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Sample records for pancreatic duct cell

  1. Pancreatic duct cells as a source of VEGF in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Guo, Ping; El-Gohary, Yousef; Fischbach, Shane; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iljana; Shiota, Chiyo; Gittes, George K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for proper pancreatic development, islet vascularisation and insulin secretion. In the adult pancreas, VEGF is thought to be predominantly secreted by beta cells. Although human duct cells have previously been shown to secrete VEGF at angiogenic levels in culture, an analysis of the kinetics of VEGF synthesis and secretion, as well as elucidation of an in vivo role for this ductal VEGF in affecting islet function and physiology, has been lacking. Methods We analysed purified duct cells independently prepared by flow cytometry, surgical isolation or laser-capture microdissection. We infected duct cells in vivo with Vegfa short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in an intrapancreatic ductal infusion system and examined the effect of VEGF knockdown in duct cells in vitro and in vivo. Results Pancreatic duct cells express high levels of Vegfa mRNA. Compared with beta cells, duct cells had a much higher ratio of secreted to intracellular VEGF. As a bioassay, formation of tubular structures by human umbilical vein endothelial cells was essentially undetectable when cultured alone and was substantially increased when co-cultured with pancreatic duct cells but significantly reduced when co-cultured with duct cells pretreated with Vegfa shRNA. Compared with islets transplanted alone, improved vascularisation and function was detected in the islets co-transplanted with duct cells but not in islets co-transplanted with duct cells pretreated with Vegfa shRNA. Conclusions/interpretation Human islet preparations for transplantation typically contain some contaminating duct cells and our findings suggest that the presence of duct cells in the islet preparation may improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:24535231

  2. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K(+) channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K(+) channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa 3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa 1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv 7.1), KCNH2 (Kv 11.1), KCNH5 (Kv 10.2), KCNT1 (KCa 4.1), KCNT2 (KCa 4.2), and KCNK5 (K 2P 5.1). We will give an overview of K(+) channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K(+) channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K(+) channels may be of importance.

  3. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  4. Intermediate endocrine-acinar pancreatic cells in duct ligation conditions.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, E; Bendayan, M

    1997-11-01

    When tissues were subjected to 24 h of duct ligation, intermediate pancreatic cells simultaneously displaying endocrine and exocrine phenotypes appeared. Immunocytochemistry by laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed the appearance of a large number of these cells coexpressing insulin and amylase. These cells were located within the islets of Langerhans as well as in the acinar parenchyma. They were also detected in a culture system of isolated pancreatic cells. With the use of immunoelectron microscopy, two types of secretory granules were identified in these cells. One was insulin immunoreactive, whereas the other, resembling zymogen granules, contained amylase. Occasionally, some small granules displayed a double labeling for both secretory proteins. Numerous crinophagic bodies and autophagosomes containing insulin and/or amylase were also present. In situ hybridization, applied with the specific probes, confirmed the presence of both insulin and amylase mRNAs in these cells. Because duct ligation is known to induce insulin cell proliferation, the present results confirm that endocrine-acinar cells do appear in such condition and may represent intermediate steps in a transdifferentiating process.

  5. Zebrafish sox9b is crucial for hepatopancreatic duct development and pancreatic endocrine cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Manfroid, Isabelle; Ghaye, Aurelie; Naye, François; Detry, Nathalie; Palm, Sarah; Pan, Luyuan; Ma, Taylur P.; Huang, Wei; Rovira, Meritxell; Martial, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael J.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Voz, Marianne L.; Peers, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Recent zebrafish studies have shown that the late appearing pancreatic endocrine cells derive from pancreatic ducts but the regulatory factors involved are still largely unknown. Here, we show that the zebrafish sox9b gene is expressed in pancreatic ducts where it labels the pancreatic Notch-responsive cells previously shown to be progenitors. Inactivation of sox9b disturbs duct formation and impairs regeneration of beta cells from these ducts in larvae. sox9b expression in the midtrunk endoderm appears at the junction of the hepatic and ventral pancreatic buds and, by the end of embryogenesis, labels the hepatopancreatic ductal system as well as the intrapancreatic and intrahepatic ducts. Ductal morphogenesis and differentiation are specifically disrupted in sox9b mutants, with the dysmorphic hepatopancreatic ducts containing misdifferentiated hepatocyte-like and pancreatic-like cells. We also show that maintenance of sox9b expression in the extrapancreatic and intrapancreatic ducts requires FGF and Notch activity, respectively, both pathways known to prevent excessive endocrine differentiation in these ducts. Furthermore, beta cell recovery after specific ablation is severely compromised in sox9b mutant larvae. Our data position sox9b as a key player in the generation of secondary endocrine cells deriving from pancreatic ducts in zebrafish. PMID:22537488

  6. Zebrafish sox9b is crucial for hepatopancreatic duct development and pancreatic endocrine cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Manfroid, Isabelle; Ghaye, Aurélie; Naye, François; Detry, Nathalie; Palm, Sarah; Pan, Luyuan; Ma, Taylur P; Huang, Wei; Rovira, Meritxell; Martial, Joseph A; Parsons, Michael J; Moens, Cecilia B; Voz, Marianne L; Peers, Bernard

    2012-06-15

    Recent zebrafish studies have shown that the late appearing pancreatic endocrine cells are derived from pancreatic ducts but the regulatory factors involved are still largely unknown. Here, we show that the zebrafish sox9b gene is expressed in pancreatic ducts where it labels the pancreatic Notch-responsive cells previously shown to be progenitors. Inactivation of sox9b disturbs duct formation and impairs regeneration of beta cells from these ducts in larvae. sox9b expression in the midtrunk endoderm appears at the junction of the hepatic and ventral pancreatic buds and, by the end of embryogenesis, labels the hepatopancreatic ductal system as well as the intrapancreatic and intrahepatic ducts. Ductal morphogenesis and differentiation are specifically disrupted in sox9b mutants, with the dysmorphic hepatopancreatic ducts containing misdifferentiated hepatocyte-like and pancreatic-like cells. We also show that maintenance of sox9b expression in the extrapancreatic and intrapancreatic ducts requires FGF and Notch activity, respectively, both pathways known to prevent excessive endocrine differentiation in these ducts. Furthermore, beta cell recovery after specific ablation is severely compromised in sox9b mutant larvae. Our data position sox9b as a key player in the generation of secondary endocrine cells deriving from pancreatic ducts in zebrafish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Subcellular Fractionation Enhances Proteome Coverage of Pancreatic Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Kadiyala, Vivek; Ghoulidi, Ali; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Subcellular fractionation of whole cell lysates offers a means of simplifying protein mixtures, potentially permitting greater depth of proteomic analysis. Here we compare proteins identified from pancreatic duct cells (PaDC) following organelle enrichment to those identified from PaDC whole cell lysates to determine if the additional procedures of subcellular fractionation increases proteome coverage. Methods We used differential centrifugation to enrich for nuclear, mitochondrial, membrane, and cytosolic proteins. We then compared - via mass spectrometry-based analysis - the number of proteins identified from these four fractions with four biological replicates of PaDC whole cell lysates. Results We identified similar numbers of proteins among all samples investigated. In total, 1658 non-redundant proteins were identified in the replicate samples, while 2196 were identified in the subcellular fractionation samples, corresponding to a 30% increase. Additionally, we noted that each organelle fraction was in fact enriched with proteins specific to the targeted organelle. Conclusions Subcellular fractionation of PaDC resulted in greater proteome coverage compared to PaDC whole cell lysate analysis. Although more labor intensive and time consuming, subcellular fractionation provides greater proteome coverage, and enriches for compartmentalized sub-populations of proteins. Application of this subcellular fractionation strategy allows for a greater depth of proteomic analysis and thus a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic disease. PMID:23352835

  8. Pancreatic ducts as an important route of tumor extension for acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ban, Daisuke; Shimada, Kazuaki; Sekine, Shigeki; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2010-07-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the pancreas is very rare, which usually grows expansively. Recently, a variant of ACC with predominant growth in the pancreatic ducts has been proposed, and is speculated to have potentially less aggressive behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate how the pancreatic duct system is related to the growth and extension of ACC. We reviewed the detailed gross and histologic features of 13 cases of ACC, of which 7 (54%) showed intraductal polypoid growth (IPG) of the tumor in the large pancreatic ducts with a mean IPG length of 24.8 mm. Tumors with IPG were found to spread characteristically along the pancreatic ducts as extending polypoid projections, filling the ducts and destroying the duct walls, although tumors did not tend to extend beyond the pancreatic parenchyma. Comparison of the clinicopathologic characteristics showed that ACC with IPG had less infiltrative features including lymphatic, venous, and neural invasion, formation of tumor thrombus in the portal vein, nodal metastasis, and invasion beyond the pancreas to the surrounding organs; death in only 1 case (14%) of ACC with IPG was the result of ACC itself. In contrast, ACC without IPG frequently showed more infiltrative growth, and was the cause of death in 50% of patients with this type of tumor. Intraductal dissemination of ACC in pancreatic ducts was proven in 1 case of ACC with IPG. These findings suggest that a significant proportion of ACC shows IPG, which is potentially linked to less aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics.

  9. Intraislet Pancreatic Ducts Can Give Rise to Insulin-Positive Cells.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Yousef; Wiersch, John; Tulachan, Sidhartha; Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Rymer, Christopher; Fischbach, Shane; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Gaffar, Iljana; Song, Zewen; Galambos, Csaba; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2016-01-01

    A key question in diabetes research is whether new β-cells can be derived from endogenous, nonendocrine cells. The potential for pancreatic ductal cells to convert into β-cells is a highly debated issue. To date, it remains unclear what anatomical process would result in duct-derived cells coming to exist within preexisting islets. We used a whole-mount technique to directly visualize the pancreatic ductal network in young wild-type mice, young humans, and wild-type and transgenic mice after partial pancreatectomy. Pancreatic ductal networks, originating from the main ductal tree, were found to reside deep within islets in young mice and humans but not in mature mice or humans. These networks were also not present in normal adult mice after partial pancreatectomy, but TGF-β receptor mutant mice demonstrated formation of these intraislet duct structures after partial pancreatectomy. Genetic and viral lineage tracings were used to determine whether endocrine cells were derived from pancreatic ducts. Lineage tracing confirmed that pancreatic ductal cells can typically convert into new β-cells in normal young developing mice as well as in adult TGF-β signaling mutant mice after partial pancreatectomy. Here the direct visual evidence of ducts growing into islets, along with lineage tracing, not only represents strong evidence for duct cells giving rise to β-cells in the postnatal pancreas but also importantly implicates TGF-β signaling in this process.

  10. Specific transduction and labeling of pancreatic ducts by targeted recombinant viral infusion into mouse pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Xiao, Xiangwei; El-Gohary, Yousef; Criscimanna, Angela; Prasadan, Krishna; Rymer, Christopher; Shiota, Chiyo; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iliana; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2013-11-01

    Specific labeling of pancreatic ducts has proven to be quite difficult. Such labeling has been highly sought after because of the power it would confer to studies of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis, as well as studies of the source of new insulin-producing β-cells. Cre-loxp recombination could, in theory, lineage-tag pancreatic ducts, but results have been conflicting, mainly due to low labeling efficiencies. Here, we achieved a high pancreatic duct labeling efficiency using a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) with a duct-specific sox9 promoter infused into the mouse common biliary/pancreatic duct. We saw rapid, diffuse duct-specific labeling, with 50 and 89% labeling in the pancreatic tail and head region, respectively. This highly specific labeling of ducts should greatly enhance our ability to study the role of pancreatic ducts in numerous aspects of pancreatic growth, development and function.

  11. Plasticity of Adult Human Pancreatic Duct Cells by Neurogenin3-Mediated Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bonné, Stefan; Heremans, Yves; Borup, Rehannah; Van de Casteele, Mark; Ling, Zhidong; Pipeleers, Daniel; Ravassard, Philippe; Nielsen, Finn; Ferrer, Jorge; Heimberg, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3). In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. Methods The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. Results Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. Conclusions/Interpretation The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes. PMID:22606327

  12. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Menter, David G.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G. . E-mail: sa08366@wotan.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells.

  13. Characterization of pancreatic stem cells derived from adult human pancreas ducts by fluorescence activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han-Tso; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Ho, Larry L-T; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Ku, Hung-Hai

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To isolate putative pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) from human adult tissues of pancreas duct using serum-free, conditioned medium. The characterization of surface phenotype of these PSCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. The potential for pancreatic lineage and the capability of β-cell differentiation in these PSCs were evaluated as well. METHODS: By using serum-free medium supplemented with essential growth factors, we attempted to isolate the putative PSCs which has been reported to express nestin and pdx-1. The Matrigel™ was employed to evaluate the differential capacity of isolated cells. Dithizone staining, insulin content/secretion measurement, and immunohistochemistry staining were used to monitor the differentiation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to detect the phenotypic markers of putative PSCs. RESULTS: A monolayer of spindle-like cells was cultivated. The putative PSCs expressed pdx-1 and nestin. They were also able to differentiate into insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-positive cells. The spectrum of phenotypic markers in PSCs was investigated; a similarity was revealed when using human bone marrow-derived stem cells as the comparative experiment, such as CD29, CD44, CD49, CD50, CD51, CD62E, PDGFR-α, CD73 (SH2), CD81, CD105(SH3). CONCLUSION: In this study, we successfully isolated PSCs from adult human pancreatic duct by using serum-free medium. These PSCs not only expressed nestin and pdx-1 but also exhibited markers attributable to mesenchymal stem cells. Although work is needed to elucidate the role of these cells, the application of these PSCs might be therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:16874866

  14. Localization of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (CD26) to human pancreatic ducts and islet alpha cells.

    PubMed

    Augstein, Petra; Naselli, Gaetano; Loudovaris, Thomas; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Campbell, Peter; Bandala-Sanchez, Esther; Rogers, Kelly; Heinke, Peter; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W; Harrison, Leonard C

    2015-12-01

    DPP-4/CD26 degrades the incretins GLP-1 and GIP. The localization of DPP-4 within the human pancreas is not well documented but is likely to be relevant for understanding incretin function. We aimed to define the cellular localization of DPP-4 in the human pancreas from cadaveric organ donors with and without diabetes. Pancreas was snap-frozen and immunoreactive DPP-4 detected in cryosections using the APAAP technique. For co-localization studies, pancreas sections were double-stained for DPP-4 and proinsulin or glucagon and scanned by confocal microscopy. Pancreata were digested and cells in islets and in islet-depleted, duct-enriched digests analyzed for expression of DPP-4 and other markers by flow cytometry. DPP-4 was expressed by pancreatic duct and islet cells. In pancreata from donors without diabetes or with type 2 diabetes, DPP-4-positive cells in islets had the same location and morphology as glucagon-positive cells, and the expression of DPP-4 and glucagon overlapped. In donors with type 1 diabetes, the majority of residual cells in islets were DPP-4-positive. In the human pancreas, DPP-4 expression is localized to duct and alpha cells. This finding is consistent with the view that DPP-4 regulates exposure to incretins of duct cells directly and of beta cells indirectly in a paracrine manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A NOVEL GENE DELIVERY METHOD TRANSDUCES PORCINE PANCREATIC DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle A.; Restrepo, M. Santiago; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Wallen, Tanner; Buchanan, Elizabeth; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Chen, Yong Hong; McCray, Paul B.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Divekar, Abhay; Uc, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy offers the possibility to treat pancreatic disease in Cystic Fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene; however gene transfer to the pancreas is untested in humans. The pancreatic disease phenotype is very similar between humans and pigs with CF, thus CF pigs create an excellent opportunity to study gene transfer to the pancreas. There are no studies showing efficient transduction of pig pancreas with gene transfer vectors. Our objective is to develop a safe and efficient method to transduce wild-type (WT) porcine pancreatic ducts that express CFTR. We catheterized the umbilical artery of WT newborn pigs and delivered an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector expressing green fluorescent protein (AAV9CMV.sceGFP) or vehicle to the celiac artery, the vessel that supplies major branches to the pancreas. This technique resulted in stable and dose-dependent transduction of pancreatic duct epithelial cells that expressed CFTR. Intravenous injection of AAV9CMV.sceGFP did not transduce the pancreas. Our technique offers an opportunity to deliver the CFTR gene to the pancreas of CF pigs. The celiac artery can be accessed via umbilical artery in newborns and via femoral artery at older ages; delivery approaches which can be translated to humans. PMID:24257348

  16. A novel gene delivery method transduces porcine pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M A; Restrepo, M S; Abu-El-Haija, M; Wallen, T; Buchanan, E; Rokhlina, T; Chen, Y H; McCray, P B; Davidson, B L; Divekar, A; Uc, A

    2014-02-01

    Gene therapy offers the possibility to treat pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene; however, gene transfer to the pancreas is untested in humans. The pancreatic disease phenotype is very similar between humans and pigs with CF; thus, CF pigs create an excellent opportunity to study gene transfer to the pancreas. There are no studies showing efficient transduction of pig pancreas with gene-transfer vectors. Our objective is to develop a safe and efficient method to transduce wild-type (WT) porcine pancreatic ducts that express CFTR. We catheterized the umbilical artery of WT newborn pigs and delivered an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector expressing green-fluorescent protein (AAV9CMV.sceGFP) or vehicle to the celiac artery, the vessel that supplies major branches to the pancreas. This technique resulted in stable and dose-dependent transduction of pancreatic duct epithelial cells that expressed CFTR. Intravenous (IV) injection of AAV9CMV.sceGFP did not transduce the pancreas. Our technique offers an opportunity to deliver the CFTR gene to the pancreas of CF pigs. The celiac artery can be accessed via the umbilical artery in newborns and via the femoral artery at older ages--delivery approaches that can be translated to humans.

  17. Ascariasis of the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Klimovskij, Michail; Dulskas, Audrius; Kraulyte, Zita; Mikalauskas, Saulius

    2015-09-15

    Ascariasis is a common helminthic disease worldwide, although Lithuania and other European countries are not considered endemic areas. The presence of the Ascaris worm in the biliary tree causes choledocholithiasis-like symptoms. We report a case of pancreatic duct ascariasis causing such symptoms. A 73-year-old Lithuanian woman underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suspecting choledocholithiasis. Contrast injection into the common bile duct demonstrated a slightly dilated biliary tree without any filling defects, and the tail of an Ascaris worm protruding from the opening of the papilla Vater. The worm was captured by a snare but escaped deep into the duct. After a small wirsungotomy the worm was retrieved from the pancreatic duct. The patient received a 150 mg dose of levamisole orally repeated 7 days later and was discharged after complete resolution of symptoms. This first reported sporadic case of pancreatic duct ascariasis in Lithuania was successfully treated with ERCP and Levamisole.

  18. Isolated Pancreatic Uncinate Duct IPMN.

    PubMed

    Maker, Ajay V; Maker, Vijay K

    2017-04-01

    The ventral pancreas originally forms as an evagination of the common bile duct at 32 days gestation and its duct, the uncinate duct, eventually rotates with the ventral anlage to join the dorsal pancreas and fuse with the main pancreatic duct. Thus, though often considered a "branch" duct of the pancreas, embryologically, the uncinate duct is the "main" pancreatic duct of the ventral pancreas. This concept is not fully addressed in the current definitions of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMN) where international consensus guidelines consider the main-duct IPMN as high risk for malignancy and most small branch-duct IPMN as low risk for malignancy. Thus, it is important to recognize that isolated uncinate-duct IPMN can occur and, based on its embryologic origin and increased association with high-grade dysplasia and invasive cancer, may be managed conceptually as a main duct type of disease rather than a branch duct until better biomarkers of malignancy are discovered. The images provide an example of this unique disease process.

  19. Reconstituting development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia from primary human pancreas duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonghyeob; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Gu, Xueying; Wang, Jing; Flowers, Brittany M.; Kim, Yoo Jung; Park, Sangbin; Szot, Gregory L.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Longacre, Teri A.; Kim, Seung K.

    2017-01-01

    Development of systems that reconstitute hallmark features of human pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), the precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, could generate new strategies for early diagnosis and intervention. However, human cell-based PanIN models with defined mutations are unavailable. Here, we report that genetic modification of primary human pancreatic cells leads to development of lesions resembling native human PanINs. Primary human pancreas duct cells harbouring oncogenic KRAS and induced mutations in CDKN2A, SMAD4 and TP53 expand in vitro as epithelial spheres. After pancreatic transplantation, mutant clones form lesions histologically similar to native PanINs, including prominent stromal responses. Gene expression profiling reveals molecular similarities of mutant clones with native PanINs, and identifies potential PanIN biomarker candidates including Neuromedin U, a circulating peptide hormone. Prospective reconstitution of human PanIN development from primary cells provides experimental opportunities to investigate pancreas cancer development, progression and early-stage detection. PMID:28272465

  20. Characterization of vectorial chloride transport pathways in the human pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma cell line HPAF.

    PubMed

    Fong, Peying; Argent, Barry E; Guggino, William B; Gray, Michael A

    2003-08-01

    Pancreatic duct cells express a Ca2+-activated Cl- conductance (CaCC), upregulation of which may be beneficial to patients with cystic fibrosis. Here, we report that HPAF, a human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line that expresses CaCC, develops into a high-resistance, anion-secreting epithelium. Mucosal ATP (50 microM) caused a fourfold increase in short-circuit current (Isc), a hyperpolarization of transepithelial potential difference (from -4.9 +/- 0.73 to -8.5 +/- 0.84 mV), and a fall in resistance to less than one-half of resting values. The effects of ATP were inhibited by mucosal niflumic acid (100 microM), implicating an apical CaCC in the response. RT-PCR indicated expression of hClC-2, hClC-3, and hClC-5, but surprisingly not hCLCA-1 or hCLCA-2. K+ channel activity was necessary to maintain the ATP-stimulated Isc. Using a pharmacological approach, we found evidence for two types of K+ channels in the mucosal and serosal membranes of HPAF cells, one activated by chlorzoxazone (500 microM) and sensitive to clotrimazole (30 microM), as well as one blocked by clofilium (100 microM) but not chromanol 293B (5 microM). RT-PCR indicated expression of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCNN4, as well as the acid-sensitive, four transmembrane domain, two pore K+ channel, KCNK5 (hTASK-2). Western blot analysis verified the expression of CLC channels, as well as KCNK5. We conclude that HPAF will be a useful model system for studying channels pertinent to anion secretion in human pancreatic duct cells.

  1. Posttraumatic pancreatic fistula cured by endoprosthesis in the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Fabre, J M; Bauret, P; Prudhomme, M; Quenet, F; Noel, P; Baumel, H; Michel, H; Domergue, J

    1995-05-01

    We report a case of pancreatic fistula attributable to posttraumatic rupture of the main duct that was undiagnosed before ERCP and was cured instantaneously by endoscopic placement of an endoprosthesis in the pancreatic duct after failure of conventional medical treatment.

  2. Duct Cells Contribute to Regeneration of Endocrine and Acinar Cells Following Pancreatic Damage in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    CRISCIMANNA, ANGELA; SPEICHER, JULIE A.; HOUSHMAND, GOLBAHAR; SHIOTA, CHIYO; PRASADAN, KRISHNA; Ji, BAOAN; LOGSDON, CRAIG D.; GITTES, GEORGE K.; ESNI, FARZAD

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS There have been conflicting results on a cell of origin in pancreatic regeneration. These discrepancies predominantly stem from lack of specific markers for the pancreatic precursors/stem cells, as well as differences in the targeted cells and severity of tissue injury in the experimental models so far proposed. We attempted to create a model that used diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) to ablate specific cell populations, control the extent of injury, and avoid induction of the inflammatory response. METHODS To target specific types of pancreatic cells, we crossed R26DTR or R26dtR/lacZ mice with transgenic mice that express the Cre recombinase in the pancreas, under control of the Pdx1 (global pancreatic) or elastase (acinar-specific) promoters. RESULTS Exposure of PdxCre;R26DTR mice to diphtheria toxin resulted in extensive ablation of acinar and endocrine tissues but not ductal cells. Surviving cells within the ductal compartment contributed to regeneration of endocrine and acinar cells via recapitulation of the embryonic pancreatic developmental program. However, following selective ablation of acinar tissue in ElaCre-ERT2;R26DTR mice, regeneration likely occurred by reprogramming of ductal cells to acinar lineage. CONCLUSIONS In the pancreas of adult mice, epithelial cells within the ductal compartment contribute to regeneration of endocrine and acinar cells. The severity of injury determines the regenerative mechanisms and cell types that contribute to this process. PMID:21763240

  3. Circumportal pancreas with retroportal main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Ross, Andrew S; Traverso, L William

    2009-08-01

    There have been 6 cases of circumportal pancreas reported, and 2 of them had the main pancreatic duct in a retroportal dorsal portion. This extremely uncommon anomaly is asymptomatic and therefore incidentally discovered. For the surgeon, it is important to discover this during pancreatic resection so the pancreatic duct can be closed and fistula is avoided. We describe the third case where a circumportal pancreas had its main pancreatic duct passing under the portal vein. The duct was identified and ligated. A fistula did not occur.

  4. Effects of chronic nicotine on the autocrine regulation of pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic duct epithelial cells by stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2012-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a mortality rate near 100%. Smoking is a documented risk factor. However, the mechanisms of smoking-associated pancreatic carcinogenesis are poorly understood. We have shown that binding of nicotine to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressing subunits α7, α3 and α5 in PDAC and pancreatic duct epithelial cells in vitro triggered the production of the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline by these cells. In turn, this autocrine catecholamine loop significantly stimulated cell proliferation via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-dependent signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors. However, the observed responses only represent acute cellular reactions to single doses of nicotine whereas nicotine exposure in smokers is chronic. Using the PDAC cell lines BxPC-3 and Panc-1 and immortalized pancreatic duct epithelial cell line HPDE6-C7, our current experiments reveal a significant sensitization of the nAChR-driven autocrine catecholamine regulatory loop in cells pre-exposed to nicotine for 7 days. The resulting increase in catecholamine production was associated with significant inductions in the phosphorylation of signaling proteins ERK, CREB, Src and AKT, upregulated protein expression of nAChR subunits α3, α4, α5 and α7 and increased responsiveness to nicotine in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and cell migration assays. All three cell lines produced the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, an activity inhibited by gene knockdown of the α4β2nAChR and suppressed by chronic nicotine via receptor desensitization. All of the observed adverse effects of chronic nicotine were reversed by treatment of the cells with γ-aminobutyric acid, suggesting the potential usefulness of this agent for the improvement of PDAC intervention strategies in smokers.

  5. Ion transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, and purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular, purinergic receptors, and determine their effects on ion transport. Human adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 cells were grown on permeable supports and set in Ussing chambers for electrophysiological recordings. Transepithelial voltage (Vte), resistance, and short-circuit currents (Isc) were measured in response to agonists. Secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), acetylcholine, forskolin, ionomycin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl ATP, and adenosine induced lumen negative Vte and Isc. These changes were consistent with anion secretion, as verified in forskolin-stimulated preparations. Extracellular nucleotides, ATP, and UTP, applied from luminal and basolateral sides, caused largest responses: Vte increased up to -5 mV, Isc increased to 20 to 30 μA/cm, and resistance decreased by up to 200 Ω·cm. Transepithelial transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, adenosine, and purinergic P2 receptors; and this human model has a good potential for studies of physiology and pathophysiology of pancreatic duct ion transport.

  6. An intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel is important for secretion in pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Wang, Jing; Hede, Susanne E; Novak, Ivana

    2012-07-15

    Potassium channels play a vital role in maintaining the membrane potential and the driving force for anion secretion in epithelia. In pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, the identity of K(+) channels has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of functional K(+) channels in rodent and human pancreatic ducts (Capan-1, PANC-1, and CFPAC-1) using molecular and electrophysiological techniques. RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs for KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNH5, KCNT1, and KCNT2, as well as KCNN4 coding for the following channels: KVLQT1; HERG; EAG2; Slack; Slick; and an intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (IK) channel (K(Ca)3.1). The following functional studies were focused on the IK channel. 5,6-Dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-one (DC-EBIO), an activator of IK channel, increased equivalent short-circuit current (I(sc)) in Capan-1 monolayer, consistent with a secretory response. Clotrimazole, a blocker of IK channel, inhibited I(sc). IK channel blockers depolarized the membrane potential of cells in microperfused ducts dissected from rodent pancreas. Cell-attached patch-clamp single-channel recordings revealed IK channels with an average conductance of 80 pS in freshly isolated rodent duct cells. These results indicated that the IK channels may, at least in part, be involved in setting the resting membrane potential. Furthermore, the IK channels are involved in anion and potassium transport in stimulated pancreatic ducts.

  7. Pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells express an autocrine catecholamine loop that is activated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors α3, α5, and α7.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in developed countries. Smoking is an established risk factor for this malignancy but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous reports have provided evidence that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) and beta adrenergic receptors (β-AR) stimulate the growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. However, a potential cooperation of these two receptor families in the regulation of pancreatic cancer has not been studied to date. Using two pancreatic cancer cell lines and immortalized pancreatic duct epithelia in vitro, our current data show that all three cell lines synthesized and released the catecholamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline upon exposure to nicotine and that this activity was regulated by α3, α5, and α7-nAChRs. In accordance with the established function of these catecholamines as β-AR agonists, nicotine-induced cell proliferation was blocked by the β-AR antagonist propranolol. Nicotine-induced proliferation was also abolished by the α7-nAChR antagonist α-bungarotoxin, whereas catecholamine production in response to nicotine was blocked by gene knockdown of the α3, α5, and α7-nAChRs. The nicotinic agonists acetylcholine, nicotine, and its nitrosated carcinogenic derivative NNK induced the phosphorylation of CREB, ERK, Src, and AKT and these responses were inhibited by propranolol. Our findings identify this hitherto unknown autocrine catecholamine loop as an important regulatory cascade in pancreatic cancer that may prove a promising new target for cancer intervention. ©2011 AACR.

  8. Purified Human Pancreatic Duct Cell Culture Conditions Defined by Serum-Free High-Content Growth Factor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hoesli, Corinne A.; Johnson, James D.; Piret, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of pancreatic duct-like CK19+ cells has implications for multiple disease states including pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. The in vitro study of this important cell type has been hampered by their limited expansion compared to fibroblast-like vimentin+ cells that overgrow primary cultures. We aimed to develop a screening platform for duct cell mitogens after depletion of the vimentin+ population. The CD90 cell surface marker was used to remove the vimentin+ cells from islet-depleted human pancreas cell cultures by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Cell sorting decreased CD90+ cell contamination of the cultures from 34±20% to 1.3±0.6%, yielding purified CK19+ cultures with epithelial morphology. A full-factorial experimental design was then applied to test the mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF, KGF and VEGF. After 6 days in test conditions, the cells were labelled with BrdU, stained and analyzed by high-throughput imaging. This screening assay confirmed the expected mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF on CK19+ cells and additionally revealed interactions between these factors and VEGF. A serum-free medium containing bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF led to CK19+ cell expansion comparable to the addition of 10% serum. The methods developed in this work should advance pancreatic cancer and diabetes research by providing effective cell culture and high-throughput screening platforms to study purified primary pancreatic CK19+ cells. PMID:22442738

  9. Measurement of intracellular pH in pancreatic duct cells: a new method for calibrating the fluorescence data.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Gray, Mike A; Argent, Barry E

    2004-05-01

    Pancreatic duct cells secrete the bicarbonate ions found in pancreatic juice. Impairment of ductal bicarbonate secretion, as occurs in cystic fibrosis, has serious consequences for pancreatic function and for the structural integrity of the gland. As bicarbonate is a buffer ion, the accurate measurement of intracellular pH (pHi) in duct cells is an important technique for studying the mechanisms of bicarbonate transport. Commonly, pHi is measured using the fluorescent dye biscarboxyethylcarboxyfluorescein (BCECF). The purpose of this study was to develop a new technique for the accurate calibration of BCECF fluorescent signals. Our results indicate that BCECF fluorescence is not only dependent on pHi but also on the total fluorescence intensity of the detected area (which may be influenced by dye loading, dye leakage, and the shutter size on the photomultiplier). The outcome is that one calibration curve is not sufficient for accurate determination of pHi. In fact, an appropriate calibration curve must be selected for each individual experiment. Moreover, the calibration plot is only linear over a narrow range of pHi values. In conclusion, we have developed a new technique that should be applicable to all cell types for the accurate calibration of fluorescent signals from the pH-sensitive dye BCECF.

  10. Uridine triphosphate increases proliferation of human cancerous pancreatic duct epithelial cells by activating P2Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hun; Ji, Young Geon; Lee, Dong Hyeon

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of uridine triphosphate (UTP) on the proliferation of human cancerous pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Proliferation was measured by immunoassay for bromodeoxyuridine incorporation into the pancreatic cell line PANC-1. Effect of UTP was assayed using selective P2 agonist and antagonist, small interfering RNA, intracellular signal inhibitors, and Western blot. Incubation of PANC-1 cells with UTP or MRS2768, a selective P2Y2 receptor agonist, resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase of proliferation. The messenger RNA transcript and protein of P2Y2 receptor were expressed in PANC-1 cells. P2 receptor antagonist suramin and small interfering RNA against P2Y2 receptor significantly decreased the proliferative effect of UTP and MRS2768. Activation of P2Y2 receptor by UTP transduced to phospholipase C, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), and protein kinase C. Uridine triphosphate-induced proliferation was mediated by protein kinase D, Src-family tyrosine kinase, Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, and phospholipase D. Uridine triphosphate increased phosphorylation of Akt through protein kinase C, Src-family tyrosine kinase, Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and PI3K. Uridine triphosphate increases proliferation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells by activation of P2Y2 receptor and PI3K/Akt pathway. This could be helpful for discovering the long-term roles of P2Y2 receptor in pancreatic cells.

  11. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  12. Efficient β-cell regeneration by a combination of neogenesis and replication following β-cell ablation and reversal of pancreatic duct ligation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ergeng; Lee, Seung-Hee; Levine, Fred

    2013-11-01

    Achieving efficient β-cell regeneration is a major goal of diabetes research. Previously, we found that a combination of β-cell ablation and pancreatic duct ligation led to β-cell regeneration by direct conversion from α-cells. Here, we studied the effect of surgical reversal of the duct ligation, finding that there was a wave of β-cell replication following reversal. The combination of β-cell neogenesis prior to reversal of the duct ligation and β-cell replication following reversal resulted in efficient β-cell regeneration and eventual recovery of function. This provides an important proof of principle that efficient β-cell regeneration is possible, even from a starting point of profound β-cell ablation. This has important implications for efforts to promote β-cell regeneration.

  13. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  14. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts.

  15. Reversal of diabetes in rats using GLP-1-expressing adult pancreatic duct-like precursor cells transformed from acinar to ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Wen, Jing; Park, Jeong Youp; Kim, Sun-A; Lee, Eun Jig; Song, Si Young

    2009-09-01

    Pancreatic injury induces replacement of exocrine acinar cells with ductal cells. These ductal cells have the potential to regenerate the pancreas, but their origin still remains unknown. It has been reported that adult pancreatic acinar cells have the potential to transdifferentiate to ductal progenitor cells. In this regards, we established novel adult pancreatic duct-like progenitor cell lines YGIC4 and YGIC5 and assessed the usefulness of these ductal progenitors in the cell therapy of diabetic rats. Acinar cells were cultured from pancreata of male Sprague Dawley rats and gradually attained ductal cell characteristics, such as expression of CK19 and CFTR with a concomitant down-regulation of amylase expression over time, suggesting transdifferentiation from acinar to ductal cells. During cell culture, the expression of Pdx-1, c-Kit, and vimentin peaked and then decreased, suggesting that transdifferentiation recapitulated embryogenesis. Overexpression of pancreas development regulatory genes and CK19, as well as the ability to differentiate into insulin-producing cells, suggests that the YGIC5 cells had characteristics of pancreatic progenitor cells. Finally, YGIC5 cells coexpressing Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 under the activation of a zinc-inducible metallothionein promoter were intravenously infused to STZ-induced diabetic rats. Hyperglycemia was ameliorated with elevation of plasma insulin, and GFP-positive donor cells were colocalized in the acinar and islet areas of recipient pancreata following zinc treatment. In conclusion, after establishing pancreatic progenitor cell lines YGIC4 and YGIC5 under the concept of acinar to ductal transdifferentiation in vitro, we demonstrate how these adult pancreatic stem/progenitor cells can be used to regulate adult pancreatic differentiation toward developing therapy for pancreatic disease such as diabetes mellitus.

  16. Impact of Sox9 Dosage and Hes1-mediated Notch Signaling in Controlling the Plasticity of Adult Pancreatic Duct Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Furuyama, Kenichiro; Horiguchi, Masashi; Aoyama, Yoshiki; Tsuboi, Kunihiko; Sakikubo, Morito; Goto, Toshihiko; Hirata, Koji; Tanabe, Wataru; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Uemoto, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    In the adult pancreas, there has been a long-standing dispute as to whether stem/precursor populations that retain plasticity to differentiate into endocrine or acinar cell types exist in ducts. We previously reported that adult Sox9-expressing duct cells are sufficiently plastic to supply new acinar cells in Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice. In the present study, using Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice as a model, we aimed to analyze how plasticity is controlled in adult ducts. Adult duct cells in these mice express less Sox9 than do wild-type mice but Hes1 equally. Acinar cell differentiation was accelerated by Hes1 inactivation, but suppressed by NICD induction in adult Sox9-expressing cells. Quantitative analyses showed that Sox9 expression increased with the induction of NICD but did not change with Hes1 inactivation, suggesting that Notch regulates Hes1 and Sox9 in parallel. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hes1-mediated Notch activity determines the plasticity of adult pancreatic duct cells and that there may exist a dosage requirement of Sox9 for keeping the duct cell identity in the adult pancreas. In contrast to the extended capability of acinar cell differentiation by Hes1 inactivation, we obtained no evidence of islet neogenesis from Hes1-depleted duct cells in physiological or PDL-induced injured conditions. PMID:25687338

  17. The stoichiometry of the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter pNBC1 in mouse pancreatic duct cells is 2 HCO3−:1 Na+

    PubMed Central

    Gross, E; Abuladze, N; Pushkin, A; Kurtz, I; Cotton, C U

    2001-01-01

    The electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter pNBC1 is believed to play a major role in the secretion of bicarbonate by pancreatic duct cells, by transporting bicarbonate into the cell across the basolateral membrane. Thermodynamics predict that this function can be achieved only if the reversal potential of the cotransporter is negative to the cell’s membrane potential, or equivalently that the HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry is not larger then 2:1. However, there are no data available on either the reversal potential or the HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry of pNBC1 in pancreatic cells. We studied pNBC1 function in mouse pancreatic duct cells. RT-PCR analysis of total RNA revealed that these cells contain the message for pNBC1, but not for kNBC1, NBC2 or NBC3. To measure cotransporter activity, mouse pancreatic duct cells were grown to confluence on a porous substrate, mounted in an Ussing chamber, and the apical plasma membrane permeabilized with amphotericin B. Ion flux through pNBC1 was achieved by applying Na+ concentration gradients across the basolateral plasma membrane. The current through the cotransporter was isolated as the difference current due to the reversible inhibitor dinitrostilbene disulfonate (DNDS). Current-voltage relationships for the cotransporter, measured at three different Na+ concentration gradients, were linear over a range of about 100 mV. The reversal potential data, obtained from these current-voltage relationships, all corresponded to a 2 HCO3−:1 Na+ stoichiometry. The data indicate that pNBC1 is functionally expressed in mouse pancreatic duct cells. The cotransporter operates with a 2 HCO3−:1 Na+ stoichiometry in these cells, and mediates the transport of bicarbonate into the cell across the basolateral membrane. PMID:11230510

  18. V-Maf Musculoaponeurotic Fibrosarcoma Oncogene Homolog A Synthetic Modified mRNA Drives Reprogramming of Human Pancreatic Duct-Derived Cells Into Insulin-Secreting Cells.

    PubMed

    Corritore, Elisa; Lee, Yong-Syu; Pasquale, Valentina; Liberati, Daniela; Hsu, Mei-Ju; Lombard, Catherine Anne; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Vetere, Amedeo; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Sokal, Etienne; Lysy, Philippe A

    2016-11-01

    : β-Cell replacement therapy represents the most promising approach to restore β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis in patients with type 1 diabetes. Safety and ethical issues associated with pluripotent stem cells stimulated the search for adult progenitor cells with endocrine differentiation capacities. We have already described a model for expansion and differentiation of human pancreatic duct-derived cells (HDDCs) into insulin-producing cells. Here we show an innovative and robust in vitro system for large-scale production of β-like cells from HDDCs using a nonintegrative RNA-based reprogramming technique. Synthetic modified RNAs for pancreatic transcription factors (pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1, neurogenin3, and V-Maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A [MAFA]) were manufactured and daily transfected in HDDCs without strongly affecting immune response and cell viability. MAFA overexpression was efficient and sufficient to induce β-cell differentiation of HDDCs, which acquired a broad repertoire of mature β-cell markers while downregulating characteristic epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers. Within 7 days, MAFA-reprogrammed HDDC populations contained 37% insulin-positive cells and a proportion of endocrine cells expressing somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide. Ultrastructure analysis of differentiated HDDCs showed both immature and mature insulin granules with light-backscattering properties. Furthermore, in vitro HDDC-derived β cells (called β-HDDCs) secreted human insulin and C-peptide in response to glucose, KCl, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and tolbutamide stimulation. Transplantation of β-HDDCs into diabetic SCID-beige mice confirmed their functional glucose-responsive insulin secretion and their capacity to mitigate hyperglycemia. Our data describe a new, reliable, and fast procedure in adult human pancreatic cells to generate clinically relevant amounts of new β cells with potential to reverse diabetes. β-Cell

  19. Clinical significance of main pancreatic duct dilation on computed tomography: Single and double duct dilation

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Mark D; Hoteit, Maarouf; Patel, Amil P; Wang, Xiaoping; Baumgarten, Deborah A; Cai, Qiang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the patients with main pancreatic duct dilation on computed tomography (CT) and thereby to provide the predictive criteria to identify patients at high risk of significant diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, and to avoid unnecessary work up for patients at low risk of such diseases. METHODS: Patients with dilation of the main pancreatic duct on CT at Emory University Hospital in 2002 were identified by computer search. Clinical course and ultimate diagnosis were obtained in all the identified patients by abstraction of their computer database records. RESULTS: Seventy-seven patients were identified in this study. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were the most common causes of the main pancreatic duct dilation on CT. Although the majority of patients with isolated dilation of the main pancreatic duct (single duct dilation) had chronic pancreatitis, one-third of patients with single duct dilation but without chronic pancreatitis had pancreatic malignancies, whereas most of patients with concomitant biliary duct dilation (double duct dilation) had pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Patients with pancreatic double duct dilation need extensive work up and careful follow-up since a majority of these patients are ultimately diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Patients with single duct dilation, especially such patients without any evidence of chronic pancreatitis, also need careful follow-up since the possibility of pancreatic malignancy, including adenocarcinoma and intraductal papillary mucinous tumors, is still high. PMID:17461473

  20. New cannulation method for pancreatic duct cannulation-bile duct guidewire-indwelling method

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yuji; Ishihara, Takeshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Tawada, Katsunobu; Saito, Masayoshi; Kurosawa, Jo; Tamura, Ryo; Togo, Seiko; Mikata, Rintaro; Tada, Motohisa; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The patient was a 58-year-old male with symptomatic alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Since a 10 mm calculus was observed in the pancreatic body and abdominal pain occurred due to congestion of pancreatic juice, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was conducted for assessment of the pancreatic duct and treatment of pancreatic calculus. Pancreatogram was slightly and insufficiently obtained by injecting the contrast media via the common channel of the duodenal main papilla. We tried to cannulate selectively into the pancreatic duct for a clear image. However, the selective cannulation of the pancreatic duct was difficult because of instability of the papilla. On the other hand, selective cannulation of the bile duct was relatively easily achieved. Therefore, after the imaging of the bile duct, a guidewire was retained in the bile duct to immobilize the duodenal papilla and cannulation of the pancreatic duct was attempted. As a result, selective pancreatic duct cannulation became possible. It is considered that the bile duct guidewire-indwelling method may serve as one of the useful techniques for cases whose selective pancreatic duct cannulation is difficult (“selective pancreatic duct difficult cannulation case”). PMID:22110840

  1. In vitro expansion and differentiation of rat pancreatic duct-derived stem cells into insulin secreting cells using a dynamicthree-dimensional cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Chen, X C; Liu, H; Li, H; Cheng, Y; Yang, L; Liu, Y F

    2016-06-27

    In this study, a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture technology was used to expand and differentiate rat pancreatic duct-derived stem cells (PDSCs) into islet-like cell clusters that can secrete insulin. PDSCs were isolated from rat pancreatic tissues by in situ collagenase digestion and density gradient centrifugation. Using a dynamic three-dimensional culture technique, the cells were expanded and differentiated into functional islet-like cell clusters, which were characterized by morphological and phenotype analyses. After maintaining 1 x 108 isolated rat PDSCs in a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture for 7 days, 1.5 x 109 cells could be harvested. Passaged PDSCs expressed markers of pancreatic endocrine progenitors, including CD29 (86.17%), CD73 (90.73%), CD90 (84.13%), CD105 (78.28%), and Pdx-1. Following 14 additional days of culture in serum-free medium with nicotinamide, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and b fibroblast growth factor (FGF), the cells were differentiated into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). The ICC morphology reflected that of fused cell clusters. During the late stage of differentiation, representative clusters were non-adherent and expressed insulin indicated by dithizone (DTZ)-positive staining. Insulin was detected in the extracellular fluid and cytoplasm of ICCs after 14 days of differentiation. Additionally, insulin levels were significantly higher at this time compared with the levels exhibited by PDSCs before differentiation (P < 0.01). By using a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture system, PDSCs can be expanded in vitro and can differentiate into functional islet-like cell clusters.

  2. Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: complete pancreas transection secondary to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gámez-del-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Garcés-Albir, Marina; Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Morera-Ocón, Francisco Javier; Villagrasa, Rosana; Sabater-Ortí, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis which is defined by a complete discontinuity of the pancreatic duct, such that a viable side of the pancreas remains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. This pancreatic disruption is infrequently observed in the clinical practice and its diagnostic and therapeutic management are controversial. We present an extreme case of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome with complete duct disruption and pancreatic transection following acute pancreatitis, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic processes carried out.

  3. Common bile duct involvement in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Angelini, G; Sgarbi, D; Castagnini, A; Cavallini, G; Bovo, P

    1994-03-01

    The features of the common bile duct (CBD) have been checked in 78 chronic pancreatitis patients in order to evaluate the frequency of extrahepatic bile duct changes, possible associated factors and effects on the outcome of the disease. Fifty of the 78 patients had an intrapancreatic stricture of the CBD and 24 of them also showed an upstream dilatation. No relationship was found between the features of the CBD and the severity of the pancreatitis, the presence of calcifications and the length of the disease. Humoral signs of impaired bile flow were found in 20 subjects, 19 of whom had an intra-pancreatic stricture of the CBD. Sixteen of these 19 patients also showed an upstream dilatation and five of them had overt jaundice. A surgical intervention on the biliary tree was carried out in 7 patients, all with a biliary stricture. Six of them also had a CBD dilatation over the stricture (p < 0.02 versus patients without CBD stricture). In conclusion CBD involvement during chronic pancreatitis is quite frequent but poorly predictable and should be checked in all patients with humoral cholestasis in order to prevent further complications.

  4. Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

    PubMed

    Butler, A E; Galasso, R; Matveyenko, A; Rizza, R A; Dry, S; Butler, P C

    2010-01-01

    In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans. We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI <25 kg/m(2)); obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication. We show for the first time that both obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication. Specifically, we report that (1) replication of pancreatic duct cells is increased tenfold by obesity, and (2) lean subjects with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a fourfold increase in replication of pancreatic duct cells compared with their lean non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic duct cell replication is increased in humans in response to both obesity and type 2 diabetes, potentially providing a mechanism for the increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in those with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes.

  5. Update on Endoscopic Management of Main Pancreatic Duct Stones in Chronic Calcific Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Kwang

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis and often contribute to additional pain and pancreatitis. Abdominal pain, one of the major symptoms of chronic pancreatitis, is believed to be caused in part by obstruction of the pancreatic duct system (by stones or strictures) resulting in increasing intraductal pressure and parenchymal ischemia. Pancreatic stones can be managed by surgery, endoscopy, or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In this review, updated management of pancreatic duct stones is discussed. PMID:22403495

  6. Transcriptional Control of Tight Junction Proteins via a Protein Kinase C Signal Pathway in Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase-Transfected Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Son, Seiichi; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Murata, Masaki; Nagayama, Minoru; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2010-01-01

    In human pancreatic cancer, integral membrane proteins of tight junction claudins are abnormally regulated, making these proteins promising molecular diagnostic and therapeutic targets. However, the regulation of claudin-based tight junctions remains unknown not only in the pancreatic cancer cells but also in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. To investigate the regulation of tight junction molecules including claudins in normal HPDE cells, we introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture. The hTERT-transfected HPDE (hTERT-HPDE) cells were positive for the pancreatic duct epithelial markers such as CK7, CK19, and carbonic anhydrase isozyme 2 and expressed epithelial tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7 and, -18, occludin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2, and tricellulin. By treatment with fetal bovine serum or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), the tight junction molecules were up-regulated at the transcriptional level via a protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway. A PKC-α inhibitor, Gö6976, prevented up-regulation of claudin-4 by TPA. Furthermore, a PKC-δ inhibitor, rottlerin, prevented up-regulation of claudin-7, occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 by TPA. By GeneChip analysis, up-regulation of the transcription factor ELF3 was observed in both fetal bovine serum- and TPA-treated cells. Treatment with small interfering RNAs of ELF3 prevented up-regulation of claudin-7 by TPA. These data suggest that tight junctions of normal HPDE cells were at least in part regulated via a PKC signal pathway by transcriptional control. PMID:20566751

  7. Duct-to-mucosa pancreatojejunostomy for small main pancreatic duct by the parachute technique after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kojun; Koyama, Isamu; Toshimitsu, Yasuko; Aikawa, Masayasu; Okada, Katsuya; Ueno, Yosuke; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A duct-to-mucosa pancreatojejunostomy is technically difficult to perform for a small main pancreatic duct after pancreatoduodenectomy. Our group applied the parachute technique to reconstruct and attach a small pancreatic duct to the jejunal mucosa. This method makes it very easy to position stitches on the posterior row of the anastomosis. It also allows a complete view of every stitch, both inside and outside the pancreatic duct and jejunal wall. Sixteen patients underwent pancreatoduodenectomy followed by duct-to-mucosa pancreatojejunostomy by the parachute technique. Pancreatic fistulae developed in 3 of the patients, but none of the fistulae were severe. The median postoperative hospital stay was 14.5 days, and there were no postoperative deaths during that time. In conclusion, pancreatojejunostomy by the parachute technique is a simple method with a very low risk of pancreatic fistula formation and a considerably shortened postoperative hospital stay. The method is also useful for reconstruction with pancreatojejunostomy after pancreatoduodenectomy.

  8. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  9. Accessory Pancreatic Duct Patterns and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Lokadolalu Chandracharya; Rajagopal, KV; Thomas, Huban R

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective: Accessory pancreatic duct (APD) designed to reduce the pressure of major pancreatic duct by forming a secondary drainage channel. Few studies have mentioned the variant types of accessory ducts and their mode of formation, some of these have a clear clinical significance. Present study is aimed to evaluate the possible variations in the APD and its terminations. Materials and Methods: Forty formalin fixed adult human pancreas with duodenum in situ specimens were studied by injecting 1% aqueous eosin, followed by piece meal dissection of the head of the pancreas from posterior surface. Formation, tributaries, relations, and the termination of the accessory pancreatic duct were noted and photographed. Results: Accessory ducts revealed 50% belonged to long type, 22.5% were of short and ansa pancreatica type each, and embryonic type of duct pattern was seen in 5% specimens. 75% of long type ducts showed positive patency with eosin dye, followed by ansa type (44.4%), and least patency was found in short type (22.2%). With regard to the patency of the accessory pancreatic ducts towards their termination, we found 52.5% of the accessory ducts and 5% of the embryonic type pancreatic ducts were patent and in 42.5% of the specimen the ducts were obliterated. In 85% of specimens the minor duodenal papillae was anterosuperior to the major papilla and superior to the major papillae in 10% of the cases, and in 5% minor papillae was absent. The average distance between the two papillae was 2.35 cm. Conclusion: The knowledge of the complex anatomical relations of the gland with its duct, duodenum and bile ducts are essential for the surgeons and sinologists to plan and perform both the diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures effectively. PMID:25954609

  10. Whole-mount imaging demonstrates hypervascularity of the pancreatic ducts and other pancreatic structures.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Yousef; Tulachan, Sidhartha; Branca, Maria; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Guo, Ping; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Gittes, George K

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy in combination with commercial software is frequently used to generate three-dimensional images of tissue architecture. Here we report a novel, whole-mount imaging protocol technique that allows detailed three-dimensional imaging of adult pancreatic structures. This technique provides an improved appreciation of the anatomical detail of pancreatic structures and of the relationship between the pancreatic ducts and islets. In addition, imaging of the pancreatic ducts revealed a previously unappreciated high degree of hypervascularity.

