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Sample records for pancreatic duct stent

  1. Treatment of Common Bile Duct Obstruction by Pancreatic Cancer Using Various Stents: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Hirai, Ritsuko; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Tamakoshi, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Kanamori, Masao

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of various means of stenting in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Sixty-two patients with biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent biliary stenting. On the basis of the findings obtained by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography(10 patients) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (52 patients),the site of obstruction was distal to the hilar confluence,predominantly especially in the middle to lower third of the common bile duct. Polyurethane-covered Wallstents (9 mm in diameter) we reinserted in 13 patients, while uncovered Wallstents (10 mm in diameter)were used in 10 patients and plastic stents (10 Fr and 12 Fr) were used in 39 patients. Results: Stenting was successful in 34 patients (87.2%) treated with plastic stents and in 22 patients(95.7%) treated with Wallstents. Effective biliary drainage was achieved in 32 out of 34 patients (94.1%) treated with plastic stents and in 21 out of 22 patients (95.5%) treated with Wallstents. The cumulative patency rate was significantly higher for the uncovered and covered Wallstents compared to plastic stents, but was not significantly higher for covered than for uncovered Wallstents. Stentocclusion occurred in 23 patients (70%; all by clogging) from the plastic stent group, in two patients (22%; by tumor ingrowth) from the uncovered Wallstent group, and in one patient (9%; by clogging) from the covered Wallstent group. The survival rate showed no significant difference among the three stent groups. Conclusion: The Wallstent is effective for long-term palliation in patients with obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer invading the middle to lower part of the common bile duct. The covered Wallstent can prevent tumor ingrowth, a problem with the uncovered Wallstent. However, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent the migration or clogging of covered Wallstents.

  2. Prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis by pancreatic duct stenting using a loop-tipped guidewire

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yuji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Hayashi, Masahiro; Senoo, Jun-ichi; Sasaki, Reina; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Mikata, Rintaro; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine whether it is possible to prevent the occurrence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis in patients experiencing difficulties with selective biliary duct cannulation by pancreatic duct stenting using a loop-tipped guidewire. METHODS Procedure success rate, frequency of unintended insertion of the guidewire into side branches of the pancreatic duct, and incidence of procedural accidents were examined using a loop-tipped guidewire (Group A, 20 patients), and a conventional straight-type guidewire (Group B, 20 patients). RESULTS The success rate of the procedure was 100% in both groups. Unintended insertion of the guidewire into a side branch of the pancreatic duct occurred 0.056 ± 0.23 (0-1) times in Group A and 2.3 ± 1.84 (0-5) times in Group B; thus, unintended insertion of the guidewire into a side branch of the pancreatic duct was seen significantly less frequently in Group A. There were no procedural accidents in Group A, whereas pancreatitis occurred in one Group B patient; however, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. The serum amylase level after ERCP was 257.15 ± 136.4 (88-628) IU/L in Group A, and 552.05 ± 534.57 (101-2389) IU/L in Group B, showing a significantly lower value in Group A. Hyperamylasemia was found in two patients (10%) in Group A, and nine (45%) in Group B, showing a significantly lower value in Group A. CONCLUSION The results suggest that in patients who experience difficulties with biliary cannulation, the use of a loop-tipped guidewire for pancreatic duct stenting may assist with the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and thereby to a reduction of the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis or hyperamylasemia. PMID:27574608

  3. Biliary and pancreatic stenting: Devices and insertion techniques in therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Arena, Monica; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Consolo, Pierluigi; Opocher, Enrico; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Stents are tubular devices made of plastic or metal. Endoscopic stenting is the most common treatment for obstruction of the common bile duct or of the main pancreatic duct, but also employed for the treatment of bilio-pancreatic leakages, for preventing post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis and to drain the gallbladder and pancreatic fluid collections. Recent progresses in techniques of stent insertion and metal stent design are represented by new, fully-covered lumen apposing metal stents. These stents are specifically designed for transmural drainage, with a saddle-shape design and bilateral flanges, to provide lumen-to-lumen anchoring, reducing the risk of migration and leakage. This review is an update of the technique of stent insertion and metal stent deployment, of the most recent data available on stent types and characteristics and the new applications for biliopancreatic stents. PMID:26862364

  4. Endoscopic placement of pancreatic stents and drains in the management of pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kozarek, R A; Patterson, D J; Ball, T J; Traverso, L W

    1989-01-01

    Although widely used in the biliary tree, little data is available on endoscopic placement of stents or drains within the pancreas. This report describes 17 patients, nine with acute relapsing pancreatitis and eight with chronic pancreatitis, who had drain or stent placement for hypertensive pancreatic duct (PD) sphincter, dominant ductal stenosis, duct disruption, or pseudocyst. Two patients have subsequently undergone surgery, and six other patients continue long-term stent placement with marked reduction of chronic pain or attacks of recurrent pancreatitis. All six pseudocysts resolved, although one recurred and required surgery. It is concluded that pancreatic drains or stents may obviate the need for surgery, temporize before definitive therapy, or direct a subsequent surgical procedure. Images Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 2A-C. Figs. 2A-C. Fig. 3. Figs. 4A-D. Figs. 5A and B. PMID:2923512

  5. SpyGlass Pancreatoscopy and Successful Retrieval of a Proximally Migrated Pancreatic Stent; Unusual Case and Technical Tips

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Aliraza; Ejtehadi, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic stent proximal migration is a well known complication of pancreatic duct stenting, which occurs in about 5-6% of cases. Serious complications should be avoided by retrieval of the stent via different endoscopic techniques. We report a new technique previously reported only once (in a pancreatic duct with underlying pathology), to remove the proximally migrated pancreatic stent in a normal pancreatic duct by SpyGlass Direct Visualization System (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts, USA) and SpyBite Forceps (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts, USA)

  6. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  7. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  8. Pancreatographic investigation of pancreatic duct system and pancreaticobiliary malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okamoto, Atsutake

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the anatomy of the pancreatic duct system and to investigate its embryology, we reviewed 256 pancreatograms with normal pancreatic head, 81 with pancreas divisum and 74 with pancreaticobiliary maljunction. Accessory pancreatograms were divided into two patterns. The long-type accessory pancreatic duct forms a straight line and joins the main pancreatic duct at the neck portion of the pancreas. The short-type accessory pancreatic duct joins the main pancreatic duct near its first inferior branch. The short-type accessory pancreatic duct is less likely to have a long inferior branch arising from the accessory pancreatic duct. The length of the accessory pancreatic duct from the orifice to the first long inferior branch was similar in the short- and long-type accessory pancreatic ducts. The first long inferior branch from the long-type accessory pancreatic duct passes though the main pancreatic duct near the origin of the inferior branch from the main pancreatic duct. Immunohistochemically, in the short-type accessory pancreatic duct, the main pancreatic duct between the junction with the short-type accessory pancreatic duct and the neck portion was located in the ventral pancreas. The long-type accessory pancreatic duct represents a continuation of the main duct of the dorsal pancreatic bud. The short-type accessory pancreatic duct is probably formed by the proximal main duct of the dorsal pancreatic bud and its long inferior branch. PMID:18194203

  9. Circumportal pancreas with retroportal main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Ross, Andrew S; Traverso, L William

    2009-08-01

    There have been 6 cases of circumportal pancreas reported, and 2 of them had the main pancreatic duct in a retroportal dorsal portion. This extremely uncommon anomaly is asymptomatic and therefore incidentally discovered. For the surgeon, it is important to discover this during pancreatic resection so the pancreatic duct can be closed and fistula is avoided. We describe the third case where a circumportal pancreas had its main pancreatic duct passing under the portal vein. The duct was identified and ligated. A fistula did not occur.

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic duct stones.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Burhenne, H J

    1992-01-01

    Encouraging results with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic duct stones have been reported from Europe. We present our experience with the first two North American patients, treated with excellent results in one and limited clinical improvement in the other patient at 1 year follow-up. Targeting of pancreatic duct stones was achieved with either fluoroscopy or ultrasound.

  11. Transpapillary biliary stenting is a risk factor for pancreatic stones in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Tomohiro; Murai, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Masao; Imai, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kikuyama, Masataka; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: Pancreatic stones occasionally develop in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), often worsen endocrine and exocrine functions, and occasionally cause pain attacks. However, the risks of pancreatic stones in AIP have been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors associated with pancreatic stone formation in cases of AIP. Patients and methods: In total, 50 patients with AIP (39 males, 11 females; mean age 64.0 years), followed up for at least a year, were analyzed for their demographic and clinical findings and pancreatic stone occurrence. Results: In total, 50 patients were followed up for an average of 59.7 (12 – 120) months, with steroid treatment in 44 patients (88 %); pancreatic stones occurred in 14 (28 %) patients after the diagnosis of AIP and endoscopic treatment was needed in one patient with pain attack. The pancreatic stones appeared only in patients with long follow-up period (P < 0.001, 83.9 months vs. 49.6 months), biliary stenting (odds ratio [OR]: 8.40, P = 0.010), relapse (OR: 6.20, P = 0.023), jaundice (OR: 5.40, P = 0.019), and swelling of the duodenal major papilla (OR: 4.67, P = 0.040). Biliary stenting was placed for an average of 9.9 months in 27 patients. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association only with biliary stenting (P = 0.011). The stones appeared relatively earlier in patients with stones in the main pancreatic duct or Santorini duct (22.1 months) than in patients where pancreatic stones developed elsewhere (53.4 months) (P = 0.018). Conclusions: The risk of pancreatic stone development should be taken into account when a biliary stent is placed in patients with AIP. PMID:27540582

  12. Stenting of the Cystic Duct in Benign Disease: A Definitive Treatment for the Elderly and Unwell

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, N.; Goode, S. D.; Peck, R. J. Lee, F.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThere have been few case reports describing cystic duct stent insertion in the management of acute cholecystitis secondary to benign disease with no case series published to date. We present our series demonstrating the role of cystic duct stents in managing benign gallbladder disease in those patients unfit for surgery.Materials and MethodsThirty three patients unfit for surgery in our institution underwent cystic duct stent insertion for the management of acute cholecystitis in the period June 2008 to June 2013. Patients underwent a mixture of transperitoneal and transhepatic gallbladder puncture. The cystic duct was cannulated with a hydrophilic guidewire which was subsequently passed through the common bile duct and into the duodenum. An 8Fr 12-cm double-pigtail stent was placed with the distal end lying within the duodenum and the proximal end within the gallbladder.ResultsTen patients presented with gallbladder perforation, 21 patients with acute cholecystitis, 1 with acute cholangitis and 1 with necrotising pancreatitis. The technical success rate was 91 %. We experienced a 13 % complication rate with 3 % mortality rate at 30 days.ConclusionCystic duct stent insertion can be successfully used to manage acute cholecystitis, gallbladder empyema or gallbladder perforations in those unfit for surgery and should be considered alongside external gallbladder drainage as a definitive mid-term treatment option.

