population. Efforts are focused on early screening of selected high-risk-cohorts, who account for approximately 10% of patients with pancreatic cancer. These include patients with chronic pancreatitis, individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer, patients with hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, cystic fibrosis or familial atypical multiple mole melanoma. At present, a multimodal-screening approach of endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography appears to be the most effective method to screen for pancreatic cancer in high-risk patients. Continued efforts are needed to elucidate effective testing to identify patients with nonhereditary risk factors who will benefit from screening protocols. A combined approach of serum markers, genetic markers and specific imaging studies may prove to be the future of pancreatic screening.

  11. Serum levels of LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 have prognostic roles on survival in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Karabulut, Senem; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Sen, Fatma; Sakar, Burak; Disci, Rian; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Serum LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 levels are important tumor markers in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of serum LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 levels in metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the outcome of 196 MPC patients who are treated with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in our clinic. Positivity rates of serum LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 were 22, 40, and 83 %, respectively. Likewise, the rates of very high serum levels of tumor markers were correlated with these positivity rates (9 % for LDH, 30 % for CEA, and 55 % for CA19-9). The serum LDH levels were significantly higher in older patients (p = 0.05) and also in the patients with large tumors (p = 0.05), hepatic metastasis (p = 0.01), hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.01), and unresponsive to chemotherapy (p = 0.04). However, no correlation was found between both serum CEA and CA19-9 levels and possible prognostic factors (p > 0.05). The significant relationships were found between the serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 (r s = 0.24, p = 0.004), and serum LDH and CEA (r(s) = 0.193, p = 0.02). But, there was no correlation between serum LDH and CA19-9 levels (p = 0.39). One-year overall survival rate was 12.8 % (95 % CI 8-18). Increased serum levels of all the tumor markers significantly had adverse affect on survival (p = 0.001 for LDH, p = 0.002 for CEA, and p = 0.007 for CA19-9). However, no difference was observed in between high levels and very high levels of serum markers for all tumor markers (p > 0.05). Patients with normal serum levels of all three tumor markers had better outcome than others (p = 0.002) and those with normal serum LDH and CEA levels (whatever CA19-9) levels had associated with better survival compared with other possible alternatives (p < 0.001). Serum levels of LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 had significant affect on survival in MPC patients.

  12. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-05

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  13. What Are the Key Statistics about Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Pancreatic Cancer About Pancreatic Cancer Key Statistics for Pancreatic Cancer How common is pancreatic cancer? ... can be affected by certain risk factors . For statistics related to survival, see Pancreatic Cancer Survival Rates ...

  14. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiulong; Rao, Geetha S; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; Gattuso, Paolo; Kaufman, Howard L; Plate, Janet; Prinz, Richard A

    2011-05-23

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and ELISA, respectively. Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production.

  15. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  16. MicroRNA Targeted Therapeutic Approach for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US and is expected to be the second leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030. Therefore, it is important to better understand the molecular pathogenesis, phenotypes and features of pancreatic cancer in order to design novel molecularly targeted therapies for achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Recently, the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer became a hot topic in the scientific community of pancreatic cancer research. By conducting miRNA expression profiling, the aberrant expression of miRNAs was revealed in the serum and in cancer tissues from patients with pancreatic cancer. These aberrantly expressed miRNAs are critically correlated with the disease stage, drug resistance, and survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Hence, targeting these tiny molecules, the specific miRNAs, could provide an efficient and optimal approach in the therapy of pancreatic cancer. Indeed, the pre-clinical and in vivo experiments showed that nanoparticle delivery of synthetic oligonucleotides or treatment with natural agents could be useful to modulate the expression of miRNAs and thereby inhibit pancreatic cancer growth and progression, suggesting that targeting miRNAs combined with conventional anti-cancer therapeutics could be a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing drug sensitivity and achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929739

  17. Thromboembolism and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Andre Luiz; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-28

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent event in the clinical course of patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer; studies have been designed to evaluate the role of prophylactic anticoagulation in this ominous disease. Searching for the molecular basis of thrombosis in cancer, Bozkurt et al. present in the Abstract #e22049 the result of their investigation on the frequency of inherited and carcinogenesis-acquired proteins in oncologic patients with and without venous thromboembolism. From the bedside, Muñoz Martin et al. present in the Abstract #e15187 their work on the incidence of venous thromboembolism in patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and the role of the established Khorana score in predicting symptomatic and incidental venous thromboembolism. At last, Cella et al. in the Abstract #e20625 expand the predictor landscape from the Khorana score to other risk factors for venous thromboembolism, refining the selection of oncologic patients who can benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation.

  18. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 represents a marker of response to neoadjuvant therapy in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Ching-Wei D; Balachandran, Aparna; Ahmad, Mediha; Lee, Jeffrey E; Krishnan, Sunil; Wang, Huamin; Crane, Christopher H; Wolff, Robert A; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Pisters, Peter W T; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Fleming, Jason B; Katz, Matthew H G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels and outcome in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy (NT). Methods This study included all patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, a serum CA 19-9 level of ≥40 U/ml and bilirubin of ≤2 mg/dl, in whom NT was initiated at one institution between 2001 and 2010. The study evaluated the associations between pre- and post-NT CA 19-9, resection and overall survival. Results Among 141 eligible patients, CA 19-9 declined during NT in 116. Following NT, 84 of 141 (60%) patients underwent resection. For post-NT resection, the positive predictive value of a decline and the negative predictive value of an increase in CA 19-9 were 70% and 88%, respectively. The normalization of CA 19-9 (post-NT <40 U/ml) was associated with longer median overall survival among both non-resected (15 months versus 11 months; P = 0.022) and resected (38 months versus 26 months; P = 0.020) patients. Factors independently associated with shorter overall survival were no resection [hazard ratio (HR) 3.86, P < 0.001] and failure to normalize CA 19-9 (HR 2.13, P = 0.001). Conclusions The serum CA 19-9 level represents a dynamic preoperative marker of tumour biology and response to NT, and provides prognostic information in both non-resected and resected patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:23991810

  19. Vaginal metastasis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Benhayoune, Khadija; El Fatemi, Hinde; El Ghaouti, Meryem; Bannani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Abdelilah; Harmouch, Taoufik

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal metastasis from pancreatic cancer is an extreme case and often indicates a poor prognosis. We present a case of pancreatic carcinoma with metastasis to the vagina that was discovered by vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world of a primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma discovered of symptoms from a vaginal metastasis.

  20. Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead. PMID:20440279

  1. Depression, cytokines, and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Tobias, Kristen; Pessin, Hayley; Ku, Geoffrey Y.; Yuan, Jianda; Gibson, Christopher; Wolchok, Jedd

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine the relationships between cytokines, depression, and pancreatic cancer. Method 75 individuals were recruited from two New York City hospitals (a cancer center and a psychiatric hospital) and comprised 4 subgroups: patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who did (n=17) and did not (n=26) have a diagnosis of Major Depressive Episode (MDE), and healthy participants with (n=7) and without (n=25) MDE. All individuals completed a battery of self-report measures. Sera was assayed using Meso Scale Discovery techniques to measure the following pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and TNF-alpha; we also calculated the IL-2/IL-4 ratio. Results Pancreatic cancer patients had significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10, and significantly lower TGF-beta levels than healthy participants. When the sample was divided into those with and without MDE, the groups only differed with regard to serum IL-6 levels. No significant cancer×depression interaction effect was observed. Severity of depressive symptoms was also significantly correlated with IL-6, rs=.28, p=.02, while hopelessness was associated with IFN-alpha, rs=.34, p=.006. Pain, fatigue and sleep disturbance were associated with several of the cytokines assayed including IL-1beta (pain intensity), IL-4 (pain intensity and overall sleep quality), IL-12p70 (pain intensity), TGF-beta (fatigue intensity), but anxiety was not associated with any of the cytokines assayed. Conclusions This study demonstrated an association between depression and IL-6, but not with other cytokines. Moreover, IL-6 was not significantly associated with other measures of psychological distress (anxiety, hopelessness) or with symptom distress (pain, fatigue, sleep quality), although some cytokines assayed were associated with specific symptoms. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of depression in pancreatic cancer

  2. Obesity and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Giuseppe; Oben, Jude A; Fusai, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an invariably fatal malignancy. Cigarette smoking and diabetes are established risk factors, but over the last two decades studies have shown that excess adiposity is an additional independent risk factor with 30-50% of cases thought to be attributed to nutritional factors. The aim of this narrative review is to analyze all the epidemiological evidence on the topic and possible pathophysiology. We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and Medline, and all available evidence was included. We firstly analyze meta- and pooled analysis. Then we discuss individual studies to identify sources of discrepancies between studies and attempt to delineate pathophysiology. It is estimated that obese individuals have a relative risk (RR) ranging between 1.19 and 1.47, when compared with those of normal weight, regardless of diabetes or smoking status. No significant differences were found between gender. There is a measurable increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer in obese individuals, and excess adiposity is related to the condition with a "dose-response" curve. Hyperinsulinemia and possibly hyperestrogenism secondary to a metabolic syndrome, and independently from diabetes status, appear to be the key elements of the pathogenesis in pancreatic cancer secondary to excess body fat. Increased efforts should therefore be made in tackling the epidemic levels of obesity in the Western world countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  4. Serum C-peptide, Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin, and Pancreatic Cancer: Do Associations Differ by Smoking?

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Leticia M; Newton, Christina C; Pollak, Michael; Silverman, Debra T; Albanes, Demetrius; Männistö, Satu; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Jacobs, Eric J; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z

    2017-06-01

    Background: Studies examining associations between circulating concentrations of C-peptide and total adiponectin, two biomarkers related to obesity and insulin secretion and sensitivity and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) risk have shown inconsistent results and included limited numbers of smokers.Methods: We examined associations of these biomarkers and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin with PDA, overall, and by smoking status. We conducted a pooled nested case-control analysis in 3 cohorts (Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Trial, Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, and Cancer Prevention Study-II), with 758 cases (435 current smokers) and 1,052 controls (531 smokers) matched by cohort, age, sex, race, blood draw date and follow-up time. We used conditional logistic regression adjusted for age, smoking, diabetes, and body mass index to calculate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: Circulating C-peptide concentration was not associated with PDA in never or former smokers, but was inversely associated with PDA in current smokers (per SD OR = 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.84; Pinteraction = 0.005). HMW adiponectin was inversely associated with PDA in never smokers (OR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.23-0.81), not associated in former smokers, and positively associated in smokers (OR = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.04-1.45; Pinteraction = 0.009). Total adiponectin was not associated with PDA in nonsmokers or current smokers.Conclusions: Associations of biomarkers of insulin secretion and sensitivity with PDA differ by smoking status. Smoking-induced pancreatic damage may explain the associations in smokers while mechanisms related to insulin resistance associations in nonsmokers.Impact: Future studies of these biomarkers and PDA should examine results by smoking status. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 914-22. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Hereditary pancreatic cancer: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Greer, Julia B; Lynch, Henry T; Brand, Randall E

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extraordinarily deadly disease and is responsible for over 220,000 deaths worldwide each year. One of the greatest risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer is a positive family history. Hereditary pancreatitis patients have a greatly elevated pancreatic cancer risk and individuals with cystic fibrosis may rarely develop this cancer, but often at very young ages. Various genetically linked cancer syndromes have been associated with pancreatic cancer in mutation-positive family members. Finally, familial pancreatic cancer-defined as families with two or more first-degree relatives who have pancreatic cancer but do not have a known cancer syndrome-is a known entity whose disease-causing mutation remains unidentified. This article describes research to date on hereditary pancreatic cancer, addresses how best clinicians should recognise hereditary forms of pancreatic cancer and explains the emotional burden of discovering a potentially lethal mutation. Many controversies and unanswered questions in hereditary pancreatic cancer remain.

  6. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  7. Chronic pancreatitis: relation to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uomo, G; Rabitti, P G

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and other pancreatic diseases, such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and pancreatic cancer (PK), remains a fairly debated question. The progression from alcoholic AP to CP is controversial, and some long-term epidemiological studies suggest that alcoholic CP might be the result of recurrent alcoholic AP (necrosis-fibrosis sequence) and a subgroup of alcoholics may present recurrent AP without progression to CP. Other predisposing factors (genetic, nutritional, environmental) seems to be important in inducing different outcomes of pancreatic damage due to alcohol. However, recurrent episodes of AP are clearly involved in pathophysiology of CP in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. A relationship between CP and subsequent PK development has long been suspected, but we actually don't know whether this association is direct or is the result of confounding factors, such as alcohol intake or cigarette smoking. Many issues should be considered as indicators of a causal association, and several of them are not fulfilled. Nonetheless, epidemiological studies (case-control or cohort studies) showed that the risk of PK is increased in patients with CP; the risk is significantly higher in tropical calcifying CP and hereditary pancreatitis. Studies on growth factors, oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and angiogenesis suggest that the sequence PC-KP is plausible from the biological standpoint.

  8. Chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Billah, M M; Chowdhury, M M; Das, B C; Shampa, N N; Khan, Z R

    2014-07-01

    An observational cross-sectional study of 50 cases of chronic calcific pancreatitis patients was conducted in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and some other tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka city from August 2008 to July 2010. Patients required laparotomy for different modalities of surgical treatment to manage chronic calcific pancreatitis were included in the study. Biopsy was taken from panceatic duct containing stone during laparotomy to determine the histopathological changes. Among 50 cases female predominance was observed. Male, female ratio was 2:3. Majority (62%) patients were in 20 to 40 years age group. Female presented earlier than male (20-30 years and 30-40 years respectively). All patients complained recurrent attack of epigastric pain. Other presentations were diabetes (74%), malnutrition and weight loss (56%), steatorrhoea (24%) and jaundice (12%). Adenocarcinoma was found in 3(6%) patients (2 male and 1 female) and rests were chronic pancreatitis. Several studies showed the association between chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Further large scale study is required to find out the national incidence level.

  9. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly fatal disease that can only be cured by complete surgical resection. However, most patients with PC have unresectable disease at the time of diagnosis, highlighting the need to detect PC and its precursor lesions earlier in asymptomatic patients. Screening is not cost-effective for population-based screening of PC. Individuals with genetic risk factors for PC based on family history or known PC-associated genetic syndromes, however, can be a potential target for PC screening programs. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology and genetic background of familial PC and discusses diagnostic and management approaches.

  10. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil or Capecitabine With or Without Zoledronic Acid in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-23

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  11. [Biological aspects of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tonel, E; Carbone, A; Scirelli, T; Bellone, G; Emanuelli, G

    2005-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma still is an aggressive disease with a fatal prognosis due to late diagnosis and resistance to pharmacological and surgical treatments. Molecular investigations of pancreatic cancer are complicated by the restricted accessibility of the organ for biopsies. However, recent studies have indicated that pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. These molecular alterations, including overexpression of receptor-ligand systems, oncogene activation and loss of tumour suppressor genes, leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The molecular findings are now integrated in a pancreatic tumour progression model, with genetically and morphological defined precursor lesions. However, it remains unclear whether the initial target cells of this cancer develop from ductal or acinar cells. This review will present recent emerging questions on the biology of pancreatic cancer with particular emphasis on the cell origin and tumour microenvironment.

  12. Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis and treatments.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yu; Cui, Zhong-Min; Chen, Jiang; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Ying-Yi

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with exceptionally high mortality. Despite the relatively low incidence rate (10th), it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in most developed countries. To improve the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and strengthen the standardized comprehensive treatment are still the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Here, we summarized the rapid developments in the diagnosis and treatments of pancreatic cancer. Regarding diagnosis, we reviewed advances in medical imaging technology, tumor markers, molecular biology (e.g., gene mutation), and proteomics. Moreover, great progress has also been made in the treatments of this disease, including surgical resection, chemotherapy, targeted radiotherapy, targeted minimally invasive treatment, and molecular targeted therapy. Therefore, we also recapitulated the development, advantages, and disadvantages of each of the treatment methods in this review.

  13. Combined evaluation of a panel of protein and miRNA serum-exosome biomarkers for pancreatic cancer diagnosis increases sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Bindhu; Yue, Shijing; Galli, Uwe; Rana, Sanyukta; Gross, Wolfgang; Müller, Miryam; Giese, Nathalia A; Kalthoff, Holger; Becker, Thomas; Büchler, Markus W; Zöller, Margot

    2015-06-01

    Late diagnosis contributes to pancreatic cancer (PaCa) dismal prognosis, urging for reliable, early detection. Serum-exosome protein and/or miRNA markers might be suitable candidates, which we controlled for patients with PaCa. Protein markers were selected according to expression in exosomes of PaCa cell line culture supernatants, but not healthy donors' serum-exosomes. miRNA was selected according to abundant recovery in microarrays of patients with PaCa, but not healthy donors' serum-exosomes and exosome-depleted serum. According to these preselections, serum-exosomes were tested by flow cytometry for the PaCa-initiating cell (PaCIC) markers CD44v6, Tspan8, EpCAM, MET and CD104. Serum-exosomes and exosome-depleted serum was tested for miR-1246, miR-4644, miR-3976 and miR-4306 recovery by qRT-PCR. The majority (95%) of patients with PaCa (131) and patients with nonPa-malignancies reacted with a panel of anti-CD44v6, -Tspan8, -EpCAM and -CD104. Serum-exosomes of healthy donors' and patients with nonmalignant diseases were not reactive. Recovery was tumor grading and staging independent including early stages. The selected miR-1246, miR-4644, miR-3976 and miR-4306 were significantly upregulated in 83% of PaCa serum-exosomes, but rarely in control groups. These miRNA were also elevated in exosome-depleted serum of patients with PaCa, but at a low level. Concomitant evaluation of PaCIC and miRNA serum-exosome marker panels significantly improved sensitivity (1.00, CI: 0.95-1) with a specificity of 0.80 (CI: 0.67-0.90) for PaCa versus all others groups and of 0.93 (CI: 0.81-0.98) excluding nonPa-malignancies. Thus, the concomitant evaluation of PaCIC and PaCa-related miRNA marker panels awaits retrospective analyses of larger cohorts, as it should allow for a highly sensitive, minimally-invasive PaCa diagnostics.

  14. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Biankin, Andrew V

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatic cancer can be diagnosed through family history and/or a personal history of pancreatitis or clinical features suggesting one of the known pancreatic cancer predisposition syndromes. This chapter describes the currently known hereditary pancreatic cancer predisposition syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis. Strategies for genetic testing for hereditary pancreatic cancer and the appropriate options for surveillance and cancer risk reduction are discussed. Finally, ongoing research and future directions in the diagnosis and management of hereditary pancreatic cancer will be considered.

  15. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  16. The clinical utility and limitations of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9) as a diagnostic tool for pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sundeep; Tang, Shou-jiang; Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash; Lara, Luis F; Siddiqui, Ali

    2011-08-01

    CA19-9 is a tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and other malignancies. However, its sensitivity and specificity is suboptimal in clinical practice, which we hypothesized limits its clinical utility. To evaluate the clinical utility and limitations of CA19-9 as a tumor marker. We performed a retrospective review of CA19-9 levels (U/ml) in 483 consecutive patients between 2006 and 2008 at two university hospitals. We abstracted clinical, radiographic, and pathological data and final diagnoses. Descriptive and non-parametric analyses were performed. Patients presenting with jaundice had the highest CA19-9 (420) compared to other complaints (<20) (p<0.01). The indications with the highest CA19-9 had evidence of biliary obstruction (71), liver mass (54), and pancreatic head mass (27) compared to other indications (<15) (p<0.01). The diagnoses with the highest CA19-9 (p<0.01) were cholangiocarcinoma (476), pancreatic cancer (161), and choledocholithiasis (138). Using a receiver operator curve to evaluate CA19-9, the area under the curve was 0.7 when evaluating all patients for pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma or patients with pancreatic head mass for pancreatic cancer. This study found that for pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma, CA19-9 had poor clinical utility as a tumor marker and did not change patient management. Elevations in CA19-9 were associated with biliary obstruction based on clinical history, laboratory data, and diagnoses.

  17. The serum miR-21 level serves as a predictor for the chemosensitivity of advanced pancreatic cancer, and miR-21 expression confers chemoresistance by targeting FasL.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhuang, Liping; Zhang, Juan; Fan, Jie; Luo, Jianmin; Chen, Hao; Wang, Kun; Liu, Luming; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2013-06-01

    miR-21 expression in cancer tissue has been reported to be associated with the clinical outcome and activity of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. However, resection is possible in only a minority of patients due to the advanced stages often present at the time of diagnosis, and safely obtaining sufficient quantities of pancreatic tumor tissue for molecular analysis is difficult at the unresectable stages. In this study, we investigated whether the serum level of miR-21 could be used as a predictor of chemosensitivity. We tested the levels of serum miR-21 in a cohort of 177 cases of advanced pancreatic cancer who received gemcitabine-based palliative chemotherapy. We found that a high level of miR-21 in the serum was significantly correlated with a shortened time-to-progression (TTP) and a lower overall survival (OS). The serum miR-21 level was an independent prognostic factor for both the TTP and the OS (HR 1.920; 95% CI, 1.274-2.903, p = 0.002 for TTP and HR 1.705; 95% CI, 1.147-2.535, p = 0.008 for OS). The results from a functional study showed that gemcitabine exposure down-regulated miR-21 expression and up-regulated FasL expression. The increased FasL expression following gemcitabine treatment induced cancer cell apoptosis, whereas the ectopic expression of miR-21 partially protected the cancer cells from gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Additionally, we confirmed that FasL was a direct target of miR-21. Therefore, the serum level of miR-21 may serve as a predictor of chemosensitivity in advanced pancreatic cancer. Additionally, we identified a new mechanism of chemoresistance mediated by the effects of miR-21 on the FasL/Fas pathway.

  18. Immunoprevention of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chinthalapally; Mohammed, Altaf; Asch, Adam; Janakiram, Naveena

    2017-02-23

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a deadly disease, with a 5-year survival rate of 6% and has significantly changed over the decades. It is difficult to diagnose PC patients at early stages, as there are no early non-invasive biomarkers or early signs or symptoms of clinical diagnosis. The lack of effective treatment strategies is also a major concern for hindering survival rates. Vaccine-based treatments for several cancers are currently under intense investigation. Current vaccine testing for PC is usually performed in advanced stages of cancer, during which the patient's impaired immune responses improved to suppress the growing tumor. However, so far such strategies have had limited success and have not become mainstream therapies. Thus, early diagnosis is imperative for immunoprevention using vaccines. Developing vaccines towards non-self-antigens has been successful, whereas vaccines against self-antigens, without any adverse effects on normal cells, have been challenging. The development of new technologies to identify mutated antigens, post-translational alterations in proteins, and tumor-specific antigens is currently underway, with a view toward vaccine development. Combining vaccines with immunostimulators or non-toxic anticancer agents are promising for cancer prevention. Successful vaccination strategies for PC at different stages of tumor development and future challenges for immunoprevention are discussed in this review.

  19. Pancreatic cancer, inflammation, and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk factor for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past 2 decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations of the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies toward this direction are urgently needed.

  20. [Hereditary gastric and pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Langner, C

    2017-05-01

    Most cases of gastric and pancreatic cancer are sporadic, but familial clustering can be observed in approximately 10% of cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and two syndromes have been characterized: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). Gastric and pancreatic cancer can develop in the setting of other hereditary cancer syndromes, such as hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), or various hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, including juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis carry an increased risk of cancer (40-55%).

  1. New developments in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Greer, Julia B; Brand, Randall E

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presents in an advanced stage and has a dismal prognosis. Extensive recent research efforts have provided us with greater insight into the etiology of pancreatic cancer and have also improved our means of prognostication. Molecular analysis demonstrated that specific pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis are perhaps more valuable to study than single genetic aberrations. Previous risk factors, including family history, body mass index, and current cigarette smoking, were validated and novel risks, such as ABO blood group alleles, were identified. Similar to other illnesses, combinations of healthful habits, such as not smoking, adhering to a Mediterranean dietary pattern, and engaging in physical activity, may decrease pancreatic cancer risk. Finally, CA 19-9 levels, the presence of diabetes mellitus, and a six-gene signature provided critical information regarding survival that could help guide treatment of individuals diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  2. Pancreatic cancer chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal gastrointestinal tumour. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy in the majority of the patients whereas resection is the only chance of cure but only possible in 15-20% of all patients. The integration of radiotherapy into multimodal treatment concepts is heavily investigated. It is now commonly accepted that induction chemotherapy should precede radiotherapy. When fractionated conventionally it should be given as chemoradiotherapy. Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy emerged as an alternative, but will have to be carefully investigated in clinical trials. This review aims to give an overview of radiotherapeutic strategies with a focus on the latest developments in the field in the context of chemotherapy and surgery.

  3. Listeria Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0411 TITLE: Listeria vaccines for pancreatic cancer...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Listeria vaccines for pancreatic cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0411 5c...reverse pro-tumor activity by leukocytes in PDA, we are investigating Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterium that infects

  4. Role of Vitamin D in the Prevention of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bulathsinghala, Pubudu; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Saif, Muhammad W.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignancy of poor prognosis which is mostly diagnosed at advanced stages. Current treatment modalities are very limited creating great interest for novel preventive and therapeutic options. Vitamin D seems to have a protective effect against pancreatic cancer by participating in numerous proapoptotic, antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, prodifferentiating, and immunomodulating mechanisms. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] serum concentrations are currently the best indicator of vitamin D status. There are three main sources of vitamin D: sun exposure, diet,and dietary supplements. Sun exposure has been associated with lower incidence of pancreatic cancer in ecological studies. Increased vitamin D levels seem to protect against pancreatic cancer, but caution is needed as excessive dietary intake may have opposite results. Future studies will verify the role of vitamin D in the prevention and therapy of pancreatic cancer and will lead to guidelines on adequate sun exposure and vitamin D dietary intake. PMID:21274445

  5. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  6. Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-1β can predict the efficacy of gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunaga, S; Ikeda, M; Shimizu, S; Ohno, I; Furuse, J; Inagaki, M; Higashi, S; Kato, H; Terao, K; Ochiai, A

    2013-01-01

    Background: With this study, we sought to characterise the impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines on the outcomes of gemcitabine monotherapy (GEM) in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods: Treatment-naive patients with advanced PC and no obvious infections were eligible for enrolment. All of the patients were scheduled to undergo systemic chemotherapy. Serum pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured using an electro-chemiluminescence assay method before chemotherapy. High cytokine levels were defined as values greater than the median. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Results: Sixty patients who received GEM were included in the analysis. High IL-6 and IL-1β levels were poor prognostic factors for overall survival in a multivariate analysis (P=0.011 and P=0.048, respectively). Patients with both a high IL-6 level and a high IL-1β level exhibited shortened overall and progression-free survival, a reduction in the tumour control rate, and a high dose intensity of GEM compared with patients with low levels of both IL-6 and IL-1β. Conclusion: The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-1β predict the efficacy of GEM in patients with advanced PC. PMID:23591198

  7. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz–Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:21734801

  8. Fluorescent Orthotopic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jonathan A; Sanchez, Antonio; Hoffman, Robert M; Nur, Saima; Lambros, Maria P

    2016-09-20

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the cancers for which survival has not improved substantially in the last few decades. Only 7% of diagnosed patients will survive longer than five years. In order to understand and mimic the microenvironment of pancreatic tumors, we utilized a murine orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer that allows non-invasive imaging of tumor progression in real time. Pancreatic cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein (PANC-1 GFP) were suspended in basement membrane matrix, high concentration, (e.g., Matrigel HC) with serum-free media and then injected into the tail of the pancreas via laparotomy. The cell suspension in the high concentration basement membrane matrix becomes a gel-like substance once it reaches room temperature; therefore, it gels when it comes in contact with the pancreas, creating a seal at the injection site and preventing any cell leakage. Tumor growth and metastasis to other organs are monitored in live animals by using fluorescence. It is critical to use the appropriate filters for excitation and emission of GFP. The steps for the orthotopic implantation are detailed in this article so researchers can easily replicate the procedure in nude mice. The main steps of this protocol are preparation of the cell suspension, surgical implantation, and whole body fluorescent in vivo imaging. This orthotopic model is designed to investigate the efficacy of novel therapeutics on primary and metastatic tumors.

  9. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  10. [Pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and obesity: hypothesis and facts].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, I N; Efimova, O V; Suvorova, T S; Tov, N L

    2014-01-01

    THE PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: Analyze the basic data on the role of obesity in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer (PC) and the modern mechanisms of this association. In the European Union and in Russia incidence of pancreatic diseases increases, such pancreatic cancer (PC) ranks 10th among cancer diseases. Obesity is a risk factor for not only of severe acute pancreatitis, but also PC at that independently of diabetes. In a meta-analysis the PC risk in obese increased by 47%, while the person with a central obesity have a higher PC risk compared to those with a peripheral type of obesity (odds ratio = 1,45, 95% CI: 1,02-2,07), but association between BMI and PC risk in this Japanese population may be different from that in Western populations, sometimes inversely. The link between obesity and PC is explained by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia: was proved a direct correlation between the level of circulating C-peptide and PC, low levels of serum adiponektin and leptin increase the PC risk. There are also genetic risk factors for PC: a statistically significant interaction between IVS1-27777C> and IVS1-23525A>T genotypes of the FTO gene with obesity and the PC risk: AA genotype in patients with BMI < 25 kg/m2 reduced PC risk by 22%-28% (p < 0,0001), and with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 was associated with 54%-60% increased PC risk (p < 0,0015). Lifestyle factors (smoking, consumption of saturated fats, etc.) increase the PC risk.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Oregovomab Followed by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Nelfinavir Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Resectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owain Peris; Melling, James Daniel; Ghaneh, Paula

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer related death worldwide with an overall five-year survival of less than 5%. Potentially curative surgery, which alone can improve 5-year survival to 10%, is an option for only 10%-20% of patients at presentation owing to local invasion of the tumour or metastatic disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve 5-year survival to 20%-25% but conflicting evidence remains with regards to chemoradiation. In this article we review the current evidence available from published randomised trials and discuss ongoing phase III trials in relation to adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Drug metabolism and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Flores, John Paul E; Diasio, Robert B; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a fatal disease in the majority of patients. The era of personalized medicine is upon us: customizing therapy according to each patient's individual cancer. Potentially, therapy can be targeted at individuals who would most likely have a favorable response, making it more efficacious and cost effective. This is particularly relevant for pancreatic cancer, which currently portends a very poor prognosis. However, there is much to be done in this field, and more studies are needed to bring this concept to reality.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Obesity, Intrapancreatic Fatty Infiltration, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and intrapancreatic fatty infiltration are associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions. The interplay among obesity, inflammation, and oncogenic Kras signaling promotes pancreatic tumorigenesis. Targeting the interaction between obesity-associated inflammation and Kras signaling may provide new strategies for prevention and therapy of pancreatic cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24782785

  17. Antimetabolite Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Malyn May Asuncion; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Wall, Nathan R

    2014-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly and aggressive disease. Less than 1% of diagnosed patients survive 5 years with an average survival time of only 4-8 months. The only option for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy where only the antimetabolites gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are used clinically. Unfortunately, efforts to improve chemotherapy regimens by combining, 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine with other drugs, such as cisplatin or oxaliplatin, have not increased cell killing or improved patient survival. The novel antimetabolite zebularine shows promise, inducing apoptosis and arresting cellular growth in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. However, resistance to these antimetabolites remains a problem highlighting the need to discover and develop new antimetabolites that will improve a patient's overall survival.

  18. Antimetabolite Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Malyn May Asuncion; Neidigh, Jonathan W.; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly and aggressive disease. Less than 1% of diagnosed patients survive 5 years with an average survival time of only 4–8 months. The only option for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy where only the antimetabolites gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are used clinically. Unfortunately, efforts to improve chemotherapy regimens by combining, 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine with other drugs, such as cisplatin or oxaliplatin, have not increased cell killing or improved patient survival. The novel antimetabolite zebularine shows promise, inducing apoptosis and arresting cellular growth in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. However, resistance to these antimetabolites remains a problem highlighting the need to discover and develop new antimetabolites that will improve a patient’s overall survival. PMID:26161298

  19. Strategies for early detection of resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose at an early stage and generally has a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment for pancreatic carcinoma. To improve the prognosis of this disease, it is essential to detect tumors at early stages, when they are resectable. The optimal approach to screening for early pancreatic neoplasia has not been established. The International Cancer of the Pancreas Screening Consortium has recently finalized several recommendations regarding the management of patients who are at an increased risk of familial pancreatic cancer. In addition, there have been notable advances in research on serum markers, tissue markers, gene signatures, and genomic targets of pancreatic cancer. To date, however, no biomarkers have been established in the clinical setting. Advancements in imaging modalities touch all aspects of the clinical management of pancreatic diseases, including the early detection of pancreatic masses, their characterization, and evaluations of tumor resectability. This article reviews strategies for screening high-risk groups, biomarkers, and current advances in imaging modalities for the early detection of resectable pancreatic cancer.

  20. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Improving theranostics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Jeremy; Bouvet, Michael; Singh, Gagandeep; Williams, John

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most deadly cancer in the United States, and is expected to be the second most deadly by 2030. The major difficulty in treating pancreatic cancer is the late onset of symptoms. Generally, patients show metastatic disease by the time of diagnosis, with a survival rate of 5% beyond 5 years. In patients without metastatic disease, surgical resection increases 5 year survival rate to 25%. The remaining 75% succumb to undetected metastases. Clearly, improvements to both detection, surgical intervention, and therapeutic strategies will be needed to improve patient outcome in pancreatic cancer. Recent literature has been surveyed and atomic models of new therapeutic approaches were generated. Here, we focus on the recent progress employing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to target pancreatic cancer associated markers, and more specifically on recent chemical and protein engineering efforts to improve the homogeneity, stability, and administration of mAbs to precisely deliver imaging agents and cytotoxins to sites of disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. What's New in Pancreatic Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Pancreatic Cancer About Pancreatic Cancer What’s New in Pancreatic Cancer Research? Research into the causes , ... KRAS oncogene, which affects regulation of cell growth. New diagnostic tests are often able to recognize this ...

  3. Endoscopic Palliation of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Sherman, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has an increasingly important role in the palliation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic biliary drainage is still requested in the majority of patients who present with obstructive jaundice, and the increased use of self-expandable metallic stents has reduced the incidence of premature stent occlusion. First-line use of metallic stents is expected to be utilized more frequently as neoadjuvant protocols are improved. The efficacy of endoscopy for palliating gastroduodenal obstruction has advanced with the development of through-the-scope, self-expandable gastroduodenal stents. There have been advances in pain management, with endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis reducing opiate requirements and pain for patients with unresectable malignancy. Future applications of endoscopy in pancreatic cancer may include fine needle injection of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the lesion itself. This review will summarize the evidence of endoscopy in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23187846

  4. Low Serum Pancreatitis-Associated Protein Does not Exclude Complications in Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Polanec, Janja; Pavelic, Zlatko P; Krizman, Igor; Osredkar, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Normal serum PAP levels on admission to the hospital in patiens with acute pancreatitis has been proposed to help select the patients who are not going to develop complications. The aims of this study were, first, to assess the specificity of serum pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) serology test and second, to evalute the usefulness of the test for prediciting complications in acute pancreatitis on admission to the hospital. The sensitivity of the PAP ELISA in patiens with acute pancreatitis on admission to the hospital was 70% and the serum PAP levels significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). However, the serum PAP levels in patients with acute pancreatitis were not significantly different from values in patients with various abdominal diseases (p < 0.58). Serum PAP levels gave good correlation to APACHE II (p = 0.02) and CRP (p = 0.01). Two patients with local complications (necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic fluid collection) had elevated serum PAP levels on admission to the hospital (> 100 ng/ml). The diagnostic specififity of PAP ELISA is low. Patients, who develop local complications in acute pancreatitis can not be excluded by normal serum PAP levels on admission to the hospital.

  5. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24151381

  6. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-10-21

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis found in human plasma using global quantitative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Crispin, David A.; May, Damon; Stevens, Tyler; McIntosh, Martin; Bronner, Mary P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose at early stages when curable treatments are effective. Biomarkers that can improve current pancreatic cancer detection would have great value in improving patient management and survival rate. A large scale quantitative proteomics study was performed to search for the plasma protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer. The enormous complexity of the plasma proteome and the vast dynamic range of protein concentration therein present major challenges for quantitative global profiling of plasma. To address these challenges, multi-dimensional fractionation at both protein and peptide levels was applied to enhance the depth of proteomics analysis. Employing stringent criteria, more than thirteen hundred proteins total were identified in plasma across 8-orders of magnitude in protein concentration. Differential proteins associated with pancreatic cancer were identified, and their relationship with the proteome of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic juice from our previous studies was discussed. A subgroup of differentially expressed proteins was selected for biomarker testing using an independent cohort of plasma and serum samples from well-diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease controls. Using ELISA methodology, the performance of each of these protein candidates was benchmarked against CA19-9, the current gold standard for a pancreatic cancer blood test. A composite marker of TIMP1 and ICAM1 demonstrate significantly better performance than CA19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from the non-pancreatic disease controls and chronic pancreatitis controls. In addition, protein AZGP1 was identified as a biomarker candidate for chronic pancreatitis. The discovery and technical challenges associated with plasma-based quantitative proteomics are discussed and may benefit the development of plasma proteomics technology in general. The protein

  8. Angiogenesis: a prognostic determinant in pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Jill A; van Eijck, Casper H J; Hop, Wim C J; van Dekken, Herman; Dicheva, Bilyana M; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Koning, Gerben A; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-11-01

    Angiogenesis has been associated with disease progression in many solid tumours, however the statement that tumours need angiogenesis to grow, invade and metastasise seems no longer applicable to all tumours or to all tumour subtypes. Prognostic studies in pancreatic cancer are conflicting. In fact, pancreatic cancer has been suggested an example of a tumour in which angiogenesis is less essential for tumour progression. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure angiogenesis in two anatomically closely related however prognostically different types of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic head and periampullary cancer, and investigate its relation with outcome. Vessels were stained by CD31 on original paraffin embedded tissue from 206 patients with microscopic radical resection (R0) of pancreatic head (n=98) or periampullary cancer (n=108). Angiogenesis was quantified by microvessel density (MVD) and measured by computerised image analysis of three randomly selected fields and investigated for associations with recurrence free survival (RFS), cancer specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS) and conventional prognostic factors. MVD was heterogeneous both between and within tumours. A higher MVD was observed in periampullary cancers compared with pancreatic head cancers (p<.01). Furthermore, MVD was associated with lymph node involvement in pancreatic head (p=.014), but not in periampullary cancer (p=.55). Interestingly, MVD was not associated with RFS, CSS or with OS. In conclusion, angiogenesis is higher in periampullary cancer and although associated with nodal involvement in pancreatic head cancer, pancreatic cancer prognosis seems indeed angiogenesis independent.

  9. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  11. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  12. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis.