  11. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  12. Induction of chronic pancreatic disease by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid infusion into rat pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Puig-Diví, V; Molero, X; Salas, A; Guarner, F; Guarner, L; Malagelada, J R

    1996-11-01

    Despite being a common disease in humans, little is known about the etiopathogenesis of and effective therapeutic approaches to chronic pancreatitis, due mainly to the fact that few simple animal models suitable to study inflammatory and fibrogenetic processes have been described in the pancreas. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induces chronic colitis and cholangitis in the rat. We hypothesized that TNBS instillation into the pancreatic ducts could also result in the development of a chronic pancreatic disease. The biliopancreatic duct of rats was cannulated and tied close to the liver. TNBS [0.4 ml of 2% TNBS in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-10% ethanol, pH 8] was infused into the pancreas under a continuous controlled-pressure system. Control rats underwent the same procedure using vehicle only. Pathology assessment of TNBS-treated rats examined at 48 h was consistent with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis, having a morality rate of 31% and serum amylase activity of 37.4 +/- 8.8 U/ml at 24 h and 13.3 +/- 1.7 U/ml at 48 h (p < 0.01 for both time points compared to PBS/ethanol-treated rats). Groups of 10 rats each were killed at 3, 4, and 6 week after the surgical procedure. Morphological examination revealed changes mimicking features of chronic pancreatitis in humans in 80% (32 of 40) of TNBS-treated rats, consisting in various degrees of periductal and lobular fibrosis, duct stenosis, patchy acute and chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates, and signs of gland atrophy. Animals developing chronic disease had a weight gain rate significantly lower than that of control rats. Serum amylase, fasting glucose, and a glucose tolerance test were not different in diseased or control rats. In conclusion, we were able to induce chronic fibrogenetic inflammatory disease in the pancreas after a single pulse instillation of TNBS into the pancreatic ducts. This might be a useful animal model to study the pathophysiology of inflammatory, fibrogenetic, and reparative

  13. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for sibling pancreatic duct stones.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Y; Ohiwa, T; Yamada, T; Sano, H; Ohara, H; Nakazawa, T; Ando, H; Hashimoto, T; Nakamura, S; Nomura, T; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of 2 brothers with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreatic duct stones which could be successfully disintegrated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). An obvious etiology for the pancreatolithiasis, like alcohol or biliary disease, was lacking and point mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene exons 2 and 3 were not detected in the long arm of the 7th chromosome. However, a hereditary etiology could not be precluded since pancreatolithiasis occurred in the siblings. There has been no recurrence of pancreatic stones during 42 months of follow-up periods, for both. ESWL, the least invasive therapy, appeared applicable and effective for pancreatolithiasis in the present cases.

  15. Spontaneous Rupture of the Main Pancreatic Duct Synchronous With a Multi-Focal Microscopic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Katerina; Kessel, Boris; Gal, Oren; Zeina, Abdel Rauf

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal types of malignant tumours, commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage. The only curative treatment for this fatal disease is surgery and early diagnosis is the key to a better outcome and prognosis. In this case report we present a 57-year-old woman presenting to the emergency room with abdominal pain and weight loss. Computer Tomography (CT) imaging showed a rupture of the main pancreatic duct and a peri-pancreatic fluid collection with no evidence of a pancreatic mass. An Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) guided Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) did not show any malignant cells and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Carbohydrate Antigen (CA) 19-9 markers were in the normal range. The patient then underwent pancreatectomy that revealed multiple microscopic foci of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with evidence of massive perineural and vascular invasion. PMID:28208932

  16. SLC26 anion exchangers of guinea pig pancreatic duct: molecular cloning and functional characterization

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Andrew K.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Vandorpe, David H.; Reimold, Fabian; Heneghan, John F.; Nakakuki, M.; Akhavein, Arash; Ko, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The secretin-stimulated human pancreatic duct secretes HCO3−-rich fluid essential for normal digestion. Optimal stimulation of pancreatic HCO3− secretion likely requires coupled activities of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) anion channel and apical SLC26 Cl−/HCO3− exchangers. However, whereas stimulated human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts secrete ∼140 mM HCO3− or more, mouse and rat ducts secrete ∼40–70 mM HCO3−. Moreover, the axial distribution and physiological roles of SLC26 anion exchangers in pancreatic duct secretory processes remain controversial and may vary among mammalian species. Thus the property of high HCO3− secretion shared by human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts prompted us to clone from guinea pig pancreatic duct cDNAs encoding Slc26a3, Slc26a6, and Slc26a11 polypeptides. We then functionally characterized these anion transporters in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In Xenopus oocytes, gpSlc26a3 mediated only Cl−/Cl− exchange and electroneutral Cl−/HCO3− exchange. gpSlc26a6 in Xenopus oocytes mediated Cl−/Cl− exchange and bidirectional exchange of Cl− for oxalate and sulfate, but Cl−/HCO3− exchange was detected only in HEK 293 cells. gpSlc26a11 in Xenopus oocytes exhibited pH-dependent Cl−, oxalate, and sulfate transport but no detectable Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The three gpSlc26 anion transporters exhibited distinct pharmacological profiles of 36Cl− influx, including partial sensitivity to CFTR inhibitors Inh-172 and GlyH101, but only Slc26a11 was inhibited by PPQ-102. This first molecular and functional assessment of recombinant SLC26 anion transporters from guinea pig pancreatic duct enhances our understanding of pancreatic HCO3− secretion in species that share a high HCO3− secretory output. PMID:21593449

  17. Endosonography for Pancreatic Duct Dilatation without Definite Pathology on Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Yang, Chi-Chieh; Yeh, Yung-Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    Main pancreatic duct dilatation raises concerns about the possibility of pancreatobiliary malignancy. We evaluated the etiologic yield of endosonography (EUS) for main pancreatic duct dilatation without definite pathology on Ultrasonography (US). A retrospective review was conducted in 54 consecutive patients referred for EUS. No pathological finding (37.0%, 20/54), followed by periampullary cancer (35.2%, 19/54), was the most common finding. Elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P) and marked common bile duct (CBD) dilatation (≥ 12 mm) were the predictors of malignancy (p < 0.05). Among the 37 subjects with available ALK-P and CBD diameter, the probability of malignancy was 84.6% (11/13) for both elevated ALK-P and marked CBD dilatation, 16.7% (1/6) for isolated elevated ALK-P, 18.2% (2/11) for isolated marked CBD dilatation, and none (0/7) was for subjects with neither elevated ALK-P nor marked CBD dilatation, respectively. The overall accuracy of EUS for periampullary carcinomas was 94.7% (18/19) and for choledocholithiasis was 100% (7/7), respectively. EUS had a 100.0% (20/20) sensitivity and a 97.1% (33/34) specificity in the diagnosis of no pathological obstruction. EUS is accurate for main pancreatic duct dilatation without definite pathology on US, and the presence of concomitant elevated ALK-P and CBD dilatation highly suggests malignancy.

  18. [Bile duct surgery in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Schuppisser, J P

    1992-05-01

    Established principles of biliary surgery in connection with biliary pancreatitis include cholecystectomy to prevent recurrence of pancreatitis and biliary drainage if an impacted papillary stone is present. Controversies persist with regard to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and with regard to the timing of ERC and endoscopic papillotomy. The role of early prophylactic ERC has become more clear when in 1988 Carr Locke and coworkers presented a prospective series of patients randomised for different management modalities and stratified according to severity of the pancreatitis. Thus the current recommendation is to plan early ERC and papillotomy for those patients who, according to one of the severity scoring systems, are at risk for a complicated course. Patients with predicted mild disease will not profit from this procedure and are unnecessarily exposed to its risks.

  19. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate.

  20. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells.

    PubMed

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-12-02

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and produce cytopathic effect in human pancreatic ductal cells. Furthermore, the viral factors that affect these capabilities were studied. The pancreatic ductal cells were highly susceptible to enterovirus infections. Both viral growth and cytolysis were detected for several enterovirus serotypes. However, the viral growth and capability to induce cytopathic effect (cpe) did not correlate completely. Some of the virus strains replicated in ductal cells without apparent cpe. Furthermore, there were strain-specific differences in the growth kinetics and the ability to cause cpe within some serotypes. Viral adaptation experiments were carried out to study the potential genetic determinants behind these phenotypic differences. The blind-passage of non-lytic CV-B6-Schmitt strain in HPDE-cells resulted in lytic phenotype and increased progeny production. This was associated with the substitution of a single amino acid (K257E) in the virus capsid protein VP1 and the viral ability to use decay accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor. This study demonstrates considerable plasticity in the cell tropism, receptor usage and cytolytic properties of enteroviruses and underlines the strong effect of single or few amino acid substitutions in cell tropism and lytic capabilities of a given enterovirus. Since ductal cells are anatomically close to pancreatic islets, the capability of enteroviruses to infect and destroy pancreatic ductal cells may also implicate in respect to enterovirus induced type 1

  1. Patients with chronic pancreatitis have islet progenitor cells in their ducts, but reversal of overt diabetes in NOD mice by anti-CD3 shows no evidence for islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jenny M; O'Reilly, Lorraine; Bland, Chris; Foulis, Alan K; Cooke, Anne

    2007-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to T-cell coreceptors have been shown to tolerise autoreactive T-cells and prevent or even reverse autoimmune pathology. In type 1 diabetes, there is a loss of insulin-secreting beta-cells, and a cure for type 1 diabetes would require not only tolerance induction but also recovery of the functional beta-cell mass. Although we have previously shown that diabetic mice have increased numbers of ductal progenitors in the pancreas, there is no evidence of any increase of insulin-secreting cells in the ducts. In contrast, in the adult human pancreas of patients with chronic pancreatitis, we can demonstrate, in the ducts, increased numbers of insulin-containing cells, as well as cells containing other endocrine and exocrine markers. There are also significantly increased numbers of cells expressing the homeodomain protein, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1. Anti-CD3 has been shown to reverse overt diabetes in NOD mice; thus, we have used this model to ask whether monoclonal antibody-mediated inhibition of ongoing beta-cell destruction enables islet regeneration to occur. We find no evidence that such monoclonal antibody therapy results in either regeneration of insulin-secreting beta-cells or of increased proliferation of islet beta-cells.

  2. Can pancreatic duct-derived progenitors be a source of islet regeneration?

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Bing; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Yi, Ran; Yang, Baofeng

    2009-06-12

    The regenerative process of the pancreas is of interest because the main pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is an inadequate number of insulin-producing {beta}-cells. The functional mass of {beta}-cells is decreased in type 1 diabetes, so replacing missing {beta}-cells or triggering their regeneration may allow for improved type 1 diabetes treatment. Therefore, expansion of the {beta}-cell mass from endogenous sources, either in vivo or in vitro, represents an area of increasing interest. The mechanism of islet regeneration remains poorly understood, but the identification of islet progenitor sources is critical for understanding {beta}-cell regeneration. One potential source is the islet proper, via the dedifferentiation, proliferation, and redifferentiation of facultative progenitors residing within the islet. Neogenesis, or that the new pancreatic islets can derive from progenitor cells present within the ducts has been reported, but the existence and identity of the progenitor cells have been debated. In this review, we focus on pancreatic ductal cells, which are islet progenitors capable of differentiating into islet {beta}-cells. Islet neogenesis, seen as budding of hormone-positive cells from the ductal epithelium, is considered to be one mechanism for normal islet growth after birth and in regeneration, and has suggested the presence of pancreatic stem cells. Numerous results support the neogenesis hypothesis, the evidence for the hypothesis in the adult comes primarily from morphological studies that have in common the production of damage to all or part of the pancreas, with consequent inflammation and repair. Although numerous studies support a ductal origin for new islets after birth, lineage-tracing experiments are considered the 'gold standard' of proof. Lineage-tracing experiments show that pancreatic duct cells act as progenitors, giving rise to new islets after birth and after injury. The identification of differentiated pancreatic ductal cells as

  3. A case report of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyoshi; Makino, Isamu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-01-21

    We herein report a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct. A 76-year-old male was referred to our hospital for treatment of a pancreatic tumor. Preoperative examinations revealed a poorly defined tumor in the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas, accompanied with severe dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, which was diagnosed as an intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm. We performed distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of a mixture of anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) and adenocarcinoma in the pancreas. There was a papillary projecting tumor composed of anaplastic carcinoma in the dilated main pancreatic duct. The patient is now receiving chemotherapy because liver metastasis was detected 12 mo after surgery. In this case, we could observe a remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct. We also discuss the pathogenesis and characteristics of this rare tumor with specific tumor growth.

  4. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  5. Role of fibrosis-related genes and pancreatic duct obstruction in rat pancreatitis models: implications for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, M; Suda, K; Kuwayama, C; Abe, H; Kakinuma, C

    2007-10-01

    Human chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible fibrosis, whereas pancreatic fibrosis in animal models is reversible. In this study, we compare the development of pancreatic fibrosis in the dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) model, WBN/Kob rats and bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. DBTC (8 mg/kg) was administered to LEW rats, and the pancreas was histopathologically investigated sequentially. Male and female WBN/Kob rats aged 4, 6 and 8 months were also examined. BDL rats were prepared by ligation of the bile duct at the duodenal portion and sacrificed at 3 or 7 days after ligation. Fibrosis in the DBTC model peaked after 1 week and was limited to the areas around the pancreatic ducts after 2 weeks, and was composed of both type I and type III collagen. In contrast, fibrosis in male WBN/Kob rats peaked at age 4 months, expanded into intralobular area, and was composed of type III collagen. It exhibited almost no type I collagen and a marked tendency to regress. Pancreatic fibrosis in BDL rats was somewhat difficult to induce and required increased stimulation. This suggests that fibrosis in human biliary pancreatitis may gradually form based on weak, continuous stimulation. We conclude that type I collagen may be involved in the progression of irreversible fibrosis. The imbalance between synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix molecules or degree of stimulation over a certain period may lead to pancreatic fibrosis. Gene expressions of prolyl hydroxylase and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-2 were elevated.

  6. Segmental occlusion of the pancreatic duct with prolamine to prevent fistula formation after distal pancreatectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, T; Hiraishi, M; Kubota, K; Bandai, Y; Makuuchi, M; Idezuki, Y

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors used prolamine (Ethibloc, Ethicon GmBH, Norderstedt, Germany) for segmental obstruction of the pancreatic duct to prevent pancreatic fistula development after distal pancreatectomy combined with total gastrectomy for gastric malignancies. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although the initial clinical application of prolamine was pancreatic duct obstruction for patients with pancreatitis and undergoing pancreatic transplantation and pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer, there are no reports on prevention of pancreatic fistula formation after distal pancreatectomy. METHODS: Prolamine (0.2 mL) was injected into the distal segment of the main duct in the remaining pancreata of 51 patients. Small pancreatic ducts on the cut surface, from which prolamine extravasates, were closed by ligation, the main duct was ligated doubly, and the transected pancreatic margin was closed 15 minutes after phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride injection. RESULTS: No patient developed a pancreatic fistula or the complication of arterial bleeding due to prolonged infection. CONCLUSION: Segmental obstruction of the pancreatic duct with prolamine is useful for preventing pancreatic fistula development after distal pancreatectomy. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7531967

  7. [Minimum intensity projection image and curved reformation image of the main pancreatic duct obtained by helical CT in patients with main pancreatic duct dilation].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, K; Furui, S; Yamauchi, T; Harasawa, A; Kohtake, H; Sasaki, Y; Suzuki, S; Tanaka, H; Takeshita, T

    1999-03-01

    Contrast enhanced CT was performed in seven patients with pancreatic disease (chronic pancreatitis, n = 3; pancreatic head cancer, n = 2; mucin-producing pancreatic tumor, n = 2) who showed dilation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) Minimum intensity projection (Min-IP) images of the pancreas were obtained using multi-projection volume reconstruction (MPVR) software by selecting an oblique slab that contained the entire MPD. Curved reformation (CR) images were obtained using multiplanar reformation (MPR) software by tracing the MPD on the Min-IP image. Both Min-IP images and CR images clearly showed the dilated main pancreatic duct in all seven patients. In three of the seven, obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head and the cause of obstruction (tumor mass, n = 2; caliculus, n = 1) were also clearly seen. Min-IP and CR images seem to be useful for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases.

  8. Duct- to islet-cell differentiation and islet growth in the pancreas of duct-ligated adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, R N; Klöppel, G; Bouwens, L

    1995-12-01

    We investigated the growth of islet beta and alpha cells in adult rats which had undergone partial pancreatic duct ligation. Whereas the non-ligated head portion of the pancreas remained unaffected in terms of histology and cell population dynamics, the ligated tail part of the pancreas showed pronounced changes in histology and cell growth. These changes included replacement of exocrine acini by ductal complexes and significant growth of islet cells. Using immunocytochemistry and morphometry, we found that the beta-cell population had nearly doubled within 1 week and that a smaller, but also significant growth of the alpha-cell population had occurred. In addition, small islets and islet-cell clusters were more numerous in the pancreatic tail, indicating islet neogenesis. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labelling index of beta and alpha cells increased five fold and threefold, respectively, in the tail. However, the observed beta-cell labelling index remained below 1% which was largely insufficient to explain the increased number of beta cells. This indicates that recruitment from a proliferating stem-cell compartment was the main source for the beta-cell hyperplasia. A tenfold-elevated BrdU labelling index (18%) was observed in the duct-cell compartment which was identified by specific immunostaining for cytokeratin 20. Transitional cytodifferentiation forms between duct cells expressing cytokeratin 20 and beta cells expressing insulin, or alpha cells expressing glucagon, were demonstrated by double immunostaining. Pancreatic duct ligation also induced the expression of the beta-cell-specific glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT-2) in duct cells, indicating their metaplastic state. We concluded that in this adult rat model, the proliferation and differentiation of exocrine duct cells represents the major mechanism of endocrine beta-cell neogenesis. Our study thus demonstrates that in normal adult rats islet-cell neogenesis can be reactivated by stimulation of

  9. Dorsal duct sphincterotomy is effective long-term treatment of acute pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Keith, R G; Shapero, T F; Saibil, F G; Moore, T L

    1989-10-01

    Nonbiliary, nonalcoholic pancreatic inflammatory disease was investigated by biochemical investigation, ultrasonography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and secretin tests. Twenty-five consecutive cases were followed up for 12 months to 10 years after treatment of disease associated with pancreas divisum, diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Thirteen patients had no recurrence of acute pancreatitis after dorsal duct sphincterotomy alone, during long-term follow-up (mean, 54 months); one patient had recurrent pancreatitis during 33 months after failed sphincterotomy. Eight patients had variable results 12 months to 8 years (mean, 49 months) after dorsal duct sphincterotomy for pancreatic pain syndrome (without amylase elevation), three were pain free, and one had recurrent pancreatitis. For 10 years after dorsal duct sphincterotomy for chronic pancreatitis, one patient had no pain relief; after subtotal pancreatectomy and pancreaticojejunostomy of the dorsal duct, both for chronic pancreatitis, one patient each was pain free and normoglycemic after 54 and 12 months, respectively. Dorsal duct sphincterotomy alone is successful in achieving long-term freedom from recurrence of acute pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum. Pancreatic pain syndrome is not consistently improved by dorsal duct sphincterotomy. Chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum should be treated by resection or drainage procedures, not by dorsal duct sphincterotomy.

  10. Air in the main pancreatic duct: a case of innocent air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, Hyung Keun; Cho, Young Seok; Kim, Sung Soo; Chae, Hiun Suk; Kim, Seung Kyong; Kim, Eun Sun; Lee, Su Yeon

    2012-09-28

    Air in the main pancreatic duct has been reported only rarely and might be associated with either a spontaneous or a surgically induced alteration of the anatomy of the biliary tract. We report a case of "innocent" air found incidentally in the main pancreatic duct. To our knowledge, this is only the third such case reported. A 54-year-old woman presented with hemoptysis that had lasted for 3 d. She underwent a chest computed tomography scan, which revealed not only focal bronchiectasis in the left lower lobe, but also air in the main pancreatic duct and dilatation of the common bile duct. She was managed conservatively for the hemoptysis and no further problems developed. She had no specific gastrointestinal symptoms and had no history of surgery or medication. Her laboratory parameters were normal. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography also demonstrated air in the main pancreatic duct and a dilated common bile duct (CBD). Duodenoscopy revealed separate biliary and pancreatic orifices with patulous openings and some air bubbles appearing in the pancreatic orifice. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed the dilated CBD and pancreatic duct with some air bubbles, but no other abnormal lesions. She was discharged with no further problems. Most patients with air in the main pancreatic duct have had a pancreatobiliary disease, or a history of pancreatobiliary disease, pancreatobiliary surgery or sphincterotomy. If the air is innocent, as in our case, ERCP should be performed to evaluate any altered sphincteric function or anatomy such as patulous openings.

  11. Augmented secretion of lysosomal enzyme into pancreatic juice after short term obstruction of the pancreatic duct in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirano, T; Manabe, T; Kyogoku, T; Ando, K; Yotsumoto, F; Imanishi, K; Ohshio, G

    1992-05-01

    To find out if and when lysosomal enzymes are excreted into pancreatic juice in physiological and pathological conditions, the changes in the secretion of cathepsin B into pancreatic juice were investigated in 66 Wistar rats with cannulation of common pancreatic-biliary duct and common bile duct, and infusions of caerulein and secretin. In a separate experiment ducts were cannulated and secretin infused as before, but in one group the ducts were "obstructed" and in another they were allowed to remain patent. Obstruction of the pancreatic duct for three hours caused a moderate significant rise in serum amylase activity. Cathepsin B activity in the pancreatic subcellular fractions was redistributed, and the amount of cathepsin B increased. In rats with obstructed ducts the secretion of cathepsin B and other lysosomal enzymes that were stimulated by caerulein was significantly greater than in the animals in which the ducts remained patent. Lysosomal enzymes associated with zymogen granules are secreted into pancreatic juice together with digestive enzymes after stimulation by gut hormones, and they may have pathophysiological roles in pancreatic juice.

  12. Association of Chronic Pancreatitis and Malignant Main Duct IPMN: A Rare but Difficult Clinical Problem.

    PubMed

    Berger, Zoltán; De La Fuente, Hernán; Meneses, Manuel; Matamala, Fernanda; Sepúlveda, Makarena; Rojas, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who consulted for recurrent short episodes of mild-to-moderate abdominal pain. Dilated main pancreatic duct was seen on CAT scan and magnetic resonance, with multiple calcifications and intraductal stones, typical in CP. However, for a more pronounced cystic dilatation in the pancreatic head, we could not exclude the coexistence of a main duct IPMN. ERCP was performed, with pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction of pancreatic stones, but, at the same time, mucin extrusion was seen from the dilated duct through the papilla. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Surgery and histology confirmed malignant IPMN with the typical image of chronic pancreatitis and intraductal stones in the vicinity. The patient is doing well 4 years after the surgery, without recurrence of the malignant disease, with changes of chronic pancreatitis in the pancreatic remnant. This paper discusses the possible relationships between the two entities and emphasizes the need of differential diagnosis.

  13. Association of Chronic Pancreatitis and Malignant Main Duct IPMN: A Rare but Difficult Clinical Problem

    PubMed Central

    De La Fuente, Hernán; Meneses, Manuel; Matamala, Fernanda; Sepúlveda, Makarena; Rojas, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who consulted for recurrent short episodes of mild-to-moderate abdominal pain. Dilated main pancreatic duct was seen on CAT scan and magnetic resonance, with multiple calcifications and intraductal stones, typical in CP. However, for a more pronounced cystic dilatation in the pancreatic head, we could not exclude the coexistence of a main duct IPMN. ERCP was performed, with pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction of pancreatic stones, but, at the same time, mucin extrusion was seen from the dilated duct through the papilla. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Surgery and histology confirmed malignant IPMN with the typical image of chronic pancreatitis and intraductal stones in the vicinity. The patient is doing well 4 years after the surgery, without recurrence of the malignant disease, with changes of chronic pancreatitis in the pancreatic remnant. This paper discusses the possible relationships between the two entities and emphasizes the need of differential diagnosis. PMID:28321347

  14. Meandering Main Pancreatic Duct as a Relevant Factor to the Onset of Idiopathic Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonoi, Wataru; Akai, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Kazuchika; Akahane, Masaaki; Hayashi, Naoto; Maeda, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Kiryu, Shigeru; Tada, Minoru; Uno, Kansei; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Okura, Naoki; Koike, Kazuhiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    Background Meandering main pancreatic duct (MMPD), which comprises loop type and reverse-Z type main pancreatic duct (MPD), has long been discussed its relation to pancreatitis. However, no previous study has investigated its clinical significance. We aimed to determine the non-biased prevalence and the effect of MMPD on idiopathic pancreatitis using non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) technique. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional study performed in a tertiary referral center. The study enrolled 504 subjects from the community and 30 patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (7 acute, 13 chronic, and 10 recurrent acute). All subjects underwent MR scanning and medical examination. MMPD was diagnosed when the MPD in the head of pancreas formed two or more extrema in the horizontal direction on coronal images of MR cholangiopancreatography, making a loop or a reverse-Z shaped hairpin curves and not accompanied by other pancreatic ductal anomaly. Statistical comparison was made among groups on the rate of MMPD including loop and reverse-Z subtypes, MR findings, and clinical features. The rate of MMPD was significantly higher for all idiopathic pancreatitis/idiopathic recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) (20%/40%; P<0.001/0.0001; odds ratio (OR), 11.1/29.0) than in the community (2.2%) but was not higher for acute/chronic pancreatitis (14%/8%; P = 0.154/0.266). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed MMPD to be a significant factor that induces pancreatitis/RAP (P<0.0001/0.0001; OR, 4.01/26.2). Loop/reverse-Z subtypes were found more frequently in idiopathic RAP subgroup (20%/20%; P = 0.009/0.007; OR, 20.2/24.2) than in the community (1.2%/1.0%). The other clinical and radiographic features were shown not associated with the onset of pancreatitis. Conclusions MMPD is a common anatomical variant and might be a relevant factor to the onset of idiopathic RAP. PMID:22655061

  15. Formation of pancreatic duct epithelium from bone marrow during neonatal development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Ge, Shundi; Gonzalez, Ignacio; McNamara, George; Rountree, C Barth; Xi, Kenny Kezhe; Huang, Grace; Bhushan, Anil; Crooks, Gay M

    2006-02-01

    Recent reports suggest that bone marrow-derived cells engraft and differentiate into pancreatic tissue at very low frequency after pancreatic injury. All such studies have used adult recipients. The aim of our studies was to investigate the potential of bone marrow to contribute to the exocrine and endocrine components of the pancreas during the normal rapid growth of the organ that occurs during the neonatal period. Five to ten million bone marrow cells from adult, male, transgenic, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were injected into neonatal nonobese diabetic/severely compromised immunodeficient/beta2microglobulin-null mice 24 hours after birth. Two months after bone marrow transplantation, pancreas tissue was analyzed with fluorescence immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Co-staining of GFP, with anticytokeratin antibody, and with FISH for the presence of donor Y chromosome indicated that up to 40% of ducts (median 4.6%) contained epithelial cells derived from donor bone marrow. In some of these donor-derived ducts, there were clusters of large and small ducts, all comprised of GFP+ epithelium, suggesting that whole branching structures were derived from donor bone marrow. In addition, rare cells that coexpressed GFP and insulin were found within islets. Unlike pancreatic damage models, no bone marrow-derived vascular endothelial cells were found. In contrast to the neonatal recipients, bone marrow transplanted into adult mice rarely generated ductal epithelium or islet cells (p<.05 difference between adult and neonate transplants). These findings demonstrate the existence in bone marrow of pluripotent stem cells or epithelial precursors that can migrate to the pancreas and differentiate into complex organ-specific structures during the neonatal period.

  16. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis by pancreatic duct stenting using a loop-tipped guidewire

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yuji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Hayashi, Masahiro; Senoo, Jun-ichi; Sasaki, Reina; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Mikata, Rintaro; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine whether it is possible to prevent the occurrence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis in patients experiencing difficulties with selective biliary duct cannulation by pancreatic duct stenting using a loop-tipped guidewire. METHODS Procedure success rate, frequency of unintended insertion of the guidewire into side branches of the pancreatic duct, and incidence of procedural accidents were examined using a loop-tipped guidewire (Group A, 20 patients), and a conventional straight-type guidewire (Group B, 20 patients). RESULTS The success rate of the procedure was 100% in both groups. Unintended insertion of the guidewire into a side branch of the pancreatic duct occurred 0.056 ± 0.23 (0-1) times in Group A and 2.3 ± 1.84 (0-5) times in Group B; thus, unintended insertion of the guidewire into a side branch of the pancreatic duct was seen significantly less frequently in Group A. There were no procedural accidents in Group A, whereas pancreatitis occurred in one Group B patient; however, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. The serum amylase level after ERCP was 257.15 ± 136.4 (88-628) IU/L in Group A, and 552.05 ± 534.57 (101-2389) IU/L in Group B, showing a significantly lower value in Group A. Hyperamylasemia was found in two patients (10%) in Group A, and nine (45%) in Group B, showing a significantly lower value in Group A. CONCLUSION The results suggest that in patients who experience difficulties with biliary cannulation, the use of a loop-tipped guidewire for pancreatic duct stenting may assist with the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and thereby to a reduction of the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis or hyperamylasemia. PMID:27574608

  19. Protein kinase C mediates the inhibitory effect of substance P on HCO3- secretion from guinea pig pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Varró, András; Tóth, András; Rácz, Gábor; Varga, Gábor; Gray, Michael A; Argent, Barry E

    2005-05-01

    The inhibitory control of pancreatic ductal HCO(3)(-) secretion may be physiologically important in terms of limiting the hydrostatic pressure developed within the ducts and in terms of switching off pancreatic secretion after a meal. Substance P (SP) inhibits secretin-stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion by modulating a Cl(-)-dependent HCO(3)(-) efflux step at the apical membrane of the duct cell (Hegyi P, Gray MA, and Argent BE. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 285: C268-C276, 2003). In the present study, we have shown that SP is present in periductal nerves within the guinea pig pancreas, that PKC mediates the effect of SP, and that SP inhibits an anion exchanger on the luminal membrane of the duct cell. Secretin (10 nM) stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion by sealed, nonperfused, ducts about threefold, and this effect was totally inhibited by SP (20 nM). Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 100 nM), an activator of PKC, reduced basal HCO(3)(-) secretion by approximately 40% and totally blocked secretin-stimulated secretion. In addition, bisindolylmaleimide I (1 nM to 1 microM), an inhibitor of PKC, relieved the inhibitory effect of SP on secretin-stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion and also reversed the inhibitory effect of PDBu. Western blot analysis revealed that guinea pig pancreatic ducts express the alpha-, beta(I)-, delta-, epsilon-, eta-, theta-, zeta-, and mu-isoforms of PKC. In microperfused ducts, luminal H(2)DIDS (0.5 mM) caused intracellular pH to alkalinize and, like SP, inhibited basal and secretin-stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion. SP did not inhibit secretion further when H(2)DIDS was present in the lumen, suggesting that SP and H(2)DIDS both inhibit the activity of an anion exchanger on the luminal membrane of the duct cell.

  20. Characterization of Insulin-Immunoreactive Cells and Endocrine Cells Within the Duct System of the Adult Human Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Yu, Lan; Zou, Xia; Zhao, Hailu

    2016-01-01

    The adult pancreatic duct system accommodates endocrine cells that have the potential to produce insulin. Here we report the characterization and distribution of insulin-immunoreactive cells and endocrine cells within the ductal units of adult human pancreas. Sequential pancreas sections from 12 nondiabetic adults were stained with biomarkers of ductal epithelial cells (cytokeratin 19), acinar cells (amylase), endocrine cells (chromogranin A; neuron-specific enolase), islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide), cell proliferation (Ki-67), and neogenesis (CD29). The number of islet hormone-immunoreactive cells increased from large ducts to the terminal branches. The insulin-producing cells outnumbered endocrine cells reactive for glucagon, somatostatin, or pancreatic polypeptide. The proportions of insulin-immunoreactive count compared with local islets (100% as a baseline) were 1.5% for the main ducts, 7.2% for interlobular ducts, 24.8% for intralobular ducts, 67.9% for intercalated ducts, and 348.9% for centroacinar cells. Both Ki-67- and CD29-labeled cells were predominantly localized in the terminal branches around the islets. The terminal branches also showed cells coexpressing islet hormones and cytokeratin 19. The adult human pancreatic ducts showed islet hormone-producing cells. The insulin-reactive cells predominantly localized in terminal branches where they may retain potential capability for β-cell neogenesis.

  1. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and K(+) channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Purinergic agonists have been considered for the treatment of respiratory epithelia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The pancreas, one of the most seriously affected organs in CF, expresses various purinergic receptors. Studies on the rodent pancreas show that purinergic signaling regulates pancreatic secretion. In the present study we aim to identify Cl(-) and K(+) channels in human pancreatic ducts and their regulation by purinergic receptors. Human pancreatic duct epithelia formed by Capan-1 or CFPAC-1 cells were studied in open-circuit Ussing chambers. In Capan-1 cells, ATP/UTP effects were dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have mutated CFTR, basolateral ATP and UTP had negligible effects. In addition to Cl(-) transport in Capan-1 cells, the effects of 5,6-dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (DC-EBIO) and clotrimazole indicated functional expression of the intermediate conductance K(+) channels (IK, KCa3.1). The apical effects of ATP/UTP were greatly potentiated by the IK channel opener DC-EBIO. Determination of RNA and protein levels revealed that Capan-1 cells have high expression of TMEM16A (ANO1), a likely CaCC candidate. We conclude that in human pancreatic duct cells ATP/UTP regulates via purinergic receptors both Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/ANO1 and CFTR) and K(+) channels (IK). The K(+) channels provide the driving force for Cl(-)-channel-dependent secretion, and luminal ATP provided locally or secreted from acini may potentiate secretory processes. Future strategies in augmenting pancreatic duct function should consider sidedness of purinergic signaling and the essential role of K(+) channels.

  2. Insulin and Glucagon Impairments in Relation with Islet Cells Morphological Modifications Following Long Term Pancreatic Duct Ligation in the Rabbit – A Model of Non-insulin-dependent Diabete

    PubMed Central

    Daumas, M.; Chanh, A. Pham Huu; Lasserre, B.; Hollande, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasma levels of glucose, insulin and glucagon were measured at various time intervals after pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) in rabbits. Two hyperglycemic periods were observed: one between 15–90 days (peak at 30 days of 15.1 ± 1.2mmol/l, p < 0.01), and the other at 450 days (11.2 ± 0.5 mmol/l, p < 0.02). The first hyperglycemic episode was significantly correlated with both hypoinsulinemia (41.8 ± 8pmol/l, r= –0.94, p < 0.01) and hyperglucagonemia (232 ± 21ng/l, r=0.95, p < 0.01). However, the late hyperglycemic phase (450 days), which was not accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, was observed after the hyperglucagonemia (390 days) produced by abundant immunostained A-cells giving rise to a 3-fold increase in pancreatic glucagon stores. The insulin and glucagon responses to glucose loading at 180, 270 and 450 days reflected the insensitivity of B- and A-cells to glucose. The PDL rabbit model with chronic and severe glycemic disorders due to the predominant role of glucagon mimicked key features of the NIDDM syndrome secondary to exocrine disease. PMID:12369713

  3. Successful Closure and Embolization of a Fistula Between the Pancreatic Duct and a Pseudocyst Using Ethibloc

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, Arno; Keulers, Peter; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1997-09-15

    We successfully achieved complete regression of a pancreatic pseudocyst after Ethibloc embolization of a fistula between the cyst and the pancreatic duct. Previous treatment by percutaneous drainage over 6 weeks had failed. Treatment with a somatostatin analog had not been undertaken.

  4. Acute on chronic pancreatitis causing a highway to the colon with subsequent road closure: pancreatic colonic fistula presenting as a large bowel obstruction treated with pancreatic duct stenting.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Context. Colonic complications associated with acute pancreatitis have a low incidence but carry an increased risk of mortality with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic colonic fistula is most commonly associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or abscess formation and rarely forms spontaneously. Classic clinical manifestations for pancreatic colonic fistula include diarrhea, hematochezia, and fever. Uncommonly pancreatic colonic fistula presents as large bowel obstruction. Case. We report a case of a woman with a history of recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis who presented with large bowel obstruction secondary to pancreatic colonic fistula. Resolution of large bowel obstruction and pancreatic colonic fistula was achieved with pancreatic duct stenting. Conclusion. Pancreatic colonic fistula can present as large bowel obstruction. Patients with resolved acute pancreatitis who have radiographic evidence of splenic flexure obstruction, but without evidence of mechanical obstruction on colonoscopy, should be considered for ERCP to evaluate for PCF. PCF not associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or peritoneal abscess can be treated conservatively with pancreatic duct stenting.

  5. Clear cell carcinoid tumor of the distal common bile duct

    PubMed Central

    Todoroki, Takeshi; Sano, Takaaki; Yamada, Shuji; Hirahara, Nobutsune; Toda, Naotaka; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Motojima, Ryuji; Motojima, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    Background Carcinoid tumors rarely arise in the extrahepatic bile duct and can be difficult to distinguish from carcinoma. There are no reports of clear cell carcinoid (CCC) tumors in the distal bile duct (DBD) to the best of our knowledge. Herein, we report a CCC tumor in the DBD and review the literature concerning extrahepatic bile duct carcinoid tumors. Case presentation A 73-old man presented with fever and occult obstructive jaundice. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) demonstrated a nodular tumor projection in the DBD without regional lymph node swelling. Under suspicion of carcinoma, we resected the head of the pancreas along with 2nd portion duodenectomy and a lymph node dissection. The surgical specimen showed a golden yellow polypoid tumor in the DBD (0.8 × 0.6 × 0.5 cm in size). The lesion was composed of clear polygonal cells arranged in nests and a trabecular pattern. The tumor invaded through the wall into the fibromuscular layer. Immunohistochemical stains showed that neoplastic cells were positive for neuron-specific enolase (NSE), chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and pancreatic polypeptide and negative for inhibin, keratin, CD56, serotonin, gastrin and somatostatin. The postoperative course was uneventful and he is living well without relapse 12 months after surgery. Conclusion Given the preoperative difficulty in differentiating carcinoid from carcinoma, the pancreaticoduodenectomy is an appropriate treatment choice for carcinoid tumors located within the intra-pancreatic bile duct. PMID:17227590

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-Guided Pancreatic Duct Drainage: The Basics of When and How to Perform EUS-Guided Pancreatic Duct Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Waxman, Irving; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic duct drainage (EUS-PDD) remains a technically challenging procedure. Technical success rates are greater than 70%; however, the average rate of adverse events is nearly 20%, which increases to 55% when stent migration is included. Until recently, a significant difficulty with this technique was the absence of dedicated devices. Proper patient selection is of utmost importance, and EUS-PDD should be reserved for patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. Furthermore, EUS-PDD must be performed by experienced endoscopists who are familiar with the technique. The most common indications include chronic pancreatitis induced strictures and stones, disconnected pancreatic ducts, inaccessible ampulla, and post-surgical altered anatomy. This manuscript will review the accessories used, techniques employed, and published literature reporting outcomes as well as adverse events regarding EUS-PDD. PMID:27012290

  7. Squamoid Cystosis of Pancreatic Ducts: A Variant of a Newly-Described Cystic Lesion, with Evidence for an Obstructive Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Wai Chin; Wang, Huamin; Prieto, Victor G.; Fleming, Jason B.; Abraham, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 40-year-old man who was found to have a cystic mass in the pancreatic tail during workup for weight loss and abdominal discomfort. Although computed tomography scan showed a single cyst associated with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, gross and histologic examination of the distal pancreatectomy specimen actually revealed a central cyst that was surrounded by multiple smaller cystic spaces. This distinctive appearance was formed from extensive cystic dilatation and squamous metaplasia of the native pancreatic duct system. Further, a traumatic neuroma was discovered near the junction between normal and abnormal parenchyma. We believe that this case represents a variant of the newly-described squamoid cyst of pancreatic ducts which we term squamoid cystosis of pancreatic ducts. The presence of chronic pancreatitis and a traumatic neuroma supports the hypothesis that squamoid cysts are non-neoplastic lesions arising from prior duct obstruction. PMID:25276318

  8. The potent activation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current by NVP-AUY922 in the human pancreatic duct cell line (PANC-1) possibly independent of heat shock protein 90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Nai-Jung; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2015-04-01

    NVP-AUY922 (AUY) is a potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Whether this compound can exert additional effects on membrane ion channels remains elusive. We investigated the effect of AUY on ion currents in human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (PDECs), including PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. AUY increased the amplitude of the K(+) current (IK) in PANC-1 cells shown by whole-cell configuration. Single-channel recordings revealed a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel in PANC-1, but not in MIA PaCa-2. In cell-attached mode, AUY increased the probability of BKCa channel opening and also potentiated the activity of stretch-induced channels. However, other HSP inhibitors, 17-AAG or BIIB021 only slightly increased the activity of BKCa channels. In inside-out recordings, sodium hydrosulphide or caffeic acid phenethyl ester increased the activity of BKCa channels, but AUY did not. We further evaluated whether conductance of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (IK(Ca)) influenced secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid in PDECs by using a modified Whitcomb-Ermentrout model. Simulation studies showed that an increase in IK(Ca) resulted in additional secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid by mimicking the effect of AUY in PDECs. Collectively, AUY can interact with the BKCa channel to largely increase IK(Ca) in PDECs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as a consequences of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Mateusz; Smoczyński, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    In last thirty years we have been observing significant development of an endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections, including transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis. Simultaneously, the use of endotherapy in treatment of main pancreatic ducts disruptions has increased. Despite many publications available in current literature, concerning the endoscopic treatment of consequences of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, the role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as an after-effect of severe acute pancreatitis remains unclear and is still a current problem. This publication includes comment on the article entitled 'Early dual drainage combining transpapillary endotherapy and percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pancreatic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis' published by Yokoi et al. in the July-August 2016 issue of Pancreatology together with questions to the authors. Furthermore, in the article we did pay particular attention to the role of transpapillary drainage in management of pancreatic fluid collections, especially of walled-of pancreatic necrosis.

  10. A Novel Model of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis: Murine Pancreatic Duct Ligation Results in Systemic Inflammation and Substantial Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Isaac; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K.; Twait, Erik; Williard, Deborah E.; Kempuraj, Duraisamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Suitable experimental models of gallstone pancreatitis with systemic inflammation and mortality are limited. We developed a novel murine model of duct-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis associated with multiorgan dysfunction and severe mortality. Methods Laparotomy was done on C57/BL6 mice followed by pancreatic duct (PD) ligation, bile duct (BD) ligation without PD ligation, or sham operation. Results Only mice with PD ligation developed acute pancreatitis and had 100% mortality. Pulmonary compliance was significantly reduced after PD ligation but not BD ligation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil count and interleukin-1β concentration, and the plasma creatinine level, were significantly elevated with PD ligation but not BD ligation. Pancreatic nuclear factor κB (p65) and activator protein 1 (c-Jun) were activated within 1 h of PD ligation. Conclusion PD-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice is associated with systemic inflammation, acute lung injury, multiorgan dysfunction and death. The development of this novel model is an exciting and notable advance in the field. PMID:20975317

  11. Diagnosis of pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula; a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anthony; Malden, Eric; Kugelmas, Marcelo; Kortz, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Pseudocysts containing activated enzymes are a common complication of pancreatitis. Pseudocysts can rupture into adjacent structures including the peritoneal cavity, adjacent organs, and rarely vascular structures. While arterial pseudoaneurysms and venous thrombosis or occlusion are well known complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, only 17 cases of pancreas-portal venous fistula have been encountered in review of the literature. A patient with chronic pancreatitis presented with a history of weight loss, fatigue and was found to have a pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula. The patient was treated surgically with good outcome.

  12. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the distal bile duct associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Martín Malagón, Antonio; López-Tomassetti Fernández, Eudaldo; Arteaga González, Iván; Carrillo Pallarés, Angel; Díaz Luis, Hermogenes

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) or inflammatory pseudotumor has been described in various organs such as the liver, intestinal tract, spleen, kidney, bladder, lung, peritoneum and heart. However, its appearance in the periampullary region is uncommon and has rarely been reported in the literature. It is characterized histologically by myofibroblastic cell proliferation together with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that clinically and radiologically mimics a malignant tumor. We report a case of IMT located in the distal common bile duct of a 51-year-old woman. She underwent Whipple resection with the initial diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma; the pathologic diagnosis of the tumor was IMT of the distal bile duct associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. Referring to previously reported cases, suspected diagnosis of a malignant tumor made surgical excision the primary choice for symptom relief and in order to obtain a definitive diagnosis. IMT relationship with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is discussed.

  13. Intraductal papillary-mucinous tumor of the pancreas head with complete absence of the ventral pancreatic duct of Wirsung.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoichi; Matsubara, Toshiki; Imazu, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Shigeru; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Ochiai, Masahiro; Funabiki, Takahiko; Mizoguchi, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    A case of intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas with complete absence of the ventral pancreatic duct of Wirsung is presented. A 74-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital because of elevated serum amylase concentration. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed diffuse dilatation of the main pancreatic duct and a diffuse and uncircumscribed area with heterogeneous density in the pancreas head. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed that the main pancreatic duct was connected with an accessory papilla and was diffusely dilated, without any irregularity of the duct wall being observed in the entire length of the duct. The common bile duct was detected only by cannulation through Vater's papilla, and no pancreatic duct or its communicating branch was found. Some branches, directed to the dorsal portion of the pancreas head, were found arising from the accessory pancreatic duct. Intraductal ultrasound examination performed through the accessory papilla and the common bile duct revealed a small tumor with a heterogeneous echo level in the pancreas head. From these findings, intraductal papillary-mucinous tumor (IPMT) occurring in the pancreas head was diagnosed, and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. The resected specimen revealed IPMT in the pancreas head. A roentgenographic study of the resected specimen revealed a defect caused by the tumor located in the pancreatic duct connected with the accessory papilla and showed that there was complete absence of the pancreatic duct connected with Vater's papilla. Surgical resection enabled us to completely analyze the duct system of pancreas divisum. Although it is not known whether there is a relationship between the pathogenesis of IPMT and embryological anomaly of the pancreatic duct system, this case may provide an insight into the pathogenesis of IPMT.

  14. Inflammatory Bile Duct Obstruction during the Healing Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Fujisawa, Mariko; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Abe, Yoko; Hoshi, Koki

    2017-01-01

    The patient was a 62-year-old woman with a history of severe acute pancreatitis complicated by walled-off necrosis (WON), who developed obstructive jaundice during the recovery phase from WON. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) revealed the complete obstruction of the distal bile duct, and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed thickening of the duct wall, with a uniform distribution, and a relatively well-preserved layered structure. A cytopathological examination using ERCP showed no malignancy. The underlying etiology of this case may have been the formation of a cicatricial stricture during the resolution of WON, in addition to fibrosis caused by the spreading of inflammation from pancreatitis.

  15. Duct Drainage Alone is Sufficient in the Operative Management of Pancreatic Pseudocyst in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nealon, William H.; Walser, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Objective To test a hypothesis that definitive management of pseudocyst associated with chronic pancreatitis is predicated on addressing pancreatic ductal anatomy. Summary Background Data The authors have previously confirmed the impact of pancreatic ductal anatomic abnormalities on the success of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst. The authors have further defined a system to categorize the pancreatic ductal abnormalities that can be seen with pancreatic pseudocyst. The authors have published, as have others, the usefulness of defining ductal anatomy when managing pancreatic pseudocysts associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods Beginning in 1985, all patients with pseudocyst who were candidates for intervention (operative, percutaneous, or endoscopic) have undergone endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). An associated diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis was established by means of ERCP findings. Patients were candidates for longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) if they had a pancreatic ductal diameter greater than 7 mm. In a nonrandomized fashion, patients were managed with either combined simultaneous LPJ and pseudocyst drainage or with LPJ alone. Results Two hundred fifty-three patients with pseudocyst have been evaluated. Among these there have been 103 patients with chronic pancreatitis and main pancreatic duct (MPD) dilatation (>7 mm). Among these 103 patients, 56 underwent combined LPJ/pseudocyst drainage and 47 had LPJ alone. Compared to combined LPJ/pseudocyst drainage, the patients undergoing LPJ alone had a shorter operative time, slightly less transfusion requirement, slightly reduced length of hospital stay, and slightly reduced complication rate. Long-term pain relief was achieved in 90%, and pseudocyst recurrence was less than 1%. Rates of each of these long-term outcomes were nearly incidental among the two groups. Conclusions Ductal drainage alone (LPJ) is sufficient in patients with chronic pancreatitis (MPD > 7

  16. Apical Cl-/HCO3- exchanger stoichiometry in the modeling of HCO3- transport by pancreatic duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Steward, Martin; Sohma, Yoshiro; Yamamoto, Akiko; Shimouchi, Akito; Kondo, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic duct cells secrete a HCO(3)(-)-rich (approximately 140 mM) fluid. Using a computer model of the pancreatic duct, Sohma, et al. have demonstrated that the activity of a Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger with a 1: 1 stoichiometry at the apical membrane would have to be suppressed in order to achieve such a HCO(3)(-)-rich secretion. Recently the apical exchanger in pancreatic ducts has been identified as SLC26A6 and this probably mediates most of Cl(-)-dependent HCO(3)(-) secretion across the apical membrane. SLC26A6 is reported to mediate electrogenic Cl(-)/2HCO(3)(-) exchange when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. To assess the implications of this 1: 2 stoichiometry for HCO(3)(-) secretion, we have reconstructed the Sohma model using MATLAB/Simulink. To do this we have formulated an expression for the turnover rate of Cl(-)/2HCO(3)(-) exchange using network thermodynamics and we have estimated the constants from published experimental data. Preliminary data suggest that the 1: 2 stoichiometry of SLC26A6 would favor HCO(3)(-) secretion at higher concentrations.

  17. Biliary tree stem cells, precursors to pancreatic committed progenitors: evidence for possible life-long pancreatic organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Carpino, Guido; Cui, Cai-Bin; Dominguez-Bendala, Juan; Wauthier, Eliane; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Pileggi, Antonello; Gerber, David; Furth, Mark E; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Inverardi, Luca; Reid, Lola M

    2013-09-01

    Peribiliary glands (PBGs) in bile duct walls, and pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) associated with pancreatic ducts, in humans of all ages, contain a continuous, ramifying network of cells in overlapping maturational lineages. We show that proximal (PBGs)-to-distal (PDGs) maturational lineages start near the duodenum with cells expressing markers of pluripotency (NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2), proliferation (Ki67), self-replication (SALL4), and early hepato-pancreatic commitment (SOX9, SOX17, PDX1, and LGR5), transitioning to PDG cells with no expression of pluripotency or self-replication markers, maintenance of pancreatic genes (PDX1), and expression of markers of pancreatic endocrine maturation (NGN3, MUC6, and insulin). Radial-axis lineages start in PBGs near the ducts' fibromuscular layers with stem cells and end at the ducts' lumens with cells devoid of stem cell traits and positive for pancreatic endocrine genes. Biliary tree-derived cells behaved as stem cells in culture under expansion conditions, culture plastic and serum-free Kubota's Medium, proliferating for months as undifferentiated cells, whereas pancreas-derived cells underwent only approximately 8-10 divisions, then partially differentiated towards an islet fate. Biliary tree-derived cells proved precursors of pancreas' committed progenitors. Both could be driven by three-dimensional conditions, islet-derived matrix components and a serum-free, hormonally defined medium for an islet fate (HDM-P), to form spheroids with ultrastructural, electrophysiological and functional characteristics of neoislets, including glucose regulatability. Implantation of these neoislets into epididymal fat pads of immunocompromised mice, chemically rendered diabetic, resulted in secretion of human C-peptide, regulatable by glucose, and able to alleviate hyperglycemia in hosts. The biliary tree-derived stem cells and their connections to pancreatic committed progenitors constitute a biological framework for life-long pancreatic

  18. Diagnostic Pitfalls and Therapeutic Strategies in the Treatment of Pancreatic Duct Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, P. J.; Mclauchlin, G.; Krige, J. E. J.; Thomson, J.; Marks, I. N.; Terblanche, J.

    1997-01-01

    Haemorrhage via the pancreatic duct, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), often poses a diagnostic dilemma. We analysed our experience with 10 patients (8 men, 2 women; mean age 44 years, range 34 – 62) treated during a 12 year period. All had a history of alcohol abuse and presented with major upper GIB requiring a median of 8 units (range 2 – 40) blood, transfusion. Nine had upper abdominal pain at the time of admission and nine had a history of pancreatitis. Upper gastroduodenal endoscopy (median 4; range 1 – 9), was diagnostic in only one. Side-viewing endoscopy showed bleeding from the pancreatic duct in 7 of 8 patients. Visceral aneurysms were demonstrated in 7 of 9 patients in whom coeliac angiography was carried out: (splenic artery 4, gastroduodenal artery 2, and pancreaticoduodenal artery 1). Two of 4 selective embolisations were successful. Six patients underwent distal pancreatectomy, 1 had gastroduodenal artery ligation and 1 died of coagulopathy following a total pancreatectomy. Pancreatic duct haemorrhage should be considered in patients with unexplained recurrent upper GIB, alcohol abuse and epigastric pain, particularly in those with established chronic pancreatitis. Selective angiography is essential for diagnosis and management. For bleeding sites in the head of the pancreas, embolisation should be attempted to avoid major resection. Distal pancreatectomy is preferred for splenic artery lesions. PMID:9298383

  19. A rare case of ascariasis in the gallbladder, choledochus and pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Gönen, Korcan Aysun; Mete, Rafet

    2010-12-01

    Due to the anatomical characteristics of the biliary tract, Ascaris lumbricoides rarely settles in the gallbladder, which makes biliary ascariasis a rare clinical condition. Ultrasonography plays a significant and practical role in the diagnosis and follow-up of suspected cases of biliary ascariasis. The 15-year-old case presented herein had been complaining of abdominal pain and dyspepsia for three months, and the clinical and laboratory findings for the patient indicated acute abdomen. Abdominal ultrasonography showed worms consistent with Ascaris inside a normal-sized gallbladder, dilated choledochus and the pancreatic duct. We started antiparasitic treatment in the patient, with cholangitis and pancreatitis diagnoses. Post-treatment follow-up ultrasonography showed a normal gallbladder, choledochus and pancreatic duct.