  13. Percutaneous Pancreatic Stent Placement for Postoperative Pancreaticojejunostomy Stenosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seung Koo

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the pancreatico-enteric anastomosis is one of the major complications of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Endoscopic stent placement, has limited success rate as a nonsurgical treatment due to altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Percutaneous treatment is rarely attempted due to the technical difficulty in accessing the pancreatic duct. We reported a case of pancreaticojejunostomy stenosis after PD, in which a pancreatic stent was successfully placed using a rendezvous technique with a dual percutaneous approach. PMID:27587970

  14. Percutaneous Pancreatic Stent Placement for Postoperative Pancreaticojejunostomy Stenosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Koo; Yoon, Chang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the pancreatico-enteric anastomosis is one of the major complications of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Endoscopic stent placement, has limited success rate as a nonsurgical treatment due to altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Percutaneous treatment is rarely attempted due to the technical difficulty in accessing the pancreatic duct. We reported a case of pancreaticojejunostomy stenosis after PD, in which a pancreatic stent was successfully placed using a rendezvous technique with a dual percutaneous approach. PMID:27587970

  15. Endoscopic palliation for pancreatic cancer with expandable metal stents.

    PubMed

    Spitz, J D; Arregui, M E

    2000-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is generally not amenable to curative resection. Consequently, therapeutic efforts for these patients are most commonly directed at palliation of symptoms. Historically, surgery has been considered the most effective method of providing relief for biliary and/or enteric obstruction. However, less invasive methods have become available that can provide effective relief of jaundice and duodenal obstruction. Surgeons should still play an integral role in the management of these patients. We present a case report in which self-expanding metallic stents were used to relieve obstruction of the bile duct and duodenum in a patient with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  16. Combined biliary and duodenal stenting for palliation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Profili, S; Feo, C F; Meloni, G B; Strusi, G; Cossu, M L; Canalis, G C

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this case report was to evaluate the usefulness of combined biliary and duodenal stenting in the palliation of pancreatic cancer. We report a series of 4 consecutive patients (2 men and 2 women, mean age 58.5 years, range 38-77 years) who underwent combined biliary and duodenal stenting in our department between March 2000 and April 2001. All patients had cancer of the head of the pancreas causing stricture of the common bile duct and second portion of the duodenum. Biliary and duodenal stents were successfully positioned, with relief of symptoms in all cases. No early complications were observed, except for a transient increase in serum lipase and amylase in one case. Mean follow-up was 7.5 months (range 5-14 months). One patient presenting recurrence of vomiting after 4 months because of tumour overgrowth at the distal edge of the prosthesis was successfully treated by insertion of a partially overlapping second coaxial stent. Combined biliary and duodenal stenting for the palliation of pancreatic cancer was performed safely and successfully. Stents allowed effective re-canalization of the biliary tract and duodenum, relieving both jaundice and vomiting. This procedure should be considered as an alternative to palliative surgery, especially in critically ill patients.

  17. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts.

  18. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  19. Percutaneous Transcholecystic Placement of an ePTFE/FEP-Covered Stent in the Common Bile Duct

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A.

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 78-year-old male patient with obstructive jaundice due to a pancreatic head neoplasm. The patient's general condition did not permit an endoscopic approach and the presence of diffuse liver metastases prohibited hepatic puncture for percutaneous biliary drainage, therefore the transcolecystic transperitoneal approach was decided to be the safest decompression route. Through a gallbladder access, a Viabil-covered stent with a mesh extension was placed in the distal common bile duct, without complications. The patient died 8 months later without signs of stent dysfunction or necessity of reintervention. Transcholecystic transperitoneal access is a safe option when diffuse liver metastases prohibit the transhepatic approach, even in cases where placement of a covered stent is considered necessary.

  20. Pancreatic Stenting Reduces Post-ERCP Pancreatitis and Biliary Sepsis in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai-En; Li, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Ou, Wei-Lin; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an established treatment modality for bile duct disorders, but patients have a risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and biliary sepsis. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pancreatic stent for prophylaxis of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating common bile duct (CBD) disorders. Methods. Two hundred and six patients with complicating confirmed or suspected CBD disorders were randomly assigned to receive ERCP with pancreatic stenting (experimental group) or without stenting (control group). Primary outcome measure was frequency of PEP, and secondary outcome measures included operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities. Results. Baseline age, sex, CBD etiology, concomitant medical/surgical conditions, cannulation difficulty, and ERCP success were comparable between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly lower frequency of PEP (7.7% versus 17.7%, P < 0.05) and positive bile microbial culture (40.4% versus 62.7%, P < 0.05). However, the two groups were similar in operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities (all P > 0.05). Conclusions. Pancreatic stenting can reduce the occurrence of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating CBD disorders but does not increase other ERCP-associated morbidities. This trial is registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (registration identifier ChiCTR-OCH-14005134). PMID:27057161

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-Guided Pancreatic Duct Drainage: The Basics of When and How to Perform EUS-Guided Pancreatic Duct Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Waxman, Irving; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic duct drainage (EUS-PDD) remains a technically challenging procedure. Technical success rates are greater than 70%; however, the average rate of adverse events is nearly 20%, which increases to 55% when stent migration is included. Until recently, a significant difficulty with this technique was the absence of dedicated devices. Proper patient selection is of utmost importance, and EUS-PDD should be reserved for patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. Furthermore, EUS-PDD must be performed by experienced endoscopists who are familiar with the technique. The most common indications include chronic pancreatitis induced strictures and stones, disconnected pancreatic ducts, inaccessible ampulla, and post-surgical altered anatomy. This manuscript will review the accessories used, techniques employed, and published literature reporting outcomes as well as adverse events regarding EUS-PDD. PMID:27012290

  2. Evaluation of Polyurethane Nasolacrimal Duct Stents: In Vivo Studies in New Zealand Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, K.E. Grabolle, B.; Urbach, H.; Tolba, R.; Schild, H.; Paulsen, F.

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and biological effects of different polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents in an animal model. Fifteen polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents (n = 5 mushroom-type stents, n = 5 newly designed S-shaped TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating, and n = 5 S-shaped TearLeader stents with hydrophilic coating) were implanted in the nasolacrimal ducts of eight unaffected New Zealand rabbits. One nasolacrimal system served as control. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1-, 2-, and 4-week intervals, then after a 3-month interval, after which the animals were euthanized. All stents were implanted without major periprocedural complications. The stents proved to be patent by the end of the procedure. During follow-up, all mushroom-type stents were occluded at 4 weeks. None of these stents opened to forced irrigation. Clinically, all rabbits demonstrated severe dacryocystitis. Three out of five TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating were blocked at 4 weeks; one out of five was open to irrigation. Best results were observed in the stent group with hydrophilic coating. Follow-up dacryocystography demonstrated patent stents in nasolacrimal ducts of all animals after 4 weeks. In only one of five cases, the coated stent became partially occluded after 2 months. These animals were free of clinical symptoms. After 3 months, at least three out of five stents still opened to forced irrigation and only one stent was completely blocked. Dislocation of the stents was not observed. Refinement of the stent surface and stent design improves the results of nasolacrimal duct stenting in this animal model. Implantation of hydrophilic-coated S-shaped stents is highly superior to conventional mushroom-type stents and noncoated stent types. Hydrophilic coating seems to prevent foreign-body reactions, resulting in maximized stent patency.

  3. Percutaneous transhepatic hybrid biliary endoprostheses using both plastic and metallic stents for palliative treatment of malignant common bile duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Tanabe, M; Takahashi, S; Iida, E; Matsunaga, N

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate clinical safety and efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic hybrid biliary prostheses for palliative treatment in patients with common bile duct obstruction caused by advanced malignancies. A total of 13 consecutive patients was treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary endoprostheses concurrently using both plastic and metallic stents. Serum total bilirubin levels before and after stent placement were evaluated. The technical success rate, the period with no obstructive jaundice, patient survival and complications were also assessed. Median bilirubin levels decreased from 3.8 mg/dL before to 1.2 mg/dL after stent placement, and this difference was statistically significant. The median no-jaundice period after bile duct stent placement was 6.0 months (range: 2-11 months), and overall survival time was 7.0 months. Of the 13 patients, nine did not have recurrent jaundice by the time of death, whereas four (31%) had recurrent jaundice. A second intervention was performed in these four patients. A new plastic stent was placed and jaundice did not recur up to the time of death. No serious complications such as cholangitis, pancreatitis or bile duct perforation developed. Percutaneous transhepatic hybrid biliary endoprostheses using both plastic and metallic stents can be useful as non-invasive palliative treatment to relieve jaundice in patients with malignant obstructive jaundice.

  4. Duct-to-mucosa pancreatojejunostomy for small main pancreatic duct by the parachute technique after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kojun; Koyama, Isamu; Toshimitsu, Yasuko; Aikawa, Masayasu; Okada, Katsuya; Ueno, Yosuke; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    A duct-to-mucosa pancreatojejunostomy is technically difficult to perform for a small main pancreatic duct after pancreatoduodenectomy. Our group applied the parachute technique to reconstruct and attach a small pancreatic duct to the jejunal mucosa. This method makes it very easy to position stitches on the posterior row of the anastomosis. It also allows a complete view of every stitch, both inside and outside the pancreatic duct and jejunal wall. Sixteen patients underwent pancreatoduodenectomy followed by duct-to-mucosa pancreatojejunostomy by the parachute technique. Pancreatic fistulae developed in 3 of the patients, but none of the fistulae were severe. The median postoperative hospital stay was 14.5 days, and there were no postoperative deaths during that time. In conclusion, pancreatojejunostomy by the parachute technique is a simple method with a very low risk of pancreatic fistula formation and a considerably shortened postoperative hospital stay. The method is also useful for reconstruction with pancreatojejunostomy after pancreatoduodenectomy.

  5. Primary Patency of Wallstents in Malignant Bile Duct Obstruction: Single vs. Two or More Noncoaxial Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Maybody, Majid Brown, Karen T.; Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Getrajdman, George I.

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the primary patency of two or more noncoaxial self-expanding metallic Wallstents (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) and to compare this with the primary patency of a single stent in malignant bile duct obstruction. From August 2002 to August 2004, 127 patients had stents placed for malignant bile duct obstruction. Forty-five patients were treated with more than one noncoaxial self-expanding metallic stents and 82 patients had a single stent placed. Two patients in the multiple-stent group were lost to follow-up. The primary patency period was calculated from the date of stenting until the first poststenting intervention for stent occlusion, death, or the time of last documented follow-up. The patency of a single stent was significantly different from that of multiple stents (P = 0.0004). In the subset of patients with high bile duct obstruction, the patency of a single stent remained significantly different from that of multiple stents (P = 0.02). In the single-stent group, there was no difference in patency between patients with high vs. those with low bile duct obstruction (P = 0.43). The overall median patency for the multistent group and the single-stent group was 201 and 261 days, respectively. In conclusion, the patency of a single stent placed for malignant low or high bile duct obstruction is similar, and significantly longer than, that of multiple stents placed for malignant high bile duct obstruction. Given the median patency of 201 days, when indicated, percutaneous stenting of multiple bile ducts is an effective palliative measure for patients with malignant high bile duct obstruction.