  13. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Germansky, Katharine A; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Innovations in genetic medicine have led to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of new genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Given the availability of new diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk of colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare manifestation of pancreatic cancer (PC). The relationship between AP and PC remains less distinct. From January 2009 to November 2015, 47consecutive patients with PC who presented with AP were reviewed for this study. Clinical features, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, and follow-up evaluations of patients were documented in detail from our database. In order to identify cutoff threshold time for surgery, receiver operating curve (ROC) was built according to patients with or without postoperative complications. Cumulative rate of survival was calculated by using the Kaplan–Meier method. The study was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the guidelines of West China Hospital. This study included 35 men (74.5%) and 12 women (25.5%) (mean age: 52 years), with a median follow-up of 40 months. AP was clinically mild in 45 (95.7%) and severe in 2 (4.3%). The diagnosis of PC was delayed by 2 to 660 days (median 101 days). Thirty-nine (83.0%) cases underwent surgery. Eight (17.0%) cases performed biopsies only. Of 39 patients, radical surgery was performed in 32 (82.1%) cases and palliative in 7 (19.9%) cases. Two (8.0%) patients were needed for vascular resection and reconstruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (30.8%) patients. About 24.5 days was the best cutoff point, with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.727 (P = 0.025, 95% confidence interval: 0.555–0.8999). The survival rate of patients at 1 year was 23.4%. The median survival in patients with vascular resection and reconstruction was 18 months, compared with 10 months in patients without vascular resection (P = 0.042). For the primary stage (T), Tix was identified in 3 patients, the survival of whom were 5, 28, 50 months, respectively. And 2 of them were still alive at the follow-up period. The severity of AP was mainly mild. Surgical intervention after 24.5 days may benefit for

  16. Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis but not Alcoholic Pancreatitis Is a Strong Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Midha, Shallu; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kabra, Madhulika; Chattopadhyay, Tushar Kanti; Joshi, Yogendra Kumar; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    To study if chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Through a cohort and a case-control study design, CP and other important risk factors including smoking, diabetes, alcohol, obesity, and genetic mutations were studied for their association with pancreatic cancer. In the cohort study, 402 patients with CP were included. During 3967.74 person-years of exposure, 5 of the 402 patients (4 idiopathic CP, 1 hereditary CP) developed pancreatic cancer after 16.60 ± 3.51 years of CP. The standardized incidence ratio was 121. In the case-control study, 249 pancreatic cancer patients and 1000 healthy controls were included. Of the 249 patients with pancreatic cancer, 24 had underlying idiopathic CP, and none had alcoholic pancreatitis. SPINK1 gene mutation was present in 16 of 26 patients with idiopathic CP who had pancreatic cancer. Multivariable analysis showed CP (odds ratio [OR], 97.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.69-751.36), diabetes (>4 years duration) (OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.79-5.18), smoking (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38-2.69) as significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The population attributable risk was 9.41, 9.06, and 9.50 for diabetes, CP, and smoking, respectively. Genetically determined CP but not alcoholic CP is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Gene-expression profiling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Casas, Pedro P; López-Fernández, Luís A

    2010-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the worst prognoses, owing principally to a late diagnosis and the absence of good treatments. In the last 5 years, up to 12 molecular pathways involved in pancreatic cancer have been described. Global gene-expression profiling and the use of microarray databases have allowed the identification of hundreds of genes that are differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer. However, validation of these genes as biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis or treatment efficacy is still incomplete. Additionally, microRNAs have emerged as a potential source of variation between cancer and normal samples, and several of them have been identified as being deregulated in pancreatic tumors. An integrative point of view in the study of pancreatic cancer that makes use of all the whole-genome technologies has revealed several molecular mechanisms that affect pancreatic cancer development. These results should encourage the use of more personalized medicine in this pathology. Recent developments and future perspectives are discussed.

  18. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  19. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... but the goal is not to try to cure the cancer. Staging laparoscopy To determine which type of surgery ... the planned operation would be very unlikely to cure the cancer and could still lead to major side effects. ...

  20. Overcoming Drug Resistance in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jiang; Zhang, Yuqing; Yu, Xianjun; Yang, Jingxuan; LeBrun, Drake; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer has the worst survival rate of all cancers. The current standard care for metastatic pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however, the success of this treatment is poor and overall survival has not improved for decades. Drug resistance (both intrinsic and acquired) is thought to be a major reason for the limited benefit of most pancreatic cancer therapies. Areas covered Previous studies have indicated various mechanisms of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer, including changes in individual genes or signaling pathways, the influence of the tumor microenvironment, and the presence of highly resistant stem cells. This review summarizes recent advances in the mechanisms of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer, and potential strategies to overcome this. Expert Opinion Increasing drug delivery efficiency and decreasing drug resistance is the current aim in pancreatic cancer treatment, and will also benefit the treatment of other cancers. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer will lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies with the potential to sensitize pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy, and to increase the efficacy of current treatments in a wide variety of human cancers. PMID:21391891

  1. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Grizzle, William E.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E.

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a “confederation model” that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  2. Circulating microRNAs in Pancreatic Juice as Candidate Biomarkers of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Raimondo, Massimo; Guha, Sushovan; Chen, Jinyun; Diao, Lixia; Dong, Xiaoqun; Wallace, Michael B; Killary, Ann M; Frazier, Marsha L; Woodward, Timothy A; Wang, Jing; Sen, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Development of sensitive and specific biomarkers, preferably those circulating in body fluids is critical for early diagnosis of cancer. This study performed profiling of microRNAs (miRNAs) in exocrine pancreatic secretions (pancreatic juice) by microarray analysis utilizing pancreatic juice from 6 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and two pooled samples from 6 non-pancreatic, non-healthy (NPNH) as controls. Differentially circulating miRNAs were subsequently validated in 88 pancreatic juice samples from 50 PDAC, 19 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients and 19 NPNH controls. A marked difference in the profiles of four circulating miRNAs (miR-205, miR-210, miR-492, and miR-1427) was observed in pancreatic juice collected from patients with PDAC and those without pancreatic disease. Elevated levels of the four miRNAs together predicted PDAC with a specificity of 88% and sensitivity of 87%. Inclusion of serum CA19-9 level increased the sensitivity to 91% and the specificity to 100%. Enrichment of the four miRNAs in pancreatic juice was associated with decreased OS, as was the combination of miR-205 and miR-210. Higher contents of miR-205 and miR-210 were also associated with lymph node metastasis. Elevated levels of circulating miR-205, miR-210, miR-492, and miR-1247 in pancreatic juice are, therefore, promising candidate biomarkers of disease and poor prognosis in patients with PDAC.

  3. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Taylor M.; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P.; Shah, Rohan M.; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Massarweh, Nader N.; Silberfein, Eric J.; Choi, Eugene A.; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L.; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3) enteral nutrition (EN) should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN) postoperatively; and, (4) a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate

  4. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3) enteral nutrition (EN) should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN) postoperatively; and, (4) a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate

  5. Prediagnostic adiponectin concentrations and pancreatic cancer risk in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Weinstein, Stephanie; Pollak, Michael; Tao, Yuzhen; Taylor, Philip R; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, has insulin-sensitizing, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory, and antiangiogenic properties. The authors conducted a nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort, a cohort of male Finnish smokers aged 50-69 years at baseline, to test whether prediagnostic adiponectin concentrations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Between January 1985 and October 2004, 311 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed among cohort participants with serum samples. Controls (n = 510) were alive and free of cancer at the time the case was diagnosed and were matched to the cases by age and date of blood drawing. The authors used conditional logistic regression adjusted for smoking, blood pressure, and C-peptide level to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreatic cancer. Higher adiponectin concentrations were inversely associated with pancreatic cancer (for highest quintile (> 9.8 microg/mL) vs. lowest (< or =4.6 microg/mL), odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.39, 1.07; P-trend = 0.04). The inverse association was significant among cases diagnosed 5 or more years after blood collection (n = 238) (for highest quintile vs. lowest, odds ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.98; P-trend = 0.03). These results support the hypothesis that higher adiponectin concentrations may be inversely associated with the development of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karandish, Fataneh; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers. PMID:27147897

  7. Pancreatic cancer: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yaokai; Wu, Qing; Li, Xin; Gu, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Jiahua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is recognized as the king of carcinoma, and the gap between basic research and clinical practice is difficult to improve the treatment effect. Translational medicine builds an important bridge between pancreatic cancer basic research and clinical practice from the pathogenesis, early diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma, drug screening, treatment strategies and metastasis prediction. This article will carry on the concrete elaboration to the above several aspects. PMID:28090514

  8. Decreased serum thrombospondin-1 levels in pancreatic cancer patients up to 24 months prior to clinical diagnosis: association with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Lucy; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; O’Brien, Darragh P.; Apostolidou, Sophia; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Fourkala, Evangelia-O; Jacobs, Ian J.; Menon, Usha; Cox, Trevor; Campbell, Fiona; Pereira, Stephen P.; Tuveson, David A.; Park, B. Kevin; Greenhalf, William; Sutton, Robert; Timms, John F.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Costello, Eithne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identification of serum biomarkers enabling earlier diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) could improve outcome. Serum protein profiles in patients with pre-clinical disease and at diagnosis were investigated. Experimental Design Serum from cases up to 4 years prior to PDAC diagnosis and controls (UKCTOCS,n=174) were studied, alongside samples from patients diagnosed with PDAC, chronic pancreatitis, benign biliary disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects (n=298). iTRAQ enabled comparisons of pooled serum from a test set (n=150). Validation was undertaken using MRM and/or western blotting in all 472 human samples and samples from a KPC mouse model. Results iTRAQ identified thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) as reduced preclinically and in diagnosed samples. MRM confirmed significant reduction in levels of TSP-1 up to 24 months prior to diagnosis. A combination of TSP-1 and CA19-9 gave an AUC of 0.86, significantly outperforming both markers alone (0.69 & 0.77 respectively; P<0.01). TSP-1 was also decreased in PDAC patients compared to healthy controls (P<0.05) and patients with benign biliary obstruction (P<0.01). Low levels of TSP-1 correlated with poorer survival, pre-clinically (P<0.05) and at clinical diagnosis (P<0.02). In PDAC patients, reduced TSP-1 levels were more frequently observed in those with confirmed diabetes mellitus (P<0.01). Significantly lower levels were also observed in PDAC patients with diabetes compared to individuals with type 2 DM (P=0.01). Conclusions Circulating TSP-1 levels decrease up to 24 months prior to diagnosis of PDAC and significantly enhance the diagnostic performance of CA19-9. The influence of diabetes mellitus on biomarker behaviour should be considered in future studies. PMID:26573598

  9. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed by surgery. If the cancer has spread, palliative treatment can improve the patient's quality of life ... and cannot be removed, the following types of palliative surgery may be done to relieve symptoms and ...

  10. Pancreatic cancer control: is vitamin D the answer?

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sarah; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by late detection, resistance to therapy, poor prognosis, and an exceptionally high mortality rate. Epidemiology ascribes a chemopreventive role to vitamin D in several cancers including pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D therapy has been ascribed a role previously in tumor inhibition and differentiation in addition to reduction of inflammation and angiogenesis. However, the role of vitamin D in pancreatic cancer prevention or therapy remains elusive to date. Studies have shown a negative correlation between the risk of pancreatic cancer and serum vitamin D levels. It is believed that vitamin D binding to certain conserved sequences called vitamin D response elements in the DNA can alter the expression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. Recent research has elucidated the role of zinc in carcinogenesis, which in turn is found to be affected by vitamin D supplementation. In the light of numerous new-found roles for vitamin D, we review and evaluate the potential actions of the sunshine vitamin with respect to pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy.

  11. Obesity potentiates the growth and dissemination of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Wade, Terrence E; Wang, Sue; Nakshatri, Poornima; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2009-08-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for pancreatic cancer development and progression, although the mechanisms underlying this association are completely unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of obesity on pancreatic cancer growth using a novel in vivo model. Lean (C57BL/6 J) and obese (Lep(Db) and Lep(Ob)) mice were inoculated with murine pancreatic cancer cells (PAN02), and studied after 5 weeks of tumor growth. Tumor histology was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, cellular proliferation was assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine, and apoptosis was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Serum adiponectin, leptin, and insulin levels were assayed. Obese mice developed larger tumors, and a significantly greater number of mice developed metastases; mortality was also greater in obese mice. Tumor apoptosis did not differ among strains, but tumors from both obese strains had greater proliferation relative to those growing in lean animals. Serum adiponectin concentration correlated negatively and serum insulin concentration correlated positively with tumor proliferation. Intratumoral adipocyte mass in tumors from both obese strains was significantly greater than that in tumors of lean mice. Data from this novel in vivo model suggest that the altered adipokine milieu and insulin resistance observed in obesity may lead directly to changes in tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting pancreatic cancer growth and dissemination.

  12. Current progress in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kelly; Kim, Victoria; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Zheng, Lei

    2016-10-10

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers with few treatment options. Immune-based strategies to treat pancreatic cancer, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, therapeutic vaccines, and combination immunotherapies, are showing promise where other approaches have failed. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-CTLA4, anti-PD-1, and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, are effective as single agents in immune sensitive cancers like melanoma, but lack efficacy in immune insensitive cancers including pancreatic cancer. However, these inhibitors are showing clinical activity, even in traditionally non-immunogenic cancers, when combined with other interventions, including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and therapeutic vaccines. Therapeutic vaccines given together with immune modulating agents are of particular interest because vaccines are the most efficient way to induce effective anti-tumor T cell responses, which is required for immunotherapies to be effective. In pancreatic cancer, early studies suggest that vaccines can induce T cells that have the potential to recognize and kill pancreatic cancer cells, but the tumor microenvironment inhibits effective T cell trafficking and function. While progress has been made in the development of immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer over the last several years, additional trials are needed to better understand the signals within the tumor microenvironment that are formidable barriers to T cell infiltration and function. Additionally, as more pancreatic specific antigens are identified, immunotherapies will continue to be refined to provide the most significant clinical benefit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Roles of Fyn in pancreatic cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yu; Cai, Lei; Bie, Ping; Wang, Shu-Guang; Jiang, Yan; Dong, Jia-Hong; Li, Xiao-Wu

    2010-02-01

    Src family kinases have been suggested to be associated with the metastasis of tumors, but their related mechanisms remain unclear. The aims of the present study were to assess the possible mechanisms by which the inhibition of Fyn activation regulates pancreatic cancer metastasis. We examined the expressions of Fyn in human pancreatic cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry and systematically investigated the relationship between Fyn expression and pancreatic cancer metastasis. A nude mouse xenograft model induced by BxPC3 cells with or without the inhibition of Fyn activation was used to explore the effect of the inhibition of Fyn on metastasis in vivo. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-labeling assays were used to examine the effect of the inhibition of Fyn on the cell proliferation of BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were performed to explore the possible mechanism of Fyn-induced metastasis. We found that the upregulation of Fyn expression was correlated with human pancreatic cancer metastasis. In BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells, the inhibition of Fyn activation by kinase-dead Fyn transfection decreased liver metastasis in nude mice. Further analyses showed that Fyn activity modulated pancreatic cell metastasis through the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. Our results suggest a possible mechanism by which Fyn activity regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis that exerts an effect on pancreatic cancer metastasis.

  14. A Mass Spectrometric Assay for Analysis of Haptoglobin Fucosylation in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhenxin; Simeone, Diane M.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Brand, Randall E.; Xie, Xiaolei; Shedden, Kerby A.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Lubman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method was developed to elucidate the N-glycan structures of serum glycoproteins and utilize fucosylated glycans as potential markers for pancreatic cancer. This assay was applied to haptoglobin in human serum where N-glycans derived from the serum of 16 pancreatic cancer patients were compared with those from 15 individuals with benign conditions (5 normals, 5 chronic pancreatitis, and 5 type II diabetes). This assay used only 10uL of serum where haptoglobin was extracted using a monoclonal antibody and quantitative permethylation was performed on desialylated N-glycans followed by MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis. Eight desialylated N-glycan structures of haptoglobin were identified where a bifucosylated tri-antennary structure was reported for the first time in pancreatic cancer samples. Both core and antennary fucosylation were elevated in pancreatic cancer samples compared to samples from benign conditions. Fucosylation degree indices were calculated and show a significant difference between pancreatic cancer patients of all stages and the benign conditions analyzed. This study demonstrates that a serum assay based on haptoglobin fucosylation patterns using mass spectrometric analysis may serve as a novel method for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21417406

  15. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop: Meeting Report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa A; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Petersen, Gloria M; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E; Chari, Suresh T; Klein, Alison P; Lubman, David M; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Wolpin, Brian M; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E; Rinaudo, Jo Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10 to 11, 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions, high-risk populations and criteria to identify a high-risk population for potential chemoprevention trials, identification of chemopreventative/immunopreventative agents, and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short-term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging, and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an National Cancer Institute working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Defining the diagnostic algorithm in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Horwhat, John David; Gress, Frank G

    2004-07-01

    Most patients with pancreatic cancer present with a mass on radiologic studies, however, not every pancreatic mass is cancer. Since radiological studies alone are insufficient to establish the diagnosis of a pancreatic mass and patient management depends on a definitive diagnosis; confirmatory cytology or histology is usually required. As a minimally invasive procedure, EUS and EUS FNA avoid the risk of cutaneous or peritoneal contamination that may occur with CT or US-guided investigations and is less invasive than surgical interventions. As a result, EUS FNA of pancreatic masses is becoming the standard for obtaining cytological diagnosis. This chapter presents an EUS-based diagnostic algorithm for the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and is based upon a review of the pertinent literature in the field of pancreatic endosonography that has been the most influential in helping to guide this evolving field. Realizing there is much overlap among the EUS characteristics of various pancreatic lesions, for the sake of simplicity we have structured our discussion in broad terms of solid versus cystic lesions and discuss various pancreatic lesions within this framework. The additional contributors to this round table discussion have been asked to provide a more dedicated, focused discussion of the various subcategories of pancreatic lesions in greater detail than we could hope to achieve here. We provide this final contribution to the round table as a means of bringing the discussion back to the big picture of pancreatic lesions, rather than trying to hone in on the fine details of any one subclass.

  18. [Pancreatic cancer linked to life style and genome].

    PubMed

    Sand, Juhani; Räty, Sari; Nordback, Isto

    2009-01-01

    Since the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is poor in spite of surgical and drug therapy, the focus should be on the prevention and early detection of the disease. In Europe, smoking accounts for up to 30% of pancreatic cancers, and heavy drinking increases the risk of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Diabetes can be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and constitute its initial symptom. Obesity and low physical activity are linked to the risk of pancreatic cancer. An increased risk of pancreatic cancer is also associated with a hereditary inflammation, cystic fibrosis, and with part of cystic tumors of the pancreas.

  19. Expression and prognostic significance of unique ULBPs in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Xu, Hong; Fang, Heng-Zhong; Zhao, Jin-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, due to the lack of efficient therapy and difficulty in early diagnosis. ULBPs have been shown to behave as important protectors with prognostic significance in various cancers. Materials and methods Immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to explore the expression of ULBPs in cancer tissue and in serum, while survival analysis was used to evaluate the subsequent clinical value of ULBPs. Results Statistics showed that high expression of membrane ULBP1 was a good biomarker of overall survival (18 months vs 13 months), and a high level of soluble ULBP2 was deemed an independent poor indicator for both overall survival (P<0.001) and disease-free survival (P<0.001). Conclusion ULBP1 provides additional information for early diagnosis, and soluble ULBP2 can be used as a novel tumor marker to evaluate the risk of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:27621649

  20. Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert C G

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is based on high-quality cross-sectional imaging, which shows tumor invasion into the celiac/superior mesenteric arteries and/or superior mesenteric/portal venous system that is not reconstructable. The optimal management of these patients is evolving quickly with the advent of newer chemotherapeutics, radiation, and nonthermal ablation modalities. This article presents the current status of initial chemotherapy, surgical therapy, ablative therapy, and radiation therapy for patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term disease control and the only chance for cure for patients with nonmetastatic exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  1. What is recent in pancreatic cancer immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Niccolai, Elena; Prisco, Domenico; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Amedei, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) represents an unresolved therapeutic challenge, due to the poor prognosis and the reduced response to currently available treatments. Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal type of digestive cancers, with a median survival of 4-6 months. Only a small proportion of PC patients is curative by surgical resection, whilst standard chemotherapy for patients in advanced disease generates only modest effects with considerable toxic damages. Thus, new therapeutic approaches, specially specific treatments such as immunotherapy, are needed. In this paper we analyze recent preclinical and clinical efforts towards immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer, including passive and active immunotherapy approaches, designed to target pancreatic-cancer-associated antigens and to elicit an antitumor response in vivo.

  2. [Persistence of chronic inflammatory responses, role in the development of chronic pancreatitis, obesity and pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Khristich, T N

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the review--to analyze the basic data of the role of chronic low-intensity inflammatory response as general biological process in the development and progression of chronic pancreatitis, obesity, and pancreatic cancer. Highlighted evidence from epidemiological studies showing that chronic pancreatitis and obesity are independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer, regardless of diabetes. Studied role of adipokines as Cytokines regulating of immune inflammatory response. Draws attention to the staging of pancreatic cancer in obesity.

  3. Targeting metabolic scavenging in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lyssiotis, Costas A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor metabolism is rewired to facilitate survival and growth in a nutrient-depleted environment. This leads to a unique dependence on metabolic recycling and scavenging pathways, including NAD salvage. Targeting this pathway in pancreatic cancer disrupts metabolic homeostasis and impairs tumor growth.

  4. Meeting Report: Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Whitcomb, David C.; Brand, Randall E.; Chari, Suresh; Klein, Alison; Lubman, David; Rhim, Andrew; Simeone, Diane M.; Wolpin, Brian; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E.; Ann Rinaudo, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer related deaths in the US with a 5 year survival rate of <10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the NCI sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10–11th 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions; high risk populations and criteria to identify a high risk population for potential chemoprevention trials; identification of chemopreventative/immuopreventative agents; and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an NCI working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27518363

  5. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-10-07

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC.

  6. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  7. Endoscopic management of pain in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Willingham, Field F; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the United States. Due to its aggressive behavior and lack of effective therapies, palliation plays a critical role in the management of the disease. Most patients with pancreatic cancer suffer from severe pain, which adversely predicts prognosis and significantly impacts the quality of life. Therefore pain management plays a central role in palliation. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioid agents are often first line medications in pain management, but they do not target the underlying pathophysiology of pain and their use is limited by adverse effects and dependence. The proposed mechanisms of pain development in pancreatic cancer include neurogenic inflammation and ductal hypertension which may be targeted by endoscopic therapies. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) and pancreatic duct stent placement are the two primary endoscopic modalities for palliative management in pancreatic cancer patients with refractory pain.  Other endoscopic treatments such as biliary stent placement and enteral stent placement for biliary and duodenal obstruction may also help palliate pain in addition to their role in decompression. This article reviews the existing evidence for these endoscopic interventions for pain management in pancreatic cancer.

  8. Measurement of serum pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) for the evaluation as a marker for pancreatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Y.; Tsujino, D.; Noguchi, M.; Someya, K.

    1985-05-01

    Clinical usefulness of measuring PSTI in sera was studied using a new RIA kit produced by Shionogi Pharmaceutical Co. The assessment of the kit performance was satisfactory with good precision (1.6-6.9% in C.V.), reproducibility (5.0-6.0%), sensitivity (>2.Ong/ml), recovery test (98-109%, m101) and linear dilution test results. Serum PSTI levels in 71 normal controls were 12.0 + 5.0 ng/ml(m+S.D.) with higher values in subjects over 60 y.o. (14.2 +- 4.2 in 60-69 y.o. and 18.9 +- 6.5 over 70 y.o.). Serum PSTI levels were measured in 183 patients with various benign diseases (BD) and 251 cancer patients (CA). Among BD relatively high positive (>30ng/ml) ratios were observed in acute pancreatitis(40%, N=15), chronic pancreatitis(23.1%,13), pneumonia(23.5%,23) in contrast to low levels in acute hepatitis (6.7%,15), chronic hepatitis (8.0%, 25), liver cirrhosis (10.3%,29) and others (11.1%,25) including 2 chronic renal failure (220 and 465 ng/ml). In a patient with acute pancreatitis followed from the onset of the attack PSTI levels revealed 2 peaks on the 1st and 4th day. Serum PSTI correlated with clinical courses better than serum amylase which declined faster than PSTI. Among CA relatively high positive ratios were seen in CA of pancreas(46.7%,30), biliary tract (52.6%,19) and primary hepatoma (58.8%,34) in contrast to low levels in CA of esophagus (18.2%,11), stomach (16.7%, 78), colon (21.6%, 37), lung (8.0%, 25) and breast (0%.17). Measurement of PSTI should provide a clinical indicator for pancreatic diseases complementing existing markers such as amylase, lipase, elastase 1 and trypsin.

  9. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  10. Immune checkpoint therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Henrik; Andersson, Roland; Bauden, Monika; Hammes, Sarah; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Ansari, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Novel treatment modalities are necessary for pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibition has shown effect in other solid tumors, and could have a place in pancreatic cancer treatment. Most available clinical studies on immune checkpoint inhibitors for pancreatic cancer are not yet completed and are still recruiting patients. Among the completed trials, there have been findings of a preliminary nature such as delayed disease progression and enhanced overall survival after treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors in mono- or combination therapy. However, due to small sample sizes, major results are not yet identifiable. The present article provides a clinical overview of immune checkpoint inhibition in pancreatic cancer. PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov and American Society of Clinical Oncology’s meeting abstracts were systematically searched for relevant clinical studies. Four articles, five abstracts and 25 clinical trials were identified and analyzed in detail. PMID:27920468

  11. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended.

  12. Splanchnicectomy for Pancreatic Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Toshiro; Kuramoto, Masafumi; Shimada, Shinya; Ikeshima, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Nakamura, Kenichi; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a serious problem that often contributes to a poor quality of life in pancreatic cancer patients. Medical management by opioid analgesics is often accompanied by side effects and incomplete pain relief. A celiac plexus block is a simple treatment which relieves pain, but the procedure demands a certain degree of proficiency and the duration of the effects obtained can be rather limited. Transhiatal bilateral splanchnicectomy achieves a certain denervation of splanchnic nerves, but it requires a laparotomy. Unilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy is a minimally invasive procedure to cause definite denervation. Bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy is recommended for unsatisfactory cases or recurrent pain occurring after the initial unilateral splanchnicectomy. It is important to select the most suitable treatment depending on patients' actual medical state and the predicted outcomes. PMID:24868557

  13. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  14. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  15. Novel strategies for managing pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loc, Welley S; Smith, Jill P; Matters, Gail; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H

    2014-01-01

    With the incidence reports of pancreatic cancer increasing every year, research over the last several decades has been focused on the means to achieve early diagnosis in patients that are at a high risk of developing the malignancy. This review covers current strategies for managing pancreatic cancer and further discusses efforts in understanding the role of early onset symptoms leading to tumor progression. Recent investigations in this discussion include type 3c diabetes, selected biomarkers and pathways related to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, drug resistance, and advances in nanomedicine which may provide significant solutions for improving early detection and treatments in future medicine. PMID:25356034

  16. Biomarkers for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Claire; Earl, Julie; Ghaneh, Paula; Halloran, Christopher; Carrato, Alfredo; Greenhalf, William; Neoptolemos, John; Costello, Eithne

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%. The lack of established strategies for early detection contributes to this poor prognosis. Although several novel candidate biomarkers have been proposed for earlier diagnosis, none have been adopted into routine clinical use. In this review, the authors examine the challenges associated with finding new pancreatic cancer diagnostic biomarkers and explore why translation of biomarker research for patient benefit has thus far failed. The authors also review recent progress and highlight advances in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer that may lead to improvements in biomarker detection and implementation.

  17. Genetic predisposition to pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghiorzo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is the most deadly of the common cancers. Owing to its rapid progression and almost certain fatal outcome, identifying individuals at risk and detecting early lesions are crucial to improve outcome. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role. Approximately 10% of PC is estimated to have familial inheritance. Several germline mutations have been found to be involved in hereditary forms of PC, including both familial PC (FPC) and PC as one of the manifestations of a hereditary cancer syndrome or other hereditary conditions. Although most of the susceptibility genes for FPC have yet to be identified, next-generation sequencing studies are likely to provide important insights. The risk of PC in FPC is sufficiently high to recommend screening of high-risk individuals; thus, defining such individuals appropriately is the key. Candidate genes have been described and patients considered for screening programs under research protocols should first be tested for presence of germline mutations in the BRCA2, PALB2 and ATM genes. In specific PC populations, including in Italy, hereditary cancer predisposition genes such as CDKN2A also explain a considerable fraction of FPC. PMID:25152581

  18. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer: how useful is it in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Smyrniotis, Vasileios

    2012-07-10

    During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Reports about clinical implications of molecular biology in patients with pancreatic cancer were retrieved from PubMed. These reports were selected on the basis of their clinical relevance, and the data of their publication (preferentially within the last 5 years). Emphasis was placed on reports investigating diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Molecular biology can be used to identify individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. Intensive surveillance is indicated in these patients to detect pancreatic neoplasia ideally at a preinvasive stage, when curative resection is still possible. Molecular biology can also be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, with molecular analysis on samples of biologic material, such as serum or plasma, duodenal fluid or preferentially pure pancreatic juice, pancreatic cells or tissue, and stools. Molecular indices have also prognostic significance. Finally, molecular biology may have therapeutic implications by using various therapeutic approaches, such as antiangiogenic factors, purine synthesis inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, factors modulating tumor-stroma interaction, inactivation of the hedgehog pathway, gene therapy, oncolytic viral therapy, immunotherapy (both passive as well as active) etc. Molecular biology may have important clinical implications in patients with pancreatic cancer and represents one of the most active areas on cancer research. Hopefully clinical applications of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer will expand in the future, improving the

  19. Diabetes, Pancreatogenic Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Dana K; Korc, Murray; Petersen, Gloria M; Eibl, Guido; Li, Donghui; Rickels, Michael R; Chari, Suresh T; Abbruzzese, James L

    2017-05-01

    The relationships between diabetes and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are complex. Longstanding type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but increasing epidemiological data point to PDAC as also a cause of diabetes due to unknown mechanisms. New-onset diabetes is of particular interest to the oncology community as the differentiation of new-onset diabetes caused by PDAC as distinct from T2DM may allow for earlier diagnosis of PDAC. To address these relationships and raise awareness of the relationships between PDAC and diabetes, a symposium entitled Diabetes, Pancreatogenic Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer was held at the American Diabetes Association's 76th Scientific Sessions in June 2016. This article summarizes the data presented at that symposium, describing the current understanding of the interrelationships between diabetes, diabetes management, and pancreatic cancer, and identifies areas where additional research is needed. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. [CORRELATION BETWEEN OBESITY AND PANCREATIC CANCER].

    PubMed

    Pin, Maja; Štimac, Davor

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor with a very poor prognosis, lack of early diagnostic symptoms and highly resistant to therapy. Its incidence is approximately equal to the mortality rate. Even though in recent years progress has been made in defining the morphological and key genetic changes, it is still unclear which factors trigger its occurrence. Some risk factors are age, gender and race, genetic susceptibility, dietary factors, fever, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes and physical inactivity. Studies have shown that an increase in BMI consequently leads to an increased risk of malignancies, including pancreatic cancer. Research based on adipokines and their role in obesity and the occurrence of pancreatic cancer are the potential for a possible future therapeutic interventions.

  1. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, John A; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Immune cell functions in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Plate, J M; Harris, J E

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer kills nearly 29,000 people in the United States annually-as many people as are diagnosed with the disease. Chemotherapeutic treatment is ineffective in halting progression of the disease. Yet, specific immunity to pancreatic tumor cells in subjects with pancreatic cancer has been demonstrated repeatedly during the last 24 years. Attempts to expand and enhance tumor-specific immunity with biotherapy, however, have not met with success. The question remains, "Why can't specific immunity regulate pancreatic cancer growth?" The idea that tumor cells have evolved protective mechanisms against immunity was raised years ago and has recently been revisited by a number of research laboratories. In pancreatic cancer, soluble factors produced by and for the protection of the tumor environment have been detected and are often distributed to the victim's circulatory system where they may effect a more generalized immunosuppression. Yet the nature of these soluble factors remains controversial, since some also serve as tumor antigens that are recognized by the same T cells that may become inactivated by them. Unless the problem of tumor-derived immunosuppressive products is addressed directly through basic and translational research studies, successful biotherapeutic treatment for pancreatic cancer may not be forthcoming.

  3. Prediagnostic Adiponectin Concentrations and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Stephanie; Pollak, Michael; Tao, Yuzhen; Taylor, Philip R.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2008-01-01

    Adiponectin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, has insulin-sensitizing, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory, and antiangiogenic properties. The authors conducted a nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort, a cohort of male Finnish smokers aged 50–69 years at baseline, to test whether prediagnostic adiponectin concentrations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Between January 1985 and October 2004, 311 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed among cohort participants with serum samples. Controls (n = 510) were alive and free of cancer at the time the case was diagnosed and were matched to the cases by age and date of blood drawing. The authors used conditional logistic regression adjusted for smoking, blood pressure, and C-peptide level to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreatic cancer. Higher adiponectin concentrations were inversely associated with pancreatic cancer (for highest quintile (>9.8 μg/mL) vs. lowest (≤4.6 μg/mL), odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.39, 1.07; P-trend = 0.04). The inverse association was significant among cases diagnosed 5 or more years after blood collection (n = 238) (for highest quintile vs. lowest, odds ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.98; P-trend = 0.03). These results support the hypothesis that higher adiponectin concentrations may be inversely associated with the development of pancreatic cancer. PMID:18801887

  4. Using Quantitative Seroproteomics to Identify Antibody Biomarkers in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Darshil T; Kim, Min-Sik; Thompson, Elizabeth D; Huang, Lanqing; Sharma, Rajni; Klein, Alison P; Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T; Laheru, Daniel A; Pandey, Akhilesh; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Anders, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Less than 6% of patients survive beyond the fifth year due to inadequate early diagnostics and ineffective treatment options. Our laboratory has developed an allogeneic, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-secreting pancreatic cancer vaccine (GVAX) that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Here, we employed a serum antibodies-based SILAC immunoprecipitation (SASI) approach to identify proteins that elicit an antibody response after vaccination. The SASI approach uses immunoprecipitation with patient-derived antibodies that is coupled to quantitative stable isotope-labeled amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Using mass spectrometric analysis, we identified more than 150 different proteins that induce an antibody response after vaccination. The regulatory subunit 12A of protein phosphatase 1 (MYPT1 or PPP1R12A), regulatory subunit 8 of the 26S proteasome (PSMC5), and the transferrin receptor (TFRC) were shown to be pancreatic cancer-associated antigens recognized by postvaccination antibodies in the sera of patients with favorable disease-free survival after GVAX therapy. We further interrogated these proteins in over 80 GVAX-treated patients' pancreases and uniformly found a significant increase in the expression of MYPT1, PSMC5, and TFRC in neoplastic compared with non-neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium. We show that the novel SASI approach can identify antibody targets specifically expressed in patients with improved disease-free survival after cancer vaccine therapy. These targets need further validation to be considered as possible pancreatic cancer biomarkers. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Gene and cell therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hans Martin; Ungerechts, Guy; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M

    2015-04-01

    The clinical outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer are poor, and the limited success of classical chemotherapy underscores the need for new, targeted approaches for this disease. The delivery of genetic material to cells allows for a variety of therapeutic concepts. Engineered agents based on synthetic biology are under clinical investigation in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on Phase I - III clinical trials of gene and cell therapy for pancreatic cancer and on future implications of recent translational research. Trials available in the US National Library of Medicine (www.clinicaltrials.gov) until February 2014 were reviewed and relevant published results of preclinical and clinical studies were retrieved from www.pubmed.gov . In pancreatic cancer, gene and cell therapies are feasible and may have synergistic antitumor activity with standard treatment and/or immunotherapy. Challenges are related to application safety, manufacturing costs, and a new spectrum of adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate available agents in carefully designed protocols and combination regimens. Enabling personalized cancer therapy, insights from molecular diagnostic technologies will guide the development and selection of new gene-based drugs. The evolving preclinical and clinical data on gene-based therapies can lay the foundation for future avenues improving patient care in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Out-FOXing Pancreatic Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancer types worldwide with increasing incidence and mortality rates in the United States. Consequently, it is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2020. Poor patient outcomes are due to a combination of diagnosis at an advanced stage and a lack of effective treatments. However, a better understanding of the molecular pathways at work in pancreatic cancers may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  7. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  8. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Talamini, G; Bassi, C; Falconi, M; Sartori, N; Salvia, R; Rigo, L; Castagnini, A; Di Francesco, V; Frulloni, L; Bovo, P; Vaona, B; Angelini, G; Vantini, I; Cavallini, G; Pederzoli, P

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare alcohol and smoking as risk factors in the development of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We considered only male subjects: (1) 630 patients with chronic pancreatitis who developed 12 pancreatic and 47 extrapancreatic cancers; (2) 69 patients with histologically well documented pancreatic cancer and no clinical history of chronic pancreatitis; and (3) 700 random controls taken from the Verona polling list and submitted to a complete medical check-up. Chronic pancreatitis subjects drink more than control subjects and more than subjects with pancreatic cancer without chronic pancreatitis (P<0.001). The percentage of smokers in the group with chronic pancreatitis is significantly higher than that in the control group [odds ratio (OR) 17.3; 95% CI 12.6-23.8; P<0.001] and in the group with pancreatic carcinomas but with no history of chronic pancreatitis (OR 5.3; 95% CI 3.0-9.4; P<0.001). In conclusion, our study shows that: (1) the risk of chronic pancreatitis correlates both with alcohol intake and with cigarette smoking with a trend indicating that the risk increases with increased alcohol intake and cigarette consumption; (2) alcohol and smoking are statistically independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis; and (3) the risk of pancreatic cancer correlates positively with cigarette smoking but not with drinking.

  9. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Patients With Pancreatic or Periampullary Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Dorine S J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Besselink, Marc G; van Eijck, Casper H; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with pancreatic or periampullary cancer, both before and after resection. Systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines). We included studies reporting on pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with pancreatic or periampullary cancer. Data on patient demographics, type of pancreatic resection, diagnostic test, and occurrence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency were extracted. Prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was calculated before and after pancreatic resections and in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Nine observational cohort studies with 693 patients were included. Median preoperative prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was 44% (range, 42%-47%) before pancreatoduodenectomy, 20% (range, 16%-67%) before distal pancreatectomy, 63% before total pancreatectomy, and 25% to 50% in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The median prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency at least 6 months after pancreatoduodenectomy was 74% (range, 36%-100%) and 67% to 80% after distal pancreatectomy. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is diagnosed in approximately half of all patients scheduled to undergo resection for pancreatic or periampullary cancer. The prevalence increases markedly after resection. These data highlight the need of pancreatic enzyme suppletion in these patients.