  20. Successful Pancreatic Duct Stent Placement for Recurrent Pancreatitis in a Patient with Polysplenia with Agenesis of the Dorsal Pancreas and Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Shintaro; Itoi, Takao; Iwasaki, Eisuke; Hosoe, Naoki; Ogata, Haruhiko; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with relapsing acute pancreatitis. A contrast CT scan revealed polysplenia, agenesis of the dorsal pancreas, preduodenal portal vein, inferior vena cava with persistent continuity of the azygos vein, abnormal lung lobation with bilateral left bronchial morphology, and intestinal malrotation (non-rotation type). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which successful pancreatic duct stent placement for the treatment of recurrent pancreatitis was performed in a polysplenia patient with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas, separate bile and pancreatic ducts and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

  1. Pancreatic duct obstruction in rabbits causes digestive zymogen and lysosomal enzyme colocalization.

    PubMed Central

    Saluja, A; Saluja, M; Villa, A; Leli, U; Rutledge, P; Meldolesi, J; Steer, M

    1989-01-01

    The pancreatic duct of anesthetized rabbits was cannulated and, in some animals, flow of pancreatic exocrine secretions was blocked by raising the cannula to a vertical position. Blockage for 3-7 h caused a rapid and significant rise in serum amylase activity and an increase in amylase activity within the pancreas. The concentration of lysosomal enzymes in the pancreas was not altered but they became redistributed among subcellular fractions and, as a result, an increased amount was recovered in the 1,000-g, 15-min pellet, which was enriched in zymogen granules. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that lysosomal enzymes become localized within organelles which, in size and distribution, resemble zymogen granules. They also contain digestive enzyme zymogens. Blockage of pancreatic secretions also caused lysosomal enzyme-containing organelles to become more fragile and subject to in vitro rupture. These changes noted after short-term pancreatic duct obstruction are remarkably similar to those previously noted to occur during the early stages of diet and secretagogue-induced experimental pancreatitis, observations that have suggested that colocalization of digestive enzyme zymogens and lysosomal hydrolases might result in intracellular digestive enzyme activation and be an important early event in the evolution of those forms of experimental acute pancreatitis. Images PMID:2477393

  2. High glucose inhibits HCO3(-) and fluid secretion in rat pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Futakuchi, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Naruse, Satoru; Ko, Shigeru B H; Fujiki, Kotoyo; Yamamoto, Akiko; Nakakuki, Miyuki; Song, Ying; Steward, Martin C; Kondo, Takaharu; Goto, Hidemi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular mechanisms underlying the impairment of pancreatic fluid and electrolyte secretion in diabetes were examined using interlobular ducts isolated from rat pancreas. Fluid secretion was assessed by monitoring changes in luminal volume. HCO3(-) uptake across the basolateral membrane was estimated from the recovery of intracellular pH following an acid load. Exposure to high glucose concentrations inhibited fluid secretion and reduced the rate of basolateral HCO3(-) uptake in secretin-stimulated ducts isolated from normal rats. In ducts isolated from streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats, fluid secretion and basolateral HCO3(-) uptake were also severely impaired but could be largely reversed by incubation in normal-glucose solutions. Sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), glucose transporter (GLUT)1, GLUT2, and GLUT8 transcripts were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in isolated ducts. Raising the luminal glucose concentration in microperfused ducts caused a depolarization of the membrane potential, consistent with the presence of SGLT1 at the apical membrane. Unstimulated ducts filled with high-glucose solutions lost luminal fluid by a phlorizin-sensitive mechanism, indicating that pancreatic ducts are capable of active glucose reabsorption from the lumen via SGLT1. In ducts exposed to high glucose concentrations, continuous glucose diffusion to the lumen and active reabsorption via SGLT1 would lead to elevation of intracellular Na+ concentration and sustained depolarization of the apical membrane. These two factors would tend to inhibit the basolateral uptake and apical efflux of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) and could therefore account for the impaired fluid and electrolyte secretion that is observed in diabetes.

  3. Anatomic variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system: MRCP findings of 1158 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Adibelli, Zehra Hilal; Adatepe, Mustafa; Imamoglu, Cetin; Esen, Ozgur Sipahi; Erkan, Nazif; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the frequencies of the anatomic variations and the gender distributions of these variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system as morphological sign of chronic pancreatitis using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). We retrospectively reviewed 1312 consecutive patients who referred to our department for MRCP between January 2013 and August 2015. We excluded 154 patients from the study because of less than optimal results due to imaging limitations or a history of surgery on pancreas. Finally a total of 1158 patients were included in the study. Among the 1158 patients included in the study, 54 (4.6%) patients showed pancreas divisum, 13 patients (1.2%) were defined as ansa pancreatica. When we evaluated the course of the pancreatic duct, we found the prevalence 62.5% for descending, 30% for sigmoid, 5.5% for vertical and 2% for loop. The most commonly observed pancreatic duct configuration was Type 3 in 528 patients (45.6%) where 521 patients (45%) had Type 1 configuration. Vertical course (p = 0.004) and Type 2 (p = 0.03) configuration of pancreatic duct were more frequent in females than males. There were no statistically significant differences between the gender for the other pancreatic duct variations such as pancreas divisium, ansa pancreatica and course types other than vertical course (p > 0.05 for all). Variants of pancreas divisum and normal pancreatic duct variants were not associated with morphologic findings of chronic pancreatitis by using the Cambridge classification system. The ansa pancreatica is a rare type of anatomical variation of the pancreatic duct, which might be considered as a predisposing factor to the onset of idiopathic pancreatitis.

  4. Anatomic variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system: MRCP findings of 1158 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Adatepe, Mustafa; Imamoglu, Cetin; Esen, Ozgur Sipahi; Erkan, Nazif; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The study was conducted to evaluate the frequencies of the anatomic variations and the gender distributions of these variations of the pancreatic duct and their relevance with the Cambridge classification system as morphological sign of chronic pancreatitis using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 1312 consecutive patients who referred to our department for MRCP between January 2013 and August 2015. We excluded 154 patients from the study because of less than optimal results due to imaging limitations or a history of surgery on pancreas. Finally a total of 1158 patients were included in the study. Results Among the 1158 patients included in the study, 54 (4.6%) patients showed pancreas divisum, 13 patients (1.2%) were defined as ansa pancreatica. When we evaluated the course of the pancreatic duct, we found the prevalence 62.5% for descending, 30% for sigmoid, 5.5% for vertical and 2% for loop. The most commonly observed pancreatic duct configuration was Type 3 in 528 patients (45.6%) where 521 patients (45%) had Type 1 configuration. Conclusions Vertical course (p = 0.004) and Type 2 (p = 0.03) configuration of pancreatic duct were more frequent in females than males. There were no statistically significant differences between the gender for the other pancreatic duct variations such as pancreas divisium, ansa pancreatica and course types other than vertical course (p > 0.05 for all). Variants of pancreas divisum and normal pancreatic duct variants were not associated with morphologic findings of chronic pancreatitis by using the Cambridge classification system. The ansa pancreatica is a rare type of anatomical variation of the pancreatic duct, which might be considered as a predisposing factor to the onset of idiopathic pancreatitis. PMID:27904444

  5. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  6. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-10-01

    Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment.

  7. Intra-pancreatic Distal Bile Duct Carcinoma is Morphologically, Genetically, and Clinically Distinct from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Konstantinidis, Ioannis T; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-Del; Hezel, Aram F; Haigis, Kevin M; Ting, David T; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Goyal, Lipika; Zhu, Andrew X; Warshaw, Andrew L; Lillemoe, Keith D; Ferrone, Cristina R

    2016-05-01

    Differentiating intra-pancreatic distal bile duct carcinoma invading the pancreas from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) surrounding the distal common bile duct (CBD) can be challenging. Our aim is to identify clinical, morphological, and genetic features characteristic of intra-pancreatic distal bile duct carcinoma. Clinicopathologic data of 550 patients undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy between September 1990 and May 2008 were reviewed. KRAS status was assessed with mass-spectrometric genotyping. Ninety-seven patients with intra-pancreatic adenocarcinomas surrounding the CBD were identified; slides were available for 80. Two relationships with the CBD were recognized as follows: type I (n = 42): cancer grew concentrically around the CBD and type II (n = 38): cancer grew asymmetrically around the CBD. Type I adenocarcinomas were associated with high-grade biliary dysplasia (45 vs. 13 %; p = 0.003); type II were associated with high-grade pancreatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PanIN-2 or -3) (39 vs. 9 %; p = 0.003). Type I tumors had a better median survival (46 months) compared to type II (23 months) or other PDAC (20 months) (p < 0.001). Mutated KRAS was identified in 3/26 (11 %) type I and 20/21 (95 %) type II cancers (p < 0.001). There may be poorer survival in the presence of a KRAS mutation than wild-type KRAS (22.9 vs. 41.6 months; p = 0.3). Distal periductal adenocarcinomas fall into two distinct groups with biologic, morphologic and genetic differences. Those growing symmetrically around the CBD are more likely to be intra-pancreatic distal bile duct carcinomas and are associated with improved survival whereas cancers with asymmetric growth are more likely to have KRAS mutations and to be PDACs. These findings facilitate a more accurate histopathological diagnosis, which could improve patient selection for therapeutic trials.

  8. Intrapancreatic distal common bile duct carcinoma: Analysis, staging considerations, and comparison with pancreatic ductal and ampullary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Bagci, Pelin; Basturk, Olca; Reid, Michelle D; Balci, Serdar; Knight, Jessica H; Kong, So Yeon; Memis, Bahar; Jang, Kee-Taek; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Tajiri, Takuma; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Kim, Grace E; Cheng, Jeanette D; Adsay, N Volkan

    2016-11-01

    Distal common bile duct carcinoma is a poorly characterized entity for reasons such as variable terminology and difficulty in determining site of origin of intrapancreatic lesions. We compared clinicopathologic features of pancreatobiliary-type adenocarcinomas within the pancreas, but arising from the distal common bile duct, with those of pancreatic and ampullary origin. Upon careful review of 1017 pancreatoduodenectomy specimens with primary adenocarcinoma, 52 (5%) qualified as intrapancreatic distal common bile duct carcinoma. Five associated with an intraductal papillary neoplasm were excluded; the remaining 47 were compared to 109 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and 133 ampullary carcinomas. Distal common bile duct carcinoma patients had a younger median age (58 years) than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (65 years) and ampullary carcinoma patients (68 years). Distal common bile duct carcinoma was intermediate between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and ampullary carcinoma with regard to tumor size and rates of node metastases and margin positivity. Median survival was better than for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (P=0.0010) but worse than for ampullary carcinoma (P=0.0006). Distal common bile duct carcinoma often formed an even band around the common bile duct and commonly showed intraglandular neutrophil-rich debris and a small tubular pattern. Poor prognostic indicators included node metastasis (P=0.0010), lymphovascular invasion (P=0.0299), and margin positivity (P=0.0069). Categorizing the tumors based on size also had prognostic relevance (P=0.0096), unlike categorization based on anatomic structures invaded. Primary distal common bile duct carcinoma is seen in younger patients than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or ampullary carcinoma. Its prognosis is significantly better than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and worse than ampullary carcinoma, at least partly because of differences in clinical presentation. Use of size-based criteria

  9. Intraoperative Ultrasound to Assess for Pancreatic Duct Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    cholecystocholangiopancreatography is often nondiagnostic, gastroenterologists may not be available for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP...10MHz.We use the SonoSite MicroMaxx SLT 10-5 MHz 52mm broadband linear array intraoperative US probe ( FUJIFILM SonoSite, Inc., Bothell, WA). The duct...Intraoperative US Availability Is gastroenterology available? Is the fluoroscopic and endoscopic equipment available? Is MRCP available? Is a

  10. Importance of common bile duct stricture associated with chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Gregg, J A; Carr-Locke, D L; Gallagher, M M

    1981-02-01

    Twenty-one patients with common bile duct strictures associated with chronic pancreatitis are described in whom ERCP was the principal diagnostic method used. In 5 of the 11 patients who had had previous pancreatic or biliary surgery, a common bile duct stricture was overlooked. Nine patients had one or more attacks of cholangitis which were severe in seven and caused death in one. Endoscopically aspirated bile cultures showed heavy gram-negative infection in four patients with previous cholangitis. Two patients developed stones above the strictures, and in one this led to obstruction of a previous cholecystjejunostomy. Although strictures may be discovered at an asymptomatic stage, there should be careful follow-up to detect the appearance of any symptoms or objective signs of stricture progression, when surgery should be offered without delay. Direct biliary-enteric anastomosis is the procedure of choice when possible to relieve symptoms and prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of cholangitis and septicemia.

  11. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Debra; Dhall, Deepti; Yu, Run

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults, which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery. α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia. Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge. Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:21245985

  12. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic and large common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of large pancreatic and common bile duct (CBD) calculi has always challenged the therapeutic endoscopist. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is an excellent tool for patients with large pancreatic and CBD calculi that are not amenable to routine endotherapy. Pancreatic calculi in the head and body are targeted by ESWL, with an aim to fragment them to < 3 mm diameter so that they can be extracted by subsequent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In our experience, complete clearance of the pancreatic duct was achieved in 76% and partial clearance in 17% of 1006 patients. Short-term pain relief with reduction in the number of analgesics ingested was seen in 84% of these patients. For large CBD calculi, a nasobiliary tube is placed to help target the calculi, as well as bathe the calculi in saline - a simple maneuver which helps to facilitate fragmentation. The aim is to fragment calculi to < 5 mm size and clear the same during ERCP. Complete clearance of the CBD was achieved in 84.4% of and partial clearance in 12.3% of 283 patients. More than 90% of the patients with pancreatic and biliary calculi needed three or fewer sessions of ESWL with 5000 shocks being delivered at each session. The use of epidural anesthesia helped in reducing patient movement. This, together with the better focus achieved with newer third-generation lithotripters, prevents collateral tissue damage and minimizes the complications. Complications in our experience with nearly 1300 patients were minimal, and no extension of hospital stay was required. Similar rates of clearance of pancreatic and biliary calculi with minimal adverse effects have been reported from the centers where ESWL is performed regularly. In view of its high efficiency, non-invasive nature and low complication rates, ESWL can be offered as the first-line therapy for selected patients with large pancreatic and CBD calculi. PMID:22110261

  13. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  14. Experiments to optimize enzyme substitution therapy in pancreatic duct-ligated pigs.

    PubMed

    Kammlott, E; Karthoff, J; Stemme, K; Gregory, P; Kamphues, J

    2005-01-01

    Ligation of the pancreatic duct in pigs leads to severe maldigestion and malabsorption of crude nutrients. Supplementation with 24 capsules of Creon (Solvay Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Hannover, Germany) per meal led to an increased digestibility of crude nutrients. With regard to optimization of the treatment of EPI no essential improvements can be achieved by adding omeprazol or lecithin to the diet. In pancreatic duct-ligated pigs the isolated addition of omeprazol led to an increase of the pre-caecal digestibility of crude fat and organic matter. With additional enzyme substitution, the application of omeprazol did not result in an improved fat digestibility. Isolated addition of lecithin to the diet resulted in a reduced total digestibility of crude fat. Offering the diet twice a day and using a higher frequency of enzyme applications (four or six instead of only two applications) had no effects on the digestibilty of crude fat or organic matter. According to the observations in pancreatic duct-ligated pigs, the addition of missing enzymes to the diet led to the best treatment results in EPI. Administration of omeprazol or a higher feeding frequency as well as the application of enzymes in small proportion of the whole meal or dosages given consecutively over the day showed no advantages. Furthermore, the present study suggests that the addition of lecithin cannot be recommended in EPI, when given diets with butter as the predominant fat source as in human dietetics.

  15. Thoracic duct ligation in the rat attenuates lung injuries in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Tsui, N; Li, Y; Wang, F

    2013-09-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), inflammatory cells and products disseminated in abdominal lymph and blood induce systemic inflammation. Interruption of abdominal lymph flow, and thereby reduction of lymphatic dissemination, could alter the course of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether thoracic duct ligation (TDL) in a rat model of cerulein-induced AP results in reduced lung damage as a marker for reduction of systemic dissemination through the lymphatic system. Thirty-four male rats were assigned to TDL (TDL-rats, n=8), AP (AP-rats, n=8), TDL+AP (TDL+AP-rats, n=9) or sham TDL (Ctr-rats, n=9) groups. TDL and sham TDL were established first. Two days later, AP was induced in AP- and TDL+AP-rats by a series of subcutaneous injections of cerulein. Vehicle was injected in the same manner in Ctr- and TDL-rats as controls. Rats were sacrificed six hours after the end of the serial injections. Histological examination showed that AP-induced damage to the pancreas and ileum were similar in AP- and TDL+AP-rats whereas lung damage was less severe in TDL+AP-rats than in AP-rats. Assays demonstrated that: hepatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activities were increased in AP-rats but not in the TDL+AP-rats; more Il-6 was found in AP-rat than TDL+AP-rat lungs; and lung-lavage fluid from AP-rats yielded more angiopoietin-2 than TDL+AP-rats. In conclusion, prior TDL in the rat attenuates lung damage in acute pancreatitis.

  16. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  17. Isolation, culture and genetic manipulation of mouse pancreatic ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Maximilian; Takano, Shigetsugu; Heeg, Steffen; Bakir, Basil; Botta, Gregory P; Rustgi, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    The most common subtype of pancreatic cancer is pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). PDAC resembles duct cells morphologically and, to some extent, at a molecular level. Recently, genetic-lineage labeling has become popular in the field of tumor biology in order to study cell-fate decisions or to trace cancer cells in the mouse. However, certain biological questions require a nongenetic labeling approach to purify a distinct cell population in the pancreas. Here we describe a protocol for isolating mouse pancreatic ductal epithelial cells and ductlike cells directly in vivo using ductal-specific Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) lectin labeling followed by magnetic bead separation. Isolated cells can be cultured (in two or three dimensions), manipulated by lentiviral transduction to modulate gene expression and directly used for molecular studies. This approach is fast (~4 h), affordable, results in cells with high viability, can be performed on the bench and is applicable to virtually all genetic and nongenetic disease models of the pancreas.

  18. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC.

  19. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions.

    PubMed

    Brugge, William; Dewitt, John; Klapman, Jason B; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-04-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18-month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pancreatic duct guidewire placement for biliary cannulation in a single-session therapeutic ERCP

    PubMed Central

    Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Bassioukas, Stefanos P; Kypreos, Dimitrios; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Scorilas, Andreas; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Dimitroulopoulos, Dimitrios; Paraskevas, Emmanouil

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the technical success and clinical complication rate of a cannulated pancreatic duct with guidewire for biliary access. METHODS: During a five-year study period, a total of 2843 patients were included in this retrospective analysis. Initial biliary cannulation method consisted of single-guidewire technique (SGT) for up to 5 attempts, followed by double-guidewire technique (DGT) when repeated unintentional pancreatic duct cannulation had taken place. Pre-cut papillotomy technique was reserved for when DGT had failed or no pancreatic duct cannulation had been previously achieved. Main outcome measurements were defined as biliary cannulation success and post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) complication rate. RESULTS: SGT (92.3% success rate) was characterized by statistically significant enhanced patient outcome compared to either the DGT (43.8%, P < 0.001), pre-cut failed DGT (73%, P < 0.001) or pre-cut as first step method (80.6%, P = 0.002). Pre-cut as first step method offered a statistically significantly more favorable outcome compared to the DGT (P < 0.001). The incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis did not differ in a statistically significant manner between either method (SGT: 5.3%, DGT: 6.1%, Pre-cut failed DGT: 7.9%, Pre-cut as first step: 7.5%) or with patients’ gender. CONCLUSION: Although DGT success rate proved not to be superior to SGT or pre-cut papillotomy, it is considered highly satisfactory in terms of safety in order to avoid the risk of a pre-cut when biliary therapy is necessary in difficult-to-cannulate cases. PMID:21528077

  1. Guadecitabine and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver, Pancreatic, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-19

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma, Biliary Type; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma, Biliary Type; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Gallbladder Cancer AJCC V7; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

  2. Pancreatic duct: A suitable route to oxygenate tissue during pancreas hypothermic preservation?

    PubMed

    Mirbolooki, M Reza; Alexander, Michael; Hoyt, David B; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2010-02-01

    The effectiveness of Two-Layer Method has been questioned recently. In this study we hypothesized that pancreatic duct might be an appropriate route to oxygenate the organ and prevent cold ischemic injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were employed for the pancreas procurement. Pancreata were removed after 20ml ductal injection of cold Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS), or pre-oxygenated solutions of HBSS (O-HBSS), perfluorocarbon (O-PFC), and emulsified PFC (O-ePFC) and then preserved in HBSS for 24h. Spectrophotometric analysis was performed to measure ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). To standardize metabolite data, values were reported in terms of 'per gram protein of pancreatic tissue'. Protein was measured according to Lowry et al. ADP/ATP ratio, total adenylates and energy charge (EC) were calculated. There was a significant decrease in tissue ATP after hypothermic preservation. Pancreatic tissues lost 47.8% of their ATP values just in the first hour of preservation and 98.5% of their ATP values within 12h of preservation and ductal oxygenation could not prevent the ischemia. Unlike the other groups, ductal injection of oxygenated PFC could slow the total adenylates reduction rate that no significant difference was detected (9.6+/-2.9 vs. 14.8+/-2.1mol/g protein, NS) after 12h of preservation. Ductal injection of oxygenated PFC significantly reduced ADP/ATP ratio (8.57+/-0.6 vs. 14.2+/-2.4, p<0.03) and improved intracellular energy charge (0.36+/-0.05 vs. 0.22+/-0.03, p<0.001) as compared to HBSS group. The findings indicate that the pancreatic duct might be a suitable route for pancreatic oxygenation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. β-Cell dedifferentiation, reduced duct cell plasticity, and impaired β-cell mass regeneration in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Noèlia; Vilaseca, Marina; Martí, Yasmina; Pla, Arturo; Montanya, Eduard

    2016-09-01

    Limitations in β-cell regeneration potential in middle-aged animals could contribute to the increased risk to develop diabetes associated with aging. We investigated β-cell regeneration of middle-aged Wistar rats in response to two different regenerative stimuli: partial pancreatectomy (Px + V) and gastrin administration (Px + G). Pancreatic remnants were analyzed 3 and 14 days after surgery. β-Cell mass increased in young animals after Px and was further increased after gastrin treatment. In contrast, β-cell mass did not change after Px or after gastrin treatment in middle-aged rats. β-Cell replication and individual β-cell size were similarly increased after Px in young and middle-aged animals, and β-cell apoptosis was not modified. Nuclear immunolocalization of neurog3 or nkx6.1 in regenerative duct cells, markers of duct cell plasticity, was increased in young but not in middle-aged Px rats. The pancreatic progenitor-associated transcription factors neurog3 and sox9 were upregulated in islet β-cells of middle-aged rats and further increased after Px. The percentage of chromogranin A+/hormone islet cells was significantly increased in the pancreases of middle-aged Px rats. In summary, the potential for compensatory β-cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy was retained in middle-aged rats, but β-cell dedifferentiation and impaired duct cell plasticity limited β-cell regeneration.

  4. Light-emitting diode modulates carbohydrate metabolism by pancreatic duct regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tatmatsu-Rocha, José Carlos; de Castro, Cynthia Aparecida; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-06-03

    Pancreatic lesions can produce metabolic disorders. Light-emitting diode (LED) has been used as a safe and effective phototherapy for cell proliferation and regeneration. We investigate the effects of phototherapy using LED irradiation on the pancreas after the injection of streptozotocin (STZ) to induce experimental diabetes and evaluate that the β cells can regenerate in the pancreas in an in vivo model and observe its implications on the control of carbohydrate metabolism. Twenty Wistar rats were randomized into three groups: non-diabetic control, diabetic control, and diabetic treated with LED. Except for the non-diabetic control group, all were induced to diabetes type I by streptozotocin injection. Treated groups were irradiated by LED: λ = 805 nm; 40 mW, 22 s; spot diameter 5 mm, spot area 0.196 cm(2), 0.88 J that it was applied on pancreas projection area for 5 consecutive days and monitored for 30 days. Diabetic group treated with LED showed regeneration of islets and ducts (p = 0.001) on the pancreas. Intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test showed differences between the diabetic control and diabetic treated groups (p = 0.03). In diabetic control group, the hepatic glycogen content was 296% lower when compared with diabetic treated with LED. Furthermore, in the diabetic control group, the glycogen content of the gastrocnemius muscle was 706% smaller when compared with diabetic treated with LED. This study shows that LED was able to modify morphological and metabolic features and also altered carbohydrate metabolism on irradiated pancreas in experimental model of diabetes.

  5. Pancreatic Duct Changes in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis Treated With Polyethylene and Sof-Flex Material Stents: A Blinded Comparison.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Andrew; Zeligman, Bernard; Russ, Paul; Austin, Gregory L; Yen, Roy; Shah, Raj J

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic stenting is used to improve painful, obstructive chronic pancreatitis. Data suggest that polyethylene stents (PESs) cause stent-associated changes (SACs). Whether a stent composed of more flexible material (Sof-Flex stent [SFS]) is associated with less SAC is unknown. This study is a retrospective study of patients who underwent pancreatic duct stenting of at least 1 PES and 1 SFS on separate examinations and had a follow-up pancreatogram at the time of stent removal. The main outcome measurements were assessed for SAC on follow-up pancreatogram and interpreted by 2 radiologists blinded to the clinical data. Stent-associated changes were noted with 28% (13/47) of SFS and with 25% (13/52) of PES (P = 0.65). For 10F stent subgroups, SACs were seen with 25% (6/24) of the SFS compared with 50% (2/4) in the PES. Thirty percent (7/23) of the 8.5F SFS subgroup had SACs versus 29% (2/7) in the PES group (P = 0.887) for 8.5F + 10F combined comparison. In patients who have had polyethylene or SFSs of varying sizes, approximately 1 in 4 have SACs. Despite the use of a softer stent material for therapeutic stenting, the rate of SACs in the 8.5F and 10F subgroups seems similar between the 2 materials and design.

  6. Collecting Duct Intercalated Cell Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ankita; Al-bataineh, Mohammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Intercalated cells are kidney tubule epithelial cells with important roles in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. However, in recent years the understanding of the function of the intercalated cell has become greatly enhanced and has shaped a new model for how the distal segments of the kidney tubule integrate salt and water reabsorption, potassium homeostasis, and acid-base status. These cells appear in the late distal convoluted tubule or in the connecting segment, depending on the species. They are most abundant in the collecting duct, where they can be detected all the way from the cortex to the initial part of the inner medulla. Intercalated cells are interspersed among the more numerous segment-specific principal cells. There are three types of intercalated cells, each having distinct structures and expressing different ensembles of transport proteins that translate into very different functions in the processing of the urine. This review includes recent findings on how intercalated cells regulate their intracellular milieu and contribute to acid-base regulation and sodium, chloride, and potassium homeostasis, thus highlighting their potential role as targets for the treatment of hypertension. Their novel regulation by paracrine signals in the collecting duct is also discussed. Finally, this article addresses their role as part of the innate immune system of the kidney tubule. PMID:25632105

  7. Na+-dependent transporters mediate HCO3– salvage across the luminal membrane of the main pancreatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Goo; Ahn, Wooin; Choi, Joo Young; Luo, Xiang; Seo, Jeong Taeg; Schultheis, Patrick J.; Shull, Gary E.; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Muallem, Shmuel

    2000-01-01

    To study the roles of Na+-dependent H+ transporters, we characterized H+ efflux mechanisms in the pancreatic duct in wild-type, NHE2–/–, and NHE3–/– mice. The pancreatic duct expresses NHE1 in the basolateral membrane, and NHE2 and NHE3 in the luminal membrane, but does not contain NHE4 or NHE5. Basolateral Na+-dependent H+ efflux in the microperfused duct was inhibited by 1.5 μM of the amiloride analogue HOE 694, consistent with expression of NHE1, whereas the luminal activity required 50 μM HOE 694 for effective inhibition, suggesting that the efflux might be mediated by NHE2. However, disruption of NHE2 had no effect on luminal transport, while disruption of the NHE3 gene reduced luminal Na+-dependent H+ efflux by ∼45%. Notably, the remaining luminal Na+-dependent H+ efflux in ducts from NHE3–/– mice was inhibited by 50 μM HOE 694. Hence, ∼55% of luminal H+ efflux (or HCO3– influx) in the pancreatic duct is mediated by a novel, HOE 694–sensitive, Na+-dependent mechanism. H+ transport by NHE3 and the novel transporter is inhibited by cAMP, albeit to different extents. We propose that multiple Na+-dependent mechanisms in the luminal membrane of the pancreatic duct absorb Na+ and HCO3– to produce a pancreatic juice that is poor in HCO3– and rich in Cl– during basal secretion. Inhibition of the transporters during stimulated secretion aids in producing the HCO3–-rich pancreatic juice. PMID:10841524

  8. Differentiating Branch Duct and Mixed IPMN in Endoscopically Collected Pancreatic Cyst Fluid via Cytokine Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda S; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Banks, Peter A; Sainani, Nisha I; Kadiyala, Vivek; Suleiman, Shadeah; Conwell, Darwin L; Paulo, Joao A

    2012-01-01

    Background. Differentiating branch duct from mixed intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) is problematic, but clinically important as mixed IPMNs are managed surgically, while some BD-IPMN may be followed. Inflammatory mediator proteins (IMPs) have been implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory and malignant pancreatic diseases. Aim. To compare IMP profile of pancreatic cyst fluid collected endoscopically from BD-IPMN and mixed IPMN. Methods. Pancreatic cyst fluid from ten patients (5 BD-IPMN and 5 mixed IPMN) was collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Concentrations of 89 IMPs in these samples were determined using a multiplexed bead-based microarray protein assay and compared between BD-IPMN and mixed IPMN. Results. Eighty-six of 89 IMPs were detected in at least one of the 10 samples. Fourteen IMPs were detected only in mixed IPMN, while none were only in BD-IPMN. Of these, TGF-β1 was most prevalent, present in 3 of 5 mixed IPMNs. Seventy-two IMPs were detected in both BD-IPMN and mixed IPMNs. Of these, only G-CSF (P < 0.05) was present in higher concentrations in mixed IPMNs. Conclusion. TGF-β1 and G-CSF detected in endoscopically collected pancreatic cyst fluid are potential diagnostic biomarkers capable of distinguishing mixed IPMN from BD-IPMN.

  9. Regeneration of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hee-Sook

    2008-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus results from inadequate mass of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by absolute loss of beta cells due to autoimmune-mediated destruction. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by relative deficiency of beta cells due to lack of compensation for insulin resistance. Restoration of deficient beta cell mass by transplantation from exogenous sources or by endogenous regeneration of insulin-producing cells would be therapeutic options. Mature beta cells have an ability to proliferate; however, it has been shown to be difficult to expand adult beta cells in vitro. Alternatively, regeneration of beta cells from embryonic and adult stem cells and pancreatic progenitor cells is an attractive method to restore islet cell mass. With information obtained from the biology of pancreatic development, direct differentiation of stem and progenitor cells toward a pancreatic beta cell phenotype has been tried using various strategies, including forced expression of beta cell-specific transcription factors. Further research is required to understand how endogenous beta cells differentiate and to develop methods to regenerate beta cells for clinically applicable therapies for diabetes.

  10. Alisertib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Effect of dexamethasone on peripheral blood leukocyte immune response in bile-pancreatic duct obstruction-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ramudo, Laura; Yubero, Sara; Manso, Manuel A; Recio, Javier S; Weruaga, Eduardo; De Dios, Isabel

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to analyze the effects of dexamethasone (Dx) (1mg/kg), prophylactically or therapeutically administered, on the inflammatory response triggered by peripheral blood leukocytes during acute pancreatitis (AP) induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO) and their consequences in the progress of the disease. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the distribution of the major leukocyte populations, the CD45 expression and the activated state of monocytes as reflected by the membrane-bound intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and monocyte chemoattract protein-1 (MCP-1) in response to lipopolysaccaride (LPS). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels, pancreatic fluid content and histology of pancreas sections were also evaluated. Dx, given either before or after AP, blunted the monocyte increase induced by BPDO-induced AP, but did not change lymphocyte and neutrophil counts. Membrane-bound ICAM-1 expression did not vary in circulating monocytes during BPDO, either in Dx-treated or non-treated rats. Both Dx treatments inhibited TNF-alpha and MCP-1 production in non-stimulated and LPS-stimulated monocytes, whose response was found to be higher than in controls from early AP. Leukocyte CD45 expression was found to be reduced in rats with AP and shifted to control values in Dx-post-treated rats. Cytokinemia as well as pancreatic edema and leukocyte infiltration found in BPDO rats were reduced by Dx given either before or after AP. We conclude that prophylactic and therapeutic Dx treatments inhibited the inflammatory response triggered by circulating leukocytes in rats with BPDO-induced AP, thus contributing to reducing the severity of the disease.

  12. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  13. Early Gastric Cancer Recurrence Following Curative Resection Presenting as Biliary Tract Dilatation, Pancreatic Duct Dilatation and Intestinal Wall Thickening.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yukiko; Tanaka, Eri; Noguchi, Kensaku; Yamamoto, Shinzo; Taniguchi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Hideo; Kumasaka, Toshio; Nakata, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Early gastric cancer, especially cancer confined to the mucosa (stage T1a), is known to have a high cure rate with rare recurrence. We herein report the case of a 40-year-old female who initially presented with biliary tract dilatation, pancreatic duct dilatation and intestinal wall thickening 3 years after curative resection of pT1aN0 stage gastric cancer. The intestinal resection specimen revealed tumor cells spreading through the subserosa to the submucosa sparing mucosal membrane, which made exploratory laparotomy the only approach to confirm the diagnosis. It is always important to be aware of malignancy recurrence and clinicians should not hesitate to choose exploratory laparotomy to avoid any delay in the diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Treatment of Common Bile Duct Obstruction by Pancreatic Cancer Using Various Stents: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Hirai, Ritsuko; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Tamakoshi, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Kanamori, Masao

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of various means of stenting in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Sixty-two patients with biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent biliary stenting. On the basis of the findings obtained by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography(10 patients) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (52 patients),the site of obstruction was distal to the hilar confluence,predominantly especially in the middle to lower third of the common bile duct. Polyurethane-covered Wallstents (9 mm in diameter) we reinserted in 13 patients, while uncovered Wallstents (10 mm in diameter)were used in 10 patients and plastic stents (10 Fr and 12 Fr) were used in 39 patients. Results: Stenting was successful in 34 patients (87.2%) treated with plastic stents and in 22 patients(95.7%) treated with Wallstents. Effective biliary drainage was achieved in 32 out of 34 patients (94.1%) treated with plastic stents and in 21 out of 22 patients (95.5%) treated with Wallstents. The cumulative patency rate was significantly higher for the uncovered and covered Wallstents compared to plastic stents, but was not significantly higher for covered than for uncovered Wallstents. Stentocclusion occurred in 23 patients (70%; all by clogging) from the plastic stent group, in two patients (22%; by tumor ingrowth) from the uncovered Wallstent group, and in one patient (9%; by clogging) from the covered Wallstent group. The survival rate showed no significant difference among the three stent groups. Conclusion: The Wallstent is effective for long-term palliation in patients with obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer invading the middle to lower part of the common bile duct. The covered Wallstent can prevent tumor ingrowth, a problem with the uncovered Wallstent. However, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent the migration or clogging of covered Wallstents.

  15. MicroRNA from pancreatic duct aspirate differentiates cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jon C; Bassi, Claudio; Giovinazzo, Francesco; Bloomston, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Prognostication for cystic neoplasms of the pancreas continues to evolve. Beyond simple size and cystic fluid CEA determination, microRNA (miRNA) detection holds great promise as molecular diagnostics for cancer risk. In this study, we sought to identify miRNAs that could predict malignant potential of pancreatic cystic lesions. RNA was harvested from the pancreatic duct aspirate of 72 cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. Samples with adequate RNA concentration (≥ 3 ng/μL) were selected for qRTPCR profiling using assays to 379 of the most common miRNAs. miRNA profiles were correlated with histopathology from resected specimens and grouped by benign (serous cystadenomas), premalignant (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystadenomas), or malignant lesions (adenocarcinoma). Adequate RNA for analysis was obtained from 42 (58.3 %) of the samples. Malignant lesions were more likely to have adequate RNA (n = 17, 81 %) than either benign (n = 6, 33 %) or premalignant lesions (n = 19, 59 %; p = 0.011). Nine miRNA were identified as differentially expressed between benign and premalignant/malignant lesions (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found between the number of differentially expressed miRNA and the likelihood of a premalignant/malignant lesion. All premalignant or malignant lesions expressed at least one miRNA surpassing the threshold of mean miRNA expression, whereas no benign lesions had more than one miRNA surpassing the threshold. The presence of RNA in the duct aspirate from patients with pancreatic cystic neoplasms may be a predictor of premalignancy or malignancy. miRNA may be utilized to further differentiate between benign, premalignant, and malignant cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  16. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24782785

  17. PPAR-gamma knockout in pancreatic epithelial cells abolishes the inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, C Y; Duan, S Z; Usher, M G; Mortensen, R M

    2007-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists, such as the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), decrease acute inflammation in both pancreatic cell lines and mouse models of acute pancreatitis. Since PPAR-gamma agonists have been shown to exert some of their actions independent of PPAR-gamma, the role of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic inflammation has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the differential role of PPAR-gamma in endodermal derivatives (acini, ductal cells, and islets) as opposed to the endothelial or inflammatory cells is unknown. To determine whether the effects of a TZD, rosiglitazone, on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis are dependent on PPAR-gamma in the endodermal derivatives, we created a cell-type specific knock out of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic acini, ducts, and islets. PPAR-gamma knockout animals show a greater response in some inflammatory genes after caerulein challenge. The anti-inflammatory effect of rosiglitazone on edema, macrophage infiltration, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines is significantly decreased in pancreata of the knockout animals compared with control animals. However, rosiglitazone retains its effect in the lungs of the pancreatic-specific PPAR-gamma knockout animals, likely due to direct anti-inflammatory effect on lung parenchyma. These data show that the PPAR-gamma in the pancreatic epithelia and islets is important in suppressing inflammation and is required for the anti-inflammatory effects of TZDs in acute pancreatitis.

  18. Histopathology and pathogenesis of caerulein-, duct ligation-, and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Rouse, Rodney L

    2014-09-01

    Three classical rodent models of acute pancreatitis were created in an effort to identify potential pre-clinical models of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) and candidate non-invasive biomarkers for improved detection of DIP. Study objectives included designing a lexicon to minimize bias by capturing normal variation and spontaneous and injury-induced changes while maintaining the ability to statistically differentiate degrees of change, defining morphologic anchors for novel pancreatic injury biomarkers, and improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for pancreatitis. Models were created in male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice through: 1) administration of the cholecystokinin analog, caerulein; 2) administration of arginine; 3) surgical ligation of the pancreatic duct. Nine morphologically detectable processes were used in the lexicon; acinar cell hypertrophy; acinar cell autophagy; acinar cell apoptosis; acinar cell necrosis; vascular injury; interstitial edema, inflammation and hemorrhage; fat necrosis; ductal changes; acinar cell atrophy. Criteria were defined for scoring levels (0 = absent, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe) for each lexicon component. Consistent with previous studies, histopathology scores were significant greater in rats compared to mice at baseline and after treatment. The histopathology scores in caerulein and ligation-treated rats and mice were significantly greater than those of arginine-treated rats and mice. The present study supports a multifaceted pathogenesis for acute pancreatitis in which intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, damage to acinar cells, fat cells, and vascular cells as well as activation/degranulation of mast cells and activated macrophages all contribute to the initiation and/or progression of acute inflammation of the exocrine pancreas.

  19. In vivo reprogramming of Sox9+ cells in the liver to insulin-secreting ducts.

    PubMed

    Banga, Anannya; Akinci, Ersin; Greder, Lucas V; Dutton, James R; Slack, Jonathan M W

    2012-09-18

    In embryonic development, the pancreas and liver share developmental history up to the stage of bud formation. Therefore, we postulated that direct reprogramming of liver to pancreatic cells can occur when suitable transcription factors are overexpressed. Using a polycistronic vector we misexpress Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA in the livers of NOD-SCID mice rendered diabetic by treatment with streptozotocin (STZ). The diabetes is relieved long term. Many ectopic duct-like structures appear that express a variety of β-cell markers, including dense core granules visible by electron microscopy (EM). Use of a vector also expressing GFP shows that the ducts persist long after the viral gene expression has ceased, indicating that this is a true irreversible cell reprogramming event. We have recovered the insulin(+) cells by cell sorting and shown that they display glucose-sensitive insulin secretion. The early formed insulin(+) cells can be seen to coexpress SOX9 and are also labeled in mice lineage labeled for Sox9 expression. SOX9(+) cells are normally found associated with small bile ducts in the periportal region, indicating that the duct-like structures arise from this source. This work confirms that developmentally related cells can be reprogrammed by suitable transcription factors and also suggests a unique therapy for diabetes.

  20. Progressive loss of pancreatic function in chronic pancreatitis is delayed by main pancreatic duct decompression. A longitudinal prospective analysis of the modified puestow procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Nealon, W H; Thompson, J C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of operative drainage of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) on functional derangements associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The author previously reported delayed functional impairment in an evaluation of the impact of operative drainage in patients with CP. The author now reports on a prospective study of 143 patients with this diagnosis. METHODS: Each patient underwent 1) ERCP, 2) the Bentiromide PABA, 3) 72-hour fecal fat test, 4) oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and 5) fat meal (LIPOMUL)--stimulated pancreatic polypeptide release (PP). All patients were stratified as mild/moderate (M/M) or severe CP on the basis of a 5-point system that was developed by the author. Patients were studied at 16-month intervals. RESULTS: All 143 patients underwent initial and follow-up evaluations in a mean follow-up of 47.3 months; 83 of 143 patients had M/M grade at initial evaluation. Eighty-seven patients underwent (MPD) decompression to relieve abdominal pain. In a separate prospective 17 patients with a diagnosis of CP, a grade of M/M and non-disabling abdominal pain were randomized to operative or non-operative treatment; 9 of these randomized patients were operated upon and 8 were not. No patient improved their grade during follow-up; 47 of 83 M/M patients had operative drainage and 36 did not. This grade was preserved in 41 of 47 (87%) operated patients but in only 8 of the 36 non-operated patients (22%). In the randomized trial, seven of nine operated patients retained their functional status in follow-up, whereas only two of eight patients (25%) randomized to non-operation preserved their functional grade. CONCLUSIONS: These data in this large study as well as among a previous randomized sample, support a policy of early operative drainage before the development of irreversible functional impairment in patients with chronic pancreatitis and associated dilation of the main pancreatic duct. PMID

  1. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jordan M.; Narang, Amol K.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Herman, Joseph M.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Dan; Eckhauser, Fred E.; Olson, Mathew T.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Miller, Robert C.; Andersen, Dana K.

    2011-01-01

    Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions' experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients) and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients) were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27–60). All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9–173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation. PMID:21464878

  2. Multiple small "imaging" branch-duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in familial pancreatic cancer: indicator for concomitant high grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Bartsch, D K; Dietzel, K; Bargello, M; Matthaei, E; Kloeppel, G; Esposito, I; Heverhagen, J T; Gress, T M; Slater, E P; Langer, P

    2013-03-01

    Most screening programs for familial pancreatic cancer are currently based on endoscopic ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cystic lesions, especially those suspicious for small intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the branch ducts, can be visualized in up to 40 % of individuals at risk, but their pathological importance in the setting of FPC is yet not well established. Individuals at risk from a prospective screening program for familial pancreatic cancer with small "imaging" IPMNs of the branch-duct type (BD-IPMN) who underwent pancreatic resection were analysed regarding clinico-pathological data and the locations of pancreatic lesions. Five of 125 individuals at risk who underwent screening had multiple small (size 2-10 mm) unicystic lesions and/or multicystic single lesions in the pancreatic body and tail suspicious for BD-IPMNs upon MRI imaging and decided to undergo surgical resection after interdisciplinary counselling, although none fulfilled the consensus criteria for IPMN resection. Histological examination revealed BD-IPMNs with low or moderate dysplasia of the gastric type in combination with multifocal PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions in 4 individuals. The remaining patient had only tiny ductectasias in the pancreatic tail with multifocal PanIN 2 lesions in the entire gland and one PanIN3 lesion in the pancreatic head. Intriguingly, the location of the most dysplastic histological lesions (PanIN3) did not correspond to the preoperatively detected lesions and were not visible in preoperative imaging. In the setting of FPC, the presence of multiple small "imaging" BD-IPMNs may indicate the presence of high-grade PanIN lesions elsewhere in the pancreas.

  3. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in the pancreatic duct provides direct visualization of ductal structures and aids in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Kahaleh, Michel; Turner, Brian G; Bezak, Karl; Sharaiha, Reem Z; Sarkaria, Savreet; Lieberman, Michael; Jamal-Kabani, Armeen; Millman, Jennifer E; Sundararajan, Subha V; Chan, Ching; Mehta, Shivani; Widmer, Jessica L; Gaidhane, Monica; Giovannini, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Confocal endomicroscopy provides real-time evaluation of various sites and has been used to provide detailed endomicroscopic imaging of the biliary tree. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and utility of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the pancreatic duct as compared to cytologic and histologic results in patients with indeterminate pancreatic duct strictures. Retrospective data on patients with indeterminate pancreatic strictures undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and confocal endomicroscopy were collected from two tertiary care centres. Real-time confocal endomicroscopy images were obtained during ERCP and immediate interpretation according to the Miami Classification was performed. 18 patients underwent confocal endomicroscopy for evaluation of pancreatic strictures from July 2011 to December 2012. Mean pancreatic duct size was 4.2mm (range 2.2-8mm). Eight cases were interpreted as benign, 4 as malignant, 4 suggestive of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and 2 appeared normal. Cytology/histopathology for 15/16 cases showed similar results to confocal endomicroscopy interpretation. Kappa coefficient of agreement between cyto/histopathology and confocal endomicroscopy was 0.8 (p=0.0001). Pancreatic confocal endomicroscopy changed management in four patients, changing the type of surgery from total pancreatectomy to whipple. Confocal endomicroscopy is effective in assisting with diagnosis of indeterminate pancreatic duct strictures as well as mapping of abnormal pancreatic ducts prior to surgery. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dilatation of the bile and pancreatic ducts due to compression by an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA): a case ameliorated by an endovascular stent grafting.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Toshiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Sakaguchi, Yutaku; Shibatani, Nobuyuki; Hachimine, Daisaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Seki, Toshihito; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to abdominal discomfort. Imaging modalities showed an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) compressing the duodenum, the distal common bile duct and the head of the pancreas concurrent with distension of the proximal bile and main pancreatic ducts in the body and tail of the pancreas. After admission, the patient underwent endovascular stent grafting to treat the AAA. The size of the aneurysm decreased and the dilatation of the bile and pancreatic ducts became less prominent. AAA should therefore be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with findings of dilatation of the bile ducts in the absence of stones or tumors in the pancreaticobiliary system. This is the first reported case of a patient treated for both AAA and dilatation of the bile and pancreatic ducts with endovascular stent grafting via the femoral artery.

  5. Factors determining recurrence of fluid collections following migration of intended long term transmural stents in patients with walled off pancreatic necrosis and disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Sharma, Ravi; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Long-term indwelling transmural stents in patients with walled off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) and disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) decreases risk of recurrence of pancreatic fluid collection (PFC). However, stents can spontaneously migrate causing recurrence of PFC in some patients whereas some patients may have asymptomatic migration of stents. We aim to retrospectively evaluate profile of patients with recurrent PFC following migration of transmural stents in patients with WOPN and DPDS and compare it with patients who had asymptomatic migration of stents. Records of consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic transmural drainage of WOPN over last 4 years were analyzed and patients with DPDS identified. Thirty-five patients (29 M; mean age 37.0 ± 7.6 years) were followed-up for mean of 28.2 ± 14.0 months (range: 6-50 months). Eight patients (22.8%) had spontaneous migration of stents. It led to recurrence of PFC in three patients, whereas in five patients it was asymptomatic. The patients with recurrent PFC had early stent migration (2, 4, and 5 months respectively) whereas patients with asymptomatic migration had their stents migrating >6 months of resolution. Patients with recurrent PFC had duct disruption in pancreatic head (100% vs. 20%), and low frequency of diabetes (nil vs. 40%), steatorrhea (nil vs. 20%) as well as pancreatic atrophy (nil vs. 80%). Early migration of stents, ductal disruption in pancreatic head as well as absence of diabetes, steatorrhea, and pancreatic atrophy seem to increase risk of recurrent PFC following migration of transmural stents in patients with DPDS.

  6. Expression of claudin-5 in canine pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma - An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Csaba; Rusvai, Miklós; Gálfi, Péter; Halász, Judit; Kulka, Janina

    2011-03-01

    Claudin-5 is an endothelium-specific tight junction protein. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression pattern of this molecule in intact pancreatic tissues and in well-differentiated and poorly differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas from dogs by the use of cross-reactive humanised anticlaudin-5 antibody. The necropsy samples taken from dogs included 10 nonneoplastic pancreatic tissues, 10 well-differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas, 10 poorly differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas, 5 intrahepatic metastases of well-differentiated and 5 intrahepatic metastases of poorly differentiated acinar cell carcinomas. A strong lateral membrane claudin-5 positivity was detected in exocrine cells in all intact pancreas samples. The endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans and the epithelial cells of the ducts were negative for claudin-5. The endothelial cells of vessels and lymphatic channels in the stroma of the intact pancreas showed strong membrane positivity for this claudin. All well-differentiated exocrine pancreas carcinomas and all poorly-differentiated pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma samples showed a diffuse loss of claudin-5 expression. The claudin-5-positive peritumoural vessels and lymphatic channels facilitated the detection of vascular invasion of the claudin-5-negative cancer cells. In liver metastasis samples, the pancreatic carcinomas were negative for claudin-5. It seems that the loss of expression of claudin-5 may lead to carcinogenesis in canine exocrine pancreatic cells.

  7. Basal autophagy maintains pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and protein synthesis and prevents ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Laura; Fagman, Johan B.; Kim, Ju Youn; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovsky, Ilya; Mackey, Mason; Ellisman, Mark H.; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells possess very high protein synthetic rates as they need to produce and secrete large amounts of digestive enzymes. Acinar cell damage and dysfunction cause malnutrition and pancreatitis, and inflammation of the exocrine pancreas that promotes development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a deadly pancreatic neoplasm. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain acinar cell function and whose dysregulation can lead to tissue damage and chronic pancreatitis are poorly understood. It was suggested that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis, but it is unknown whether impaired autophagy is a cause or a consequence of pancreatitis. To address this question, we generated Atg7Δpan mice that lack the essential autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) in pancreatic epithelial cells. Atg7Δpan mice exhibit severe acinar cell degeneration, leading to pancreatic inflammation and extensive fibrosis. Whereas ATG7 loss leads to the expected decrease in autophagic flux, it also results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, oxidative stress, activation of AMPK, and a marked decrease in protein synthetic capacity that is accompanied by loss of rough ER. Atg7Δpan mice also exhibit spontaneous activation of regenerative mechanisms that initiate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a process that replaces damaged acinar cells with duct-like structures. PMID:26512112

  8. Postprandial changes in secretory flow of pancreatic juice in the main pancreatic duct: evaluation with cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse.

    PubMed

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of oral ingestion on the secretory flow dynamics of physiological pancreatic juice within the main pancreatic duct in healthy subjects by using cine-dynamic MRCP with spatially-selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse non-invasively. Thirty-eight healthy subjects were investigated. MRCP with spatially-selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 s for 5 min to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). A set of 20 MRCP images was repeatedly obtained before and after liquid oral ingestion every 7 min (including 2-min interval) for 40 min (a total of seven sets). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice on cine-dynamic MRCP was compared before and after oral ingestion using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Median secretion grades of pancreatic juice at 5 min (score = 2.15), 12 min (score = 1.95) and 19 min (score = 2.05) after ingestion were significantly higher than that before ingestion (score = 1.40) (P = 0.004, P = 0.032, P = 0.045, respectively). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice showed a maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. Thereafter, the secretion grade of pancreatic juice tended to gradually decline. Non-invasive cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially-selective IR pulse showed potential for evaluating postprandial changes in the secretory flow dynamics of pancreatic juice as a physiological reaction. • Secretion grade of pancreatic juice at cine-dynamic MRCP after ingestion was evaluated. • Secretion grade was significantly increased within 19 min after liquid meal ingestion. • Secretion grade showed maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. • Postprandial changes in pancreatic juice flow can be assessed by cine-dynamic MRCP.