  6. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  7. Accessory Pancreatic Duct Patterns and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Lokadolalu Chandracharya; Rajagopal, KV; Thomas, Huban R

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective: Accessory pancreatic duct (APD) designed to reduce the pressure of major pancreatic duct by forming a secondary drainage channel. Few studies have mentioned the variant types of accessory ducts and their mode of formation, some of these have a clear clinical significance. Present study is aimed to evaluate the possible variations in the APD and its terminations. Materials and Methods: Forty formalin fixed adult human pancreas with duodenum in situ specimens were studied by injecting 1% aqueous eosin, followed by piece meal dissection of the head of the pancreas from posterior surface. Formation, tributaries, relations, and the termination of the accessory pancreatic duct were noted and photographed. Results: Accessory ducts revealed 50% belonged to long type, 22.5% were of short and ansa pancreatica type each, and embryonic type of duct pattern was seen in 5% specimens. 75% of long type ducts showed positive patency with eosin dye, followed by ansa type (44.4%), and least patency was found in short type (22.2%). With regard to the patency of the accessory pancreatic ducts towards their termination, we found 52.5% of the accessory ducts and 5% of the embryonic type pancreatic ducts were patent and in 42.5% of the specimen the ducts were obliterated. In 85% of specimens the minor duodenal papillae was anterosuperior to the major papilla and superior to the major papillae in 10% of the cases, and in 5% minor papillae was absent. The average distance between the two papillae was 2.35 cm. Conclusion: The knowledge of the complex anatomical relations of the gland with its duct, duodenum and bile ducts are essential for the surgeons and sinologists to plan and perform both the diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures effectively. PMID:25954609

  8. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  9. Disintegration of a pancreatic duct stone with extracorporeal shock waves in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T; Holl, J; Sackmann, M; Werner, R; Wotzka, R; Paumgartner, G

    1987-09-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with chronic calcifying pancreatitis in whom an intraductal pancreatic stone with a diameter of 8 mm was successfully disintegrated with extracorporeal shock waves, permitting subsequent endoscopic extraction of the fragments. The patient had a mild attack of pancreatitis after the treatment. We conclude that shockwave lithotripsy of a pancreatic duct stone in patients with chronic pancreatitis is possible. It should, however, be viewed with reservation until further experience has been gained.

  10. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  11. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  12. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  13. Conservation of pancreatic tissue by combined gastric, biliary, and pancreatic duct drainage for pain from chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L

    1985-04-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the sclerosing process of the pancreas may constrict not only the pancreatic duct for also the bile duct and duodenum. This study analyzes the prevalence of these obstructive lesions in 58 consecutive patients with chronic pancreatitis requiring surgery for either pain (57 patients) or for painless jaundice (1 patient). There was significant biliary obstruction in 21, 4 of whom also had symptomatic duodenal obstruction. All 21 patients with biliary and duodenal obstruction were among the 38 with a dilated pancreatic duct suitable for pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure). None of the 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis had biliary or duodenal obstruction. Pseudocysts were distributed evenly between the two groups (9 of 38 patients with a dilated duct versus 4 of 20 patients with small duct pancreatitis). Pancreaticojejunostomy combined with choledochoenterostomy and gastrojejunostomy in appropriately selected patients provided good to excellent long-term (mean 3.6 years) relief of pain in 30 of 36 patients (83 percent). There was no correlation between successful relief of pain and development of pancreatic exocrine or endocrine insufficiency or calcification. Stenosis of the bile duct developed some years subsequent to pancreaticojejunostomy in four patients and required a second operation for choledochoenterostomy in three. Three other patients required secondary pancreatic resections due to failure of the pancreaticojejunostomy to relieve pain. It is often possible to effect excellent relief of symptoms with maximal conservation of remaining pancreatic functions despite sclerotic obstruction of multiple organ systems.

  14. Experimental Study of Poly-l-Lactic Acid Biodegradable Stents in Normal Canine Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kiyosei Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Furuichi, Kinya; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Morimoto, Kengo; Uchida, Hideo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to clarify the advantages of biodegradable stents in terms of mucosal reaction and biodegradation after placement. We designed a biodegradable stent and assessed stent degradation and changes in the normal bile ducts of dogs. Methods: The biodegradable stent is a balloon-expandable Z stent consisting of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) with a diameter of 6 mm and a length of 15 mm. We assessed four groups of three beagle dogs each at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of follow-up. After evaluating stent migration by radiography and stent and bile duct patency by cholangiography, the dogs were sacrificed to remove the bile duct together with the stent. The bile duct lumen was examined macroscopically and histologically, and the stent degradation was examined macroscopically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Bile duct obstruction was absent and none of the stents migrated. Macroscopic evaluation showed moderate endothelial proliferation in the bile ducts at the implant sites at 3 and 6 months and a slight change at 9 months. Slight mononuclear cell infiltration was histologically identified at all time points and epithelial hyperplasia that was moderate at 3 months was reduced to slight at 6 and 9 months. Stent degradation was macroscopically evident in all animals at 9 months and was proven by SEM in two dogs at 6 months and in all of them at 9 months. Conclusions: Our results suggest that PLLA bioabsorbable stents seems to be useful for implantation in the biliary system with further investigation.

  15. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with immunological studies.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Takeo; Uchida, Kazushige; Satoi, Sohei; Koyabu, Masanori; Fukata, Norimasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Sakaguchi, Yutaku; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fukui, Toshiro; Shimatani, Masaaki; Matsushita, Mitsunobu; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Yoshiko; Kwon, A-Hon; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2010-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with elevated serum levels of pancreatic enzymes was referred to our hospital for further examinations. Abdominal US and contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated swelling of the pancreas body and tail. MRCP and ERCP revealed abrupt ending of the MPD in the pancreas body. Under the suspicion of malignancy, distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. The histopathological findings showed idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with granulocytic epithelial lesions (GEL). As most cases of Japanese autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) are lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), the present case seems to be helpful to clarify the clinical findings of IDCP in Japan. PMID:21139294

  16. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  17. Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Treatment of Malignant Biliary Strictures due to Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Ahmed Abdel; Stumpf, Michael; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    Background Transpapillary stents are used to treat malignant biliary strictures. However, there are different stent types and data are controversial in respect to success and complications. Recently, completely covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS) have become available. The aim of this study is to present a consecutive series of CSEMS placed to decompress the bile duct in malignant stenosis due to pancreatic carcinoma and to evaluate the effectiveness, complication rate and extractability of these devices. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the courses of 27 consecutive patients who received CSEMS due to malignant biliary strictures because of pancreatic carcinoma regardless of presumed resectability between January 2010 and May 2012 in our endoscopic unit. Results A total of 27 patients (12 male and 15 female) were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 75 years. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) and stent placement were successful at first attempt in all cases. The mean length of the stenosis was 20 mm. In 24 patients (89%) a stent length of 4 cm was sufficient to bridge the stenosis. In three cases a stent length of 6 cm was necessary. Drainage was achieved as monitored by a significant decrease or normalization of bilirubin in all cases (mean bilirubin 8.5 mg/dL and 1.5 mg/dL before and after stent placement respectively), 15 patients underwent surgery with pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy. In all patients who underwent surgery stents could be removed during the operation without difficulties. Leakage of the biliodigestive anastomosis occurred in one patient (6.6%). Four (15%) of the 27 patients developed complications related to the endoscopic procedure and/or stent placement respectively (cholecystitis in two patients, stent occlusion in one patient, and post-sphincterotomy bleeding in one patient). Conclusion The prolonged patency, extractability, and low complication rate

  18. Common bile duct perforation sealed with a metal fully-covered stent.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, Jesús; Ferri-Bataller, Ramón; Gómez-Ruiz, Carmen Julia

    2016-08-01

    A common bile duct perforation due to sphincteroplasty is reported. It was managed by temporary insertion of a metal fully covered stent with good outcomes. Images from the procedure are provided. PMID:27554382

  19. Imaging of the pancreatic duct by linear endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rai, Praveer; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Arya, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    The current gold standard investigation for anatomic exploration of the pancreatic duct (PD) is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is a noninvasive method for exploration of the PD. A comprehensive evaluation of the course of PD and its branches has not been described by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). In this article, we describe the techniques of imaging of PD using linear EUS. PMID:26374577

  20. Effect of herpesvirus infection on pancreatic duct cell secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Péter; Ördög, Balázs; Jr, Zoltán Rakonczai; Takács, Tamás; Lonovics, János; Szabolcs, Annamária; Sári, Réka; Tóth, András; Papp, Julius G; Kovács, András Varró Mária K; Gray, Mike A; Argent, Barry E; Boldogköi, Zsolt

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of acute infection caused by herpesvirus (pseudorabies virus, PRV) on pancreatic ductal secretion. METHODS: The virulent Ba-DupGreen (BDG) and non-virulent Ka-RREp0lacgfp (KEG) genetically modified strains of PRV were used in this study and both of them contain the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Small intra/interlobular ducts were infected with BDG virus (107 PFU/mL for 6 h) or with KEG virus (1010 PFU/mL for 6 h), while non-infected ducts were incubated only with the culture media. The ducts were then cultured for a further 18 h. The rate of HCO3- secretion [base efflux -J(B-)] was determined from the buffering capacity of the cells and the initial rate of intracellular acidification (1) after sudden blockage of basolateral base loaders with dihydro-4,4-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid (500 mmol/L) and amiloride (200 mmol/L), and (2) after alkali loading the ducts by exposure to NH4Cl. All the experiments were performed in HCO3--buffered Ringer solution at 37°C (n = 5 ducts for each experimental condition). Viral structural proteins were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Virally-encoded GFP and immunofluorescence signals were recorded by a confocal laser scanning microscope. RESULTS: The BDG virus infected the majority of accessible cells of the duct as judged by the appearance of GFP and viral antigens in the ductal cells. KEG virus caused a similarly high efficiency of infection. After blockage of basolateral base loaders, BDG infection significantly elevated -J(B-) 24 h after the infection, compared to the non-infected group. However, KEG infection did not modify -J(B-). After alkali loading the ducts, -J(B-) was significantly elevated in the BDG group compared to the control group 24 h after the infection. As we found with the inhibitor stop method, no change was observed in the group KEG compared to the non-infected group. CONCLUSION: Incubation with the BDG or KEG strains of PRV results in an effective

  1. Association of pancreatitis and variant ductal anatomy: dominant drainage of the duct of Santorini.

    PubMed

    Heiss, F W; Shea, J A

    1978-08-01

    Four patients with acute relapsing pancreatitis were found to have drainage of the main pancreatic duct through the duct of Santorini and accessory papilla by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. No other cause of pancreatitis was identified. These cases and the possible significance of this association are discussed.

  2. Accessory Pancreatic Duct-Portal Vein Fistula: A Rare Complication of Chronic Pancreatitis during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Lin, Jung-Chun; Kawashima, Yohei; Maruno, Atsuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis, hemorrhage and perforation are the most frequent complications associated with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We report a rare case of accessory pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula, which occurred during ERCP in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of accessory pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula created during ERCP by the use of a guide wire. PMID:25473386

  3. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-10-07

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36,923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum.