  10. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  11. Using Quantitative Seroproteomics to Identify Antibody Biomarkers in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Darshil T.; Kim, Min-Sik; Thompson, Elizabeth D.; Huang, Lanqing; Sharma, Rajni; Klein, Alison P.; Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Anders, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Less than 6% of patients survive beyond the fifth year due to inadequate early diagnostics and ineffective treatment options. Our lab has developed an allogeneic, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secreting pancreatic cancer vaccine (GVAX) that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Here, we employed a novel Serum Antibodies based SILAC-Immunoprecipitation (SASI) approach to identify proteins that elicit an antibody response after vaccination. The SASI approach utilizes immunoprecipitation with patient derived antibodies that is coupled to quantitative stable isotope–labeled amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Using mass spectrometric analysis, we identified more than 150 different proteins that induce an antibody response after vaccination. The regulatory subunit 12A of protein phosphatase 1 (MYPT1 or PPP1R12A), regulatory subunit 8 of the 26S proteasome (PSMC5), and the transferrin receptor (TFRC) were shown to be pancreatic cancer associated antigens recognized by post-vaccination antibodies in the sera of patients with favorable disease-free survival after GVAX therapy. We further interrogated these proteins in over 80 GVAX-treated patients’ pancreases and uniformly found a significant increase in the expression of MYPT1, PSMC5, and TFRC in neoplastic compared to non-neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium. We show that the novel SASI approach can identify antibody targets specifically expressed in patients with improved disease-free survival after cancer vaccine therapy. These targets need further validation to be considered as possible pancreatic cancer biomarkers. PMID:26842750

  12. Hybrid kappa\\lambda antibody is a new serological marker to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Mingju; Li, Wenli; Yi, Lang; Yu, Songlin; Fan, Gaowei; Lu, Tian; Yang, Xin; Wang, Guojing; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Jiansheng; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-06-08

    The only generally accepted serological marker currently used for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is IgG4. Our aim was mainly to determine whether hybrid κ\\λ antibody can help to diagnose AIP and to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system to measure the levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in human sera. Sera were obtained from 338 patients, including 61 with AIP, 74 with pancreatic cancer, 50 with acute pancreatitis, 40 with ordinary chronic pancreatitis, 15 with miscellaneous pancreatic diseases, and 98 with normal pancreas. Our study showed levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in the AIP group were significantly higher than in the non-AIP group (P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the diagnosis of AIP were 80.3%, 91%, 66.2% and 95.5% respectively. Furthermore, the combined measurement of serum hybrid κ\\λ antibody and IgG4 tended to increase the sensitivity although the difference was not statistically significant (90.2% vs. 78.7%, P = 0.08), compared to measurement of IgG4 alone. Our findings suggest that hybrid κ\\λ antibody could be a new serological marker to diagnose AIP and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

  13. Is There a Link Between Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Is There a Link Between Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer? Type 2 diabetes onset or worsening may be ... 2 diabetes could be an early sign of pancreatic cancer, new research suggests. Researchers analyzed data from nearly ...

  14. Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium.

    PubMed

    Elena, Joanne W; Steplowski, Emily; Yu, Kai; Hartge, Patricia; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Brotzman, Michelle J; Chanock, Stephen J; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Arslan, Alan A; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J; LaCroix, Andrea; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Amundadottir, Laufey; Bao, Ying; Boeing, Heiner; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E; Gaziano, J Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L; Duell, Eric J; Hallmans, Göran; Howard, Barbara V; Hunter, David J; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Michaud, Dominique S; Palli, Domenico; Phillips, Lawrence S; Overvad, Kim; Patel, Alpa V; Sansbury, Leah; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Simon, Michael S; Slimani, Nadia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Visvanathan, Kala; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wolpin, Brian M; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Fuchs, Charles S; Hoover, Robert N; Gross, Myron

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case-control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (<2 years) of pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer. Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2-8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52). These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.

  15. CAM 17.1--a new diagnostic marker in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gansauge, F.; Gansauge, S.; Parker, N.; Beger, M. I.; Poch, B.; Link, K. H.; Safi, F.; Beger, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    CAM 17.1-Ab is a recently described monoclonal antibody that detects a mucus glycoprotein with high specificity for intestinal mucus, particularly in the colon, small intestine, biliary tract and pancreas. We investigated the expression and release of CAM 17.1 in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and tissue specimens of normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. CAM 17.1 was weakly expressed on normal ductal cells and chronic pancreatitis, whereas it was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Serum analysis using a new enzyme-linked antibody sandwich assay (CAM 17.1/WGA) of patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer or other gastrointestinal cancer and of healthy blood donors revealed a high sensitivity (67%) and excellent specificity (90%) of CAM 17.1/WGA assay in pancreatic cancer. In comparison with the tumour marker CA19-9, the sensitivity of the CAM 17.1/WGA assay was similar to the sensitivity of CA 19-9 (67% and 76%, P = 0.22), whereas the specificity of CAM 17.1/WGA assay was higher than in CA 19-9 (90% compared with 78% in chronic pancreatitis, P > 0.05). Images Figure 2 PMID:8980403

  16. Plasma biomarker for detection of early stage pancreatic cancer and risk factors for pancreatic malignancy using antibodies for apolipoprotein-AII isoforms.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Michimoto; Okusaka, Takuji; Rinaudo, Jo Ann; Huang, Ying; Marsh, Tracey; Sanada, Mitsuaki; Sasajima, Yoshiyuki; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Miura, Nami; Kamita, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Takako; Shoji, Hirokazu; Jung, Giman; Srivastava, Sudhir; Yamada, Tesshi

    2015-11-09

    We recently reported that circulating apolipoprotein AII (apoAII) isoforms apoAII-ATQ/AT (C-terminal truncations of the apoAII homo-dimer) decline significantly in pancreatic cancer and thus might serve as plasma biomarkers for the early detection of this disease. We report here the development of novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for measurement of apoAII-ATQ/AT and their clinical applicability for early detection of pancreatic cancer. Plasma and serum concentrations of apoAII-ATQ/AT were measured in three independent cohorts, which comprised healthy control subjects and patients with pancreatic cancer and gastroenterologic diseases (n = 1156). These cohorts included 151 cases of stage I/II pancreatic cancer. ApoAII-ATQ/AT not only distinguished the early stages of pancreatic cancer from healthy controls but also identified patients at high risk for pancreatic malignancy. AUC values of apoAII-ATQ/AT to detect early stage pancreatic cancer were higher than those of CA19-9 in all independent cohorts. ApoAII-ATQ/AT is a potential biomarker for screening patients for the early stage of pancreatic cancer and identifying patients at risk for pancreatic malignancy (161 words).

  17. Plasma biomarker for detection of early stage pancreatic cancer and risk factors for pancreatic malignancy using antibodies for apolipoprotein-AII isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Michimoto; Okusaka, Takuji; Rinaudo, Jo Ann; Huang, Ying; Marsh, Tracey; Sanada, Mitsuaki; Sasajima, Yoshiyuki; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Miura, Nami; Kamita, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Takako; Shoji, Hirokazu; Jung, Giman; Srivastava, Sudhir; Yamada, Tesshi

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that circulating apolipoprotein AII (apoAII) isoforms apoAII-ATQ/AT (C-terminal truncations of the apoAII homo-dimer) decline significantly in pancreatic cancer and thus might serve as plasma biomarkers for the early detection of this disease. We report here the development of novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for measurement of apoAII-ATQ/AT and their clinical applicability for early detection of pancreatic cancer. Plasma and serum concentrations of apoAII-ATQ/AT were measured in three independent cohorts, which comprised healthy control subjects and patients with pancreatic cancer and gastroenterologic diseases (n = 1156). These cohorts included 151 cases of stage I/II pancreatic cancer. ApoAII-ATQ/AT not only distinguished the early stages of pancreatic cancer from healthy controls but also identified patients at high risk for pancreatic malignancy. AUC values of apoAII-ATQ/AT to detect early stage pancreatic cancer were higher than those of CA19–9 in all independent cohorts. ApoAII-ATQ/AT is a potential biomarker for screening patients for the early stage of pancreatic cancer and identifying patients at risk for pancreatic malignancy (161 words). PMID:26549697

  18. Insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, and pancreatic cancer in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Graubard, Barry I; Chari, Suresh; Limburg, Paul; Taylor, Philip R; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2005-12-14

    Obesity, diabetes mellitus, and glucose intolerance have been associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk; however, prediagnostic serum insulin concentration has not been evaluated as a predictor of this malignancy. To investigate whether prediagnostic fasting glucose and insulin concentrations and insulin resistance are associated with subsequent incidence of exocrine pancreatic cancer in a cohort of male smokers. A case-cohort prospective study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (1985-1988) cohort of 29,133 male Finnish smokers ages 50 to 69 years. The study included 400 randomly sampled subcohort control participants and 169 incident pancreatic cancer cases that occurred after the fifth year of follow-up. All participants were followed up through December 2001 (up to 16.7 years of follow-up). Incident exocrine pancreatic cancer identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. After adjusting for age, smoking, and body mass index, higher baseline fasting serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance were positively associated with pancreatic cancer. The presence of biochemically defined diabetes mellitus (glucose, > or =126 mg/dL [> or =6.99 mmol/L]) and insulin concentration in the highest vs lowest quartile both showed a significant 2-fold increased risk (hazard ratio [HR], 2.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-4.35; and HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.03-3.93; respectively). There were significant interactions for all the biomarker exposures by follow-up time, such that the positive associations were stronger among the cases that occurred more than 10 years after baseline (highest vs lowest quartile: glucose, HR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.05-4.42; P for trend = .02; insulin, HR, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.22-6.92; P for trend = .005; and insulin resistance, HR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.19-6.18; P for trend = .006). These results support the hypothesis that exposure to higher insulin concentrations and insulin resistance predicts the risk of

  19. Afatinib Dimaleate and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-04

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-24

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Microbiota, oral microbiome, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Dominique S; Izard, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Only 30% of patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer survive 1 year after the diagnosis. Progress in understanding the causes of pancreatic cancer has been made, including solidifying the associations with obesity and diabetes, and a proportion of cases should be preventable through lifestyle modifications. Unfortunately, identifying reliable biomarkers of early pancreatic cancer has been extremely challenging, and no effective screening modality is currently available for this devastating form of cancer. Recent data suggest that the microbiota may play a role in the disease process, but many questions remain. Future studies focusing on the human microbiome, both etiologically and as a marker of disease susceptibility, should shed light on how to better tackle prevention, early detection, and treatment of this highly fatal disease.

  2. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonsa, Alisha M; Chalfant, Madeleine C; Gorden, Lee D; VanSaun, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  3. Modulation of the Leptin Receptor Mediates Tumor Growth and Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalfant, Madeleine C.; Gorden, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration. PMID:25919692

  4. Targeted diagnostic magnetic nanoparticles for medical imaging of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, I; Strauss, A; Dobiasch, S; Weis, C; Szanyi, S; Gil-Iceta, L; Alonso, E; González Esparza, M; Gómez-Vallejo, V; Szczupak, B; Plaza-García, S; Mirzaei, S; Israel, L L; Bianchessi, S; Scanziani, E; Lellouche, J-P; Knoll, P; Werner, J; Felix, K; Grenacher, L; Reese, T; Kreuter, J; Jiménez-González, M

    2015-09-28

    Highly aggressive cancer types such as pancreatic cancer possess a mortality rate of up to 80% within the first 6months after diagnosis. To reduce this high mortality rate, more sensitive diagnostic tools allowing an early stage medical imaging of even very small tumours are needed. For this purpose, magnetic, biodegradable nanoparticles prepared using recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) and incorporated iron oxide (maghemite, γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were developed. Galectin-1 has been chosen as target receptor as this protein is upregulated in pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions but not in healthy pancreatic tissue nor in pancreatitis. Tissue plasminogen activator derived peptides (t-PA-ligands), that have a high affinity to galectin-1 have been chosen as target moieties and were covalently attached onto the nanoparticle surface. Improved targeting and imaging properties were shown in mice using single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT), a handheld gamma camera, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year and only 6% will make it past 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25585100

  6. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year, which is reduced to 6% after 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25933185

  7. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-04-14

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes "standard" adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients.

  8. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Da Silva, R; Gravekamp, C; Libutti, S K; Abraham, T; Dadachova, E

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides, which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. Although a lot of progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled (90)Y and (177)Lu somatostatin peptide analogs, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  9. Neoadjuvant strategies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Polistina, Francesco; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Ambrosino, Giovanni; Frego, Mauro

    2014-07-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of cancer death in Western countries, the only chance for long term survival is an R0 surgical resection that is feasible in about 10%-20% of all cases. Five years cumulative survival is less than 5% and rises to 25% for radically resected patients. About 40% has locally advanced in PC either borderline resectable (BRPC) or unresectable locally advanced (LAPC). Since LAPC and BRPC have been recognized as a particular form of PC neoadjuvant therapy (NT) has increasingly became a valid treatment option. The aim of NT is to reach local control of disease but, also, it is recognized to convert about 40% of LAPC patients to R0 resectability, thus providing a significant improvement of prognosis for responding patients. Once R0 resection is achieved, survival is comparable to that of early stage PCs treated by upfront surgery. Thus it is crucial to look for a proper patient selection. Neoadjuvant strategies are multiples and include neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT), and the association of nCT with radiotherapy (nCRT) given as either a combination of a radio sensitizing drug as gemcitabine or capecitabine or and concomitant irradiation or as upfront nCT followed by nRT associated to a radio sensitizing drug. This latter seem to be most promising as it may select patients who do not go on disease progression during initial treatment and seem to have a better prognosis. The clinical relevance of nCRT may be enhanced by the application of higher active protocols as FOLFIRINOX.

  10. Neoadjuvant strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polistina, Francesco; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Ambrosino, Giovanni; Frego, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of cancer death in Western countries, the only chance for long term survival is an R0 surgical resection that is feasible in about 10%-20% of all cases. Five years cumulative survival is less than 5% and rises to 25% for radically resected patients. About 40% has locally advanced in PC either borderline resectable (BRPC) or unresectable locally advanced (LAPC). Since LAPC and BRPC have been recognized as a particular form of PC neoadjuvant therapy (NT) has increasingly became a valid treatment option. The aim of NT is to reach local control of disease but, also, it is recognized to convert about 40% of LAPC patients to R0 resectability, thus providing a significant improvement of prognosis for responding patients. Once R0 resection is achieved, survival is comparable to that of early stage PCs treated by upfront surgery. Thus it is crucial to look for a proper patient selection. Neoadjuvant strategies are multiples and include neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT), and the association of nCT with radiotherapy (nCRT) given as either a combination of a radio sensitizing drug as gemcitabine or capecitabine or and concomitant irradiation or as upfront nCT followed by nRT associated to a radio sensitizing drug. This latter seem to be most promising as it may select patients who do not go on disease progression during initial treatment and seem to have a better prognosis. The clinical relevance of nCRT may be enhanced by the application of higher active protocols as FOLFIRINOX. PMID:25071332

  11. Current status and progress of pancreatic cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Quan-Jun; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is currently one of the most important public health problems in the world. Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with poor prognosis. As in most other countries, the health burden of pancreatic cancer in China is increasing, with annual mortality rates almost equal to incidence rates. The increasing trend of pancreatic cancer incidence is more significant in the rural areas than in the urban areas. Annual diagnoses and deaths of pancreatic cancer in China are now beyond the number of cases in the United States. GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates that cases in China account for 19.45% (65727/337872) of all newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer and 19.27% (63662/330391) of all deaths from pancreatic cancer worldwide. The population’s growing socioeconomic status contributes to the rapid increase of China’s proportional contribution to global rates. Here, we present an overview of control programs for pancreatic cancer in China focusing on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we describe key epidemiological, demographic, and socioeconomic differences between China and developed countries. Facts including no nationwide screening program for pancreatic cancer, delay in early detection resulting in a late stage at presentation, lack of awareness of pancreatic cancer in the Chinese population, and low investment compared with other cancer types by government have led to backwardness in China’s pancreatic cancer diagnosis and treatment. Finally, we suggest measures to improve health outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients in China. PMID:26185370

  12. Glycoproteins and glycoproteomics in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A; Chen, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Aberrations in protein glycosylation and polysaccharides play a pivotal role in pancreatic tumorigenesis, influencing cancer progression, metastasis, immuno-response and chemoresistance. Abnormal expression in sugar moieties can impact the function of various glycoproteins, including mucins, surface receptors, adhesive proteins, proteoglycans, as well as their effectors and binding ligands, resulting in an increase in pancreatic cancer invasiveness and a cancer-favored microenvironment. Recent advance in glycoproteomics, glycomics and other chemical biology techniques have been employed to better understand the complex mechanism of glycosylation events and how they orchestrate molecular activities in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics implicated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A variety of strategies have been demonstrated targeting protein glycosylation and polysaccharides for diagnostic and therapeutic development. PMID:27895417

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  14. Serum CA 19-9 as a Marker of Resectability and Survival in Patients with Potentially Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.; Wolff, Robert A.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Pisters, Peter W. T.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Abdalla, Eddie K.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Wang, Huamin; Crane, Christopher H.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Tamm, Eric P.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Evans, Douglas B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The role of carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 in the evaluation of patients with resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy prior to planned surgical resection is unknown. We evaluated CA 19-9 as a marker of therapeutic response, completion of therapy, and survival in patients enrolled on two recently reported clinical trials. Patients and Methods We analyzed patients with radiographically resectable adenocarcinoma of the head/uncinate process treated on two phase II trials of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Patients without evidence of disease progression following chemoradiation underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). CA 19-9 was evaluated in patients with a normal bilirubin level. Results We enrolled 174 patients, and 119 (68%) completed all therapy including PD. Pretreatment CA 19-9 <37 U/ml had a positive predictive value (PPV) for completing PD of 86% but a negative predictive value (NPV) of 33%. Among patients without evidence of disease at last follow-up, the highest pretreatment CA 19-9 was 1,125 U/ml. Restaging CA 19-9 <61 U/ml had a PPV of 93% and a NPV of 28% for completing PD among resectable patients. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve of pretreatment and restaging CA 19-9 levels for completing PD was 0.59 and 0.74, respectively. We identified no association between change in CA 19-9 and histopathologic response (P = 0.74). Conclusions Although the PPV of CA 19-9 for completing neoadjuvant therapy and undergoing PD was high, its clinical utility was compromised by a low NPV. Decision-making for patients with resectable PC should remain based on clinical assessment and radiographic staging. PMID:20162463

  15. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies.

  16. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  17. Interventional Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianwei; Jin, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Background Palliative therapy and primarily chemoradiotherapy are the mainstream treatments in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC). Conventional endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided interventional therapy has emerged as an important procedure for PC management. In this review, the progress in conventional endoscopy and EUS for PC management is discussed. Summary For local palliative therapy against PC, EUS-guided fine needle injection (FNI) could deliver different kinds of agents, such as radioactive seeds and fiducials. Although their feasibility and safety have been proven, the long-term efficiency of EUS-FNI is still not established. For pain, EUS-celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) is effective. However, CPN can only relieve the pain to a limited degree, with short duration. Endoscopy-guided stent placement is the preferred strategy for biliary and duodenal obstruction. Plastic and metal stents are equally effective for the relief of obstructive jaundice. The functional times of metal stents are longer than those of a plastic stent. Key Message For biliary obstruction, a metal stent is the first choice. The long-term efficiency of EUS-FNI still needs further study. Practical Implications Endoscopy and EUS-guided interventions have gradually become the mainstream method for local treatment of PC due to mini-invasiveness and real-time observation. PC is the second most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States, leading to about 4.0% of all cancer deaths [Siegel et al: CA Cancer J Clin 2014;64:9-29]. The only curative approach for patients with PC is surgical resection, but unfortunately 80-90% of patients have a surgically inoperable disease, with 53% having local metastases at the time of diagnosis [Weinberg et al: Oncology (Williston Park) 2015;29:809-820, 886]. Therefore, palliative therapy and primarily chemoradiotherapy are the mainstream of treatment in

  18. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  19. Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation by LRH-1 Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0396 TITLE: INHIBITION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELL...DATES COVERED 15September2012–14September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INHIBITION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELL PROLIFERATION BY LRH-1 INHIBITORS 5a...of pancreatic cancer is devastating, with mortality rates nearing its incidence rates. To date, there are no effective targeted anti-pancreatic

  20. Moving Into Stage IV: Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Waxler, Robert P

    2016-12-01

    Living with pancreatic cancer is always an adjustment, an attempt to find balance and direction in a world of the sick and the healthy. It is also a journey into unknown territory, a search for beauty, a battle of life against death, eros struggling with thanatos. In this narrative, you will find personal details of the life of a pancreatic cancer patient, his daily struggles, his treatments, his medications, but you will also find his search for the meaning of life itself embedded in his unfolding story, his attempt to come to terms with the questions of why we live and what we might consider to be a genuinely fortunate life.

  1. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  2. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. New insights into pancreatic cancer-induced paraneoplastic diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Nagpal, Sajan Jiv Singh; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chari, Suresh T.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 85% of patients with pancreatic cancer have diabetes or hyperglycaemia, which frequently manifests as early as 2–3 years before a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Conversely, patients with new-onset diabetes have a 5–8-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 1–3 years of developing diabetes. Emerging evidence now indicates that pancreatic cancer causes diabetes. As in type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are seen in pancreatic cancer-induced diabetes. However, unlike in patients with type 2 diabetes, glucose control worsens in patients with pancreatic cancer in the face of ongoing, often profound, weight loss. Diabetes and weight loss, which precede cachexia onset by several months, are paraneoplastic phenomena induced by pancreatic cancer. Although the pathogenesis of these pancreatic cancer-induced metabolic alterations is only beginning to be understood, these are likely mechanisms to promote the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer in a hostile and highly desmoplastic microenvironment. Interestingly, these metabolic changes could enable early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, if they can be distinguished from the ones that occur in patients with type 2 diabetes. One such possible biomarker is adrenomedullin, which is a potential mediator of β-cell dysfunction in pancreatic cancer-induced diabetes. PMID:23528347

  4. Overexpression of ankyrin1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; MacGregor, Anne; Hong, Seung-Mo; Ayars, Michael; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Borges, Michael; Kanda, Mitsuro; Li, Ang; Vincent, Audrey; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The methylation status of a promoter influences gene expression and aberrant methylation during tumor development has important functional consequences for pancreatic and other cancers. Using methylated CpG island amplification and promoter microarrays, we identified ANK1 as hypomethylated in pancreatic cancers. Expression analysis determined ANK1 as commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancers relative to normal pancreas. ANK1 was co-expressed with miR-486 in pancreatic cancer cells. Stable knockdown of ANK1 in the pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC1 led to changes in cell morphology, and decreases in colony formation. Stable knockdown of ANK1 also marked reduced the growth of tumors in athymic nude mice. Among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, those with pancreatic cancers expressing ANK1 had a poorer prognosis than those without ANK1 expression. These findings indicate a role for ANK1 overexpression in mediating pancreatic cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27144336

  5. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Detection Consortium (PCDC) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Detection Consortium (PCDC) develops and tests new molecular and imagi | Develops and tests new molecular and imaging biomarkers to detect early stage PDAC and its precursor lesions.

  7. Nanoparticle formulation of ormeloxifene for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sheema; Chauhan, Neeraj; Yallapu, Murali M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Balakrishna, Swathi; Ellis, Robert T.; Thompson, Paul A.; Balabathula, Pavan; Behrman, Stephen W.; Zafar, Nadeem; Singh, Man Mohan; Halaweish, Fathi T.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most prevalent cancer with about an 85% mortality rate; thus, an utmost need exists to discover new therapeutic modalities that would enhance therapy outcomes of this disease with minimal or no side effects. Ormeloxifene (ORM), a synthetic molecule, has exhibited potent anti-cancer effects through inhibition of important oncogenic and proliferation signaling pathways. However, the anti-cancer efficacy of ORM can be further improved by developing its nanoformulation, which will also offer tumor specific targeted delivery. Therefore, we have developed a novel ORM encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle (NP) formulation (PLGA-ORM NP). This formulation was characterized for particle size, chemical composition, and drug loading efficiency, using various physico-chemical methods (TEM, FT-IR, DSC, TGA, and HPLC). Because of its facile composition, this novel formulation is compatible with antibody/aptamer conjugation to achieve tumor specific targeting. The particle size analysis of this PLGA-ORM formulation (~ 100 nm) indicates that this formulation can preferentially reach and accumulate in tumors by the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Cellular uptake and internalization studies demonstrate that PLGA-ORM NPs escape lysosomal degradation, providing efficient endosomal release to cytosol. PLGA-ORM NPs showed remarkable anti-cancer potential in various pancreatic cancer cells (HPAF-II, BxPC-3, Panc-1, MiaPaca) and a BxPC-3 xenograft mice model resulting in increased animal survival. PLGA-ORM NPs suppressed pancreatic tumor growth via suppression of Akt phosphorylation and expression of MUC1, HER2, PCNA, CK19 and CD31. This study suggests that the PLGA-ORM formulation is highly efficient for the inhibition of pancreatic tumor growth and thus can be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in the future. PMID:25890768

  8. Evaluation of serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity and helical computed tomography versus conventional testing for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Forman, M A; Marks, S L; De Cock, H E V; Hergesell, E J; Wisner, E R; Baker, T W; Kass, P H; Steiner, J M; Williams, D A

    2004-01-01

    Serum feline trypsinogen-like immunoreactivity (fTLI) concentrations and abdominal ultrasound have facilitated the noninvasive diagnosis of pancreatitis in cats, but low sensitivities (33% and 20-35%, respectively) have been reported. A radioimmunoassay has been validated to measure feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI), but the assay's sensitivity and specificity have not been established. In human beings, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) is high (75-90%), but in a study of 10 cats, only 2 had CT changes suggestive of pancreatitis. We prospectively evaluated these diagnostic tests in cats with and without pancreatitis. In all cats, serum was obtained for fTLI and fPLI concentrations, and pancreatic ultrasound images and biopsies were acquired. Serum fPLI concentrations (P< .0001) and ultrasound findings (P = .0073) were significantly different between healthy cats and cats with pancreatitis. Serum fTLI concentrations (P = .15) and CT measurements (P = .18) were not significantly different between the groups. The sensitivity of fTLI in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis was 80%, and the specificity in healthy cats was 75%. Feline PLI concentrations were both sensitive in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis (100%) and specific in the healthy cats (100%). Abdominal ultrasound was both sensitive in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis (80%) and specific in healthy cats (88%). The high sensitivities of fPLI and abdominal ultrasound suggest that these tests should play an important role in the noninvasive diagnosis of feline pancreatitis. As suggested by a previous study, pancreatic CT is not a useful diagnostic test for feline pancreatitis.

  9. A Multicenter Trial Defining a Serum Protein Signature Associated with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gerdtsson, Anna S.; Malats, Núria; Säll, Anna; Real, Francisco X.; Porta, Miquel; Skoog, Petter; Persson, Helena; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease with rapid tumor progression and poor prognosis. This study was motivated by the lack of sensitive and specific PDAC biomarkers and aimed to identify a diagnostic, serum protein signature for PDAC. Methods. To mimic a real life test situation, a multicenter trial comprising a serum sample cohort, including 338 patients with either PDAC or other pancreatic diseases (OPD) and controls with nonpancreatic conditions (NPC), was analyzed on 293-plex recombinant antibody microarrays targeting immunoregulatory and cancer-associated antigens. Results. Serum samples collected from different hospitals were analyzed and showed that (i) sampling from five different hospitals could not be identified as a preanalytical variable and (ii) a multiplexed biomarker signature could be identified, utilizing up to 10 serum markers that could discriminate PDAC from controls, with sensitivities and specificities in the 91–100% range. The first protein profiles associated with the location of the primary tumor in the pancreas could also be identified. Conclusions. The results demonstrate that robust enough serum signatures could be identified in a multicenter trial, potentially contributing to the development of a multiplexed biomarker immunoassay for improved PDAC diagnosis. PMID:26587286

  10. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colorectal, Stomach, or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-21

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  11. Gold nanoclusters-assisted delivery of NGF siRNA for effective treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yifeng; Tang, Lixue; Xie, Yangzhouyun; Xianyu, Yunlei; Zhang, Lingmin; Wang, Peng; Hamada, Yoh; Jiang, Kai; Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human cancers, whose progression is highly dependent on the nervous microenvironment. The suppression of gene expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) may have great potential in pancreatic cancer treatment. Here we show that gold nanocluster-assisted delivery of siRNA of NGF (GNC–siRNA) allows efficient NGF gene silencing and pancreatic cancer treatment. The GNC–siRNA complex increases the stability of siRNA in serum, prolongs the circulation lifetime of siRNA in blood and enhances the cellular uptake and tumour accumulation of siRNA. The GNC–siRNA complex potently downregulates the NGF expression in Panc-1 cells and in pancreatic tumours, and effectively inhibits the tumour progression in three pancreatic tumour models (subcutaneous model, orthotopic model and patient-derived xenograft model) without adverse effects. Our study constitutes a straightforward but effective approach to inhibit pancreatic cancer via NGF knockdown, suggesting a promising therapeutic direction for pancreatic cancer. PMID:28440296

  12. Gold nanoclusters-assisted delivery of NGF siRNA for effective treatment of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yifeng; Tang, Lixue; Xie, Yangzhouyun; Xianyu, Yunlei; Zhang, Lingmin; Wang, Peng; Hamada, Yoh; Jiang, Kai; Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human cancers, whose progression is highly dependent on the nervous microenvironment. The suppression of gene expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) may have great potential in pancreatic cancer treatment. Here we show that gold nanocluster-assisted delivery of siRNA of NGF (GNC-siRNA) allows efficient NGF gene silencing and pancreatic cancer treatment. The GNC-siRNA complex increases the stability of siRNA in serum, prolongs the circulation lifetime of siRNA in blood and enhances the cellular uptake and tumour accumulation of siRNA. The GNC-siRNA complex potently downregulates the NGF expression in Panc-1 cells and in pancreatic tumours, and effectively inhibits the tumour progression in three pancreatic tumour models (subcutaneous model, orthotopic model and patient-derived xenograft model) without adverse effects. Our study constitutes a straightforward but effective approach to inhibit pancreatic cancer via NGF knockdown, suggesting a promising therapeutic direction for pancreatic cancer.

  13. Localized Autoimmune Pancreatitis: Report of a Case Clinically Mimicking Pancreatic Cancer and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease with clinical presentations that greatly mimic pancreatic cancer (PC). It is critical for clinicians to distinguish AIP from PC because their treatments and prognoses are entirely different. Typical images show characteristic features such as diffuse pancreatic swelling and strictures of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). However, AIP may present as a localized pancreatic mass, in which case it is very difficult to differentiate from PC. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old man with computed tomography (CT) imaging studies confirming an area of low-density neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas with dilation in the common biliary duct (CBD) and MPD. Increased uptake in the uncinate mass was observed by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which strongly suggested PC. Further laboratory analyses showed a marked elevation of serum IgG4. Because there was not enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis of malignancy, a histopathological biopsy became the criterion standard. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle biopsy failed. As an alternative, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was conducted for the biopsy, and pathological analysis confirmed IgG4-related sclerotic chronic pancreatitis with moderate lymphoplasmacellular infiltration.We suggest that an accurate preoperative diagnosis for localized AIP with MPD and CBD obstructions mimicking PC is of great importance. Radiological imaging findings, particularly observations of diffused enlargement of the pancreas and delayed enhancement during the venous and portal phases, are essential for diagnosing AIP. Careful consideration should be given if serum IgG4 was taken as a special indicator for a differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. A history of IgG4-related diseases involving the biliary, lacrimal, salivary, retroperitoneal, renal, or pulmonary systems should also be highlighted. Thus, the pathology of extrapancreatic organs can be utilized as diagnostic

  14. MRI of pancreatic metastases from renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekis, N.L.; Semelka, R.C.; Siegelman, E.S.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to describe the MR features of pancreatic metastases from renal cancer. Five patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cancer were imaged with MR. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T MR imager using excitation-spoiled fat-suppressed T1-weighted SE images (all patients), T1-weighted spoiled GE images (all patients), T2-weighted fast SE (one patient) and excitation-spoiled fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast SE (one patient) images, serial postgadolinium spoiled GE images (all patients), and postcontrast excitation-spoiled fat-suppressed T1-weighted SE images (two patients). Multiple pancreatic lesions (n = 6) were present in two patients, solitary tumors in two patients, and diffuse micronodular pancreatic enlargement in one patient. All lesions were hypointense compared to normal pancreas on T1-weighted fat-suppressed SE images. Lesions were high in ST on T2-weighted images in two of two patients. All lesions demonstrated enhancement on the immediate postgadolinium spoiled GE images with the smaller tumors (<1.5 cm, three individual and the micronodular tumors) showing diffuse enhancement and the larger tumors (>1.5 cm, five tumors) showing pre-dominantly rim enhancement. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma have distinctive MR features that include diffuse enhancement in small lesions and rim enhancement in large lesions on immediate postgadolinium images and high SI on T2-weighted images. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  15. [Hereditary gastric and pancreatic cancer predisposition syndromes].

    PubMed

    Leoz, María Liz; Sánchez, Ariadna; Carballal, Sabela; Ruano, Lucía; Ocaña, Teresa; Pellisé, María; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Moreira, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    The most common hereditary gastrointestinal cancers are colorectal, mainly hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and familial adenomatous polyposis. Other extracolonic neoplasms, including the gastric and pancreatic adenocarcinomas, are less well known and studied because they account for a relatively small percentage of hereditary gastrointestinal cancers. Nonetheless, they merit special attention because of the high associated morbidity and mortality rates. We review the hereditary and familial syndromes associated with gastric and pancreatic cancers with a view to improving knowledge and understanding of these diseases, in order to heighten diagnostic suspicion and thus implement appropriate diagnostic strategies, screening, surveillance and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  17. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  19. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  20. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  1. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  2. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer: underlying mechanisms and potential targets

    PubMed Central

    Kolodecik, Thomas; Shugrue, Christine; Ashat, Munish; Thrower, Edwin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review: Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. Recent findings: Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-κB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis (AP). Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogenic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16) can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary: Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions. PMID:24474939

  3. Serological characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis from pancreatic cancer by using a combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9, globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a special type of chronic pancreatitis, which may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic carcinoma. This study aims to verify new biomarkers for AIP and propose a serological pattern to differentiate AIP from pancreatic adenocarcinoma with routinely performed tests. In this study, data of serum samples were collected and compared between 25 patients with AIP and 100 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression was performed to evaluate the diagnostic effect of serum parameters in differentiating AIP from pancreatic carcinoma alone or in combination. Among several serum markers observed in the two groups, carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (Ca19-9), globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin were selected as the independent markers. Serum levels of Globulin, Eosinophil percentage in AIP group were significantly higher than in pancreatic cancer group (P<0.05), while hemoglobin and tumor marker CA19-9 levels were lower (P <0.05). The combination of these markers identified patients with AIP with 92% sensitivity and 79% specificity, which indicated relatively high diagnostic value. Elevated serum eosinophils, globulin, together with decreased hemoglobin level can be used as a preoperative indicator for AIP and can help to initiate diagnosis of AIP in time. PMID:28369140

  4. Serological characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis from pancreatic cancer by using a combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9, globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianlian; Ke, Yini; Chen, Yi; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a special type of chronic pancreatitis, which may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic carcinoma. This study aims to verify new biomarkers for AIP and propose a serological pattern to differentiate AIP from pancreatic adenocarcinoma with routinely performed tests. In this study, data of serum samples were collected and compared between 25 patients with AIP and 100 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression was performed to evaluate the diagnostic effect of serum parameters in differentiating AIP from pancreatic carcinoma alone or in combination. Among several serum markers observed in the two groups, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (Ca19-9), globulin, eosinophils and hemoglobin were selected as the independent markers. Serum levels of Globulin, Eosinophil percentage in AIP group were significantly higher than in pancreatic cancer group (P<0.05), while hemoglobin and tumor marker CA19-9 levels were lower (P <0.05). The combination of these markers identified patients with AIP with 92% sensitivity and 79% specificity, which indicated relatively high diagnostic value. Elevated serum eosinophils, globulin, together with decreased hemoglobin level can be used as a preoperative indicator for AIP and can help to initiate diagnosis of AIP in time.