  9. Pancreatic stellate cell: Pandora's box for pancreatic disease biology

    PubMed Central

    Bynigeri, Ratnakar R; Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Subramanyam, Chivukula; Sasikala, Mitnala; Rao, G Venkat; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were identified in the early 1980s, but received much attention after 1998 when the methods to isolate and culture them from murine and human sources were developed. PSCs contribute to a small proportion of all pancreatic cells under physiological condition, but are essential for maintaining the normal pancreatic architecture. Quiescent PSCs are characterized by the presence of vitamin A laden lipid droplets. Upon PSC activation, these perinuclear lipid droplets disappear from the cytosol, attain a myofibroblast like phenotype and expresses the activation marker, alpha smooth muscle actin. PSCs maintain their activated phenotype via an autocrine loop involving different cytokines and contribute to progressive fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Several pathways (e.g., JAK-STAT, Smad, Wnt signaling, Hedgehog etc.), transcription factors and miRNAs have been implicated in the inflammatory and profibrogenic function of PSCs. The role of PSCs goes much beyond fibrosis/desmoplasia in PDAC. It is now shown that PSCs are involved in significant crosstalk between the pancreatic cancer cells and the cancer stroma. These interactions result in tumour progression, metastasis, tumour hypoxia, immune evasion and drug resistance. This is the rationale for therapeutic preclinical and clinical trials that have targeted PSCs and the cancer stroma. PMID:28210075

  10. Pancreatic stellate cell: Pandora's box for pancreatic disease biology.

    PubMed

    Bynigeri, Ratnakar R; Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Subramanyam, Chivukula; Sasikala, Mitnala; Rao, G Venkat; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-01-21

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were identified in the early 1980s, but received much attention after 1998 when the methods to isolate and culture them from murine and human sources were developed. PSCs contribute to a small proportion of all pancreatic cells under physiological condition, but are essential for maintaining the normal pancreatic architecture. Quiescent PSCs are characterized by the presence of vitamin A laden lipid droplets. Upon PSC activation, these perinuclear lipid droplets disappear from the cytosol, attain a myofibroblast like phenotype and expresses the activation marker, alpha smooth muscle actin. PSCs maintain their activated phenotype via an autocrine loop involving different cytokines and contribute to progressive fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Several pathways (e.g., JAK-STAT, Smad, Wnt signaling, Hedgehog etc.), transcription factors and miRNAs have been implicated in the inflammatory and profibrogenic function of PSCs. The role of PSCs goes much beyond fibrosis/desmoplasia in PDAC. It is now shown that PSCs are involved in significant crosstalk between the pancreatic cancer cells and the cancer stroma. These interactions result in tumour progression, metastasis, tumour hypoxia, immune evasion and drug resistance. This is the rationale for therapeutic preclinical and clinical trials that have targeted PSCs and the cancer stroma.

  11. GP2-expressing cells in the conjunctiva and tear ducts of mice: identification of a novel type of cells in the squamous stratified epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shunsuke; Kishimoto, Ayuko; Mutoh, Mami; Takahashi-Iwanaga, Hiromi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    GP2 is a membrane-associated secretory protein originally identified in zymogen granules of pancreatic acinar cells. Recently, this glycoprotein has attracted attention as a marker substance of M cells of Peyer's patches and for its involvement in the selective uptake of pathological bacteria via M cells. When we stained the conjunctiva and tear ducts of mice using a GP2 antibody, all goblet cells in the squamous stratified epithelium of the conjunctiva were intensely immunolabeled, while goblet cells in the intestine and airway were devoid of the immunoreactivity, indicating that the conjunctiva contains a special type of goblet cell. Further immunostaining for GP-2 labeled dispersed cells of peculiar shapes within the stratified squamous epithelium in the lacrimal canaliculi, lacrimal sac, and nasolacrimal duct. The GP2-immunoreactive cells in the tear duct projected arched or branched processes toward the basement membrane. Electron-microscopically, immunogold particles for GP2 outlined the basolateral plasma membrane of both the conjuntival goblet cells and the peculiarly shaped cells in the tear duct. Intracellularly, GP2 products of the goblet cells were localized around secretory granules in the apical cytoplasm and those of the tear duct cells inside the vesicles. The luminal contents close to apical plasma membrane were heavily labeled with immunogold particles, suggesting an exocytosis-based targeting of GP2 to the plasma membrane and its release into the lumen. The possible function of GP2 in tear ducts is discussed in relation to a defense system against invasive microoranisms and antigens.

  12. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  13. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ayşe; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  14. Apigenin Inhibits Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activity in Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Porro, Laura J.; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Falzon, Miriam; Spratt, Heidi; Zhou, Jia; Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by recurrent pancreatic injury, resulting in inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis. There are currently no drugs limiting pancreatic fibrosis associated with CP, and there is a definite need to fill this void in patient care. MATERIALS AND METHODS Pancreatitis was induced in C57/BL6 mice using supraphysiologic doses of cerulein (CR), and apigenin treatment (once daily, 50 μg/mouse by oral gavage) was initiated one week into the recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) protocol. Pancreata were harvested after four weeks of RAP. Immunostaining with fibronectin antibody was used to quantify the extent of pancreatic fibrosis. To assess how apigenin may decrease organ fibrosis, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) in vitro. Lastly, we assessed apigenin’s effect on gene expression in PSCs stimulated with parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), a pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory mediator of pancreatitis, using RT-PCR. RESULTS After four weeks of RAP, apigenin significantly reduced the fibrotic response to injury while preserving acinar units. Apigenin inhibited viability and induced apoptosis of PSCs in a time and dose-dependent manner. Lastly, apigenin reduced PTHrP-stimulated increases in the PSC mRNA expression levels of extracellular matrix proteins collagen 1A1 and fibronectin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, TGF-β, and IL-6. CONCLUSIONS These in vivo and in vitro studies provide novel insights regarding apigenin’s mechanism(s) of action in reducing the severity of RAP. Additional preclinical testing of apigenin analogs is warranted to develop a therapeutic agent for patients at risk for CP. PMID:25799526

  15. Pancreatic growth and cell turnover in the rat fed raw soya flour

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, P.S.; Morgan, R.G. )

    1982-08-01

    Growth and differentiation of the pancreatic acinar cell was studied in rats fed raw soya flour (RSF) for up to a year. A second group of rats were fed a control diet. After 1 week of RSF feeding there was a 200% increase in tissue RNA and weight, indicating initial hypertrophy, which was maintained for the 1-year study period. By the second week and over the remainder of the period studied there was also a marked increase in total DNA, suggesting hyperplasia. Cell turnover, as measured by the rate of incorporation of 3H-thymidine into pancreatic DNA, was significantly higher in RSF-fed animals only from the second to fourth weeks; it then returned to control values. Autoradiography showed an 18-fold increase in duct cell labeling at the end of the first week and an 11-fold increase by the end of the second week. Acinar cell labeling doubled from the second to the twelfth week. These studies confirm previous reports that RSF produces pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. They furthermore show that there is initially marked stimulation of DNA synthesis in the duct cell compartment. The results suggest that cells with the morphologic characteristics of duct cells may be the precursors of acinar cells in hyperplastic pancreatic tissue.

  16. Cross-Species Analysis of Nicotine-Induced Proteomic Alterations in Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Urrutia, Raul; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxic compounds in tobacco, such as nicotine, may have adversely affect pancreatic function. We aim to determine nicotine-induced protein alterations in pancreatic cells, which may reveal a link between nicotine exposure and pancreatic disease. Methods We compared the proteomic alterations induced by nicotine treatment in cultured pancreatic cells (mouse, rat and human stellate cells and human duct cells) using mass spectrometry-based techniques, specifically GeLC-MS/MS and spectral counting. Results We identified thousands of proteins in pancreatic cells, hundreds of which were identified exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated cells. Inter-species comparisons of stellate cell proteins revealed several differentially-abundant proteins (in nicotine treated versus untreated cells) common among the 3 species. Proteins appearing in all nicotine-treated stellate cells include amyloid beta (A4), procollagen type VI alpha 1, integral membrane protein 2B,and Toll interacting protein. Conclusions Proteins which were differentially expressed upon nicotine treatment across cell lines, were enriched in certain pathways, including nAChR, cytokine, and integrin signaling. At this analytical depth, we conclude that similar pathways are affected by nicotine, but alterations at the protein level among stellate cells of different species vary. Further interrogation of such pathways will lead to insights into the potential effect of nicotine on pancreatic cells at the biomolecular level and the extension of this concept to the effect of nicotine on pancreatic disease. PMID:23456891

  17. Intra-ductal infusion of taurocholate followed by distal common bile duct ligation leads to a severe, necrotic model of pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tianming; Eisses, John F.; Lemon, Kathryn L.; Ozolek, John A.; Pociask, Derek A.; Orabi, Abrahim I.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The most common etiology for acute pancreatitis results from the impaction of gallstones or sludge in the distal common bile duct (CBD). The result is pancreatic duct obstruction, diversion of bile into the pancreas, or cholestasis. In the current study, we examined whether combining both aspects, that is, infusion of the bile acid taurocholate (TC) followed by bile duct ligation (BDL), could yield a more severe form of pancreatitis that mimics biliary pancreatitis. Methods In mice, following laparotomy, the CBD was infused with either normal saline (NS) or TC. Subsequently, the CBD was ligated at the ampulla. Results Mice receiving TC infusion followed by BDL (TC+BDL) had higher mortality compared to animals receiving intra-ductal NS with BDL (NS+BDL). The TC+BDL arm developed more severe and diffuse pancreatic necrosis. In addition, serum amylase, IL-6, and bilirubin, were significantly higher. However, pancreatic edema as well as lung and liver injury were unchanged between TC+BDL and NS+BDL. Conclusions In summary, the combination of bile infusion into the pancreas followed by BDL causes a more severe, necrotizing pancreatitis. We believe this novel model of pancreatitis is useful because it can be employed in transgenic mice and recapitulates several aspects of biliary pancreatitis. PMID:25469547

  18. IRBIT coordinates epithelial fluid and HCO3– secretion by stimulating the transporters pNBC1 and CFTR in the murine pancreatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongki; Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Zeng, Weizhong; Ohana, Ehud; So, Insuk; Ando, Hideaki; Mizutani, Akihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Muallem, Shmuel

    2008-01-01

    Fluid and HCO3– secretion are vital functions of secretory epithelia. In most epithelia, this entails HCO3– entry at the basolateral membrane, mediated by the Na+-HCO3– cotransporter, pNBC1, and exit at the luminal membrane, mediated by a CFTR-SLC26 transporters complex. Here we report that the protein IRBIT (inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3), a previously identified activator of pNBC1, activates both the basolateral pNBC1 and the luminal CFTR to coordinate fluid and HCO3– secretion by the pancreatic duct. We used video microscopy and ion selective microelectrodes to measure fluid secretion and Cl– and HCO3– concentrations in cultured murine sealed intralobular pancreatic ducts. Short interference RNA–mediated knockdown of IRBIT markedly inhibited ductal pNBC1 and CFTR activities, luminal Cl– absorption and HCO3– secretion, and the associated fluid secretion. Single-channel measurements suggested that IRBIT regulated CFTR by reducing channel mean close time. Furthermore, expression of IRBIT constructs in HEK cells revealed that activation of pNBC1 required only the IRBIT PEST domain, while activation of CFTR required multiple IRBIT domains, suggesting that IRBIT activates these transporters by different mechanisms. These findings define IRBIT as a key coordinator of epithelial fluid and HCO3– secretion and may have implications to all CFTR-expressing epithelia and to cystic fibrosis. PMID:19033647

  19. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  20. Presence and density of common bile duct microlithiasis in acute biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kohut, Maciej; Nowak, Andrzej; Nowakowska-Dulawa, Ewa; Marek, Tomasz

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Common bile duct microlithiasis (CBDM) is found in majority of patients with acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) and no CBD stones in fluoroscopy during urgent ERCP. It is unclear, however, weather CBDM is a cause or the result of the disease. This prospective study was done to investigate the presence and density of CBDM in patients with ABP, when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was done in different periods from the onset of the disease. METHODS: One hundred fifty one consecutive patients with ABP and no CBDS on ERCP, performed as an urgent (< 24 h of admission) procedure, (101 - with gallbladder stones, 50 post-cholecystectomy patients), treated during last 4 years were prospectively included to the study. The presence and density of CBDM (cholesterol monohydrate crystals-CMCs and calcium bilirubinate granules-CBGs) in bile collected directly from common bile duct during ERCP was prospectively calculated according to Juniper and Burson criteria. High density of crystals was considered, when we found > 10 CMCs and/or > 25 clusters of CBGs on 1 slide. RESULTS: CBD microlithiasis was present in given number of patients: on d1-30/34 (88.2%), on d2-41/49 (83.7%), on d3-23/33 (69.6%), on d4-7-24/35 (68.6%) [P for trend = 0.018]. In patients with CBD microlithiasis the high density of crystals was observed in given number of patients:on d1-27/30 (90%), on d2-34/41 (82.9%), on d3-18/23 (78.3%), on d4-7-16/24 (66.7%) [P for trend = 0.039]. CONCLUSION: In patients with ABP and no CBDS on ERCP, CBD microlithiasis is observed in the majority of patients, especially during the first day of the disease. Density of CBD microlithiasis is the highest in the first day of the disease. This suggests that CBD microlithiasis can be the cause and not the result of ABP. PMID:12046092

  1. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  2. Incomplete Annular Pancreas with Ectopic Opening of the Pancreatic and Bile Ducts into the Pyloric Ring: First Report of a Rare Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Hoshino, Horoyuki; Segami, Kouhei; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ooike, Nobuyuki; Otsubo, Takehito

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 56-year-old woman who had experienced epigastralgia and dorsal pain several times over the last 20 years. She was admitted for a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, and severe intra- and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation with inner air density was noted. No papilla of Vater was present in the descending duodenum, and 2 small holes were present in the pyloric ring. Bile excretion from one of the small holes was observed under forward-viewing endoscope. It was considered that the pancreatic and bile ducts separately opened into the pyloric ring. Based on these findings, malformation of the pancreaticobiliary duct was diagnosed. She did not wish treatment, but the obstruction associated with duodenal stenosis was noted after 2 years. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed as curative treatment for duodenal stenosis and retrograde biliary infection through the bile duct opening in the pyloric ring. The ventral pancreas encompassed almost the entire circumference of the pyloric ring, suggesting a subtype of annular pancreas. Generally, lesions are present in the descending part of the duodenum in an annular pancreas, and the pancreatic and bile ducts join in the papillary region. However, in this patient, (1) the pancreas encompassed the pyloric ring, (2) the pancreatic and bile ducts opened separately, and (3) the openings of the pancreatic and bile ducts were present in the pyloric ring. The pancreas and biliary tract develop through a complex process, which may cause various types of malformation of the pancreaticobiliary system, but no similar case report was found on a literature search. This case was very rare and could not be classified in any type of congenital anomaly of the pancreas. We would classify it as a subtype of annular pancreas with separate ectopic opening of the pancreatic and bile ducts into the pyloric ring.

  3. Molecular biology of adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic duct, current state and future therapeutic avenues.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saleh

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a lethal disease; currently surgery offers five years survival of less than 5%. Any improvement in the outcome is likely to be through novel therapeutic agents that will target the genetic machinery of the cell. Knowledge of genetic alterations in the process of carcinogenesis is expanding rapidly, the targeted therapy, however, is progressing slowly. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lend the cancer cells their ability not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes involve genetic alteration in oncogenes, cancer suppressor genes, changes in cell cycle, pathways of apoptosis and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Monotherapeutic targeted agents seem(s) to have limited effect on cancer cells. The near future is likely to show an improvement in the treatment outcome, which is likely to be a result of the combination of targeted agents with surgery and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  5. cAMP-activated chloride channels in a CFTR-transfected pancreatic adenocarcinoma-derived cell line, pANS6.

    PubMed

    Smith, A N; Wardle, C J; Winpenny, J P; Verdon, B; Gray, M A; Argent, B E; Harris, A

    1995-06-09

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines rarely express the CFTR gene, despite the high levels of CFTR protein that are present in primary pancreatic duct cells. We have attempted to generate a non-CF pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line that stably produces high levels of CFTR mRNA and protein by transfecting a vector containing the CFTR cDNA, driven by a strong mammalian promoter, into the poorly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, Panc-1. The pANS6 pancreatic duct cell line expresses substantial levels of CFTR mRNA, but little CFTR protein. Despite this we were able to detect low conductance chloride channels in 40% of patches, stimulated with cAMP, that have similar biophysical properties to CFTR.

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  7. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Correction: Prospective pilot study of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for refractory benign pancreatic duct strictures: long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Saburo; Sasahira, Naoki; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Takahara, Naminatsu; Mizuno, Suguru; Kogure, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Nakai, Yousuke; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Background and study aims: Temporary placement of a fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) has recently emerged as a treatment option for pancreatic duct strictures due to chronic pancreatitis refractory to conventional plastic stenting. However, there are no data about long-term outcomes with this therapeutic option. The aims of the current study were to estimate the feasibility, safety, efficacy, and long-term outcomes of temporary FCSEMS placement for refractory pancreatic duct strictures. Patients and methods: This was a prospective, single-center feasibility study. Ten patients with refractory pancreatic duct strictures due to chronic pancreatitis underwent FCSEMS placement for 3 months. We evaluated the rate of recurrent symptoms after stent removal during long-term follow-up, as well as adverse events (AEs). Results: Two patients required early (within 1 week) stent removal because of intolerable pain or pancreatitis. In the remaining 8 patients, the recurrence rate of any symptoms after FCSEMS removal was 63% during 35 months of follow up. The causes of recurrent symptoms were as follows: recurrence of stricture in 2; stent-induced stricture in 1; impaction of pancreatic stones in 1; and development of a pseudocyst in 1. When limited to stricture, the recurrence rate was 38%. Additional endoscopic treatments were required in 4 patients: a second FCSEMS placement in 1; plastic stent (PS) placement in 1; stone extraction in 1; and endoscopic ultrasound–guided pseudocyst drainage in 1. Asymptomatic stent migration occurred in 2 patients. Suppurative pancreatic ductitis due to food impaction in the FCSEMS occurred in 2 patients, and endoscopic pancreatic duct drainage was performed. Stent-induced ductal changes developed in 2 patients and PS treatment was required in 1 patient for pain relief. Conclusion: The FCSEMS appears to be a feasible and potentially effective option for the management of refractory pancreatic duct

  9. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  10. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. Massive acinar cell apoptosis with secondary necrosis, origin of ducts in atrophic lobules and failure to regenerate in cyanohydroxybutene pancreatopathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lyndell; Reid, Lynne; Walker, Neal I

    1999-01-01

    Cyanohydroxybutene (CHB), a glycosinolate breakdown product, causes pancreatic injury when given to animals in large amounts. To determine the course of CHB-induced pancreatopathy, rats were given a single subcutaneous dose of CHB and the pancreas weighed and examined by light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry at intervals from 2 h to 28 days. The pancreatic lesion was unusual in that there was marked early oedema with limited inflammatory cell infiltration, rapid synchronous onset of acinar cell apoptosis and early advanced atrophy engendering only a limited regenerative response. Acinar cell apoptosis was atypical in that cell fragmentation was limited and phagocytosis delayed, resulting in extensive secondary necrosis. As ducts were unaffected by CHB, the crowded ducts making up the epithelial component of atrophic lobules could be clearly shown to derive from their condensation and proliferation, not the redifferentiation of pre-existing acinar cells, widely held to produce this lesion. Although the basis of CHB selectivity and toxicity for pancreatic acinar cells remains unknown, the potential therapeutic benefit of such an agent in patients with pancreatitis or pancreatic tumours warrants further investigation. PMID:10583631

  12. Immune cell functions in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Plate, J M; Harris, J E

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer kills nearly 29,000 people in the United States annually-as many people as are diagnosed with the disease. Chemotherapeutic treatment is ineffective in halting progression of the disease. Yet, specific immunity to pancreatic tumor cells in subjects with pancreatic cancer has been demonstrated repeatedly during the last 24 years. Attempts to expand and enhance tumor-specific immunity with biotherapy, however, have not met with success. The question remains, "Why can't specific immunity regulate pancreatic cancer growth?" The idea that tumor cells have evolved protective mechanisms against immunity was raised years ago and has recently been revisited by a number of research laboratories. In pancreatic cancer, soluble factors produced by and for the protection of the tumor environment have been detected and are often distributed to the victim's circulatory system where they may effect a more generalized immunosuppression. Yet the nature of these soluble factors remains controversial, since some also serve as tumor antigens that are recognized by the same T cells that may become inactivated by them. Unless the problem of tumor-derived immunosuppressive products is addressed directly through basic and translational research studies, successful biotherapeutic treatment for pancreatic cancer may not be forthcoming.

  13. Complement Component 5 Mediates Development of Fibrosis, via Activation of Stellate Cells, in 2 Mouse Models of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sendler, Matthias; Beyer, Georg; Mahajan, Ujjwal M.; Kauschke, Vivien; Maertin, Sandrina; Schurmann, Claudia; Homuth, Georg; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Halangk, Walter; Wartmann, Thomas; Weiss, Frank-Ulrich; Hegyi, Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of complement component 5 (C5) in pancreatic fibrogenesis in mice and patients. Methods Chronic pancreatitis was induced by ligation of the midpancreatic duct, followed by a single supramaximal intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, in C57Bl6 (control) and C5-deficient mice. Some mice were given injections of 2 different antagonists of the receptor for C5a over 21 days. In a separate model, mice were given injections of cerulein for 10 weeks to induce chronic pancreatitis. Direct effects of C5 were studied in cultured primary cells. We performed genotype analysis for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs 17611 and rs 2300929 in C5 in patients with pancreatitis and healthy individuals (controls). Blood cells from 976 subjects were analyzed by transcriptional profiling. Results During the initial phase of pancreatitis, levels of pancreatic damage were similar between C5-deficient and control mice. During later stages of pancreatitis, C5-deficient mice and mice given injections of C5a-receptor antagonists developed significantly less pancreatic fibrosis than control mice. Primary pancreatic stellate cells were activated in vitro by C5a. There were no differences in the rs 2300929 SNP between subjects with or without pancreatitis, but the minor allele rs17611 was associated with a significant increase in levels of C5 in whole blood. Conclusions In mice, loss of C5 or injection of a C5a-receptor antagonist significantly reduced the level of fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis, but this was not a consequence of milder disease in early stages of pancreatitis. C5 might be a therapeutic target for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26001927

  14. Downregulation of tight junction-associated MARVEL protein marvelD3 during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takashi; Takasawa, Akira; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-10-01

    The novel tight junction protein marvelD3 contains a conserved MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain like occludin and tricellulin. However, little is yet known about the detailed role and regulation of marvelD3 in normal epithelial cells and cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated marvelD3 expression in well and poorly differentiated human pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells in which the hTERT gene was introduced into human pancreatic duct epithelial cells in primary culture, and the changes of marvelD3 during Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) under hypoxia, TGF-β treatment and knockdown of FOXA2 in well differentiated pancreatic cancer HPAC cells. MarvelD3 was transcriptionally downregulated in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and during Snail-induced EMT of pancreatic cancer cells in which Snail was highly expressed and the fence function downregulated, whereas it was maintained in well differentiated human pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Depletion of marvelD3 by siRNAs in HPAC cells resulted in downregulation of barrier functions indicated as a decrease in transepithelial electric resistance and an increase of permeability to fluorescent dextran tracers, whereas it did not affect fence function of tight junctions. In conclusion, marvelD3 is transcriptionally downregulated in Snail-induced EMT during the progression for the pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pancreatic Differentiation from Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are considered as a cell source for replacement therapies for pancreatic beta cells and other organs.We identified tetrabenazine (TBZ), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor as a promoter of late-stage differentiation of Pdx1-positive pancreatic progenitor cells into Ngn3-positive endocrine progenitor cells. A cell-permeable cAMP analog, dBu-cAMP promotes beta cell maturation in late stage of differentiation. The induced beta cells can secrete insulin in a glucose-dependent manner.Our protocol consists of a three -step differentiation process. ES cell recapitulate embryonic developmental processes in vitro. Therefore, the ES cell differentiation system is a useful model for the understanding of molecular mechanism of beta-cell differentiation and are useful for application for future regenerative medicine.

  16. Extraparenchymal Bile/Pancreatic Ducts and Duodenal Papillae: Pathologic Evaluation in Nonclinical Species--A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Kapil; Nady, Sherry L; Engler, Rita D; Kelsch, Brian K; Lynk, Susan N; Cape, Benjamin R; Hoffmann, Guenther; Meseck, Emily K; Johnson, Robert C

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on the anatomy, histologic preparation, and pathologic evaluation of extraparenchymal bile and pancreatic ducts (BPDs) and their openings at the duodenal papillae in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis), the Beagle dog (Canis familiaris), the Wistar Hanover rat (Rattus norvegicus), and the CD1 mouse (Mus musculus). In nonclinical safety assessment, intraparenchymal BPDs (with sections of liver and pancreas, respectively) are evaluated routinely. However, detailed evaluation of the extraparenchymal BPDs or the duodenal papillae is not included. In the context of nonclinical safety assessment studies, this review describes situations in which evaluation of extraparenchymal ductal structures and duodenal papillae may be useful in characterizing test article-related changes; elucidates anatomic similarities between human, macaque, and dog and notable differences in rats and mice; and consolidates the information required for the histopathologic evaluation of these tissues.

  17. Culturing primary rat inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Faust, Dörte; Geelhaar, Andrea; Eisermann, Beate; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno; Klussman, Enno

    2013-06-21

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) facilitates water reabsorption by renal collecting duct principal cells and thereby fine-tunes body water homeostasis. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R) on the surface of the cells and thereby induces synthesis of cAMP. This stimulates cellular signaling processes leading to changes in the phosphorylation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein kinase A phoshorylates AQP2 and thereby triggers the translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane facilitating water reabsorption from primary urine. Aberrations of AVP release from the pituitary or AVP-activated signaling in principal cells can cause central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, respectively; an elevated blood plasma AVP level is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic heart failure and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Here, we present a protocol for cultivation of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, which express V2R and AQP2 endogenously. The cells are suitable for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the control of AQP2 and thus to discover novel drug targets for the treatment of diseases associated with dysregulation of AVP-mediated water reabsorption. IMCD cells are obtained from rat renal inner medullae and are used for experiments six to eight days after seeding. IMCD cells can be cultured in regular cell culture dishes, flasks and micro-titer plates of different formats, the procedure only requires a few hours, and is appropriate for standard cell culture laboratories.

  18. Culturing Primary Rat Inner Medullary Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Dörte; Geelhaar, Andrea; Eisermann, Beate; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussman, Enno

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) facilitates water reabsorption by renal collecting duct principal cells and thereby fine-tunes body water homeostasis. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R) on the surface of the cells and thereby induces synthesis of cAMP. This stimulates cellular signaling processes leading to changes in the phosphorylation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein kinase A phoshorylates AQP2 and thereby triggers the translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane facilitating water reabsorption from primary urine. Aberrations of AVP release from the pituitary or AVP-activated signaling in principal cells can cause central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, respectively; an elevated blood plasma AVP level is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic heart failure and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Here, we present a protocol for cultivation of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, which express V2R and AQP2 endogenously. The cells are suitable for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the control of AQP2 and thus to discover novel drug targets for the treatment of diseases associated with dysregulation of AVP-mediated water reabsorption. IMCD cells are obtained from rat renal inner medullae and are used for experiments six to eight days after seeding. IMCD cells can be cultured in regular cell culture dishes, flasks and micro-titer plates of different formats, the procedure only requires a few hours, and is appropriate for standard cell culture laboratories. PMID:23852264

  19. Metastasis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okutur, Kerem; Bozkurt, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Taner; Karaaslan, Ercan; Guner, Levent; Goksel, Suha; Demir, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Although involvement of pancreas is a common finding in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis (MIAP) is very rare. A 50-year-old female with SCLC who had limited disease and achieved full response after treatment presented with acute pancreatitis during her follow-up. The radiologic studies revealed a small area causing obliteration of the pancreatic duct without mass in the pancreatic neck, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) confirmed the metastasis of SCLC. The patient was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered to pancreatic field. In SCLC, cases of MIAP can be encountered with conventional computed tomography with no mass image, and positron emission tomography and EUS-FNA can be useful for diagnosis of such cases. Aggressive systemic and local treatment can prolong survival, especially in patients with good performance status. PMID:26075124

  20. Gene and cell therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hans Martin; Ungerechts, Guy; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M

    2015-04-01

    The clinical outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer are poor, and the limited success of classical chemotherapy underscores the need for new, targeted approaches for this disease. The delivery of genetic material to cells allows for a variety of therapeutic concepts. Engineered agents based on synthetic biology are under clinical investigation in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on Phase I - III clinical trials of gene and cell therapy for pancreatic cancer and on future implications of recent translational research. Trials available in the US National Library of Medicine (www.clinicaltrials.gov) until February 2014 were reviewed and relevant published results of preclinical and clinical studies were retrieved from www.pubmed.gov . In pancreatic cancer, gene and cell therapies are feasible and may have synergistic antitumor activity with standard treatment and/or immunotherapy. Challenges are related to application safety, manufacturing costs, and a new spectrum of adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate available agents in carefully designed protocols and combination regimens. Enabling personalized cancer therapy, insights from molecular diagnostic technologies will guide the development and selection of new gene-based drugs. The evolving preclinical and clinical data on gene-based therapies can lay the foundation for future avenues improving patient care in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Pancreatic cell tracing, lineage tagging and targeted genetic manipulations in multiple cell types using pancreatic ductal infusion of adeno-associated viral vectors and/or cell-tagging dyes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Peirish, Lauren; Fischbach, Shane; Song, Zewen; Gaffar, Iljana; Wiersch, John; El-Gohary, Yousef; Husain, Sohail Z; Gittes, George K

    2014-12-01

    Genetic manipulations, with or without lineage tracing for specific pancreatic cell types, are very powerful tools for studying diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Nevertheless, the use of Cre/loxP systems to conditionally activate or inactivate the expression of genes in a cell type- and/or temporal-specific manner is not applicable to cell tracing and/or gene manipulations in more than one lineage at a time. Here we report a technique that allows efficient delivery of dyes for cell tagging into the mouse pancreas through the duct system, and that also delivers viruses carrying transgenes or siRNA under a specific promoter. When this technique is applied in genetically modified mice, it enables the investigator to perform either double lineage tracing or cell lineage tracing combined with gene manipulation in a second lineage. The technique requires <40 min.

  2. Biliary tree stem/progenitor cells in glands of extrahepatic and intraheptic bile ducts: an anatomical in situ study yielding evidence of maturational lineages.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Guido; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Onori, Paolo; Franchitto, Antonio; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Rossi, Massimo; Wang, Yunfang; Semeraro, Rossella; Anceschi, Maurizio; Brunelli, Roberto; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2012-02-01

    Stem/progenitors have been identified intrahepatically in the canals of Hering and extrahepatically in glands of the biliary tree. Glands of the biliary tree (peribiliary glands) are tubulo-alveolar glands with mucinous and serous acini, located deep within intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. We have shown that biliary tree stem/progenitors (BTSCs) are multipotent, giving rise in vitro and in vivo to hepatocytes, cholangiocytes or pancreatic islets. Cells with the phenotype of BTSCs are located at the bottom of the peribiliary glands near the fibromuscular layer. They are phenotypically heterogeneous, expressing transcription factors as well as surface and cytoplasmic markers for stem/progenitors of liver (e.g. SOX9/17), pancreas (e.g. PDX1) and endoderm (e.g. SOX17, EpCAM, NCAM, CXCR4, Lgr5, OCT4) but not for mature markers (e.g. albumin, secretin receptor or insulin). Subpopulations co-expressing liver and pancreatic markers (e.g. PDX1(+)/SOX17(+)) are EpCAM(+/-), and are assumed to be the most primitive of the BTSC subpopulations. Their descendants undergo a maturational lineage process from the interior to the surface of ducts and vary in the mature cells generated: pancreatic cells in hepatopancreatic ducts, liver cells in large intrahepatic bile ducts, and bile duct cells along most of the biliary tree. We hypothesize that there is ongoing organogenesis throughout life, with BTSCs giving rise to hepatic stem cells in the canals of Hering and to committed progenitors within the pancreas. The BTSCs are likely to be central to normal tissue turnover and injury repair and to be key elements in the pathophysiology of liver, pancreas and biliary tree diseases, including oncogenesis.

  3. Pancreatic Islet Cell Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Romer, Anthony I.; Sussel, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This review will discuss recent advances in understanding mouse and human pancreatic islet cell development, novel concepts related to β cell dysfunction and improved approaches for replenishing β cells to treat diabetes. Recent Findings Considerable knowledge about pancreatic islet development and function has been gained using model systems with subsequent validation in human tissues. Recently, several rodent studies have revealed that differentiated adult islet cells retain remarkable plasticity and can be converted to other islet cell types by perturbing their transcription factor profiles. Furthermore, significant advances have been made in the generation of β-like cells from stem cell populations. Therefore, the generation of functionally mature β cells by the in situ conversion of non-β cell populations or by the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells could represent novel mechanisms for replenishing β cells in diabetic patients. Summary The overall conservation between mouse and human pancreatic development, islet physiology and etiology of diabetes encourages the translation of novel β cell replacement therapies to humans. Further deciphering the molecular mechanisms that direct islet cell regeneration, plasticity and function could improve and expand the β cell replacement strategies for treating diabetes. PMID:26087337

  4. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  5. Mechanisms of disease: chronic inflammation and cancer in the pancreas--a potential role for pancreatic stellate cells?

    PubMed

    Algül, Hana; Treiber, Matthias; Lesina, Marina; Schmid, Roland M

    2007-08-01

    Late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic options mean that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal forms of human cancer. The identification of genetic alterations facilitated the launch of the Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasm nomenclature, a standardized classification system for pancreatic duct lesions, but the factors that contribute to the development of such lesions and their progression to high-grade neoplasia remain obscure. Age, smoking, obesity and diabetes confer increased risk of PDA, and the presence of chronic pancreatitis is a consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. It is hypothesized that chronic inflammation generates a microenvironment that contributes to malignant transformation in the pancreas, as is known to occur in other organs. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the main mediator of fibrogenesis during chronic pancreatitis, but their contribution to the development of PDA has not been elucidated. Data now suggest that PSCs might assume a linking role in inflammation-associated carcinogenesis through their ability to communicate with inflammatory cells, acinar cells, and pancreatic cancer cells in a complicated network of interactions. In this Review, the role of PSCs in the process of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis is discussed and new potential treatment options evaluated.

  6. Canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis by regulating T cells in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Woo-Jin; Li, Qiang; Han, Sei-Myoung; Jeon, Kee-Ok; Park, Sang-Chul; Ryu, Min-Ok; Chae, Hyung-Kyu; Kyeong, Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with systemic complications and high mortality rate in dogs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in several inflammation models. In the present study, the effects of canine adipose tissue-derived (cAT)-MSCs in a rat model of SAP induced by retrograde injection of 3% sodium taurocholate solution into the pancreatic duct were investigated. cAT-MSCs labeled with dioctadecyl-3,3,3′-tetramethylindo-carbocyanine perchlorate (1 × 107 cells/kg) were systemically administered to rats and pancreatic tissue was collected three days later for histopathological, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical analyses. Greater numbers of infused cAT-MSCs were detected in the pancreas of SAP relative to sham-operated rats. cAT-MSC infusion reduced pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, and decreased pancreatic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -12, -17, and -23 and interferon-γ, while stimulating expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in SAP rats. Moreover, cAT-MSCs decreased the number of clusters of differentiation 3-positive T cells and increased that of forkhead box P3-positive T cells in the injured pancreas. These results indicate that cAT-MSCs can be effective as a cell-based therapeutic strategy for treatment of SAP in dogs. PMID:27297425

  7. Canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis by regulating T cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Woo-Jin; Li, Qiang; Han, Sei-Myoung; Jeon, Kee-Ok; Park, Sang-Chul; Ryu, Min-Ok; Chae, Hyung-Kyu; Kyeong, Kweon; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-12-30

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with systemic complications and high mortality rate in dogs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in several inflammation models. In the present study, the effects of canine adipose tissue-derived (cAT)-MSCs in a rat model of SAP induced by retrograde injection of 3% sodium taurocholate solution into the pancreatic duct were investigated. cAT-MSCs labeled with dioctadecyl-3,3,3'-tetramethylindo-carbocyanine perchlorate (1 × 10⁷ cells/kg) were systemically administered to rats and pancreatic tissue was collected three days later for histopathological, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical analyses. Greater numbers of infused cAT-MSCs were detected in the pancreas of SAP relative to sham-operated rats. cAT-MSC infusion reduced pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, and decreased pancreatic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -12, -17, and -23 and interferon-γ, while stimulating expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in SAP rats. Moreover, cAT-MSCs decreased the number of clusters of differentiation 3-positive T cells and increased that of forkhead box P3-positive T cells in the injured pancreas. These results indicate that cAT-MSCs can be effective as a cell-based therapeutic strategy for treatment of SAP in dogs.

  8. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  9. Pancreatic stellate cells--multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In addition, we have seen great progress in our understanding of the cell biology of PSCs and the interactions between PSCs and other cell types in the pancreas. In response to pancreatic injury or inflammation, quiescent PSCs are activated to myofibroblast-like cells. Recent studies have shown that the activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinases plays a role in the activation of PSCs. microRNAs might also play a role, because the microRNA expression profiles are dramatically altered in the process of activation. In addition to producing extracellular matrix components such as type I collagen, PSCs have a wide variety of cell functions related to local immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and exocrine and endocrine functions in the pancreas. From this point of view, the interactions between PSCs and other cell types such as pancreatic exocrine cells, endocrine cells, and cancer cells have attracted increasing attention of researchers. PSCs might regulate exocrine functions in the pancreas through the cholecystokinin-induced release of acetylcholine. PSCs induce apoptosis and decrease insulin expression in β-cells, suggesting a novel mechanism of diabetes in diseased pancreas. PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that PSCs induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition and enhance the stem-cell like features of pancreatic cancer cells. In conclusion, PSCs should now be recognized as not only profibrogenic cells but as multi-functional cells in the pancreas.

  10. Are liver function tests, pancreatitis and cholecystitis predictors of common bile duct stones? Results of a prospective, population-based, cohort study of 1171 patients undergoing cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Videhult, Per; Sandblom, Gabriel; Rudberg, Claes; Rasmussen, Ib Christian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the accuracy of elevated liver function values, age, gender, pancreatitis and cholecystitis as predictors of common bile duct stones (CBDS). Methods: All patients operated on for gallstone disease over a period of 3 years in a Swedish county of 302 564 citizens were registered prospectively. Intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) was used to detect CBDS. Results: A total of 1171 patients were registered; 95% of these patients underwent IOC. Common bile duct stones were found in 42% of patients with elevated liver function values, 20% of patients with a history of pancreatitis and 9% of patients with cholecystitis. The presence of CBDS was significantly predicted by elevated liver function values, but not by age, gender, history of acute pancreatitis or cholecystitis. A total of 93% of patients with normal liver function tests had a normal IOC. The best agreement between elevated liver function values and CBDS was seen in patients undergoing elective surgery without a history of acute pancreatitis or cholecystitis. Conclusions: Although alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin levels represented the most reliable predictors of CBDS, false positive and false negative values were common, especially in patients with a history of cholecystitis or pancreatitis, which indicates that other mechanisms were responsible for elevated liver function values in these patients. PMID:21762294

  11. Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation by LRH-1 Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0396 TITLE: INHIBITION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELL...DATES COVERED 15September2012–14September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INHIBITION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELL PROLIFERATION BY LRH-1 INHIBITORS 5a...of pancreatic cancer is devastating, with mortality rates nearing its incidence rates. To date, there are no effective targeted anti-pancreatic

  12. Keratinocyte growth factor induces pancreatic ductal epithelial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yi, E S; Yin, S; Harclerode, D L; Bedoya, A; Bikhazi, N B; Housley, R M; Aukerman, S L; Morris, C F; Pierce, G F; Ulich, T R

    1994-07-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) causes a proliferation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells in adult rats after daily systemic administration for 1 to 2 weeks. Even before the proliferation of intralobular ducts is histologically evident, KGF also induces proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression within the ductal epithelium of intercalated, intralobular, and interlobular ducts. KGF also causes incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine in ductal epithelial cells. Epithelial cell proliferation is histologically most prominent at the level of the intralobular ducts adjacent to and within the islets of Langerhans. Pancreatic ductal proliferation is not histologically apparent in rats sacrificed 7 to 10 days after the cessation of KGF administration. The pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide are normally distributed within islets that demonstrate intrainsular ductal proliferation. The proliferating ductal epithelium does not show endocrine differentiation as evidenced by the lack of immunoreactivity for pancreatic hormones. KGF is a potent in vivo mitogen for pancreatic ductal epithelial cells.

  13. Collecting duct principal cell transport processes and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Pearce, David; Soundararajan, Rama; Trimpert, Christiane; Kashlan, Ossama B; Deen, Peter M T; Kohan, Donald E

    2015-01-07

    The principal cell of the kidney collecting duct is one of the most highly regulated epithelial cell types in vertebrates. The effects of hormonal, autocrine, and paracrine factors to regulate principal cell transport processes are central to the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the face of wide variations in food and water intake. In marked contrast with the epithelial cells lining the proximal tubule, the collecting duct is electrically tight, and ion and osmotic gradients can be very high. The central role of principal cells in salt and water transport is reflected by their defining transporters-the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), the renal outer medullary K(+) channel, and the aquaporin 2 (AQP2) water channel. The coordinated regulation of ENaC by aldosterone, and AQP2 by arginine vasopressin (AVP) in principal cells is essential for the control of plasma Na(+) and K(+) concentrations, extracellular fluid volume, and BP. In addition to these essential hormones, additional neuronal, physical, and chemical factors influence Na(+), K(+), and water homeostasis. Notably, a variety of secreted paracrine and autocrine agents such as bradykinin, ATP, endothelin, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 counterbalance and limit the natriferic effects of aldosterone and the water-retaining effects of AVP. Considerable recent progress has improved our understanding of the transporters, receptors, second messengers, and signaling events that mediate principal cell responses to changing environments in health and disease. This review primarily addresses the structure and function of the key transporters and the complex interplay of regulatory factors that modulate principal cell ion and water transport. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Collecting Duct Principal Cell Transport Processes and Their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Rama; Trimpert, Christiane; Kashlan, Ossama B.; Deen, Peter M.T.; Kohan, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    The principal cell of the kidney collecting duct is one of the most highly regulated epithelial cell types in vertebrates. The effects of hormonal, autocrine, and paracrine factors to regulate principal cell transport processes are central to the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the face of wide variations in food and water intake. In marked contrast with the epithelial cells lining the proximal tubule, the collecting duct is electrically tight, and ion and osmotic gradients can be very high. The central role of principal cells in salt and water transport is reflected by their defining transporters—the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), the renal outer medullary K+ channel, and the aquaporin 2 (AQP2) water channel. The coordinated regulation of ENaC by aldosterone, and AQP2 by arginine vasopressin (AVP) in principal cells is essential for the control of plasma Na+ and K+ concentrations, extracellular fluid volume, and BP. In addition to these essential hormones, additional neuronal, physical, and chemical factors influence Na+, K+, and water homeostasis. Notably, a variety of secreted paracrine and autocrine agents such as bradykinin, ATP, endothelin, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 counterbalance and limit the natriferic effects of aldosterone and the water-retaining effects of AVP. Considerable recent progress has improved our understanding of the transporters, receptors, second messengers, and signaling events that mediate principal cell responses to changing environments in health and disease. This review primarily addresses the structure and function of the key transporters and the complex interplay of regulatory factors that modulate principal cell ion and water transport. PMID:24875192

  15. Pancreatic Endocrine and Exocrine Cell Ontogeny From Renal Capsule–transplanted Embryonic Stem Cells in Streptozocin-injured Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Maho; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Kanegasaki, Shiro; Ochiya, Takahiro; Quinn, Gary

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe pancreatic cell ontogeny in renal capsule–transplanted embryonic stem cells (ES) after injury by streptozocin (STZ), showing pancreatogenesis in situ. Seven-week-old female BALB/c nude mice were treated with either a single 175- or 200-mg/kg STZ dose, a regimen that induces substantial β-cell damage without overt hyperglycemia, and transplanted 24 hr later with 1 × 105 ES. Immunohistochemistry was performed on ES tissue at 15, 21, and 28 days after transplantation using antibodies against stage- and lineage-specific pancreatic markers. After 21 days, PDX-1+ pancreatic foci first appeared in the renal capsule and expressed both amylase and endocrine hormones (insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin). These foci increased in size by day 28 because of acinar and duct cell proliferation, whereas endocrine cells remained non-dividing, and made up 2–4% of ES tumor volume. PDX-1, Nkx6.1, Ngn3, and ISL-1 protein localization patterns in pancreatic foci were comparable with embryonic pancreatogenesis. A prevalence of multihormonal endocrine cells, a characteristic of adult β-cell regeneration, indicated a possible divergence from embryonic islet cell development. The results indicate that β-cell damage, without overt hyperglycemia, induces a process of fetal-like pancreatogenesis in renal capsule–transplanted ES, leading to β-cell neogenesis. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:33–44, 2008) PMID:17875656

  16. Receptor strategies in pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Grendell, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of receptors on pancreatic acinar and duct cells regulate both pancreatic exocrine secretion and intracellular processes. These receptors are potential sites of action for therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatitis. Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists, which may reduce the level of metabolic "stress" on acinar cells, have been shown to mitigate the severity of acute pancreatitis in a number of models. Not all studies have shown a benefit, however, and differences may exist between different structural classes of antagonists. Because increased pancreatic stimulation due to loss of feedback inhibition of CCK has been proposed to contribute to the pain of some patients with chronic pancreatitis, CCK receptor antagonists could also be of benefit in this setting. Somatostatin and its analogs diminish pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes and have been effective in treating pancreatic fistulas and pseudocysts. These agents are also being evaluated for their ability to reduce pain in chronic pancreatitis (perhaps by reducing ductal pressure by diminishing secretory volume) and mitigating the severity of acute pancreatitis (possibly by reducing the metabolic load on acinar cells). Recently described secretin receptor antagonists may also have therapeutic value as a means of selectively inhibiting pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes. PMID:1340060

  17. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Çiǧdem; Arkan, Melek C.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (IkkαΔpan) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in IkkαΔpan mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation. PMID:23563314

  18. Kindlin-2 in pancreatic stellate cells promotes the progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Kindlin-2 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates the activation of integrins. This study aimed to clarify the role of kindlin-2 in PSCs in pancreatic cancer. Kindlin-2 expression in 79 resected pancreatic cancer tissues was examined by immunohistochemical staining. Kindlin-2-knockdown immortalized human PSCs were established using small interfering RNA. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with conditioned media of PSCs, and the cell proliferation and migration were examined. SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice alone or with PSCs and the size of the tumors was monitored. Kindlin-2 expression was observed in PDAC and the peritumoral stroma. Stromal kindlin-2 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival time after R0 resection. Knockdown of kindlin-2 resulted in decreased proliferation, migration, and cytokine expression in PSCs. The PSC-induced proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells were suppressed by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PSCs increased the size of the tumors, but this effect was abolished by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In conclusion, kindlin-2 in PSCs promoted the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  19. In Patients with a Soft Pancreas, a Thick Parenchyma, a Small Duct, and Fatty Infiltration Are Significant Risks for Pancreatic Fistula After Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Kojima, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Tatsushi; Gotohda, Naoto; Konishi, Masaru

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to characterize soft and hard pancreatic textures radiologically and histologically, and to identify specific risks in a soft pancreas associated with postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) formation after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Consecutive 145 patients who underwent PD at a single institution between January 2010 and May 2013 were studied. Pancreatic consistency was intraoperatively judged as soft or hard. Pancreatic configuration was assessed using preoperative CT. Histologic components of the pancreatic stump were evaluated using a morphometric analysis. Clinicopathologic parameters were then analyzed for the risk of clinically relevant POPF. Compared with patients with a hard pancreas (n = 66), those with a soft pancreas (n = 79) had a smaller main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter and a larger parenchymal thickness on CT, had a smaller fibrosis ratio and a larger lobular ratio histologically, and developed clinically relevant POPF more frequently (P < 0.001 for all). In patients with a soft pancreas, an MPD diameter <2 mm, a parenchymal thickness ≥10 mm, a lobular ratio <75%, and a fat ratio ≥20% were independently associated with clinically relevant POPF (P < 0.010 for all). In patients with a soft pancreas, a thick parenchyma, a small MPD, and fatty infiltration were strongly associated with clinically relevant POPF after PD.

  20. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-02-06

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  1. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  2. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  3. Overexpression of ankyrin1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; MacGregor, Anne; Hong, Seung-Mo; Ayars, Michael; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Borges, Michael; Kanda, Mitsuro; Li, Ang; Vincent, Audrey; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The methylation status of a promoter influences gene expression and aberrant methylation during tumor development has important functional consequences for pancreatic and other cancers. Using methylated CpG island amplification and promoter microarrays, we identified ANK1 as hypomethylated in pancreatic cancers. Expression analysis determined ANK1 as commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancers relative to normal pancreas. ANK1 was co-expressed with miR-486 in pancreatic cancer cells. Stable knockdown of ANK1 in the pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC1 led to changes in cell morphology, and decreases in colony formation. Stable knockdown of ANK1 also marked reduced the growth of tumors in athymic nude mice. Among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, those with pancreatic cancers expressing ANK1 had a poorer prognosis than those without ANK1 expression. These findings indicate a role for ANK1 overexpression in mediating pancreatic cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27144336

  4. Effect of taurine on acinar cell apoptosis and pancreatic fibrosis in dibutyltin dichloride-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Koki; Mizushima, Takaaki; Shirahige, Akinori; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Sawa, Kiminari; Ochi, Koji; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Koide, Norio

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells has not been fully elucidated. We reported that taurine had an anti-fibrotic effect in a dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC)-chronic pancreatitis model. However, the effect of taurine on apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells is still unclear. Therefore, we examined apoptosis in DBTC-chronic pancreatitis and in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line with/without taurine. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by a single administration of DBTC. Rats were fed a taurine-containing diet or a normal diet and were sacrificed at day 5. The AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line was incubated with/without DBTC with taurine chloramines. Apoptosis was determined by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The expression of Bad and Bcl-2 proteins in the AR42J cells lysates was detected by Western blot analysis. The apoptotic index of pancreatic acinar cells in DBTC-administered rats was significantly increased. Taurine treatment inhibited pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of acinar cells induced by DBTC. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell lines was significantly increased by the addition of DBTC. Incubation with taurine chloramines ameliorated these changes. In conclusion, taurine inhibits apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatitis in experimental chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brugge, William R; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  6. Transepithelial ion transport across duct cells of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Ohana, E

    2015-10-01

    Fluid and electrolyte secretions are vital for all epithelia and when aberrant lead to numerous pathophysiological conditions. Electrolyte transport across epithelia generates the osmotic force for fluid movement and is mediated by several membrane proteins expressed on both apical and basolateral poles of epithelial cells. Sodium and chloride are crucial for regulation of fluid secretion, thus regulating salivary volume. Bicarbonate (HCO3-), on the other hand, is the major pH buffer; hence, aberrant HCO3- secretion is a major factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF) causing altered mucin hydration and solubilization. Here, the structure-function mechanisms of the major membrane transporters involved in salivary duct electrolyte transport are reviewed focusing on transepithelial movement of Cl(-) and HCO3-.

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Gulinnaz; Karlitepe, Ayfer; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is considered one of the deadliest human cancers, with 1-5% 5-year survival rates (~6-month median survival duration) despite therapy; thus, PDAC represents an unmet therapeutic challenge. PDAC is the major histological subtype, comprising 90% of all pancreatic cancers. It is a highly complex and aggressive malignancy, presenting with early local invasion and metastasis, and is resistant to most therapies, all of which are believed to contribute to its extremely poor prognosis. PDAC is characterized by molecular alterations, including mutations of K-RAS (~90% of cases), TP53, transforming growth factor-β, Hedgehog, WNT and NOTCH signaling pathways. Given that cancer stem cells have a crucial role not only in tumor initiation and progression, but also in drug resistance and relapse or recurrence of various cancer types, they may be excellent targets for effective novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we reviewed recent therapeutic strategies targeting pancreatic cancer stem cells using chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs, non-coding RNAs (i.e., siRNA and miRNAs), immunotherapy, and natural compounds. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Jose Antonio; Colonna, Jorge; Vitellas, Kenneth M; Frankel, Wendy L

    2005-10-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a rare entity that has been described under many different names and constitutes a diagnostic challenge as it may simulate a neoplastic process. Herein, we report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented to our institution complaining of left flank pain and was found to have normal levels of amylase and lipase. An abdominal magnetic resonance image showed thickening of the pancreatic tail and compression of the pancreatic duct. The radiographic differential included both chronic pancreatitis and a neoplastic process. She underwent an exploratory laparotomy, during which a pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Grossly, the pancreas contained a yellowish white, firm homogeneous mass measuring 6.5 x 3.3 x 2.9 cm involving the entire pancreatic tail and hilum of the spleen. Histologically, pancreatic sections showed extensive fibrosis admixed with an inflammatory infiltrate. This infiltrate was composed mainly of lymphocytes with multiple germinal centers, as well as plasma cells and eosinophils that surrounded pancreatic ducts and extended into the peripancreatic adipose tissue. No malignancy was identified, and the process was diagnosed as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis.

  9. Pancreatic stellate cells respond to inflammatory cytokines: potential role in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mews, P; Phillips, P; Fahmy, R; Korsten, M; Pirola, R; Wilson, J; Apte, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: It is now generally accepted that chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis may result from repeated episodes of acute pancreatic necroinflammation (the necrosis-fibrosis sequence). Recent studies suggest that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), when activated, may play an important role in the development of pancreatic fibrosis. Factors that may influence PSC activation during pancreatic necroinflammation include cytokines known to be important in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, such as tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and the interleukins 1, 6, and 10 (IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10). Aim: To determine the effects of these cytokines on PSC activation, as assessed by cell proliferation, α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and collagen synthesis. Methods: Cultured rat PSCs were incubated with cytokines for 24 hours. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring 3H thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA, α-SMA expression by western blotting, and collagen synthesis by incorporation of 14C proline into collagenase sensitive protein. mRNA levels for procollagen α1(1) in PSCs were determined by northern and dot blotting methods. Results: Expression of α-SMA by PSCs was increased on exposure to each of the cytokines used in the study. Stellate cell proliferation was stimulated by TNF-α but inhibited by IL-6, while IL-1 and IL-10 had no effect on PSC proliferation. Collagen synthesis by PSCs was stimulated by TNF-α and IL-10, inhibited in response to IL-6, and unaltered by IL-1. Changes in collagen protein synthesis in response to TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-6 were not regulated at the mRNA level in the cells. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that PSCs have the capacity to respond to cytokines known to be upregulated during acute pancreatitis. Persistent activation of PSCs by cytokines during acute pancreatitis may be a factor involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. PMID:11889076

  10. Somatostatin analogue (octreotide) inhibits bile duct epithelial cell proliferation and fibrosis after extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, T. F.; Tector, A. J.; Goerke, M. E.; Kitchen, S.; Lagunoff, D.