  4. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36 923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum. PMID:25293684

  5. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  6. Spontaneously removed biliary stent drainage versus T-tube drainage after laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yakun; Dong, Chengyong; Ma, Kexin; Long, Fei; Jiang, Keqiu; Shao, Ping; Liang, Rui; Wang, Liming

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) as a minimally invasive treatment options for choledocholithiasis. Use of T-tube or biliary stent drainage tube placement after laparoscopic choledochotomy for common bile duct (CBD) stones is still under debate. This study tried to confirm the safety of spontaneously removable biliary stent in the distal CBD after LCBDE to allow choledochus primary closure. A total of 47 patients with choledocholithiasis underwent LCBDE with primary closure and internal drainage using a spontaneously removable biliary stent drainage tube (stent group, N = 22) or T-tube (T-tube group, N = 25). Operative parameters and outcomes are compared. Surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospital stay, drainage tube removal time, postoperative intestinal function recovery, and cost of treatment were all significantly lower in the stent group as compared to that in the T-tube group (P < 0.05 for all). Otherwise, Bile leakage between the two groups had no significant difference (P > 0.05). The biliary stent drainage tube was excreted spontaneously 4 to 14 days after surgery with the exception of one case, where endoscopic removal of biliary tube was required due to failure of its spontaneous discharge. LCBDE with primary closure and use of spontaneously removable biliary stent drainage showed advantage over the use of traditional T-tube drainage in patients with choledocholithiasis.

  7. Incidental finding of elongated ventral duct in a case of pancreatic divisum mimicking double pancreatic ducts on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography—a rare normal variant

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Y. Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic variations and developmental anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are often noticed as an incidental finding on imaging. However, knowledge of these variants may prove to be crucial during surgery as it may prevent unintentional ductal injury. We report a case of pancreatic divisum with codominant ventral duct mimicking double pancreatic ducts along with the elongated uncinate process of pancreas. It was picked incidentally on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) done to rule out cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis. It is a rare anatomic variant and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported so far. PMID:26682149

  8. Temporary Trans-jejunal Hepatic Duct Stenting in Roux-en-y Hepaticojejunostomy for Reconstruction of Iatrogenic Bile Duct Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh Fazeli, Mohammad; Kazemeini, Ali Reza; Jafarian, Ali; Bashashati, Mohammad; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Bile Duct Injuries (BDI) during cholecystectomy are now being recognized as major health problems. Objectives Herein, we present our experience with handling major BDIs and report long-term outcome of hepaticojejunostomies followed by trans-jejunal hepatic duct stenting performed to reconstruct extra-hepatic biliary tracts. Materials and Methods In this case series, we prospectively collected data of 22 patients, who underwent first time biliary reconstruction through Roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy followed by hepatic duct stenting using a trans-jejunal bifurcated 6F tube drain. The long-term outcome was assessed and defined as excellent (asymptomatic, normal liver enzymes and bilirubin levels), good (asymptomatic, mild abnormality in liver enzyme and bilirubin levels), poor (symptomatic, abnormal liver enzymes and bilirubin level) and failure (requiring reoperation). Results A total of 22 patients including four males (18.1%) and 18 females (81.8%) were evaluated. The mean age was 42.71 (range: 23 - 74) years. Twelve patients had undergone open cholecystectomy (54.5%) and the rest had a history of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The mean interval between the primary operation and reconstruction was 92.71 days. The mean follow-up period after biliary reconstruction was 42.33 (range: 1 - 96) months. No instance of anastomotic leakage or stenosis, biliary sepsis, thromboembolic event, or respiratory infection was noted in the long-term follow-up. The outcome was excellent in all patients. No case with poor or failure of result was noticed. Conclusions Although a devastating complication iatrogenic major bile duct injuries can be corrected surgically with a high rate of success. Temporary trans-jejunal stenting of the hepatic ducts can help in maintaining the integrity of anastomosis without stenosis or biliary sepsis. PMID:27626003

  9. Risk Factors for Post-Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Pancreatitis and Stent Dysfunction after Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Patients with Malignant Biliary Stricture.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ito, Kei; Koshida, Shinsuke; Kanno, Yoshihide; Ogawa, Takahisa; Masu, Kaori; Iwashita, Yuji; Horaguchi, Jun; Kobayashi, Go; Noda, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the risk factors for post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) and stent dysfunction after performing preoperative biliary drainage (BD) in patients with malignant biliary stricture. Methods Between January 2003 and February 2013, 105 consecutive patients who had undergone transpapillary BD before surgery were enrolled in this study. Procedure-related complications, stent dysfunction rates, and their respective risk factors were investigated. PEP was defined according to the consensus guidelines. Results Fifty-five patients had bile duct cancer, 31 had pancreatic cancer, 16 had ampullary cancer, and 3 had gallbladder cancer. Endoscopic biliary stenting (EBS) and nasobiliary drainage (NBD) were performed in 84 patients and 21 patients, respectively. PEP occurred in 10% of the patients, with a significantly higher frequency in those with hilar/upper bile duct stricture (p=0.026) and a normal bilirubin level at admission (p=0.016). Of the 84 patients who underwent initial EBS, stent dysfunction occurred in 13%. The mean number of days from EBS to stent dysfunction was 14±12 days. A multivariate analysis revealed a male gender (p=0.048), a stent diameter ≤8 Fr (p=0.036), and an ERCP procedure time ≥45 minutes (p=0.021) to be risk factors for stent dysfunction. No NBD tube dysfunction was observed. Conclusion Patients with upper/hilar bile duct stricture or a normal bilirubin level are at high risk of developing PEP after preoperative BD. NBD or EBS with a large-bore stent is therefore recommended as preoperative BD. PMID:27629944

  10. Surgical management of Stenson’s duct injury by using double J stent urethral catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aloosi, Suha N.; Khoshnaw, Najmaddin; Ali, Shakhawan M.; Muhammad, Belal A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Parotid duct or gland injury can be caused by assault with a knife, bottle, electrical-saw, road traffic accident, or rarely gunshot and fractures of the facial skeleton. The injury can be in the form of laceration, ductal exposure, total cutting, or crushing of the duct. These conditions are difficult to diagnose because of complex anatomy and variable forms of the injury. A successful management of parotid duct injuries depends on early diagnosis and appropriate intervention; improper surgery may lead to complications such as sialocele or salivary fistula Case report A 27-years-old man was presented to the maxillofacial unit, complaining of bleeding over the right side of his face after accidental exposure to a chain-saw three hours before admission. On examination, a 6 cm deep lacerated wound was found over the right buccal area, suspecting facial nerve-buccal branch and parotid duct injury. Under general anesthesia the parotid duct injury diagnosed, microsurgical anastomosis of the cut-ends of the parotid duct performed using the double J catheter. Sutures and JJ stent removed seven and twenty postoperative days respectively. After a proper supportive treatment a complete healing of the duct was obtained with normal amount of saliva. Conclusions Herein, we described an easy yet efficient technique in management of parotid duct injury using a JJ stent which is often used for urethra. We think that use of JJ stent is a valuable technique to be used in the diagnosis and surgical repair of the parotid duct during traumatic facial and/or parotid injuries. PMID:26555062

  11. Treatment of pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum by dorsal duct sphincterotomy alone.

    PubMed

    Keith, R G; Shapero, T F; Saibil, F G

    1982-11-01

    Of 480 patients seen with pancreatitis at the Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, in the past 5 years, 5 had pancreas divisum, demonstrated by pancreatography. Clinical presentations included recurrent acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis and recurrent subcutaneous fat necrosis with steatorrhea. Pancreatography demonstrated dorsal pancreatic drainage through the duct of Santorini in all cases. The luminal diameter at the orifice of the duct of Santorini, assessed at operation, was inadequate to provide normal drainage from the gland. Sphincterotomy of the duct of Santorini alone, without surgery to the duct of Wirsung or sphincter of Oddi, was performed in four patients. This relieved the pain of chronic pancreatitis, eliminated recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis and curtailed recurrence of subcutaneous fat necrosis and steatorrhea during follow-up periods of 51, 27, 17 and 28 months respectively. One patient who refused operation continued to have recurrent pancreatitis 41 months after diagnosis.

  12. The role of the accessory pancreatic duct of Santorini in pancreatic drainage in children (with emphasis on choledochal cyst patients).

    PubMed

    Perisic, V N; Mihailovic, T; Tomomasa, T; Milovanovic, D; Kuroume, T

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic drainage patterns have been studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in four children with choledochal cyst (CC). The first two had mild or chemical pancreatitis; the third had a history of recurrent cholangitis and was diagnosed as chronic pancreatitis. The fourth manifested with severe, acute pancreatitis. All children were found to have an impaired flow through the papilla of Vater. In the first three cases, the duct of Santorini (DS) seemed to play an important role in the pancreatic drainage. In the fourth case, however, the duct was found to be absent. ERCP findings in additional eleven children without CC also were reviewed, and in this group the DS did not seem to play any significant role in pancreatic drainage. These results indicate that in children with common bile duct (CBD) anomalies, the DS may relieve the obstruction and ameliorate the pancreatitis.

  13. Zebrafish sox9b is crucial for hepatopancreatic duct development and pancreatic endocrine cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Manfroid, Isabelle; Ghaye, Aurelie; Naye, François; Detry, Nathalie; Palm, Sarah; Pan, Luyuan; Ma, Taylur P.; Huang, Wei; Rovira, Meritxell; Martial, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael J.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Voz, Marianne L.; Peers, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Recent zebrafish studies have shown that the late appearing pancreatic endocrine cells derive from pancreatic ducts but the regulatory factors involved are still largely unknown. Here, we show that the zebrafish sox9b gene is expressed in pancreatic ducts where it labels the pancreatic Notch-responsive cells previously shown to be progenitors. Inactivation of sox9b disturbs duct formation and impairs regeneration of beta cells from these ducts in larvae. sox9b expression in the midtrunk endoderm appears at the junction of the hepatic and ventral pancreatic buds and, by the end of embryogenesis, labels the hepatopancreatic ductal system as well as the intrapancreatic and intrahepatic ducts. Ductal morphogenesis and differentiation are specifically disrupted in sox9b mutants, with the dysmorphic hepatopancreatic ducts containing misdifferentiated hepatocyte-like and pancreatic-like cells. We also show that maintenance of sox9b expression in the extrapancreatic and intrapancreatic ducts requires FGF and Notch activity, respectively, both pathways known to prevent excessive endocrine differentiation in these ducts. Furthermore, beta cell recovery after specific ablation is severely compromised in sox9b mutant larvae. Our data position sox9b as a key player in the generation of secondary endocrine cells deriving from pancreatic ducts in zebrafish. PMID:22537488

  14. Metallic stent in the endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Tozlu, M.; Kocaman, O.; Baysal, B.; Ince, A.; Danalioglu, A.; Kayar, Y.; Senturk, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: The endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) has become the preferred first-line approach. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) were considered as an alternative to multiple double pigtail stents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the endosonography guided drainage (EUS-GD) of PFCs with FCEMS. Materials and Methods: A total of 33 consecutive patients were included. Cystogastrostomy and cystoduodenostomy were created with a linear echoendoscope under endosonographic and fluoroscopic control. Procedures were performed in a standard way of, puncture with a 19 gauge needle, bougie dilation and insertion of FCSEMS. Results: A total of 33 patients (mean age 52 years, 21 men, range: 18-77 years), were included. PFCs were 22 non-infected symptomatic pseudocyst and 11 walled-off necrosis or abscess. EUS-GD was successful in 30 (90.9%) patients. Stent insertion failed in one patient. Two patients needed surgery. Complications were observed in 8 (25%) patients (stent dislocation in 3, perforation in 2, bleeding in 2 and pneumoperitoneum in 1 patient). Procedure related mortality was not seen. The mean cyst size was 11.3 cm (5-22). FCSEMS were successful in the treatment of pseudocysts (after 1 month mean cyst size is 6.2 cm, range: 0-15 cm, with 54.8% decrement rate). During a mean follow-up of 15 months complete resolution was 66.6% (20 patients) and recurrence due to stent malfunction was 10%. All these cases were submitted to a new session of endoscopic drainage. Conclusions: EUS-GD, FCSEMS insertion provides an effective, minimally invasive, and safe approach in the management of PFCs. PMID:26425505