  5. Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kenner, Barbara J.; Chari, Suresh T.; Cleeter, Deborah F.; Go, Vay Liang W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Innovation leading to significant advances in research and subsequent translation to clinical practice is urgently necessary in early detection of sporadic pancreatic cancer. Addressing this need, the Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer Summit Conference was conducted by Kenner Family Research Fund in conjunction with the 2014 American Pancreatic Association and Japan Pancreas Society Meeting. International interdisciplinary scientific representatives engaged in strategic facilitated conversations based on distinct areas of inquiry: Case for Early Detection: Definitions, Detection, Survival, and Challenges; Biomarkers for Early Detection; Imaging; and Collaborative Studies. Ideas generated from the summit have led to the development of a Strategic Map for Innovation built upon 3 components: formation of an international collaborative effort, design of an actionable strategic plan, and implementation of operational standards, research priorities, and first-phase initiatives. Through invested and committed efforts of leading researchers and institutions, philanthropic partners, government agencies, and supportive business entities, this endeavor will change the future of the field and consequently the survival rate of those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:25938853

  6. Predictive value of low serum pancreatic enzymes in invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Yosuke; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Zen, Yoh; Takenaka, Mamoru; Toyama, Hirochika; Sofue, Keitaro; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Koudai; Hoshi, Namiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Arisaka, Yoshifumi; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence suggesting a role of chronic pancreatitis in pancreatic carcinogenesis, its relationship with invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) remains unclear. Low levels of pancreatic enzymes are predictive markers of advanced chronic pancreatitis. We investigated whether low pancreatic enzyme levels were associated with a higher incidence of invasive IPMN. This study included 146 consecutive patients who underwent surgical resection of IPMN between April 2001 and October 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between serum pancreatic enzymes and the incidence of invasive IPMN, with adjustment for clinical characteristics including alcohol consumption. The association of serum pancreatic enzymes with pathological pancreatic atrophy and inflammation in areas adjacent to or distant from the tumor was also evaluated. Low serum levels of pancreatic amylase and lipase were associated with a higher incidence of invasive IPMN (multivariable odds ratio [OR] = 9.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.99 to 35.1, P = 0.0001; OR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.77 to 112, P = 0.001, respectively). Low serum pancreatic amylase and lipase levels were also associated with higher grade pancreatic atrophy in areas adjacent to the tumor (P = 0.011 and P = 0.017, respectively) and in areas distant from the tumor (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, low serum pancreatic amylase and lipase levels were associated with higher grade inflammation in areas distant from the tumor (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Low serum pancreatic enzymes may be a predictive marker of invasive IPMN. Excessive alcohol consumption did not influence the association of low pancreatic enzyme levels with invasive IPMN. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19th century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20th century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections. PMID:26361403

  8. Familial pancreatic cancer: Concept, management and issues

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Takaori, Kyoichi; Morizane, Chigusa; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Wada, Keita; Hosoi, Hiroko; Yachida, Shinichi; Suzuki, Masami; Usui, Risa; Furukawa, Toru; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Takamitsu; Ueno, Makoto; Kiyozumi, Yoshimi; Hijioka, Susumu; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Terashima, Takeshi; Mizumoto, Masaki; Kodama, Yuzo; Torishima, Masako; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Ashida, Reiko; Kitano, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Furukawa, Masayuki; Kawabe, Ken; Majima, Yoshiyuki; Shimosegawa, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) is broadly defined as two first-degree-relatives with pancreatic cancer (PC) and accounts for 4%-10% of PC. Several genetic syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), also have increased risks of PC, but the narrowest definition of FPC excludes these known syndromes. When compared with other familial tumors, proven genetic alterations are limited to a small proportion (< 20%) and the familial aggregation is usually modest. However, an ethnic deviation (Ashkenazi Jewish > Caucasian) and a younger onset are common also in FPC. In European countries, “anticipation” is reported in FPC families, as with other hereditary syndromes; a trend toward younger age and worse prognosis is recognized in the late years. The resected pancreases of FPC kindred often show multiple pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) foci, with various K-ras mutations, similar to colorectal polyposis seen in the FAP patients. As with HBOC patients, a patient who is a BRCA mutation carrier with unresectable pancreatic cancer (accounting for 0%-19% of FPC patients) demonstrated better outcome following platinum and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor treatment. Western countries have established FPC registries since the 1990s and several surveillance projects for high-risk individuals are now ongoing to detect early PCs. Improvement in lifestyle habits, including non-smoking, is recommended for individuals at risk. In Japan, the FPC study group was initiated in 2013 and the Japanese FPC registry was established in 2014 by the Japan Pancreas Society. PMID:28246467

  9. Regulation of pancreatic cancer growth by superoxide.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Nelson, Elke S; Simons, Andrean L; Olney, Kristen E; Moser, Justin C; Schrock, Hannah E; Wagner, Brett A; Buettner, Garry R; Smith, Brian J; Teoh, Melissa L T; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Cullen, Joseph J

    2013-07-01

    K-ras mutations have been identified in up to 95% of pancreatic cancers, implying their critical role in the molecular pathogenesis. Expression of K-ras oncogene in an immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line, originally derived from normal pancreas (H6c7), induced the formation of carcinoma in mice. We hypothesized that K-ras oncogene correlates with increased non-mitochondrial-generated superoxide (O 2.-), which could be involved in regulating cell growth contributing to tumor progression. In the H6c7 cell line and its derivatives, H6c7er-Kras+ (H6c7 cells expressing K-ras oncogene), and H6c7eR-KrasT (tumorigenic H6c7 cells expressing K-ras oncogene), there was an increase in hydroethidine fluorescence in cell lines that express K-ras. Western blots and activity assays for the antioxidant enzymes that detoxify O 2.- were similar in these cell lines suggesting that the increase in hydroethidine fluorescence was not due to decreased antioxidant capacity. To determine a possible non-mitochondrial source of the increased levels of O 2.-, Western analysis demonstrated the absence of NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX2) in H6c7 cells but present in the H6c7 cell lines expressing K-ras and other pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of NOX2 decreased hydroethidine fluorescence and clonogenic survival. Furthermore, in the cell lines with the K-ras oncogene, overexpression of superoxide dismutases that detoxify non-mitochondrial sources of O 2.-, and treatment with the small molecule O 2.- scavenger Tempol, also decreased hydroethidine fluorescence, inhibited clonogenic survival and inhibited growth of tumor xenografts. Thus, O 2.- produced by NOX2 in pancreatic cancer cells with K-ras, may regulate pancreatic cancer cell growth. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  11. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  12. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS: One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. CONCLUSION: As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful. PMID:25561813

  13. Mast Cell Tryptase Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Growth through Promoting Angiogenesis via Activation of Angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiangjie; Zhai, Liqin; Xue, Ruobing; Shi, Jieru; Zeng, Qiang; Gao, Cairong

    2016-05-27

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. During the development and progression of cancer, tumor angiogenesis plays a crucial role. A great deal of evidence has revealed that human mast cells (MCs) contributed to tumor angiogenesis through releasing several pro-angiogenetic factors, among which tryptase is one of the most active. However, the role of mast cell tryptase (MCT) in human pancreatic cancer angiogenesis is still not well documented. In this study, we examined the MCT levels in serum from pancreatic cancer patients and evaluated the correlationship of the MCT level and tumor angiogenesis. In addition, the effect of MCT on endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation was investigated both in vitro and in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor. It was found that MCT contributes to endothelial cell growth and tube formation via up-regulation of angiopoietin-1 expression. Moreover, using the MCT inhibitor nafamostat, tryptase-induced angiogenesis was obviously suppressed both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that MCT plays an important role in pancreatic cancer angiogenesis and tumor growth via activating the angiopoietin-1 pathway, and tryptase inhibitors may be evaluated as an effective anti-angiogenetic approach in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  14. New DNA Methylation Markers for Pancreatic Cancer: Discovery, Tissue Validation, and Pilot Testing in Pancreatic Juice.

    PubMed

    Kisiel, John B; Raimondo, Massimo; Taylor, William R; Yab, Tracy C; Mahoney, Douglas W; Sun, Zhifu; Middha, Sumit; Baheti, Saurabh; Zou, Hongzhi; Smyrk, Thomas C; Boardman, Lisa A; Petersen, Gloria M; Ahlquist, David A

    2015-10-01

    Discriminant markers for pancreatic cancer detection are needed. We sought to identify and validate methylated DNA markers for pancreatic cancer using next-generation sequencing unbiased by known targets. At a referral center, we conducted four sequential case-control studies: discovery, technical validation, biologic validation, and clinical piloting. Candidate markers were identified using variance-inflated logistic regression on reduced-representation bisulfite DNA sequencing results from matched pancreatic cancers, benign pancreas, and normal colon tissues. Markers were validated technically on replicate discovery study DNA and biologically on independent, matched, blinded tissues by methylation-specific PCR. Clinical testing of six methylation candidates and mutant KRAS was performed on secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice samples from 61 patients with pancreatic cancer, 22 with chronic pancreatitis, and 19 with normal pancreas on endoscopic ultrasound. Areas under receiver-operating characteristics curves (AUC) for markers were calculated. Sequencing identified >500 differentially hyper-methylated regions. On independent tissues, AUC on 19 selected markers ranged between 0.73 and 0.97. Pancreatic juice AUC values for CD1D, KCNK12, CLEC11A, NDRG4, IKZF1, PKRCB, and KRAS were 0.92*, 0.88, 0.85, 0.85, 0.84, 0.83, and 0.75, respectively, for pancreatic cancer compared with normal pancreas and 0.92*, 0.73, 0.76, 0.85*, 0.73, 0.77, and 0.62 for pancreatic cancer compared with chronic pancreatitis (*, P = 0.001 vs. KRAS). We identified and validated novel DNA methylation markers strongly associated with pancreatic cancer. On pilot testing in pancreatic juice, best markers (especially CD1D) highly discriminated pancreatic cases from controls. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Ablation Strategies for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linecker, Michael; Pfammatter, Thomas; Kambakamba, Patryk; DeOliveira, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of novel and somewhat effective chemotherapy against pancreas cancer, several groups developed a new interest on locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Unresectable tumors constitute up to 80% of pancreatic cancer (PC) at the time of diagnosis and are associated with a 5-year overall survival of less than 5%. To control those tumors locally, with perhaps improved patients survival, significant advances were made over the last 2 decades in the development of ablation methods including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound and irreversible electroporation (IRE). Many suggested a call for caution for possible severe or lethal complications in using such techniques on the pancreas. Most fears were on the heating or freezing of the pancreas, while non-thermal ablation (IRE) could offer safer approaches. The multimodal therapies along with high-resolution imaging guidance have created some enthusiasm toward ablation for LAPC. The impact of ablation techniques on primarily non-resectable PC remains, however, unclear.

  16. Nutrition in Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Simone; Krüger, Janine; Aghdassi, Ali A; Steveling, Antje; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both genders. More than 80% of patients suffer from significant weight loss at diagnosis and over time develop severe cachexia. Early nutritional support is therefore essential. This review evaluates the different nutritional therapies, such as enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition and special nutritional supplements, on nutritional status, quality of life and survival. Due to the high prevalence of malnutrition and the rapid development of anorexia-cachexia-syndrome, early nutritional intervention is crucial and supported by clinical data. Enteral nutrition should be preferred over parenteral nutrition. Omega-3 fatty acids and l-carnitine are promising substances for the prevention of severe cachexia, but further randomized controlled trials are needed to establish generally accepted guidelines on nutrition in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology, Detection, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiubo; Zeng, Linjuan; Chen, Yinting; Lian, Guoda; Qian, Chenchen; Chen, Shaojie; Li, Jiajia; Huang, Kaihong

    2016-01-01

    PC (pancreatic cancer) is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer worldwide. The incidence and mortality rates have been increasing year by year worldwide, and this review has analyzed the most recent incidence and mortality data for pancreatic cancer occurrence in China. Several possible risk factors have been discussed here, involving known established risk factors and novel possible risk factors. The development of this cancer is a stepwise progression through intraepithelial neoplasia to carcinoma. Though early and accurate diagnosis is promising based on a combination of recent techniques including tumor markers and imaging modalities, lacking early clinical symptoms makes the diagnosis late. Correct staging is critical because treatment is generally based on this parameter. Treatment options have improved throughout the last decades. However, surgical excision remains the primary therapy and efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy for PC is limited. Recently, some novel new therapies have been developed and will be applied in clinics soon. This review will provide an overview of pancreatic cancer, including an understanding of the developments and controversies. PMID:26941789

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology, Detection, and Management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiubo; Zeng, Linjuan; Chen, Yinting; Lian, Guoda; Qian, Chenchen; Chen, Shaojie; Li, Jiajia; Huang, Kaihong

    2016-01-01

    PC (pancreatic cancer) is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer worldwide. The incidence and mortality rates have been increasing year by year worldwide, and this review has analyzed the most recent incidence and mortality data for pancreatic cancer occurrence in China. Several possible risk factors have been discussed here, involving known established risk factors and novel possible risk factors. The development of this cancer is a stepwise progression through intraepithelial neoplasia to carcinoma. Though early and accurate diagnosis is promising based on a combination of recent techniques including tumor markers and imaging modalities, lacking early clinical symptoms makes the diagnosis late. Correct staging is critical because treatment is generally based on this parameter. Treatment options have improved throughout the last decades. However, surgical excision remains the primary therapy and efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy for PC is limited. Recently, some novel new therapies have been developed and will be applied in clinics soon. This review will provide an overview of pancreatic cancer, including an understanding of the developments and controversies.

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Gulinnaz; Karlitepe, Ayfer; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is considered one of the deadliest human cancers, with 1-5% 5-year survival rates (~6-month median survival duration) despite therapy; thus, PDAC represents an unmet therapeutic challenge. PDAC is the major histological subtype, comprising 90% of all pancreatic cancers. It is a highly complex and aggressive malignancy, presenting with early local invasion and metastasis, and is resistant to most therapies, all of which are believed to contribute to its extremely poor prognosis. PDAC is characterized by molecular alterations, including mutations of K-RAS (~90% of cases), TP53, transforming growth factor-β, Hedgehog, WNT and NOTCH signaling pathways. Given that cancer stem cells have a crucial role not only in tumor initiation and progression, but also in drug resistance and relapse or recurrence of various cancer types, they may be excellent targets for effective novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we reviewed recent therapeutic strategies targeting pancreatic cancer stem cells using chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs, non-coding RNAs (i.e., siRNA and miRNAs), immunotherapy, and natural compounds. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic evolution of pancreatic cancer: lessons learnt from the pancreatic cancer genome sequencing project

    PubMed Central

    Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease caused by the accumulation of genetic alterations in specific genes. Elucidation of the human genome sequence, in conjunction with technical advances in the ability to perform whole exome sequencing, have provided new insight into the mutational spectra characteristic of this lethal tumour type. Most recently, exomic sequencing has been used to clarify the clonal evolution of pancreatic cancer as well as provide time estimates of pancreatic carcinogenesis, indicating that a long window of opportunity may exist for early detection of this disease while in the curative stage. Moving forward, these mutational analyses indicate potential targets for personalised diagnostic and therapeutic intervention as well as the optimal timing for intervention based on the natural history of pancreatic carcinogenesis and progression. PMID:21749982

  1. Alisertib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Application of glycoscience to the early detection of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Eiji; Kamada, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    The prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor compared to other cancers. One of the reasons for this is the difficulty of early diagnosis. Surveillance using cancer biomarkers and image diagnosis can enable early detection and has improved the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in Japan. However, it is very difficult to detect pancreatic cancer at an early stage using cancer biomarkers and image diagnosis alone. Fucosylation is one of the most important types of glycosylation involved in cancer and inflammation. We have developed a novel glycocancer biomarker, fucosylated haptoglobin (Fuc-Hpt), and have investigated its usefulness for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer over approximately 10 years. Recently, we also found that most pancreatic tissues surrounding pancreatic cancer exhibit chronic pancreatitis with fibrosis and/or fatty degeneration. Certain forms of chronic pancreatitis might indicate high risk for the development of pancreatic cancer. In this review, we provide a historical summary of our research on Fuc-Hpt as a cancer biomarker, and discuss a potential early detection system for pancreatic cancer.

  3. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS).

    PubMed

    Bockhorn, Maximilian; Uzunoglu, Faik G; Adham, Mustapha; Imrie, Clem; Milicevic, Miroslav; Sandberg, Aken A; Asbun, Horacio J; Bassi, Claudio; Büchler, Markus; Charnley, Richard M; Conlon, Kevin; Cruz, Laureano Fernandez; Dervenis, Christos; Fingerhutt, Abe; Friess, Helmut; Gouma, Dirk J; Hartwig, Werner; Lillemoe, Keith D; Montorsi, Marco; Neoptolemos, John P; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, William; Vashist, Yogesh K; Vollmer, Charles; Yeo, Charles J; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2014-06-01

    This position statement was developed to expedite a consensus on definition and treatment for borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BRPC) that would have worldwide acceptability. An international panel of pancreatic surgeons from well-established, high-volume centers collaborated on a literature review and development of consensus on issues related to borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) supports the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for the definition of BRPC. Current evidence supports operative exploration and resection in the case of involvement of the mesentericoportal venous axis; in addition, a new classification of extrahepatic mesentericoportal venous resections is proposed by the ISGPS. Suspicion of arterial involvement should lead to exploration to confirm the imaging-based findings. Formal arterial resections are not recommended; however, in exceptional circumstances, individual therapeutic approaches may be evaluated under experimental protocols. The ISGPS endorses the recommendations for specimen examination and the definition of an R1 resection (tumor within 1 mm from the margin) used by the British Royal College of Pathologists. Standard preoperative diagnostics for BRPC may include: (1) serum levels of CA19-9, because CA19-9 levels predict survival in large retrospective series; and also (2) the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio because of the prognostic relevance of the systemic inflammatory response. Various regimens of neoadjuvant therapy are recommended only in the setting of prospective trials at high-volume centers. Current evidence justifies portomesenteric venous resection in patients with BRPC. Basic definitions were identified, that are currently lacking but that are needed to obtain further evidence and improvement for this important patient subgroup. A consensus for each topic is given. Copyright © 2014

  4. Resection or cryosurgery relates with pancreatic tumor type: primary pancreatic cancer with previous non-pancreatic cancer or secondary metastatic cancer within the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Ji, Xiaoyan; Ren, He; Tang, Yong; Hao, Jihui

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the incidence of primary pancreatic cancer with previous non-pancreatic cancer (PPC) and secondary metastatic cancer within the pancreas (SMC) to elucidate the differential diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. The clinical data of 2539 patients with pancreatic mass in Tianjin Cancer Hospital from January 2000 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. All of the 66 patients who showed double or multiple primary cancers or metastatic pancreatic malignancies were included into the PPC group or SMC group, respectively. In addition, PPC patients were compared with 570 patients suffering from pancreatic cancer (PC) alone. For the PPC group (n = 34), the most common previous non-pancreatic cancers were gastric cancer, breast cancer, and thyroid cancer. For the SMC group (n = 32), the most common metastatic tumors were lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and gastric cancer. Multivariate analysis identified age (OR = 1.099; 95% CI, 1.007-1.199), previous tumor type (OR = 1.164; 95% CI, 1.046-1.296), and time interval between two tumors (OR = 1.021; 95% CI, 1.003-1.039) as significant indicators. Significantly better survival times were observed after resection than after cryosurgery in the PPC group (p < 0.001) but not in the SMC group (p = 0.670). Overall, primary pancreatic cancers are as common as metastasis to the pancreas in patients with a previous cancer. A longer time interval between two tumors indicates a higher possibility that a new pancreatic cancer will occur. Some cancers (particularly RCC) are more likely to metastasize to the pancreas than other cancers. For metastatic cancers, cryosurgery is as effective as resection as a treatment option. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment to the pancreatic function in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulan; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye; Zhao, Jing; Fang, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghui; Chen, Tian Zhou; Shen, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Present study was designed to investigate the pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function damage after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. It was a retrospective analysis of blood glucose and amylase changes in 59 advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with HIFU from 2010 February to 2014 January. The mean glucose and amylase before HIFU treatment were 6.02mmol/L and 59.17 U/L respectively. After HIFU treatment, it was shown that the mean glucose and amylase levels were 5.66mmol/L and 57.86/L respectively. There was no statistical significance between them. No acute pancreatitis was observed. The endocrine and exocrine function of pancreatic cancer patients was not damaged by HIFU treatment. HIFU treatment for the pancreatic cancer patients seems to be safe.

  6. RON is not a prognostic marker for resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase RON exhibits increased expression during pancreatic cancer progression and promotes migration, invasion and gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer cells in experimental models. However, the prognostic significance of RON expression in pancreatic cancer is unknown. Methods RON expression was characterized in several large cohorts, including a prospective study, totaling 492 pancreatic cancer patients and relationships with patient outcome and clinico-pathologic variables were assessed. Results RON expression was associated with outcome in a training set, but this was not recapitulated in the validation set, nor was there any association with therapeutic responsiveness in the validation set or the prospective study. Conclusions Although RON is implicated in pancreatic cancer progression in experimental models, and may constitute a therapeutic target, RON expression is not associated with prognosis or therapeutic responsiveness in resected pancreatic cancer. PMID:22958871

  7. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, M; Risch, H A; Bosetti, C; Anderson, K E; Petersen, G M; Bamlet, W R; Cotterchio, M; Cleary, S P; Ibiebele, T I; La Vecchia, C; Skinner, H G; Strayer, L; Bracci, P M; Maisonneuve, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Zaton Ski, W; Lu, L; Yu, H; Janik-Koncewicz, K; Polesel, J; Serraino, D; Neale, R E

    2015-08-01

    The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. We used data from nine case-control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.19, P = 7.4 × 10(-6), P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus <110 IU/day: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.55, P = 2.4 × 10(-3), P-heterogeneity = 0.81], with the association possibly stronger in people with low retinol/vitamin A intake. Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case–Control Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, M.; Risch, H. A.; Bosetti, C.; Anderson, K. E.; Petersen, G. M.; Bamlet, W. R.; Cotterchio, M.; Cleary, S. P.; Ibiebele, T. I.; La Vecchia, C.; Skinner, H. G.; Strayer, L.; Bracci, P. M.; Maisonneuve, P.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Zaton´ski, W.; Lu, L.; Yu, H.; Janik-Koncewicz, K.; Neale, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. Patients and methods We used data from nine case–control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case–Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. Results Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–1.19, P = 7.4 × 10−6, P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus <110 IU/day: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10–1.55, P = 2.4 × 10−3, P-heterogeneity = 0.81], with the association possibly stronger in people with low retinol/vitamin A intake. Conclusion Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis. PMID:25977560

  9. Periodontal Pathogens in the Etiology of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Öğrendik, Mesut

    2017-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Chronic pancreatitis is frequently observed in patients with pancreatic cancer, and a significant relationship between orodigestive cancer-related deaths and chronic periodontitis has been detected. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, collectively called the Red complex, are the major pathogens responsible for chronic periodontitis and secrete peptidylarginine deiminase. Anti-P. gingivalis antibodies titers are higher in pancreatic cancer patients than in healthy subjects. This review examines the association between oral bacteria and the etiology of pancreatic cancer. High rates of tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations, particularly p53 arginine mutations, were detected in pancreatic cancer patients. K-ras arginine mutations were detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Oral bacteria peptidylarginine deiminases might lead to the p53 and K-ras point mutations by degrading arginine. Oral bacteria are likely to be responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer. If this hypothesis is true, it may reveal the real cause of pancreatic cancer, which is a fatal disease.

  10. Molecular Targeted Intervention for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Pant, Shubham; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the worst cancers, with almost uniform lethality. PC risk is associated with westernized diet, tobacco, alcohol, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, and family history of pancreatic cancer. New targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations have yet to provide adequate treatments for patients with advanced cancer. To design better preventive and/or treatment strategies against PC, knowledge of PC pathogenesis at the molecular level is vital. With the advent of genetically modified animals, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology and pathogenesis of PC. Currently, several clinical trials and preclinical evaluations are underway to investigate novel agents that target signaling defects in PC. An important consideration in evaluating novel drugs is determining whether an agent can reach the target in concentrations effective to treat the disease. Recently, we have reported evidence for chemoprevention of PC. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of current updates on molecularly targeted interventions, as well as dietary, phytochemical, immunoregulatory, and microenvironment-based approaches for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive regimens. Special attention is given to prevention and treatment in preclinical genetically engineered mouse studies and human clinical studies. PMID:26266422

  11. Ultrasound-enhanced nanotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The paper reports in vivo results of ultrasonic nanotherapy of orthotopically grown pancreatic cancer. Phase-shift paclitaxel (PTX) loaded perfluoropentane (PFP) nanoemusions combined with tumor-directed ultrasound have been used with a considerable success for tumor-targeted chemotherapy of gemcitabin (GEM)-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). The GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer proved sensitive to treatment by a micellar PTX formulation Genexol PM (GEN) andor nanodroplet PTX formulation ndGEN. Due to increased permeability of tumor blood vessels, drug-loaded nanodroplets accumulated in the tumor via passive targeting, which was confirmed by ultrasound imaging. Nanodroplets converted into microbubbles in situ under the action of tumor-directed 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound. The strongest therapeutic effect was observed for the combination therapy by PTX-loaded nanodroplets, GEM and ultrasound (ndGEN+GEM+ultrasound). This combination therapy resulted in a spectacular tumor regression and in some cases complete tumor resolution. Moreover, formation of metastases was dramatically decreased and ascitis generation was completely suppressed. However for all animal groups, local tumor recurrence was observed after the completion of the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors.

  12. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: Definitions and management

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Nicole E; Prendergast, Cristina; Lowy, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. While surgical resection remains the only curative option, more than 80% of patients present with unresectable disease. Unfortunately, even among those who undergo resection, the reported median survival is 15-23 mo, with a 5-year survival of approximately 20%. Disappointingly, over the past several decades, despite improvements in diagnostic imaging, surgical technique and chemotherapeutic options, only modest improvements in survival have been realized. Nevertheless, it remains clear that surgical resection is a prerequisite for achieving long-term survival and cure. There is now emerging consensus that a subgroup of patients, previously considered poor candidates for resection because of the relationship of their primary tumor to surrounding vasculature, may benefit from resection, particularly when preceded by neoadjuvant therapy. This stage of disease, termed borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, has become of increasing interest and is now the focus of a multi-institutional clinical trial. Here we outline the history, progress, current treatment recommendations, and future directions for research in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:25152577

  13. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals throughout the day that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes ... the Pancreas NPF Centers Pancreatitis Centers Pancreatitis Center Application Pancreatic Cancer Centers Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas ...

  14. New Test May Help Spot Pancreatic Cancer Early

    MedlinePlus

    ... could be key weapon against No. 4 cancer killer in U.S. To use the sharing features on ... research team says. The nation's No. 3 cancer killer, pancreatic cancer often goes undiagnosed until it is ...

  15. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  16. Inflammation, autophagy, and obesity: common features in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Li, Ning; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an environment that facilitates the induction and progression of pancreatic diseases. However, little is known about how inflammation, autophagy, and obesity interact to promote exocrine pancreatic disorders. We review the roles of inflammation and autophagy, and their deregulation by obesity, in pancreatic diseases. We discuss the connections among disordered pathways and important areas for future research. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lack of association between the pancreatitis risk allele CEL-HYB and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Koji; Yu, Jun; Suenaga, Masaya; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Tamura, Koji; Almario, Jose Alejandro Navarro; Brant, Aaron; Borges, Michael; Siddiqui, Abdulrehman; Datta, Lisa; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Hruban, Ralph H; Klein, Alison Patricia; Goggins, Michael

    2017-02-07

    CEL-HYB is a hybrid allele that arose from a crossover between the 3' end of the Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) gene and the nearby CEL pseudogene (CELP) and was recently identified as a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Since chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer, we compared the prevalence of the CEL-HYB allele in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to spousal controls and disease controls. The CEL-HYB allele was detected using Sanger and next generation sequencing. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of the CEL-HYB allele between cases with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma compared to controls; 2.6% (22/850) vs. 1.8% (18/976) (p=0.35). CEL-HYB carriers were not more likely to report a history of pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic cancer are not more likely than controls to be carriers of the CEL-HYB allele.

  18. Kindlin-2 in pancreatic stellate cells promotes the progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Kindlin-2 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates the activation of integrins. This study aimed to clarify the role of kindlin-2 in PSCs in pancreatic cancer. Kindlin-2 expression in 79 resected pancreatic cancer tissues was examined by immunohistochemical staining. Kindlin-2-knockdown immortalized human PSCs were established using small interfering RNA. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with conditioned media of PSCs, and the cell proliferation and migration were examined. SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice alone or with PSCs and the size of the tumors was monitored. Kindlin-2 expression was observed in PDAC and the peritumoral stroma. Stromal kindlin-2 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival time after R0 resection. Knockdown of kindlin-2 resulted in decreased proliferation, migration, and cytokine expression in PSCs. The PSC-induced proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells were suppressed by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PSCs increased the size of the tumors, but this effect was abolished by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In conclusion, kindlin-2 in PSCs promoted the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Intraportal endovascular ultrasonography for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Nakao, A; Takagi, H

    1998-01-01

    Intraportal endovascular ultrasonography (IPEUS) is a new diagnostic procedure for pancreatic cancer. In portal invasion, subtle invasion and compression are difficult to differentiate with conventional imaging techniques such as computed tomography and angiography. IPEUS is performed with an 8-French, 20-MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter. IPEUS provides high-resolution, real-time images perpendicular to the portal vein axis. With IPEUS, the portal vein wall is visualized as an echogenic band. A subtle portal invasion can be detected by observing this portal vein wall. Moreover, the segment II of the extrapancreatic nerve plexus is visualized as an echogenic area around the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). The extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion can be diagnosed as low echoic infiltration of the area around the IPDA. In the diagnosis of portal vein and extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion, IPEUS provides a good diagnostic value and important information for the staging of local extension of the pancreatic cancer.

  20. Pancreatic cancer cachexia: a review of mechanisms and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Carlyn R.; Yaffee, Patrick M.; Jamil, Laith H.; Lo, Simon K.; Nissen, Nicholas; Pandol, Stephen J.; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have gained new insight into the pathophysiology of cachexia associated with pancreatic cancer. Unfortunately, its treatment is complex and remains a challenge. Pancreatic cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by uncompensated adipose tissue and skeletal muscle loss in the setting of anorexia that leads to progressive functional impairment. This paper will review the current concepts of pancreatic cancer cachexia, its assessment and pathophysiology as well as current and future treatments. The successful management of pancreatic cancer cachexia will likely require a multimodal approach that includes nutritional support and combination pharmaceutical interventions. PMID:24624094

  1. Activation peptide of carboxypeptidase B in serum and urine in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Appelros, S; Thim, L; Borgstrom, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—The pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis involves activation of the pancreatic proenzymes. Levels of the trypsinogen activation peptide in urine in acute pancreatitis has been shown to correlate with the severity of disease. However, this peptide is unstable in urine and, because of its low molecular mass, difficult to measure. Procarboxypeptidase B has a larger activation peptide which could be more suitable for analysis in serum and urine. 
Aims—To study the presence of the activation peptide from procarboxypeptidase B (CAPAP) in serum and urine in acute pancreatitis. 
Patients—Urine and serum samples were obtained within 48 hours of admittance from 40 patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity was classified retrospectively according to levels of C-reactive protein and clinical course. Thirty four patients with abdominal pain from other causes were studied as controls. 
Methods—CAPAP was purified from human pancreatic juice. Specific antibodies were obtained and a radioimmunoassay was developed. 
Results—Levels of CAPAP in serum and urine in acute pancreatitis correlate with the severity of the attack. CAPAP is very stable, and urine contains only CAPAP whereas, in serum, cross reacting procarboxypeptidase B is found together with CAPAP. 
Conclusions—CAPAP could be a valuable tool in the diagnosis and early determination of severity in acute pancreatitis. 

 Keywords: carboxypeptidase B; activation peptide; acute pancreatitis PMID:9505893

  2. Pancreatic Cancer: Progress in Systemic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Perkhofer, Luka; Ettrich, Thomas J; Seufferlein, Thoma

    2014-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. Due to lack of specific symptoms and no accessible precursor lesions, primary diagnosis is commonly delayed, resulting in the identification of only 15-20% of patients with potentially curable disease. The major limiting factor is an already locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Consequently, systemic therapy forms the backbone of treatment strategy for the majority of patients. A deeper understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer has led to the identification of several potential therapeutic targets. A variety of targeted therapies are currently under clinical evaluation as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy for PDAC. This review highlights the current state of chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer and provides an outlook on its future perspectives. This review focuses on the current chemotherapy regimens for the systemic treatment of PDAC. Various neoadjuvant approaches have been explored, including chemoradiation, chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation or intensified chemotherapy without defining a standard of care so far. The standard of care is gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 may be a promising new agent in this setting. For first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, no targeted therapy has yet demonstrated clinical benefit apart from the combination of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib plus gemcitabine. Recently, novel chemotherapeutic regimens such as FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel have been introduced. Both combinations have proved to be superior to the standard gemcitabine regimen. For second-line treatment the combination of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and oxaliplatin yields improved results compared to best supportive care.

  3. Proteomics analysis of bodily fluids in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Chen, Ru

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics study of pancreatic cancer using bodily fluids emphasizes biomarker discovery and clinical application, presenting unique prospect and challenges. Depending on the physiological nature of the bodily fluid and its proximity to pancreatic cancer, the proteomes of bodily fluids, such as pancreatic juice, pancreatic cyst fluid, blood, bile and urine, can be substantially different in terms of protein constitution and the dynamic range of protein concentration. Thus, a comprehensive discovery and specific detection of cancer-associated proteins within these varied fluids is a complex task, requiring rigorous experiment design and a concerted approach. While major challenges still remain, fluid proteomics studies in pancreatic cancer to date have provided a wealth of information in revealing proteome alterations associated with pancreatic cancer in various bodily fluids. PMID:25780901

  4. Proteomics analysis of bodily fluids in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A; Chen, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics study of pancreatic cancer using bodily fluids emphasizes biomarker discovery and clinical application, presenting unique prospect and challenges. Depending on the physiological nature of the bodily fluid and its proximity to pancreatic cancer, the proteomes of bodily fluids, such as pancreatic juice, pancreatic cyst fluid, blood, bile, and urine, can be substantially different in terms of protein constitution and the dynamic range of protein concentration. Thus, a comprehensive discovery and specific detection of cancer-associated proteins within these varied fluids is a complex task, requiring rigorous experiment design and a concerted approach. While major challenges still remain, fluid proteomics studies in pancreatic cancer to date have provided a wealth of information in revealing proteome alterations associated with pancreatic cancer in various bodily fluids. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  6. Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Suresh T.; Kelly, Kimberly; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Thayer, Sarah P.; Ahlquist, David A.; Andersen, Dana K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Canto, Marcia; Cleeter, Deborah F.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Go, Vay Liang W.; Hines, O. Joe; Kenner, Barbara J.; Klimstra, David S.; Lerch, Markus M.; Levy, Michael J.; Maitra, Anirban; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Rhim, Andrew D.; Simeone, Diane M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Tanaka, Masao; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic cancer (PC) is estimated to become the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States by 2020. Early detection is the key to improving survival in PC. Addressing this urgent need, the Kenner Family Research Fund conducted the inaugural Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer Summit Conference in 2014 in conjunction with the 45th Anniversary Meeting of the American Pancreatic Association and Japan Pancreas Society. This seminal convening of international representatives from science, practice, and clinical research was designed to facilitate challenging interdisciplinary conversations to generate innovative ideas leading to the creation of a defined collaborative strategic pathway for the future of the field. An in-depth summary of current efforts in the field, analysis of gaps in specific areas of expertise, and challenges that exist in early detection is presented within distinct areas of inquiry: Case for Early Detection: Definitions, Detection, Survival, and Challenges; Biomarkers for Early Detection; Imaging; and Collaborative Studies. In addition, an overview of efforts in familial PC is presented in an addendum to this article. It is clear from the summit deliberations that only strategically designed collaboration among investigators, institutions, and funders will lead to significant progress in early detection of sporadic PC. PMID:25931254

  7. Tackling pancreatic cancer with metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Marchetti, Paolo

    2017-05-28

    Pancreatic tumours, the majority of which arise from the exocrine pancreas, have recently shown an increasing incidence in western countries. Over the past few years more and more new selective molecules directed against specific cellular targets have become available for cancer therapy, leading to significant improvements. However, despite such advances in therapy, prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains disappointing. Metronomic chemotherapy (MCT), which consists in the administration of continuous, low-dose anticancer drugs, has demonstrated the ability to suppress tumour growth. Thus, it may provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for counteracting the progression of the tumour. Here we discuss evidence arising from preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of MCT in pancreatic cancer. Good results have generally been achieved in preclinical studies, particularly when MCT was combined with standard dose chemotherapy or antinflammatory, antiangiogenic and immunostimolatory agents. The few available clinical experiences, which mainly refer to retrospective data, have reported good tolerability though mild activity of metronomic schedules. Further studies are therefore awaited to confirm both preclinical findings and the preliminary clinical data.

  8. Natural anti-cancer agents: Implications in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marasini, Bishal; Sahu, Ravi P

    2017-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancy accounting for the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Among several explored anti-cancer agents, Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue remained a front line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, gemcitabine exerts a low response rate with limited progression free survival in cancer patients due to cellular resistance of pancreatic tumors to this therapy. Several chemotherapeutic agents have been explored in combination with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer with overall mixed responses and survival rates. Naturally occurring dietary agents possess promising anti-cancer properties and have been shown to target various oncogenic signaling pathways in in-vitro and in-vivo pancreatic cancer models. Multiple studies using natural compounds have shown increased therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer models. This review is focused on recent updates on preclinical and clinical studies utilizing natural anti-cancer agents with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer.

  9. Sweating the small stuff: microRNAs and genetic changes define pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Siuwah; Bonaroti, Jillian; Unlu, Sebnem; Liang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Daolin; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 18- to 22-nucleotide-long, single-stranded, noncoding RNAs that regulate important biological processes including differentiation, proliferation, and response to cellular stressors such as hypoxia, nutrient depletion, and traversion of the cell cycle by controlling protein expression within the cell. Many investigators have profiled cancer tissue and serum miRNAs to identify potential therapeutic targets, understand the pathways involved in tumorigenesis, and identify diagnostic tumor signatures. In the setting of pancreatic cancer, obtaining pancreatic tissue is invasive and impractical for early diagnosis. Several groups have profiled miRNAs that are present in the blood as a means to diagnose tumor progression and predict prognosis/survival or drug resistance. Several miRNA signatures found in pancreatic tissue and the peripheral blood, as well as the pathways that are associated with pancreatic cancer, are reviewed here in detail. Three miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, miR-155, and miR-200) have been repetitively identified in both pancreatic cancer tissue and patients' blood. Those miRNAs regulate and are regulated by the central genetic and epigenetic changes observed in pancreatic cancer including p53, transforming growth factor β, p16(INK4A), BRCA1/2, and Kras. These miRNAs are involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell invasion and also play important roles in promoting metastases.

  10. Utility of different serum fibrosis markers in diagnosing patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Anna; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kaczka, Aleksandra; Borkowska, Anna; Czupryniak, Leszek; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Gąsiorowska, Anita

    2016-01-01

    AIM To estimate the levels of serum cytokines in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients in order to evaluate their usefulness as possible biomarkers. METHODS The study included 167 Caucasian patients: 74 with PDAC (28 men and 42 women, aged 30-88 years), 78 with CP (50 men and 21 women, aged 20-79 years) and 15 age-matched healthy controls hospitalized in the Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland between 2006 and 2013. Serum MCP-1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, HA and s-Fr were measured in patients with CP (n = 78), PDAC (n = 74) and healthy controls (n = 15) using ELISA (Corgenix United Kingdom Ltd R and D Systems). The severity of CP was assessed according to the Cambridge classification. RESULTS Both patients with CP and PDAC had a significantly higher mean TGF-β1 serum level (1066 ± 582 and 888 ± 356 vs 264 ± 93, P < 0.0001), mean s-Fr (2.42 ± 1.385 and 2.41 ± 1.275 vs 0.6 ± 0.370, P < 0.0001) and mean HA (199 ± 254 and 270 ± 358 vs 40 ± 26, P < 0.0001) compared to controls. There was no difference in mean MCP-1 between all the groups. There were no significant differences in any cytokine levels between the PC and PDAC groups. No significant differences between serum cytokines depending on age, gender or smoking status were found in CP patients. Mean s-Fr concentration was significantly higher in CP, lasting longer than 5 years compared to those with a shorter disease clinical course (2.639 ± 1.125 vs 1.870 ± 0.970, P < 0.03). There was no correlation between tumor size, localization or TNM classification and serum TGF-β1, MCP-1, s-Fr and HA levels in patients with PDAC. No significant differences between cytokines depending on diabetes presence in CP were found. Nevertheless, mean serum TGF-β1 concentration in PDAC patients was higher in those with diabetes compared to the remaining group (986 vs 839, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION Serum TGF-β1, s-Fr and HA may be

  11. Risk factors associated with elevated serum pancreatic amylase levels during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Hsu; Yang, Wu-Chang; Wang, Feng-Ming; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Ng, Yee-Yung; Wu, Tsai-Hun; Lin, Yao-Ping; Lin, Chih-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum pancreatic enzymes are frequently observed in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The complex hemodynamic, biochemical, and physiological alterations in uremia were speculated to cause excessive release of pancreatic enzymes beyond decreased renal clearance. However, hemodynamic factors are seldom explored in this aspect. We performed the study to evaluate the association between intradialytic hemodynamic change and elevated serum pancreatic amylase (SPA). Eighty-three prevalent HD patients without any clinical evidence of acute pancreatitis underwent pre-HD and post-HD blood sampling for serum pancreatic enzyme levels. Demographic, biochemical, and hematological data were collected from patient record review. Hemodialysis information including intradialytic blood pressure changes and ultrafiltration (UF) amount were collected and averaged for 1 month before the blood sampling day. Patients with elevated SPA during the HD session had greater mean systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure reduction, greater UF volume, greater pre-HD blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, higher serum phosphorus, lower pre-HD serum total CO2, and lower left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF). Using multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis, the independent predictors of elevated SPA were determined to be mean arterial pressure reduction during HD, mean UF amount, pre-HD serum total CO2, and LVEF. Greater blood pressure reduction during HD, greater UF volume, lower pre-HD serum total CO2, and lower LVEF were significantly associated with elevated SPA during HD. This suggests that hemodynamic factors contribute to elevated serum pancreatic enzymes in HD patients.