    1993-01-01

    Extrahepatic biliary obstruction leads to bile duct epithelial cell proliferation. Somatostatin and its analogue, octreotide, have been shown to inhibit DNA synthesis and proliferation in hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of octreotide on the biliary epithelial cell proliferative responses to biliary obstruction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent common bile duct ligation and subcutaneous injection of either saline or octreotide (6 micrograms/kg) twice daily for 7 days. Morphometric analysis of hepatocytes, bile duct epithelial cells, and periportal connective tissue was performed by computerized point counting. Hepatocyte volume was preserved with octreotide treatment, which also significantly decreased bile duct proliferation and periportal extracellular matrix deposition in response to biliary obstruction compared with saline treated, duct-ligated animals. These results indicate that octreotide prevents the morphological changes that accompany extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Images Figure 1 PMID:8256850

  11. Ionic mechanisms in pancreatic β cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Nian; Shi, Yue; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuxin; Yu, Jia; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2014-11-01

    The function and survival of pancreatic β cells critically rely on complex electrical signaling systems composed of a series of ionic events, namely fluxes of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-) across the β cell membranes. These electrical signaling systems not only sense events occurring in the extracellular space and intracellular milieu of pancreatic islet cells, but also control different β cell activities, most notably glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Three major ion fluxes including K(+) efflux through ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels, the voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx and K(+) efflux through voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels operate in the β cell. These ion fluxes set the resting membrane potential and the shape, rate and pattern of firing of action potentials under different metabolic conditions. The KATP channel-mediated K(+) efflux determines the resting membrane potential and keeps the excitability of the β cell at low levels. Ca(2+) influx through CaV1 channels, a major type of β cell CaV channels, causes the upstroke or depolarization phase of the action potential and regulates a wide range of β cell functions including the most elementary β cell function, insulin secretion. K(+) efflux mediated by KV2.1 delayed rectifier K(+) channels, a predominant form of β cell KV channels, brings about the downstroke or repolarization phase of the action potential, which acts as a brake for insulin secretion owing to shutting down the CaV channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry. These three ion channel-mediated ion fluxes are the most important ionic events in β cell signaling. This review concisely discusses various ionic mechanisms in β cell signaling and highlights KATP channel-, CaV1 channel- and KV2.1 channel-mediated ion fluxes.

  12. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A.; Washburn, William K.; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  13. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A; Washburn, William K; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-08-03

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases.

  14. Role of the WWOX gene, encompassing fragile region FRA16D, in suppression of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunji; Semba, Shuho; Maeda, Naoko; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    The WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D (16q23.2) and is believed to be a tumor suppressor in various human malignancies. We have previously shown frequent down-modulation of Wwox expression in pancreatic carcinoma (PC); however, biological function of Wwox in pancreatic duct carcinogenesis remains unknown. In PANC-1 (Wwox-negative) PC-derived cells, restoration of recombinant WWOX gene expression with adenoviral gene delivery (Ad-WWOX) effectively increased the number of cells with subG(1) DNA contents in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manners: Ad-WWOX infection up-regulated caspase-3 activity and reduced procaspase-3 and procaspase-8 levels. We also confirmed that restoration of WWOX gene suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. In addition, transduction of wild-type WWOX-expressing vector inhibited PANC-1 colony formation; however, substitution of Y33 of Wwox with arginine did not lead to inhibition of colony formation, suggesting the biological significance of the WW1 domain of Wwox for its tumor-suppressing activity. In PC tissue samples, abundant cytoplasmic Wwox expression was detected in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, whereas Wwox expression was frequently reduced not only in a large fraction of PC but also in precancerous lesions in accord with the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) grade, which was closely correlated with patients' poorer outcome. Interestingly, the existence of Wwox expression was associated with elevated mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that down-modulation of Wwox expression is an early event and may be associated with the down-regulation of Smad4 protein levels during pancreatic duct carcinogenesis.

  15. Curcumin Modulates Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell-Derived Exosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Carlos J. Diaz; Lynch, James C.; Leaf, Patrick; Gonda, Amber; Ferguson Bennit, Heather R.; Griffiths, Duncan; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rates of all cancer types. One potential explanation for the aggressiveness of this disease is that cancer cells have been found to communicate with one another using membrane-bound vesicles known as exosomes. These exosomes carry pro-survival molecules and increase the proliferation, survival, and metastatic potential of recipient cells, suggesting that tumor-derived exosomes are powerful drivers of tumor progression. Thus, to successfully address and eradicate pancreatic cancer, it is imperative to develop therapeutic strategies that neutralize cancer cells and exosomes simultaneously. Curcumin, a turmeric root derivative, has been shown to have potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies have suggested that exosomal curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory properties on recipient cells. However, curcumin’s effects on exosomal pro-tumor function have yet to be determined. We hypothesize that curcumin will alter the pro-survival role of exosomes from pancreatic cancer cells toward a pro-death role, resulting in reduced cell viability of recipient pancreatic cancer cells. The main objective of this study was to determine the functional alterations of exosomes released by pancreatic cancer cells exposed to curcumin compared to exosomes from untreated pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrate, using an in vitro cell culture model involving pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2, that curcumin is incorporated into exosomes isolated from curcumin-treated pancreatic cancer cells as observed by spectral studies and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, curcumin is delivered to recipient pancreatic cancer cells via exosomes, promoting cytotoxicity as demonstrated by Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy as well as AlamarBlue and Trypan blue exclusion assays. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy of curcumin may be enhanced in pancreatic cancer cells through

  16. Heterogeneity of the Pancreatic Beta Cell

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Giselle Dominguez; Gromada, Jesper; Sussel, Lori

    2017-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell functions as a key regulator of blood glucose levels by integrating a variety of signals in response to changing metabolic demands. Variations in beta cell identity that translate into functionally different subpopulations represent an interesting mechanism to allow beta cells to efficiently respond to diverse physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Recently, there is emerging evidence that morphological and functional differences between beta cells exist. Furthermore, the ability of novel single cell technologies to characterize the molecular identity of individual beta cells has created a new era in the beta cell field. These studies are providing important novel information about the origin of beta cell heterogeneity, the type and proportions of the different beta cell subpopulations, as well as their intrinsic properties. Furthermore, characterization of different beta cell subpopulations that could variably offer protection from or drive progression of diabetes has important clinical implications in diabetes prevention, beta cell regeneration and stem cell treatments. In this review, we will assess the evidence that supports the existence of heterogeneous populations of beta cells and the factors that could influence their formation. We will also address novel studies using islet single cell analysis that have provided important information toward understanding beta cell heterogeneity and discuss the caveats that may be associated with these new technologies. PMID:28321233

  17. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W.; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  18. Effects of oxalate on IMCD cells: a line of mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Chandhoke, Paramjit S; Koul, Hari K

    2004-12-01

    Oxalate, a metabolic end product and a major constituent of the majority of renal stones, has been shown to be toxic to renal epithelial cells of cortical origin. However, it is unknown whether inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells that are physiologically exposed to higher concentrations of oxalate also behave in a similar manner. In the present study, we examined the effects of oxalate on IMCD cells. IMCD cells from the mouse were maintained in DMEM/F12 media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and antibiotics. Exposure of IMCD cells to oxalate produced time- and concentration-dependent changes in the light microscopic appearance of the cells. Long-term exposure to oxalate resulted in alterations in cell viability, with net cell loss after exposure to concentrations of 2 mM or greater. The production of free radicals was directly related to the exposure time and the concentration of oxalate. Crystal formation occurred in less than 1 h and cells in proximity to crystals would lose membrane integrity. Compared with IMCD cells, LLC-PK1 cells as well as HK-2 cells showed significant toxicity starting at lower oxalate concentrations (0.4 mM or greater). These results provide the first direct demonstration of toxic effects of oxalate in IMCD cells, a line of renal epithelial cells of the inner medullary collecting duct, and suggest that the cells lining the collecting duct are relatively resistant to oxalate toxicity.

  19. Control of beta-cell differentiation by the pancreatic mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Attali, Myriam; Stetsyuk, Volodymyr; Basmaciogullari, Annie; Aiello, Virginie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Duvillie, Bertrand; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2007-05-01

    The importance of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions for normal development of the pancreas was recognized in the early 1960s, and mesenchymal signals have been shown to control the proliferation of early pancreatic progenitor cells. The mechanisms by which the mesenchyme coordinates cell proliferation and differentiation to produce the normal number of differentiated pancreatic cells are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the mesenchyme positively controls the final number of beta-cells that develop from early pancreatic progenitor cells. In vitro, the number of beta-cells that developed from rat embryonic pancreatic epithelia was larger in cultures with mesenchyme than without mesenchyme. The effect of mesenchyme was not due to an increase in beta-cell proliferation but was due to increased proliferation of early pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1)-positive progenitor cells, as confirmed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Consequently, the window during which early PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells differentiated into endocrine progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 was extended. Fibroblast growth factor 10 mimicked mesenchyme effects on proliferation of early PDX1(+) progenitor cells and induction of Ngn3 expression. Taken together, our results indicate that expansion of early PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells represents a way to increase the final number of beta-cells developing from early embryonic pancreas.

  20. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katharina J.; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  1. [Nicotinamide influence on pancreatic cells viability].

    PubMed

    Kuchmerovs'ka, T M; Donchenko, H V; Tykhonenko, T M; Huzyk, M M; Stavniĭchuk, R V; Ianits'ka, L V; Stepanenko, S P; Klymenko, A P

    2012-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the modulating effect of nicotinamide (NAm) in different concentrations and under different glucose concentrations on the viability and oxidative stress induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 5 mmol/l) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 micromol/l) on isolated rat pancreatic cells of the Langerhans islets in vitro. Cell viability did not depend on the concentration of glucose in the range of 5-20 mmol/l, and in subsequent studies we used glucose in concentration of 10 mmol/l to protect cells against its hypo- and hyperglycemic action. Cytoprotective effect of NAm in concentrations from 5 to 20 mmol/l on cells survival was the same. It was found that the destructive action of STZ and H2O2 during 24 hours on isolated cells of the pancreas resulted in the significant cell death. It was revealed that NAm in concentration of 5 mmol/l not only had cytoprotective effects against STZ and H2O2 but also partially reduced the level of oxidative stress in the investigated cells induced by these compounds. High concentration of NAm, 35 mmol/l, causes cytotoxic effect on the viability of pancreatic islet cells and increase of oxidative stress induced by STZ and H2O2. Most likely these effects could be associated with direct modulatory action of NAm on important effector mechanisms involved in cell death, including PARP-dependent processes, or/and indirectly, through metabolic and antioxidant effects of the compound.

  2. Pancreatic Satellite Cells Derived Galectin-1 Increase the Progression and Less Survival of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Sen; Ye, Nianyuan; Li, Ping; Gao, Sujun; Miao, Yi; Wang, Daorong; Jiang, Kuirong

    2014-01-01

    Background Galectin-1, a member of carbohydrate-binding proteins with a polyvalent function on tumor progression, was found strongly expressed in pancreatic satellite cells (PSCs), which partner in crime with cancer cells and promote the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We evaluated the effects of PSCs derived Galectin-1 on the progression of PDAC, as well as the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts. Methods The relationship between immunohistochemistry staining intensity of Galectin-1 and clinicopathologic variables were assessed in 66 PDAC tissues, 18 chronic pancreatitis tissues and 10 normal controls. The roles of PSCs isolated from PDAC and normal pancreas on the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and the invasion of CFPAC-1 in the co-cultured system, as well as on the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts by mixed implanting with CFPAC-1 subcutaneously were evaluated. Results Galectin-1 expression was gradually increased from normal pancreas (negative), chronic pancreatitis (weak) to PDAC (strong), in which Galectin-1 expression was also increased from well, moderately to poorly differentiated PDAC. Galectin-1 staining intensity of pancreatic cancer tissue was associated with increase in tumor size, lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and differentiation and UICC stage, and served as the independent prognostic indicator of poor survival of pancreatic cancer. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that TGF-β1 upregulated Galectin-1 expression in PSCs, which could further promotes the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, as well as the tumor establishment and growth. Conclusion Galectin-1 expression in stromal cells of pancreatic cancer suggests that this protein plays a role in the promotion of cancer cells invasion and metastasis and provides a therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24595374

  3. Susceptibility of ATM-deficient pancreatic cancer cells to radiation.

    PubMed

    Ayars, Michael; Eshleman, James; Goggins, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is inactivated in a significant minority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and may be predictor of treatment response. We determined if ATM deficiency renders pancreatic cancer cells more sensitive to fractionated radiation or commonly used chemotherapeutics. ATM expression was knocked down in three pancreatic cancer cell lines using ATM-targeting shRNA. Isogenic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. DNA repair kinetics were analyzed in irradiated cells using the comet assay. We find that while rendering pancreatic cancer cells ATM-deficient did not significantly change their sensitivity to several chemotherapeutics, it did render them exquisitely sensitized to radiation. Pancreatic cancer ATM status may help predict response to radiotherapy.

  4. Ras-driven transformation of human nestin-positive pancreatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M; Lee, Kwang M; Ouellette, Michel M; Kim, Hong Jin; Groehler, Angela L; Khazak, Vladimir; Der, Channing J

    2008-01-01

    Mutational activation of the K-Ras oncogene is well established as a key genetic step in the development and growth of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the means by which aberrant Ras signaling promotes uncontrolled pancreatic tumor cell growth remains to be fully elucidated. The recent use of primary human cells to study Ras-mediated oncogenesis provides important model cell systems to dissect this signaling biology. This chapter describes the establishment and characterization of telomerase-immortalized human pancreatic duct-derived cells to study mechanisms of Ras growth transformation. An important strength of this model system is the ability of mutationally activated K-Ras to cause potent growth transformation in vitro and in vivo. We have utilized this cell system to evaluate the antitumor activity of small molecule inhibitors of the Raf-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. This model will be useful for genetic and pharmacologic dissection of the contribution of downstream effector signaling in Ras-dependent growth transformation.

  5. Altered Gene Expression in Cerulein-Stimulated Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Pathologic Mechanism of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Lim, Joo Weon

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a multifactorial disease associated with the premature activation of digestive enzymes. The genes expressed in pancreatic acinar cells determine the severity of the disease. The present study determined the differentially expressed genes in pancreatic acinar cells treated with cerulein as an in vitro model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were stimulated with 10-8 M cerulein for 4 h, and genes with altered expression were identified using a cDNA microarray for 4,000 rat genes and validated by real-time PCR. These genes showed a 2.5-fold or higher increase with cerulein: lithostatin, guanylate cyclase, myosin light chain kinase 2, cathepsin C, progestin-induced protein, and pancreatic trypsin 2. Stathin 1 and ribosomal protein S13 showed a 2.5-fold or higher decreases in expression. Real-time PCR analysis showed time-dependent alterations of these genes. Using commercially available antibodies specific for guanylate cyclase, myosin light chain kinase 2, and cathepsin C, a time-dependent increase in these proteins were observed by Western blotting. Thus, disturbances in proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton arrangement, enzyme activity, and secretion may be underlying mechanisms of acute pancreatitis. PMID:20054485

  6. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  7. Protein Kinase D Regulates Cell Death Pathways in Experimental Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Liu, Yannan; Tan, Tanya; Guha, Sushovan; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early events of pancreatitis including NF-κB activation and inappropriate intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In current studies, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PKD/PKD1 in the regulation of necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells by using two novel small molecule PKD inhibitors CID755673 and CRT0066101 and molecular approaches in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis. Our results demonstrated that both CID755673 and CRT0066101 are PKD-specific inhibitors and that PKD/PKD1 inhibition by either the chemical inhibitors or specific PKD/PKD1 siRNAs attenuated necrosis while promoting apoptosis induced by pathological doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK) in pancreatic acinar cells. Conversely, up-regulation of PKD expression in pancreatic acinar cells increased necrosis and decreased apoptosis. We further showed that PKD/PKD1 regulated several key cell death signals including inhibitors of apoptotic proteins, caspases, receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 to promote necrosis. PKD/PKD1 inhibition by CID755673 significantly ameliorated necrosis and severity of pancreatitis in an in vivo experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Thus, our studies indicate that PKD/PKD1 is a key mediator of necrosis in acute pancreatitis and that PKD/PKD1 may represent a potential therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:22470346

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells are activated by proinflammatory cytokines: implications for pancreatic fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Apte, M; Haber, P; Darby, S; Rodgers, S; McCaughan, G; Korsten, M; Pirola, R; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is unknown. In the liver, stellate cells play a major role in fibrogenesis by synthesising increased amounts of collagen and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins when activated by profibrogenic mediators such as cytokines and oxidant stress. 
AIMS—To determine whether cultured rat pancreatic stellate cells produce collagen and other ECM proteins, and exhibit signs of activation when exposed to the cytokines platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) or transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). 
METHODS—Cultured pancreatic stellate cells were immunostained for the ECM proteins procollagen III, collagen I, laminin, and fibronectin using specific polyclonal antibodies. For cytokine studies, triplicate wells of cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of PDGF or TGF-β. 
RESULTS—Cultured pancreatic stellate cells stained strongly positive for all ECM proteins tested. Incubation of cells with 1, 5, and 10 ng/ml PDGF led to a significant dose related increase in cell counts as well as in the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA. Stellate cells exposed to 0.25, 0.5, and 1 ng/ml TGF-β showed a dose dependent increase in α smooth muscle actin expression and increased collagen synthesis. In addition, TGF-β increased the expression of PDGF receptors on stellate cells. 
CONCLUSIONS—Pancreatic stellate cells produce collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins, and respond to the cytokines PDGF and TGF-β by increased proliferation and increased collagen synthesis. These results suggest an important role for stellate cells in pancreatic fibrogenesis. 

 Keywords: pancreatic fibrosis; stellate cell activation; cytokines PMID:10075961

  9. Cyr61-positive cancer stem-like cells enhances distal metastases of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Weidong; Zhang, Chenyue; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Hao; Liu, Luming; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Efficient inhibition of tumor metastasis after resection of primary tumors is critical for cancer therapy. We have recently shown that Cyr61 promotes growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) through PI3k/Akt signaling-enhanced nuclear exclusion of p27. Here, we report that administration of adeno-associated viral vectors carrying a short-hairpin interfering RNA (shRNA) for Cyr61 via pancreatic duct significantly decreased the distal tumor metastases after resection of primary pancreatic tumor in mice. Moreover, Cyr61 depletion in PDAC cells significantly inhibited the tumor sphere formation in vitro, significantly decreased the growth of the subcutaneously transplanted tumor, and significantly decreased the incidence of tumor formation after serial adoptive transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. Finally, higher Cyr61 levels were detected in the PDAC specimens from the patients with distal tumor metastasis, compared to PDAC without metastasis at diagnosis. Together, our study suggests that suppression of Cyr61 in cancer stem cell-like cells in PDAC may inhibit tumor cell metastasis after resection of the primary tumor. PMID:27705906

  10. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor-β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co-cultured adhesive potential of Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc-1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc-1 cells. The expression of TNF-α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, and also in

  11. Environmental Contaminants and Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fabricio, Gabriel; Malta, Ananda; Chango, Abalo; De Freitas Mathias, Paulo Cezar

    2016-01-01

    Despite health policies as well as clinical and research efforts, diabetes prevalence is still rising around the world. A multitude of causes have been suggested for this increase, mostly related to familial background, the occidental diet which is rich in fat/carbohydrates, and sedentary life style. Type 2 diabetes involves malfunctions of the primary pancreatic beta-cells, usually attributed to local damage; however, it can be associated with other stressful environmental agents, such as chemical contaminants from food, plastic and air, among others. Indeed, exposure to these chemical agents during perinatal and adolescent life can increase the risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases later in life. This review explores data showing which environmental chemical agents may produce injury in beta-cells and further impair the insulinotropic process of type 2 diabetes. Additionally, it points the need to also consider unusual causes of metabolic diseases, such as environmental contaminants. PMID:27087124

  12. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and transforming growth factor‑β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co‑cultured adhesive potential of Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc‑1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc‑1 cells. The expression of TNF‑α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc

  13. Successful removal of an internal pancreatic stent that migrated into the bile duct using double-balloon enteroscopy after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiko; Kawai, Manabu; Yamashita, Yasunobu; Okada, Ken-Ichi; Miyazawa, Motoki; Ueno, Masaki; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Itonaga, Masahiro; Kitano, Masayuki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2017-07-08

    Internal stents used during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are generally spontaneously passed through the rectum by defecation. However, we encountered six patients with internal stents that migrated into the bile duct after PD. We herein report the outcomes of these six patients and the usefulness of double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for removal of such stents from the bile duct. An internal stent was placed across pancreaticojejunostomy in 416 (68.8%) of 605 consecutive patients undergoing PD between 2005 and 2015. This study evaluated the characteristics and outcomes of the six patients whose internal stent migrated into the bile duct. Migration of an internal stent into the bile duct was found during follow-up computed tomography (CT) in 6 (1.4%) of 416 patients who had an internal stent placed during PD. Three patients developed stent-induced cholangitis, and two had bile duct stones. Excluding one patient whose internal stent spontaneously slipped out and disappeared from the bile duct, all patients underwent successful removal of a stent from the bile duct by a single instance of biliary intervention involving DBE. Removal of a stent from the bile duct using DBE is a feasible and useful procedure that should be considered if an internal stent is detected during follow-up CT after PD.

  14. Perineural Mast Cells Are Specifically Enriched in Pancreatic Neuritis and Neuropathic Pain in Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Kehl, Timo; Giese, Nathalia A.; Algül, Hana; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuritis is a histopathological hallmark of pancreatic neuropathy and correlates to abdominal neuropathic pain sensation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, inflammatory cell subtypes that compose pancreatic neuritis and their correlation to the neuropathic pain syndrome in PCa and CP are yet unknown. Methods Inflammatory cells within pancreatic neuritis lesions of patients with PCa (n = 20) and CP (n = 20) were immunolabeled and colorimetrically quantified with the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, with CD68 (macrophages), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes), CD4 (T-helper cells), CD20 (B-lymphocytes), NCL-PC (plasma cells), neutrophil elastase, PRG2 (eosinophils), anti-mast cell (MC) tryptase and correlated to pain sensation. Perineural mast cell subtypes were analyzed by double immunolabeling with MC chymase. Expression and neural immunoreactivity of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR-1) and type 2 (PAR-2) were analyzed in PCa and CP and correlated to pain status of the patients. Results In PCa and CP, nerves were predominantly infiltrated by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (PCa: 35% of all perineural inflammatory cells, CP: 33%), macrophages (PCa: 39%, CP: 33%) and MC (PCa: 21%, CP: 27%). In both entities, neuropathic pain sensation was associated with a specific increase of perineural MC (PCa without pain: 14% vs. PCa with pain: 31%; CP without pain: 19% vs. CP with pain: 34%), not affecting the frequency of other inflammatory cell subtypes. The vast majority of these MC contained MC chymase. PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression did not correlate to the pain sensation of PCa and CP patients. Conclusion Pancreatic neuritis in PC and CP is composed of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, macrophages and MC. The specific enrichment of MC around intrapancreatic nerves in neuropathic pain due to PCa and CP suggests the presence of MC-induced visceral hypersensitivity in the pancreas. Therefore, pancreatic and enteric neuropathies seem

  15. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  16. Identification of cholinergic chemosensory cells in mouse tracheal and laryngeal glandular ducts.

    PubMed

    Krasteva-Christ, G; Soultanova, A; Schütz, B; Papadakis, T; Weiss, C; Deckmann, K; Chubanov, V; Gudermann, T; Voigt, A; Meyerhof, W; Boehm, U; Weihe, E; Kummer, W

    2015-11-01

    Specialized epithelial cells in the respiratory tract such as solitary chemosensory cells and brush cells sense the luminal content and initiate protective reflexes in response to the detection of potentially harmful substances. The majority of these cells are cholinergic and utilize the canonical taste signal transduction cascade to detect "bitter" substances such as bacterial quorum sensing molecules. Utilizing two different mouse strains reporting expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the synthesizing enzyme of acetylcholine (ACh), we detected cholinergic cells in the submucosal glands of the murine larynx and trachea. These cells were localized in the ciliated glandular ducts and were neither found in the collecting ducts nor in alveolar or tubular segments of the glands. ChAT expression in tracheal gland ducts was confirmed by in situ hybridization. The cholinergic duct cells expressed the brush cell marker proteins, villin and cytokeratin-18, and were immunoreactive for components of the taste signal transduction cascade (Gα-gustducin, transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel = TRPM5, phospholipase C(β2)), but not for carbonic anhydrase IV. Furthermore, these cells expressed the bitter taste receptor Tas2r131, as demonstrated utilizing an appropriate reporter mouse strain. Our study identified a previously unrecognized presumptive chemosensory cell type in the duct of the airway submucosal glands that likely utilizes ACh for paracrine signaling. We propose that these cells participate in infection-sensing mechanisms and initiate responses assisting bacterial clearance from the lower airways.

  17. Exosomal Transfer From Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells To Distal Tubule And Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, John J.; Seaton, Joscelyn E.; Victor, Ken G.; Reyes, Camellia M.; Wang, Dora Bigler; Pettigrew, Abigail C.; Courtner, Crystal E.; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh T.; Van Sciver, Robert E.; Carlson, Julia M.; Felder, Robin A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Exosomes are 50-90 nm extracellular membrane particles that may mediate trans-cellular communication between cells and tissues. We have reported that human urinary exosomes contain miRNA that are biomarkers for salt sensitivity and inverse salt sensitivity of blood pressure. This study examines exosomal transfer between cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) and from RPTCs to human distal tubule and collecting duct cells. Design and methods For RPTC-to-RPTC exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 RPTC lines producing exosomes that were fluorescently labeled with exosomal-specific markers CD63-EGFP or CD9-RFP. Transfer between RPTCs was demonstrated by co-culturing CD63-EGFP and CD9-RFP stable clones and performing live confocal microscopy. For RPTC-to-distal segment exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 distal tubule and 3 collecting duct immortalized cell lines. Results Time-lapse videos revealed unique proximal tubule cellular uptake patterns for exosomes and eventual accumulation into the multi-vesicular body. Using culture supernatant containing exosomes from 3 CD9-RFP and 2 CD63-EGFP RPTC cell lines, all 5 distal tubule cell lines and all 3 collecting duct cell lines showed exosomal uptake as measured by microplate fluorometry. Furthermore, we found that RPTCs stimulated with fenoldopam (dopamine receptor agonist) had increased production of exosomes, which upon transfer to distal tubule and collecting duct cells, reduced the basal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates in those recipient cells. Conclusion Due to the complex diversity of exosomal contents, this proximal-to-distal vesicular inter-nephron transfer may represent a previously unrecognized trans-renal communication system. PMID:24976626

  18. Exosomal transfer from human renal proximal tubule cells to distal tubule and collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Seaton, Joscelyn E; Victor, Ken G; Reyes, Camellia M; Bigler Wang, Dora; Pettigrew, Abigail C; Courtner, Crystal E; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh T; Van Sciver, Robert E; Carlson, Julia M; Felder, Robin A

    2014-10-01

    Exosomes are 50-90nm extracellular membrane particles that may mediate trans-cellular communication between cells and tissues. We have reported that human urinary exosomes contain miRNA that are biomarkers for salt sensitivity and inverse salt sensitivity of blood pressure. This study examines exosomal transfer between cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) and from RPTCs to human distal tubule and collecting duct cells. For RPTC-to-RPTC exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 RPTC lines producing exosomes that were fluorescently labeled with exosomal-specific markers CD63-EGFP or CD9-RFP. Transfer between RPTCs was demonstrated by co-culturing CD63-EGFP and CD9-RFP stable clones and performing live confocal microscopy. For RPTC-to-distal segment exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 distal tubule and 3 collecting duct immortalized cell lines. Time-lapse videos revealed unique proximal tubule cellular uptake patterns for exosomes and eventual accumulation into the multivesicular body. Using culture supernatant containing exosomes from 3 CD9-RFP and 2 CD63-EGFP RPTC cell lines, all 5 distal tubule cell lines and all 3 collecting duct cell lines showed exosomal uptake as measured by microplate fluorometry. Furthermore, we found that RPTCs stimulated with fenoldopam (dopamine receptor agonist) had increased production of exosomes, which upon transfer to distal tubule and collecting duct cells, reduced the basal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates in those recipient cells. Due to the complex diversity of exosomal contents, this proximal-to-distal vesicular inter-nephron transfer may represent a previously unrecognized trans-renal communication system. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chlamydia pneumoniae promotes dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Annette R; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P; Perry, George; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2015-06-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (p<0.005) decreased beta cell ATP and insulin production, in contrast to uninfected mast cells co-cultured with beta cells. Infected mast cells exhibited pyknotic nuclei and active caspase-3 and caspase-1 expression. Additionally, ex vivo analyses of tissues collected from C. pneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability.

  20. Triterpenes from Poria cocos suppress growth and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through the downregulation of MMP-7

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, SHUJIE; ELIAZ, ISAAC; LIN, JUNFANG; SLIVA, DANIEL

    2013-01-01

    Poria cocos is a medicinal mushroom that is widely used in traditional Asian medicine. Here, we show that a characterized mixture of triterpenes extracted from P. cocos (PTE) and three purified triterpenes: pachymic acid (PA), dehydropachymic acid (DPA) and polyporenic acid C (PPAC) suppress the proliferation of the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MiaPaca-2, AsPc-1 and BxPc-3. Moreover, the most effective compound, PA, only slightly affects the proliferation of HPDE-6 normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. The anti-proliferative effects of PTE on BxPc-3 cells are mediated by the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that PTE significantly downregulates the expression of KRAS and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) in BxPc-3 cells. In addition, PTE and PA suppress the invasive behavior of BxPc-3 cells. The inhibition of invasiveness by PTE and PA was associated with the reduction of MMP-7 at the protein level and the role of MMP-7 further confirmed by the gene silencing of MMP-7 which also suppressed the invasiveness of BxPc-3 cells. In conclusion, triterpenes from P. cocos demonstrate anticancer and anti-invasive effects on human pancreatic cancer cells and can be considered as new therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23588713

  1. Triterpenes from Poria cocos suppress growth and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through the downregulation of MMP-7.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shujie; Eliaz, Isaac; Lin, Junfang; Thyagarajan-Sahu, Anita; Sliva, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Poria cocos is a medicinal mushroom that is widely used in traditional Asian medicine. Here, we show that a characterized mixture of triterpenes extracted from P. cocos (PTE) and three purified triterpenes: pachymic acid (PA), dehydropachymic acid (DPA) and polyporenic acid C (PPAC) suppress the proliferation of the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MiaPaca-2, AsPc-1 and BxPc-3. Moreover, the most effective compound, PA, only slightly affects the proliferation of HPDE-6 normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. The anti-proliferative effects of PTE on BxPc-3 cells are mediated by the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that PTE significantly downregulates the expression of KRAS and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) in BxPc-3 cells. In addition, PTE and PA suppress the invasive behavior of BxPc-3 cells. The inhibition of invasiveness by PTE and PA was associated with the reduction of MMP-7 at the protein level and the role of MMP-7 further confirmed by the gene silencing of MMP-7 which also suppressed the invasiveness of BxPc-3 cells. In conclusion, triterpenes from P. cocos demonstrate anticancer and anti-invasive effects on human pancreatic cancer cells and can be considered as new therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Techniques for cutting irradiated fuel ducts at FFTF/IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Payzant, W.H.

    1990-09-01

    Two remotely controlled mill-type cutters have been used in the Fast Flux Test Facility Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell to assist in the disassembly of 18 fuel assemblies. These cutters slit the outer duct of the fuel assemblies, which allows the ducts to be removed and provides access to the encased fuel pins. The cutters were developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company and thoroughly tested by cutting prototypic ducts. During actual use, however, occasional loss of cutting depth control occurred. A discussion of the control problems and the operation and design techniques developed for their resolution is presented. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Cytokines and Pancreatic β-Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, L A; Prause, M; Størling, J; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    The discovery 30 years ago that inflammatory cytokines cause a concentration, activity, and time-dependent bimodal response in pancreatic β-cell function and viability has been a game-changer in the fields of research directed at understanding inflammatory regulation of β-cell function and survival and the causes of β-cell failure and destruction in diabetes. Having until then been confined to the use of pathophysiologically irrelevant β-cell toxic chemicals as a model of β-cell death, researchers could now mimic endocrine and paracrine effects of the cytokine response in vitro by titrating concentrations in the low to the high picomolar-femtomolar range and vary exposure time for up to 14-16h to reproduce the acute regulatory effects of systemic inflammation on β-cell secretory responses, with a shift to inhibition at high picomolar concentrations or more than 16h of exposure to illustrate adverse effects of local, chronic islet inflammation. Since then, numerous studies have clarified how these bimodal responses depend on discrete signaling pathways. Most interest has been devoted to the proapoptotic response dependent upon mainly nuclear factor κ B and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, leading to gene expressional changes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and triggering of mitochondrial dysfunction. Preclinical studies have shown preventive effects of cytokine antagonism in animal models of diabetes, and clinical trials demonstrating proof of concept are emerging. The full clinical potential of anticytokine therapies has yet to be shown by testing the incremental effects of appropriate dosing, timing, and combinations of treatments. Due to the considerable translational importance of enhancing the precision, specificity, and safety of antiinflammatory treatments of diabetes, we review here the cellular, preclinical, and clinical evidence of which of the death pathways recently proposed in the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

  5. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell markers are expressed by ductal plate and bile duct cells in developing human liver.

    PubMed

    Blakolmer, K; Jaskiewicz, K; Dunsford, H A; Robson, S C

    1995-06-01

    The identification of ductal plate cells as likely progenitors for bile duct epithelium and hepatocytes and their possible reappearance as oval cells in the regenerating liver have generated much interest in their pluripotential capacities. We have examined the distribution of three hematopoietic stem cell markers, c-kit, CD34, and CD33 in addition to laminin, the standard cytokeratin markers CAM 5.2, CK 18, and CK 7 and the oval cell marker OV-6 in fetal liver during various stages of development. Hematopoietic stem cell markers were expressed in ductal plate cells in a pattern similar to the early cytokeratin markers CAM 5.2 and CK 18. Cells stained strongly for these early cytokeratin markers until 22 weeks. Thereafter, the expression of these markers decreased while positivity for CK 7 increased. Bile duct cells showed a distribution of hematopoietic and cytokeratin markers resembling that of ductal plate cells. Both ductal plate cells and bile duct cells expressed OV-6 strongly throughout development. This study showed similarity between hepatic and bile duct precursors and bone marrow stem cells. The comparable distribution of markers in bile duct epithelium and ductal plate cells may imply fewer transitional stages between ductal plate cells and bile duct epithelium than between the putative stem cells and hepatocytes.

  7. Cell Proliferation and Oncogene Expression After Bile Duct Ligation in the Rat: Evidence of a Specific Growth Effect on Bile Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Polimeno, Lorenzo; Azzarone, Alessandro; Zeng, Qui Hua; Panella, Carmine; Subbotin, Vladimir; Carr, Brian; Bouzahzah, Boumediene; Francavilla, Antonio; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The proliferative response of the rat liver was measured after temporary or permanent total biliary obstruction (BDO) and in different regions after selective ligation of the lobar ducts draining the right 60% of the hepatic mass. The results were compared with those after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). Cell proliferation was assessed globally by measuring DNA synthesis and stratified to the separate cell populations with cytostaining techniques that allowed distinction of hepatocytes, duct cells, and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs). In selected experimental groups, gene expression was determined of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ-1), prothrom-bin, c-erb-B2, transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα), human Cyclophilin (CyP), and 28S ribosomal RNA. The stimulation of a proliferative response to total BDO required obstruction for longer than 24 hours, but after this deligation did not switch off regeneration. In the first week after permanent BDO, there was progressive infiltration of NPCs, fibrous linkage of some portal areas, and a crescendo of DNA synthesis that was obvious at 24 hours, maximal at 48 hours, and back nearly to baseline at 6 days. At the 2-day mark. the bile duct cells had a 17-fold increase in proliferation, accompanied by a threefold to fourfold increase in hepatocyte renewal Little or no increase in expression of TGFα or the hepatocyte-specific prothrombin gene was detectable in the first 48 hours, whereas levels of the oncogene c-erb-B2 that is associated with cholangiocarcinoma were expressed from 48 to 96 hours. Livers subjected to regional BDO with or without immunosuppressive treatment with FK 506 and cyclosporine had an inflammatory reaction only on the side with ligated ducts. DNA synthesis increased in both the obstructed and freely draining lobes to approximately half the level that occurred after total BDO. The proliferation of the obstructed side was similar to the mixed duct cell/hepatocyte response after total BDO, but this almost

  8. Long non-coding RNA CRNDE sponges miR-384 to promote proliferation and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells through upregulating IRS1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Jingen; Zhang, Lu; Wei, Yajun; Wang, Cheng

    2017-09-21

    Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE), a vital cancer-related long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), has been brought to reports for playing quintessential functions in the growth and progression of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the expression as well as the functional mechanisms of CRNDE in pancreatic cancer is not known so for. This study aimed at investigating the biological and clinical importance of CRNDE in human pancreatic cancer. The expression levels of CRNDE in pancreatic cancer tissues as well as cell lines were identified with the help of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, the analysis of the relationship between CRNDE expression and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with pancreatic cancer was also performed. Novel target of CRNDE was identified with the use of bioinformatics analysis and confirmed by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed was knocked down using siRNA in pancreatic cancer cells. Thereafter, cell proliferation, migration and invasion were examined. Tumour xenograft was created to explore the function of CRNDE in tumorigenesis in vivo. Upregulation of the expression of CRNDE was found in pancreatic cancer tissues as well as cell lines, in comparison with the adjacent non-tumour tissues and human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. High expression of CRNDE was correlated with poor clinicpathological characteristics and shorter overall survival. We identified miR-384 as a direct target for CRNDE. Moreover, the CRNDE knockdown considerably inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion not only in vitro but also in vivo. In addition, CRNDE positively regulated IRS1 expression through sponging miR-384. Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed performed an oncogenic function in cell proliferation as well as metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Our results suggest that CRNDE is likely to serve as an efficient therapeutic approach in

  9. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami; Ripoche, Doriane; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Rehfeld, Jens F; Lepinasse, Florian; Hervieu, Valérie; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bertolino, Philippe; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2015-10-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have migrated from the duodenum. In the current study, we further characterized previously described transient pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells using cell lineage tracing in a pan-pancreatic progenitor and a pancreatic endocrine progenitor model. We provide evidence showing that pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells, found from embryonic day 12.5 until postnatal day 7, are derived from pancreatic Ptf1a(+) and neurogenin 3-expressing (Ngn3(+)) progenitors. Importantly, the majority of them coexpress glucagon, with 4% coexpressing insulin, indicating that they are a temporary subpopulation of both alpha and beta cells. Interestingly, Men1 disruption in both Ngn3 progenitors and beta and alpha cells resulted in the development of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors, suggesting that the latter developed from islet cells. Finally, we detected gastrin expression using three human cohorts with pancreatic endocrine tumors (pNETs) that have not been diagnosed as gastrinomas (in 9/34 pNETs from 6/14 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in 5/35 sporadic nonfunctioning pNETs, and in 2/20 sporadic insulinomas), consistent with observations made in mouse models. Our work provides insight into the histogenesis of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors.

  10. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Hu, Yanling; Ni, Jianbo; Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao; Shen, Jie; Tang, Maochun; Chen, Congying; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xingpeng; and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  11. Isolated Roux-en-Y anastomosis of the pancreatic stump in a duct-to-mucosa fashion in patients with distal pancreatectomy with en-bloc celiac axis resection.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ken-Ichi; Kawai, Manabu; Tani, Masaji; Hirono, Seiko; Miyazawa, Motoki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Kitahata, Yuji; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2014-03-01

    A pancreatic fistula is one of the most serious complications in distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR), because the pancreatic transection is performed on the right side of the portal vein, which results in a large cross-section surface, and because post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage is hard to treat by interventional radiology. Therefore, a procedure to decrease the incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula is urgently needed. Twenty-six consecutive patients who underwent DP-CAR between April 2008 and August 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The first 13 consecutive patients underwent DP-CAR with no anastomosis, and the subsequent 13 consecutive patients were treated with Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) in a duct-to-mucosa fashion. Extremely high amylase levels (>4000 IU/l) of all drainage fluid specimens on postoperative day (POD) 1, 3 and 4 were detected more frequently in cases with no anastomosis (n = 7) compared to those with PJ (n = 1) (P = 0.056). The incidence of grade B/C pancreatic fistulas was 15.4% in cases with isolated Roux-en-Y anastomosis of the pancreatic stump performed in a duct-to-mucosa fashion, and we are currently examining whether this anastomosis method reduces the pancreatic fistula rate in a multicenter, randomized controlled trial for distal pancreatectomy patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01384617). © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  12. CFTR-Mediated Cl− Transport in the Acinar and Duct Cells of Rabbit Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Michael; Ding, Chuanqing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the role that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may play in Cl− transport in the acinar and ductal epithelial cells of rabbit lacrimal gland (LG). Methods Primary cultured LG acinar cells were processed for whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recording of Cl− currents by using perfusion media with high and low [Cl−], 10 μM forskolin and 100 μM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), the non-specific Cl− channel blocker 4,4′-disothiocyanostilbene-2, 2′ sulphonic acid (DIDS; 100 μM) and CFTRinh-172 (10 μM), a specific blocker for CFTR. Ex vivo live cell imaging of [Cl−] changes in duct cells was performed on freshly dissected LG duct with a multiphoton confocal laser scanning microscope using a Cl− sensitive fluorescence dye, N-[ethoxycarbonylmethyl]-6-methoxy-quinolinium bromide. Results Whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrated the presence of Cl− current in isolated acinar cells and revealed that this Cl− current was mediated by CFTR channel. Live cell imaging also showed the presence of CFTR-mediated Cl− transport across the plasma membrane of duct cells. Conclusions Our previous data showed the presence of CFTR in all acinar and duct cells within the rabbit LG, with expression most prominent in the apical membranes of duct cells. The present study demonstrates that CFTR is actively involved in Cl− transport in both acinar cells and epithelial cells from duct segments, suggesting that CFTR may play a significant role in LG secretion. PMID:22578307

  13. Targeting of the P2X7 receptor in pancreatic cancer and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannuzzo, Andrea; Saccomano, Mara; Napp, Joanna; Ellegaard, Maria; Alves, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    The ATP‐gated receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) is involved in regulation of cell survival and has been of interest in cancer field. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly cancer and new markers and therapeutic targets are needed. PDAC is characterized by a complex tumour microenvironment, which includes cancer and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), and potentially high nucleotide/side turnover. Our aim was to determine P2X7R expression and function in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro as well as to perform in vivo efficacy study applying P2X7R inhibitor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of PDAC. In the in vitro studies we show that human PDAC cells with luciferase gene (PancTu‐1 Luc cells) express high levels of P2X7R protein. Allosteric P2X7R antagonist AZ10606120 inhibited cell proliferation in basal conditions, indicating that P2X7R was tonically active. Extracellular ATP and BzATP, to which the P2X7R is more sensitive, further affected cell survival and confirmed complex functionality of P2X7R. PancTu‐1 Luc migration and invasion was reduced by AZ10606120, and it was stimulated by PSCs, but not by PSCs from P2X7‐/‐ animals. PancTu‐1 Luc cells were orthotopically transplanted into nude mice and tumour growth was followed noninvasively by bioluminescence imaging. AZ10606120‐treated mice showed reduced bioluminescence compared to saline‐treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed P2X7R expression in cancer and PSC cells, and in metaplastic/neoplastic acinar and duct structures. PSCs number/activity and collagen deposition was reduced in AZ10606120‐treated tumours. PMID:27513892

  14. Impaired Pancreatic Beta Cell Function by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Khan, Shakil A.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2013-01-01

    Breathing disorders with recurrent apnea produce periodic decreases in arterial blood O2 or chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Recurrent apnea patients and CIH-exposed rodents exhibit several co-morbidities including diabetes. However, the effects of CIH on pancreatic beta cell function are not known. In the present study, we investigated pancreatic beta cell function in C57BL6 mice exposed to 30 days of CIH. CIH-exposed mice exhibited elevated levels of fasting plasma insulin, but comparable glucose levels, and higher homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), indicating insulin resistance. Pancreatic beta cell morphology was unaltered in CIH- exposed mice. Insulin content was decreased in CIH-exposed beta cells, and this effect was associated with increased proinsulin levels. mRNA and protein levels of the enzyme pro-hormone convertase 1 (PC1) which converts proinsulin to insulin were down regulated in CIH-treated islets. More importantly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was impaired in CIH-exposed mice and in isolated islets. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in CIH-exposed pancreatic islets. Treatment of mice with mito-tempol, a scavenger of mitochondrial ROS during CIH exposure, prevented the augmented insulin secretion and restored the proinsulin as well as HOMA values to control levels. These results demonstrate that CIH leads to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction manifested by augmented basal insulin secretion, insulin resistance, defective proinsulin processing, impaired GSIS and mitochondrial ROS mediates the effects of CIH on pancreatic beta cell function. PMID:23709585

  15. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Junjun; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Wensheng; Song, Junxin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 7 and 9 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:28176967

  16. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Junjun; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Wensheng; Song, Junxin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 7 and 9 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Evaluation of a new modification of pancreaticogastrostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy: anastomosis of the pancreatic duct to the gastric mucosa with invagination of the pancreatic remnant end into the posterior gastric wall for patients with cancer head of pancreas and periampullary carcinoma in terms of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation.

    PubMed

    Osman, Mohamed Mazloum; Abd El Maksoud, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) remains the main problem after pancreaticoduodenectomy and determines to a large extent the final outcome. We describe a new modification of pancreaticogastrostomy which combines duct to mucosa anastomosis with suturing the pancreatic capsule to posterior gastric wall and then invaginating the pancreatic remnant into the posterior gastric wall. This study was designed to assess the results of this new modification of pancreaticogastrostomy. The newly modified pancreaticogastrostomy was applied to 37 consecutive patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy for periampullary cancer (64.86%) or cancer head of the pancreas (35.14%). Eighteen patients (48.65%) had a soft pancreatic remnant, 13 patients (35.14%) had firm pancreatic remnant, and 6 patients (16.22%) had intermediate texture of pancreatic remnant. Rate of mortality, early postoperative complications, and hospital stay were also reported. Operative mortality was zero and morbidity was 29.73%. Only three patients (8.11%) developed pancreatic leaks; they were treated conservatively. Eight patients (16.1%) had delayed gastric emptying, one patient (2.70%) had minor hemorrhage, one patient (2.70%) had biliary leak, and four patients (10.81%) had superficial wound infection. The new modified pancreatogastrostomy seems safe and reliable with low rate of POPF. However, further prospective controlled trials are essential to support these results.

  18. Assessing the Secretory Capacity of Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geron, Erez; Schejter, Eyal D.; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells produce and secrete digestive enzymes. These cells are organized as a cluster which forms and shares a joint lumen. This work demonstrates how the secretory capacity of these cells can be assessed by culture of isolated acini. The setup is advantageous since isolated acini, which retain many characteristics of the intact exocrine pancreas can be manipulated and monitored more readily than in the whole animal. Proper isolation of pancreatic acini is a key requirement so that the ex vivo culture will represent the in vivo nature of the acini. The protocol demonstrates how to isolate intact acini from the mouse pancreas. Subsequently, two complementary methods for evaluating pancreatic secretion are presented. The amylase secretion assay serves as a global measure, while direct imaging of pancreatic secretion allows the characterization of secretion at a sub-cellular resolution. Collectively, the techniques presented here enable a broad spectrum of experiments to study exocrine secretion. PMID:25226212

  19. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuates Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dandan; Gao, Jun; Gong, Yanfang; Wu, Hongyu; Xu, Aifang

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims. Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains a high-mortality disease. Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to have plasticity of transdifferentiation and to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we assessed the roles of MSCs in SAP and the therapeutic effects of MSC on SAP after transplantation. Methods. A pancreatitis rat model was induced by the injection of taurocholic acid (TCA) into the pancreatic duct. After isolation and characterization of MSC from BM, MSC transplantation was conducted 24 hrs after SAP induction by tail vein injection. The survival rate was observed and MSCs were traced after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was also analyzed. Results. The survival rate of the transplantation group was significantly higher compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Infused MSCs were detected in the pancreas and BM 3 days after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was significantly lower than in the control group in both the pancreas and the lungs (p < 0.05). Conclusions. MSC transplantation could improve the prognosis of SAP rats. Engrafted MSCs have the capacity of homing, migration, and planting during the treatment of SAP. PMID:27721836

  20. Glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford; Salehi, Albert; Vergari, Elisa; Zhang, Quan; Rorsman, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes involves a ménage à trois of impaired glucose regulation of pancreatic hormone release: in addition to impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the release of the hyperglycaemic hormone glucagon becomes dysregulated; these last-mentioned defects exacerbate the metabolic consequences of hypoinsulinaemia and are compounded further by hypersecretion of somatostatin (which inhibits both insulin and glucagon secretion). Glucagon secretion has been proposed to be regulated by either intrinsic or paracrine mechanisms, but their relative significance and the conditions under which they operate are debated. Importantly, the paracrine and intrinsic modes of regulation are not mutually exclusive; they could operate in parallel to control glucagon secretion. Here we have applied mathematical modelling of α-cell electrical activity as a novel means of dissecting the processes that underlie metabolic regulation of glucagon secretion. Our analyses indicate that basal hypersecretion of somatostatin and/or increased activity of somatostatin receptors may explain the loss of adequate counter-regulation under hypoglycaemic conditions, as well as the physiologically inappropriate stimulation of glucagon secretion during hyperglycaemia seen in diabetic patients. We therefore advocate studying the interaction of the paracrine and intrinsic mechanisms; unifying these processes may give a more complete picture of the regulation of glucagon secretion from α-cells than studying the individual parts. PMID:27044683

  1. Aptamer-Mediated Delivery of Chemotherapy to Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; Cheek, Marcus A.; Sharaf, Mariam L.; Li, Na; Ellington, Andrew D.; Sullenger, Bruce A.; Shaw, Barbara Ramsay

    2012-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analog that is currently the best available single-agent chemotherapeutic drug for pancreatic cancer. However, efficacy is limited by our inability to deliver sufficient active metabolite into cancer cells without toxic effects on normal tissues. Targeted delivery of gemcitabine into cancer cells could maximize effectiveness and concurrently minimize toxic side effects by reducing uptake into normal cells. Most pancreatic cancers overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. We utilized a nuclease resistant RNA aptamer that binds and is internalized by EGFR on pancreatic cancer cells to deliver gemcitabine-containing polymers into EGFR-expressing cells and inhibit cell proliferation in vitro. This approach to cell type–specific therapy can be adapted to other targets and to other types of therapeutic cargo. PMID:23030589

  2. Bone marrow-derived stem cells initiate pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hess, David; Li, Li; Martin, Matthew; Sakano, Seiji; Hill, David; Strutt, Brenda; Thyssen, Sandra; Gray, Douglas A; Bhatia, Mickie

    2003-07-01

    We show that transplantation of adult bone marrow-derived cells expressing c-kit reduces hyperglycemia in mice with streptozotocin-induced pancreatic damage. Although quantitative analysis of the pancreas revealed a low frequency of donor insulin-positive cells, these cells were not present at the onset of blood glucose reduction. Instead, the majority of transplanted cells were localized to ductal and islet structures, and their presence was accompanied by a proliferation of recipient pancreatic cells that resulted in insulin production. The capacity of transplanted bone marrow-derived stem cells to initiate endogenous pancreatic tissue regeneration represents a previously unrecognized means by which these cells can contribute to the restoration of organ function.

  3. Metformin suppresses sonic hedgehog expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masafumi; Ogo, Ayako; Yamura, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Metformin use has previously been associated with decreased cancer risk. The Hedgehog signaling pathway is a well-characterized early and late mediator of pancreatic cancer oncogenesis. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of metformin on factors involved in Hedgehog signaling. BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cells were treated with metformin, and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) mRNA and protein levels were examined by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. The effect of metformin on Shh levels was also examined in three other cancer cell lines. Shh protein and mRNA expression was suppressed by metformin in BxPC3 cells. This phenomenon was further confirmed in three other cancer cell lines. Shh mRNA expression was inhibited by metformin in a concentration-dependent manner in two cancer cell lines. Metformin reduces the expression of Shh in several cancer cell lines including pancreatic cancer cell.