  15. Pancreatitis following bile duct sphincter of Oddi manometry: utility of the aspirating catheter.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S; Hawes, R H; Troiano, F P; Lehman, G A

    1992-01-01

    The aspirating sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) catheter was shown to reduce the frequency of post-procedure pancreatitis from 31% to 4% following a pancreatic duct evaluation. This study was designed to prospectively evaluate the utility of the aspirating manometry catheter in reducing the frequency of pancreatic enzyme elevation and clinical pancreatitis following isolated bile duct manometry. Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned to undergo bile duct SOM with the standard perfusion (infused group) catheter or the aspirating catheter (aspirated group). Overall, the frequency of both amylase and lipase level elevation at least two times the upper limits of normal was 30% at 2 hours, 25% at 6 hours, and 18% at 18 hours after the procedure and was similar for the aspirated and infused groups. No episodes of clinical pancreatitis occurred in either group. The SOM catheter was perfused with full-strength contrast in 12 consecutive patients undergoing a bile duct evaluation. Only one patient had any contrast material identified in the pancreatic duct. The results of this study support the theory that increased pancreatic duct hydrostatic pressure is the major cause for post-SOM pancreatitis and suggests that SOM evaluation of the bile duct alone appears to be safe.

  16. Simultaneous stent implantation for coarctation of the aorta and closure of patent ductus arteriosus using the Amplatzer duct occluder.

    PubMed

    Hakim, F; Hawelleh, A A; Goussous, Y; Hijazi, Z M

    1999-05-01

    We report on a 13-year-old girl with coarctation of the aorta and patent ductus arteriosus who underwent successful simultaneous stent implantation for the coarctation and catheter closure of the ductus using an Amplatzer duct occluder. PMID:10385155

  17. The Pancreatic Duct Ligated (Mini)pig as a Model for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter Colin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Kamphues, Josef; Möeler, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Modern therapy of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) using pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) has largely been very effective and has greatly helped in improving the nutritional status of patients with PEI and in increasing the life expectancy in cystic fibrosis. It is believed that the use of predictable large animal models could play an important role in assessing and developing new therapies. This article reviews the pancreatic duct ligated (adult) minipig as a chronic model of total PEI, with a detailed look at the influence of PEI and response to PERT on prececal compared to fecal digestibility, to directly investigate effects on protein and starch digestion and absorption. In addition, the piglet with PEI is reviewed as a model for PEI in young patients with the aim of further improving the therapy and nutritional status of young patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27623555

  18. The Pancreatic Duct Ligated (Mini)pig as a Model for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter Colin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Kamphues, Josef; Möeler, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Modern therapy of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) using pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) has largely been very effective and has greatly helped in improving the nutritional status of patients with PEI and in increasing the life expectancy in cystic fibrosis. It is believed that the use of predictable large animal models could play an important role in assessing and developing new therapies. This article reviews the pancreatic duct ligated (adult) minipig as a chronic model of total PEI, with a detailed look at the influence of PEI and response to PERT on prececal compared to fecal digestibility, to directly investigate effects on protein and starch digestion and absorption. In addition, the piglet with PEI is reviewed as a model for PEI in young patients with the aim of further improving the therapy and nutritional status of young patients with cystic fibrosis.

  19. Lethal post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis following fully covered metal stent placement in distal biliary obstruction due to unresectable cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Takao; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Reina; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    Biliary self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) is the preferred and first-line therapy for unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. To date, several reports have revealed the relatively high incidence of acute complications such as pancreatitis and cholecystitis due to mechanical stent compression. In the present case, we encountered fatal pancreatitis following fully covered metal stent placement. An 85-year-old man had middle bile duct strictures due to cholangiocarcinoma. A 10-mm diameter fully covered SEMS was placed across the papilla for biliary decompression. Laboratory data and physical evidence the following day revealed acute pancreatitis. Therefore, antibiotics and protein degeneration enzyme inhibitors were given. However, his condition did not improve. Two days after the procedure, we removed the stent and returned him to his original hospital. Serum amylase level decreased below 400 mg/dL 6 h after the procedure. However, the acute pancreatitis worsened. Although we treated the patient in the intensive care unit, he died 32 days after the second admission.

  20. Pancreatico-enteric fistula post pancreatic duct ligation for delayed haemorrhage complicating pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Noaman, Islam; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Khawar, Mahwish; Khalaf, Hatem; Elaffandi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic fistula remains the main cause for postoperative morbidity following pancreaticoduodenectomy. The coincidence of sentinel bleed prior to post pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) and pancreatic fistula is associated with very high mortality. Presentation of case We report a case of pancreaticoduodenectomy complicated by postoperative leak and hematemesis. Severe delayed haemorrhage from the pancreatico-jejunostomy necessitated re-laparotomy and complete disconnection of the pancreatic anastomosis. Hemodynamic instability precluded a pancreatectomy or creation of a new anastomosis. A follow up MRI done 3 weeks after the patient’s discharge demonstrated a fistulous tract causing a communication between both the pancreatic and biliary systems and the enteric loop. Discussion Spontaneous development a pancreatico-enteric fistula despite ligation of the pancreatic duct and complete disconnection of the pancreatic anastomosis has never been reported in literature to date. Conclusion Pancreatic duct occlusion may be considered over a completion pancreatectomy or revisional pancreatic anastomosis in hemodynamically unstable and challenging cases. PMID:26921533

  1. Duodenal duplication cyst communicating with an accessory pancreatic duct of Santorini.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Y; Kawarada, Y; Mizumoto, R

    1998-01-01

    A 16 year-old girl with recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding was found to have an aberrant pancreatic duct communicating with a duodenal duplication cyst and a pancreatic pseudocyst on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). A partial gastrectomy combined with resection of the aberrant pancreas was performed. The patient is doing well without any problems 17 years after surgery. ERP was of great value in diagnosing this rare disease. Gastroduodenal duplication cysts communicating with the pancreatic duct are rare; only 21 cases, including our own, have been reported in the English-language literature since 1958.

  2. Palliative treatment in "peri"-pancreatic carcinoma: stenting or surgical therapy?

    PubMed

    van Heek, N T; van Geenen, R C I; Busch, O R C; Gouma, D J

    2002-01-01

    Mostly, patients with peri-pancreatic cancer (including pancreatic, ampullary and distal bile duct tumors) are diagnosed in a stage in which curative resection is not possible. The median survival rate of patients with non resectable peri-pancreatic cancer varies between 6 and 12 months. During this period palliative treatment is necessary, which should focus on major symptoms as obstructive jaundice, duodenal obstruction and pain. Controversy exists about how to provide optimal palliative treatment. Both surgical and non surgical palliative procedures relief obstructive jaundice. From early retrospective and prospective randomized studies it is known that in the early phase after treatment, more complications are found after surgical palliation, whereas in the late phase more complications are seen after endoscopic palliation. Because more recent studies clearly showed improved results after surgical palliation, current recommendations probably should be that patients with a suspected poor short-term survival (< 6 months) should be offered non surgical palliative therapy and those with a longer life expectancy may best be treated with bypass surgery. Unfortunately, valid criteria for estimating the remaining survival time are not available, except for the presence of metastases. The use of a prognostic score chart might assist in estimating the prognosis. Literature does not give sufficient information to make a well deliberated (evidence based) selection between the different types of surgical bypasses, but a choledochojejunostomy is generally preferred. After stenting, a correlation is found between survival and the development of duodenal obstruction, and between 9% and 21% of the patients who underwent a surgical biliary bypass without a prophylactic gastric bypass, will develop gastric outlet obstruction. Therefore, in patients with a relatively good prognosis it is recommended to perform routinely a double--biliary and gastric--bypass. Pain is a frequent

  3. Patency of the Santorini duct and acute biliary pancreatitis. A prospective ERCP study.

    PubMed

    Nowak, A; Nowakowska-Dutawa, E; Rybicka, J

    1990-05-01

    Disturbance of outflow of the pancreatic juice is considered to be a pathogenic factor in the development of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). In the years 1984-1988 sixty-seven patients admitted with ABP were prospectively allocated to urgent ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy. Diagnostic criteria of acute biliary pancreatitis were as follows: epigastric pain, an elevated serum amylase concentration, biochemical prediction of gallstones, positive pattern of pancreatitis in US and CT-scan and ERCP performed within 24 h of admission. At ERCP the anatomy of the pancreatic duct was evaluated and special attention was paid to the patency of the accessory (Santorini) duct as a potential outflow route of the pancreatic juice. The control group comprised 100 consecutive patients in whom a pancreatogram was obtained during ERCP performed because of expected biliary pathology. Patency of the Santorini duct was found merely in 17% patients with ABP. In contrast, this duct was patent in 69% of the patients in the control group (p less than 0.001). The absence of this additional possibility of draining pancreatic juice might be an important pathogenic factor in acute biliary pancreatitis.

  4. Limited Role for Biliary Stent as Surrogate Fiducial Marker in Pancreatic Cancer: Stent and Intratumoral Fiducials Compared

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Lens, Eelco; Wognum, Silvia; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Because of low soft-tissue contrast of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fiducial markers are often used for radiation therapy patient setup verification. For pancreatic cancer patients, biliary stents have been suggested as surrogate fiducials. Using intratumoral fiducials as standard for tumor position, this study aims to quantify the suitability of biliary stents for measuring interfractional and respiratory-induced position variations of pancreatic tumors. Methods and Materials: Eleven pancreatic cancer patients with intratumoral fiducials and a biliary stent were included in this study. Daily CBCT scans (243 in total) were registered with a reference CT scan, based on bony anatomy, on fiducial markers, and on the biliary stent, respectively. We analyzed the differences in tumor position (ie, markers center-of-mass position) among these 3 registrations. In addition, we measured for 9 patients the magnitude of respiratory-induced motion (MM) of the markers and of the stent on 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and determined the difference between these 2 magnitudes (ΔMM). Results: The stent indicated tumor position better than bony anatomy in 67% of fractions; the absolute difference between the markers and stent registration was >5 mm in 46% of fractions and >10 mm in 20% of fractions. Large PTV margins (superior-inferior direction, >19 mm) would be needed to account for this interfractional position variability. On 4DCT, we found in superior-inferior direction a mean ΔMM of 0.5 mm (range, –2.6 to 4.2 mm). Conclusions: For respiratory-induced motion, the mean ΔMM is small, but for individual patients the absolute difference can be >4 mm. For interfractional position variations, a stent is, on average, a better surrogate fiducial than bony anatomy, but large PTV margins would still be required. Therefore, intratumoral fiducials are recommended for online setup verification for all pancreatic patients scheduled for radiation therapy, including

  5. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    GIMÉNEZ, Mariano E.; PALERMO, Mariano; HOUGHTON, Eduardo; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo; FINGER, Caetano; VERDE, Juan M.; CÚNEO, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. Aim: To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. Methods: In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. Results: In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusion: The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:27438039

  6. Partial pancreatic head resection for intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of santorini.

    PubMed

    Nakagohri, T; Konishi, M; Inoue, K; Izuishi, K; Kinoshita, T

    2002-01-01

    We report partial pancreatic head resection of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of Santorini. The tumor was located in the ventral part of pancreatic head at a distance from the Wirsung duct. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography accurately showed the communication between the duct of Santorini and the cystic tumor, and was useful for determining the part of the pancreas to be resected. Both the duct of Wirsung and the duct of Santorini were preserved. Partial pancreatic head resection would play an important role in surgical management of low-grade malignant neoplasm.