  12. Pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 expression and significance in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Chun-You; Wu, He-Shui; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the correlations of Pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 with pancreatic cancer characteristics, including pathological grading, TNM grading, tumor metastasis and tumor cell proliferation. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect PDX-1 mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer tissue and normal pancreatic tissue. The expression of PDX-1 protein was measured by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry was also used to detect proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Correlations of PDX-1 with pancreatic cancer characteristics, including pathological grading, TNM grading, tumor metastasis and tumor cell proliferation, were analyzed by using χ2 test. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry showed that 41.1% of pancreatic cancers were positive for PDX-1 expression, but normal pancreatic tissue except islets showed no staining for PDX-1. In consistent with the result of imunohistochemistry, Western blot showed that 37.5% of pancreatic cancers were positive for PDX-1. RT-PCR showed that PDX-1 expression was significantly higher in pancreatic cancer tissues than normal pancreatic tissues (2-3.56 ± 0.35 vs 2-8.76 ± 0.14, P < 0.01). Lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01), TNM grading (P < 0.05), pathological grading (P < 0.05) and tumor cell proliferation (P < 0.01) were significantly correlated with PDX-1 expression levels. CONCLUSION: PDX-1 is re-expressed in pancreatic cancer, and PDX-1-positive pancreatic cancer cells show more malignant potential compared to PDX-1-negative cells. Therefore, PDX-1-positive cells may be tumor stem cells and PDX-1 may act as alternate surface marker of pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:17552012

  13. Laser immunotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extremely malignant disease with high mortality rate. Currently there is no effective therapeutic strategy for highly metastatic pancreatic cancers. Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is a combination therapeutic approach of targeted phototherapy and immunotherapy, which could destroy treated primary tumors with elimination of untreated metastases. LIT affords a remarkable efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in pancreatic tumors in mice, and results in complete tumor regression in many cases. LIT could synergize targeted phototherapy and immunological effects of immunoadjuvant, which represent a promising treatment modality to induce systemic antitumor response through a local intervention, paving the way for the treatment of highly metastatic pancreatic cancers.

  14. CD44 regulates pancreatic cancer invasion through MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Yaqing; Kane, Kevin T; Collins, Meredith A; Simeone, Diane M; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Nguyen, Kevin Tri

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies due to its early metastatic spread and resistance to therapy. The mechanisms regulating pancreatic cancer metastasis are so far poorly understood. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, it is demonstrated that CD44, a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on a subset of pancreatic cancer cells, is required for the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the activation of an invasive program in pancreatic cancer. Mechanistically, the transcription factor Snail1 (SNAI1), a regulator of the EMT program, is a downstream target of CD44 in primary pancreatic cancer cells and regulates membrane bound metalloproteinase (MMP14/MT1-MMP) expression. In turn, MT1-MMP expression is required for pancreatic cancer invasion. Thus, these data establish the CD44-Snail-MMP axis as a key regulator of the EMT program and of invasion in pancreatic cancer. This study sets the stage for CD44 and MT1-MMP as therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer, for which small molecule or biologic inhibitors are available. Visual Overview: http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2014/09/10/1541-7786.MCR-14-0076/F1.large.jpg. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics that can modify the usual management of this disease, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, polypharmacy, performance status, comorbidities and organ dysfunction. However, the biological age, not the chronological age, of the patient should be the limiting factor in determining the most appropriate treatment for these patients. Unfortunately, despite the increased incidence of this pathology in older patients, there is an underrepresentation of these patients in clinical trials, and the management of older patients is thus determined by extrapolation from the results of studies performed in younger patients. In this review, the special characteristics of the elderly, the multidisciplinary management of localized and advanced ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and the most recent advances in the management of this condition will be discussed, focusing on surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and palliative care. PMID:26811623

  16. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-14

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics that can modify the usual management of this disease, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, polypharmacy, performance status, comorbidities and organ dysfunction. However, the biological age, not the chronological age, of the patient should be the limiting factor in determining the most appropriate treatment for these patients. Unfortunately, despite the increased incidence of this pathology in older patients, there is an underrepresentation of these patients in clinical trials, and the management of older patients is thus determined by extrapolation from the results of studies performed in younger patients. In this review, the special characteristics of the elderly, the multidisciplinary management of localized and advanced ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and the most recent advances in the management of this condition will be discussed, focusing on surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and palliative care.

  17. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways.

  18. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated. PMID:24281213

  19. Surgical management of pancreatic cancer--pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy R; Reber, Howard A

    2015-02-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy, the Whipple resection, is a complex operation that is commonly performed for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and other malignant or benign lesions in the head of the pancreas. It can be done with low morbidity and mortality rates, particularly when performed at high-volume hospitals and by high-volume surgeons. While it has been conventionally reserved for patients with early-stage malignant disease, it is being used increasingly for patients with locally extensive tumors who have undergone neoadjuvant therapy and downstaging. This article summarizes the role of pancreaticoduodenectomy for the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer. It highlights the surgical staging of disease, the technical aspects of the operation and perioperative care, and the oncologic outcome.

  20. Treatment of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extract in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study (PICNIC).

    PubMed

    Zdenkowski, Nicholas; Radvan, George; Pugliese, Leanna; Charlton, Julie; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Fraser, Allison; Bonaventura, Antonino

    2017-06-01

    Survival with advanced pancreatic cancer is less than 12 months. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may contribute to pancreatic cancer-related cachexia, via nutrient malabsorption. We aimed to determine the feasibility of prescribing pancreatic extract (Creon®) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, without frank malabsorption, were randomised in this feasibility study to pancreatic extract 50,000 units with meals and 25,000 units with snacks, or placebo. Standardised dietary advice was given. Anti-cancer and supportive care treatments were permitted. Outcomes included weight, body mass index (BMI), quality of life (QLQC30, PAN26), survival and nutritional assessment (PG-SGA). Eighteen patients were randomised before study closure due to slow recruitment. Baseline characteristics were well matched. Weight loss prior to randomisation was numerically greater in the pancreatic extract group (mean 0.7 vs 2.2 kg). Weight loss was numerically greater in the placebo group, however not significantly. No differences in BMI or nutrition score were seen. Quality of life did not differ between study groups. Median overall survival was 17 (95% CI 8.1-48.7) weeks in the control group, and 67.6 (95% CI 14.1-98.4) weeks in the pancreatic extract group (p = 0.1063). Only 17% (18/106) of potentially eligible patients were recruited, related to patient/family reluctance, rapid clinical deterioration and patients already prescribed pancreatic extract. A moderate pill burden was noted. Despite intriguing survival results, this study was not sufficiently feasible to proceed to a fully powered comparative study. A multi-centre study would be required to exclude a significant difference in outcomes.

  1. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed by surgery. If the cancer has spread, palliative treatment can improve the patient's quality of life ... and cannot be removed, the following types of palliative surgery may be done to relieve symptoms and ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed by surgery. If the cancer has spread, palliative treatment can improve the patient's quality of life ... and cannot be removed, the following types of palliative surgery may be done to relieve symptoms and ...

  3. Vitamin E intake, alpha-tocopherol status, and pancreatic cancer in a cohort of male smokers.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Sheffler-Collins, Seth; Weinstein, Stephanie; Garabrant, David H; Mannisto, Satu; Taylor, Philip; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2009-02-01

    Evidence indicates that vitamin E has anticarcinogenic properties for gastrointestinal cancers; however, few studies have examined this with respect to exocrine pancreatic cancer. The objective was to examine whether vitamin E intake and serum alpha-tocopherol concentrations were prospectively associated with exocrine pancreatic cancer. We conducted a cohort analysis of prediagnostic vitamin E intake (4 tocopherols, 4 tocotrienols), serum alpha-tocopherol concentrations, and pancreatic cancer in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study of male Finnish smokers aged 50-69 y at baseline. During follow-up from 1985 to 2004 (maximum: 19.4 y; median: 16 y), 318 incident cases were diagnosed among cohort participants with complete serum samples (n = 29,092); 306 cases had complete dietary data (n = 27,111). Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, smoking history, history of diabetes mellitus, and/or serum cholesterol were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Higher alpha-tocopherol concentrations were associated with lower pancreatic cancer risk (highest compared with lowest quintile, HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.80; P for trend = 0.03; continuous HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99). Polyunsaturated fat, a putative prooxidant nutrient, modified the association such that the inverse alpha-tocopherol association was most pronounced in subjects with a high polyunsaturated fat intake (ie, >9.9 g/d; highest compared with lowest quintile, HR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20, 0.70; P for trend = 0.03; continuous HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.97; P for interaction = 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). No associations were observed for dietary tocopherols and tocotrienols. Our results support the hypothesis that higher alpha-tocopherol concentrations may play a protective role in pancreatic carcinogenesis in male smokers.

  4. Comprehensive Evaluation of Altered Systemic Metabolism and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    phenotypes, such as obesity and diabetes , and banked plasma samples for interrogation. The potential impact of understanding the mechanisms underlying...extensive data on metabolic phenotypes, such as obesity and diabetes , and banked plasma samples for interrogation. The potential impact of understanding...treatment strategies that disrupt pancreatic tumor metabolism. KEYWORDS: Pancreatic cancer; Metabolism; Obesity, Diabetes , Early detection, Cancer

  5. Significant association between ABO blood group and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Julia B; Yazer, Mark H; Raval, Jay S; Barmada, M Michael; Brand, Randall E; Whitcomb, David C

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the ABO blood group is related to pancreatic cancer risk in the general population of the United States. METHODS: Using the University of Pittsburgh’s clinical pancreatic cancer registry, the blood donor database from our local blood bank (Central Blood Bank), and the blood product recipient database from the regional transfusion service (Centralized Transfusion Service) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, we identified 274 pancreatic cancer patients with previously determined serological ABO blood group information. The ABO blood group frequency was compared between these patients and 708 842 individual, community-based blood donors who had made donations to Pittsburgh’s Central Blood Bank between 1979 and 2009. RESULTS: The frequency of blood group A was statistically significantly higher amongst pancreatic cancer patients compared to its frequency amongst the regional blood donors [47.63% vs 39.10%, odds ratio (OR) = 1.43, P = 0.004]. Conversely, the frequency of blood group O was significantly lower amongst pancreatic cancer patients relative to the community blood donors (32.12% vs 43.99%, OR = 0.60, P = 0.00007). There were limited blood group B (n = 38) and AB (n = 17) pancreatic cancer patients; the overall P trend value comparing patient to donor blood groups was 0.001. CONCLUSION: The ABO blood group is associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Future studies should examine the mechanism linking pancreatic cancer risk to ABO blood group. PMID:21105191

  6. CD44 regulates pancreatic cancer invasion through MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Yaqing; Kane, Kevin T.; Collins, Meredith A.; Simeone, Diane M.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Nguyen, Kevin Tri

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies due to its early metastatic spread and resistance to therapy. The mechanisms regulating pancreatic cancer metastasis are so far poorly understood. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, it is demonstrated that CD44, a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on a subset of pancreatic cancer cells, is required for the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the activation of an invasive program in pancreatic cancer. Mechanistically, the transcription factor Snail1 (SNAI1), a regulator of the EMT program, is a downstream target of CD44 in primary pancreatic cancer cells and regulates membrane bound metalloproteinase (MMP14/MT1-MMP) expression. In turn, MT1-MMP expression is required for pancreatic cancer invasion. Thus, these data establish the CD44-Snail-MMP axis as a key regulator of the EMT program and of invasion in pancreatic cancer. (135) IMPLICATIONS This study sets the stage for CD44 and MT1-MMP as therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer, for which small molecule or biologic inhibitors are available. PMID:25566991

  7. Cholecystokinin and pancreatic cancer: the chicken or the egg?

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Solomon, Travis E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) causes the release of pancreatic digestive enzymes and growth of the normal pancreas. Exogenous CCK administration has been used in animal models to study pancreatitis and also as a promoter of carcinogen-induced or Kras-driven pancreatic cancer. Defining CCK receptors in normal human pancreas has been problematic because of its retroperitoneal location, high concentrations of pancreatic proteases, and endogenous RNase. Most studies indicate that the predominant receptor in human pancreas is the CCK-B type, and CCK-A is the predominant form in rodent pancreas. In pancreatic cancer cells and tumors, the role of CCK is better established because receptors are often overexpressed by these cancer cells and stimulation of such receptors promotes growth. Furthermore, in established cancer, endogenous production of CCK and/or gastrin occurs and their actions stimulate the synthesis of more receptors plus growth by an autocrine mechanism. Initially it was thought that the mechanism by which CCK served to potentiate carcinogenesis was by interplay with inflammation in the pancreatic microenvironment. But with the recent findings of CCK receptors on early PanIN (pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia) lesions and on stellate cells, the question has been raised that perhaps CCK actions are not the result of cancer but an early driving promoter of cancer. This review will summarize what is known regarding CCK, its receptors, and pancreatic cancer, and also what is unknown and requires further investigation to determine which comes first, the chicken or the egg, "CCK or the cancer."

  8. EMT and Treatment Resistance in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaianigo, Nicola; Melisi, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the third leading cause of adult cancer mortality in the United States. The poor prognosis for patients with PC is mainly due to its aggressive course, the limited efficacy of active systemic treatments, and a metastatic behavior, demonstrated throughout the evolution of the disease. On average, 80% of patients with PC are diagnosed with metastatic disease, and the half of those who undergo surgery and adjuvant therapy develop liver metastasis within two years. Metastatic dissemination is an early event in PC and is mainly attributed to an evolutionary biological process called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This innate mechanism could have a dual role during embryonic growth and organ differentiation, and in cancer progression, cancer stem cell intravasation, and metastasis settlement. Many of the molecular pathways decisive in EMT progression have been already unraveled, but little is known about the causes behind the induction of this mechanism. EMT is one of the most distinctive and critical features of PC, occurring even in the very first stages of tumor development. This is known as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and leads to early dissemination, drug resistance, and unfavorable prognosis and survival. The intention of this review is to shed new light on the critical role assumed by EMT during PC progression, with a particular focus on its role in PC resistance. PMID:28895920

  9. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  10. Targeting reactive nitrogen species suppresses hereditary pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo; Chen, Qian; Ma, Teng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutation of BRCA2 induces hereditary pancreatic cancer. However, how BRCA2 mutation specifically induces pancreatic tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we have examined a mouse model of Brca2-deficiency–induced pancreatic tumors and found that excessive reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitrite, are generated in precancerous pancreases, which induce massive DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks. RNS-induced DNA lesions cause genomic instability in the absence of Brca2. Moreover, with the treatment of antioxidant tempol to suppress RNS, not only are DNA lesions significantly reduced, but also the onset of pancreatic cancer is delayed. Thus, this study demonstrates that excess RNS are a nongenetic driving force for Brca2-deficiency–induced pancreatic tumors. Suppression of RNS could be an important strategy for pancreatic cancer prevention. PMID:28630313

  11. Metabolomic profile in pancreatic cancer patients: a consensus-based approach to identify highly discriminating metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Mazza, Tommaso; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fusilli, Caterina; Ippolito, Antonio; Mattivi, Fulvio; Latiano, Anna; Andriulli, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths due to its aggressive behavior and poor clinical outcome. There is a considerable variability in the frequency of serum tumor markers in cancer' patients. We performed a metabolomics screening in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Two targeted metabolomic assays were conducted on 40 serum samples of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40 healthy controls. Multivariate methods and classification trees were performed. Materials and Methods Sparse partial least squares discriminant analysis (SPLS-DA) was used to reduce the high dimensionality of a pancreatic cancer metabolomic dataset, differentiating between pancreatic cancer (PC) patients and healthy subjects. Using Random Forest analysis palmitic acid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol, lanosterol, lignoceric acid, 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, cholesterol 5α,6α epoxide, erucic acid and taurolithocholic acid (T-LCA), oleoyl-L-carnitine, oleanolic acid were identified among 206 metabolites as highly discriminating between disease states. Comparison between Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves for palmitic acid and CA 19-9 showed that the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of palmitic acid (AUC=1.000; 95% confidence interval) is significantly higher than CA 19-9 (AUC=0.963; 95% confidence interval: 0.896-1.000). Conclusion Mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling of sera from pancreatic cancer patients and normal subjects showed significant alterations in the profiles of the metabolome of PC patients as compared to controls. These findings offer an information-rich matrix for discovering novel candidate biomarkers with diagnostic or prognostic potentials. PMID:26735340

  12. Longitudinal evaluation of serum pancreatic enzymes and ultrasonographic findings in diabetic cats without clinically relevant pancreatitis at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Hafner, M; Kook, P; Lutz, T A; Ohlerth, S; Reusch, C E

    2015-01-01

    Cats with diabetes mellitus can have subclinical pancreatitis but prospective studies to confirm this are lacking. Metabolic control of diabetic cats with pancreatitis is difficult. Subclinical pancreatitis occurs in diabetic cats at the time diabetes is diagnosed or might develop during the follow-up period, hampering diabetic remission. Thirty cats with newly diagnosed diabetes without clinical signs of pancreatitis on admission. Prospective study. On admission and 2 and 6 months later, serum Spec fPL and DGGR-lipase were measured and the pancreas underwent ultrasonographic examination. Pancreatitis was suspected if serum markers were increased or ≥2 ultrasonographic abnormalities were detected. Cats were treated with insulin glargine and diabetic remission was defined as euglycemia ≥4 weeks after discontinuation of insulin. Nonparametric statistical tests were used for analysis. Subclinical pancreatitis at the time of diagnosis was suspected in 33, 50, and 31% of cats based on Spec fPL, DGGR-lipase and ultrasonography, respectively; and in 60% when diagnostic criteria were combined. During the follow-up period, suspected pancreatitis developed in additional 17-30% cats. Only 1 cat had transient clinical signs compatible with pancreatitis. Seventeen of the 30 cats (57%) achieved remission. Frequency of abnormal Spec fPL and DGGR-lipase and abnormal ultrasonographic findings did not differ in cats achieving remission and those who did not. Cats achieving remission had significantly lower Spec fPL at 2 months (P < .001). Based on laboratory and ultrasonographic measurements, many cats with diabetes might have pancreatitis, although without clinical signs. Cats with high Spec fPL might have a reduced chance of diabetic remission; however, this topic needs further studies in large cohorts of diabetic cats. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of

  13. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Pancreatic cancer: development of a unifying etiologic concept.

    PubMed

    Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P

    1999-06-30

    Our knowledge of the etiology of all forms of cancer including pancreatic cancer has improved dramatically in the second half of this century. The current model describes a gradual change from a normal pancreatic cell to a fully malignant cell requiring several stages with gradual and progressive alterations appearing at the genetic and the tissue level. Although there are many germ line diseases that are associated with pancreatic cancer it is probable that inherited diseases account for only about 10% of the total burden of pancreatic cancer. Avoidance of smoking and dietary modification are the current best strategies for reducing the risk of this tumor. In addition, newer molecular techniques and imaging procedures should provide clinicians with the ability to detect pancreatic cancer at an early, potentially curable stage.

  15. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  16. Measuring sickness behavior in the context of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Kristen; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2015-03-01

    Sickness behavior has been widely recognized as a symptom cluster that is associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine activation resulting from diverse conditions. The symptoms that comprise sickness behavior overlap substantially with major depressive disorder (MDD), which raises questions about the relationship between these two constructs, both of which occur frequently in patients with cancer. The construct of sickness behavior, while well-established in animal research, has rarely been applied to studies examining cytokines and depression in humans, perhaps because no reliable or validated measure of sickness behavior has been developed. We developed a version of a sickness behavior measure (the Sickness Behavior Inventory or SBI) and conducted a preliminary examination of its scale properties. Specifically, we hypothesized that a measure of sickness behavior would be significantly associated with five biomarkers of immune functioning (serum IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-10) in a human sample. The sample was comprised of four groups: individuals with pancreatic cancer and MDD (n = 16), individuals with pancreatic cancer and who did not have a diagnosis of MDD (n =2 6), individuals without cancer who had MDD (n = 7), and individuals who did not have cancer or MDD (n = 25). The SBI demonstrated moderate reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .66), and total scores were significantly correlated with IL-6 (rs = .26, p = .03), but not with other markers of immune functioning. Factor analysis supported a 3-factor model of sickness behavior with different associations between the three SBI factors and cytokines. These results highlight the need to further refine symptom measurement to better understand the relationships among immune functioning, cancer, depression, and sickness behavior.

  17. Measuring sickness behavior in the context of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Kristen; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2015-01-01

    Sickness behavior has been widely recognized as a symptom cluster that is associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine activation resulting from diverse conditions. The symptoms that comprise sickness behavior overlap substantially with major depressive disorder (MDD), which raises questions about the relationship between these two constructs, both of which occur frequently in patients with cancer. The construct of sickness behavior, while well-established in animal research, has rarely been applied to studies examining cytokines and depression in humans, perhaps because no reliable or validated measure of sickness behavior has been developed. We developed a version of a sickness behavior measure (the Sickness Behavior Inventory or SBI) and conducted a preliminary examination of its scale properties. Specifically, we hypothesized that a measure of sickness behavior would be significantly associated with five biomarkers of immune functioning (serum IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-10) in a human sample. The sample was comprised of four groups: individuals with pancreatic cancer and MDD (n=16), individuals with pancreatic cancer and who did not have a diagnosis of MDD (n=26), individuals without cancer who had MDD (n=7), and individuals who did not have cancer or MDD (n=25). The SBI demonstrated moderate reliability (Cronbach's alpha=.66), and total scores were significantly correlated with IL-6 (rs=.26, p=.03), but not with other immune functioning markers. Factor analysis supported a 3-factor model of sickness behavior with different associations between the three SBI factors and cytokines. These results highlight the need to further refine symptom measurement to better understand the relationships among immune functioning, cancer, depression, and sickness behavior. PMID:25659492

  18. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  19. Spontaneous regression of pancreatic cancer: real or a misdiagnosis?

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-06-21

    Spontaneous tumor regression has been subject of numerous studies and speculations for many years. This phenomenon is exceptional, but well reported, in some types of tumors, but not in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer has the worst five-year survival rate of any cancer. Despite numerous molecular studies and clinical approaches, using several mouse models, this cancer responds poorly to the existing chemotherapeutic agents and progress on treatment remains elusive. Although pancreatic cancer tumors seldom undergo spontaneous regression, and some authors take that with skepticism, there are some cases reported in the literature. However, the variability in the description of the reports and technical details could make this process susceptible to misdiagnosis. Distinguishing between different types of pancreatic carcinoma should be taken with caution as they have wide differences in malignant potential. Diseases such as pancreatic benign tumors, insulinomas, or autoimmune pancreatitis could be responsible for this misdiagnosis as a pancreatic cancer. Here we review different cases reported, their clinical characteristics, and possible mechanisms leading to spontaneous regression of pancreatic cancer. We also discuss the possibilities of misdiagnosis.

  20. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W.; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  1. Oncogenic KRAS signalling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Eser, S; Schnieke, A; Schneider, G; Saur, D

    2014-08-26

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost universally fatal. The annual number of deaths equals the number of newly diagnosed cases, despite maximal treatment. The overall 5-year survival rate of <5% has remained stubbornly unchanged over the last 30 years, despite tremendous efforts in preclinical and clinical science. There is unquestionably an urgent need to further improve our understanding of pancreatic cancer biology, treatment response and relapse, and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Rigorous research in the field has uncovered genetic aberrations that occur during PDAC development and progression. In most cases, PDAC is initiated by oncogenic mutant KRAS, which has been shown to drive pancreatic neoplasia. However, all attempts to target KRAS directly have failed in the clinic and KRAS is widely assumed to be undruggable. This has led to intense efforts to identify druggable critical downstream targets and nodes orchestrated by mutationally activated KRAS. This includes context-specific KRAS effector pathways, synthetic lethal interaction partners and KRAS-driven metabolic changes. Here, we review recent advances in oncogenic KRAS signalling and discuss how these might benefit PDAC treatment in the future.

  2. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, G H; Tsiotos, G G

    2001-01-01

    The development of cancer involves the accumulation of genetic changes. Over the past decade there has a been spectacular advance in the knowledge of the genetic basis of cancer, mainly as a result of the rapid progression of molecular technology. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. Conventional therapeutic approaches have not had much impact on the course of this aggressive neoplasm. Knowledge of the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer has grown rapidly. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer include oncogene mutations (most commonly K-ras mutations), and tumour suppressor gene alterations (mainly p53, p16, DCC, etc.). These advances have potential implications for the management of this deadly disease. Identification of a hereditary genetic predisposition to pancreatic cancer has led to the formation of pancreatic cancer registries around the world, with voluntary screening of patients and siblings for the hereditary genetic defect. Asymptomatic population screening remains unrealistic, but the recognition of subpopulations at increased risk from pancreatic cancer, along with novel and sensitive detection techniques, means that targeted population screening is a step closer. Intensive research is performed in specialist laboratories to improve the diagnostic approach in patients with pancreatic cancer. The use of such molecular diagnostic methods is likely to expand. Molecular biology may also have a great impact on the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and many therapeutic approaches are being evaluated in clinical trials, including gene replacement therapy, genetic prodrug activation therapy, antisense immunology and peptide technology. The 'molecular age' has the promise of delivering still better results. This review summarises recent data relating to the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, with emphasis on features that may be of clinical significance for diagnosis and/or therapy.

  3. Is metastatic pancreatic cancer an untargetable malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Gharios, Joseph; Elkarak, Fadi; Antoun, Joelle; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies, known to be chemo-resistant and have been recently considered resistant to some targeted therapies (TT). Erlotinib combined to gemcitabine is the only targeted therapy that showed an overall survival benefit in MPC. New targets and therapeutic approaches, based on new-TT, are actually being evaluated in MPC going from immunotherapy, epigenetics, tumor suppressor gene and oncogenes to stromal matrix regulators. We aim in this paper to present the major causes rendering MPC an untargetable malignancy and to focus on the new therapeutic modalities based on TT in MPC. PMID:26989465

  4. Pancreatic cancer mortality in Louisiana.

    PubMed Central

    Pickle, L W; Gottlieb, M S

    1980-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the investigation of high pancreas-cancer mortality among White males in a cluster of Louisiana parishes, we examined 876 pairs of certificates of death which occurred in this area during 1960--75. The pancreas-cancer death records were matched to controls by age, race, sex, year of death, and parish of residence. The odds ratios were increased about two-fold for workers in the oil refining and paper manufacturing industries, and slight elevations were seen among residents near refineries and food processing plants. Despite the limited residential and occupational information available on death certificates, this study suggests leads to environmental factors that can be further investigated by a case-control interview study in Louisiana. PMID:7356088

  5. Refinement of screening for familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, D K; Slater, E P; Carrato, A; Ibrahim, I S; Guillen-Ponce, C; Vasen, H F A; Matthäi, E; Earl, J; Jendryschek, F S; Figiel, J; Steinkamp, M; Ramaswamy, A; Vázquez-Sequeiros, E; Muñoz-Beltran, M; Montans, J; Mocci, E; Bonsing, B A; Wasser, M; Klöppel, G; Langer, P; Fendrich, V; Gress, T M

    2016-08-01

    Surveillance programmes are recommended for individuals at risk (IAR) of familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) to detect early pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, PDAC). However, the age to begin screening and the optimal screening protocol remain to be determined. IAR from non-CDKN2A FPC families underwent annual screening by MRI with endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in board-approved prospective screening programmes at three tertiary referral centres. The diagnostic yield according to age and different screening protocols was analysed. 253 IAR with a median age of 48 (25-81) years underwent screening with a median of 3 (1-11) screening visits during a median follow-up of 28 (1-152) months. 134 (53%) IAR revealed pancreatic lesions on imaging, mostly cystic (94%), on baseline or follow-up screening. Lesions were significantly more often identified in IAR above the age of 45 years (p<0.0001). In 21 IAR who underwent surgery, no significant lesions (PDAC, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 3 lesions, high-grade intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN)) were detected before the age of 50 years. Potentially relevant lesions (multifocal PanIN2 lesions, low/moderate-grade branch-duct IPMNs) occurred also significantly more often after the age of 50 years (13 vs 2, p<0.0004). The diagnostic yield of potentially relevant lesions was not different between screening protocols using annual MRI with EUS (n=98) or annual MRI with EUS every 3rd year (n=198) and between IAR screened at intervals of 12 months (n=180) or IAR that decided to be screened at ≥24 months intervals (n=30). It appears safe to start screening for PDAC in IAR of non-CDKN2a FPC families at the age of 50 years. MRI-based screening supplemented by EUS at baseline and every 3rd year or when changes in MRI occur appears to be efficient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Vitamin D Metabolic Pathway Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Yu, Kai; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Moy, Kristin; Freedman, Neal D.; Mayne, Susan T.; Albanes, Demetrius; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa; Bamlet, William R.; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Bracci, Paige; Canzian, Federico; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duell, Eric J.; Gallinger, Steve; Giles, Graham G.; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hartge, Patricia; Hassan, Manal; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert; Jacobs, Eric J.; Kamineni, Aruna; Klein, Alison; Klein, Eric; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Li, Donghui; Malats, Núria; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Porta, Miquel; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Maeder, Dennis; Brotzman, Michelle; Risch, Harvey; Sampson, Joshua N.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008–0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:25799011

  7. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ma, Ling; Zhang, Zhengkui; Liu, Xiaoran; Gao, Hongqiao; Zhuang, Yan; Yang, Pei; Kornmann, Marko; Tian, Xiaodong; Yang, Yinmo

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is crucially involved in tumorigenesis. This study aimed to assess the role of Hh signaling in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), stemness properties and chemoresistance of human pancreatic Panc-1 cancer stem cells (CSCs). Panc-1 cells were transfected with recombinant lentiviral vectors to silence SMO and serum-free floating-culture system was used to isolate Panc-1 tumorspheres. The expression of CSC and EMT markers was detected by flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Malignant behaviors of Panc-1 CSC were evaluated by tumorigenicity assays and nude mouse lung metastasis model. We found that tumorspheres derived from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1 possessed self-renewal, differentiation and stemness properties. Hh pathway and EMT were active in Panc-1 tumorspheres. Inhibition of Hh signaling by SMO knockdown inhibited self-renewal, EMT, invasion, chemoresistance, pulmonary metastasis, tumorigenesis of pancreatic CSCs. In conclusion, Hh signaling contributes to the maintenance of stem-like properties and chemoresistance of pancreatic CSC and promotes the tumorigenesis and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Hh pathway is a potential molecular target for the development of therapeutic strategies for pancreatic CSCs. PMID:26918054

  8. Review of screening for pancreatic cancer in high risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Stoita, Alina; Penman, Ian D; Williams, David B

    2011-05-21

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose at an early stage and is associated with a very poor survival. Ten percent of pancreatic cancers result from genetic susceptibility and/or familial aggregation. Individuals from families with multiple affected first-degree relatives and those with a known cancer-causing genetic mutation have been shown to be at much higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Recent efforts have focused on detecting disease at an earlier stage to improve survival in these high-risk groups. This article reviews high-risk groups, screening methods, and current screening programs and their results.

  9. Review of screening for pancreatic cancer in high risk individuals

    PubMed Central

    Stoita, Alina; Penman, Ian D; Williams, David B

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose at an early stage and is associated with a very poor survival. Ten percent of pancreatic cancers result from genetic susceptibility and/or familial aggregation. Individuals from families with multiple affected first-degree relatives and those with a known cancer-causing genetic mutation have been shown to be at much higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Recent efforts have focused on detecting disease at an earlier stage to improve survival in these high-risk groups. This article reviews high-risk groups, screening methods, and current screening programs and their results. PMID:21633635

  10. CA125 is superior to CA19-9 in predicting the resectability of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guopei; Xiao, Zhiwen; Long, Jiang; Liu, Zuqiang; Liu, Liang; Liu, Chen; Xu, Jin; Ni, Quanxing; Yu, Xianjun

    2013-12-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) has been reported as a biomarker to predict the resectability of pancreatic cancer, several limitations have restricted its clinical use. The potential of several serum tumor markers (CA19-9, CA125, CA50, CA242, CA724, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)) to predict the resectability of pancreatic cancer was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in a series of 212 patients with proven pancreatic cancer. Compared with other tumor markers including CA19-9, CA125 has a superior predictive value (CA19-9, ROC area 0.66, cutoff value 289.40 U/mL; CA125, ROC area 0.81, cutoff value 19.70 U/mL). In addition, for patients with unresectable diseases misjudged by CT as resectable, the percentage of CA125 over selected cutoff value was higher than that of CA19-9 (CA19-9, 70.27 %; CA125, 81.08 %). CA125 is superior to CA19-9 in predicting the resectability of pancreatic cancer. Aberrant high levels of CA125 may indicate unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  11. Susceptibility of ATM-deficient pancreatic cancer cells to radiation.

    PubMed

    Ayars, Michael; Eshleman, James; Goggins, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is inactivated in a significant minority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and may be predictor of treatment response. We determined if ATM deficiency renders pancreatic cancer cells more sensitive to fractionated radiation or commonly used chemotherapeutics. ATM expression was knocked down in three pancreatic cancer cell lines using ATM-targeting shRNA. Isogenic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. DNA repair kinetics were analyzed in irradiated cells using the comet assay. We find that while rendering pancreatic cancer cells ATM-deficient did not significantly change their sensitivity to several chemotherapeutics, it did render them exquisitely sensitized to radiation. Pancreatic cancer ATM status may help predict response to radiotherapy.

  12. Deciphering the role of hedgehog signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dongsheng; Schlotman, Kelly E; Xie, Jingwu

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer, mostly pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the US, with a dismal median survival of 6 months. Thus, there is an urgent unmet need to identify ways to diagnose and to treat this deadly cancer. Although a number of genetic changes have been identified in pancreatic cancer, their mechanisms of action in tumor development, progression and metastasis are not completely understood. Hedgehog signaling, which plays a major role in embryonic development and stem cell regulation, is known to be activated in pancreatic cancer; however, specific inhibitors targeting the smoothened molecule failed to improve the condition of pancreatic cancer patients in clinical trials. Furthermore, results regarding the role of Hh signaling in pancreatic cancer are controversial with some reporting tumor promoting activities whereas others tumor suppressive actions. In this review, we will summarize what we know about hedgehog signaling in pancreatic cancer, and try to explain the contradicting roles of hedgehog signaling as well as the reason(s) behind the failed clinical trials. In addition to the canonical hedgehog signaling, we will also discuss several non-canonical hedgehog signaling mechanisms.

  13. Role of Endogenous Cholecystokinin on Growth of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matters, Gail L.; McGovern, Christopher; Harms, John F.; Markovic, Kevin; Anson, Krystal; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Martenis, Melissa; Awad, Christina; Smith, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin stimulate growth of pancreatic cancer. Although down regulation of gastrin inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer, the contribution of endogenous CCK to tumor growth is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of endogenous CCK on autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for CCK mRNA and peptide expression by real time RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effect of endogenous CCK on growth was evaluated by treating cancer cells with CCK neutralizing antibodies and by down regulating CCK mRNA by RNAi. Wild type pancreatic cancer cells expressed significantly lower CCK mRNA and peptide levels than gastrin. Neither treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with CCK antibodies nor the down regulation of CCK mRNA and peptide by shRNAs altered growth in vitro or in vivo. Conversely, when gastrin mRNA expression was down regulated, the same cells failed to produce tumors in spite of having sustained levels of endogenous CCK. Pancreatic cancer cells produce CCK and gastrin; however, the autocrine production of gastrin is more important for stimulating tumor growth. PMID:21186400

  14. Epigenetics and pancreatic cancer: pathophysiology and novel treatment aspects.

    PubMed

    Neureiter, Daniel; Jäger, Tarkan; Ocker, Matthias; Kiesslich, Tobias

    2014-06-28

    An improvement in pancreatic cancer treatment represents an urgent medical goal. Late diagnosis and high intrinsic resistance to conventional chemotherapy has led to a dismal overall prognosis that has remained unchanged during the past decades. Increasing knowledge about the molecular pathogenesis of the disease has shown that genetic alterations, such as mutations of K-ras, and especially epigenetic dysregulation of tumor-associated genes, such as silencing of the tumor suppressor p16(ink4a), are hallmarks of pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe genes that are commonly affected by epigenetic dysregulation in pancreatic cancer via DNA methylation, histone acetylation or miRNA (microRNA) expression, and review the implications on pancreatic cancer biology such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, morphological pattern formation, or cancer stem cell regulation during carcinogenesis from PanIN (pancreatic intraepithelial lesions) to invasive cancer and resistance development. Epigenetic drugs, such as DNA methyltransferases or histone deactylase inhibitors, have shown promising preclinical results in pancreatic cancer and are currently in early phases of clinical development. Combinations of epigenetic drugs with established cytotoxic drugs or targeted therapies are promising approaches to improve the poor response and survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients.