  4. Connective tissue growth factor production by activated pancreatic stellate cells in mouse alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Brigstock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, inflammation, and scarring, the latter of which is due to excessive collagen deposition by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). The aim of this study was to establish a model of ACP in mice, a species that is usually resistant to the toxic effects of alcohol, and to identify the cell type(s) responsible for production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a pro-fibrotic molecule. C57Bl/6 male mice received intraperitoneal ethanol injections for three weeks against a background of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Peak blood alcohol levels remained consistently high in ethanol-treated mice as compared to control mice. In mice receiving ethanol plus cerulein, there was increased collagen deposition as compared to other treatment groups as well as increased frequency of α-smooth muscle actin and desmin-positive PSC which also demonstrated significantly enhanced CTGF protein production. Expression of mRNA for collagen α1(I), α-smooth muscle actin or CTGF were all increased and co-localized exclusively to activated PSC in ACP. Pancreatic expression of mRNA for key profibrotic markers were all increased in ACP. In conclusion, a mouse model of ACP has been developed that mimics key pathophysiological features of the disease in humans and which shows that activated PSC are the principal producers of collagen and CTGF. PSC-derived CTGF is thus a candidate therapeutic target in anti-fibrotic strategies for ACP. PMID:20368699

  5. Troglitazone Induces Extracellular Matrix and Cytoskeleton Remodeling in Mouse Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corinaldi, Jaime; Nasrallah, Rania; Clark, Jordan; Paris, Geneviève; Miura, Pedro; Jasmin, Bernard J.; Hébert, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) has been shown to have a protective role in the nephron through its ability to inhibit a transforming growth factor- (TGF-β) mediated fibrotic response. In contrast, PPARγ was also shown to induce a mesenchymal transformation in epithelial intestinal cells. A fibrotic response in the collecting duct has only recently been established; however, the entire collecting duct has not been fully examined. Inner medullary collecting duct cells (IMCD-K2) and mouse cortical collecting duct cells (M1), representing the cortical and medullary collecting duct, were exposed to 5–10 μM troglitazone for 24 hours. Troglitazone resulted in an elongated morphology, 60% decreases in E-cadherin and β-catenin, a 35% decrease in α-catenin, and a 1.5-fold increase in fibronectin. These effects were not reversed with PPARγ antagonists or affected with PPARγ overexpression. Our results indicate that troglitazone induced a mesenchymal-like transformation in M1 and IMCD-K2 epithelial cells independently of PPARγ. PMID:22500093

  6. Production of pancreatic hormone-expressing endocrine cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Kevin A; Bang, Anne G; Eliazer, Susan; Kelly, Olivia G; Agulnick, Alan D; Smart, Nora G; Moorman, Mark A; Kroon, Evert; Carpenter, Melissa K; Baetge, Emmanuel E

    2006-11-01

    Of paramount importance for the development of cell therapies to treat diabetes is the production of sufficient numbers of pancreatic endocrine cells that function similarly to primary islets. We have developed a differentiation process that converts human embryonic stem (hES) cells to endocrine cells capable of synthesizing the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. This process mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis by directing cells through stages resembling definitive endoderm, gut-tube endoderm, pancreatic endoderm and endocrine precursor--en route to cells that express endocrine hormones. The hES cell-derived insulin-expressing cells have an insulin content approaching that of adult islets. Similar to fetal beta-cells, they release C-peptide in response to multiple secretory stimuli, but only minimally to glucose. Production of these hES cell-derived endocrine cells may represent a critical step in the development of a renewable source of cells for diabetes cell therapy.

  7. Antiproliferation and apoptosis induced by tamoxifen in human bile duct carcinoma QBC939 cells via upregulated p53 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Peng; Kang, Jin-He; Li, Hua-Liang; Hu, Su-Xian; Lian, Hui-Hui; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wen-Gang; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2009-07-24

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen that has been used in the treatment of breast cancer for over 30 years. Recently, it was shown that TAM also has efficacy on gastrointestinal neoplasms such as hepatocarcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma, and that the chemopreventive activities of TAM might be due to its abilities to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of tamoxifen on growth and apoptosis in the human bile duct carcinoma (BDC) cell line QBC939 using MTT assay, inverted microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, classic DNA fragmentation agarose gel electrophoresis assay, PI single- and FITC/PI double-staining flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Our data revealed that TAM could significantly inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in QBC939 cells. Increased expression of p53 was observed in TAM-treated cells, indicating that p53 might play an important role in TAM-induced apoptosis in QBC939 cells. These results provide significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of TAM on BDC.

  8. Vitamin D Receptor Signaling and Pancreatic Cancer Cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of human malignancies. Even in patients who undergo resection, long-term survival rates remain extremely low. A major contributor to the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a physiologic process of morphological and genetic changes in carcinoma cells from an epithelial phenotype to a mesenchymal phenotype, which is the basis of the high metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells. EMT is triggered by various tumor microenvironmental factors, including cytokines, growth factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. This review highlights the growing evidence of the effect of EMT on pancreatic cancer progression, focusing on the interaction of EMT with other pathways central to cancer progression, especially vitamin D receptor signaling. Studies of the signaling pathways that lead to the inactivation of EMT programs during these disease processes are providing new insights into the plasticity of cellular phenotypes and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25506892

  9. CAR T-cell therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    DeSelm, Carl J; Tano, Zachary E; Varghese, Anna M; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2017-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy utilizes genetic engineering to redirect a patient's own T cells to target cancer cells. The remarkable results in hematological malignancies prompted investigating this approach in solid tumors such as pancreatic cancer. The complex tumor microenvironment, stromal hindrance in limiting immune response, and expression of checkpoint blockade on T cells pose hurdles. Herein, we summarize the opportunities, challenges, and state of knowledge in targeting pancreatic cancer with CAR T-cell therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    PubMed

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    2017-01-01

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  11. Bone marrow-derived pancreatic stellate cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Sparmann, Gisela; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Hofmeister-Mielke, Nicole; Koczan, Dirk; Jaster, Robert; Liebe, Stefan; Wolff, Daniel; Emmrich, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Origin and fate of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) before, during and after pancreatic injury are a matter of debate. The crucial role of PSCs in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is generally accepted. However, the turnover of the cells remains obscure. The present study addressed the issue of a potential bone marrow (BM) origin of PSCs. We used a model of stable hematopoietic chimerism by grafting enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-expressing BM cells after irradiation of acceptor rats. Chimerism was detected by FACS analysis of eGFP-positive cells in the peripheral blood. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) was used to induce acute pancreatic inflammation with subsequent recovery over 4 weeks. Investigations have been focused on isolated cells to detect the resting PSC population. The incidence of eGFP-positive PSC obtained from the pancreas of chimeric rats was approximately 7% in healthy pancreatic tissue and increased significantly to a mean of 18% in the restored pancreas 4 weeks after DBTC-induced acute inflammation. Our results suggest that BM-derived progenitor cells represent a source of renewable stellate cells in the pancreas. Increased numbers of resting PSCs after regeneration point toward enhanced recruitment of BM-derived cells to the pancreas and/or re-acquisition of a quiescent state after inflammation-induced activation.

  12. Novel aspects on pancreatic beta-cell signal-transduction.

    PubMed

    Leibiger, Ingo B; Brismar, Kerstin; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2010-05-21

    Pancreatic beta-cells release insulin in appropriate amounts in order to keep blood glucose levels within physiological limits. Failure to do so leads to the most common metabolic disorder in man, diabetes mellitus. The glucose-stimulus/insulin-secretion coupling represents a sophisticated interplay between glucose and a variety of modulatory factors. These factors are provided by the blood supply (such as nutrients, vitamins, incretins etc.), the nerval innervations, cell-cell contacts as well as by paracrine and autocrine feedback loops within the pancreatic islet of Langerhans. However, the underlying mechanisms of their action remain poorly understood. In the present mini-review we discuss novel aspects of selective insulin signaling in the beta-cell and novel insights into the role of higher inositol phosphates in insulin secretion. Finally we present a newly developed experimental platform that allows non-invasive and longitudinal in vivo imaging of pancreatic islet/beta-cell biology at single-cell resolution.

  13. Lineage Reprogramming: A Promising Road for Pancreatic β Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rui; Hong, Tianpei

    2016-03-01

    Cell replacement therapy is a promising method to restore pancreatic β cell function and cure diabetes. Distantly related cells (fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and muscle cells) and developmentally related cells (hepatocytes, gastrointestinal, and pancreatic exocrine cells) have been successfully reprogrammed into β cells in vitro and in vivo. However, while some reprogrammed β cells bear similarities to bona fide β cells, others do not develop into fully functional β cells. Here we review various strategies currently used for β cell reprogramming, including ectopic expression of specific transcription factors associated with islet development, repression of maintenance factors of host cells, regulation of epigenetic modifications, and microenvironmental changes. Development of simple and efficient reprogramming methods is a key priority for developing fully functional β cells suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  14. Suppression of Alk8-mediated Bmp signaling cell-autonomously induces pancreatic β-cells in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won-Suk; Andersson, Olov; Row, Richard; Kimelman, David; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2009-01-01

    Bmp signaling has been shown to regulate early aspects of pancreas development, but its role in endocrine, and especially β-cell, differentiation remains unclear. Taking advantage of the ability in zebrafish embryos to cell-autonomously modulate Bmp signaling in single cells, we examined how Bmp signaling regulates the ability of individual endodermal cells to differentiate into β-cells. We find that specific temporal windows of Bmp signaling prevent β-cell differentiation. Thus, future dorsal bud-derived β-cells are sensitive to Bmp signaling specifically during gastrulation and early somitogenesis stages. In contrast, ventral pancreatic cells, which require an early Bmp signal to form, do not produce β-cells when exposed to Bmp signaling at 50 hpf, a stage when the ventral bud-derived extrapancreatic duct is the main source of new endocrine cells. Importantly, inhibiting Bmp signaling within endodermal cells via genetic means increased the number of β-cells, at early and late stages. Moreover, inhibition of Bmp signaling in the late stage embryo using dorsomorphin, a chemical inhibitor of Bmp receptors, significantly increased β-cell neogenesis near the extrapancreatic duct, demonstrating the feasibility of pharmacological approaches to increase β-cell numbers. Our in vivo single-cell analyses show that whereas Bmp signaling is necessary initially for formation of the ventral pancreas, differentiating endodermal cells need to be protected from exposure to Bmps during specific stages to permit β-cell differentiation. These results provide important unique insight into the intercellular signaling environment necessary for in vivo and in vitro generation of β-cells. PMID:20080554

  15. Pancreatic panniculitis as a paraneoplastic phenomenon of a pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naeyaert, Charlotte; de Clerck, Frederik; De Wilde, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 59-year-old patient admitted with extreme painful erythematous subcutaneous nodules of the lower extremities in association with arthritis and peripheral eosinophilia. Upon skin biopsy, the diagnosis of pancreatic panniculitis was made. On further investigation, an underlying acinar cell type pancreas carcinoma was revealed. This clinical case does illustrate how a seemingly innocuous skin condition may herald an underlying malignant disease. The presence of pancreatic panniculitis should trigger clinicians to undertake further thorough diagnostic investigation of the pancreas.

  16. A holistic approach to dissecting SPARC family protein complexity reveals FSTL-1 as an inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Viloria, Katrina; Munasinghe, Amanda; Asher, Sharan; Bogyere, Roberto; Jones, Lucy; Hill, Natasha J.

    2016-01-01

    SPARC is a matricellular protein that is involved in both pancreatic cancer and diabetes. It belongs to a wider family of proteins that share structural and functional similarities. Relatively little is known about this extended family, but evidence of regulatory interactions suggests the importance of a holistic approach to their study. We show that Hevin, SPOCKs, and SMOCs are strongly expressed within islets, ducts, and blood vessels, suggesting important roles for these proteins in the normal pancreas, while FSTL-1 expression is localised to the stromal compartment reminiscent of SPARC. In direct contrast to SPARC, however, FSTL-1 expression is reduced in pancreatic cancer. Consistent with this, FSTL-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. The complexity of SPARC family proteins is further revealed by the detection of multiple cell-type specific isoforms that arise due to a combination of post-translational modification and alternative splicing. Identification of splice variants lacking a signal peptide suggests the existence of novel intracellular isoforms. This study underlines the importance of addressing the complexity of the SPARC family and provides a new framework to explain their controversial and contradictory effects. We also demonstrate for the first time that FSTL-1 suppresses pancreatic cancer cell growth. PMID:27886258

  17. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  18. Nuclear translocation of FGFR1 and FGF2 in pancreatic stellate cells facilitates pancreatic cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Stacey J; Chioni, Athina-Myrto; Ghallab, Mohammed; Anderson, Rhys K; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Kocher, Hemant M; Grose, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by desmoplasia, driven by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Over-expression of FGFs and their receptors is a feature of pancreatic cancer and correlates with poor prognosis, but whether their expression impacts on PSCs is unclear. At the invasive front of human pancreatic cancer, FGF2 and FGFR1 localise to the nucleus in activated PSCs but not cancer cells. In vitro, inhibiting FGFR1 and FGF2 in PSCs, using RNAi or chemical inhibition, resulted in significantly reduced cell proliferation, which was not seen in cancer cells. In physiomimetic organotypic co-cultures, FGFR inhibition prevented PSC as well as cancer cell invasion. FGFR inhibition resulted in cytoplasmic localisation of FGFR1 and FGF2, in contrast to vehicle-treated conditions where PSCs with nuclear FGFR1 and FGF2 led cancer cells to invade the underlying extra-cellular matrix. Strikingly, abrogation of nuclear FGFR1 and FGF2 in PSCs abolished cancer cell invasion. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic approach, where preventing nuclear FGF/FGFR mediated proliferation and invasion in PSCs leads to disruption of the tumour microenvironment, preventing pancreatic cancer cell invasion. PMID:24503018

  19. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  20. Epigenomic plasticity enables human pancreatic α to β cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bramswig, Nuria C; Everett, Logan J; Schug, Jonathan; Dorrell, Craig; Liu, Chengyang; Luo, Yanping; Streeter, Philip R; Naji, Ali; Grompe, Markus; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2013-03-01

    Insulin-secreting β cells and glucagon-secreting α cells maintain physiological blood glucose levels, and their malfunction drives diabetes development. Using ChIP sequencing and RNA sequencing analysis, we determined the epigenetic and transcriptional landscape of human pancreatic α, β, and exocrine cells. We found that, compared with exocrine and β cells, differentiated α cells exhibited many more genes bivalently marked by the activating H3K4me3 and repressing H3K27me3 histone modifications. This was particularly true for β cell signature genes involved in transcriptional regulation. Remarkably, thousands of these genes were in a monovalent state in β cells, carrying only the activating or repressing mark. Our epigenomic findings suggested that α to β cell reprogramming could be promoted by manipulating the histone methylation signature of human pancreatic islets. Indeed, we show that treatment of cultured pancreatic islets with a histone methyltransferase inhibitor leads to colocalization of both glucagon and insulin and glucagon and insulin promoter factor 1 (PDX1) in human islets and colocalization of both glucagon and insulin in mouse islets. Thus, mammalian pancreatic islet cells display cell-type-specific epigenomic plasticity, suggesting that epigenomic manipulation could provide a path to cell reprogramming and novel cell replacement-based therapies for diabetes.

  1. Epigenomic plasticity enables human pancreatic α to β cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bramswig, Nuria C.; Everett, Logan J.; Schug, Jonathan; Dorrell, Craig; Liu, Chengyang; Luo, Yanping; Streeter, Philip R.; Naji, Ali; Grompe, Markus; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-secreting β cells and glucagon-secreting α cells maintain physiological blood glucose levels, and their malfunction drives diabetes development. Using ChIP sequencing and RNA sequencing analysis, we determined the epigenetic and transcriptional landscape of human pancreatic α, β, and exocrine cells. We found that, compared with exocrine and β cells, differentiated α cells exhibited many more genes bivalently marked by the activating H3K4me3 and repressing H3K27me3 histone modifications. This was particularly true for β cell signature genes involved in transcriptional regulation. Remarkably, thousands of these genes were in a monovalent state in β cells, carrying only the activating or repressing mark. Our epigenomic findings suggested that α to β cell reprogramming could be promoted by manipulating the histone methylation signature of human pancreatic islets. Indeed, we show that treatment of cultured pancreatic islets with a histone methyltransferase inhibitor leads to colocalization of both glucagon and insulin and glucagon and insulin promoter factor 1 (PDX1) in human islets and colocalization of both glucagon and insulin in mouse islets. Thus, mammalian pancreatic islet cells display cell-type–specific epigenomic plasticity, suggesting that epigenomic manipulation could provide a path to cell reprogramming and novel cell replacement-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:23434589

  2. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H.; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D.; Tuveson, David

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  3. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis.

  4. Distribution of the interstitial Cajal-like cells in the gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary duct of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Mei, Feng; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Hong-Jun; Han, Juan; Jiang, Zhong-Yong; Zhou, De-shan

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLC) may be involved in the spontaneous rhythmic electrical activities of the extrahepatic bile duct system. The present study investigated the distribution and characteristics of ICLC, which are immunopositive for CD117/ Kit receptor tyrosine kinase, using immunohistochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody raised against CD117/Kit on whole-mount preparations. The Kit-positive ICLC were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy or fluorescence microscopy. ICLC, immunoreactive for Kit, were pleiomorphic and/or spindle-shaped cells with a few bipolar processes and distributed in the smooth muscle layers of the gallbladder and bile duct system. They were scattered in the hepatic duct, cystic duct and gallbladder as well as in the upper part of the common bile duct. The ICLC gradually increased in number and formed a completed cellular network in the lower part of the common bile duct and ampulla. The numbers of ICLC in the ampulla were similar to that of the duodenum and significantly much greater in number than in the gallbladder and bile ducts. The density of the ICLC in the common bile duct was significantly higher than that of other bile ducts. Our results suggested that the ICLC might contribute to the regulation of the spontaneous rhythmic contraction and development of motility disorders of the bile duct system.

  5. Pancreatic tumor cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 promotes endothelial cell migration and aberrant neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-05-16

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer.

  6. A case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN).

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yuichi; Nakamichi, Rei; Kamata, Noriko; Miyake, Hideo; Fujino, Masahiko; Itoh, Shigeki

    2015-03-01

    We report here a rare case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. In an 80-year-old woman, an approximately 8-mm papillary mass was incidentally detected at the downstream edge of a dilatated main pancreatic duct lumen on CT and MRI. Main pancreatic duct dilatation in the pancreatic body and tail and parenchymal atrophy were observed in the upstream of the mass. Histopathologically, the tumor protruded into the downstream edge of the dilatated main pancreatic duct lumen in the pancreatic body. The tumor cells had highly atypical nuclei and abundant polymorphic structures, and showed positive staining for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which led to the diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma. A total of 13 cases of undifferentiated carcinoma with intraductal tumor growth have been reported to date. The case report by Bergmann et al. has been the smallest in histopathological specimen, and the present case is the smallest in size detected by radiological images. Since early undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas can resemble those of main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in cross-sectional images, we have to consider undifferentiated carcinoma in the differential diagnosis of the solitary and papillary mass with low contrast enhancement in early phase in the main pancreatic duct.

  7. Inflammatory role of the acinar cells during acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dios, Isabel De

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are secretory cells whose main function is to synthesize, store and finally release digestive enzymes into the duodenum. However, in response to noxious stimuli, acinar cells behave like real inflammatory cells because of their ability to activate signalling transduction pathways involved in the expression of inflammatory mediators. Mediated by the kinase cascade, activation of Nuclear factor-κB, Activating factor-1 and Signal transducers and activators of transcription transcription factors has been demonstrated in acinar cells, resulting in overexpression of inflammatory genes. In turn, kinase activity is down-regulated by protein phosphatases and the final balance between kinase and phosphatase activity will determine the capability of the acinar cells to produce inflammatory factors. The kinase/phosphatase pair is a redox-sensitive system in which kinase activation overwhelms phosphatase activity under oxidant conditions. Thus, the oxidative stress developed within acinar cells at early stages of acute pancreatitis triggers the activation of signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In this way, acinar cells trigger the release of the first inflammatory signals which can mediate the activation and recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells into the injured pancreas. Accordingly, the role of acinar cells as promoters of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis may be considered. This concept leads to amplifying the focus from leukocyte to acinar cells themselves, to explain the local inflammation in early pancreatitis. PMID:21577290

  8. Inflammatory role of the acinar cells during acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dios, Isabel De

    2010-02-06

    Pancreatic acinar cells are secretory cells whose main function is to synthesize, store and finally release digestive enzymes into the duodenum. However, in response to noxious stimuli, acinar cells behave like real inflammatory cells because of their ability to activate signalling transduction pathways involved in the expression of inflammatory mediators. Mediated by the kinase cascade, activation of Nuclear factor-κB, Activating factor-1 and Signal transducers and activators of transcription transcription factors has been demonstrated in acinar cells, resulting in overexpression of inflammatory genes. In turn, kinase activity is down-regulated by protein phosphatases and the final balance between kinase and phosphatase activity will determine the capability of the acinar cells to produce inflammatory factors. The kinase/phosphatase pair is a redox-sensitive system in which kinase activation overwhelms phosphatase activity under oxidant conditions. Thus, the oxidative stress developed within acinar cells at early stages of acute pancreatitis triggers the activation of signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In this way, acinar cells trigger the release of the first inflammatory signals which can mediate the activation and recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells into the injured pancreas. Accordingly, the role of acinar cells as promoters of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis may be considered. This concept leads to amplifying the focus from leukocyte to acinar cells themselves, to explain the local inflammation in early pancreatitis.

  9. Casein kinase II inhibition induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Rainer; Saur, Dieter; Fritsch, Ralph; Reichert, Maximilian; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in western civilization. The five-year survival rate is below 1% and of the 10% of patients with resectable disease only around one-fifth survives 5 years. Survival rates have not changed much during the last 20 years, demonstrating the inefficacy of current available therapies. To improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, there is the need to develop effective non-surgical treatment for this disease. The protein kinase casein kinase II (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine kinase and its activity is enhanced in all human tumors examined so far. The contribution of CK2 to the tumor maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. To investigate the function of CK2 in pancreatic cancer cells we used the CK2 specific inhibitors 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole and Apigenin. Furthermore, we interfered with CK2 expression using CK2 specific siRNAs. Interfering with CK2 function led to a reduction of pancreatic cancer cell viability, which was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis correlated with a reduced NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. This study validates CK2 as a molecular drug target in a preclinical in vitro model of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Pancreastatin producing cell line from human pancreatic islet cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Jimi, A; Wakasugi, H; Ikeda, Y; Kono, A

    1990-04-30

    It has been characterized that cell line QGP-1 derived from human non-functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor produces human pancreastatin. Exponentially growing cultures produced 5.7 fmol of pancreastatin/10(6) cells/hr. Human pancreastatin immunoreactivities in plasma and tumor after xenografting with QGP-1 into nude mouse were 92.7 fmol/ml and 160.2 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. Immunocytochemical study revealed both chromogranin A and pancreastatin immunoreactive cells in the tumor. Gel filtrations of culture medium and tumor extract identified heterogenous molecular forms of PST-LI which eluted as large and smaller molecular species. These results suggest that plasma pancreastatin levels may be useful as a tumor marker of endocrine tumor of the pancreas, and the pancreastatin producing cell line may be useful for studies of the mechanism of secretions and processing of chromogranin A and pancreastatin.

  11. A Na-K-Cl cotransporter in isolated rat papillary collecting duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grupp, C.; Pavenstaedt-Grupp, I.G.; Grunewald, R.W.; Bevan, C.; Stokes, J.B. 3d.; Kinne, R.K. )

    1989-08-01

    Lactate production and ion fluxes were measured in isolated rat papillary collecting duct cells (PCD) to gain further insight into the transport properties of the papillary collecting duct. Lactate production was found to be inhibited by bumetanide in a dose-dependent manner, a maximum inhibition of 22% was obtained at 10(-4) M bumetanide and an apparent Ki of 10(-8) M was determined. Bumetanide inhibition of lactate production was dependent on the presence of sodium and chloride. Chloride removal inhibited lactate production also by 20%. Bumetanide (10(-4) M) inhibited by 35% sodium uptake into PCD cells exposed to 10 mM ouabain and chloride uptake into ion depleted PCD cells by 40%. In addition, this bumetanide-sensitive chloride uptake was dependent on the presence of sodium and potassium in the incubation medium. Furthermore, 86Rb uptake into these cells was significantly reduced in the presence of 10(-4) M bumetanide. These data provide evidence for the operation of a Na-K-Cl cotransport system in rat papillary collecting duct cells. This transport system might be involved in active chloride transport in the papillary collecting duct and/or volume regulation of the PCD cells.

  12. [Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma: diagnostic and surgical treatment strategy].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-chao; Zhan, Han-xiang; Zhang, Tai-ping; Zhao, Yu-pei

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the clinical features, diagnostic and therapeutic strategy of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma. The data of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma patients who underwent surgical operations from January 2002 to January 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma, identified with pathology were collected, including 3 males and 3 females with the average of 47.8 yeas old. Upper abdominal pain was present in 5 cases, weight loss was present in 4 cases with the average of 12.5 kg. Other symptoms included nausea/vomiting, back pain and obstructive jaundice. The serum CA19-9 and CA24-2 level were significantly elevated in 2 cases. CT scan, MRI and DSA were the main imaging methods to diagnose this disease. However, no case was diagnosed as pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma before operation. All cases were confirmed by the pathological examination. Relatively high rates of surgical resection, long operative time, more blood loss and combined multi-organ resection were the characteristics of this disease's operative surgical procedures. The average period of postoperative follow-up process was 60 months, and the mean survival time was (32 ± 8) months. The clinical features and biological behavior of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma are different from those of ductal adenocarcinoma, while the relatively specific clinical manifestations and imaging changes will be helpful for qualitative diagnosis before operation. As it has high rate of resection and better prognosis, more radical surgical strategies should be carried out for patients of this disease.

  13. CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic ductal cells into islet {beta}-cells mediated by hepatocyte growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Yu; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Xiao-Chen

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in pancreatic duct cells. {yields} Activation of the PI3K/AKT/CREB pathway plays a critical role in the HGF-mediated differentiation of pancreatic duct cells in vivo. {yields} CREB was causally linked to the expression of transcription factors during PDEC differentiation induced by HGF. -- Abstract: We have previously reported that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced differentiation of adult rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs) into islet {beta}-cells in vitro. The transcription factor CREB is one of the downstream key effectors of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Recent studies showing that CREB is required for the survival of certain cell types prompted us to examine whether CREB is a nuclear target for activation via the HGF-dependent Ser/Thr kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic duct cell into islet {beta}-cells. In this study, we first attempted to examine whether HGF modulates the Akt-dependent activation of target gene CREB and then investigated whether CREB activity affects the differentiation of HGF-induced PDECs. Finally, we studied the role of CREB in modulating the expression of transcription factors in PDECs during the differentiation of HGF-induced PDECs. Our results demonstrated that CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic ductal cells into islet {beta}-cells mediated by HGF.

  14. [Inhibition of pancreatic stellate cell activation by lisinopril for prevention fibrogenesis in experimental chronic alcoholic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Nichitaĭlo, M E; Kravchenko, D A; Medvetskiĭ, E B; Shpon'ka, I S; Savitskaia, I M

    2012-07-01

    Lisinopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) attenuates fibrotic changes in pancreas after distal pancreatectomy in rats with experimental alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis. Lisinopril was administered after distal pancreatectomy in rats with experimental alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis. The animals were treated with lisinopril at the dose of 10 mg/kg body weight per day for 21 days after operation. To estimate the efficacy of the treatment on activity and number of pancreatic stellate cells the immunohistochemical investigation was made with alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), desmin, vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) using. The treatment of rats after operation with lisinopril inhibite activity of pancreatic stellate cells and characterized by significant decrease of the alpha-SMA, desmin, GFAP, vimentin and TIMP-2 expression. The ratio of MMP-1/TIMP-2 was greater in the group with treatment then in the control group. This therapy had a trend to alleviate the fibrotic changes in pancreas.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via the EGFR pathway and caspase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Weiping; Zhao, Ren; Jing, Xiaoqian; Shen, Baiyong; Peng, Chenghong; Qiu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (PA-MSHA) has demonstrated efficacy against several solid tumors. In this study, we found that PA-MSHA inhibited the proliferation of PANC-1 and SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells, but had no obvious effects on HPDE6-C7 normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of apoptotic bodies and intracellular vacuole formation in PA-MSHA-treated pancreatic cancer cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the rate of apoptosis correlated with the PA-MSHA concentration. We observed a decrease in cell fractions in G0/G1 and G2/M phases, and an increase in the fraction in S phase (p < 0.01). PA-MSHA thus caused cell cycle arrest. Increasing concentrations of PA-MSHA did not alter total levels of EGFR, AKT or ERK, but levels of the corresponding phosphoproteins decreased. PA-MSHA also reduced tumor volume in a xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer (p < 0.01). Furthermore, caspase-3 levels decreased while the levels of cleaved caspase-3 increased (p < 0.01). These data suggest that by blocking cell cycle progression, PA-MSHA induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth. PA-MSHA-mediated inhibition of EGFR signaling and activation of the caspase pathway may play an important role in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27788491

  16. HT-9 duct cutting - IEM cell and mock-up testing experience at FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, P.W.; Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes experience gained during remote cutting of the HT-9 alloy duct from an advanced fuel assembly in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Also describes is a test program performed on mock-up equipment to develop successful cutting parameters.

  17. Membrane Proteome Analysis of Cerulein-Stimulated Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Implication for Early Event of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jangwon; Seo, Ji Hye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis with dysregulation of the production and secretion of digestive enzymes, edema formation, cytoplasmic vacuolization and the death of acinar cells. We hypothesized that membrane proteins may be altered as the early event during the induction of acute pancreatitis. Present study aims to determine the differentially expressed proteins in the membranes of cerulein-treated pancreatic acinar cells. Methods Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with 10-8 M cerulein for 1 hour. Membrane proteins were isolated from the cells and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis using pH gradients of 5-8. Membrane proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis of the peptide digests. The differentially expressed proteins, whose expression levels were more or less than three-fold in cerulein-treated cells, were analyzed. Results Two differentially expressed proteins (mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2, heat shock protein 60) were up-regulated while four proteins (protein disulfide isomerase, γ-actin, isocitrate dehydrogenase 3, seven in absentia homolog 1A) were down-regulated by cerulein treatment in pancreatic acinar cells. These proteins are related to cell signaling, oxidative stress, and cytoskeleton arrangement. Conclusions Oxidative stress may induce cerulein-induced cell injury and disturbances in defense mechanism in pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:20479917

  18. Pancreatic endoproteases and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor immunoreactivity in human Paneth cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, M; Borgström, A; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1986-01-01

    Normal and metaplastic gastrointestinal mucosa obtained at surgical resection were studied by light microscopy, using the unlabelled antibody enzyme method for immunohistochemical staining of lysozyme, pancreatic endoproteases, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). Paneth cells in the mucosa of normal small intestine, gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, and colonic metaplastic mucosa were found to contain anionic trypsin, cationic trypsin, lysozyme, and PSTI immunoreactivity, but not chymotrypsin and elastase immunoreactivity. Normal gastric and colonic mucosa and some goblet cells in the small intestine showed positive PSTI immunoreactivity but no endoprotease immunoreactivity. The presence of immunoreactive trypsin and immunoreactive PSTI in the Paneth cells, which are of secretory type, probably indicates an important extrapancreatic source of these proteins rather than a storage of endocytosed material. Images PMID:3525612

  19. microRNA regulation of human pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Fan; Hannafon, Bethany N.

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNAs that function primarily in the post transcriptional regulation of gene expression in plants and animals. Deregulation of miRNA expression in cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer cells, is well documented, and the involvement of miRNAs in orchestrating tumor genesis and cancer progression has been recognized. This review focuses on recent reports demonstrating that miRNAs are involved in regulation of pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs). A number of miRNA species have been identified to be involved in regulating pancreatic CSCs, including miR-21, miR-34, miR-1246, miR-221, the miR-17-92 cluster, the miR-200 and let-7 families. Furthermore, the Notch-signaling pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process are associated with miRNA regulation of pancreatic CSCs. Given the significant contribution of CSCs to chemo-resistance and tumor progression, a better understanding of how miRNAs function in pancreatic CSCs could provide novel strategies for the development of therapeutics and diagnostics for this devastating disease. PMID:28217707

  20. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yikwon; Han, Dohyun; Min, Hophil; Jin, Jonghwa; Yi, Eugene C.; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal cancers and is associated with limited diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Currently, gemcitabine is the only effective drug and represents the preferred first-line treatment for chemotherapy. However, a high level of intrinsic or acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer to gemcitabine can contribute to the failure of gemcitabine treatment. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer, we performed label-free quantification of protein expression in intrinsic gemcitabine-resistant and - sensitive human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines using our improved proteomic strategy, combined with filter-aided sample preparation, single-shot liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, enhanced spectral counting, and a statistical method based on a power law global error model. We identified 1931 proteins and quantified 787 differentially expressed proteins in the BxPC3, PANC-1, and HPDE cell lines. Bioinformatics analysis identified 15 epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and 13 EMT-related proteins that were closely associated with drug resistance were differentially expressed. Interestingly, 8 of these proteins were involved in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism. These results suggest that proteins related to the EMT and glutathione metabolism play important roles in the development of intrinsic gemcitabine resistance by pancreatic cancer cell lines. PMID:25518923

  1. Effects of insulin on human pancreatic cancer progression modeled in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michelle T; Lim, Gareth E; Skovsø, Søs; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Albrecht, Tobias; Alejandro, Emilyn U; Hoesli, Corinne A; Piret, James M; Warnock, Garth L; Johnson, James D

    2014-11-06

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancers, yet it remains understudied and poorly understood. Hyperinsulinemia has been reported to be a risk factor of pancreatic cancer, and the rapid rise of hyperinsulinemia associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes foreshadows a rise in cancer incidence. However, the actions of insulin at the various stages of pancreatic cancer progression remain poorly defined. Here, we examined the effects of a range of insulin doses on signalling, proliferation and survival in three human cell models meant to represent three stages in pancreatic cancer progression: primary pancreatic duct cells, the HPDE immortalized pancreatic ductal cell line, and the PANC1 metastatic pancreatic cancer cell line. Cells were treated with a range of insulin doses, and their proliferation/viability were tracked via live cell imaging and XTT assays. Signal transduction was assessed through the AKT and ERK signalling pathways via immunoblotting. Inhibitors of AKT and ERK signalling were used to determine the relative contribution of these pathways to the survival of each cell model. While all three cell types responded to insulin, as indicated by phosphorylation of AKT and ERK, we found that there were stark differences in insulin-dependent proliferation, cell viability and cell survival among the cell types. High concentrations of insulin increased PANC1 and HPDE cell number, but did not alter primary duct cell proliferation in vitro. Cell survival was enhanced by insulin in both primary duct cells and HPDE cells. Moreover, we found that primary cells were more dependent on AKT signalling, while HPDE cells and PANC1 cells were more dependent on RAF/ERK signalling. Our data suggest that excessive insulin signalling may contribute to proliferation and survival in human immortalized pancreatic ductal cells and metastatic pancreatic cancer cells, but not in normal adult human pancreatic ductal cells. These data suggest that signalling pathways

  2. Collecting Duct-Derived Cells Display Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties and Retain Selective In Vitro and In Vivo Epithelial Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Joan; Ariunbold, Usukhbayar; Suhaimi, Norseha; Sunn, Nana; Guo, Jinjin; McMahon, Jill A.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    We previously described a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like population within the adult mouse kidney that displays long-term colony-forming efficiency, clonogenicity, immunosuppression, and panmesodermal potential. Although phenotypically similar to bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, kidney MSC–like cells display a distinct expression profile. FACS sorting from Hoxb7/enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice identified the collecting duct as a source of kidney MSC–like cells, with these cells undergoing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition to form clonogenic, long-term, self-renewing MSC-like cells. Notably, after extensive passage, kidney MSC–like cells selectively integrated into the aquaporin 2–positive medullary collecting duct when microinjected into the kidneys of neonatal mice. No epithelial integration was observed after injection of BM-MSCs. Indeed, kidney MSC–like cells retained a capacity to form epithelial structures in vitro and in vivo, and conditioned media from these cells supported epithelial repair in vitro. To investigate the origin of kidney MSC–like cells, we further examined Hoxb7+ fractions within the kidney across postnatal development, identifying a neonatal interstitial GFPlo (Hoxb7lo) population displaying an expression profile intermediate between epithelium and interstitium. Temporal analyses with Wnt4GCE/+:R26tdTomato/+ mice revealed evidence for the intercalation of a Wnt4-expressing interstitial population into the neonatal collecting duct, suggesting that such intercalation may represent a normal developmental mechanism giving rise to a distinct collecting duct subpopulation. These results extend previous observations of papillary stem cell activity and collecting duct plasticity and imply a role for such cells in collecting duct formation and, possibly, repair. PMID:24904087

  3. Collecting duct-derived cells display mesenchymal stem cell properties and retain selective in vitro and in vivo epithelial capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Joan; Ariunbold, Usukhbayar; Suhaimi, Norseha; Sunn, Nana; Guo, Jinjin; McMahon, Jill A; McMahon, Andrew P; Little, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    We previously described a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like population within the adult mouse kidney that displays long-term colony-forming efficiency, clonogenicity, immunosuppression, and panmesodermal potential. Although phenotypically similar to bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, kidney MSC-like cells display a distinct expression profile. FACS sorting from Hoxb7/enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice identified the collecting duct as a source of kidney MSC-like cells, with these cells undergoing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition to form clonogenic, long-term, self-renewing MSC-like cells. Notably, after extensive passage, kidney MSC-like cells selectively integrated into the aquaporin 2-positive medullary collecting duct when microinjected into the kidneys of neonatal mice. No epithelial integration was observed after injection of BM-MSCs. Indeed, kidney MSC-like cells retained a capacity to form epithelial structures in vitro and in vivo, and conditioned media from these cells supported epithelial repair in vitro. To investigate the origin of kidney MSC-like cells, we further examined Hoxb7(+) fractions within the kidney across postnatal development, identifying a neonatal interstitial GFP(lo) (Hoxb7(lo)) population displaying an expression profile intermediate between epithelium and interstitium. Temporal analyses with Wnt4(GCE/+):R26(tdTomato/+) mice revealed evidence for the intercalation of a Wnt4-expressing interstitial population into the neonatal collecting duct, suggesting that such intercalation may represent a normal developmental mechanism giving rise to a distinct collecting duct subpopulation. These results extend previous observations of papillary stem cell activity and collecting duct plasticity and imply a role for such cells in collecting duct formation and, possibly, repair.

  4. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    also increased PSC expression of PDGF (Figure 16b). PSC morphology was unchanged (Figure 16c). Fig. 15a Fig. 15b DC+PSC (MFI 190) PSC (MFI 81...there may possibly be a role for endogenous LPS derived from gut bacteria in modulating pancreatic carcinogenesis. Indeed, a role for the microbiome

  5. Collision tumors: pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dasanu, Constantin A; Shimanovsky, Alexei; Rotundo, Edyta K; Posteraro, Anthony F; Cooper, Dennis L; Atienza, Jonessa A

    2013-07-10

    Collision tumors are very rare entities composed of two or more distinct tumor components, each separated by normal tissue. Perhaps due to technical advances in the last decade, the incidence of collision tumors has been on the rise. To the best of our knowledge, collision tumors featuring mantle cell lymphoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma have not been previously described in the scientific literature. For the first time, we describe herein the clinical course of a collision tumor between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma. We hypothesize several aspects in the pathogenesis of a such event and review the existing literature on collision tumors.

  6. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes.

  7. Automated quantification of pancreatic β-cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Golson, Maria L.; Bush, William S.

    2014-01-01

    β-Cell mass is a parameter commonly measured in studies of islet biology and diabetes. However, the rigorous quantification of pancreatic β-cell mass using conventional histological methods is a time-consuming process. Rapidly evolving virtual slide technology with high-resolution slide scanners and newly developed image analysis tools has the potential to transform β-cell mass measurement. To test the effectiveness and accuracy of this new approach, we assessed pancreata from normal C57Bl/6J mice and from mouse models of β-cell ablation (streptozotocin-treated mice) and β-cell hyperplasia (leptin-deficient mice), using a standardized systematic sampling of pancreatic specimens. Our data indicate that automated analysis of virtual pancreatic slides is highly reliable and yields results consistent with those obtained by conventional morphometric analysis. This new methodology will allow investigators to dramatically reduce the time required for β-cell mass measurement by automating high-resolution image capture and analysis of entire pancreatic sections. PMID:24760991

  8. Expression and immunolocalization of AQP6 in intercalated cells of the rat kidney collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, K; Yaoita, E; Yoshida, Y; Fujinaka, H; Matsuki, A; Kamiie, J; Kovalenko, P; Yamamoto, T

    2001-08-01

    The expression and localization of AQP6 were examined in rat kidneys. In the kidney compartments, the expression was more intense in the outer medulla than in the cortex or inner medulla, and was negative in the glomerulus. During development, the AQP6 mRNA expression in the kidney was not detected in the fetus, but was recognized at birth, increased gradually by 4 weeks of age, and was unchanged thereafter. In situ hybridization demonstrated significant signals for AQP6 mRNA along the outer and inner medullary collecting ducts. Since the localization of the AQP6 mRNA-expressing cells was comparable to that of immunoreactive H+ ATPase-bearing cells in the collecting duct, they were identified as intercalated cells. No AQP6 mRNA signals were recognizable in other cells in the kidneys, including glomerular cells. No glomerular expression of AQP6 mRNA was confirmed by RT-PCR using total RNA extracted from the glomeruli. Immunohistochemistry using an antibody raised against recombinant rat AQP6 protein could localize the immunoreactivity in a population of collecting duct cells. Serial section observations indicated that the AQP6-immunoreactive cells corresponded to H+ ATPase bearing intercalated cells.

  9. Quantitative estimation of transmembrane ion transport in rat renal collecting duct principal cells.

    PubMed

    Ilyaskin, Alexander V; Karpov, Denis I; Medvedev, Dmitriy A; Ershov, Alexander P; Baturina, Galina S; Katkova, Liubov E; Solenov, Evgeniy I

    2014-01-01

    Kidney collecting duct principal cells play a key role in regulated tubular reabsorption of water and sodium and secretion of potassium. The importance of this function for the maintenance of the osmotic homeostasis of the whole organism motivates extensive study of the ion transport properties of collecting duct principal cells. We performed experimental measurements of cell volume and intracellular sodium concentration in rat renal collecting duct principal cells from the outer medulla (OMCD) and used a mathematical model describing transmembrane ion fluxes to analyze the experimental data. The sodium and chloride concentrations ([Na+]in = 37.3 ± 3.3 mM, [Cl-]in = 32.2 ± 4.0 mM) in OMCD cells were quantitatively estimated. Correspondence between the experimentally measured cell physiological characteristics and the values of model permeability parameters was established. Plasma membrane permeabilities and the rates of transmembrane fluxes for sodium, potassium and chloride ions were estimated on the basis of ion substitution experiments and model predictions. In particular, calculated sodium (PNa), potassium (PK) and chloride (PCl) permeabilities were equal to 3.2 × 10-6 cm/s, 1.0 × 10-5 cm/s and 3.0 × 10-6 cm/s, respectively. This approach sets grounds for utilization of experimental measurements of intracellular sodium concentration and cell volume to quantify the ion permeabilities of OMCD principal cells and aids us in understanding the physiology of the adjustment of renal sodium and potassium excretion.

  10. Differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct at dynamic CT, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and MR cholangiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Jihun; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2012-11-01

    To compare findings at dynamic computed tomography (CT), endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in patients with sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) and periductal infiltrating cancer in the common bile duct (CBD), and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ERC and MRC in differentiating between the two diseases. Bile duct changes at dynamic CT, ERC and MRC were compared in 58 patients with SC-AIP and CBD involvement and 93 patients with periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. Two radiologists rated their confidence in differentiating between the two diseases and the diagnostic performances of ERC and MRC were compared. At CT, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with intrapancreatic CBD involvement, thinner CBD walls, concentric wall thickening, smooth outer margins, and lower degrees of upstream ductal dilatation and contrast enhancement (P ≤ 0.05) than CBD cancer. At ERC and MRC, SC-AIP was more frequently associated with smooth margins, gradual and symmetric narrowing, multifocal involvement and hourglass appearance (P ≤ 0.027) than CBD cancer. MRC showed good diagnostic performance comparable to ERC. Dynamic CT, ERC and MRC can be helpful in distinguishing SC-AIP from periductal infiltrating CBD cancer. MRC may be a useful diagnostic alternative to ERC in differentiating between the two diseases. • SC-AIP often mimics periductal infiltrating ductal cancer. • Imaging findings of SC-AIP and periductal infiltrating CBD cancer can be similar. • Dynamic CT, ERC and MRC help differentiate between these two diseases. • MRC may be a useful diagnostic alternative to ERC.

  11. Pirfenidone inhibits pancreatic cancer desmoplasia by regulating stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kozono, Shingo; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Eguchi, Daiki; Ikenaga, Naoki; Fujiwara, Kenji; Cui, Lin; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Masao

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC), which are implicated in desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer, enhance the malignancy of cancer cells and confer resistance to established treatments. We investigated whether the antifibrotic agent pirfenidone can suppress desmoplasia and exert antitumor effects against pancreatic cancer. Primary PSCs were established from pancreatic cancer tissue obtained during surgery. In vitro, pirfenidone inhibited the proliferation, invasiveness, and migration of PSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Although supernatants of untreated PSCs increased the proliferation, invasiveness, and migration of pancreatic cancer cells (PCC), supernatants of pirfenidone-treated PSCs decreased these effects. Exposure to PCC supernatant increased the production of platelet-derived growth factor-A, hepatic growth factor, collagen type I, fibronectin, and periostin in PSCs, which was significantly reduced by pirfenidone. Mice were subcutaneously implanted with PCCs (SUIT-2 cells) and PSCs into the right flank and PCCs alone into the left flank. Oral administration of pirfenidone to these mice significantly reduced tumor growth of co-implanted PCCs and PSCs, but not of PCCs alone. Pirfenidone also decreased the proliferation of PSCs and the deposition of collagen type I and periostin in tumors. In mice with orthotopic tumors consisting of PCCs co-implanted with PSCs, pirfenidone suppressed tumor growth, reduced the number of peritoneal disseminated nodules, and reduced the incidence of liver metastasis. Pirfenidone in combination with gemcitabine more effectively suppressed orthotopic tumor growth compared with pirfenidone or gemcitabine alone. In conclusion, our findings indicate that pirfenidone is a promising antitumor agent for pancreatic cancer, owing to its suppression of desmoplasia through regulating PSCs.

  12. Cancer cell chemokines direct chemotaxis of activated stellate cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ishan; Boyle, Kathleen A; Vonderhaar, Emily P; Zimmerman, Noah P; Gorse, Egal; Mackinnon, A Craig; Hwang, Rosa F; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Cukierman, Edna; Tsai, Susan; Evans, Douglas B; Dwinell, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    The mechanisms by which the extreme desmoplasia observed in pancreatic tumors develops remain unknown and its role in pancreatic cancer progression is unsettled. Chemokines have a key role in the recruitment of a wide variety of cell types in health and disease. Transcript and protein profile analyses of human and murine cell lines and human tissue specimens revealed a consistent elevation in the receptors CCR10 and CXCR6, as well as their respective ligands CCL28 and CXCL16. Elevated ligand expression was restricted to tumor cells, whereas receptors were in both epithelial and stromal cells. Consistent with its regulation by inflammatory cytokines, CCL28 and CCR10, but not CXCL16 or CXCR6, were upregulated in human pancreatitis tissues. Cytokine stimulation of pancreatic cancer cells increased CCL28 secretion in epithelial tumor cells but not an immortalized activated human pancreatic stellate cell line (HPSC). Stellate cells exhibited dose- and receptor-dependent chemotaxis in response to CCL28. This functional response was not linked to changes in activation status as CCL28 had little impact on alpha smooth muscle actin levels or extracellular matrix deposition or alignment. Co-culture assays revealed CCL28-dependent chemotaxis of HPSC toward cancer but not normal pancreatic epithelial cells, consistent with stromal cells being a functional target for the epithelial-derived chemokine. These data together implicate the chemokine CCL28 in the inflammation-mediated recruitment of cancer-associated stellate cells into the pancreatic cancer parenchyma.

  13. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue associated with intra- and extrahepatic choledochal cysts.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Uchida, T; Nakayama, H; Ugajin, W; Inaniwa, Y; Sugitani, M; Mori, Y

    1999-08-01

    A case report of heterotopic pancreas in intra- and extrahepatic biliary tracts in a 36-year-old female who suffered from intra- and extrahepatic choledochal cysts with an anomalous pancreatobiliary duct system. Histologic examination of the resected specimen showed pancreatic tissues located along the wall of the biliary tract with choledochal cysts. The pancreatic tissue consisted of acinar cells and duct elements without Langerhans' islets; the acinar cells were positive immunohistochemically for alpha-amylase and negative for endocrine hormones. Ultrastructural study revealed zymogen granules in the acinar cells. In the present case the heterotopic exocrine pancreatic tissue seems to be etiologically related to choledochal cysts as well as to the anomalous arrangement of the pancreatobiliary duct.

  14. Rapid, high efficiency isolation of pancreatic ß-cells

    PubMed Central

    Clardy, Susan M.; Mohan, James F.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Keliher, Edmund J.; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The ability to isolate pure pancreatic ß-cells would greatly aid multiple areas of diabetes research. We developed a fluorescent exendin-4-like neopeptide conjugate for the rapid purification and isolation of functional mouse pancreatic β-cells. By targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor with the fluorescent conjugate, β-cells could be quickly isolated by flow cytometry and were >99% insulin positive. These studies were confirmed by immunostaining, microscopy and gene expression profiling on isolated cells. Gene expression profiling studies of cytofluorometrically sorted β-cells from 4 and 12 week old NOD mice provided new insights into the genetic programs at play of different stages of type-1 diabetes development. The described isolation method should have broad applicability to the β-cell field. PMID:26330153

  15. Effects of garlic oil on pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xy; Sun, Hy; Liu, Jj; Lin, Y; Zhu, Zy; Han, X; Sun, X; Li, Xr; Zhang, Hc; Tang, Zy

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the preventive and therapeutic potential of garlic oil on human pancreatic carcinoma cells. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to study the effects of garlic oil on three human pancreatic cancer cell lines, AsPC-1, Mia PaCa-2 and PANC-1. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry (FCM), staining with PI and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI), respectively. Morphologic changes of pancreatic cancer cells were observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after treatment with garlic oil at low inhibitory concentrations (2.5 μM and 10 μM) for 24 hours. Proliferation of the AsPC-1, PANC-1, and Mia PaCa-2 cells was obviously inhibited in the first 24 hours with the MTT assay. The inhibition effect was more significant after 48 hours. When cells were exposed to garlic oil at higher concentrations, an early change of the apoptotic tendency was detected by FCM and TEM. Garlic oil could inhibit the proliferation of AsPC-1, PANC-1, and Mia PaCa-2 cells in this study. Moreover, due to programmed cell death, cell cycle arrest, or both, pro-apoptosis effects on AsPC-1 cells were induced by garlic oil in a dose and time dependent manner in vitro.

  16. Tuft Cell Regulation of miRNAs in Pancreatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Stanton L Young Blvd , WP1345 Oklahoma City, OK 73104 9. SPONSORING I MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) A ND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S...Sureban SM, May R, Lightfoot SA, Hoskins AB, Lerner M, Brackett DJ, et al. DCAMKL-1 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cells

  17. Gallstone pancreatitis secondary to a pathological cystic duct stump in a setting of chronic pain syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Tan, Jeffrey; Gandhi, Natasha

    2015-03-12

    A 32-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain. She was a patient with chronic pain syndrome and had visited the emergency department several times over the past year. She did not drink alcohol. She had a laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone pancreatitis 4 years ago. Her lipase was 2020 with normal bilirubin. MR cholangiopancreatography revealed a cystic structure resembling a gallbladder in the gallbladder fossa. This was in connection with the biliary system. The structure also contained stones. A review of the histology did confirm the gallbladder had been removed. She proceeded to have a laparoscopic re-cholecystectomy and made an unremarkable recovery.

  18. Characterization of Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransporter Activity in Rabbit Lacrimal Gland Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vizvári, Eszter; Katona, Máté; Orvos, Péter; Berczeli, Orsolya; Facskó, Andrea; Rárosi, Ferenc; Venglovecz, Viktória; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Ding, Chuanqing; Tóth-Molnár, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We recently reported that isolated duct segments from rabbit lacrimal gland (LG) were able to secrete fluid in response to secretagogues, which were blocked completely by bumetanide. This suggests the functional involvement of Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1) in ductal fluid secretion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the activity profile of NKCC1 in isolated rabbit LG duct segments. Methods Interlobular ducts were isolated from fresh rabbit LG tissue. Microfluorometry with the ammonium (NH4+)–pulse technique was used to elicit pH changes in duct cells, and the rate of bumetanide-sensitive cytosolic acidification after addition of NH4+ was used to quantify the activity of NKCC1. Results While basal activity of NKCC1 was undetectable, low cytosolic chloride (Cl−) level and hyperosmotic challenge (390 mOsm) were able to increase the activity of NKCC1. Carbachol (100 μM) had no significant effect on NKCC1 activity. Elevation of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) level with Ca2+-ionophore (A 23187, 1 μM) did not cause any alteration in the activity of the cotransporter while direct activation of protein kinase C (phorbol myristate acetate, 100 nM) increased its activity slightly but in a significant manner. Addition of either forskolin (10 μM), cell-permeable cAMP analogue (8-bromo cAMP, 100 μM) or vasoactive intestinal peptide (200 nM) resulted in a significant increase in the activity of NKCC1. Conclusions These results highlight the functional involvement of NKCC1 in LG duct secretion. These findings may facilitate our understanding of LG function and may contribute to the development of targeted pharmacologic interventions in case of dry eye disease. PMID:27438543

  19. Murine amniotic fluid stem cells contribute mesenchymal but not epithelial components to reconstituted mammary ducts.