  7. A Novel Model of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis: Murine Pancreatic Duct Ligation Results in Systemic Inflammation and Substantial Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Isaac; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K.; Twait, Erik; Williard, Deborah E.; Kempuraj, Duraisamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Suitable experimental models of gallstone pancreatitis with systemic inflammation and mortality are limited. We developed a novel murine model of duct-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis associated with multiorgan dysfunction and severe mortality. Methods Laparotomy was done on C57/BL6 mice followed by pancreatic duct (PD) ligation, bile duct (BD) ligation without PD ligation, or sham operation. Results Only mice with PD ligation developed acute pancreatitis and had 100% mortality. Pulmonary compliance was significantly reduced after PD ligation but not BD ligation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil count and interleukin-1β concentration, and the plasma creatinine level, were significantly elevated with PD ligation but not BD ligation. Pancreatic nuclear factor κB (p65) and activator protein 1 (c-Jun) were activated within 1 h of PD ligation. Conclusion PD-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice is associated with systemic inflammation, acute lung injury, multiorgan dysfunction and death. The development of this novel model is an exciting and notable advance in the field. PMID:20975317

  8. Intraislet Pancreatic Ducts Can Give Rise to Insulin-Positive Cells.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Yousef; Wiersch, John; Tulachan, Sidhartha; Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Rymer, Christopher; Fischbach, Shane; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Gaffar, Iljana; Song, Zewen; Galambos, Csaba; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2016-01-01

    A key question in diabetes research is whether new β-cells can be derived from endogenous, nonendocrine cells. The potential for pancreatic ductal cells to convert into β-cells is a highly debated issue. To date, it remains unclear what anatomical process would result in duct-derived cells coming to exist within preexisting islets. We used a whole-mount technique to directly visualize the pancreatic ductal network in young wild-type mice, young humans, and wild-type and transgenic mice after partial pancreatectomy. Pancreatic ductal networks, originating from the main ductal tree, were found to reside deep within islets in young mice and humans but not in mature mice or humans. These networks were also not present in normal adult mice after partial pancreatectomy, but TGF-β receptor mutant mice demonstrated formation of these intraislet duct structures after partial pancreatectomy. Genetic and viral lineage tracings were used to determine whether endocrine cells were derived from pancreatic ducts. Lineage tracing confirmed that pancreatic ductal cells can typically convert into new β-cells in normal young developing mice as well as in adult TGF-β signaling mutant mice after partial pancreatectomy. Here the direct visual evidence of ducts growing into islets, along with lineage tracing, not only represents strong evidence for duct cells giving rise to β-cells in the postnatal pancreas but also importantly implicates TGF-β signaling in this process. PMID:26505114

  9. Pancreatitis-Induced Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis Treated by Percutaneous Transhepatic Stent Placement: a Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, G. Vaninbroukx, J.; Verslype, C.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Hootegem, P. van; Nevens, F.

    2003-08-15

    One month after onset of an acute biliary pancreatitis, a 75-year-old man developed refractory ascites. Duplex ultrasound and CT scan revealed a focal stenosis of the extrahepatic portal vein as confirmed by transhepatic direct portography. In the same session, this stenosis, responsible for symptomatic prehepaticportal hypertension, was successfully dilated and stented and afterwards a residual pressure gradient of 1 mmHg over the stented segment was measured. One week after the stenting procedure the patient was free of ascites and control physical and biochemical examination one year later is completely normal.

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of AXIOS stent for drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) have conventionally been treated with surgery, percutaneous drainage, or with the more recently established endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage modality. Currently, endoscopic plastic or metallic stents are used for PFC drainage. Plastic stents present issues with stent migration and premature occlusion requiring frequent stent exchanges or placement of additional stents. Metallic stents are tubular and may migrate, resulting in inefficient drainage, content leakage, retrieval and replacement, and possible mucosal injury. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed AXIOS stent, a lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS)for PFC drainage. A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 298 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Overall, a 97% technical success rate and a 96% clinical success rate have been reported. Early and late complications related to the placement or removal of LASEMS have been reported, however few cases have presented life-threatening results. EUS-guided PFC drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065729

  11. Superior Mesenteric Artery Stent-graft Placement in a Patient with Pseudoaneurysm Developing from a Pancreatic Pseudocyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, H.; Banno, T.; Sato, Y.; Hara, M.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2004-01-15

    Pseudoaneurysm is a relatively rare but serious complication of pancreatitis which is often fatal. We report successful stent-graft placement in the superior mesenteric artery in a 45-year-old man with a pancreatic pseudocyst that grew during therapy for chronic pancreatitis and developed into a pseudoaneurysm. After a stent graft was inserted in the superior mesenteric artery, the pseudoaneurysm disappeared and no further complications developed. Stent-graft placement was considered to be a useful therapy for pseudoaneurysms in the superior mesenteric arterial region.

  12. SLC26 anion exchangers of guinea pig pancreatic duct: molecular cloning and functional characterization

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Andrew K.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Vandorpe, David H.; Reimold, Fabian; Heneghan, John F.; Nakakuki, M.; Akhavein, Arash; Ko, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The secretin-stimulated human pancreatic duct secretes HCO3−-rich fluid essential for normal digestion. Optimal stimulation of pancreatic HCO3− secretion likely requires coupled activities of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) anion channel and apical SLC26 Cl−/HCO3− exchangers. However, whereas stimulated human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts secrete ∼140 mM HCO3− or more, mouse and rat ducts secrete ∼40–70 mM HCO3−. Moreover, the axial distribution and physiological roles of SLC26 anion exchangers in pancreatic duct secretory processes remain controversial and may vary among mammalian species. Thus the property of high HCO3− secretion shared by human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts prompted us to clone from guinea pig pancreatic duct cDNAs encoding Slc26a3, Slc26a6, and Slc26a11 polypeptides. We then functionally characterized these anion transporters in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In Xenopus oocytes, gpSlc26a3 mediated only Cl−/Cl− exchange and electroneutral Cl−/HCO3− exchange. gpSlc26a6 in Xenopus oocytes mediated Cl−/Cl− exchange and bidirectional exchange of Cl− for oxalate and sulfate, but Cl−/HCO3− exchange was detected only in HEK 293 cells. gpSlc26a11 in Xenopus oocytes exhibited pH-dependent Cl−, oxalate, and sulfate transport but no detectable Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The three gpSlc26 anion transporters exhibited distinct pharmacological profiles of 36Cl− influx, including partial sensitivity to CFTR inhibitors Inh-172 and GlyH101, but only Slc26a11 was inhibited by PPQ-102. This first molecular and functional assessment of recombinant SLC26 anion transporters from guinea pig pancreatic duct enhances our understanding of pancreatic HCO3− secretion in species that share a high HCO3− secretory output. PMID:21593449

  13. Idiopathic perforation of acalculous gallbladder after insertion of a transpapillary pancreatic stent

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Tomoko; Irisawa, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Hiroto; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tomoda, Hiroyuki; Saito, Ryo; Kinuta, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography (ERCP) is associated with many types of adverse events (AEs) but idiopathic perforation of the gallbladder (IPGB) is very rare. Pancreatobiliary reflux is one of the factors involved with occurrence of IPGB 1. Here we present a case of acalculous gallbladder perforation as an AE following the insertion of an indwelling endoscopic nasal pancreatic drainage (ENPD) tube (a pancreatic stent) to obtain pancreatic fluid. In this case, acute pancreatobiliary reflux might have been caused by the insertion of the ENPD-tube. PMID:27540570

  14. Percutaneous Palliation of Pancreatic Head Cancer: Randomized Comparison of ePTFE/FEP-Covered Versus Uncovered Nitinol Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Mouzas, Ioannis; Bezzi, Mario; Kouroumalis, Elias; Pasariello, Roberto; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated-ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered stents with that of uncovered nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer. Eighty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study. Bare nitinol stents were used in half of the patients, and ePTFE/FEP-covered stents were used in the remaining patients. Patency, survival, complications, and mean cost were calculated in both groups. Mean patency was 166.0 {+-} 13.11 days for the bare-stent group and 234.0 {+-} 20.87 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.007). Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 77.5, 69.8, and 69.8% for the bare-stent group and 97.5, 92.2, and 87.6% for the covered-stent group, respectively. Mean secondary patency was 123.7 {+-} 22.5 days for the bare-stent group and 130.3 {+-} 21.4 days for the covered-stent group. Tumour ingrowth occurred exclusively in the bare-stent group in 27.5% of cases (p = 0.002). Median survival was 203.2 {+-} 11.8 days for the bare-stent group and 247.0 {+-} 20 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.06). Complications and mean cost were similar in both groups. Regarding primary patency and ingrowth rate, ePTFE/FEP-covered stents have shown to be significantly superior to bare nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer and pose comparable cost and complications. Use of a covered stent does not significantly influence overall survival rate; nevertheless, the covered endoprosthesis seems to offer result in fewer reinterventions and better quality of patient life.

  15. Cholecystokinin acts as an essential factor in the exacerbation of pancreatic bile duct ligation-induced rat pancreatitis model under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, K; Washizuka, M; Segawa, Y

    2000-09-01

    We examined the influence of 2 gut hormones involved in the enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion, secretin and cholecystokinin (CCK), in the exacerbation of pancreatitis. We also examined the role of the vagal system, which was considered to be a transmission route for these hormones. Our model of pancreatitis in the rat was prepared by pancreatic bile duct ligation (PBDL), which simultaneously ligated the pancreatic duct and the common bile duct. Serum amylase activity and histopathological changes in the pancreas were used as indices of pancreatitis. We also measured the volume of pancreatic juice, as well as the amylase activity and protein level of the pancreatic juice, as indices of increased pancreatic exocrine secretion. Two gut hormones were given 6 times at 1-h intervals. Administration of secretin (1-3 microg/kg, s.c.) did not influence serum amylase activity in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. However, food stimulation and administration of CCK-8 (1 microg/kg, s.c.) increased serum amylase activity and promoted vacuolation of the pancreatic acinar cells in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. Administration of atropine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) or a CCK1-receptor antagonist, Z-203 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.), inhibited food-stimulated or CCK-8-induced (1 microg/kg, s.c.) enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion and exacerbation after the development of PBDL-induced pancreatitis. These results suggest that not secretin, which regulates the volume of pancreatic juice, but CCK, which regulates the secretion of pancreatic enzymes via the vagal system, plays an essential role in food-stimulated exacerbation after the development of pancreatitis.