  15. Epigenetics and pancreatic cancer: Pathophysiology and novel treatment aspects

    PubMed Central

    Neureiter, Daniel; Jäger, Tarkan; Ocker, Matthias; Kiesslich, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    An improvement in pancreatic cancer treatment represents an urgent medical goal. Late diagnosis and high intrinsic resistance to conventional chemotherapy has led to a dismal overall prognosis that has remained unchanged during the past decades. Increasing knowledge about the molecular pathogenesis of the disease has shown that genetic alterations, such as mutations of K-ras, and especially epigenetic dysregulation of tumor-associated genes, such as silencing of the tumor suppressor p16ink4a, are hallmarks of pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe genes that are commonly affected by epigenetic dysregulation in pancreatic cancer via DNA methylation, histone acetylation or miRNA (microRNA) expression, and review the implications on pancreatic cancer biology such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, morphological pattern formation, or cancer stem cell regulation during carcinogenesis from PanIN (pancreatic intraepithelial lesions) to invasive cancer and resistance development. Epigenetic drugs, such as DNA methyltransferases or histone deactylase inhibitors, have shown promising preclinical results in pancreatic cancer and are currently in early phases of clinical development. Combinations of epigenetic drugs with established cytotoxic drugs or targeted therapies are promising approaches to improve the poor response and survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:24976721

  16. Identification of genes and candidate agents associated with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-sheng; Liu, Zhen; Sun, Shao-long; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. A major challenge in current cancer research is biological interpretation of complexity of cancer somatic mutation profiles. It has been suggested that several molecular alterations may play important roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this study, by using the GSE28735 affymetrix microarray data accessible from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between paired pancreatic cancer tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues, followed the protein-protein interaction of the DEGs. Our study identified thousands of DEGs involved in regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis in progression of pancreatic cancer. Sp1 was predicted to be the major regulator by transcription factors analysis. From the protein-protein interaction networks, we found that Tk1 might play an important role in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we predicted candidate agents, including tomatidine and nialamide, which may be used as drugs to treat pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, our data provide a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of genes and pathways which may be involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Clinical significance of plasma metastin level in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumihiko; Nagai, Kazuyuki; Kida, Atsushi; Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Takeyama, Masaharu; Doi, Ryuichiro; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2009-03-01

    Metastin, which is a 54-residue peptide coded by KiSS-1 gene, is an endogenous ligand to a G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54. Metastin suppresses a malignant tumor to metastasize and regulates secretion of gonadotropine releasing hormone. Physiological action of metastin has been focused on in oncology. It is reported that less KiSS-1 gene and more hOT7T175 gene which codes GPR54 are expressed in pancreatic cancers than in normal pancreatic tissues; however, there is no study that investigates the relationship between clinicopathological characteristics and plasma metastin concentration in pancreatic cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between plasma metastin-like immunoreactive substance (LI) levels and clinical characteristics in pancreatic cancer patients. Thirty-three patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic cancer before or just after treatments and 24 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Patients were grouped according to the International Union Against Cancer TNM classification. Plasma metastin-LI was measured by enzyme immunoassay. The plasma metastin-LI levels of cancer patients were significantly higher when compared with healthy volunteers. Significant relationship was not found between the plasma metastin-LI levels and the clinicopathological factors such as tumor size, invasion, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis. The plasma metastin levels may be a significant biomarker to predict the presence of pancreatic cancer and could be used in pancreatic cancer screening.

  18. Cancer Manipulation of Host Physiology: Lessons from Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Miller, George

    2017-04-08

    Homeostasis is a fundamental property of living organisms enabling the human body to withstand internal and external insults. In several chronic diseases, and especially in cancer, many homeostatic mechanisms are deranged. Pancreatic cancer in particular is notorious for its ability to invoke an intense fibroinflammatory stromal reaction facilitating its progression and resistance to treatment. In the past decade, several seminal discoveries have elucidated previously unrecognized modes of commandeering the host's defense systems. Here we review novel discoveries in pancreatic cancer immunobiology and attempt to integrate the notion of deranged homeostasis in the pathogenesis of this disease. We also highlight areas of controversy and obstacles that need to be overcome, hoping to further our mechanistic insight into this malignancy.

  19. Increased pancreatic cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Michael; Børge Johannesen, Tom; Gilbert, Ethel S; Stovall, Marilyn; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Rajaraman, Preetha; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Aleman, Berthe M P; Andersson, Michael; Curtis, Rochelle E; Dores, Graça M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Hall, Per; Holowaty, Eric J; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Langmark, Frøydis; Lynch, Charles F; Pukkala, Eero; Storm, Hans H; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Morton, Lindsay M; Fossa, Sophie D; Travis, Lois B

    2016-09-27

    Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated among testicular cancer (TC) survivors. However, the roles of specific treatments are unclear. Among 23 982 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1947-1991, doses from radiotherapy to the pancreas were estimated for 80 pancreatic cancer patients and 145 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Cumulative incidence of second primary pancreatic cancer was 1.1% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. Radiotherapy (72 (90%) cases and 115 (80%) controls) was associated with a 2.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-7.8) increased risk. The OR increased linearly by 0.12 per Gy to the pancreas (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 4.6 (95% CI 1.9-11.0) for ⩾25 Gy vs <25 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after TC diagnosis (P=0.020). The risk increased with the number of cycles of chemotherapy with alkylating or platinum agents (P=0.057), although only one case was exposed to platinum. A dose-response relationship exists between radiation to the pancreas and subsequent cancer risk, and persists for over 20 years. These excesses, although small, should be considered when radiotherapy with exposure to the pancreas is considered for newly diagnosed patients. Additional data are needed on the role of chemotherapy.

  20. A Brief Summary of Early Detection in Pancreatic Cancer and Research Needs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and early stage pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents over 90% of all pancreatic malignancies. The majority of PDAC are sporadic, occurring without a family history of the disease. |

  1. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  2. The Impact of Obesity on Gallstone Disease, Acute Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Conwell, Darwin L; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a well-recognized risk factor for gallstone formation and increases the risk for gallstone-related complications. Pancreatic diseases are impacted adversely by obesity. Although weight loss surgery increases the risk of gallstone disease, evidence suggests that bariatric surgery mitigates the obesity-associated adverse prognostication in acute pancreatitis. Obesity is also a significant risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Obesity is a global epidemic and is increasing worldwide and among all age groups. There is an urgent need for focused health policies aimed at reducing the incidence and prevalence of obesity. This article summarizes the current literature highlighting the association between obesity and the pathophysiology and outcome of gallstone disease, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Precursor lesions in pancreatic cancer: morphological and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Christopher J; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death in Western societies. In large part this is due to its typically late presentation, usually as locally advanced or metastatic disease. Identification of the non-invasive precursor lesions to pancreatic cancer raises the possibility of surgical treatment or chemoprevention at an early stage in the evolution of this disease, when more amenable to therapeutic interventions. Precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, in particular pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), have been recognised under a variety of synonyms for over 50 years. Over the past decade our understanding of the morphology, biological significance and molecular aberrations of these lesions has grown rapidly and there is now a widely accepted progression model integrating the accumulated morphological and molecular observations. Further progress is likely to be accelerated by improved mouse models of pancreatic cancer and by insight into the cancer genome gained by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), in which an Australian consortium is leading the pancreatic cancer initiative. This review also outlines the morphological and molecular features of the other two precursors of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, i.e., intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms.

  4. Pancreatic cancer and its stroma: a conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Pothula, Srinivasa P; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by a prominent desmoplastic/stromal reaction that has received little attention until recent times. Given that treatments focusing on pancreatic cancer cells alone have failed to significantly improve patient outcome over many decades, research efforts have now moved to understanding the pathophysiology of the stromal reaction and its role in cancer progression. In this regard, our Group was the first to identify the cells (pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) that produced the collagenous stroma of pancreatic cancer and to demonstrate that these cells interacted closely with cancer cells to facilitate local tumour growth and distant metastasis. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that stromal PSCs may also mediate angiogenesis, immune evasion and the well known resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This review will summarise current knowledge regarding the critical role of pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma in pancreatic cancer biology and the therapeutic approaches being developed to target the stroma in a bid to improve the outcome of this devastating disease.

  5. Roles of Carbonic Anhydrase IX in Development of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuji; Dong, Ming; Sheng, Weiwei; Huang, Longping

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the effects of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) towards the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The expressions of CA IX in 58 cases of pancreatic cancer and paired paracancerous normal tissues, obtained from 2005 to 2012 in the first Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, were detected, as well as its expressions in different pancreatic cancer cell lines, aiming to detect the impacts of CA IX silencing towards the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. The CA IX expressions in 58 pancreatic cancer cases were higher than those in the paired paracancerous normal tissues (P < 0.01), and positively correlated with the tumor size and the UICC staging UICC (P < 0.05), the multivariate analysis showed that the high expression of CA IX was the independent risk factor towards the prognosis of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). The CA IX was highly expressed in AxPC-1 and Miapaca-2, and the interference effects were significant. CA IX silencing could significantly inhibit the invasion and metastasis of AxPC-1 and Miapaca. We support a pro-tumor role of CA IX in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Keleg, Shereen; Büchler, Peter; Ludwig, Roman; Büchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2003-01-22

    Pancreatic cancer remains a challenging disease with an overall cumulative 5-year survival rate below 1%. The process of cancer initiation, progression and metastasis is still not understood well. Invasion and tumor metastasis are closely related and both occur within a tumour-host microecology, where stroma and tumour cells exchange enzymes and cytokines that modify the local extracellular matrix, stimulate cell migration, and promote cell proliferation and tumor cell survival. During the last decade considerable progress has been made in understanding genetic alterations of genes involved in local and systemic tumor growth. The most important changes occur in genes which regulate cell cycle progression, extracellular matrix homeostasis and cell migration. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that epigenetic factors including angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis may participate in the formation of tumor metastasis. In this review we highlight the most important genetic alterations involved in tumor invasion and metastasis and further outline the role of tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in systemic tumor dissemination.

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Metastases Harbor Evidence of Polyclonality

    PubMed Central

    Maddipati, Ravikanth; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the cancer genome have demonstrated that tumors are comprised of multiple sub-clones with varied genetic and phenotypic properties. However, little is known about how metastases arise and evolve from these sub-clones. To understand the cellular dynamics that drive metastasis, we used multi-color lineage tracing technology in an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that precursor lesions exhibit significant clonal heterogeneity but that this diversity decreases during pre-malignant progression. Furthermore, we present evidence that a significant fraction of metastases are polyclonally seeded by distinct tumor sub-clones. Finally, we show that clonality during metastatic growth – leading to either monoclonal or polyclonal expansion – differs based on the site of metastatic invasion. These results provide an unprecedented window into the cellular dynamics of tumor evolution and suggest that heterotypic interactions between tumor subpopulations contribute to metastatic progression in native tumors. PMID:26209539

  8. Human pancreatic cancer xenografts recapitulate key aspects of cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Delitto, Andrea E.; Nosacka, Rachel L.; Rocha, Fernanda G.; DiVita, Bayli B.; Gerber, Michael H.; George, Thomas J.; Behrns, Kevin E.; Hughes, Steven J.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Judge, Andrew R.; Trevino, Jose G.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cachexia represents a debilitating syndrome that diminishes quality of life and augments the toxicities of conventional treatments. Cancer cachexia is particularly debilitating in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Mechanisms responsible for cancer cachexia are under investigation and are largely derived from observations in syngeneic murine models of cancer which are limited in PC. We evaluate the effect of human PC cells on both muscle wasting and the systemic inflammatory milieu potentially contributing to PC-associated cachexia. Specifically, human PC xenografts were generated by implantation of pancreatic cancer cells, L3.6pl and PANC-1, either in the flank or orthotopically within the pancreas. Mice bearing orthotopic xenografts demonstrated significant muscle wasting and atrophy-associated gene expression changes compared to controls. Further, despite the absence of adaptive immunity, splenic tissue from orthotopically engrafted mice demonstrated elevations in several pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with cancer cachexia, including TNFα, IL1β, IL6 and KC (murine IL8 homologue), when compared to controls. Therefore, data presented here support further investigation into the complexity of cancer cachexia in PC to identify potential targets for this debilitating syndrome. PMID:27901481

  9. Screening and surveillance approaches in familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2008-07-01

    Screening and surveillance for pancreatic cancer and its precursors is a relatively new indication for endoscopic ultrasound. It provides an alternative approach to the ineffective treatment of mostly incurable symptomatic pancreatic cancer. It is currently reserved for individuals with an increased risk for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, such as those who have inherited genetic syndromes (eg, patients who have Peutz-Jeghers syndrome or hereditary pancreatitis, germline mutation carriers of p16 and BRCA2) and at-risk relatives of patients who have familial pancreatic cancer. This article discusses the rationale for performing screening and surveillance, the types of patients who are eligible for screening, the diagnostic modalities and technique for screening, the diagnostic yield of screening, and the ongoing research.

  10. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells and Their Niche: Current Therapeutic Implications and Challenges in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiangang; Li, Jiahui; Schlößer, Hans A.; Popp, Felix; Popp, Marie Christine; Alakus, Hakan; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified as a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells with the ability of self-renewal and differentiation in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. CSCs are thought to be responsible for cancer initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence in pancreatic cancer. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs and discuss the mechanisms involved in resistance to chemotherapy, the interactions with the niche, and the potential role in cancer immunoediting. We propose that immunotherapy targeting pancreatic CSCs, in combination with targeting the niche components, may provide a novel treatment strategy to eradicate pancreatic CSCs and hence improve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. PMID:28845161

  11. Circulating Leptin and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From 3 Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Newton, Christina C.; Silverman, Debra T.; Pollak, Michael; Nogueira, Leticia M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Männistö, Satu; Jacobs, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Adiposity is associated with pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism(s) is uncertain. Leptin is an adipokine involved in metabolic regulation, and obese individuals have higher concentrations. We conducted a pooled, nested case-control study of cohort participants from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to investigate whether prediagnostic serum leptin was associated with pancreatic cancer. A total of 731 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases that occurred between 1986 and 2010 were included (maximum follow-up, 23 years). Incidence density–selected controls (n = 909) were matched to cases by cohort, age, sex, race, and blood draw date. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Sex-specific quintiles were based on the distribution of the controls. Overall, serum leptin was not associated with pancreatic cancer (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.71; Ptrend = 0.38). There was a significant interaction by follow-up time (P = 0.003), such that elevated risk was apparent only during follow-up of more than 10 years after blood draw (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 2.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 5.27; Ptrend = 0.004). Our results support an association between increasing leptin concentration and pancreatic cancer; however, long follow-up is necessary to observe the relationship. Subclinical disease may explain the lack of association during early follow-up. PMID:26085045

  12. Circulating Leptin and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From 3 Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Newton, Christina C; Silverman, Debra T; Pollak, Michael; Nogueira, Leticia M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius; Männistö, Satu; Jacobs, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    Adiposity is associated with pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism(s) is uncertain. Leptin is an adipokine involved in metabolic regulation, and obese individuals have higher concentrations. We conducted a pooled, nested case-control study of cohort participants from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to investigate whether prediagnostic serum leptin was associated with pancreatic cancer. A total of 731 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases that occurred between 1986 and 2010 were included (maximum follow-up, 23 years). Incidence density-selected controls (n = 909) were matched to cases by cohort, age, sex, race, and blood draw date. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Sex-specific quintiles were based on the distribution of the controls. Overall, serum leptin was not associated with pancreatic cancer (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.71; Ptrend = 0.38). There was a significant interaction by follow-up time (P = 0.003), such that elevated risk was apparent only during follow-up of more than 10 years after blood draw (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 2.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 5.27; Ptrend = 0.004). Our results support an association between increasing leptin concentration and pancreatic cancer; however, long follow-up is necessary to observe the relationship. Subclinical disease may explain the lack of association during early follow-up. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. ABO blood group and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolpin, Brian M; Chan, Andrew T; Hartge, Patricia; Chanock, Stephen J; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S

    2009-03-18

    Other than several rare, highly penetrant familial syndromes, genetic risk factors for sporadic pancreatic cancer are largely unknown. ABO blood type is an inherited characteristic that in previous small studies has been associated with the risk of gastrointestinal malignancies. We separately examined the relationship between ABO blood type and the risk of incident pancreatic cancer in two large, independent, prospective cohort studies (the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study) that collected blood group data on 107 503 US health professionals. Hazard ratios for pancreatic cancer by ABO blood type were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other known risk factors, including age, tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, and history of diabetes mellitus. All statistical tests were two-sided. During 927 995 person-years of follow-up, 316 participants developed pancreatic cancer. ABO blood type was associated with the risk of developing pancreatic cancer (P = .004; log-rank test). Compared with participants with blood group O, those with blood groups A, AB, or B were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer (adjusted hazard ratios for incident pancreatic cancer were 1.32 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 1.02 to 1.72], 1.51 [95% CI = 1.02 to 2.23], and 1.72 [95% CI = 1.25 to 2.38], respectively). The association between blood type and pancreatic cancer risk was nearly identical in the two cohorts (P(interaction) = .97). Overall, 17% of the pancreatic cancer cases were attributable to inheriting a non-O blood group (blood group A, B, or AB). The age-adjusted incidence rates for pancreatic cancer per 100 000 person-years were 27 (95% CI = 23 to 33) for participants with blood type O, 36 (95% CI = 26 to 50) for those with blood type A, 41 (95% CI = 31 to 56) for those with blood type AB, and 46 (95% CI = 32 to 68) for those with blood type B. In two large, independent populations, ABO blood type was

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer: innovative applications beyond the basics

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Joseph; Kistler, C. Andrew; Yan, Linda; Dargan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become a mainstay in assisting in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. In addition, EUS provides a modality to treat chronic pain through celiac plexus neurolysis. Currently, there is growing data and utilization of EUS in more diverse and innovative applications aimed at providing more sophisticated diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic options for patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS delivery of chemotherapy, viral and biological vectors and fiducial markers may eventually revolutionize the way clinicians approach the care of a patient with pancreatic cancer. PMID:28078128

  15. MECHANISMS OF ASCORBATE-INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Martin, Sean M.; Levine, Mark; Wagner, Brett A.; Buettner, Garry R.; Wang, Sih-han; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Du, Changbin; Knudson, C. Michael; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacological concentrations of ascorbate may be effective in cancer therapeutics. We hypothesized that ascorbate concentrations achievable with intravenous dosing would be cytotoxic in pancreatic cancer where the five-year survival is < 3%. Experimental Design Pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with ascorbate (0, 5, and 10 mM) for one hour, then viability and clonogenic survival were determined. Pancreatic tumor cells were delivered subcutaneously into the flank region of nude mice and allowed to grow at which time they were randomized to receive either ascorbate (4 g/kg) or osmotically equivalent saline (1 M) i.p. for two weeks. Results There was a time and dose-dependent increase in measured H2O2 production with increased concentrations of ascorbate. Ascorbate decreased viability in all pancreatic cancer cell lines, but had no effect on an immortalized pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line. Ascorbate decreased clonogenic survival of the pancreatic cancer cell lines, which was reversed by treatment of cells with scavengers of H2O2. Treatment with ascorbate induced a caspase-independent cell death that was associated with autophagy. In vivo, treatment with ascorbate inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival. Conclusions These results demonstrate that pharmacological doses of ascorbate, easily achievable in humans, may have potential for therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:20068072

  16. How fibrosis influences imaging and surgical decisions in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Mert; Hausmann, Simone; Michalski, Christoph W.; Schlitter, Anna M.; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Dobritz, Martin; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is shifting away from a disease of malignant ductal cells-only, toward a complex system where tumor evolution is a result of interaction of cancer cells with their microenvironment. This change has led to intensification of research focusing on the fibrotic stroma of PDAC. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the main fibroblastic cells of the pancreas which are responsible for producing the desmoplasia in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and PDAC. Clinically, the effect of desmoplasia is two-sided; on the negative side it is a hurdle in the diagnosis of PDAC because the fibrosis in cancer resembles that of CP. It is also believed that PSCs and pancreatic fibrosis are partially responsible for the therapy resistance in pancreatic cancer. On the positive side, a fibrotic pancreas is safer to operate on compared to a fatty and soft pancreas which is prone for postoperative pancreatic fistula. In this review the impact of pancreatic fibrosis on diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and surgical decisions are discussed from a clinical point of view. PMID:23060813

  17. Bulk pancreatic cancer cells can convert into cancer stem cells(CSCs) in vitro and 2 compounds can target these CSCs

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Huang, Ling; He, Xiaoping; Gong, Yanfang; Gao, Jun; Wu, Hongyu; Man, Xiaohua; Jin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Li, Zhaoshen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing evidence has confirmed the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in both hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, the origin of CSCs is still uncertain, and few agents have been capable of eliminating CSCs till now. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bulk pancreatic cancer cells could convert into CSCs under certain conditions and explore whether metformin and curcumin can kill pancreatic CSCs. Aspc1, Bxpc3 and Panc1 pancreatic cancer cells were cultured in stem cell culture medium (serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium/Nutrient Mixture F-12 containing basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, B27 and insulin) for 5 days and it was found that all the pancreatic cancer cells aggregated into spheres and expressed pancreatic cancer stem cell surface markers. Then characteristics of Panc1 sphere cells were analyzed and cytotoxicity assays were performed. The results show that Panc1 sphere cells exhibited CSC characteristics and were more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and more sensitive to metformin and curcumin than their parent cells. These findings suggested that bulk pancreatic cancer cells could acquire CSC characteristics under certain conditions, which may support the “yin-yang” model of CSCs (interconversion between bulk cancer cells and CSCs). These results also showed that metformin and curcumin could be candidate drugs for targeting pancreatic CSCs. PMID:26709750

  18. MIF Drives Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness by Downregulating NR3C2 | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Pancreatic cancer, while relatively rare, is an aggressive disease ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Because most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and their tumors resist available treatments, novel therapeutic targets are urgently needed. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is elevated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, and may provide a molecular link between inflammation and cancer, though the mechanism is unknown.

  19. Metformin suppresses sonic hedgehog expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masafumi; Ogo, Ayako; Yamura, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Metformin use has previously been associated with decreased cancer risk. The Hedgehog signaling pathway is a well-characterized early and late mediator of pancreatic cancer oncogenesis. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of metformin on factors involved in Hedgehog signaling. BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cells were treated with metformin, and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) mRNA and protein levels were examined by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. The effect of metformin on Shh levels was also examined in three other cancer cell lines. Shh protein and mRNA expression was suppressed by metformin in BxPC3 cells. This phenomenon was further confirmed in three other cancer cell lines. Shh mRNA expression was inhibited by metformin in a concentration-dependent manner in two cancer cell lines. Metformin reduces the expression of Shh in several cancer cell lines including pancreatic cancer cell.

  20. Pancreatic Cancer: Progress and Challenges in a Rapidly Moving Field.

    PubMed

    Collisson, Eric A; Olive, Kenneth P

    2017-03-01

    "Pancreatic Cancer: Advances in Science and Clinical Care," a Special Conference of the American Association for Cancer Research, was held in Orlando, FL, on May 12 to 15, bringing together more than 450 basic, translational, clinical, and epidemiologic pancreatic cancer researchers as well as pancreatic cancer patients, survivors, and advocates. Pancreatic cancer remains one of the great challenges in medicine, but the accelerating pace of research and early hints of clinical successes to come were palpable throughout the meeting. Prominent meeting themes included immunology and the tumor microenvironment, heterogeneity of both the epithelial and stromal compartments, personalized medicine efforts to integrate molecular information into clinical practice, new approaches to early detection, and clinical trials using a host of novel targeted therapies. Adding to the vibrant atmosphere of the meeting, a coalition of pancreatic cancer research and support foundations participated, with several innovative initiatives announced by individual organizations. We present here a summary of meeting highlights, a series of "success factors" that will benchmark the progress of the field over the next 2 years, and three challenges to the pancreatic cancer research community as it moves toward to the goal of extending patient survival. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1060-2. ©2017 AACR.

  1. Cigarette Smoking and Pancreatic Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chen; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Babic, Ana; Clish, Clary B; Kraft, Peter; Bao, Ying; Qian, Zhi Rong; Rubinson, Douglas A; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir J; Gaziano, John Michael; Sesso, Howard D; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2017-03-30

    Purpose Cigarette smoking is associated with increased incidence of pancreatic cancer. However, few studies have prospectively evaluated the association of smoking with patient survival. Patients and Methods We analyzed survival by smoking status among 1,037 patients from two large US prospective cohort studies diagnosed from 1986 to 2013. Among 485 patients from four prospective US cohorts, we also evaluated survival by prediagnostic circulating levels of cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine that is proportional to tobacco smoke exposure. On the basis of prediagnosis cotinine levels, we classified patients as nonsmokers (< 3.1 ng/mL), light smokers (3.1-20.9 ng/mL), or heavy smokers (≥ 21.0 ng/mL). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death by using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes status, diagnosis year, and cancer stage. Results The multivariable-adjusted HR for death was 1.37 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.69) comparing current smokers with never smokers ( P = .003). A statistically significant negative trend in survival was observed for increasing pack-years of smoking ( Ptrend = .008), with HR for death of 1.49 (95% CI, 1.05 to 2.10) for > 60 pack-years of smoking versus never smoking. Survival among former smokers was similar to that for never smokers, regardless of time since quitting. Heavy smokers defined by prediagnostic circulating cotinine levels had a multivariable-adjusted HR for death of 1.76 (95% CI, 1.23 to 2.51) compared with nonsmokers. Among patients with circulating cotinine levels measured within 5 years before diagnosis, heavy smokers had a multivariable-adjusted HR for death of 2.47 (95% CI, 1.24 to 4.92) compared with nonsmokers. Conclusion Cigarette smoking was associated with a reduction in survival among patients with pancreatic cancer.

  2. Blood Type Influences Pancreatic Cancer Risk | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    A variation in the gene that determines ABO blood type influences the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) for this highly lethal disease. The genetic variation, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), was discovered in a region of chromosome 9 that harbors the gene that determines blood type, the researchers reported August 2 online in Nature Genetics. |

  3. Multiplex detection of pancreatic cancer biomarkers using a SERS-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Banaei, Nariman; Foley, Anne; Houghton, Jean Marie; Sun, Yubing; Kim, Byung

    2017-09-22

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is critical to reduce the mortality rate of this disease. Current biological analysis approaches cannot robustly detect several low abundance pancreatic cancer biomarkers in sera, limiting the clinical application of these biomarkers. This study demonstrates a novel system for multiplex detection of pancreatic biomarkers CA19-9, MMP7 and MUC4 in sera samples with high sensitivity. Measuring the levels of these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer patients, pancreatitis patients, and healthy individuals reveals the unique expression pattern of these markers in pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting the great potential of using this approach for early diagnostics of pancreatic cancers. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  5. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Translating Discovery in Zebrafish Pancreatic Development to Human Pancreatic Cancer: Biomarkers, Targets, Pathogenesis, and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Abid A.; Yee, Rosemary K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer. PMID:23682805

  7. Nationwide prospective audit of pancreatic surgery: design, accuracy, and outcomes of the Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit.

    PubMed

    van Rijssen, L Bengt; Koerkamp, Bas G; Zwart, Maurice J; Bonsing, Bert A; Bosscha, Koop; van Dam, Ronald M; van Eijck, Casper H; Gerhards, Michael F; van der Harst, Erwin; de Hingh, Ignace H; de Jong, Koert P; Kazemier, Geert; Klaase, Joost; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Patijn, Gijs A; Rupert, Coen G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Scheepers, Joris J; van der Schelling, George P; Busch, Olivier R; Besselink, Marc G

    2017-07-25

    Auditing is an important tool to identify practice variation and 'best practices'. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit is mandatory in all 18 Dutch centers for pancreatic surgery. Performance indicators and case-mix factors were identified by a PubMed search for randomized controlled trials (RCT's) and large series in pancreatic surgery. In addition, data dictionaries of two national audits, three institutional databases, and the Dutch national cancer registry were evaluated. Morbidity, mortality, and length of stay were analyzed of all pancreatic resections registered during the first two audit years. Case ascertainment was cross-checked with the Dutch healthcare inspectorate and key-variables validated in all centers. Sixteen RCT's and three large series were found. Sixteen indicators and 20 case-mix factors were included in the audit. During 2014-2015, 1785 pancreatic resections were registered including 1345 pancreatoduodenectomies. Overall in-hospital mortality was 3.6%. Following pancreatoduodenectomy, mortality was 4.1%, Clavien-Dindo grade ≥ III morbidity was 29.9%, median (IQR) length of stay 12 (9-18) days, and readmission rate 16.0%. In total 97.2% of >40,000 variables validated were consistent with the medical charts. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit, with high quality data, reports good outcomes of pancreatic surgery on a national level. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer stem cells: Involvement in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and perspectives on cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Albulescu, Radu

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies. Despite remarkable progress in understanding pancreatic carcinogenesis at the molecular level, as well as progress in new therapeutic approaches, pancreatic cancer remains a disease with a dismal prognosis. Among the mechanisms responsible for drug resistance, the most relevant are changes in individual genes or signaling pathways and the presence of highly resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). In pancreatic cancer, CSCs represent 0.2%-0.8% of pancreatic cancer cells and are considered to be responsible for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and recurrence. CSCs have been extensively studied as of late to identify specific surface markers to ensure reliable sorting and for signaling pathways identified to play a pivotal role in CSC self-renewal. Involvement of CSCs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis has also highlighted these cells as the preferential targets for therapy. The present review is an update of the results in two main fields of research in pancreatic cancer, pathogenesis and therapy, focused on the narrow perspective of CSCs. PMID:25152582

  9. Cancer stem cells: involvement in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and perspectives on cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Albulescu, Radu

    2014-08-21

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies. Despite remarkable progress in understanding pancreatic carcinogenesis at the molecular level, as well as progress in new therapeutic approaches, pancreatic cancer remains a disease with a dismal prognosis. Among the mechanisms responsible for drug resistance, the most relevant are changes in individual genes or signaling pathways and the presence of highly resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). In pancreatic cancer, CSCs represent 0.2%-0.8% of pancreatic cancer cells and are considered to be responsible for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and recurrence. CSCs have been extensively studied as of late to identify specific surface markers to ensure reliable sorting and for signaling pathways identified to play a pivotal role in CSC self-renewal. Involvement of CSCs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis has also highlighted these cells as the preferential targets for therapy. The present review is an update of the results in two main fields of research in pancreatic cancer, pathogenesis and therapy, focused on the narrow perspective of CSCs.

  10. Dietary Energy Balance Modulation of Kras– and Ink4a/Arf+/-–Driven Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Lashinger, Laura M.; Harrison, Lauren M.; Rasmussen, Audrey J.; Logsdon, Craig D.; Fischer, Susan M.; McArthur, Mark J.; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    New molecular targets and intervention strategies for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link are urgently needed. Using relevant spontaneous and orthotopically transplanted murine models of pancreatic cancer, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy balance modulation impacts pancreatic cancer development and progression through an insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1–dependent mechanism. In LSL-KrasG12D/Pdx-1-Cre/Ink4a/Arflox/+ mice, calorie restriction, versus overweight- or obesity-inducing diet regimens, decreased serum IGF-1, tumoral Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, pancreatic desmoplasia, and progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC); and increased pancreatic tumor-free survival. Serum IGF-1, Akt/mTOR signaling, and orthotopically transplanted PDAC growth were decreased in liver-specific IGF-1–deficient mice (versus wild-type mice), and rescued with IGF-1 infusion. Thus, dietary energy balance modulation impacts spontaneous pancreatic tumorigenesis induced by mutant Kras and Ink4a deficiency, the most common genetic alterations in human pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, IGF‐1 and components of its downstream signaling pathway are promising mechanistic targets for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link. PMID:23980075

  11. Dietary energy balance modulation of Kras- and Ink4a/Arf+/--driven pancreatic cancer: the role of insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Lashinger, Laura M; Harrison, Lauren M; Rasmussen, Audrey J; Logsdon, Craig D; Fischer, Susan M; McArthur, Mark J; Hursting, Stephen D

    2013-10-01

    New molecular targets and intervention strategies for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link are urgently needed. Using relevant spontaneous and orthotopically transplanted murine models of pancreatic cancer, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy balance modulation impacts pancreatic cancer development and progression through an insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I-dependent mechanism. In LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx-1-Cre/Ink4a/Arf(lox/+) mice, calorie restriction versus overweight- or obesity-inducing diet regimens decreased serum IGF-I, tumoral Akt/mTOR signaling, pancreatic desmoplasia, and progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and increased pancreatic tumor-free survival. Serum IGF-I, Akt/mTOR signaling, and orthotopically transplanted PDAC growth were decreased in liver-specific IGF-I-deficient mice (vs. wild-type mice), and rescued with IGF-I infusion. Thus, dietary energy balance modulation impacts spontaneous pancreatic tumorigenesis induced by mutant Kras and Ink4a deficiency, the most common genetic alterations in human pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, IGF-I and components of its downstream signaling pathway are promising mechanistic targets for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link.

  12. Resistin: New serum marker for predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kibar, Yunus I; Albayrak, Fatih; Arabul, Mahmut; Dursun, Hakan; Albayrak, Yavuz; Ozturk, Yasin

    2016-04-01

    To assess the effectiveness of resistin in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis who presented at the Gastroenterology Clinic, Erzurum Education and Research Hospital, Turkey were enrolled in this prospective study. White blood cell (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and resistin levels were measured on admission and at 24 h, day 3 and day 7 following admission, along with other blood parameters. Patients were divided into two groups: mild acute pancreatitis and moderate/severe acute pancreatitis. Of 59 patients with acute pancreatitis (mild, n = 37; moderate/severe, n = 22), significant between-group differences were found in terms of resistin and CRP levels. Receiver operating curve analysis showed that resistin levels were better for predicting severe cases of acute pancreatitis than CRP or WBC levels on day 3 (area under the curve [AUC], 0.88 versus 0.81 and 0.63, respectively). Resistin levels on day 3 were better than CRP levels for predicting necrosis development (AUC, 0.70 versus 0.69, respectively). Resistin may represent a new, effective indicator to predict the severity of acute pancreatitis and presence of necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. [Autophagy contributes to the initiation of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Iovanna, Juan L

    2017-03-01

    The pancreatic adenocarcinoma initiation results from the interaction of genetic events combined with multiple other factors. Among the genetic alterations that contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease, the mutation of the KRAS oncogene is required but not sufficient to trigger this cancer. Pancreatitis, an inflammatory disease, facilitates and accelerates the transformation of pancreatic cells when the KRAS oncogene is mutated. Of note, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis which are responsible of the promotion of KRAS-mediated transformation is not completely defined. Importantly, autophagy has been proposed as one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to pancreatic carcinogenesis, especially in the initial phases, in which the oncogene KRAS appears to play its leading role. In addition, autophagy is strongly induced during pancreatitis. Although some aspects of autophagy in pancreatic cancer development are not completely established, we can affirm that overexpression of VMP1, an inducer of autophagy which is specifically activated in pancreas during pancreatitis, improves the development of pancreatic precancerous lesions PanINs when the oncogene KRAS is mutated. In addition, inhibition of the autophagic flux with chloroquine inhibits the KRAS pro-tumor effect in the pancreas. In conclusion, activation of expression of VMP1 improves the pro-tumor role of KRAS in pancreas.

  14. Cystic precursors to invasive pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matthaei, Hanno; Schulick, Richard D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in the sensitivity and quality of cross-sectional imaging have led to increasing numbers of patients being diagnosed with cystic lesions of the pancreas. In parallel, clinical, radiological, pathological and molecular studies have improved the systems for classifying these cysts. Patients with asymptomatic serous cystic neoplasms can be managed conservatively with regular monitoring; however, the clinical management of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms is far more challenging, as it is difficult to determine whether these lesions will progress to malignancy. Fortunately, prospective studies have helped to establish that proposed clinical and radiological criteria (the Sendai guidelines) can be used to guide the care of patients with cystic lesions of the pancreas. Despite this progress in imaging and clinical guidelines, sensitive and specific tests have not yet been developed that can reliably predict the histology and biological properties of a cystic lesion. Such biomarkers are urgently needed, as noninvasive precursors of pancreatic cancer are curable, while the vast majority of invasive pancreatic adenocarcinomas are not. PMID:21383670

  15. miRNA analysis in pancreatic cancer: the Dartmouth experience.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Francine B de; Liu, Xiaoying; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is considered one of the most lethal cancers being the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in adults in the United States because of the lack of early signs and symptoms and the lack of early detection. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common histological type among pancreatic cancers, representing 80%-90% of all solid tumors of the pancreas. The majority of PDAC develops from three precursor lesions: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasm and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Although histologic tissue evaluation remains the gold standard for diagnosis, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration has become the preferred modality for obtaining pathologic confirmation. At Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC),we have developed and validated a microRNA (miRNA) panel for patients with pancreatic diseases that can be used in association with the gold standard method for diagnosis. miRNAs have an important role in biological processes, such as apoptosis, metabolism, cell growth and differentiation. In cancer, miRNAs can be classified as either oncogenic or tumor suppressor according to their function in the carcinogenic process. In this study, we describe the expression of many miRNA in benign and malignant pancreatic tissues as well as their clinical significance. For this reason, miRNAs have been considered potential biomarkers of pancreatic diseases that could potentially contribute to an early diagnosis, predict disease progression, accurately monitor disease, contribute to better treatment strategies and reduce mortality by improving disease management.

  16. Association of postprandial serum triglyceride concentration and serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in overweight and obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Verkest, K R; Fleeman, L M; Morton, J M; Groen, S J; Suchodolski, J S; Steiner, J M; Rand, J S

    2012-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia has been proposed to contribute to the risk of developing pancreatitis in dogs. To determine associations between postprandial serum triglyceride concentrations and canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) concentrations or pancreatic disease. Thirty-five client-owned overweight (n = 25) or obese (n = 10) dogs weighing >10 kg. Healthy dogs were prospectively recruited for a cross-sectional study. Serum triglyceride concentrations were measured before and hourly for 12 hours after a meal. Fasting cPLI and canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI) concentrations were assayed. Cut-off values for hypertriglyceridemia were set a priori for fasting (≥ 88, ≥ 177, ≥ 354, ≥ 885 mg/dL) and peak postprandial (≥ 133, ≥ 442, ≥ 885 mg/dL) triglyceride concentrations. The association between hypertriglyceridemia and high cPLI concentrations was assessed by exact logistic regression. Follow-up was performed 4 years later to determine the incidence of pancreatic disease. Eight dogs had peak postprandial triglycerides >442 mg/dL and 3 dogs had fasting serum cPLI concentrations ≥ 400 μg/L. Odds of high cPLI concentrations were 16.7 times higher in dogs with peak postprandial triglyceride concentrations ≥ 442 mg/dL relative to other dogs (P < .001). Fasting triglyceride concentration was not significantly associated with cPLI concentrations. None of the dogs with high triglyceride concentrations and one of the dogs with low fasting and peak postprandial triglyceride concentrations developed clinically important pancreatic disease. Overweight and obese dogs with peak serum postprandial triglyceride concentrations ≥ 442 mg/dL after a standard meal are more likely to have serum cPLI concentrations ≥ 400 μg/L, but did not develop clinically important pancreatic disease. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Expression levels of microRNA-375 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiduo; Zhou, Jian; He, Songbing; Zhu, Dongming; Zhang, Zixiang; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Yi; Li, Dechun

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs of endogenous origin that have been increasingly shown to have altered expressions in various cancer types. The expression levels of miR-375 have not been comprehensively investigated in pancreatic cancer. In this study, total RNA was extracted from 44 pairs of pancreatic cancer tissues and non-tumor adjacent tissues, as well as from four pancreatic cancer cell lines, Panc-1, SW1990, BxpC3 and Patu8988. Following polyadenylation and reverse transcription, the expression levels of miR-375 were determined by real-time PCR and the difference in expression was calculated using the 2(-ΔΔCt) method. The correlation between the expression levels of miR-375 and clinicopathological characteristics of pancreatic cancer was also assessed. miR-375 expression was frequently downregulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues compared to their non-tumor counterparts (P<0.05; paired t-test). Moreover, a significantly low expression of miR-375 was found in the pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1, P=0.016; SW1990, P=0.016; BxPC3, P=0.018; Patu8988, P=0.017; paired t-test). However, no significant correlations were observed between the low expression of miR-375 and parameters including gender, age, tumor size, tumor location and histological grade (P>0.05). The low expression of miR-375 was correlated with pT stage, lymph node metastases and pTNM stage (P<0.05) (non-parametric test; Mann-Whitney U test between 2 groups and Kruskal-Wallis H test for ≥3 groups). In conclusion, miR-375 is potentially involved in the carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancers and serves as is a potential biomarker for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis mimicking pancreatic cancer and neck metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhou, Qiang; Brigstock, David R; Yan, Su; Xiu, Ming; Piao, Rong-Li; Gao, Yan-Hang; Gao, Run-Ping

    2014-12-14

    Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner's tumour) is an uncommon disorder that has recently been confirmed as an IgG4-related disease. Here, we describe a rare case of a 53-year-old male patient who primarily presented with pancreatic body mass, left neck mass and several lumps in his lower lip mimicking pancreatic cancer (PC) and neck metastasis. The patient underwent pancreatic body mass and labial gland lumps resection as well as an ultrasound-guided biopsy of the left neck mass. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related focal type of AIP (f-AIP) and Küttner's tumour by immunohistochemistry. The patient responded well to corticosteroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at one year follow-up. The differentiation of f-AIP from PC is very important to avoid unnecessary pancreatic resection.