    PubMed

    Klemmt, Petra A B; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2010-07-07

    Amniotic fluid harbors cells indicative of all three germ layers, and pluripotent fetal amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSs) are considered potentially valuable for applications in cellular therapy and tissue engineering. We investigated whether it is possible to direct the cell fate of AFSs in vivo by transplantation experiments into a particular microenvironment, the mammary fat pad. This microenvironment provides the prerequisites to study stem cell function and the communication between mesenchymal and epithelial cells. On clearance of the endogenous epithelium, the ductal tree can be reconstituted by the transfer of exogenously provided mammary stem cells. Analogously, exogenously provided stem cells from other tissues can be investigated for their potential to contribute to mammary gland regeneration. We derived pluripotent murine AFSs, measured the expression of stem cell markers, and confirmed their in vitro differentiation potential. AFSs were transplanted into cleared and non cleared fat pads of immunocompromised mice to evaluate their ability to assume particular cell fates under the instructive conditions of the fat-pad microenvironment and the hormonal stimulation during pregnancy. Transplantation of AFSs into cleared fat pads alone or in the presence of exogenous mammary epithelial cells caused their differentiation into stroma and adipocytes and replaced endogenous mesenchymal components surrounding the ducts in co-transplantation experiments. Similarly, transplantation of AFSs into fat pads that had not been previously cleared led to AFS-derived stromal cells surrounding the elongating endogenous ducts. AFSs expressed the marker protein α-SMA, but did not integrate into the myoepithelial cell layer of the ducts in virgin mice. With pregnancy, a small number of AFS-derived cells were present in acinar structures. Our data demonstrate that the microenvironmental cues of the mammary fat pad cause AFSs to participate in mammary gland regeneration by

  20. Role of YAP and TAZ in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and in stellate cells associated with cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Morvaridi, Susan; Dhall, Deepti; Greene, Mark I; Pandol, Stephen J; Wang, Qiang

    2015-11-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a fibrotic and inflammatory microenvironment that is formed primarily by activated, myofibroblast-like, stellate cells. Although the stellate cells are thought to contribute to tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance of PDAC, the signaling events involved in activation of the stellate cells are not well defined. Functioning as transcription co-factors, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and its homolog transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) modulate the expression of genes involved in various aspects of cellular functions, such as proliferation and mobility. Using human tissues we show that YAP and TAZ expression is restricted to the centroacinar and ductal cells of normal pancreas, but is elevated in cancer cells. In particular, YAP and TAZ are expressed at high levels in the activated stellate cells of both chronic pancreatitis and PDAC patients as well as in the islets of Langerhans in chronic pancreatitis tissues. Of note, YAP is up regulated in both acinar and ductal cells following induction of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice. These findings indicate that YAP and TAZ may play a critical role in modulating pancreatic tissue regeneration, neoplastic transformation, and stellate cell functions in both PDAC and pancreatitis.

  1. Endoscopic pancreatic and biliary manometry in pancreatic, biliary, and papillary disease, and after endoscopic sphincterotomy and surgical sphincteroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, J A; Carr-Locke, D L

    1984-01-01

    Endoscopic manometry was used to measure pancreatic duct, common bile duct, pancreatic duct sphincter and bile duct sphincter pressures in 43 healthy volunteers and 162 patients with a variety of papillary, pancreatic and biliary disorders. Common bile duct pressure was significantly raised after cholecystectomy, with common bile duct stones and papillary stenosis but pancreatic duct pressure only in papillary stenosis. After endoscopic sphincterotomy mean common bile duct pressure fell from 11.2 to 1.1 mmHg and pancreatic duct pressure from 18.0 to 11.2 mmHg. Distinct pancreatic duct sphincter and bile duct sphincter zones were identified as phasic pressures of 3-12 waves/minute on pull-through from pancreatic duct and common bile duct to duodenum. Pancreatic duct sphincter pressures were higher with common bile duct stones and stenosis whereas bile duct sphincter pressures were higher in pancreatitis and stenosis. Bile duct sphincter activity was present in 60% of patients after surgical sphincteroplasty but 21% of patients after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic manometry facilitated the diagnosis of papillary stenosis, has allowed study of papillary pathophysiology and has shown a functional inter-relationship between the two sphincteric zones. PMID:6500363

  2. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  3. Cell transplantation to the auditory nerve and cochlear duct.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Kojima, Ken; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Kim, Tae-Soo; Tamura, Tetsuya; Ito, Juichi

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a technique to deliver cells to the inner ear without injuring the membranes that seal the endolymphatic and perilymphatic chambers. The integrity of these membranes is essential for normal hearing, and the technique should significantly reduce surgical trauma during cell transplantation. Embryonic stem cells transplanted at the internal auditory meatal portion of an atrophic auditory nerve migrated extensively along it. Four-five weeks after transplantation, the cells were found not only throughout the auditory nerve, but also in Rosenthal's canal and the scala media, the most distal portion of the auditory nervous system where the hair cells reside. Migration of the transplanted cells was more extensive following damage to the auditory nerve. In the undamaged nerve, migration was more limited, but the cells showed more signs of neuronal differentiation. This highlights an important balance between tissue damage and the potential for repair.

  4. Norepinephrine inhibits the migratory activity of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stock, Anna-Maria; Powe, Desmond G; Hahn, Stephan A; Troost, Gabriele; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Entschladen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    We have shown previously that norepinephrine induces migratory activity of tumour cells from breast, colon and prostate tissue via activation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors. Consequently, this effect can be inhibited pharmacologically by clinically established beta-blockers. Tumour cell migration is a prerequisite for metastasis formation, and accordingly we and others have shown that breast cancer patients, which take beta-blockers due to hypertension, have reduced metastasis formation and increased survival probability as compared to patients without hypertension or using other anti-hypertensive medication. Unlike the aforementioned tumour cells, pancreatic cancer cells show a reduced migratory activity upon norepinephrine treatment. By means of our three-dimensional, collagen-based cell migration assay, we have investigated the signal transduction pathways involved in this phenomenon. We have found that this conflicting effect of norepinephrine on pancreatic cancer cells is due to an imbalanced activation of the two pathways that usually mediate a pro-migratory effect of norepinephrine in other tumour cell types. Firstly, the inhibitory effect results from activation of a pathway which causes a strong increase of the secondary cell signalling molecule, cAMP. In addition, activation of phospholipase C gamma and the downstream protein kinase C alpha were shown to be already activated in pancreatic cancer cells and cannot be further activated by norepinephrine. We hypothesize that this constitutive activation of the phospholipase C gamma pathway is due to a cross-talk with receptor tyrosine kinase signalling, and this might also deliver an explanation for the unusual high spontaneous migratory activity of pancreatic cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell type-specific glycoconjugates of collecting duct cells during maturation of the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Holthöfer, H

    1988-08-01

    The ontogeny of lectin-positive epithelial cell types and the maturation of polarized expression of the glycocalyx of the collecting ducts (CD) of the rat kidney were studied from samples of 18th-day fetal and neonatal kidneys of various ages. Lectins from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa (VVA), with preferential affinity to principal cells, stained virtually all CD cells of the fetal kidneys. However, within two days postnatally, the number of cells positive for DBA and VVA decreased to amounts found in the adult kidneys. Moreover, a characteristic change occurred rapidly after birth in the intracellular polarization of the reactive glycoconjugates, from a uniform plasmalemmal to a preferentially apical staining. In contrast, lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Maclura pomifera (MPA) and Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA), reacting indiscriminatively with principal and intercalated cells of adult kidneys, stained most CD cells in the fetal kidneys, and failed to show any postnatal change in the amount of positive cells or in the intracellular polarization. The immunocytochemical tests for (Na + K)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase (CA II) revealed the characteristic postnatal decrease in the amount of principal cells and simultaneous increase in the amount of CA II rich intercalated cells. DBA and VVA reactive cells also decreased postnatally, paralleling the changes observed in the (Na + K)-ATPase positive principal cells. The present results suggest that the expression of the cell type-specific glycocalyx of principal and intercalated cells is developmentally regulated, undergoes profound changes during maturation, and is most likely associated with electrolyte transport phenomena.

  6. Duck Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Primary Bile Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Culvenor, Janetta G.; Angus, Peter; Smallwood, Richard; Nicoll, Amanda; Locarnini, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Primary cultures of intrahepatic bile duct epithelial (IBDE) cells isolated from duckling livers were successfully grown for studies of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The primary IBDE cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry using CAM 5.2, a cytokeratin marker which was shown to react specifically to IBDE cells in duck liver tissue sections and in primary cultures of total duck liver cells. Immunofluorescence assay using anti-duck albumin, a marker for hepatocytes, revealed that these IBDE cultures did not appear to contain hepatocytes. A striking feature of these cultures was the duct-like structures present within each cell colony of multilayered IBDE cells. Normal duck serum in the growth medium was found to be essential for the development of these cells into duct-like structures. When the primary cultures of duck IBDE cells were acutely infected with DHBV, dual-labeled confocal microscopy using a combination of anti-DHBV core proteins and CAM 5.2 or a combination of anti-pre-S1 proteins and CAM 5.2 revealed that the IBDE cell colonies contained DHBV proteins. Immunoblot analysis of these cells showed that the DHBV pre-S1 and core proteins were similar to their counterparts in infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Southern blot analysis of infected IBDE preparations using a digoxigenin-labeled positive-sense DHBV riboprobe revealed the presence of hepadnavirus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, minus-sense single-stranded (SS) DNA , double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. The presence of minus-sense SS DNA in the acutely infected IBDE cultures is indicative of DHBV reverse transcriptase activity, while the establishment of a pool of viral CCC DNA reveals the ability of these cells to maintain persistent infection. Taken collectively, the results from this study demonstrated that primary duck IBDE cells supported hepadnavirus replication as shown by the de novo synthesis of DHBV proteins and DNA replicative intermediates. PMID

  7. Duck hepatitis B virus replication in primary bile duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Culvenor, J G; Angus, P; Smallwood, R; Nicoll, A; Locarnini, S

    2001-08-01

    Primary cultures of intrahepatic bile duct epithelial (IBDE) cells isolated from duckling livers were successfully grown for studies of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The primary IBDE cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry using CAM 5.2, a cytokeratin marker which was shown to react specifically to IBDE cells in duck liver tissue sections and in primary cultures of total duck liver cells. Immunofluorescence assay using anti-duck albumin, a marker for hepatocytes, revealed that these IBDE cultures did not appear to contain hepatocytes. A striking feature of these cultures was the duct-like structures present within each cell colony of multilayered IBDE cells. Normal duck serum in the growth medium was found to be essential for the development of these cells into duct-like structures. When the primary cultures of duck IBDE cells were acutely infected with DHBV, dual-labeled confocal microscopy using a combination of anti-DHBV core proteins and CAM 5.2 or a combination of anti-pre-S1 proteins and CAM 5.2 revealed that the IBDE cell colonies contained DHBV proteins. Immunoblot analysis of these cells showed that the DHBV pre-S1 and core proteins were similar to their counterparts in infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Southern blot analysis of infected IBDE preparations using a digoxigenin-labeled positive-sense DHBV riboprobe revealed the presence of hepadnavirus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, minus-sense single-stranded (SS) DNA, double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. The presence of minus-sense SS DNA in the acutely infected IBDE cultures is indicative of DHBV reverse transcriptase activity, while the establishment of a pool of viral CCC DNA reveals the ability of these cells to maintain persistent infection. Taken collectively, the results from this study demonstrated that primary duck IBDE cells supported hepadnavirus replication as shown by the de novo synthesis of DHBV proteins and DNA replicative intermediates.

  8. Paraneoplastic Glomerulopathy in a Case of Collecting Duct Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devarsetty, Srikanth Prasad; Bhat, Shailaja; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic glomerulopathy has been described in established cases of the solid tumors of lung, gastrointestinal system, breast, etc., and rarely in patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). Studies on secondary glomerular diseases have described a higher incidence of IgA nephropathy in patients with RCC compared to membranous glomerulopathy, which are commonly reported in malignancies of the lung and gastrointestinal tract. Collecting Duct Carcinoma (CDC), a rare high grade adenocarcinoma accounts for <1% of all renal malignancies. It arises from the cells of the collecting ducts of Bellini. We report a case of an elderly male who was diagnosed to have a disseminated CDC during his evaluation for nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy was suggestive of a secondary membranous glomerulonephropathy. PMID:28384915

  9. Induction of Sca-1 via activation of STAT3 system in the duct cells of the mouse submandibular gland by ligation of the main excretory duct.

    PubMed

    Purwanti, Nunuk; Karabasil, Mileva Ratko; Matsuo, Shinsuke; Chen, Gang; Javkhlan, Purevjav; Azlina, Ahmad; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Yao, Chenjuan; Akamatsu, Tetsuya; Hosoi, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    To examine the very initial step that takes place immediately after tissue injury and is linked to tissue regeneration, we employed the submandibular gland (SMG), which was injured by ligation of its main excretory duct (MED). Ligation of the MED of the SMG in mice induced the expression of Sca-1, a protein marker of hematopoietic stem cells. In the normal gland, a low level of Sca-1 was expressed, which was localized predominantly in the excretory duct cells. At 1 day after ligation, Sca-1 expression increased prominently in almost all of cells in the duct system, but not in the acinar cells. The level of Sca-1 mRNA had begun to increase at 6 h after ligation and continuously rose thereafter until it reached a plateau, which occurred ∼12 h after ligation. STAT3 phosphorylated at its tyrosine-705 (p-STAT3) in the ligated gland increased immediately after ligation, and it was localized in the nuclei of all duct cells. The results of an EMSA revealed the specific binding of a nuclear extract to the sequence of the γ-interferon activation site (GAS) present in the Sca-1 promoter and confirmed that such binding increased after ligation. Thus the present study suggests that STAT3, having been phosphorylated following MED ligation, was transferred to the nucleus, where it bound to the GAS element in the promoter of Sca-1 gene, resulting in promotion of Sca-1 gene expression. Actual prevention of STAT3 phosphorylation reduced the ligation-induced Sca-1 elevation.

  10. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (autoimmune pancreatitis): evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Satomi; Siegelman, Stanley S; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that centers on the pancreatic ducts. It is a cause of benign pancreatic disease that can clinically mimic pancreatic cancer. Preoperative detection of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is important because patients usually respond to steroid therapy. Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are often referred for computed tomography (CT) when they are suspected of having a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm; therefore, it is important to search for potential findings suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis when typical findings of a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm are not found. Typical CT findings include diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas without dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Focal enlargement is most commonly seen in the head of the pancreas, and the involved pancreas on contrast material-enhanced CT images may be iso-attenuating relative to the rest of the pancreas, or hypo-attenuating, especially during the early postcontrast phase. Thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the common bile duct and gallbladder may reflect inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. There are several features seen at CT that may help to differentiate lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer, such as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with minimal peripancreatic stranding in patients with obstructive jaundice, an absence of significant pancreatic atrophy, and an absence of significant main pancreatic duct dilatation. When these findings are encountered, clinical, other imaging, and serologic data should be evaluated.

  11. A Starring Role for Stellate Cells in the Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Minoti V.; Wilson, Jeremy S.; Lugea, Aurelia; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a devastating disease, and patient outcomes have not improved in decades. Treatments that target tumor cells have largely failed. This could be because research has focused on cancer cells and the influence of the stroma on tumor progression has been largely ignored. The focus of pancreatic cancer research began to change with the identification of pancreatic stellate cells, which produce the pancreatic tumor stroma. There is compelling in vitro and in vivo evidence for the influence of pancreatic stellate cells on pancreatic cancer development; several recent preclinical studies have reported encouraging results with approaches designed to target pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma. We review the background and recent advances in these areas, along with important areas of future research that could improve therapy. PMID:23622130

  12. Techniques for cutting irradiated fuel ducts at the FFTF/IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Payzant, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The interim examination and maintenance (IEM) cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) contains horizontal and vertical duct cutters for remote disassembly of irradiated fuel assemblies. During the 7 yr of use, cutters have been used to disassemble 18 fuel assemblies. At first, cutting problems were common, but their frequency diminished as experience was gained and equipment upgrades were incorporated. Techniques have been developed to the point that cutting is becoming routine.

  13. Mechanisms of Doxorubicin Toxicity in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heart, Emma A.; Karandrea, Shpetim; Liang, Xiaomei; Balke, Maren E.; Beringer, Patrick A.; Bobczynski, Elyse M.; Zayas-Bazán Burgos, Delaine; Richardson, Tiffany; Gray, Joshua P.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to chemotherapeutic agents has been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a disease characterized by both the peripheral insulin resistance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. Using the rat β-cell line INS-1 832/13 and isolated mouse pancreatic islets, we investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (Adriamycin) on pancreatic β-cell survival and function. Exposure of INS-1 832/13 cells to doxorubicin caused impairment of GSIS, cellular viability, an increase in cellular toxicity, as soon as 6 h post-exposure. Doxorubicin impaired plasma membrane electron transport (PMET), a pathway dependent on reduced equivalents NADH and NADPH, but failed to redox cycle in INS-1 832/13 cells and with their lysates. Although NADPH/NADP+ content was unaffected, NADH/NAD+ content decreased at 4 h post-exposure to doxorubicin, and was followed by a reduction in ATP content. Previous studies have demonstrated that doxorubicin functions as a topoisomerase II inhibitor via induction of DNA cross-linking, resulting in apoptosis. Doxorubicin induced the expression of mRNA for mdm2, cyclin G1, and fas whereas downregulating p53, and increased the melting temperature of genomic DNA, consistent with DNA damage and induction of apoptosis. Doxorubicin also induced caspase-3 and -7 activity in INS-1 832/13 cells and mouse islets; co-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK temporarily attenuated the doxorubicin-mediated loss of viability in INS-1 832/13 cells. Together, these data suggest that DNA damage, not H2O2 produced via redox cycling, is a major mechanism of doxorubicin toxicity in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:27255381

  14. Epiregulin is critical for the acinar cell regeneration of the submandibular gland in a mouse duct ligation model.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Koichi; Arai, Hideo; Okudera, Michisato; Yamamura, Takashi; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2014-05-01

    Acinar cell regeneration from tubular structures has been reported to occur in duct-deligated salivary glands. However, the detailed process of acinar cell regeneration has not been clarified. We have developed a mouse duct ligation model to clarify the mechanisms underlying acinar cell regeneration, and we analyzed the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands using the model. We studied these ligands expressions in the course of acinar cell regeneration using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods. In the duct-ligated portion of the submandibular gland (SMG) that underwent atrophy, newly formed acinar cells were observed arising from the tubular structures after the release of the duct obstruction. The constitutive expression of EGFR was observed by immunohistochemistry in both the duct-ligated and duct-deligated animals as well as in normal controls. The EGFR phosphorylation detected on the tubular structures after duct ligation paralleled the acinar cell regeneration. RT-PCR showed an increase in the epiregulin and heparin-binding EGF levels from day 0 to day 3 after the release of the duct obstruction. The EGF level was increased only after day 7. In vitro, cultured cells isolated from ligated SMGs proliferated and produced EGF ligands following the addition of epiregulin to the culture medium. These findings suggest that the tubular structures localized in an atrophic gland are the source of acinar cell regeneration of the salivary gland. The induction of EGF ligands, in particular epiregulin, may play an important role in acinar cell regeneration in this model. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cell therapies for pancreatic beta-cell replenishment.

    PubMed

    Okere, Bernard; Lucaccioni, Laura; Dominici, Massimo; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-07-11

    The current treatment approach for type 1 diabetes is based on daily insulin injections, combined with blood glucose monitoring. However, administration of exogenous insulin fails to mimic the physiological activity of the islet, therefore diabetes often progresses with the development of serious complications such as kidney failure, retinopathy and vascular disease. Whole pancreas transplantation is associated with risks of major invasive surgery along with side effects of immunosuppressive therapy to avoid organ rejection. Replacement of pancreatic beta-cells would represent an ideal treatment that could overcome the above mentioned therapeutic hurdles. In this context, transplantation of islets of Langerhans is considered a less invasive procedure although long-term outcomes showed that only 10 % of the patients remained insulin independent five years after the transplant. Moreover, due to shortage of organs and the inability of islet to be expanded ex vivo, this therapy can be offered to a very limited number of patients. Over the past decade, cellular therapies have emerged as the new frontier of treatment of several diseases. Furthermore the advent of stem cells as renewable source of cell-substitutes to replenish the beta cell population, has blurred the hype on islet transplantation. Breakthrough cellular approaches aim to generate stem-cell-derived insulin producing cells, which could make diabetes cellular therapy available to millions. However, to date, stem cell therapy for diabetes is still in its early experimental stages. This review describes the most reliable sources of stem cells that have been developed to produce insulin and their most relevant experimental applications for the cure of diabetes.

  16. Asymptomatic common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Rosseland, A R; Glomsaker, T B

    2000-11-01

    Patients with asymptomatic bile duct stones exhibit typical signs, such as elevated liver function tests, dilated bile ducts on ultrasound, a history of jaundice, or pancreatitis. The incidence of asymptomatic bile duct stones is about 10%, but up to 2% of patients show no signs of the disease. Bile duct stones can be diagnosed by using clinical judgement, scoring systems, or discriminant function tests. Which diagnostic modality is most reliable, cost-effective and safe, varies with different hospitals. Which therapy is most effective, safe and the cheapest also varies with different departments, but in the future an increasing number of departments will use the one-stage laparoscopic approach.

  17. Fuel assembly duct cutting in the FFTF/IEM Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Two mill type slitting cutters are used in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell during the disassembly sequence of a Driver Fuel Assembly. This disassembly is necessary so that selected parts may be examined both in the IEM Cell and elsewhere. The cutters have been in use for two years. During this time eight Driver Fuel assemblies have been taken apart in the IEM Cell. The cutters' operating philosophy and characteristics, as well as lessons learned from a significant equipment failure are presented. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Silencing of ATF2 inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells and enhances sensitivity to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Wu, Xingda; Liu, Ning; Li, Xiaoying; Meng, Fanbin; Song, Shaowei

    2017-03-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a multifunctional transcription factor, and is implicated in tumor progress, yet its role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In the present study, the level of ATF2 in pancreatic cancer tissues and the adjacent non-tumorous tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. The roles of ATF2 in the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells were investigated through ATF2 silencing, and the effect of ATF2 shRNA on the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, was explored. The results of our study showed that the ATF2 level in the pancreatic cancer tissues was higher than that in the adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Silencing of ATF2 was found to inhibit proliferation, arrest cell cycle at G1 phase and induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, ATF2 silencing enhanced gemcitabine-induced growth-inhibition and apoptosis-induction effects in pancreatic cancer cells. In summary, silencing of ATF2 inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells and enhanced the anti-tumor effects of gemcitabine, suggesting that ATF2 plays a pro-survival role in pancreatic cancer. Our results also propose that a high level of ATF2 may serve as a potential biomarker of pancreatic cancer, and that ATF2 may become a potential target for anti-tumor therapy.

  19. Detailed transcriptome atlas of the pancreatic beta cell.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Burak; Burdick, David; Baxter, David; Rasschaert, Joanne; Flamez, Daisy; Eizirik, Decio L; Welsh, Nils; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy

    2009-01-15

    Gene expression patterns provide a detailed view of cellular functions. Comparison of profiles in disease vs normal conditions provides insights into the processes underlying disease progression. However, availability and integration of public gene expression datasets remains a major challenge. The aim of the present study was to explore the transcriptome of pancreatic islets and, based on this information, to prepare a comprehensive and open access inventory of insulin-producing beta cell gene expression, the Beta Cell Gene Atlas (BCGA). We performed Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) analysis of human pancreatic islet samples and microarray analyses of purified rat beta cells, alpha cells and INS-1 cells, and compared the information with available array data in the literature. MPSS analysis detected around 7600 mRNA transcripts, of which around a third were of low abundance. We identified 2000 and 1400 transcripts that are enriched/depleted in beta cells compared to alpha cells and INS-1 cells, respectively. Microarray analysis identified around 200 transcription factors that are differentially expressed in either beta or alpha cells. We reanalyzed publicly available gene expression data and integrated these results with the new data from this study to build the BCGA. The BCGA contains basal (untreated conditions) gene expression level estimates in beta cells as well as in different cell types in human, rat and mouse pancreas. Hierarchical clustering of expression profile estimates classify cell types based on species while beta cells were clustered together. Our gene atlas is a valuable source for detailed information on the gene expression distribution in beta cells and pancreatic islets along with insulin producing cell lines. The BCGA tool, as well as the data and code used to generate the Atlas are available at the T1Dbase website (T1DBase.org).

  20. Subassembly duct cutting in the FFTF/IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, P.W.

    1985-11-01

    After irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), certain driver fuel assemblies (DFA) are selected for disassembly in the interim examination and maintenance (IEM) cell for further examination elsewhere. Cutting operations near fuel pins are delicate evolutions, and inadvertent penetrations of pin claddings have occurred. Improved features related to precise and reliable position control that have been incorporated into the FFTF cutters are described. The IEM cell cutters have proven to be effective tools in DFA processing.

  1. Autophagy Is Required for Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells, Associated With Pancreatic Cancer Progression and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Endo, Sho; Nakata, Kohei; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Takesue, Shin; Nakayama, Hiromichi; Abe, Toshiya; Koikawa, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Takashi; Sada, Masafumi; Horioka, Kohei; Zheng, Biao; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Chika; Murata, Masaharu; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Hashizume, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) change from a quiescent to activated state in the tumor environment and secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and cytokines to increase the aggressiveness of tumors. However, it is not clear how PSCs are activated to produce these factors, or whether this process can be inhibited. PSCs have morphologic and functional similarities to hepatic stellate cells, which undergo autophagy to promote fibrosis and tumor growth. We investigated whether autophagy activates PSCs, which promotes development of the tumor stroma and growth of pancreatic tumors in mice. We used immunofluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry to analyze pancreatic tumor specimens from 133 patients who underwent pancreatectomy in Japan from 2000 to 2009. PSCs were cultured from pancreatic tumor tissues or tissues of patients with chronic pancreatitis; these were analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblots, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and in assays for invasiveness, proliferation, and lipid droplets. Autophagy was inhibited in PSCs by administration of chloroquine or transfection with small interfering RNAs. Proteins were knocked down in immortalized PSCs by expression of small hairpin RNAs. Cells were transplanted into pancreatic tails of nude mice, and tumor growth and metastasis were quantified. Based on immunohistochemical analyses, autophagy was significantly associated with tumor T category (P = .018), histologic grade (P = .001), lymph node metastases (P < .001), stage (P = .009), perilymphatic invasion (P = .001), and perivascular invasion (P = .003). Autophagy of PSCs was associated with shorter survival times of patients with pancreatic cancer. PSC expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, a marker of autophagosomes, was associated with poor outcomes (shorter survival time, disease recurrence) for patients with pancreatic cancer (relative risk of shorter survival time, 1

  2. Activated pancreatic stellate cells can impair pancreatic islet function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Guangxiang; Sandberg, Monica; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Welsh, Nils; Jansson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic or islet fibrosis is often associated with activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). PSCs are considered not only to promote fibrosis, but also to be associated with glucose intolerance in some diseases. We therefore evaluated morphological and functional relationships between islets and PSCs in the normal mouse pancreas and transplanted islets. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to map the presence of PSCs in the normal mouse pancreas and islets implanted under the renal capsule. We isolated and cultured mouse PSCs and characterized them morphologically by immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, we measured their cytokine production and determined their effects on insulin release from simultaneously cultured islets. Results PSCs were scattered throughout the pancreas, with occasional cells within the islets, particularly in the islet capsule. In islet transplants they were found mainly in the graft periphery. Cultured PSCs became functionally activated and produced several cytokines. Throughout the culture period they linearly increased their production of interleukin-6 and mammalian keratinocyte-derived chemokine. PSC cytokine production was not affected by acute hyperglycemia. Syngeneic islets co-cultured with PSCs for 24–48 h increased their insulin release and lowered their insulin content. However, short-term insulin release in batch-type incubations was unaffected after 48 h of co-culture. Increased islet cell caspase-3 activation and a decreased islet cell replication were consistently observed after co-culture for 2 or 7 days. Conclusion Activated PSCs may contribute to impaired islet endocrine function seen in exocrine pancreatitis and in islet fibrosis associated with some cases of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25854824

  3. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Maylie-Pfenninger, M; Jamieson, JD

    1979-01-01

    We describe here a simple, general procedure for the purification of a variety of lectins, and for the preparation of lectin-ferritin conjugates of defined molar composition and binding properties to be used as probes for cell surface saccharides. The technique uses a “universal” affinity column for lectins and their conjugates, which consists of hog sulfated gastric mucin glycopeptides covalently coupled to agarose. The procedure involes: (a) purification of lectins by chromatography of aqueous extracts of seeds or other lectin-containing fluids over the affinity column, followed by desorption of the desired lectin with its hapten suge; (b) iodination of the lectin to serve as a marker during subsequent steps; (c) conjugation of lectin to ferritin with glutaraldehyde; (d) collection of active lectin-ferritin conjugates by affinity chromatography; and (e) separation of monomeric lectin-ferritin conjugates from larger aggregates and unconjugated lectin by gel chromatography. Based on radioactivity and absorbancy at 310 nm for lectin and ferritin, respectively, the conjugates consist of one to two molecules of lectin per ferrritin molecule. Binding studies of native lectins and their ferritin conjugates to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells showed that the conjugation procedure does not significantly alter either the affinity constant of the lectin for its receptor on the cell surface or the number of sites detected. PMID:422653

  4. Pancreatic stellate cells: a starring role in normal and diseased pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Minoti V.; Pirola, Romano C.; Wilson, Jeremy S.

    2012-01-01

    While the morphology and function of cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas have been studied over several centuries, one important cell type in the gland, the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC), had remained undiscovered until as recently as 20 years ago. Even after its first description in 1982, it was to be another 16 years before its biology could begin to be studied, because it was only in 1998 that methods were developed to isolate and culture PSCs from rodent and human pancreas. PSCs are now known to play a critical role in pancreatic fibrosis, a consistent histological feature of two major diseases of the pancreas—chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In health, PSCs maintain normal tissue architecture via regulation of the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent studies have also implied other functions for PSCs as progenitor cells, immune cells or intermediaries in exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans. During pancreatic injury, PSCs transform from their quiescent phase into an activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype that secretes excessive amounts of ECM proteins leading to the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. An ever increasing number of factors that stimulate and/or inhibit PSC activation via paracrine and autocrine pathways are being identified and characterized. It is also now established that PSCs interact closely with pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression. Based on these findings, several therapeutic strategies have been examined in experimental models of chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer, in a bid to inhibit/retard PSC activation and thereby alleviate chronic pancreatitis or reduce tumor growth in pancreatic cancer. The challenge that remains is to translate these pre-clinical developments into clinically applicable treatments for patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:22973234

  5. Epimorphin regulates bile duct formation via effects on mitosis orientation in rat liver epithelial stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junnian; Zhao, Lei; Qin, Lipeng; Wang, Jing; Jia, Yali; Yao, Hailei; Sang, Chen; Hu, Qinghua; Shi, Shuangshuang; Nan, Xue; Yue, Wen; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Yang, Chun; Wang, Yunfang; Pei, Xuetao

    2010-03-17

    Understanding how hepatic precursor cells can generate differentiated bile ducts is crucial for studies on epithelial morphogenesis and for development of cell therapies for hepatobiliary diseases. Epimorphin (EPM) is a key morphogen for duct morphogenesis in various epithelial organs. The role of EPM in bile duct formation (DF) from hepatic precursor cells, however, is not known. To address this issue, we used WB-F344 rat epithelial stem-like cells as model for bile duct formation. A micropattern and a uniaxial static stretch device was used to investigate the effects of EPM and stress fiber bundles on the mitosis orientation (MO) of WB cells. Immunohistochemistry of liver tissue sections demonstrated high EPM expression around bile ducts in vivo. In vitro, recombinant EPM selectively induced DF through upregulation of CK19 expression and suppression of HNF3alpha and HNF6, with no effects on other hepatocytic genes investigated. Our data provide evidence that EPM guides MO of WB-F344 cells via effects on stress fiber bundles and focal adhesion assembly, as supported by blockade EPM, beta1 integrin, and F-actin assembly. These blockers can also inhibit EPM-induced DF. These results demonstrate a new biophysical action of EPM in bile duct formation, during which determination of MO plays a crucial role.

  6. Epimorphin Regulates Bile Duct Formation via Effects on Mitosis Orientation in Rat Liver Epithelial Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lipeng; Wang, Jing; Jia, Yali; Yao, Hailei; Sang, Chen; Hu, Qinghua; Shi, Shuangshuang; Nan, Xue; Yue, Wen; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Yang, Chun; Wang, Yunfang; Pei, Xuetao

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how hepatic precursor cells can generate differentiated bile ducts is crucial for studies on epithelial morphogenesis and for development of cell therapies for hepatobiliary diseases. Epimorphin (EPM) is a key morphogen for duct morphogenesis in various epithelial organs. The role of EPM in bile duct formation (DF) from hepatic precursor cells, however, is not known. To address this issue, we used WB-F344 rat epithelial stem-like cells as model for bile duct formation. A micropattern and a uniaxial static stretch device was used to investigate the effects of EPM and stress fiber bundles on the mitosis orientation (MO) of WB cells. Immunohistochemistry of liver tissue sections demonstrated high EPM expression around bile ducts in vivo. In vitro, recombinant EPM selectively induced DF through upregulation of CK19 expression and suppression of HNF3α and HNF6, with no effects on other hepatocytic genes investigated. Our data provide evidence that EPM guides MO of WB-F344 cells via effects on stress fiber bundles and focal adhesion assembly, as supported by blockade EPM, β1 integrin, and F-actin assembly. These blockers can also inhibit EPM-induced DF. These results demonstrate a new biophysical action of EPM in bile duct formation, during which determination of MO plays a crucial role. PMID:20305811

  7. Anomalous pancreatico-biliary ductal union with cystic dilatation of the bile duct.

    PubMed

    Richer, J P; Faure, J P; Morichau-Beauchant, M; Dugue, T; Maillot, N; Kamina, P; Carretier, M

    1998-01-01

    We report, in an adult, an asymptomatic association between cystic dilation of the bile duct (type IV A in Todani's classification) and anomalous pancreatico-biliary ductal union (APBD) with stones in a long common channel. In APBD, the connection between the common bile duct and the main pancreatic duct is located outside the duodenal wall andis therefore not under the influence of the sphincter of Boyden. An abnormally long common channel is in excess of 15 mm. Two types of convergence anomalies are defined according to whether the bile duct opens into the main pancreatic duct (BP) or the main pancreatic duct into the bile duct (PB). In APBD, there is probably a reverse pressure gradient between the bile and pancreatic ducts, with regurgitation of pancreatic juice into the bile duct, repeated attacks of cholangitis, stenosis and cystic dilatation. A long common channel is associated with a higher incidence of carcinoma of the gall bladder of the bile duct.

  8. Pancreas++: Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyu; Martin, Bronwen; Cai, Huan; Fiori, Jennifer L.; Egan, Josephine M.; Siddiqui, Sana; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral, and “involuted” alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta) quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard. PMID:23293605

  9. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin’s clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome’s proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin’s turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  10. Adrenoceptors in renal medullary collecting duct (RMCD) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.; Garg, L.C. )

    1990-02-26

    Recently, the authors have reported that specific, saturable and high affinity alpha{sub 1} adrenoceptors, linked to phosphoinositide messenger system, are present in the RMCD cells. In order to determine if alpha{sub 2} adrenoceptors are also present in RMCD cells, the authors measured the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, an d{sub 2} adrenergic antagonist, to RMCD cells isolated from the inner medulla of the rabbit kidney. Binding of ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine to the homogenates of RMCD cells was measured in the absence (total binding) and the presence (non-specific binding) of 100 {mu}M phentolamine. The specific binding (the difference between total and non-specific binding) was measured at various concentrations of ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine. The interpolated values (fmol/mg protein) are from a curve generated using the EBDA program to analyze data from 3 animals. The apparent K{sub d} and B{sub max} of({sup 3}H)rauwolscine was 3.56 nM and 29 fmol/mg, respectively. Yohimbine inhibited binding of ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine with an IC{sub 50} of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M. Prazosin which was much less effective in displacing ({sup 3}H) rauwolscine, had a IC{sub 50} of 10{sup {minus}5} M. The authors conclude that in addition to alpha{sub 1} adrenoceptors, the specific, saturable and high affinity alpha{sub 2} adrenoceptors are also present on RMCD cells.

  11. Endoscopic bile duct brushing of malignant pancreatic biliary strictures: retrospective study with comparison of conventional smear and ThinPrep techniques.

    PubMed

    Ylagan, Lourdes R; Liu, Lucy H; Maluf, Horacio M

    2003-04-01

    Endoscopic bile duct brushing (EBDB) is carried out to differentiate benign from malignant biliary strictures in patients who have pancreaticobiliary disease. The sensitivity of this method for the diagnosis of malignancy is relatively low. The aim of this study is to analyze the cytomorphologic features that are helpful in increasing the sensitivity of detecting these lesions on cytologic samples. These features are compared with slides prepared with the ThinPrep technique. The study included 142 patients with bile duct obstruction or pancreatic mass who underwent EBDB and follow-up surgery or biopsy between 1997 to 2000. Twenty-five (18%) of these cases were positive for malignancy in both EBDB and follow-up surgical biopsy; 20 of these cases were used as positive controls (PC). Sixty-one (43%) were negative in both EBDB and follow-up surgical biopsy specimens, and 21 of those cases were used as negative controls (NC). Fifty-six (39%) cases were negative/atypical in EBDB cytology but were suspicious or positive in the surgical or biopsy specimens (false-negative). We identified the cytologic criteria that were helpful in differentiating our positive and negative control groups and applied these criteria to our false-negative group to see whether our sensitivity could be increased, using well-defined cytologic criteria alone. Of the 56 false-negative cases, 9 (16%) were upgraded to suspicious/positive based on the presence of the following features: three-dimensional (3D) micropapillae (95% PC vs 19% NC, P < 0.0001), anisonucleosis (90% PC vs 5% NC, P < 0.0001), high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio (95% PC vs 9% NC, P < 0.0001), nuclear contour irregularity (65% PC vs 24% NC, P = 0.0079), and prominent nucleoli (70% PC vs 38% NC, P = 0.0406). Cytomorphologic features which were not helpful in distinguishing positive and negative cases were: single naked nuclei (50% PC vs 28% NC, P = 0.1597), chromatin granularity (50% PC vs 62% NC, P = 0.54), and necrosis (10

  12. Non-invasive discrimination between pancreatic islets and exocrine cells using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Li, Ge; Hao, Mingming; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we propose a non-invasive method to distinguish pancreatic islet cells from exocrine cell clusters using multiphoton (MP) imaging. We demonstrate the principle of distinguishing them based on autofluorescence. The results show that MP imaging has a potential to distinguish pancreatic islets from exocrine cells. This ability to distinguish the two cell types could have many applications, such as the examination of fresh pancreatic biopsies when staining is not possible or desirable.

  13. SOX2 promotes dedifferentiation and imparts stem cell-like features to pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, M; Zhang, J-S; Koenig, A; Abel, E V; Smyrk, T C; Bamlet, W R; de Narvajas, A A-M; Gomez, T S; Simeone, D M; Bujanda, L; Billadeau, D D

    2013-01-01

    SOX2 (Sex-determining region Y (SRY)-Box2) has important functions during embryonic development and is involved in cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, in which it impairs cell growth and tumorigenicity. However, the function of SOX2 in pancreatic cancer cells is unclear. The objective of this study was to analyze SOX2 expression in human pancreatic tumors and determine the role of SOX2 in pancreatic cancer cells regulating CSC properties. In this report, we show that SOX2 is not expressed in normal pancreatic acinar or ductal cells. However, ectopic expression of SOX2 is observed in 19.3% of human pancreatic tumors. SOX2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cells results in cell growth inhibition via cell cycle arrest associated with p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 induction, whereas SOX2 overexpression promotes S-phase entry and cell proliferation associated with cyclin D3 induction. SOX2 expression is associated with increased levels of the pancreatic CSC markers ALDH1, ESA and CD44. Importantly, we show that SOX2 is enriched in the ESA+/CD44+ CSC population from two different patient samples. Moreover, we show that SOX2 directly binds to the Snail, Slug and Twist promoters, leading to a loss of E-Cadherin and ZO-1 expression. Taken together, our findings show that SOX2 is aberrantly expressed in pancreatic cancer and contributes to cell proliferation and stemness/dedifferentiation through the regulation of a set of genes controlling G1/S transition and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, suggesting that targeting SOX2-positive cancer cells could be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:23917223

  14. Isolation, Culture, and Imaging of Human Fetal Pancreatic Cell Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ana D.; Kayali, Ayse G.; Hayek, Alberto; King, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    For almost 30 years, scientists have demonstrated that human fetal ICCs transplanted under the kidney capsule of nude mice matured into functioning endocrine cells, as evidenced by a significant increase in circulating human C-peptide following glucose stimulation1-9. However in vitro, genesis of insulin producing cells from human fetal ICCs is low10; results reminiscent of recent experiments performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC), a renewable source of cells that hold great promise as a potential therapeutic treatment for type 1 diabetes. Like ICCs, transplantation of partially differentiated hESC generate glucose responsive, insulin producing cells, but in vitro genesis of insulin producing cells from hESC is much less robust11-17. A complete understanding of the factors that influence the growth and differentiation of endocrine precursor cells will likely require data generated from both ICCs and hESC. While a number of protocols exist to generate insulin producing cells from hESC in vitro11-22, far fewer exist for ICCs10,23,24. Part of that discrepancy likely comes from the difficulty of working with human fetal pancreas. Towards that end, we have continued to build upon existing methods to isolate fetal islets from human pancreases with gestational ages ranging from 12 to 23 weeks, grow the cells as a monolayer or in suspension, and image for cell proliferation, pancreatic markers and human hormones including glucagon and C-peptide. ICCs generated by the protocol described below result in C-peptide release after transplantation under the kidney capsule of nude mice that are similar to C-peptide levels obtained by transplantation of fresh tissue6. Although the examples presented here focus upon the pancreatic endoderm proliferation and β cell genesis, the protocol can be employed to study other aspects of pancreatic development, including exocrine, ductal, and other hormone producing cells. PMID:24895054

  15. Isolation, culture, and imaging of human fetal pancreatic cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ana D; Kayali, Ayse G; Hayek, Alberto; King, Charles C

    2014-05-18

    For almost 30 years, scientists have demonstrated that human fetal ICCs transplanted under the kidney capsule of nude mice matured into functioning endocrine cells, as evidenced by a significant increase in circulating human C-peptide following glucose stimulation(1-9). However in vitro, genesis of insulin producing cells from human fetal ICCs is low(10); results reminiscent of recent experiments performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC), a renewable source of cells that hold great promise as a potential therapeutic treatment for type 1 diabetes. Like ICCs, transplantation of partially differentiated hESC generate glucose responsive, insulin producing cells, but in vitro genesis of insulin producing cells from hESC is much less robust(11-17). A complete understanding of the factors that influence the growth and differentiation of endocrine precursor cells will likely require data generated from both ICCs and hESC. While a number of protocols exist to generate insulin producing cells from hESC in vitro(11-22), far fewer exist for ICCs(10,23,24). Part of that discrepancy likely comes from the difficulty of working with human fetal pancreas. Towards that end, we have continued to build upon existing methods to isolate fetal islets from human pancreases with gestational ages ranging from 12 to 23 weeks, grow the cells as a monolayer or in suspension, and image for cell proliferation, pancreatic markers and human hormones including glucagon and C-peptide. ICCs generated by the protocol described below result in C-peptide release after transplantation under the kidney capsule of nude mice that are similar to C-peptide levels obtained by transplantation of fresh tissue(6). Although the examples presented here focus upon the pancreatic endoderm proliferation and β cell genesis, the protocol can be employed to study other aspects of pancreatic development, including exocrine, ductal, and other hormone producing cells.

  16. Protein Kinase C Iota is Required for Pancreatic Cancer Cell Transformed Growth and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Michele L.; Bamlet, William R.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States with an overall 5-year survival rate of <5%. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies underscoring the critical need for new molecular targets for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy. The KRAS proto-oncogene is mutated in >90% of PDAC. Protein kinase C iota (PKCι) is required for oncogenic Ras-mediated transformed growth in lung cancer and intestinal epithelial cells. However, little is known about the role of PKCι in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we evaluated the expression of PKCι in human pancreatic cancer and the requirement for PKCι for the transformed growth and tumorigenicity of PDAC cells. We find that PKCι is significantly over-expressed in human pancreatic cancer and high PKCι expression correlates with poor patient survival. Inhibition of PKCι expression blocks PDAC cell transformed growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Inhibition of PKCι expression in pancreatic tumors also significantly reduces tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Analysis of downstream PKCι effectors implicates the Rac1-MEK/ERK1/2 signaling axis in PKCι-mediated transformed growth and cellular invasion. Taken together, our data demonstrate a required role for PKCι in the transformed growth of pancreatic cancer cells and reveal a novel role for PKCι in pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo. Our results strongly indicate that PKCι will be an effective target for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:20179210

  17. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis in different animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, D.G.; Rao, M.S.; Reddy, J.K.

    1984-06-01

    Pancreatic carcinomas can be induced in rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters by a variety of carcinogens. The types of neoplasms which arise vary with the species of rodent. In the rat, they consist exclusively of acinar cells, in the other species the lesions are adenocarcinomas resembling those derived from pancreatic ductules and ducts, those in hamster more so than in guinea pigs. Careful sequential studies in the guinea pig and hamster suggest that acinar cells together with ductular and duct cells are involved in the genesis of duct adenocarcinomas. In each rodent model, the acinar cell appears to be quite sensitive to continued exposure to carcinogen. In each instance, acini undergo modulation, and in the guinea pig and hamster, permanent metaplastic transformation to ductlike structures. Such cells assume an enhanced capacity for cell proliferation which persists following cessation of carcinogen treatment. Other studies suggest that adult pancreatic acinar cells possess a surprising degree of plasticity. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of neoplasms resembling pancreatic ducts is not unlike other carcinogenic sequences where extensive cell modulation and metaplasia precede and are an integral part of the neoplastic transformation. 55 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Clonal preservation of human pancreatic cell line derived from primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, R M; Li, Y; Mohamed, A N; Pettit, G R; Adsay, V; Vaitkevicius, V K; Al-Katib, A M; Sarkar, F H

    1999-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas generally remains an incurable disease by available treatment modalities, demanding the development of a suitable cell-culture/animal model and the discovery and evaluation of novel therapeutic agents. We report the clonal preservation of a human pancreatic cell line (KCI-MOH1) established from a 74-year-old African-American man diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Initially the human primary tumor was grown as a xenograft in SCID mice and, subsequently, a cell line was established from tumors grown as a xenograft as reported in our earlier publication. The molecular characterization of the primary tumor, the tumors grown as xenograft, and the cell line all revealed similar genotypic properties. By using an automated DNA sequencer, a K-ras mutation (codon 12, GGT to CGT, Gly to Arg) was detected in the pancreatic tumor tissue taken from the patient, whereas no p53 mutation was detected. The same K-ras mutation and unaltered p53 was also found in the xenograft tumor and in the KCI-MOH1 cell line. Chromosome analysis of the cultured cells revealed: 42,XY,add(3)(p11.2),der(7)t(7;12) (p22;q12),-10,-12,add (14)(p11),-18,add (20)(q13),-22/84, idemx2, which is the same chromosome complement found in xenograft tumors. The KCI-MOH1 cell line grows well in tissue culture and forms tumors in the SCID mice when implanted subcutaneously, as well as in orthotopic sites. The KCI-MOH1 cell line-derived SCID mouse xenograft model was used for efficacy evaluation of bryostatin 1, auristatin-PE, spongistatin 1, and gemcitabine alone and in combination. Tumor growth inhibition (T/C expressed as percentage), tumor growth delay (T - C), and log 10 kill for these agents were 38%, 22 days, and 0.53; 15%, 30 days, and 0.80; 24%, 25 days, and 0.66; and 10%, 33 days, and 0.90, respectively. When given in combination, two of seven gemcitabine + auristatin-PE-treated animals were free of tumors for 150 days and were considered cured. Animals treated with a

  19. A case of primary pancreatic non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderloni, Andrea; Genco, Chiara; Ballarè, Marco; Carmagnola, Stefania; Battista, Serena; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphoma frequently involves the gastrointestinal tract, in particular the stomach and the small bowel. Rarely, it can also be a cause of pancreatic masses. Clinical presentation is often non-specific and may overlap with other pancreatic conditions such as carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumours and autoimmune pancreatitis. We report a case of primary pancreatic lymphoma in a young woman with jaundice, fever and abdominal pain mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis. Clinical evaluation included the abdominal Computed Tomography scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that revealed a large duodenal mass. Endoscopic biopsies were performed and eventually histological examination was coherent with a diagnosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma.

  20. Impact by pancreatic stellate cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition and pancreatic cancer cell invasion: Adding a third dimension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karnevi, Emelie; Rosendahl, Ann H; Hilmersson, Katarzyna Said; Saleem, Moin A; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with a highly abundant stroma and low-grade inflammation. In the local tumour microenvironment, elevated glucose levels, the presence of tumour-associated stellate cells and macrophages are hypothesised to promote the tumour progression and invasion. The present study investigated the influence by the microenvironment on pancreatic cancer cell invasion in vitro. After co-culture with tumour-associated pancreatic stellate cells (TPSCs), pancreatic cancer cells displayed up to 8-fold reduction in levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers E-cadherin and ZO-1, while β-catenin and vimentin levels were increased. A 3D organotypic model showed that TPSCs stimulated pancreatic cancer cell invasion, both as single cell (PANC-1) and cohort (MIAPaCa-2) invasion. The combined presence of TPSCs and M2-like macrophages induced invasion of the non-invasive BxPC-3 cells. High glucose conditions further enhanced changes in EMT markers as well as the cancer cell invasion. In summary, co-culture with TPSCs induced molecular changes associated with EMT in pancreatic cancer cells, regardless of differentiation status, and the organotypic model demonstrated the influence of microenvironmental factors, such as glucose, stellate cells and macrophages, on pancreatic cancer cell invasion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pancreatic stellate cells contribute pancreatic cancer pain via activation of sHH signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Duan, Wanxing; Zhang, Lun; Yu, Shuo; Xu, Qinhong; Lei, Jianjun; Li, Xuqi; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng; Huang, Jason H.; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong; Ma, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a critical clinical symptom in pancreatic cancer (PC) that affects the quality of life for PC patients. However, the pathogenesis of PC pain is largely unknown. In this study, we show that PC pain is initiated by the sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway in pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), which is activated by sHH secreted from PC cells, and then, neurotrophic factors derived from PSCs mediate the pain. The different culture systems were established in vitro, and the expression of sHH pathway molecules, neurotrophic factors, TRPV1, and pain factors were examined. Capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were examined by the patch-clamp technique. Pain-related behavior was observed in an orthotopic tumor model. sHH and PSCs increased the expression and secretion of TRPV1, SP, and CGRP by inducing NGF and BDNF in a co-culture system, also increasing TRPV1 current. But, suppressing sHH pathway or NGF reduced the expression of TRPV1, SP, and CGRP. In vivo, PSCs and PC cells that expressed high levels of sHH could enhance pain behavior. Furthermore, the blockade of NGF or TRPV1 significantly attenuated the pain response to mechanical stimulation compared with the control. Our results demonstrate that sHH signaling pathway is involved in PC pain, and PSCs play an essential role in the process greatly by inducing NGF. PMID:26934446

  2. Pancreatic stellate cells contribute pancreatic cancer pain via activation of sHH signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Duan, Wanxing; Zhang, Lun; Yu, Shuo; Xu, Qinhong; Lei, Jianjun; Li, Xuqi; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng; Huang, Jason H; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong; Ma, Zhenhua

    2016-04-05

    Abdominal pain is a critical clinical symptom in pancreatic cancer (PC) that affects the quality of life for PC patients. However, the pathogenesis of PC pain is largely unknown. In this study, we show that PC pain is initiated by the sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway in pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), which is activated by sHH secreted from PC cells, and then, neurotrophic factors derived from PSCs mediate the pain. The different culture systems were established in vitro, and the expression of sHH pathway molecules, neurotrophic factors, TRPV1, and pain factors were examined. Capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were examined by the patch-clamp technique. Pain-related behavior was observed in an orthotopic tumor model. sHH and PSCs increased the expression and secretion of TRPV1, SP, and CGRP by inducing NGF and BDNF in a co-culture system, also increasing TRPV1 current. But, suppressing sHH pathway or NGF reduced the expression of TRPV1, SP, and CGRP. In vivo, PSCs and PC cells that expressed high levels of sHH could enhance pain behavior. Furthermore, the blockade of NGF or TRPV1 significantly attenuated the pain response to mechanical stimulation compared with the control. Our results demonstrate that sHH signaling pathway is involved in PC pain, and PSCs play an essential role in the process greatly by inducing NGF.