  16. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary and pancreatic duct interventions

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    When endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography fails to decompress the pancreatic or biliary system, alternative interventions are required. In this situation, endosonography guided cholangio-pancreatography (ESCP), percutaneous radiological therapy or surgery can be considered. Small case series reporting the initial experience with ESCP have been superseded by comprehensive reports of large cohorts. Although these reports are predominantly retrospective, they demonstrate that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided biliary and pancreatic interventions are associated with high levels of technical and clinical success. The procedural complication rates are lower than those seen with percutaneous therapy or surgery. This article describes and discusses data published in the last five years relating to EUS-guided biliary and pancreatic intervention. PMID:25400865

  18. EUS correlates of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome in walled-off necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Ji Young; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Hasan, Muhammad K.; Hawes, Robert H.; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Although the diagnostic features of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic/endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (MRCP/ERCP) have been established, no such characterization exists for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). This study describes the imaging features of EUS that accurately define DPDS. Patients and methods: This is a prospective study comprising 21 of 42 patients who underwent EUS-guided drainage of walled-off necrosis (WON) over an 18-month period. Findings on EUS were correlated with CT and pancreatography or surgical pathology when available. DPDS by EUS was defined by the presence of a well-defined fluid collection along the course of the main pancreatic duct with the upstream pancreatic parenchyma and duct terminating into the fluid collection. The main outcome measure was to assess the accuracy of EUS in diagnosing DPDS by correlation with CT and pancreatography or surgical pathology. Results: Twenty-one patients with WON (median age 55 years; 15 males) constituted the study cohort. Median duration of pancreatitis was 12 weeks (range 5 – 20) and median WON size was 120 mm (range 40 mm to 200 mm). At EUS, the upstream pancreatic parenchyma and duct were found to terminate within the WON in all 21 patients in whom DPDS was subsequently confirmed by follow-up CT in all patients, by ERCP in 17, EUS-pancreatogram in 3 and surgical pathology in 1. There was 100 % correlation between EUS characterization of DPDS with CT and pancreatography or surgical pathology. Conclusions: We report EUS findings indicating the presence of DPDS. These findings may have significant clinical implications for the management of patients with WON. PMID:27540578

  19. Retrospective evaluation of endoscopic stenting of combined malignant common bile duct and gastric outlet-duodenum obstructions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianfeng; Hao, Jianyu; Wu, Dongfang; Lang, Haibo

    2014-10-01

    Malignant dual obstruction in the common bile duct and gastric outlet-duodenum can cause difficulties in palliative treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize our successful experience with the endoscopic stenting procedure for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary and gastric outlet-duodenum obstruction. Seventeen patients who underwent dual stenting procedures for the common bile duct and duodenum were retrospectively reviewed. The success rate of placement, palliative effect for biliary and duodenal obstruction, incidence of complication and restricture and stent patency were analyzed. Stent placement achieved a 100% success rate. Total bilirubin decreased from 263.4±62.5 to 157.6±25.1 μmol/l, direct bilirubin decreased from 233.2±66.5 to 130.9±27.7 μmol/l and alkaline phosphatase from 534.2±78.7 to 216.3±23.3 IU/l. The differences between the preoperative and postoperative results were statistically significant (P<0.01). The gastric outlet obstruction score increased significantly from 0.9±1.1 to 2.1±0.7 points (P<0.01). The general nutritional status of the patients was improved. No serious complications occurred in any of the patients, and the survival time of patients following stenting ranged between 70 and 332 days with a mean survival time of 192 days. In conclusion, our methodology for combined biliary and enteral stenting is highly effective for the palliation of malignant biliary and gastric outlet-duodenal obstruction.

  20. Basolateral anion transport mechanisms underlying fluid secretion by mouse, rat and guinea-pig pancreatic ducts

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salazar, M Paz; Pascua, Patricia; Calvo, José Julián; López, María A; Case, R Maynard; Steward, Martin C; San Román, José I

    2004-01-01

    Fluid secretion by interlobular pancreatic ducts was determined by using video microscopy to measure the rate of swelling of isolated duct segments that had sealed following overnight culture. The aim was to compare the HCO3− requirement for secretin-evoked secretion in mouse, rat and guinea-pig pancreas. In mouse and rat ducts, fluid secretion could be evoked by 10 nm secretin and 5 μm forskolin in the absence of extracellular HCO3−. In guinea-pig ducts, however, fluid secretion was totally dependent on HCO3−. Forskolin-stimulated fluid secretion by mouse and rat ducts in the absence of HCO3− was dependent on extracellular Cl− and was completely inhibited by bumetanide (30 μm). It was therefore probably mediated by a basolateral Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter. In the presence of HCO3−, forskolin-stimulated fluid secretion was reduced ∼40% by bumetanide, ∼50% by inhibitors of basolateral HCO3− uptake (3 μm EIPA and 500 μm H2DIDS), and was totally abolished by simultaneous application of all three inhibitors. We conclude that the driving force for secretin-evoked fluid secretion by mouse and rat ducts is provided by parallel basolateral mechanisms: Na+–H+ exchange and Na+–HCO3− cotransport mediating HCO3− uptake, and Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransport mediating Cl− uptake. The absence or inactivity of the Cl− uptake pathway in the guinea-pig pancreatic ducts may help to account for the much higher concentrations of HCO3− secreted in this species. PMID:14978209

  1. Bleeding Risk of Stent Removal After EUS-Guided Cystgastrostomy and Metal Stent Placement for Drainage of a Pancreatic Fluid Collection.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Farid; Samarasena, Jason; Lee, John G

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopists are keenly aware of bleeding risks during and immediately after cystgastrostomy and reduce this risk by endoscopic ultrasound guidance to avoid manipulation near major vessels. Bleeding risk associated with cystgastrostomy stent removal after resolution of a pancreatic fluid collection, however, is less evident. We present our experience with bleeding during cystgastrostomy stent removal in a patient with resolved walled-off necrosis and will discuss the significance of unexplained spontaneous upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this setting, which may serve as a warning sign for possible stent erosion into major vessels. PMID:27622199

  2. Bleeding Risk of Stent Removal After EUS-Guided Cystgastrostomy and Metal Stent Placement for Drainage of a Pancreatic Fluid Collection

    PubMed Central

    Samarasena, Jason; Lee, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopists are keenly aware of bleeding risks during and immediately after cystgastrostomy and reduce this risk by endoscopic ultrasound guidance to avoid manipulation near major vessels. Bleeding risk associated with cystgastrostomy stent removal after resolution of a pancreatic fluid collection, however, is less evident. We present our experience with bleeding during cystgastrostomy stent removal in a patient with resolved walled-off necrosis and will discuss the significance of unexplained spontaneous upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this setting, which may serve as a warning sign for possible stent erosion into major vessels. PMID:27622199

  3. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic and large common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-10-21

    Extraction of large pancreatic and common bile duct (CBD) calculi has always challenged the therapeutic endoscopist. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is an excellent tool for patients with large pancreatic and CBD calculi that are not amenable to routine endotherapy. Pancreatic calculi in the head and body are targeted by ESWL, with an aim to fragment them to < 3 mm diameter so that they can be extracted by subsequent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In our experience, complete clearance of the pancreatic duct was achieved in 76% and partial clearance in 17% of 1006 patients. Short-term pain relief with reduction in the number of analgesics ingested was seen in 84% of these patients. For large CBD calculi, a nasobiliary tube is placed to help target the calculi, as well as bathe the calculi in saline - a simple maneuver which helps to facilitate fragmentation. The aim is to fragment calculi to < 5 mm size and clear the same during ERCP. Complete clearance of the CBD was achieved in 84.4% of and partial clearance in 12.3% of 283 patients. More than 90% of the patients with pancreatic and biliary calculi needed three or fewer sessions of ESWL with 5000 shocks being delivered at each session. The use of epidural anesthesia helped in reducing patient movement. This, together with the better focus achieved with newer third-generation lithotripters, prevents collateral tissue damage and minimizes the complications. Complications in our experience with nearly 1300 patients were minimal, and no extension of hospital stay was required. Similar rates of clearance of pancreatic and biliary calculi with minimal adverse effects have been reported from the centers where ESWL is performed regularly. In view of its high efficiency, non-invasive nature and low complication rates, ESWL can be offered as the first-line therapy for selected patients with large pancreatic and CBD calculi.

  4. Extracorporeal piezoelectric shockwave lithotripsy of multiple pancreatic duct stones under ultrasonographic control.

    PubMed

    Kerzel, W; Ell, C; Schneider, T; Matek, W; Heyder, N; Hahn, E G

    1989-09-01

    The first ultrasonographically controlled fragmentation of multiple pancreatic duct stones of up to 14 mm size by means of extracorporeal, piezoelectric shockwave lithotripsy is reported. On account of the ultrasound localization and continuous control during therapy a nasopancreatic tube for instillation of contrast medium and frequent x-ray checks were not necessary. The 48-year-old patient did not experience any pain during the four treatment sessions and during the follow-up period. No complications were noted.

  5. Pancreatic pseudocyst with hemorrhage into the gastrointestinal tract through the duct of Santorini.

    PubMed

    Brayko, C M; Kozarek, R A; Sanowski, R A; Chinichian, A

    1985-08-01

    Hemorrhage into a pancreatic pseudocyst frequently goes unrecognized. This catastrophic event can be heralded by intermittent bleeding, or may present as massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A high index of suspicion, proper diagnostic workup, and prompt surgical management afford the patient the best chance for survival. We report a patient with massive pseudocyst bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract via the duct of Santorini and discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  6. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Menter, David G.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G. . E-mail: sa08366@wotan.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells.

  7. Can pancreatic duct-derived progenitors be a source of islet regeneration?

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Bing; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Yi, Ran; Yang, Baofeng

    2009-06-12

    The regenerative process of the pancreas is of interest because the main pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is an inadequate number of insulin-producing {beta}-cells. The functional mass of {beta}-cells is decreased in type 1 diabetes, so replacing missing {beta}-cells or triggering their regeneration may allow for improved type 1 diabetes treatment. Therefore, expansion of the {beta}-cell mass from endogenous sources, either in vivo or in vitro, represents an area of increasing interest. The mechanism of islet regeneration remains poorly understood, but the identification of islet progenitor sources is critical for understanding {beta}-cell regeneration. One potential source is the islet proper, via the dedifferentiation, proliferation, and redifferentiation of facultative progenitors residing within the islet. Neogenesis, or that the new pancreatic islets can derive from progenitor cells present within the ducts has been reported, but the existence and identity of the progenitor cells have been debated. In this review, we focus on pancreatic ductal cells, which are islet progenitors capable of differentiating into islet {beta}-cells. Islet neogenesis, seen as budding of hormone-positive cells from the ductal epithelium, is considered to be one mechanism for normal islet growth after birth and in regeneration, and has suggested the presence of pancreatic stem cells. Numerous results support the neogenesis hypothesis, the evidence for the hypothesis in the adult comes primarily from morphological studies that have in common the production of damage to all or part of the pancreas, with consequent inflammation and repair. Although numerous studies support a ductal origin for new islets after birth, lineage-tracing experiments are considered the 'gold standard' of proof. Lineage-tracing experiments show that pancreatic duct cells act as progenitors, giving rise to new islets after birth and after injury. The identification of differentiated pancreatic ductal cells as

  8. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions.