  19. Nut consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Y; Hu, F B; Giovannucci, E L; Wolpin, B M; Stampfer, M J; Willett, W C; Fuchs, C S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increasing nut intake has been associated with reduced risk of diabetes mellitus, which is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods: We prospectively followed 75 680 women in the Nurses' Health Study, and examined the association between nut consumption and pancreatic cancer risk. Participants with a previous history of cancer were excluded. Nut consumption was assessed at baseline and updated every 2 to 4 years. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: We documented 466 incident cases of pancreatic cancer. After adjusting for age, height, smoking, physical activity, and total energy intake, women who consumed a 28-g (1 oz) serving size of nuts ⩾2 times per week experienced a significantly lower risk of pancreatic cancer (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.47–0.92; P for trend=0.007) when compared with those who largely abstained from nuts. The results did not appreciably change after further adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and history of diabetes mellitus (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48–0.95; P for trend=0.01). The inverse association persisted within strata defined by BMI, physical activity, smoking, and intakes of red meat, fruits, and vegetables. Conclusion: Frequent nut consumption is inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer in this large prospective cohort of women, independent of other potential risk factors for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24149179

  20. Casein kinase II inhibition induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Rainer; Saur, Dieter; Fritsch, Ralph; Reichert, Maximilian; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in western civilization. The five-year survival rate is below 1% and of the 10% of patients with resectable disease only around one-fifth survives 5 years. Survival rates have not changed much during the last 20 years, demonstrating the inefficacy of current available therapies. To improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, there is the need to develop effective non-surgical treatment for this disease. The protein kinase casein kinase II (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine kinase and its activity is enhanced in all human tumors examined so far. The contribution of CK2 to the tumor maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. To investigate the function of CK2 in pancreatic cancer cells we used the CK2 specific inhibitors 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole and Apigenin. Furthermore, we interfered with CK2 expression using CK2 specific siRNAs. Interfering with CK2 function led to a reduction of pancreatic cancer cell viability, which was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis correlated with a reduced NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. This study validates CK2 as a molecular drug target in a preclinical in vitro model of pancreatic cancer.

  1. The Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer: What Will it Take to Diagnose and Treat Curable Pancreatic Neoplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Anne Marie; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Canto, Marcia Irene; Klein, Alison P.; Herman, Joseph M.; Goggins, Michael; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kamel, Ihab; Weiss, Matthew J.; Diaz, Luis A.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the deadliest of all solid malignancies. Early detection offers the best hope for a cure, but characteristics of this disease such as the lack of early clinical symptoms, make the early detection difficult. Recent genetic mapping of the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer suggests that a large window of opportunity exists for the early detection of pancreatic neoplasia, and developments in cancer genetics offer new, potentially highly specific, approaches for screening for curable pancreatic neoplasia. We review the challenges of screening for early pancreatic neoplasia, as well as opportunities presented by incorporating molecular genetics into these efforts. PMID:24924775

  2. Pancreatic cancer in obesity: epidemiology, clinical observations, and basic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; White, Patrick B

    2011-06-01

    Obesity, now a worldwide epidemic, causes myriad medical problems. One of the most significant obesity-related problems is the well-recognized relationship between obesity and various malignancies, including pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease--the annual death rate nearly approximates its incidence. While surgical extirpation provides the best chance at long term survival, systemic therapy is largely ineffective: even those patients undergoing successful operative resection have only approximately 20% 5-year survival. These poor outcomes are largely a consequence of poor understanding of tumor biology. Clearly, identification of novel treatment strategies is of paramount importance; investigation of pancreatic cancer biology from the novel aspect of obesity offers the potential to identify unique therapeutic targets. This manuscript reviews the epidemiology, clinical findings, and putative basic science mechanisms underlying obesity-related pancreatic cancer.

  3. Nab-Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared the combination of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel [Abraxane®]) and gemcitabine (Gemzar®) versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  4. The impact of hypoxia in pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Angela; Díaz, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors. Recent advances in cancer biology indicate that hypoxia is not only a consequence of unrestrained tumor growth, but also plays an active role in promoting tumor progression, malignancy, and resistance to therapy. Hypoxia signaling is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which are not only stabilized under hypoxia, but also by activated oncogenes or inactivated tumor suppressors under normoxia. Hypoxia is a prominent feature of the tumor microenvironment of pancreatic tumors, also characterized by the presence of a fibrotic reaction that promotes, and is also modulated by, hypoxia. As the mechanisms by which hypoxia signaling impacts invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer are being elucidated, hypoxia is emerging as a key determinant of pancreatic cancer malignancy as well as an important target for therapy. Herein we present an overview of recent advances in the understanding of the impact that hypoxia has in pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27774469

  5. Cachexia but not obesity worsens the postoperative outcome after pancreatoduodenectomy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pausch, Thomas; Hartwig, Werner; Hinz, Ulf; Swolana, Thomas; Bundy, Bogota D; Hackert, Thilo; Grenacher, Lars; Büchler, Markus W; Werner, Jens

    2012-09-01

    Prognosis after pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer is determined by tumor characteristics, completeness of resection, and patient's comorbidity. Our aim was to assess the effects of body mass and fat distribution on the postoperative course after pancreatoduodenectomy. Of 2,968 pancreatic resections, 408 patients with primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy and of whom cross sectional images were available were identified and followed-up in a prospective database. Preoperative computed tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed for abdominal wall fat, hip girdle fat, visceral fat, and abdominal depth. Peri- and postoperative parameters, including preoperative unintentional weight loss, cachexia-associated serum parameters, nonoperative and operative complications, and mortality and long-term survival were evaluated and correlated with body mass index and fat distribution. Patients with low body mass index had a greater 90-day mortality (P = .048) and a trend toward greater complication rates and in-hospital mortality, despite a greater comorbidity in obese patients with a higher body mass index. Accordingly, patients with large amounts of abdominal wall fat had fewer intra-abdominal abscesses (P = .047), lower in-hospital (P = .019) and 90-day mortality rates (P = .007), and better long-term survival (P = .016). In pancreatic cancer, underweight but not obese patients have a poor outcome after pancreatoduodenectomy. This observation emphasizes the need for pre- and perioperative therapeutic improvements in the setting of pancreatic cancer-associated cachexia. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cigarette Smoking and Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Vrieling, Alina; Lubin, Jay H.; Kraft, Peter; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Hartge, Patricia; Canzian, Federico; Steplowski, Emily; Arslan, Alan A.; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J.; LaCroix, Andrea; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Bingham, Sheila A.; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clipp, Sandra; Hoover, Robert N.; Jacobs, Kevin; Johnson, Karen C.; Kooperberg, Charles; Luo, Juhua; Messina, Catherine; Palli, Domenico; Patel, Alpa V.; Riboli, Elio; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Rodriguez Suarez, Laudina; Thomas, Gilles; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Tong, Elissa; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Ye, Weimin; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquette, Anne; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2009-01-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, detailed examination of the association of smoking intensity, smoking duration, and cumulative smoking dose with pancreatic cancer is limited. The authors analyzed pooled data from the international Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium nested case-control study (1,481 cases, 1,539 controls). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression. Smoking intensity effects were examined with an excess odds ratio model that was linear in pack-years and exponential in cigarettes smoked per day and its square. When compared with never smokers, current smokers had a significantly elevated risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38, 2.26). Risk increased significantly with greater intensity (≥30 cigarettes/day: OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.42), duration (≥50 years: OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.25, 3.62), and cumulative smoking dose (≥40 pack-years: OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.35, 2.34). Risk more than 15 years after smoking cessation was similar to that for never smokers. Estimates of excess odds ratio per pack-year declined with increasing intensity, suggesting greater risk for total exposure delivered at lower intensity for longer duration than for higher intensity for shorter duration. This finding and the decline in risk after smoking cessation suggest that smoking has a late-stage effect on pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:19561064

  7. Pancreatic Cancer: Multicenter Prospective Data Collection and Analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gábor; Balázs, Anita; Kui, Balázs; Gódi, Szilárd; Szücs, Ákos; Szentesi, Andrea; Szentkereszty, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Vincze, Áron; Czimmer, József; Pár, Gabriella; Bajor, Judit; Szabó, Imre; Izbéki, Ferenc; Halász, Adrienn; Leindler, László; Farkas, Gyula; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. There is very limited information available regarding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of pancreatic cancer in Central Europe. The purpose of the study was to prospectively collect and analyze data of pancreatic cancer in the Hungarian population. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group (HPSG) organized prospective, uniform data collection. Altogether 354 patients were enrolled from 14 Hungarian centers. Chronic pancreatitis was present in 3.7% of the cases, while 33.7% of the patients had diabetes. Family history for pancreatic cancer was positive in 4.8%. The most frequent presenting symptoms included pain (63.8%), weight loss (63%) and jaundice (52.5%). The reported frequency of smoking and alcohol consumption was lower than expected (28.5% and 27.4%, respectively). The majority of patients (75.6%) were diagnosed with advanced disease. Most patients (83.6%) had a primary tumor located in the pancreatic head. The histological diagnosis was ductal adenocarcinoma in 90.7% of the cases, while neuroendocrine tumor was present in 5.3%. Biliary stent implantation was performed in 166 patients, 59.2% of them received metal stents. Primary tumor resection was performed in 60 (16.9%) patients. Enteral or biliary bypass was done in 35 and 49 patients, respectively. In a multivariate Cox-regression model, smoking status and presence of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors for overall survival. We report the first data from a large cohort of Hungarian pancreatic cancer patients. We identified smoking status and chemotherapy as independent predictors in this cohort.

  8. Surgery for oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fengchun; Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has steadily increased over the past several decades. The majority of PDAC patients will present with distant metastases, limiting surgical management in this population. Hepatectomy and pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) has been well established for colorectal cancer patients with isolated, resectable hepatic or pulmonary metastatic disease. Recent advancements in effective systemic therapy for PDAC have led to the selection of certain patients where metastectomy may be potentially indicated. However, the indication for resection of oligometastases in PDAC is not well defined. This review will discuss the current literature on the surgical management of metastatic disease for PDAC with a specific focus on surgical resection for isolated hepatic and pulmonary metastases. PMID:26361405

  9. Molecular Pathways Controlling Autophagy in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    New, Maria; Van Acker, Tim; Long, Jaclyn S.; Sakamaki, Jun-ichi; Ryan, Kevin M.; Tooze, Sharon A.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the few cancer types where the 5-year survival rate shows no improvement. Despite conflicting evidence, the majority of data points to an essential role for autophagy in PDAC growth and survival, in particular constitutively activated autophagy, can provide crucial fuel to PDAC tumor cells in their nutrient-deprived environment. Autophagy, which is required for cell homeostasis, can both suppress and promote tumorigenesis and tumor survival in a context-dependent manner. Protein by protein, the mystery of how PDAC abuses the cell’s homeostasis system for its malignant growth has recently begun to be unraveled. In this review, we focus on how autophagy is responsible for growth and development of PDAC tumors and where autophagy and the mechanisms controlling it fit into PDAC metabolism. Understanding the range of pathways controlling autophagy and their interplay in PDAC could open the way for new therapeutic avenues. PMID:28316954

  10. MicroRNAs in pancreatic cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj K.; Brand, Randall E.; Mehla, Kamiya

    2014-01-01

    Advances in understanding the biology of tumour progression and metastasis have clearly highlighted the importance of aberrant tumour metabolism, which supports not only the energy requirements but also the enormous biosynthetic needs of tumour cells. Such metabolic alterations modulate glucose, amino acid and fatty-acid-dependent metabolite bio-synthesis and energy production. Although much progress has been made in understanding the somatic mutations and expression genomics behind these alterations, the regulation of these processes by microRNAs (miRNAs) is only beginning to be appreciated. This Review focuses on the miRNAs that are potential regulators of the expression of genes whose protein products either directly regulate metabolic machinery or serve as master regulators, indirectly modulating the expression of metabolic enzymes. We focus particularly on miRNAs in pancreatic cancer. PMID:22508159

  11. Molecular Pathways Controlling Autophagy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    New, Maria; Van Acker, Tim; Long, Jaclyn S; Sakamaki, Jun-Ichi; Ryan, Kevin M; Tooze, Sharon A

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the few cancer types where the 5-year survival rate shows no improvement. Despite conflicting evidence, the majority of data points to an essential role for autophagy in PDAC growth and survival, in particular constitutively activated autophagy, can provide crucial fuel to PDAC tumor cells in their nutrient-deprived environment. Autophagy, which is required for cell homeostasis, can both suppress and promote tumorigenesis and tumor survival in a context-dependent manner. Protein by protein, the mystery of how PDAC abuses the cell's homeostasis system for its malignant growth has recently begun to be unraveled. In this review, we focus on how autophagy is responsible for growth and development of PDAC tumors and where autophagy and the mechanisms controlling it fit into PDAC metabolism. Understanding the range of pathways controlling autophagy and their interplay in PDAC could open the way for new therapeutic avenues.

  12. Keratin 8 sequence variants in patients with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Matthias; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich; Landt, Olfert; Drenth, Joost P H; Castellani, Carlo; Real, Francisco X; Akar, Nejat; Ammann, Rudolf W; Bargetzi, Mario; Bhatia, Eesh; Demaine, Andrew Glenn; Battagia, Cinzia; Kingsnorth, Andrew; O'Reilly, Derek; Truninger, Kaspar; Koudova, Monika; Spicak, Julius; Cerny, Milos; Menzel, Hans-Jürgen; Moral, Pedro; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Rickards, Olga; De Stefano, Gian Franco; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Sikora, Sadiq S; Jansen, Jan B M J; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Pietschmann, Matthias; Teich, Niels; Gress, Thomas M; Ockenga, Johann; Schmidt, Hartmut; Kage, Andreas; Halangk, Juliane; Rosendahl, Jonas; Groneberg, David Alexander; Nickel, Renate; Witt, Heiko

    2006-12-01

    Keratin 8 (KRT8) is one of the major intermediate filament proteins expressed in single-layered epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract. Transgenic mice over-expressing human KRT8 display pancreatic mononuclear infiltration, interstitial fibrosis and dysplasia of acinar cells resulting in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. These experimental data are in accordance with a recent report describing an association between KRT8 variations and chronic pancreatitis. This prompted us to investigate KRT8 polymorphisms in patients with pancreatic disorders. The KRT8 Y54H and G62C polymorphisms were assessed in a cohort of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis of various aetiologies or pancreatic cancer originating from Austria (n=16), the Czech Republic (n=90), Germany (n=1698), Great Britain (n=36), India (n=60), Italy (n=143), the Netherlands (n=128), Romania (n=3), Spain (n=133), and Switzerland (n=129). We also studied 4,234 control subjects from these countries and 1,492 control subjects originating from Benin, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ecuador, and Turkey. Polymorphisms were analysed by melting curve analysis with fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes. The frequency of G62C did not differ between patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma and control individuals. The frequency of G62C varied in European populations from 0.4 to 3.8%, showing a northwest to southeast decline. The Y54H alteration was not detected in any of the 2,436 patients. Only 3/4,580 (0.07%) European, Turkish and Indian control subjects were heterozygous for Y54H in contrast to 34/951 (3.6%) control subjects of African descent. Our data suggest that the KRT8 alterations, Y54H and G62C, do not predispose patients to the development of pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer.

  13. Presence of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-3 in a background of chronic pancreatitis in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Kyeom; Kim, Haeryoung; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jaihwan; Cho, Jai Young; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-10-01

    The clinical significance of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions in non-neoplastic pancreata of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients remains controversial. As chronic inflammation has been recently demonstrated to promote dissemination of in situ precancerous lesions, we investigated the prognostic significance of PanINs associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) in PDAC patients. This retrospective study analyzed 125 curatively resected PDAC specimens for the presence of PanIN and CP. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify significant predictive factors for poor disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Immunohistochemical staining for E-cadherin and S100A4, markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, was performed on resected specimens containing PanIN-3 lesions. CP was observed in 27.2% (34/125) and PanIN-3 in 25.6% (32/125) of specimens. In the presence of CP, PanIN-3 was significantly associated with decreased survival (DFS: 4.3 vs 15.5 months, P = 0.021; OS: 16.3 vs 30.9 months, P = 0.004). PanIN-3 was not a prognostic factor in the absence of CP. The presence of both PanIN-3 and CP was associated with a reduced survival compared to the other cases, in both univariate (DFS: P = 0.039; OS: P = 0.023) and multivariate (DFS: P = 0.020; OS: P = 0.076) analyses. Furthermore, E-cadherin loss and S100A4 expression were more frequently observed in PanIN-3 lesions of CP specimens than in those of non-CP specimens, although not statistically significant. PanIN-3 in association with CP is a significant prognostic factor for decreased survival in PDAC patients, suggesting that chronic inflammation may accelerate the progression of preinvasive high-grade PanIN. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Surgical treatment of the pancreatic stump: preventive strategies of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    TERSIGNI, R.; CAPALDI, M.; IALONGO, P.; GRILLO, L.R.; ANSELMO, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The institutions with high volume of pancreatic surgery report morbidity rate from 30% to 50% and mortality less than 5% after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). At the present, the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality is pancreatic fistula (PF). Aim The purpose of the study is to identify the most important clinical factors which may predict PF development and eventually suggest alternative approaches to the pancreatic stump management. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of a clinical data base of a tertiary care Hospital was performed. From 2002 to 2012 a single Surgeon prospectively performed 150 pancreaticoduodenectomies for cancer. Four different techniques were used: end to end pancreaticojejunostomy, end to side pancreaticojejunostomy, pancreatic duct occlusion and duct to mucosa anastomosis. The intraoperative gland texture was classified as soft, firm and hard. The duct size was preoperatively (CT scan) and intraoperatively recorded and classified: < 3 mm small, 3–6 mm medium, > 6 mm large. The histopathological characteristic of the gland fibrosis was graduate as low 1, moderate 2, high 3. Conclusion Relationships between pre and intraoperative duct size measurement, pancreatic texture and pancreatic fibrosis grading were highly significant. Small duct and soft pancreas with low grade fibrosis are the most important risk factors for pancreatic fistula development. The proper selection of pancreatic stump management or the decision to refer the high risk patients to high volume Center can be suggested by the elevated correspondence of pre and intraoperative duct diameter with the related pancreatic fibrosis grade and gland consistency. Preoperative assessment of the pancreatic duct makes possible to predict the risk of pancreatic fistula. PMID:25419587

  15. Imaging of pancreatic cancer: what the surgeon wants to know.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Randy; Steinman, Jonathan; Luk, Lyndon; Kluger, Michael D; Hecht, Elizabeth M

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Early detection is challenging because symptoms are relatively nonspecific. Imaging is vital in detecting and staging pancreatic tumors, and management depends on imaging findings. Radiologists should be aware of current surgical treatments for pancreatic neoplasms, as surgeons rely on interpretation of cross-sectional imaging for presurgical planning. Understanding postsurgical anatomy is critical to assess for complications and recurrence. This review will emphasize the role of the radiologist in planning for surgery and will review postoperative changes based on surgical intervention and common complications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Dietary Patterns and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Ying; Shu, Long; Shen, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xu-Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2017-01-05

    A number of studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of pancreatic cancer. MEDLINE (provided by the National Library of Medicine) and EBSCO (Elton B. Stephens Company) databases were searched for relevant articles published up to May 2016 that identified common dietary patterns. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were finally included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy patterns (odds ratio, OR = 0.86; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.77-0.95; p = 0.004) and light-moderate drinking patterns (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83-0.98; p = 0.02). There was evidence of an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in the highest compared with the lowest categories of western-type pattern (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06-1.45; p = 0.008) and heavy drinking pattern (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10-1.48; p = 0.002). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that healthy and light-moderate drinking patterns may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas western-type and heavy drinking patterns may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6): a novel treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundar, Ponnandai; Riggs, Dale R; Jackson, Barbara J; Cunningham, Cynthia; Vona-Davis, Linda; McFadden, David W

    2005-06-15

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a naturally occurring polyphosphorylated carbohydrate found in food sources high in fiber content. IP6 has been reported to have significant inhibitory effects against a variety of primary tumors including breast and colon. The effects of IP6 have not been evaluated in pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that IP6 would significantly inhibit cell growth and increase the apoptotic rate of pancreatic cancer in vitro. Two pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIAPACA and PANC1) were cultured using standard techniques and treated with IP6 at doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 mm. Cell viability was measured by MTT at 24 and 72 h. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V-FITC and results calculated using FACS analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. Significant reductions (P < 0.01) in cellular proliferation were observed with all IP6 concentrations tested in both cell lines and at both time points. Reductions in cell proliferation ranged from 37.1 to 91.5%. IP6 increased early and late apoptotic activity (P < 0.01). Treatment of pancreatic cancer with the common dietary polyphosphorylated carbohydrate IP6 significantly decreased cellular growth and increased apoptosis. Our findings suggest that IP6 has the potential to become an effective adjunct for pancreatic cancer treatment. Further in vivo and human studies are needed to evaluate safety and clinical utility of this agent in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  18. Family history of cancer and risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Eric J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; LaCroix, Andrea; McWilliams, Robert R.; Steplowski, Emily; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Agalliu, Ilir; Allen, Naomi E.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Canzian, Federico; Clipp, Sandra; Dorronsoro, Miren; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Kraft, Peter; Kooperberg, Charles; Lynch, Shannon M.; Sund, Malin; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Mouw, Tracy; Newton, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Thomas, Gilles; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e. ovarian, breast, and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of five types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast, and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe, and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling, or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (multivariate-adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.19–2.61). A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.12–1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.52–1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.97–1.51), or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.93–1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study. PMID:20049842

  19. Association between allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Cotterchio, Michelle; Lowcock, Elizabeth; Hudson, Thomas J; Greenwood, Celia; Gallinger, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Less than 10% of pancreatic cancer cases survive 5 years, yet its etiology is not well understood. Studies suggest allergies are associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk. Our study collected additional information on allergies (including skin prick test results and differentiation of allergic/nonallergic asthma), and is the first to assess possible confounding by allergy medications. A population-based case-control study was designed to comprehensively assess the association between allergy and pancreatic cancer risk. Pancreas cancer cases were diagnosed during 2011 to 2012, and identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry (345 cases). Population-based controls were identified using random digit dialing and age/sex frequency matched to cases (1,285 controls). Questionnaires collected lifetime allergy history (type of allergy, age at onset, skin prick testing results), allergy medications, and established pancreas cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odd ratios and test potential confounders, including allergy medications. Hay fever was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [AOR = 0.68; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.52-0.89], and reduction was greatest for those whose skin prick test was positive for hay fever allergens. No particular patterns were observed as regards age at onset and duration of allergy. Positive dust/mold allergy skin prick test and animal allergies were associated with a statistically significant reduced pancreatic cancer risk; AOR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31-0.78 and AOR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.46-0.99, respectively. Asthma was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. These findings support the growing body of evidence that suggests certain allergies are associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk. ©2014 AACR.

  20. Molecular Targeted Approaches for Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z.Q.; Saluja, A.K.; Dudeja, V.; Vickers, S.M.; Buchsbaum, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer remains a highly malignant disease with almost similar incidence and mortality despite extensive research. Many targeted therapies are under development. However, clinical investigation showed that single targeted therapies and most combined therapies were not able to improve the prognosis of this disease, even though some of these therapies had excellent anti-tumor effects in pre-clinical models. Cross-talk between cell proliferation signaling pathways may be an important phenomenon in pancreatic cancer, which may result in cancer cell survival even though some pathways are blocked by targeted therapy. Pancreatic cancer may possess different characteristics and targets in different stages of pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis. Sensitivity to therapy may also vary for cancer cells at different stages. The unique pancreatic cancer structure with abundant stroma creates a tumor microenvironment with hypoxia and low blood perfusion rate, which prevents drug delivery to cancer cells. In this review, the most commonly investigated targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer treatment are discussed. However, how to combine these targeted therapies and/or combine them with chemotherapy to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still a challenge. Genomic and proteomic studies using pancreatic cancer samples obtained from either biopsy or surgery are recommended to individualize tumor characters and to perform drug sensitivity study in order to design a tailored therapy with minimal side effects. These studies may help to further investigate tumor pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis to create cellular expression profiles at different stages. Integration of the information obtained needs to be performed from multiple levels and dimensions in order to develop a successful targeted therapy. PMID:21777178

  1. A prospective nested case-control study of vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Vieth, Reinhold; Azad, Azar; Pietinen, Pirjo; Taylor, Philip R; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2006-10-15

    Sun exposure is associated with lower death rates for pancreatic cancer in some ecological studies. Skin exposure to UVB light induces cutaneous production of precursors to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. Pancreatic islet and duct cells express 25(OH)D(3)-1alpha-hydroxylase that generates the biologically active 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D form. Thus, 25(OH)D concentrations could affect pancreatic function and possibly pancreatic cancer etiology. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention cohort of male Finnish smokers, ages 50 to 69 years at baseline, to test whether more adequate vitamin D status, as determined by prediagnostic serum 25(OH)D concentrations, was associated with lower pancreatic cancer risk. Two hundred incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases that occurred between 1985 and 2001 (up to 16.7 years of follow-up) were matched by age and date of blood draw to 400 controls who were alive and free of cancer at the time the case was diagnosed. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Higher vitamin D concentrations were associated with a 3-fold increased risk for pancreatic cancer (highest versus lowest quintile, >65.5 versus <32.0 nmol/L: OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.56-5.48, P(trend) = 0.001) that remained after excluding cases diagnosed early during follow-up. Contrary to expectations, subjects with higher prediagnostic vitamin D status had an increased pancreatic cancer risk compared with those with lower status. Our findings need to be replicated in other populations and caution is warranted in their interpretation and implication. Our results are intriguing and may provide clues that further the understanding of the etiology of this highly fatal cancer.

  2. Design of a nanoplatform for treating pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manawadu, Harshi Chathurangi

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. Asymptomatic early cancer stages and late diagnosis leads to very low survival rates of pancreatic cancers, compared to other cancers. Treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer are limited to chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, as surgical removal of the cancerous tissue becomes impossible at later stages. Therefore, there's a critical need for innovative and improved chemotherapeutic treatment of (late) pancreatic cancers. It is mandatory for successful treatment strategies to overcome the drug resistance associated with pancreatic cancers. Nanotechnology based drug formulations have been providing promising alternatives in cancer treatment due to their selective targeting and accumulation in tumor vasculature, which can be used for efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors and metastases. The research of my thesis is following the principle approach to high therapeutic efficacy that has been first described by Dr. Helmut Ringsdorf in 1975. However, I have extended the use of the Ringsdorf model from polymeric to nanoparticle-based drug carriers by exploring an iron / iron oxide nanoparticle based drug delivery system. A series of drug delivery systems have been synthesized by varying the total numbers and the ratio of the tumor homing peptide sequence CGKRK and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin at the surfaces of Fe/Fe3O 4-nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of these nanoformulations was tested against murine pancreatic cancer cell lines (Pan02) to assess their therapeutic capabilities for effective treatments of pancreatic cancers. Healthy mouse fibroblast cells (STO) were also tested for comparison, because an effective chemotherapeutic drug has to be selective towards cancer cells. Optimal Experimental Design methodology was applied to identify the nanoformulation with the highest therapeutic activity. A statistical analysis method known as response

  3. Vitamin D–binding protein and pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study12345

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Marina R; Freedman, D Michal; Robien, Kim; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Horst, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D–binding protein (DBP) is the primary carrier of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the circulation. One prospective study in male smokers found a protective association between DBP and pancreatic cancer, particularly among men with higher 25(OH)D concentrations. Objective: The objective was to examine the association between DBP and pancreatic cancer risk in an American population. Design: We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer screening trial cohort of men and women aged 55–74 y at baseline. Between 1993 and 2010, 295 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases were reported (follow-up to 15.1 y). Two controls (n = 590) were matched to each case by age, race, sex, and month of blood draw. We calculated smoking- and diabetes-adjusted ORs and 95% CIs with the use of conditional logistic regression. Results: DBP concentration was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer overall [highest (≥7149.4 nmol/L) vs. lowest (<3670.4 nmol/L) quintile; OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.91, 3.37; P-trend = 0.25]. For serum 25(OH)D compared with the referent (50 to <75 nmol/L), individuals in the highest group had a significantly higher risk (≥100 nmol/L; OR: 3.23; 95% CI: 1.24, 8.44), whereas those in the lowest group had no significant association (<25 nmol/L; OR: 2.50; 95% CI: 0.92, 6.81). Further adjustment for DBP did not alter this association. Conclusion: Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum DBP or 25(OH)D plays a protective role in pancreatic cancer. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00339495. PMID:25904602

  4. Anthropometric Measures, Body Mass Index and Pancreatic Cancer: a Pooled Analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Alan A.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Kooperberg, Charles; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Steplowski, Emily; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gross, Myron D.; Jacobs, Eric J.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Bamlet, William R.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Bingham, Sheila A.; Boeing, Heiner; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clipp, Sandra; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Kraft, Peter; Lynch, Shannon M.; Manjer, Jonas; Manson, JoAnn E.; McTiernan, Anne; McWilliams, Robert R.; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Palli, Domenico; Rohan, Thomas E.; Slimani, Nadia; Thomas, Gilles; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Patel, Alpa V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pooled data were analyzed from the NCI Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between pre-diagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2,170 cases and 2,209 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), as well as conventional BMI categories: underweight (<18.5 kg/m2), normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), obese (30.0-34.9 kg/m2), and severely obese (≥35.0 kg/m2). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results Among all subjects, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs. lowest BMI quartile = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.12-1.58, Ptrend < 0.001). Among men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs. lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI = 1.04-1.69, Ptrend <0.03). Among women, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest quartile of BMI was 1.34 (95% CI = 1.05-1.70, Ptrend = 0.01). Increased WHR was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer among women (adjusted OR for the highest vs. lowest quartile = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.31-2.69, Ptrend = 0.003) but less so in men. Conclusion The findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women. PMID:20458087

  5. Vitamin D Receptor Signaling and Pancreatic Cancer Cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of human malignancies. Even in patients who undergo resection, long-term survival rates remain extremely low. A major contributor to the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a physiologic process of morphological and genetic changes in carcinoma cells from an epithelial phenotype to a mesenchymal phenotype, which is the basis of the high metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells. EMT is triggered by various tumor microenvironmental factors, including cytokines, growth factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. This review highlights the growing evidence of the effect of EMT on pancreatic cancer progression, focusing on the interaction of EMT with other pathways central to cancer progression, especially vitamin D receptor signaling. Studies of the signaling pathways that lead to the inactivation of EMT programs during these disease processes are providing new insights into the plasticity of cellular phenotypes and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25506892

  6. MicroRNA markers for the diagnosis of pancreatic and biliary-tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Motohiro; Sudo, Hiroko; Kawauchi, Junpei; Takizawa, Satoko; Kondou, Satoshi; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to detect pancreatic cancer or biliary-tract cancer at an early stage using current diagnostic technology. Utilizing microRNA (miRNA) markers that are stably present in peripheral blood, we aimed to identify pancreatic and biliary-tract cancers in patients. With "3D-Gene", a highly sensitive microarray, we examined comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in 571 serum samples obtained from healthy patients, patients with pancreatic, biliary-tract, or other digestive cancers, and patients with non-malignant abnormalities in the pancreas or biliary tract. The samples were randomly divided into training and test cohorts, and candidate miRNA markers were independently evaluated. We found 81 miRNAs for pancreatic cancer and 66 miRNAs for biliary-tract cancer that showed statistically different expression compared with healthy controls. Among those markers, 55 miRNAs were common in both the pancreatic and biliary-tract cancer samples. The previously reported miR-125a-3p was one of the common markers; however, it was also expressed in other types of digestive-tract cancers, suggesting that it is not specific to cancer types. In order to discriminate the pancreato-biliary cancers from all other clinical conditions including the healthy controls, non-malignant abnormalities, and other types of cancers, we developed a diagnostic index using expression profiles of the 10 most significant miRNAs. A combination of eight miRNAs (miR-6075, miR-4294, miR-6880-5p, miR-6799-5p, miR-125a-3p, miR-4530, miR-6836-3p, and miR-4476) achieved a sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and AUC of 80.3%, 97.6%, 91.6% and 0.953, respectively. In contrast, CA19-9 and CEA gave sensitivities of 65.6% and 40.0%, specificities of 92.9% and 88.6%, and accuracies of 82.1% and 71.8%, respectively, in the same test cohort. This diagnostic index identified 18/21 operable pancreatic cancers and 38/48 operable biliary-tract cancers in the entire cohort. Our results suggest that the assessment of

  7. Early changes in serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate predict pancreatic necrosis and mortality in acute pancreatitis: Creatinine and eGFR in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Michal; Rydzewski, A; Rydzewska, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the significance of serum creatinine level (SCL) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measured in an early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) for prediction of pancreatic necrosis (PNec) and mortality. One hundred and forty-seven patients with AP were retrospectively reviewed in the study. Serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate (calculated using the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation) on admission and 48 h thereafter were analyzed for each patient. These parameters were compared with contrast-enhanced computed tomography images performed within 96 h from admission (n = 103). Usefulness of SCL and eGFR for prediction of PNec and fatal outcome of AP was evaluated using a receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and comparison of average parameter values. We confirmed pancreatic necrosis in 41 (39.8%) of 103 patients using computed tomography examination. Both creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate measured on admission (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively) and 48 h later (p = 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively) were significantly associated with the presence of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, serum creatinine level and eGFR measured on the 1st day proved to be a good predictor of fatal outcome. Both, mortality and presence of pancreatic necrosis were significantly higher in the group with elevated serum creatinine level and low eGFR values. SCL and eGFR on admission are useful indicators of PNec and mortality. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Resection versus other treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Kumar, Senthil; Davidson, Brian R; Fusai, Giuseppe

    2014-02-27

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer. Resection of the cancer is the only treatment with the potential to achieve long-term survival. However, a third of patients with pancreatic cancer have locally advanced cancer involving adjacent structures such as blood vessels which are not usually removed because of fear of increased complications after surgery. Such patients often receive palliative treatment. Resection of the pancreas along with the involved vessels is an alternative to palliative treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. To compare the benefits and harms of surgical resection versus palliative treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers until February 2014. We included randomised controlled trials comparing pancreatic resection versus palliative treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (irrespective of language or publication status). Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and random-effects models using Review Manager (RevMan). We calculated the hazard ratio (HR), risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on an intention-to-treat analysis. We identified two trials comparing pancreatic resection versus other treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Ninety eight patients were randomised to pancreatic resection (n = 47) or palliative treatment (n = 51) in the two trials included in this review. Both trials were at high risk of bias. Both trials included patients who had locally advanced pancreatic cancer which involved the serosa anteriorly or retroperitoneum posteriorly or involved the blood vessels. Such pancreatic cancers would be considered

  9. A natural food sweetener with anti-pancreatic cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Dai, L-H; Dou, D-Q; Ma, L-Q; Sun, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Mogroside V is a triterpenoid isolated from the traditional Chinese medical plant Siraitia grosvenorii. Mogroside V has a high degree of sweetness and a low calorific content. Herein, we found that mogroside V possesses tumor growth inhibitory activity in in vitro and in vivo models of pancreatic cancer by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 cells), which may in part be mediated through regulating the STAT3 signaling pathway. These results were confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. In xenograft tumors, Ki-67 and PCNA, the most commonly used markers of tumor cell proliferation, were downregulated after intravenous administration of mogroside V. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays showed that mogroside V treatment promoted apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in the xenograft tumors. Furthermore, we found that mogroside V treatment significantly reduced the expression of CD31-labeled blood vessels and of the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor in the xenografts, indicating that mogroside V might limit the growth of pancreatic tumors by inhibiting angiogenesis and reducing vascular density. These results therefore demonstrate that the natural, sweet-tasting compound mogroside V can inhibit proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting multiple biological targets. PMID:27065453

  10. [Anti-metastasis effect of thymoquinone on human pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Zhao; Shen, Yue; Huang, Li-Li; Jiang, Ping

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies reported that thymoquinone (TQ), a component derived from the medicinal spice Nigella sativa (also called black cumin), exhibited inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of many cancer cell lines. This study was performed to investigate the anti-metastatic effect of thymoquinone on the pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that thymoquinone suppressed the migration and invasion of Panc-1 cells in a does-dependent manner. To investigate the possible mechanisms involved in these events, Western blotting analysis was performed, and found that thymoquinone significantly down-regulates NF-kappaB and MMP-9 in Panc-1 cells. In addition, metastatic model simulating human pancreatic cancer was established by orthotropic implantation of histologically intact pancreatic tumor tissue into the pancreatic wall of nude mice. And administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced tumor metastasis compared to untreated control. Furthermore, the expression of NF-kappaB and MMP-9 in tumor tissues was also suppressed after treatment with thymoquinone. Taken together, the results indicate that thymoquinone exerts anti-metastatic activity on pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo, which may be related to down-regulation of NF-kappaB and its regulated molecules such as MMP-9 protein. Consequently, these results provide important insights into thymoquinone as an antimetastatic agent for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer.

  11. A natural food sweetener with anti-pancreatic cancer properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Dai, L-H; Dou, D-Q; Ma, L-Q; Sun, Y-X

    2016-04-11

    Mogroside V is a triterpenoid isolated from the traditional Chinese medical plant Siraitia grosvenorii. Mogroside V has a high degree of sweetness and a low calorific content. Herein, we found that mogroside V possesses tumor growth inhibitory activity in in vitro and in vivo models of pancreatic cancer by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 cells), which may in part be mediated through regulating the STAT3 signaling pathway. These results were confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. In xenograft tumors, Ki-67 and PCNA, the most commonly used markers of tumor cell proliferation, were downregulated after intravenous administration of mogroside V. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays showed that mogroside V treatment promoted apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in the xenograft tumors. Furthermore, we found that mogroside V treatment significantly reduced the expression of CD31-labeled blood vessels and of the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor in the xenografts, indicating that mogroside V might limit the growth of pancreatic tumors by inhibiting angiogenesis and reducing vascular density. These results therefore demonstrate that the natural, sweet-tasting compound mogroside V can inhibit proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting multiple biological targets.