  3. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  4. The Potential for Circulating Tumor Cells in Pancreatic Cancer Management

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta, Michael; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Wang, Ruoxiang; Pandol, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one the most lethal malignancies. Only a small proportion of patients with this disease benefit from surgery. Chemotherapy provides only a transient benefit. Though much effort has gone into finding new ways for early diagnosis and treatment, average patient survival has only been improved in the order of months. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors, including pre-malignant phases. These cells possess information about the genomic characteristics of their tumor source in situ, and their detection and characterization holds potential in early cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Liquid Biopsies present an alternative to tumor biopsy that are hard to sample. Below we summarize current methods of CTC detection, the current literature on CTCs in pancreatic cancer, and future perspectives. PMID:28626429

  5. A Hyaluronic Acid-Rich Node and Duct System in Which Pluripotent Adult Stem Cells Circulate.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Chandra, Vishal; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative medicine is in demand of adult pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). The "Bonghan System (BHS)" was discovered and suggested to contain cells with regenerative capacity in the early 1960s. It had been ignored for a long time due to the lack of sufficient details of experiments, but about 37 years after the initial report, the BHS was rediscovered and named as the "primo vascular system." Recently, we have discovered a similar structure, which contained a high level of hyaluronic acid, and hence, named the structure as hyaluronic acid-rich node and duct system (HAR-NDS). Here we discuss the HAR-NDS concept starting from the discovery of BHS, and findings pointing to its importance in regenerative medicine. This HAR-NDS contained adult PSCs, called node and duct stem cells (NDSCs), which appeared to circulate in it. We describe the evidence that NDSCs can differentiate into hemangioblasts that further produced differentiated blood cells. The NDSCs had a potential to differentiate into neuronal cells and hepatocytes; thus, NDSCs had a capability to become cells from all three germ layers. This system appears to be a promising alternative source of adult stem cells that can be easily delivered to their target tissues and participate in tissue regeneration.

  6. Follicular pancreatitis, report of a case clinically mimicking pancreatic cancer and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Aishima, Shinichi; Hattori, Masami; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Aso, Akira; Takahata, Shunichi; Ohtsuka, Takao; Ueda, Junji; Tanaka, Masao; Oda, Yoshinao

    2014-02-01

    We herein present a 71-year-old man who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy with the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis. We could not completely deny malignancy by a preoperative imaging study. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy demonstrated clusters of benign acinar cells and no proliferation of atypical lymphoid cells or rich plasma cells. Histologically, the prominent lymphoid follicle formation was seen in an ill-defined mass, 15 mm in size, in the pancreatic parenchyma. Duct-centered fibrotic rims were seen in the pancreatic ducts accompanied by mild fibrotic change between the follicles and obliterative phlebitis. No neoplastic epithelial cells were observed in the resected specimen, and infiltrating lymphocytes did not show any morphological atypia and monoclonal proliferation by immunohistochemical staining with B and T cell markers. In addition, we could exclude IgG4-related disease, because plasmacytic cells were rarely positive for IgG4. Although follicular pancreatitis is rare, this mass-forming inflammatory disease (pancreatitis) should be included in the preoperative differential diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 regulates pancreatic stellate cell activity via the EP4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Charo, Chantale; Holla, Vijaykumar; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Hwang, Rosa; Yang, Peiying; Dubois, Raymond N; Menter, David G; Logsdon, Craig D; Ramachandran, Vijaya

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells are source of dense fibrotic stroma, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We observed correlation between levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the extent of pancreatic fibrosis. The aims of this study were to delineate the effects of PGE2 on immortalized human pancreatic stellate cells (HPSCs) and to identify the receptor involved. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to assess COX-2, extracellular matrix, and matrix metalloproteinase gene expression. Eicosanoid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Human pancreatic stellate cell proliferation was assessed by MTS assay, migration by Boyden chamber assay, and invasion using an invasion chamber. Transient silencing was obtained by small interfering RNA. Human pancreatic stellate cells express COX-2 and synthesize PGE2. Prostaglandin E2 stimulated HPSC proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulated expression of both extracellular matrix and matrix metalloproteinase genes. Human pancreatic stellate cells expressed all 4 EP receptors. Only blocking the EP4 receptor resulted in abrogation of PGE2-mediated HPSC activation. Specificity of EP4 for the effects of PGE2 on stellate cells was confirmed using specific antagonists. Our data indicate that PGE2 regulates pancreatic stellate cell profibrotic activities via EP4 receptor, thus suggesting EP4 receptor as useful therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer to reduce desmoplasia.

  8. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  9. Imaging pancreatic islet cells by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Karunananthan, Johann; Pelham, Bradley; Kandeel, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that every year more than 30000 persons in the United States - approximately 80 people per day - are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is caused by autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islet (β cells) cells. Islet transplantation has become a promising therapy option for T1D patients, while the lack of suitable tools is difficult to directly evaluate of the viability of the grafted islet over time. Positron emission tomography (PET) as an important non-invasive methodology providing high sensitivity and good resolution, is able to accurate detection of the disturbed biochemical processes and physiological abnormality in living organism. The successful PET imaging of islets would be able to localize the specific site where transplanted islets engraft in the liver, and to quantify the level of islets remain alive and functional over time. This information would be vital to establishing and evaluating the efficiency of pancreatic islet transplantation. Many novel imaging agents have been developed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of PET islet imaging. In this article, we summarize the latest developments in carbon-11, fluorine-18, copper-64, and gallium-68 labeled radioligands for the PET imaging of pancreatic islet cells. PMID:27721939

  10. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  11. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Vasopressin-Responsive Nuclear Proteins in Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Laura K.; Bolger, Steven J.; Luginbuhl, Kelli; Gonzales, Patricia A.; Rinschen, Markus M.; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin controls transport in the renal collecting duct, in part, by regulating transcription. This complex process, which can involve translocation and/or modification of transcriptional regulators, is not completely understood. Here, we applied a method for large-scale profiling of nuclear proteins to quantify vasopressin-induced changes in the nuclear proteome of cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells. Using stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry, we quantified 3987 nuclear proteins and identified significant changes in the abundance of 65, including previously established targets of vasopressin signaling in the collecting duct. Vasopressin-induced changes in the abundance of the transcription factors JunB, Elf3, Gatad2b, and Hmbox1; transcriptional co-regulators Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) and Crebbp; subunits of the Mediator complex; E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4; nuclear transport regulator RanGap1; and several proteins associated with tight junctions and adherens junctions. Bioinformatic analysis showed that many of the quantified transcription factors have putative binding sites in the 5′-flanking regions of genes coding for the channel proteins Aqp2, Aqp3, Scnn1b (ENaCβ), and Scnn1g (ENaCγ), which are known targets of vasopressin. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the increase in β-catenin in nuclear fractions was accompanied by an even larger increase in its phosphorylated form (pSer552). The findings provide a new online database resource for nuclear proteomics (http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mNPD/) and generate new hypotheses regarding vasopressin-mediated transcriptional regulation in the collecting duct. PMID:22440904

  12. Derivation and characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived exocrine pancreatic cell line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment and initial characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic cell line, PICM-31, and a colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, is described. The cell lines were propagated for several months at split ratios of 1:3 or 1:5 at each passage on STO feeder cells af...

  13. Fibrogenesis in pancreatic cancer is a dynamic process regulated by macrophage-stellate cell interaction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chanjuan; Washington, M. Kay; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Drosos, Yiannis; Revetta, Frank L.; Weaver, Connie J.; Buzhardt, Emily; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; Whitehead, Robert H.; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Wilson, Keith T.; Means, Anna L.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer occurs in the setting of a profound fibrotic microenvironment that often dwarfs the actual tumor. While pancreatic fibrosis has been well-studied in chronic pancreatitis, its development in pancreatic cancer is much less well understood. This manuscript describes the dynamic remodeling that occurs from pancreatic precursors (PanINs) to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, highlighting similarities and differences between benign and malignant disease. While collagen matrix is a commonality throughout this process, early stage PanINs are virtually free of periostin while late stage PanIN and pancreatic cancer are surrounded by an increasing abundance of this extracellular matrix protein. Myofibroblasts also become increasingly abundant during progression from PanIN to cancer. From the earliest stages of fibrogenesis, macrophages are associated with this ongoing process. In vitro co-culture indicates there is cross-regulation between macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells, precursors to at least some of the fibrotic cell populations. When quiescent pancreatic stellate cells were co-cultured with macrophage cell lines, the stellate cells became activated and the macrophages increased cytokine production. In summary, fibrosis in pancreatic cancer involves a complex interplay of cells and matrices that regulate not only the tumor epithelium but the composition of the microenvironment itself. PMID:24535260

  14. Epidemiology, risk factors, and the promotion of pancreatic cancer: role of the stellate cell.

    PubMed

    Pandol, Stephen; Gukovskaya, Anna; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Edderkoui, Mouad; Dawson, David; Eibl, Guido; Lugea, Aurelia

    2012-03-01

    There are approximately 277,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer and 266,000 deaths from pancreatic cancer annually, indicating a mortality rate of 96% of the cases diagnosed. Because of the ineffectiveness of therapies, a major emphasis needs to be placed on prevention. This paper reviews the epidemiology and risk factors for pancreatic cancer, and uses this information to propose plausible research directions for determining the biological mechanisms mediating the effects of risk factors on the promotion of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the pancreatic stellate cell. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Aquaporin-2 abundance in the renal collecting duct: new insights from cultured cell models.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Udo; Leroy, Valérie; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Féraille, Eric

    2009-07-01

    The renal cortico-papillary osmotic gradient is generated by sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb. The antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases collecting duct water permeability by enhancing aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel insertion in the apical membrane of principal cells, allowing water to passively flow along the osmotic gradient from the tubule lumen to the interstitium. In addition to short-term AQP2 redistribution between intracellular compartments and the cell surface, AQP2 whole cell abundance is tightly regulated. AVP is a major transcriptional activator of the AQP2 gene, and stimulation of insulin- and calcium-sensing receptors respectively potentiate and reduce its action. Extracellular tonicity is another key factor that determines the levels of AQP2 abundance. Its effect is dependent on activation of the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein that reinforces AVP-induced AQP2 transcriptional activation. Conversely, activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptional factor by proinflammatory factors reduces AQP2 gene transcription. Aldosterone additionally regulates AQP2 whole cell abundance by simultaneously reducing AQP2 gene transcription and stimulating AQP2 mRNA translation. These examples illustrate how cross talk between various stimuli regulates AQP2 abundance in collecting duct principal cells and consequently contributes to maintenance of body water homeostasis.

  16. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  17. Apical endosomes isolated from kidney collecting duct principal cells lack subunits of the proton pumping ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sabolić, I; Wuarin, F; Shi, L B; Verkman, A S; Ausiello, D A; Gluck, S; Brown, D

    1992-10-01

    Endocytic vesicles that are involved in the vasopressin-stimulated recycling of water channels to and from the apical membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells were isolated from rat renal papilla by differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the isolated vesicles maintained a high, HgCl2-sensitive water permeability, consistent with the presence of vasopressin-sensitive water channels. They did not, however, exhibit ATP-dependent luminal acidification, nor any N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive ATPase activity, properties that are characteristic of most acidic endosomal compartments. Western blotting with specific antibodies showed that the 31- and 70-kD cytoplasmically oriented subunits of the vacuolar proton pump were not detectable in these apical endosomes from the papilla, whereas they were present in endosomes prepared in parallel from the cortex. In contrast, the 56-kD subunit of the proton pump was abundant in papillary endosomes, and was localized at the apical pole of principal cells by immunocytochemistry. Finally, an antibody that recognizes the 16-kD transmembrane subunit of oat tonoplast ATPase cross-reacted with a distinct 16-kD band in cortical endosomes, but no 16-kD band was detectable in endosomes from the papilla. This antibody also recognized a 16-kD band in affinity-purified H+ ATPase preparations from bovine kidney medulla. Therefore, early endosomes derived from the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct principal cells fail to acidify because they lack functionally important subunits of a vacuolar-type proton pumping ATPase, including the 16-kD transmembrane domain that serves as the proton-conducting channel, and the 70-kD cytoplasmic subunit that contains the ATPase catalytic site. This specialized, non-acidic early endosomal compartment appears to be involved primarily in the hormonally induced recycling of water channels to and from the apical plasma membrane of

  18. Apical endosomes isolated from kidney collecting duct principal cells lack subunits of the proton pumping ATPase

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Endocytic vesicles that are involved in the vasopressin-stimulated recycling of water channels to and from the apical membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells were isolated from rat renal papilla by differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the isolated vesicles maintained a high, HgCl2-sensitive water permeability, consistent with the presence of vasopressin-sensitive water channels. They did not, however, exhibit ATP-dependent luminal acidification, nor any N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive ATPase activity, properties that are characteristic of most acidic endosomal compartments. Western blotting with specific antibodies showed that the 31- and 70-kD cytoplasmically oriented subunits of the vacuolar proton pump were not detectable in these apical endosomes from the papilla, whereas they were present in endosomes prepared in parallel from the cortex. In contrast, the 56-kD subunit of the proton pump was abundant in papillary endosomes, and was localized at the apical pole of principal cells by immunocytochemistry. Finally, an antibody that recognizes the 16-kD transmembrane subunit of oat tonoplast ATPase cross-reacted with a distinct 16-kD band in cortical endosomes, but no 16-kD band was detectable in endosomes from the papilla. This antibody also recognized a 16-kD band in affinity- purified H+ ATPase preparations from bovine kidney medulla. Therefore, early endosomes derived from the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct principal cells fail to acidify because they lack functionally important subunits of a vacuolar-type proton pumping ATPase, including the 16-kD transmembrane domain that serves as the proton-conducting channel, and the 70-kD cytoplasmic subunit that contains the ATPase catalytic site. This specialized, non-acidic early endosomal compartment appears to be involved primarily in the hormonally induced recycling of water channels to and from the apical plasma membrane of

  19. Quantitative apical membrane proteomics reveals vasopressin-induced actin dynamics in collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Chin-San; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Po-Jen; Chen, Pei-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fenton, Robert A.; Knepper, Mark A.; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2013-01-01

    In kidney collecting duct cells, filamentous actin (F-actin) depolymerization is a critical step in vasopressin-induced trafficking of aquaporin-2 to the apical plasma membrane. However, the molecular components of this response are largely unknown. Using stable isotope-based quantitative protein mass spectrometry and surface biotinylation, we identified 100 proteins that showed significant abundance changes in the apical plasma membrane of mouse cortical collecting duct cells in response to vasopressin. Fourteen of these proteins are involved in actin cytoskeleton regulation, including actin itself, 10 actin-associated proteins, and 3 regulatory proteins. Identified were two integral membrane proteins (Clmn, Nckap1) and one actin-binding protein (Mpp5) that link F-actin to the plasma membrane, five F-actin end-binding proteins (Arpc2, Arpc4, Gsn, Scin, and Capzb) involved in F-actin reorganization, and two actin adaptor proteins (Dbn1, Lasp1) that regulate actin cytoskeleton organization. There were also protease (Capn1), protein kinase (Cdc42bpb), and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Arhgef2) that mediate signal-induced F-actin changes. Based on these findings, we devised a live-cell imaging method to observe vasopressin-induced F-actin dynamics in polarized mouse cortical collecting duct cells. In response to vasopressin, F-actin gradually disappeared near the center of the apical plasma membrane while consolidating laterally near the tight junction. This F-actin peripheralization was blocked by calcium ion chelation. Vasopressin-induced apical aquaporin-2 trafficking and forskolin-induced water permeability increase were blocked by F-actin disruption. In conclusion, we identified a vasopressin-regulated actin network potentially responsible for vasopressin-induced apical F-actin dynamics that could explain regulation of apical aquaporin-2 trafficking and water permeability increase. PMID:24085853

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 mediates formation of bile ducts and hepatic maturation of fetal hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Sei; Kamiya, Akihide; Goto, Fumio; Kaneko, Shun; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Asano, Yu; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nitta, Sayuri; Nakata, Toru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; and others

    2016-01-22

    Fetal hepatic stem/progenitor cells, called hepatoblasts, play central roles in liver development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the phenotype of these cells have not been completely elucidated. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 is a type I transmembrane proteinase regulating pericellular proteolysis of the extracellular matrix and is essential for the activation of several MMPs and cytokines. However, the physiological functions of MMP-14 in liver development are unknown. Here we describe a functional role for MMP-14 in hepatic and biliary differentiation of mouse hepatoblasts. MMP-14 was upregulated in cells around the portal vein in perinatal stage liver. Formation of bile duct-like structures in MMP-14–deficient livers was significantly delayed compared with wild-type livers in vivo. In vitro biliary differentiation assays showed that formation of cholangiocytic cysts derived from MMP-14–deficient hepatoblasts was completely impaired, and that overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatoblasts promoted the formation of bile duct-like cysts. In contrast, the expression of molecules associated with metabolic functions in hepatocytes, including hepatic nuclear factor 4α and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, were significantly increased in MMP-14–deficient livers. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly upregulated in MMP-14–deficient livers. We demonstrate that MMP-14–mediated signaling in fetal hepatic progenitor cells promotes biliary luminal formation around the portal vein and negatively controls the maturation of hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Loss of MMP-14 delayed formation of bile duct-like structures in perinatal liver. • Overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatobalsts promoted the biliary formation in vitro. • Loss of MMP-14 promoted hepatocyte maturation of hepatoblasts in vivo. • MMP-14–mediated signaling regulates terminal differentiation of

  1. Berberine inhibits cell growth and mediates caspase-independent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Garcia, Lina; Efferth, Thomas; Torres, Amada; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Youns, Mahmoud

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. In addition to the poor survival rates, combinations using gemcitabine as a backbone have failed to show any benefit beyond monotherapy. These facts underscore an urgent need for novel therapeutic options and motivated us to study the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we undertook an mRNA-based gene expression profiling study in order to get deeper insight into the molecular targets mediating the growth inhibitory effects of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Twenty-four hours after treatment, berberine showed preferential selectivity toward pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Moreover, expression profiling and Ingenuity pathway analysis results showed that the cytotoxicity of berberine was accompanied with an activation of BRCA1-mediated DNA damage response, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation, and P53 signalling pathways. The activation of these signalling pathways might be explained by the fact that berberine intercalates DNA and induces DNA strand break through inhibition of topoisomerases and induction of DNA lesions.

  2. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  3. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. (c) RSNA, 2006.

  4. Bombesin stimulates insulin secretion by a pancreatic islet cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Swope, S L; Schonbrunn, A

    1984-01-01

    The amphibian tetradecapeptide, bombesin (BBS) has been shown to stimulate insulin secretion both in vivo and by pancreatic islet cells in vitro. To determine whether BBS can act directly on pancreatic beta cells, we examined its effects on insulin secretion by HIT-T15 cells (HIT cells), a clonal islet cell line. Addition of 100 nM BBS to HIT cells stimulated insulin release 25-fold within 30 sec. The rapid stimulatory effect of BBS on insulin release was short-lived: the secretory rate returned to basal levels after 90 min of BBS treatment. The decrease in the rate of insulin release in the continued presence of BBS was due not to depletion of intracellular insulin stores but to specific desensitization to this peptide. Stimulation of insulin secretion by BBS was dose dependent with an ED50 value (0.51 +/- 0.15 nM) similar to the concentration of BBS-like immunoreactive material in rat plasma. Five BBS analogs, including porcine gastrin-releasing peptide, were as powerful as BBS in stimulating insulin release. The relative potencies of the analogs tested indicated that the COOH-terminal octapeptide sequence in BBS was sufficient for stimulation of release. In contrast, 14 peptides structurally unrelated to BBS did not alter insulin secretion. BBS action was synergistic with that of glucagon; insulin secretion in the presence of maximal concentrations of both peptides was greater than the additive effects of the two peptides added individually. Somatostatin inhibited BBS-stimulated release by 69 +/- 1% with an ID50 value of 3.2 +/- 0.3 nM. These results show that BBS stimulation of insulin secretion by a clonal pancreatic cell line closely parallels its effects in vivo and support the hypothesis that BBS stimulates insulin secretion by a direct effect on the pancreatic beta cell. The clonal HIT cell line provides a homogeneous cell preparation amenable for studies on the biochemical mechanisms of BBS action in the endocrine pancreas. PMID:6143320

  5. Ingestion of proteoglycan fraction from shark cartilage increases serum inhibitory activity against matrix metalloproteinase-9 and suppresses development of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine-induced pancreatic duct carcinogenesis in hamster.

    PubMed

    Kitahashi, Tsukasa; Ikawa, Shoko; Sakamoto, Akika; Nomura, Yoshihiro; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Kenji; Sasabe, Shuji; Park, Eun Young; Nakamura, Yasushi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Sato, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    A water extract of shark cartilage was fractionated into acidic and basic fractions by preparative isoelectric focusing on the basis of the amphoteric nature of samples. The acidic fraction was further fractionated into ethanol-soluble and -precipitate fractions. After the carcinogenesis treatment using N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine, hamsters received a diet containing each fraction or purified chondroichin sulfate to give 0.4% (w/w) for 50 days. Only administration of the acidic ethanol-precipitate-fraction-containing diet significantly increased serum inhibitory activity against matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and reduced the number of adenocarcinomas in the pancreatic duct. The active fraction predominantly consisted of chondroichin sulfate-containing proteoglycan. However, the purified chondroichin sulfate had no significant activity. These results suggest that the protein moiety of the proteoglycan might be involved in the increase of serum inhibitory activity against MMP-9 and suppression of pancreatic carcinogenesis in hamster.

  6. CD271+ Subpopulation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells Correlates with Prognosis of Pancreatic Cancer and Is Regulated by Interaction with Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kenji; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Shindo, Koji; Eguchi, Daiki; Kozono, Shingo; Ikenaga, Naoki; Ohtsuka, Takao; Takahata, Shunichi; Aishima, Shinichi; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a crucial role in the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer. Although heterogeneity of PSCs has been identified, the functional differences remain unclear. We characterized CD271+ PSCs in human pancreatic cancer. Immunohistochemistry for CD271 was performed for 31 normal pancreatic tissues and 105 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We performed flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR, and assessed CD271 expression in PSCs isolated from pancreatic tissues and the changes in CD271 expression in PSCs cocultured with cancer cells. We also investigated the pattern of CD271 expression in a SCID mouse xenograft model. In the immunohistochemical analyses, the CD271-high staining rates in pancreatic stroma in normal pancreatic tissues and PDACs were 2/31 (6.5%) and 29/105 (27.6%), respectively (p = 0.0069). In PDACs, CD271+ stromal cells were frequently observed on the edge rather than the center of the tumors. Stromal CD271 high expression was associated with a good prognosis (p = 0.0040). Flow cytometric analyses demonstrated CD271-positive rates in PSCs were 0–2.1%. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that CD271 mRNA expression was increased in PSCs after coculture with pancreatic cancer cells. However, the level of CD271 mRNA expression subsequently decreased after the transient increase. Furthermore, CD271 mRNA expression was decreased in PSCs migrating toward pancreatic cancer cells through Matrigel. In the xenograft model, CD271+ PSCs were present at tumor margins/periphery and were absent in the tumor core. In conclusion, CD271 was expressed in PSCs around pancreatic tumors, but not in the center of the tumors, and expression decreased after long coculture with pancreatic cancer cells or after movement toward pancreatic cancer cells. These findings suggest that CD271+ PSCs appear at the early stage of pancreatic carcinogenesis and that CD271 expression is significantly correlated with a better prognosis in

  7. Proteomics analysis of rough endoplasmic reticulum in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Schnepp, Patricia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-05-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed ER to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by 1D SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. GO analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001081 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001081). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Modeling Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Adaptation and Diabetes in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Lisette A.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2017-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is an important element of energy balance and is conserved in organisms from fruit fly to mammals. Central to the control of circulating glucose levels in vertebrates are the endocrine cells of the pancreas, particularly the insulin-producing β-cells and the glucagon producing α-cells. A feature of α- and β-cells is their plasticity, an ability to adapt, in function and number as a response to physiological and pathophysiological conditions of increased hormone demand. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptive responses that maintain glucose homeostasis are incompletely defined. The zebrafish is an attractive model due to the low cost, high fecundity, and amenability to genetic and compound screens, and mechanisms governing the development of the pancreatic endocrine cells are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. Post development, both β- and α-cells of zebrafish display plasticity as in mammals. Here, we summarize the studies of pancreatic endocrine cell adaptation in zebrafish. We further explore the utility of the zebrafish as a model for diabetes, a relevant topic considering the increase in diabetes in the human population. PMID:28184214

  9. PROTEOMICS ANALYSIS OF ROUGH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Skallos, Patracia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M.; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by one dimensional SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. Gene ontology analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. PMID:25546123

  10. The origin of endothelial cells in novel structures, Bonghan ducts and Bonghan corpuscles determined using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sun-Shin; Hwang, In-Koo; Kim, Min-Su; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Yoon, Yeo-Sung

    2009-09-01

    Bonghan ducts (BHDs), and their associated Bonghan corpuscles (BHCs), which are novel threadlike structures, were recently observed in rats and rabbits by using various methods. As further support for the putative circulatory function of the novel threadlike structures (NTS), we investigated the presence and the origin of the endothelial cells within these structures. We immunostained the NTS with anti-CD146, an endothelial cell marker, and with anti-podoplanin, a lymphatic cell marker. Positive expression of CD146 in the BHDs was obtained, and the distribution of endothelial cells showed that the inner boundaries of the channels in the subducts branched from the BHDs and curled around, in a complicated manner, inside a BHCs. The negative expression of podoplanin implies that the endothelial cells in the BHDs are likely to be of vascular and not of lymphatic origin.

  11. Genetic modification of primate amniotic fluid-derived stem cells produces pancreatic progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Mack, David L; Williams, J Koudy; Mirmalek-Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Moorefield, Emily; Chun, So-Young; Wang, Jun; Lorenzetti, Diego; Furth, Mark; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2013-01-01

    Insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes does not prevent serious long-term complications including vascular disease, neuropathy, retinopathy and renal failure. Stem cells, including amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells - highly expansive, multipotent and nontumorigenic cells - could serve as an appropriate stem cell source for β-cell differentiation. In the current study we tested whether nonhuman primate (nhp)AFS cells ectopically expressing key pancreatic transcription factors were capable of differentiating into a β-cell-like cell phenotype in vitro. nhpAFS cells were obtained from Cynomolgus monkey amniotic fluid by immunomagnetic selection for a CD117 (c-kit)-positive population. RT-PCR for endodermal and pancreatic lineage-specific markers was performed on AFS cells after adenovirally transduced expression of PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Expression of MAFA was sufficient to induce insulin mRNA expression in nhpAFS cell lines, whereas a combination of MAFA, PDX1 and NGN3 further induced insulin expression, and also induced the expression of other important endocrine cell genes such as glucagon, NEUROD1, NKX2.2, ISL1 and PCSK2. Higher induction of these and other important pancreatic genes was achieved by growing the triply infected AFS cells in media supplemented with a combination of B27, betacellulin and nicotinamide, as well as culturing the cells on extracellular matrix-coated plates. The expression of pancreatic genes such as NEUROD1, glucagon and insulin progressively decreased with the decline of adenovirally expressed PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Together, these experiments suggest that forced expression of pancreatic transcription factors in primate AFS cells induces them towards the pancreatic lineage.

  12. Id3 upregulates BrdU incorporation associated with a DNA damage response, not replication, in human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Levine, Fred; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms of cell cycle control in normally quiescent human pancreatic β-cells has the potential to impact regeneration strategies for diabetes. Previously we demonstrated that Id3, a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins, was sufficient to induce cell cycle entry in pancreatic duct cells, which are closely related to β-cells developmentally. We hypothesized that Id3 might similarly induce cell cycle entry in primary human β-cells. To test this directly, adult human β-cells were transduced with adenovirus expressing Id3. Consistent with a replicative response, β-cells exhibited BrdU incorporation. Further, Id3 potently repressed expression of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p57Kip2, a gene which is also silenced in a rare β-cell hyperproliferative disorder in infants. Surprisingly, however, BrdU positive β-cells did not express the proliferation markers Ki67 and pHH3. Instead, BrdU uptake reflected a DNA damage response, as manifested by hydroxyurea incorporation, γH2AX expression and 53BP1 subcellular relocalization. The uncoupling of BrdU uptake from replication raises a cautionary note about interpreting studies relying solely upon BrdU incorporation as evidence of β-cell proliferation. The data also establish that loss of p57Kip2 is not sufficient to induce cell cycle entry in adult β-cells. Moreover, the differential responses to Id3 between duct and β-cells reveal that β-cells possess intrinsic resistance to cell cycle entry not common to all quiescent epithelial cells in the adult human pancreas. The data provide a much needed comparative model for investigating the molecular basis for this resistance in order to develop a strategy for improving replication competence in β-cells. PMID:21964314

  13. Dendritic cell immunotherapy combined with gemcitabine chemotherapy enhances survival in a murine model of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghansah, Tomar; Vohra, Nasreen; Kinney, Kathleen; Weber, Amy; Kodumudi, Krithika; Springett, Gregory; Sarnaik, Amod A; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extremely aggressive malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice have multiple immunoregulatory subsets including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that may limit the effectiveness of anti-tumor immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer. It is possible that modulating these subsets will enhance anti-tumor immunity. The goal of this study was to explore depletion of immunoregulatory cells to enhance dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy in a murine model of pancreatic cancer. Flow cytometry results showed an increase in both Tregs and MDSC in untreated pancreatic cancer-bearing mice compared with control. Elimination of Tregs alone or in combination with DC-based vaccination had no effect on pancreatic tumor growth or survival. Gemcitabine (Gem) is a chemotherapeutic drug routinely used for the treatment for pancreatic cancer patients. Treatment with Gem led to a significant decrease in MDSC percentages in the spleens of tumor-bearing mice, but did not enhance overall survival. However, combination therapy with DC vaccination followed by Gem treatment led to a significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival in pancreatic cancer-bearing mice. Increased MDSC were measured in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatment with Gem also led to a decrease of this population in pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting that combination therapy with DC-based cancer vaccination and Gem may lead to improved treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  14. What Is Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver. Types of bile duct cancer by cell type Bile duct cancers can also be divided ... Our Volunteers More ACS Sites Bookstore Shop Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center ...

  15. Investigation and characterization of the duct cell-enriching process during serum-free suspension and monolayer culture using the human exocrine pancreas fraction.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tino; Heremans, Yves; Heimberg, Harry; Pipeleers, Daniel; Madsen, Ole D; Serup, Palle; Heller, R Scott

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to characterize a serum-free culture system resulting in highly enriched duct cells from human exocrine pancreas. In addition, we tested the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on endothelial cell proliferation and endocrine differentiation of the duct cells. The exocrine pellet fraction was cultivated in suspension followed by monolayer culture. Time course analysis of multiple acinar and duct cell markers was performed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. The effects of VEGF and placental growth factor on the quantities of endothelial, duct, and endocrine cells and fibroblasts were investigated using computerized imaging analysis. Suspension culture of the exocrine material efficiently enriched the cultures for duct cells. Frequent acinar cell death as well as cell selective adherence of acinar cells to the culture dish was the underlying cause of the enrichment. Confocal microscopy demonstrated the virtual absence of cells coexpressing duct cell- and acinar cell-specific markers. The endothelial immunoreactivity of the suspension culture system could be increased 2-fold by VEGF treatment, yet no effect was observed on endocrine cell numbers. We have characterized a serum-free in vitro culture system to enrich human duct cells and further show that the contribution of acinoductal transdifferentiation to the enrichment of duct cells is negligible.

  16. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  17. Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome with Embryonal Cell Carcinoma along with Ectopic Cross Fused Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, NR Manju; Narayana, V; Raja, V Om Pramod Kumar; Jambula, Pranav Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS) is a form of internal male pseudohermaphroditism, where there is normal development of male secondary sexual characters, along with the presence of bilateral fallopian tubes and uterus. Majority of these cases go undetected and some cases are accidentally diagnosed while investigating for other problems. Cross fused renal ectopia is a condition where one kidney lies in the opposite side, fused to the other kidney. We present an extremely rare case of a phenotypical male presenting with mass per abdomen and bilateral cryptorchidism, turned out to have uterus with bilateral fallopian tubes, ectopic cross fused right kidney and Embryonal cell carcinoma of left undescended testis. PMID:26894123

  18. Chaotic Synchronization between Coupled Pancreatic β-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lading, B.; Mosekilde, E.; Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Y.

    The paper first describes the main bifurcation structure for a typical model of an insulin producing pancreatic β-cell. Considering a system of two coupled identical and chaotically spiking β-cells, the paper continues to examine the bifurcations through which low periodic orbits embedded in the synchronized chaotic state lose their transverse stability and produce the characteristic picture of locally and globally riddled basins of attraction. We discuss the different types of riddled basins with the associated phenomena of attractor bubbling and on-off intermittency.

  19. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  20. Sonic hedgehog acts at multiple stages during pancreatic tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Jennifer P.; Mongeau, Michelle E.; Klimstra, David S.; Morris, John P.; Lee, Yie Chia; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Hebrok, Matthias; Lewis, Brian C.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling occurs in the majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Here we investigate the mechanisms by which Shh contributes to pancreatic tumorigenesis. We find that Shh expression enhances proliferation of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, potentially through the transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and p21. We further show that Shh protects pancreatic duct epithelial cells from apoptosis through the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling and the stabilization of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Significantly, Shh also cooperates with activated K-Ras to promote pancreatic tumor development. Finally, Shh signaling enhances K-Ras-induced pancreatic tumorigenesis by reducing the dependence of tumor cells on the sustained activation of the MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Thus, our data suggest that Shh signaling contributes to tumor initiation in the pancreas through at least two mechanisms and additionally enhances tumor cell resistance to therapeutic intervention. Collectively, our findings demonstrate crucial roles for Shh signaling in multiple stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:17372229

  1. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A. Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, CA Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels )

    1988-07-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 {plus minus} 20 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N{sub i} to inhibit adenylate cyclase.

  2. Integrated Proteomic Profiling of Cell Line Conditioned Media and Pancreatic Juice for the Identification of Pancreatic Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Makawita, Shalini; Smith, Chris; Batruch, Ihor; Zheng, Yingye; Rückert, Felix; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Gallinger, Steven; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths, for which serological biomarkers are urgently needed. Most discovery-phase studies focus on the use of one biological source for analysis. The present study details the combined mining of pancreatic cancer-related cell line conditioned media and pancreatic juice for identification of putative diagnostic leads. Using strong cation exchange chromatography, followed by LC-MS/MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer, we extensively characterized the proteomes of conditioned media from six pancreatic cancer cell lines (BxPc3, MIA-PaCa2, PANC1, CAPAN1, CFPAC1, and SU.86.86), the normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line HPDE, and two pools of six pancreatic juice samples from ductal adenocarcinoma patients. All samples were analyzed in triplicate. Between 1261 and 2171 proteins were identified with two or more peptides in each of the cell lines, and an average of 521 proteins were identified in the pancreatic juice pools. In total, 3479 nonredundant proteins were identified with high confidence, of which ∼40% were extracellular or cell membrane-bound based on Genome Ontology classifications. Three strategies were employed for identification of candidate biomarkers: (1) examination of differential protein expression between the cancer and normal cell lines using label-free protein quantification, (2) integrative analysis, focusing on the overlap of proteins among the multiple biological fluids, and (3) tissue specificity analysis through mining of publically available databases. Preliminary verification of anterior gradient homolog 2, syncollin, olfactomedin-4, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, and collagen alpha-1(VI) chain in plasma samples from pancreatic cancer patients and healthy controls using ELISA, showed a significant increase (p < 0.01) of these proteins in plasma from pancreatic cancer patients. The combination of these five proteins showed an improved area under the receiver

  3. Genetic Modification of Primate Amniotic Fluid-derived Stem Cells Produces Pancreatic Progenitor Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Mack, David L.; Williams, J Koudy; Mirmalek-Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Moorefield, Emily; Chun, So-Young; Wang, Jun; Lorenzetti, Diego; Furth, Mark; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2013-01-01

    Insulin therapy for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) does not prevent serious long-term complications including vascular disease, neuropathy, retinopathy and renal failure. Stem cells, including amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells--highly expansive, multipotent, and non-tumorigenic cells--could serve as an appropriate stem cell source for β-cell differentiation. In the current study we tested whether nonhuman primate (nhp) AFS cells ectopically expressing key pancreatic transcription factors were capable of differentiating into a beta-like cell phenotype in vitro. NHPAFS cells were obtained from Cynomolgus monkey amniotic fluid by immunomagnetic selection for a CD117 (c-kit) positive population. RT-PCR for endodermal and pancreatic lineage-specific markers was performed on AFS cells after adenovirally transduced expression of PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Expression of MAFA was sufficient to induce insulin mRNA expression in nhpAFS cell lines, whereas a combination of MAFA, PDX1 and NGN3further induced insulin expression, as well as induced the expression of other important endocrine cell genes such as glucagon, NEUROD1, NKX2.2, ISL1 and PCSK2. Higher induction of these and other important pancreatic genes was achieved by growing the triply infected AFS cells in media supplemented with a combination of B27, betacellulin and nicotinamide, as well as culturing the cells on extra-cellular matrix coated plates. The expression of pancreatic genes such as NEUROD1, glucagon and insulin progressively decreased with the decline of adenovirally-expressed PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Together, these experiments suggest that forced expression of pancreatic transcription factors in primate AFS cells induces them towards the pancreatic lineage. PMID:23306211

  4. In Vitro Proliferation of Porcine Pancreatic Islet Cells for β-Cell Therapy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Guoguang; McQuilling, John P.; Zhou, Yu; Opara, Emmanuel C.; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    β-Cell replacement through transplantation is the only curative treatment to establish a long-term stable euglycemia in diabetic patients. Owing to the shortage of donor tissue, attempts are being made to develop alternative sources of insulin-secreting cells. Stem cells differentiation and reprograming as well as isolating pancreatic progenitors from different sources are some examples; however, no approach has yet yielded a clinically relevant solution. Dissociated islet cells that are cultured in cell numbers by in vitro proliferation provide a promising platform for redifferentiation towards β-cells phenotype. In this study, we cultured islet-derived cells in vitro and examined the expression of β-cell genes during the proliferation. Islets were isolated from porcine pancreases and enzymatically digested to dissociate the component cells. The cells proliferated well in tissue culture plates and were subcultured for no more than 5 passages. Only 10% of insulin expression, as measured by PCR, was preserved in each passage. High glucose media enhanced insulin expression by about 4–18 fold, suggesting a glucose-dependent effect in the proliferated islet-derived cells. The islet-derived cells also expressed other pancreatic genes such as Pdx1, NeuroD, glucagon, and somatostatin. Taken together, these results indicate that pancreatic islet-derived cells, proliferated in vitro, retained the expression capacity for key pancreatic genes, thus suggesting that the cells may be redifferentiated into insulin-secreting β-like cells. PMID:28050568

  5. K-Ras promotes growth transformation and invasion of immortalized human pancreatic cells by Raf and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M; Groehler, Angela L; Lee, Kwang M; Ouellette, Michel M; Khazak, Vladimir; Der, Channing J

    2007-03-01

    Mutational activation of the K-Ras oncogene is well established as a key genetic step in the development and growth of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the mechanism by which aberrant Ras signaling promotes uncontrolled pancreatic tumor cell growth remains to be fully elucidated. The recent use of primary human cells to study Ras-mediated oncogenesis provides important model cell systems to dissect this mechanism. We have used a model of telomerase-immortalized human pancreatic duct-derived cells (E6/E7/st) to study mechanisms of Ras growth transformation. First, we found that human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes, which block the function of the p53 and Rb tumor suppressors, respectively, and SV40 small t antigen were required to allow mutant K-Ras(12D) growth transformation. Second, K-Ras(12D) caused growth transformation in vitro, including enhanced growth rate and loss of density dependency for growth, anchorage independence, and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane proteins, and tumorigenic transformation in vivo. Third, we determined that the Raf, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Ral guanine nucleotide exchange factor effector pathways were activated, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was not up-regulated persistently. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK and PI3K signaling impaired K-Ras-induced anchorage-independent growth and invasion. In summary, our studies established, characterized, and validated E6/E7/st cells for the study of Ras-induced oncogenesis.

  6. Pancreatic stellate cell secreted IL-6 stimulates STAT3 dependent invasiveness of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S; Castellanos, Jason A; VanSaun, Michael N; Dai, Xizi; Ambrose, Mahogany; Guo, Qiaozhi; Xiong, Yanhua; Merchant, Nipun B

    2016-10-04

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a dynamic tumor supported by several stromal elements such as pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Significant crosstalk exists between PSCs and tumor cells to stimulate oncogenic signaling and malignant progression of PDAC. However, how PSCs activate intercellular signaling in PDAC cells remains to be elucidated. We have previously shown that activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is a key component in the progression of pancreatic neoplasia. We hypothesize that PSC secreted IL-6 activates STAT3 signaling to promote PanIN progression to PDAC. Human PDAC and mouse PanIN cells were treated with PSC-conditioned media (PSC-CM), and phospho- and total-STAT3 levels by immunoblot analysis were determined. IL-6 was quantified in PSC-CM and cell invasion and colony formation assays were performed in the presence or absence of a neutralizing IL-6 antibody and the JAK/STAT3 inhibitor AZD1480. Serum from Ptf1aCre/+;LSL-KrasG12D/+;Tgfbr2flox/flox (PKT) and LSL-KrasG12D/+; Trp53R172H/+; Pdx1Cre/+ (KPC) mice demonstrated increased levels of IL-6 compared to serum from non-PDAC bearing KC and PK mice. PSC secreted IL-6 activated STAT3 signaling in noninvasive, precursor PanIN cells as well as PDAC cells, resulting in enhanced cell invasion and colony formation in both cell types. There was a significant positive linear correlation between IL-6 concentration and the ratio of phosphorylated STAT3/total STAT3. IL-6 neutralization or STAT3 inhibition attenuated PSC-CM induced activation of STAT3 signaling and tumorigenicity. These data provide evidence that PSCs are directly involved in promoting the progression of PanINs towards invasive carcinoma. This study demonstrates a novel role of PSC secreted IL-6 in transitioning noninvasive pancreatic precursor cells into invasive PDAC through the activation of STAT3 signaling.

  7. Pancreatic stellate cell secreted IL-6 stimulates STAT3 dependent invasiveness of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S.; Castellanos, Jason A.; VanSaun, Michael N.; Dai, Xizi; Ambrose, Mahogany; Guo, Qiaozhi; Xiong, Yanhua; Merchant, Nipun B.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a dynamic tumor supported by several stromal elements such as pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Significant crosstalk exists between PSCs and tumor cells to stimulate oncogenic signaling and malignant progression of PDAC. However, how PSCs activate intercellular signaling in PDAC cells remains to be elucidated. We have previously shown that activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is a key component in the progression of pancreatic neoplasia. We hypothesize that PSC secreted IL-6 activates STAT3 signaling to promote PanIN progression to PDAC. Human PDAC and mouse PanIN cells were treated with PSC-conditioned media (PSC-CM), and phospho- and total-STAT3 levels by immunoblot analysis were determined. IL-6 was quantified in PSC-CM and cell invasion and colony formation assays were performed in the presence or absence of a neutralizing IL-6 antibody and the JAK/STAT3 inhibitor AZD1480. Serum from Ptf1aCre/+;LSL-KrasG12D/+;Tgfbr2flox/flox' (PKT) and LSL-KrasG12D/+; Trp53R172H/+; Pdx1Cre/+ (KPC) mice demonstrated increased levels of IL-6 compared to serum from non-PDAC bearing KC and PK mice. PSC secreted IL-6 activated STAT3 signaling in noninvasive, precursor PanIN cells as well as PDAC cells, resulting in enhanced cell invasion and colony formation in both cell types. There was a significant positive linear correlation between IL-6 concentration and the ratio of phosphorylated STAT3/total STAT3. IL-6 neutralization or STAT3 inhibition attenuated PSC-CM induced activation of STAT3 signaling and tumorigenicity. These data provide evidence that PSCs are directly involved in promoting the progression of PanINs towards invasive carcinoma. This study demonstrates a novel role of PSC secreted IL-6 in transitioning noninvasive pancreatic precursor cells into invasive PDAC through the activation of STAT3 signaling. PMID:27602757

  8. Paracrine regulation of pancreatic cancer cell invasion by peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ziv; Cavel, Oren; Kelly, Kaitlyn; Brader, Peter; Rein, Avigail; Gao, Sizhi P; Carlson, Diane L; Shah, Jatin P; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J

    2010-01-20

    The ability of cancer to infiltrate along nerves is a common clinical observation in pancreas, head and neck, prostate, breast, and gastrointestinal carcinomas. For these tumors, nerves may provide a conduit for local cancer progression into the central nervous system. Although neural invasion is associated with poor outcome, the mechanism that triggers it is unknown. We used an in vitro Matrigel dorsal root ganglion and pancreatic cancer cell coculture model to assess the dynamic interactions between nerves and cancer cell migration and the role of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how nerve invasion affects sciatic nerve function. Nerves induced a polarized neurotrophic migration of cancer cells (PNMCs) along their axons, which was more efficient than in the absence of nerves (migration distance: mean = 187.1 microm, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 148 to 226 microm vs 14.4 microm, 95% CI = 9.58 to 19.22 microm, difference = 143 microm; P < .001; n = 20). PNMC was induced by secretion of GDNF, via phosphorylation of the RET-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Nerves from mice deficient in GDNF had reduced ability to attract cancer cells (nerve invasion index: wild type vs gdnf+/-, mean = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.77 vs 0.43, 95% CI = 0.42 to 0.44; P < .001; n = 60-66). Tumor specimens excised from patients with neuroinvasive pancreatic carcinoma had higher expression of the GDNF receptors RET and GRFalpha1 as compared with normal tissue. Finally, systemic therapy with pyrazolopyrimidine-1, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the RET pathway, suppressed nerve invasion toward the spinal cord and prevented paralysis in mice. These data provide evidence for paracrine regulation of pancreatic cancer invasion by nerves, which may have important implications for potential therapy directed against nerve invasion by cancer.

  9. Claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tsuyoshi; Kondoh, Masuo; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) modulates the tight junction protein claudin and disrupts the tight junctional barrier. It also can enhance the effectiveness of anticancer agents. However, the detailed mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE remain unclear in both normal and cancerous cells. The C-CPE mutant called C-CPE 194 binds only to claudin-4, but the C-CPE 194 mutant called C-CPE m19 binds not only to claudin-4 but also to claudin-1. In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE on claudin expression, the tight junctional functions and the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents, human pancreatic cancer cells, and normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDEs) were treated with C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19. In well-differentiated cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAC, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 disrupted both the barrier and fence functions without changes in expression of claudin-1 and -4, together with an increase of MAPK phosphorylation. C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, enhanced the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents gemcitabine and S-1. In poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1, C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced MAPK activity and the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. In normal HPDEs, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced the MAPK activity, whereas they did not affect the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. Our findings suggest that the claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

  10. Chidamide Inhibits Aerobic Metabolism to Induce Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth Arrest by Promoting Mcl-1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbing; Kuai, Qiyuan; Li, Changlan; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Xingwei; Wang, Xuanlin; Li, Weijing; He, Min; Ren, Suping; Yu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal malignancy worldwide and urgently requires valid therapies. Previous research showed that the HDAC inhibitor chidamide is a promising anti-cancer agent in pancreatic cancer cell lines. In this study, we elucidate a probable underlying anti-cancer mechanism of chidamide involving the degradation of Mcl-1. Mcl-1 is frequently upregulated in human cancers, which has been demonstrated to participate in oxidative phosphorylation, in addition to its anti-apoptotic actions as a Bcl-2 family member. The pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and PANC-1 were treated with chidamide, resulting in Mcl-1 degradation accompanied by induction of Mcl-1 ubiquitination. Treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor reduced Mcl-1 degradation stimulated by chidamide. Chidamide decreased O2 consumption and ATP production to inhibit aerobic metabolism in both pancreatic cancer cell lines and primary cells, similar to knockdown of Mcl-1, while overexpression of Mcl-1 in pancreatic cancer cells could restore the aerobic metabolism inhibited by chidamide. Furthermore, chidamide treatment or Mcl-1 knockdown significantly induced cell growth arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines and primary cells, and Mcl-1 overexpression could reduce this cell growth inhibition. In conclusion, our results suggest that chidamide promotes Mcl-1 degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, suppressing the maintenance of mitochondrial aerobic respiration by Mcl-1, and resulting in inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Our work supports the claim that chidamide has therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27875574

  11. The Notch Pathway Is Important in Maintaining the Cancer Stem Cell Population in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Ethan V.; Kim, Edward J.; Wu, Jingjiang; Hynes, Mark; Bednar, Filip; Proctor, Erica; Wang, Lidong; Dziubinski, Michele L.; Simeone, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized. Methods Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth. Results Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population. Conclusion The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24647545

  12. Argonaute2 Mediates Compensatory Expansion of the Pancreatic β Cell

    PubMed Central

    Tattikota, Sudhir G.; Rathjen, Thomas; McAnulty, Sarah J.; Wessels, Hans-Hermann; Akerman, Ildem; van de Bunt, Martijn; Hausser, Jean; Esguerra, Jonathan L.S.; Musahl, Anne; Pandey, Amit K.; You, Xintian; Chen, Wei; Herrera, Pedro L.; Johnson, Paul R.; O’Carroll, Donal; Eliasson, Lena; Zavolan, Mihaela; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ferrer, Jorge; Shalom-Feuerstein, Ruby; Aberdam, Daniel; Poy, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic β cells adapt to compensate for increased metabolic demand during insulin resistance. Although the microRNA pathway has an essential role in β cell proliferation, the extent of its contribution is unclear. Here, we report that miR-184 is silenced in the pancreatic islets of insulin-resistant mouse models and type 2 diabetic human subjects. Reduction of miR-184 promotes the expression of its target Argonaute2 (Ago2), a component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Moreover, restoration of miR-184 in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice decreased Ago2 and prevented compensatory β cell expansion. Loss of Ago2 during insulin resistance blocked β cell growth and relieved the regulation of miR-375-targeted genes, including the growth suppressor Cadm1. Lastly, administration of a ketogenic diet to ob/ob mice rescued insulin sensitivity and miR-184 expression and restored Ago2 and β cell mass. This study identifies the targeting of Ago2 by miR-184 as an essential component of the compensatory response to regulate proliferation according to insulin sensitivity. PMID:24361012

  13. Argonaute2 mediates compensatory expansion of the pancreatic β cell.

    PubMed

    Tattikota, Sudhir G; Rathjen, Thomas; McAnulty, Sarah J; Wessels, Hans-Hermann; Akerman, Ildem; van de Bunt, Martijn; Hausser, Jean; Esguerra, Jonathan L S; Musahl, Anne; Pandey, Amit K; You, Xintian; Chen, Wei; Herrera, Pedro L; Johnson, Paul R; O'Carroll, Donal; Eliasson, Lena; Zavolan, Mihaela; Gloyn, Anna L; Ferrer, Jorge; Shalom-Feuerstein, Ruby; Aberdam, Daniel; Poy, Matthew N

    2014-01-07

    Pancreatic β cells adapt to compensate for increased metabolic demand during insulin resistance. Although the microRNA pathway has an essential role in β cell proliferation, the extent of its contribution is unclear. Here, we report that miR-184 is silenced in the pancreatic islets of insulin-resistant mouse models and type 2 diabetic human subjects. Reduction of miR-184 promotes the expression of its target Argonaute2 (Ago2), a component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Moreover, restoration of miR-184 in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice decreased Ago2 and prevented compensatory β cell expansion. Loss of Ago2 during insulin resistance blocked β cell growth and relieved the regulation of miR-375-targeted genes, including the growth suppressor Cadm1. Lastly, administration of a ketogenic diet to ob/ob mice rescued insulin sensitivity and miR-184 expression and restored Ago2 and β cell mass. This study identifies the targeting of Ago2 by miR-184 as an essential component of the compensatory response to regulate proliferation according to insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of AQP2 during apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Flamenco, Pilar; Galizia, Luciano; Rivarola, Valeria; Fernandez, Juan; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2009-04-01

    A major hallmark of apoptosis is cell shrinkage, termed apoptotic volume decrease, due to the cellular outflow of potassium and chloride ions, followed by osmotically obliged water. In many cells, the ionic pathways triggered during the apoptotic volume decrease may be similar to that observed during a regulatory volume decrease response under hypotonic conditions. However, the pathways involved in water loss during apoptosis have been largely ignored. It was recently reported that in some systems this water movement is mediated via specific water channels (aquaporins). Nevertheless, it is important to identify whether this is a ubiquitous aspect of apoptosis as well as to define the mechanisms involved. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of aquaporin-2 during apoptosis in renal-collecting duct cells. We evaluated the putative relationship between aquaporin-2 expression and the activation of the ionic pathways involved in the regulatory volume response. Apoptosis was induced by incubating cells with a hypertonic solution or with cycloheximide in two cortical collecting duct cell lines: one not expressing aquaporins and the other stably transfected with aquaporin-2. Typical features of apoptosis were evaluated with different approaches and the water permeability was measured by fluorescence videomicroscopy. Our results show that the rate of apoptosis is significantly increased in aquaporin-2 cells and it is linked to the rapid activation of volume-regulatory potassium and chloride channels. Furthermore, the water permeability of cells expressing aquaporin-2 was strongly reduced during the apoptotic process and it occurs before DNA degradation. These results let us propose that under apoptotic stimulation aquaporin-2 would act as a sensor leading to a co-ordinated activation of specific ionic channels for potassium and chloride efflux, resulting in both more rapid cell shrinkage and more rapid achievement of adequate levels of ions necessary to

  15. Phenotype and Genotype of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Deer, Emily L.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jessica; Coursen, Jill D.; Shea, Jill E.; Ngatia, Josephat; Scaife, Courtney L.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Mulvihill, Sean J.

    2009-01-01

    The dismal prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) is due in part due to a lack of molecular information regarding disease development. Established cell lines remain a useful tool for investigating these molecular events. Here we present a review of available information on commonly used PA cell lines as a resource to help investigators select the cell lines most appropriate for their particular research needs. Information on clinical history, in vitro and in vivo growth characteristics, phenotypic characteristics, such as adhesion, invasion, migration and tumorigenesis, and genotypic status of commonly altered genes (KRAS, p53, p16, and SMAD4) was evaluated. Identification of both consensus and discrepant information in the literature suggests careful evaluation before selection of cell lines and attention be given to cell line authentication. PMID:20418756