  12. Elevated serum amylase in patients with chronic pancreatitis: acute attack or macroamylasemia?

    PubMed

    Gubergrits, Natalya; Golubova, Oksana; Lukashevich, Galina; Fomenko, Pavlo

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis not infrequently have elevated concentrations of amylase, even though detailed examination reveals no indication of an acute exacerbation. One hundred and eighty-six consecutive patients with chronic pancreatitis were examined clinically and, if indicated, by ultrasonography and computed tomography. In addition, all patients underwent determination of serum amylase and serum lipase as well as amylase/creatinine clearance, followed as required by a polyethylene glycol test and/or chromatography to demonstrate macroamylase. Twenty (11%) of the 186 patients had macroamylasemia, and 15 of these 20 had hyperamylasemia. In the remaining five cases the serum amylase levels were within the normal range. Patients with asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia should first be investigated for macroamylasemia, before initiating any costly or complex procedures in the attempt to demonstrate a clinically silent or only mildly symptomatic attack of their disease. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. miR-29c suppresses pancreatic cancer liver metastasis in an orthotopic implantation model in nude mice and affects survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongkang; Li, Jianwei; Chen, Zhiyu; Li, Xiaowu; Zheng, Shuguo; Yi, Dong; Zhong, Ai; Chen, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We investigated mechanisms of pancreatic cancer metastasis and defined the biological role of miR-29c in pancreatic cancer metastasis. After two rounds of cell selection in vivo, pancreatic cancer cells with various metastatic potentials derived from spontaneous liver metastases were used as a model of pancreatic cancer to determine the role of miR-29c in pancreatic cancer metastasis. Pancreatic cancer samples were analyzed for miRNA-29c expression, and these levels were associated with survival between groups. miR-29c suppresses cell migration and invasion by targeting the MMP2 3'UTR. Overexpression of miR-29c suppresses pancreatic cancer liver metastasis in a nude mouse orthotopic implantation model. miR-29c expression was associated with metastasis and pancreatic cancer patient survival. miR-29c plays an important role in mediating pancreatic cancer metastasis to the liver by targeting MMP2. Therefore, miR-29c may serve as a novel marker of pancreatic cancer metastasis and possibly as a therapeutic target to treat pancreatic cancer liver metastasis.

  14. Targeting GIPC/synectin in pancreatic cancer inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Muders, Michael H; Vohra, Pawan K; Dutta, Shamit K; Wang, Enfeng; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Wang, Ling; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika; Memic, Adnan; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Rupashinghe, Chamila N; Baretton, Gustavo B; Aust, Daniela E; Langer, Silke; Datta, Kaustubh; Simons, Michael; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-06-15

    Various studies have shown the importance of the GAIP interacting protein, COOH-terminus (GIPC, also known as Synectin) as a central adaptor molecule in different signaling pathways and as an important mediator of receptor stability. GIPC/Synectin is associated with different growth-promoting receptors such as insulin-like growth factor receptor I (IGF-IR) and integrins. These interactions were mediated through its PDZ domain. GIPC/Synectin has been shown to be overexpressed in pancreatic and breast cancer. The goal of this study was to show the importance of GIPC/Synectin in pancreatic cancer growth and to evaluate a possible therapeutic strategy by using a GIPC-PDZ domain inhibitor. Furthermore, the effect of targeting GIPC on the IGF-I receptor as one of its associated receptors was tested. The in vivo effects of GIPC/Synectin knockdown were studied after lentiviral transduction of luciferase-expressing pancreatic cancer cells with short hairpin RNA against GIPC/Synectin. Additionally, a GIPC-PDZ--targeting peptide was designed. This peptide was tested for its influence on pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of GIPC/Synectin led to a significant inhibition of pancreatic adenocarcinoma growth in an orthotopic mouse model. Additionally, a cell-permeable GIPC-PDZ inhibitor was able to block tumor growth significantly without showing toxicity in a mouse model. Targeting GIPC was accompanied by a significant reduction in IGF-IR expression in pancreatic cancer cells. Our findings show that targeting GIPC/Synectin and its PDZ domain inhibits pancreatic carcinoma growth and is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Serum amylase and lipase and urinary trypsinogen and amylase for diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rompianesi, Gianluca; Hann, Angus; Komolafe, Oluyemi; Pereira, Stephen P; Davidson, Brian R; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2017-04-21

    The treatment of people with acute abdominal pain differs if they have acute pancreatitis. It is important to know the diagnostic accuracy of serum amylase, serum lipase, urinary trypsinogen-2, and urinary amylase for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, so that an informed decision can be made as to whether the person with abdominal pain has acute pancreatitis. There is currently no Cochrane review of the diagnostic test accuracy of serum amylase, serum lipase, urinary trypsinogen-2, and urinary amylase for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of serum amylase, serum lipase, urinary trypsinogen-2, and urinary amylase, either alone or in combination, in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in people with acute onset of a persistent, severe epigastric pain or diffuse abdominal pain. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR HTA and DARE), and other databases until March 2017. We searched the references of the included studies to identify additional studies. We did not restrict studies based on language or publication status, or whether data were collected prospectively or retrospectively. We also performed a 'related search' and 'citing reference' search in MEDLINE and Embase. We included all studies that evaluated the diagnostic test accuracy of serum amylase, serum lipase, urinary trypsinogen-2, and urinary amylase for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. We excluded case-control studies because these studies are prone to bias. We accepted any of the following reference standards: biopsy, consensus conference definition, radiological features of acute pancreatitis, diagnosis of acute pancreatitis during laparotomy or autopsy, and organ failure. At least two review authors independently searched and screened the references located by the search to identify relevant studies. Two review authors independently extracted data from the included studies. The thresholds used

  16. Appearance mechanism and molecular heterogeneity of serum pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI).

    PubMed

    Nakano, I; Funakoshi, A; Sumii, T; Miyazaki, K; Oogami, Y; Kimura, T; Ibayashi, H

    1985-08-01

    Serum immunoreactive pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) was measured by RIA. Serum PSTI levels were elevated in case of acute pancreatitis (15 of 15 cases: 317.7 +/- 155.6 ng/ml: Mean +/- SE) or pancreatic carcinoma (16 of 25 cases; 71.8 +/- 17.1 ng/ml), and in those with chronic renal failure (6 of 6 cases: 412.8 +/- 98.2 ng/ml). The molecular heterogeneity of elevated serum PSTI n such diseases was studied using chromatofocusing column chromatography. The results showed that serum PSTI was free from trypsin(-ogen) and was composed of at least three molecular forms of different isoelectric points. Two major forms were eluted around pH 8.2 (peak I) and 7.5 (peak II), with one minor form around pH 6.9 (peak III) from the column. The relative ratio of three forms differed with the disease state. Peak I was high in patients with pancreatic carcinoma, and peak II was high in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  17. Purified Human Pancreatic Duct Cell Culture Conditions Defined by Serum-Free High-Content Growth Factor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hoesli, Corinne A.; Johnson, James D.; Piret, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of pancreatic duct-like CK19+ cells has implications for multiple disease states including pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. The in vitro study of this important cell type has been hampered by their limited expansion compared to fibroblast-like vimentin+ cells that overgrow primary cultures. We aimed to develop a screening platform for duct cell mitogens after depletion of the vimentin+ population. The CD90 cell surface marker was used to remove the vimentin+ cells from islet-depleted human pancreas cell cultures by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Cell sorting decreased CD90+ cell contamination of the cultures from 34±20% to 1.3±0.6%, yielding purified CK19+ cultures with epithelial morphology. A full-factorial experimental design was then applied to test the mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF, KGF and VEGF. After 6 days in test conditions, the cells were labelled with BrdU, stained and analyzed by high-throughput imaging. This screening assay confirmed the expected mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF on CK19+ cells and additionally revealed interactions between these factors and VEGF. A serum-free medium containing bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF led to CK19+ cell expansion comparable to the addition of 10% serum. The methods developed in this work should advance pancreatic cancer and diabetes research by providing effective cell culture and high-throughput screening platforms to study purified primary pancreatic CK19+ cells. PMID:22442738

  18. Top classic citations in pancreatic cancer research.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Jiang, Yuan

    2016-11-29

    The number of times that articles are cited by is widely used to evaluate the impact of an article or an individual author has on its scientific community. This bibliometric analysis aimed to explore the top classic citations in pancreatic cancer (PC) research. A computerized literature search was conducted using the database, the Science Citation Index Expanded. The top 100 highly cited articles were included and further analyzed. The most cited article had 3,032 citations, with a mean of 626 citations per paper. These highly cited articles were published in 37 journals, led by Cancer Research (15 articles). Of the 100 articles, 40 were observational studies, 36 dealt with basic science, and 14 were randomized controlled trials. These articles came from 11 countries, with the USA contributing 79 articles. Fifty-one institutions produced these 100 citation classics, led by Johns Hopkins University (20 articles). Twenty-seven persons authored two or more of the top-cited articles, led by Kern SE (6) and Yeo CJ (5). This analysis of the top highly cited articles allows for the recognition of major advances in PC research and gives a historic perspective on the progress of this specialty of PC research.

  19. The complex landscape of pancreatic cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Cristovão Marques; Kimmelman, Alec C.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDA) are extremely aggressive cancers and currently available therapies are only minimally effective in treating this disease. Tackling this devastating cancer has been a major challenge to the scientific and medical communities, in part due to its intense therapeutic resistance. One of the aspects of this tumor that contributes to its aggressive behavior is its altered cellular metabolism. Indeed, PDA cells seem to possess the ability to adapt their metabolism to the particular environment to which they are exposed, including utilizing diverse fuel sources depending on their availability. Moreover, PDA tumors are efficient at recycling various metabolic substrates through activation of different salvage pathways such as autophagy and macropinocytosis. Together, these diverse metabolic adaptations allow PDA cells to survive and thrive in harsh environments that may lack nutrients and oxygen. Not surprisingly, given its central role in the pathogenesis of this tumor, oncogenic Kras plays a critical role in much of the metabolic reprogramming seen in PDA. In this review, we discuss the metabolic landscape of PDA tumors, including the molecular underpinnings of the key regulatory nodes, and describe how such pathways can be exploited for future diagnostic and therapeutic approaches PMID:24743516

  20. Overview of linkage analysis: application to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, Alison P

    2005-01-01

    Linkage analysis has aided in the identification of genes involved in many diseases, including several cancers. It relies on using family-based data to detect genetic loci that may harbor disease predisposing genes. Although linkage studies were first designed to find the genes responsible for simple Mendelian diseases (diseases caused by alterations in a single gene), today it is more common for investigators to use linkage analysis to locate genes involved in complex diseases (diseases caused by the independent and joint effects of multiple genes often in conjunction with environmental factors), such as pancreatic cancer. During the past decade linkage analysis has been key step in the identification of several cancer genes, including BRCA2 and STK11, which additional studies have shown also carry an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, these known genes explain very little of the observed familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer. While the foundations of linkage analysis are relatively straightforward, the actual implementation of linkage studies, especially for complex diseases such as pancreatic cancer, can be quite difficult. This chapter focuses on the basics of linkage analysis for qualitative traits (affected/unaffected) as could be applied to the study of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Aptamer-Mediated Delivery of Chemotherapy to Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; Cheek, Marcus A.; Sharaf, Mariam L.; Li, Na; Ellington, Andrew D.; Sullenger, Bruce A.; Shaw, Barbara Ramsay

    2012-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analog that is currently the best available single-agent chemotherapeutic drug for pancreatic cancer. However, efficacy is limited by our inability to deliver sufficient active metabolite into cancer cells without toxic effects on normal tissues. Targeted delivery of gemcitabine into cancer cells could maximize effectiveness and concurrently minimize toxic side effects by reducing uptake into normal cells. Most pancreatic cancers overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. We utilized a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer that binds and is internalized by EGFR on pancreatic cancer cells to deliver gemcitabine-containing polymers into EGFR-expressing cells and inhibit cell proliferation in vitro. This approach to cell type–specific therapy can be adapted to other targets and to other types of therapeutic cargo. PMID:23030589

  2. Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Cathepsin E as a Drug Activator

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elgaliel, Wael R.; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Wang, Huamin; Logsdon, Craig D.; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is challenging to treat, and better means to detect and/or treat pancreatic cancer are urgently needed to save lives. Cathepsin E (Cath E) is a proteolytic enzyme highly expressed in PDAC. In this study, a novel approach using Cath E activation of a Cath E-specific prodrug was demonstrated. Specific activation of the prodrug is expected to kill pancreatic cancer cells without harming normal pancreatic cells. A novel 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) prodrug was custom-designed to be activated selectively by endogenous Cath E within the PDAC cells. The 5-ALA prodrug was incubated with Cath E-positive and -negative tumor cells and illuminated with various doses of light. In addition, mice genetically engineered to develop PDAC were injected intravenously with the 5-ALA prodrug, and the pancreas was treated with light irradiation. One day after treatment, PDAC tissue was assessed for apoptosis. The 5-ALA prodrug was activated within the Cath E-positive tumor but not in the normal pancreatic tissue. When used in combination with light treatment, it allowed delivery of selective photodynamic therapy (PDT) to the cancerous tissues, with minimal harm to the adjacent normal tissues. With this novel Cath E activation approach, it is possible to detect pancreatic cancer cells accurately and specifically impair their viability, while sparing normal cells. This treatment could result in fewer side effects than the non-specific treatments currently in use. Cath E is a specific and effective drug activator for PDAC treatment. PMID:23422726

  3. Cadmium Exposure and Pancreatic Cancer in South Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Luckett, Brian G.; Su, L. Joseph; Rood, Jennifer C.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium has been hypothesized to be a pancreatic carcinogen. We test the hypothesis that cadmium exposure is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer with a population-based case-control study sampled from a population with persistently high rates of pancreatic cancer (south Louisiana). We tested potential dietary and nondietary sources of cadmium for their association with urinary cadmium concentrations which reflect long-term exposure to cadmium due to the accumulation of cadmium in the kidney cortex. Increasing urinary cadmium concentrations were significantly associated with an increasing risk of pancreatic cancer (2nd quartile OR = 3.34, 3rd = 5.58, 4th = 7.70; test for trend P ≤ 0.0001). Potential sources of cadmium exposure, as documented in the scientific literature, found to be statistically significantly associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer included working as a plumber, pipefitter or welder (OR = 5.88) and high consumption levels of red meat (4th quartile OR = 6.18) and grains (4th quartile OR = 3.38). Current cigarette smoking, at least 80 pack years of smoking, occupational exposure to cadmium and paints, working in a shipyard, and high consumption of grains were found to be statistically significantly associated with increased concentrations of urinary cadmium. This study provides epidemiologic evidence that cadmium is a potential human pancreatic carcinogen. PMID:23319964

  4. A mathematical prognosis model for pancreatic cancer patients receiving immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefang; Xu, Jian-Xin

    2016-10-07

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer since it typically spreads rapidly and can seldom be detected in its early stage. Pancreatic cancer therapy is thus a challenging task, and appropriate prognosis or assessment for pancreatic cancer therapy is of critical importance. In this work, based on available clinical data in Niu et al. (2013) we develop a mathematical prognosis model that can predict the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients who receive immunotherapy. The mathematical model incorporates pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic stellate cells, three major classes of immune effector cells CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, helper T cells, and two major classes of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The proposed model describes the dynamic interaction between tumor and immune cells. In order for the model to be able to generate appropriate prognostic results for disease progression, the distribution and stability properties of equilibria in the mathematical model are computed and analysed in absence of treatments. In addition, numerical simulations for disease progression with or without treatments are performed. It turns out that the median overall survival associated with CIK immunotherapy is prolonged from 7 to 13months compared with the survival without treatment, this is consistent with the clinical data observed in Niu et al. (2013). The validity of the proposed mathematical prognosis model is thus verified. Our study confirms that immunotherapy offers a better prognosis for pancreatic cancer patients. As a direct extension of this work, various new therapy methods that are under exploration and clinical trials could be assessed or evaluated using the newly developed mathematical prognosis model.

  5. Potential Biomarkers in Lewis Negative Patients With Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guopei; Liu, Chen; Guo, Meng; Cheng, He; Lu, Yu; Jin, Kaizhou; Liu, Liang; Long, Jiang; Xu, Jin; Lu, Renquan; Ni, Quanxing; Yu, Xianjun

    2017-04-01

    To examine potential biomarkers in Lewis negative patients with pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is currently the most important and widely used biomarker in pancreatic cancer. However, approximately 5 to 10% of the population are Lewis negative individuals, and they are documented to have scarce or no CA19-9 secretion. Therefore, it is necessary to explore potential biomarkers to compensate for this drawback. Lewis genotypes were determined in a large cohort of patients with pancreatic cancer (682 cases) and controls (525 cases) by sequencing the Fucosyltransferase 3 (FUT3) gene from genomic DNA. Potential biomarkers were examined in patients with Lewis negative genotypes and normal subjects. The impact of potential biomarkers on tumor burden and survival was analyzed. Forty-seven (6.9%) patients with pancreatic cancer had Lewis negative genotypes. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA125 had greater sensitivity than other biomarkers in Lewis negative patients with pancreatic cancer [CEA, 63.8%; CA125, 51.1%; CA72-4, 25.5%; CA15-3, 21.3%; CA19-9, 19.1%; CA50, 12.8%; CA242, 10.6%; and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), 0.0%]. In addition, both CEA (98.0%) and CA125 (93.8%) showed a high specificity. Compared with other biomarkers, CEA (60.9%) was sensitive for stage I, II diseases and CA125 (75.0%) was sensitive for stage III, IV diseases. CEA and CA125 were associated with tumor metastasis and therapeutic response. CEA and CA125 have the potential to be applied as biomarkers in Lewis negative patients with pancreatic cancer. CEA and CA125 should be routinely measured for all patients with pancreatic cancer.

  6. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the recent clinical and experimental findings on pancreatic cancer. It also discusses the data supporting current standard clinical outcomes, and offers conclusions that may improve the management of pancreatic cancer in the future. PMID:26811624

  7. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Arslan, Alan A.; Qi, Dai; Patel, Alpa V.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Purdue, Mark P.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wilkins, Lynn R.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Cai, Qiuyin; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard; Clipp, Sandra; Horst, Ronald L.; Irish, Lonn; Koenig, Karen; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.

    2010-01-01

    Results from epidemiologic studies examining pancreatic cancer risk and vitamin D intake or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (the best indicator of vitamin D derived from diet and sun) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the authors conducted a pooled nested case-control study of participants from 8 cohorts within the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP) (1974–2006) to evaluate whether prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with the development of pancreatic cancer. In total, 952 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases occurred among participants (median follow-up, 6.5 years). Controls (n = 1,333) were matched to each case by cohort, age, sex, race/ethnicity, date of blood draw, and follow-up time. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate smoking-, body mass index-, and diabetes-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreatic cancer. Clinically relevant 25(OH)D cutpoints were compared with a referent category of 50–<75 nmol/L. No significant associations were observed for participants with lower 25(OH)D status. However, a high 25(OH)D concentration (≥100 nmol/L) was associated with a statistically significant 2-fold increase in pancreatic cancer risk overall (odds ratio = 2.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.64). Given this result, recommendations to increase vitamin D concentrations in healthy persons for the prevention of cancer should be carefully considered. PMID:20562185

  8. Prognostic value of PDL1 expression in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, David J; Finetti, Pascal; Lopresti, Alexia; Gilabert, Marine; Poizat, Flora; Turrini, Olivier; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Moutardier, Vincent; Birnbaum, Daniel; Mamessier, Emilie; Bertucci, François

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human cancers. PD1/PDL1-inhibitors recently showed promising results in different cancers with correlation between PDL1 tumor expression and responses. Expression of programmed cell death receptor ligand 1 (PDL1) has been scarcely studied in pancreatic cancer. In this retrospective study, we analyzed PDL1 mRNA expression in 453 clinical pancreatic cancer samples profiled using DNA microarrays and RNASeq. Compared to normal pancreatic samples, PDL1 expression was upregulated in 19% of cancer samples. Upregulation was not associated with clinicopathological features such as patients' age and sex, pathological type, tumor size, lymph node status, and grade, but was associated with shorter disease-free survival and overall survival in multivariate analyses. Analysis of correlations with biological parameters showed that PDL1 upregulation was associated with some degree of lymphocyte infiltration and signs of anti-tumor T-cell response, but to a lesser extent than what has been reported in breast cancer and GIST. PDL1-up pancreatic cancers displayed profiles of lymphocyte exhaustion, were more enriched in inhibitory molecules and pro-tumor populations (Tregs with upregulation of FOXP3 and IL10, myeloid-derived suppressor cells with upregulation of CD33 and S100A8/A9), and demonstrated a down-modulation of most MHC class I members (HLA-A/B/C, HLA-E/F/G) suggestive of a defect in antigen processing and presentation. In conclusion, our results suggest that PDL1 expression might refine the prediction of metastatic relapse in operated pancreatic cancer, and that PD1/PDL1 inhibitors might reactivate inhibited T-cells to increase the anti-tumor immune response in PDL1-upregulated tumors.

  9. Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 overexpressed in pancreatic cancers is involved in cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Ken; Takamura, Masaaki; Masugi, Yohei; Mori, Taisuke; Du, Wenlin; Hibi, Taizo; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Ohta, Tsutomu; Ohki, Misao; Hirohashi, Setsuo; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis among cancers due to the difficulty of early diagnosis and its aggressive behavior. To characterize the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancers on gene expression, pancreatic cancer xenografts transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice served as a panel for gene-expression profiling. As a result of profiling, the adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) gene was shown to be overexpressed in all of the xenografts. The expression of CAP1 protein in all 73 cases of pancreatic cancer was recognized by immunohistochemical analyses. The ratio of CAP1-positive tumor cells in clinical specimens was correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and neural invasion, and also with the poor prognosis of patients. Immunocytochemical analyses in pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated that CAP1 colocalized to the leading edge of lamellipodia with actin. Knockdown of CAP1 by RNA interference resulted in the reduction of lamellipodium formation, motility, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report demonstrating the overexpression of CAP1 in pancreatic cancers and suggesting the involvement of CAP1 in the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. Pancreatic cancer and thromboembolic disease, 150 years after Trousseau

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Daniel; Andersson, Roland; Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2015-01-01

    The connection between pancreatic cancer and venous thrombosis has been discussed for almost 150 years. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms are still partly understood, but it is known that pancreatic cancer induces a prothrombotic and hypercoagulable state and genetic events involved in neoplastic transformation (e.g., KRAS, c-MET, p53), procoagulant factors [e.g., tissue factor (TF), platelet factor 4 (PF4), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)], mucin production (e.g., through activation of P- and L-selectin) and pro-inflammatory factors [e.g., cytokines, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)] may be implicated. Also pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, is associated with increased risk of venous thrombosis, but in this circumstance a direct inflammatory process may be more important. This article discusses the incidence, treatment and outcome of venous thromboembolism (VTE) complicating pancreatic disease, with special emphasis on new knowledge obtained during the last fifteen years. PMID:26605280

  11. [Surgery for pancreatic cancer: Evidence-based surgical strategies].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Cabús, Santiago; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer surgery represents a challenge for surgeons due to its technical complexity, the potential complications that may appear, and ultimately because of its poor survival. The aim of this article is to summarize the scientific evidence regarding the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer in order to help surgeons in the decision making process in the management of these patients .Here we will review such fundamental issues as the need for a biopsy before surgery, the type of pancreatic anastomosis leading to better results, and the need for placement of drains after pancreatic surgery will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Obesity, autophagy and the pathogenesis of liver and pancreatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Aghajan, Mariam; Li, Ning; Karin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Liver and pancreatic cancers are both highly lethal diseases with limited to no therapeutic options for patients. Recent studies suggest that deregulated autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases by perturbing cellular homeostasis and laying the foundation for disease development. While accumulation of p62 upon impaired autophagy has been implicated in hepatocellular carcinoma, its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains less clear. This review will focus on recent studies illustrating the role of autophagy in liver and pancreatic cancers. The relationships between autophagy, nuclear factor-κB signaling and obesity in hepatocellular carcinoma will be discussed, as well as the dual role of autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-02

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  14. Road map for pain management in pancreatic cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lahoud, Marie José; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Antoun, Joelle; El Osta, Lana; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Beside its poor prognosis and its late diagnosis, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most painful malignancies. Optimal management of pain in this cancer represents a real challenge for the oncologist whose objective is to ensure a better quality of life to his patients. We aimed in this paper to review all the treatment modalities incriminated in the management of pain in pancreatic cancer going from painkillers, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and interventional techniques to agents under investigation and alternative medicine. Although specific guidelines and recommendations for pain management in pancreatic cancer are still absent, we present all the possible pain treatments, with a progression from medical multimodal treatment to radiotherapy and chemotherapy then interventional techniques in case of resistance. In addition, alternative methods such as acupuncture and hypnosis can be added at any stage and seems to contribute to pain relief. PMID:27574552

  15. Oncolytic viral therapy for pancreatic cancer: current research and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Justin W; Heffner, Jacqueline; Klein, Elizabeth; Fong, Yuman

    2014-01-01

    The development of targeted agents and chemotherapies for pancreatic cancer has only modestly affected clinical outcome and not changed 5-year survival. Fortunately the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer are being rapidly uncovered and are providing opportunities for novel targeted therapies. Oncolytic viral therapy is one of the most promising targeted agents for pancreatic cancer. This review will look at the current state of the development of these self-replicating nanoparticles in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27512661

  16. Phospholipase A2 as a point of care alternative to serum amylase and pancreatic lipase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Philips, Natalie; Khan, Shahid A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to serve as high lipase (n = 20), CA19-9 positive (n = 15), and healthy (n = 20) controls. sPLA2-IB concentration correlated well with the serum activity of both amylase and lipase, and performed at least as well as either markers in the differentiation of pancreatitis from controls.Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to

  17. CAR T-cell therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    DeSelm, Carl J; Tano, Zachary E; Varghese, Anna M; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2017-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy utilizes genetic engineering to redirect a patient's own T cells to target cancer cells. The remarkable results in hematological malignancies prompted investigating this approach in solid tumors such as pancreatic cancer. The complex tumor microenvironment, stromal hindrance in limiting immune response, and expression of checkpoint blockade on T cells pose hurdles. Herein, we summarize the opportunities, challenges, and state of knowledge in targeting pancreatic cancer with CAR T-cell therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Oncologic Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the early 1990s, its application has been extended to various diseases. For pancreatic cancer, EUS-FNA can obtain specimens from the tumor itself with fewer complications than other methods. Interventional EUS enables various therapeutic options: local ablation, brachytherapy, placement of fiducial markers for radiotherapy, and direct injection of antitumor agents into cancer. This paper will focus on EUS-guided oncologic therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23533319

  19. Vaccinia virus, a promising new therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Yaghchi, Chadwan; Zhang, Zhongxian; Alusi, Ghassan; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Wang, Yaohe

    2015-01-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients signifies a need for radically new therapeutic strategies. Tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses have emerged as attractive therapeutic candidates for cancer treatment due to their inherent ability to specifically target and lyse tumor cells as well as induce antitumor effects by multiple action mechanisms. Vaccinia virus has several inherent features that make it particularly suitable for use as an oncolytic agent. In this review, we will discuss the potential of vaccinia virus in the management of pancreatic cancer in light of our increased understanding of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in the disease process as well as our extending knowledge in the biology of vaccinia virus.

  20. Investigative approaches to the problem of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moossa, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    A prospective study of 134 patients suspected of having pancreatic cancer is reported. Ultrasonography and duodenal drainage studies are the best initial investigations. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytological examination is the test most likely to provide a definitive diagnosis. Arteriography is essential before laparotomy to delineate anomalies in the foregut vasculature. Pancreatic oncofetal antigen is the only tumour marker that is useful in diagnosis and in monitoring therapy. Images FIG. 5 FIG. 7 PMID:434747

  1. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  2. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Targeting GIPC/Synectin in Pancreatic Cancer Inhibits Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Muders, Michael H.; Vohra, Pawan K.; Dutta, Shamit K; Wang, Enfeng; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Wang, Ling; Udugamasooriya, D. Gomika; Memic, Adnan; Rupashinghe, Chamila N.; Baretton, Gustavo B.; Aust, Daniela E.; Langer, Silke; Datta, Kaustubh; Simons, Michael; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Translational Relevance The five year survival rate in patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is less than 4%. Accordingly, new targets for the treatment of this deadly disease are urgently needed. In this study, we show that targeting GAIP interacting protein C-terminal (GIPC, also known as Synectin) and its PDZ-domain reduces pancreatic cancer growth significantly in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the blockage of GIPC/Synectin was accompanied by a reduction of IGF-1R protein levels. In summary, the use of a GIPC-PDZ domain inhibitor may be a viable option in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in future. Purpose Various studies have demonstrated the importance of GAIP interacting protein, C-terminus (GIPC, also known as Synectin) as a central adaptor molecule in different signaling pathways and as an important mediator of receptor stability. GIPC/Synectin is associated with different growth promoting receptors like IGF-1R and integrins. These interactions were mediated through its PDZ domain. GIPC/Synectin has been shown to be overexpressed in pancreatic and breast cancer. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the importance of GIPC/Synectin in pancreatic cancer growth and to evaluate a possible therapeutic strategy by using a GIPC-PDZ domain inhibitor. Furthermore, the effect of targeting GIPC on the IGF-1 receptor as one of its associated receptors was tested. Experimental Design In vivo effects of GIPC/Synectin knockdown were studied after lentiviral transduction of luciferase-expressing pancreatic cancer cells with shRNA against GIPC/Synectin. Additionally, a GIPC-PDZ-targeting peptide was designed. This peptide was tested for its influence on pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Results Knockdown of GIPC/Synectin led to a significant inhibition of pancreatic adenocarcinoma growth in an orthotopic mouse model. Additionally, a cell-permeable GIPC-PDZ inhibitor was able to block tumor growth significantly without showing

  4. The pancreatic niche inhibits the effectiveness of sunitinib treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Guerrero, Pedro Enrique; Moreno, Mireia; José, Anabel; Iglesias, Mar; Munné-Collado, Jessica; Anta, Héctor; Gibert, Joan; Orozco, Carlos Alberto; Vinaixa, Judith; Fillat, Cristina; Viñals, Francesc; Navarro, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) are ineffective, making this the 4th leading cause of cancer deaths. Sunitinib is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of tyrosine kinase receptors mostly known for its anti-angiogenic effects. We tested the therapeutic effects of sunitinib in pancreatic cancer using the Ela-myc transgenic mouse model. We showed that Ela-myc pancreatic tumors express PDGFR and VEGFR in blood vessels and epithelial cells, rendering these tumors sensitive to sunitinib by more than only its anti-angiogenic activity. However, sunitinib treatment of Ela-myc mice with either early or advanced tumor progression had no impact on either survival or tumor burden. Further histopathological characterization of these tumors did not reveal differences in necrosis, cell differentiation, angiogenesis, apoptosis or proliferation. In stark contrast, in vitro sunitinib treatment of Ela-myc– derived cell lines showed high sensitivity to the drug, with increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation. Correspondingly, subcutaneous tumors generated from these cell lines completely regressed in vivo after sunitinib treatments. These data point at the pancreatic tumor microenvironment as the most likely barrier preventing sunitinib treatment efficiency in vivo. Combined treatments with drugs that disrupt tumor fibrosis may enhance sunitinib therapeutic effectiveness in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27374084

  5. Pancreatic cancer: New hopes after first line treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Francesca; Bertocchi, Paola; Savelli, Giordano; Rosso, Edoardo; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Extensive research has yielded advances in first-line treatment strategies, but there is no standardized second-line therapy. In this review, we examine the literature trying to establish a possible therapeutic algorithm. PMID:27672426

  6. Second line treatment options for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Passero, Frank C; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2017-08-18

    ABTRACT Introduction: Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) refractory to first-line therapy have a dismal prognosis and limited therapeutic options, with only one option consisting of nanoliposomal irinotecan in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid which was approved by FDA based upon results of the phase III NAPOLI-1 study. Areas covered: We performed a literature search for relevant published clinical trials, abstracts of trials in progress and ongoing or planned trials for the second line treatment of APC using Pubmed.com, ClinicalTrials.gov and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) abstract search as sources. We present an in-depth analysis of the phase I-III clinical trials determining the role and efficacy of second-line treatment in patients with APC. We also describe ongoing studies and rationale for future investigation. Expert opinion: Despite advances in first-line therapy such as gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel and FOLFIRINOX in APC, median overall survival remains less than 12 months, highlighting the need to develop second-line therapies. In order to establish much needed effective second-line treatment options, we need cooperative efforts among institutions and community practices in enrolling these refractory patients in clinical trials. It should be emphasized that in addition to chemotherapy options, all patients should have the opportunity to consult with nutritionist, social worker and palliative care health providers to assist with goals of care, symptom management and end of life discussions.

  7. Role of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, J D; Ghaneh, P; Kawesha, A; Neoptolemos, J P

    1997-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases are a family of proteolytic enzymes which normally have an important physiological role in tissue remodelling and wound healing, but more recently have been implicated in the proteolytic events which occur during tumour invasion. The expanding family of matrix metalloproteinases and the specific tissue inhibitors of the matrix metalloproteinases are reviewed including their classification, structure, function, regulation of activity, and tissue expression with particular reference to pancreatic cancer. The effect of synthetic matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors in preclinical studies is reviewed together with the results of ongoing clinical trials in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is associated with the overexpression of several matrix metalloproteinases with a reduced expression of their specific inhibitors. Orally bioavailable matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors have successfully completed phase I/II clinical trials with promising results. Multicentre randomised controlled phase IIb/III clinical trials aren currently under way in pancreatic cancer. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition may represent a novel approach to the management of pancreatic cancer not only in advanced disease, but in the adjuvant treatment setting following tumour resection either alone or in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. Inaugural Meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Kenner, Barbara J.; Fleshman, Julie M.; Goldberg, Ann E.; Rothschild, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations planned by Kenner Family Research Fund and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network was held on July 15–16, 2015, in New York City. The meeting was attended by 32 individuals from 20 nonprofit groups from the United States and Canada. The objectives of this inaugural convening were to share mission goals and initiatives, engage as leaders, cultivate potential partnerships, and increase participation in World Pancreatic Cancer Day. The program was designed to provide opportunities for informal conversations, as well as facilitated discussions to meet the stated objectives. At the conclusion of the meeting, the group agreed that enhancing collaboration and communication will result in a more unified approach within the field and will benefit individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As a first step, the group will actively collaborate to participate in World Pancreatic Cancer Day, which is planned for November 13, 2015, and seeks to raise the level of visibility about the disease globally. PMID:26465947

  9. Pancreatic cancer: systemic combination therapies for a heterogeneous disease.

    PubMed

    Melisi, Davide; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Frizziero, Melissa; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the only human malignancy for which patients' survival has not improved substantially during the past 30 years. Despite advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic carcinogenesis, current systemic treatments offer only a modest benefit in tumor-related symptoms and survival. Over the past decades, gemcitabine and its combination with other standard cytotoxic agents have been the reference treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer patients. The recent introduction of the three-drug combination regimen FOLFIRINOX or the new taxane nab-paclitaxel represent key advances for a better control of the disease. Novel agents targeting molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development and maintenance are currently under clinical investigation. This review describes the most important findings in the field of systemic combination therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We discuss the emerging evidences for the clinical activity of combination treatments with standard chemotherapy plus novel agents targeting tumor cell-autonomous and tumor microenvironment signaling pathways. We present some of the most important advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer and the emerging therapeutic targets to overcome this resistance.

  10. Germline mutations in Japanese familial pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Kubo, Emi; Ohmoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Masami; Hruban, Ralph H.; Okusaka, Takuji; Morizane, Chigusa; Furukawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Clinicopathologic and genetic features of familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) in Asian countries remain largely unknown. The main purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of FPC and to define causative FPC-predisposition genes in a Japanese cohort with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We reviewed 1,197 patients with a pathologically proven PDAC and found that 88 (7.3%) were FPC patients who had at least one first-degree relative with PDAC. There were no significant differences between the FPC cases and sporadic cases in terms of gender, age, tumor location, stage, family history of any cancer except PDAC, and personal history of smoking, other cancers, diabetes mellitus and chronic pancreatitis. In the FPC patients, we then investigated the prevalence of germline mutations in 21 genes associated with hereditary predispositions for pancreatic, breast and ovarian cancers by means of the next-generation sequencing using a custom multiple-gene panel. We found that eight (14.5%) of the 54 FPC patients with available germline DNA carried deleterious mutations in BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, or MLH1. These results indicate that a significant fraction of patients with PDAC in Japan have a family history of pancreatic cancer, and some of them harbor deleterious causative mutations in known FPC predisposition genes. PMID:27732944

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2009-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is a malignant disease with almost equal incidence and mortality. Effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are still urgently needed to improve its survival rate. With advances in structural and functional genomics, recent work has focused on targeted molecular therapy using monoclonal antibodies. This review summarizes the target molecules on the tumor cell surface and normal tissue stroma, which are related to pancreatic cancer oncogenesis, tumor growth or resistance to chemotherapy, as well as molecules involved in regulating inflammation and host immunoresponses. Targeted molecules include cell-surface receptors, such as the EGF receptor, HER2, death receptor 5 and IGF-1 receptor. Effects of monoclonal antibodies against these target molecules alone or in combination with chemotherapy, small-molecule signal transduction inhibitors, or radiation therapy are also discussed. Also discussed are the use of toxin or radioisotope conjugates, and information relating to the use of these targeting agents in pancreatic cancer clinical trials. Although targeted molecular therapy with monoclonal antibodies has made some progress in pancreatic cancer treatment, especially in preclinical studies, its clinical application to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients requires further investigation. PMID:20046965

  12. Potentials of interferon therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Booy, Stephanie; Hofland, Leo; van Eijck, Casper

    2015-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. To improve survival for patients with pancreatic cancer, research has focused on other treatment modalities like adding biological modulators such as type-I interferons (IFNs). Type I IFNs (ie, IFN-α/IFN-β) have antiproliferative, antiviral, and immunoregulatory activities. Furthermore, they are able to induce apoptosis, exert cell cycle blocking, and sensitize tumor cells for chemo- and radiotherapy. A few years ago in vitro, in vivo, and several clinical trials have been described regarding adjuvant IFN-α therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Some studies reported a remarkable increase in the 2- and 5-year survival. Unfortunately, the only randomized clinical trial did not show a significant increase in overall survival, although the increased median survival implicated that some patients in the experimental group benefited from the adjuvant IFN-α therapy. Furthermore, encouraging in vitro and in vivo data points to a possible role for adjuvant IFN therapy. However, up till now, the use of IFNs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer remains controversial. This review, therefore, aims to describe, based on the available data, whether there is a distinct role for IFN therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Impact of Metformin on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Survival: Too Little, Too Late?