    PubMed

    Brugge, William; Dewitt, John; Klapman, Jason B; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-04-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18-month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  9. Improving patient and user safety during endoscopic investigation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John E.; Melville, C. David; Lee, Cameron M.; Saunders, Michael D.; Burkhardt, Matthew R.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Endoscopic investigation of the main pancreatic duct and biliary ducts is called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and carries a risk of pancreatitis for the patient. During ERCP, a metal guidewire is inserted into the pancreatobiliary duct from a side-viewing large endoscope within the duodenum. To verify correct placement of the ERCP guidewire, an injection of radiopaque dye is required for fluoroscopic imaging, which exposes the patient and clinical team to x-ray radiation. A safer and more effective means to access the pancreatobiliary system can use direct optical imaging, although the endoscope diameter and stiffness will be significantly larger than a guidewire's. To quantify this invasiveness before human testing, a synthetic force-sensing pancreas was fabricated and attached to an ERCP training model. The invasiveness of a new, 1.7-mm diameter, steerable scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) was compared to the standard ERCP guidewire of 0.89-mm (0.035") diameter that is not steerable. Although twice as large and significantly stiffer than the ERCP guidewire, the SFE generated lower or significantly less average force during insertion at all 4 sensor locations (P<0.05) within the main pancreatic duct. Therefore, the addition of steering and forward visualization at the tip of the endoscope reduced the invasiveness of the in vitro ERCP procedure. Since fluoroscopy is not required, risks associated with dye injection and x-ray exposure can be eliminated when using direct optical visualization. Finally, the SFE provides wide-field high resolution imaging for image-guided interventions, laser-based fluorescence biomarker imaging, and spot spectral analysis for future optical biopsy.

  10. Management of pancreatic ductal leaks and fistulae.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Michael; Kozarek, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic duct leaks can occur as a result of both acute and chronic pancreatitis or in the setting of pancreatic trauma. Manifestations of leaks include pseudocysts, pancreatic ascites, high amylase pleural effusions, disconnected duct syndrome, and internal and external pancreatic fistulas. Patient presentations are highly variable and range from asymptomatic pancreatic cysts to patients with severe abdominal pain and sepsis from infected fluid collections. The diagnosis can often be made by high-quality cross-sectional imaging or during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Because of their complexity, pancreatic leak patients are best managed by a multidisciplinary team comprised of therapeutic endoscopists, interventional radiologists, and surgeons in the field of pancreatic interventions. Minor leaks will often resolve with conservative management while severe leaks will frequently require interventions. Endoscopic treatments for pancreatic duct leaks have replaced surgical interventions in many situations. Interventional radiologists also have the ability to offer therapeutic interventions for many leak patients. The mainstay of endotherapy for pancreatic leaks is transpapillary pancreatic duct stenting with a stent that bridges the leak if possible, but varies based on the manifestation and clinical presentation. Fluid collections that result from leaks, such as pseudocysts, can often be treated by endoscopic transluminal drainage with or without endoscopic ultrasound or by percutaneous drainage. Endoscopic interventions have been shown to be effective and have an acceptable complication rate.

  11. Pancreatic Stent or Rectal Indomethacin-Which Better Prevents Post-ERCP Pancreatitis?: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Dong; Jia, Xin-Yong; Dong, Hai-Yan; Pang, Qiu-Ping; Zhai, Hai-Lan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Guo, Rong; Dong, Yan-Chun; Qin, Cheng-Yong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated and compared 2 clinical strategies to prevent postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP).We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent ERCP between 2008 and 2014. Of 623 patients at high risk for PEP, 145 were treated with prophylactic pancreatic stent placement (PSP) only, and 478 were treated with rectal indomethacin (RI) only, for PEP prevention. Patients were matched by one-to-one propensity score matching (PSM) by risk factors, with overall PEP incidence as primary outcome, and moderate or severe PEP and complication rates as secondary outcomes.Of 623 patients with high-risk factors, 145 pairs were generated after PSM. Thirty-two patients developed pancreatitis-10 (6.9 %) in the PSP group and 22 (15.2 %) in the RI group (P = 0.025). Moderate-to-severe pancreatitis developed in 5 patients (2.8%) in the PSP group and 14 patients (9.7 %) in the RI group (P = 0.047).Although indomethacin represents an easy, inexpensive treatment, prophylactic PSP is still the better prevention strategy for PEP. PMID:26962808

  12. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Ágnes; Altorjay, Áron; Madácsy, László

    2013-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Self-Expandable Metal Stent Placement for the Treatment of Infected Pancreatic Pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Masrour, Farbod; Mallat, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The standard endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) approach of cystogastrostomy involves the use of series of plastic pigtail stents that are placed through the wall of the cyst. The use of a single stent has also been described in the literature. Here we describe five cases of EUS-guided cystogastrostomy with irrigation of infected pancreatic pseudocysts using a single self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). To our knowledge this has not been described in the literature in the United States. This novice approach will have significant implications in the management of infected pseudocysts with a lower morbidity, mortality and overall cost compared to conventional management such as surgery or percutaneous drainage.

  14. Bestrophin expression and function in the human pancreatic duct cell line, CFPAC-1

    PubMed Central

    Marsey, Laura L; Winpenny, John P

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic duct epithelial cells (PDECs) have been shown to express calcium activated chloride channels (CaCCs) and there is evidence for their involvement in fluid secretion from these cells. The molecular identity of the CaCC in PDECs remains unknown. Recently, the bestrophin family of proteins have been proposed as a potential molecular candidate for CaCCs. Expression of bestrophins is strongly correlated with the function of CaCCs in a variety of tissues. In the present study, the expression of bestrophins has been investigated in the cystic fibrosis pancreatic duct cell line, CFPAC-1. Iodide efflux analysis was used to characterise native CaCCs in CFPAC-1 cell monolayers. Efflux was induced with the addition of UTP (100 μm, 10.2 ± 1.5 nmol min−1), which was blocked by the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid (81%) and DIDS (90%). The UTP-stimulated iodide efflux was shown to be Ca2+ dependent and cAMP independent. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from CFPAC-1 cells demonstrated positive identification of all four human bestrophin mRNAs. Western blot of CFPAC-1 cell protein isolates with antibodies specific to human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) showed that hBest1 protein was expressed in this cell line. HBest1 was present on the cell surface, demonstrated using biotinylation and confocal imaging, as well as in the cytoplasm. SiRNA-mediated silencing of hBest1 in CFPAC-1 cells reduced the UTP-stimulated iodide efflux by around 40%. This study provides evidence that the bestrophins are expressed in pancreatic duct cells and, more specifically, that hBest1 plays a role in the CaCCs found in these cells. PMID:19237432

  15. The accessory pancreatic ducts of the starling Sturnus vulgaris: an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Vinnicombe, S J; Kendall, M D

    1983-01-01

    Wild starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were utilised for a study of the small accessory pancreatic ducts that pass from the pancreas to the loop of the duodenum. These ducts do not appear to have been described before in the literature. Each duct was composed of an epithelial lining of a main cell type, which had small numbers of two other cell types intermixed. A lamina propria consisting of a loose collagenous network, richly endowed with a thick nerve plexus, separated the epithelium from the muscle coat. The muscle consisted of inner longitudinal, middle transverse and outermost spiral layers. This was surrounded by a dense collagenous tunica adventitia, and the ducts were accompanied by large blood vessels. The main columnar cells of the epithelium had a strong PAS positivity, and an alcian blue-positive reaction at high molarities of magnesium chloride (greater than 0.5 M). This indicated the presence of mucopolysaccharides with a high degree of sulphation, such as heparan sulphate. Both of the staining reactions were limited to a fine apical surface reaction which probably did not extend into the cells themselves. At the electron microscope level it could be seen that the surface coat corresponded to a filamentous layer overlying short stubby microvilli on the apical surface of the epithelium. Numerous apical electron-dense inclusion granules did not appear to participate in the histochemical reaction. Comparisons of these findings with work on the main ducts of the pancreas in other species have been made and discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:6630045

  16. Percutaneous Approach for Removal of a Migrated Cystogastric Stent from a Pancreatic Pseudocyst: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Al-Shehri; Qazi, Shahbaz; Khankan, Azzam; Al-Muaikeel, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Stent migration into pancreatic pseudocysts during endosonographic (EUS) cystogastrostomy is a relatively rare complication. The migrated stent may induce, if it remains within the body, infection and perforation. Therefore, retrieval and/or re-stenting is necessary. Endoscopic retrieval is commonly attempted first. However, it is technically challenging and largely dependent on the skill of the endoscopists; if retrieval is unsuccessful, surgery is usually carried out. We report a case of stent migration into a pancreatic pseudocyst that was retrieved with a percutaneous approach under imaging guidance using a simple technique with available devices. A technique that enhances the role of interventional radiology in the management of this rare complication. PMID:27200158

  17. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations—such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen—recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  18. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-03-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations-such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen-recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  19. [Invasive endoscopy or surgery for pancreatic disorders?].

    PubMed

    Pap, Akos

    2008-12-01

    Endoscopic double papillotomy occupied the place of surgical transduodenal double sphincteroplasty for disorders of papilla of Vater or chronic pancreatitis several years ago. Endoscopic cystoenterostomy and cystogastrostomy can also replace surgery in the treatment of pseudocysts and walled-of necrosis even in cases of severe acute pancreatitis with/or without sepsis. In chronic pancreatitis endotherapy may be the treatment of choice at first, although surgical techniques give somewhat better long-term results for pain relief. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, stone resolution or extraction and multiple pancreatic stents without aggressive balloon dilatation can progressively calibrate dominant stricture of the main pancreatic duct without further damage, ischemia or obstruction of side branches. Relapse-free period becomes longer (also after stents removal) if alcohol consumption and smoking are stopped definitively. Well-controlled, randomised studies are still needed to demonstrate clinical advantage of multiple endoscopic stent placement in comparison to surgery.

  20. [Endoscopic therapy of acute and chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Veltzke-Schlieker, W; Adler, A; Abou-Rebyeh, H; Wiedenmann, B; Rösch, T

    2005-02-01

    Endoscopic therapy is valuable for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Early endoscopic papillotomy appears, in the case of a severe course of acute biliary pancreatitis, to be advantageous. Endoscopic drainage can be considered in cases of acute fluid retention and necrosis as well as subacute, non-healing pancreatitis or cyst development. By acute chronic pancreatitis with strictures or bile duct stones, papillotomy, dilation and stent insertion can lead to an improvement in pain symptoms. An improvement in endo- or exocrine function, however, is not expected. Studies on the endoscopic therapy of pancreatitis are still very limited, and recommendations can usually only be made based on retrospective case series. PMID:15657718

  1. Blockade of bradykinin B(2) receptor suppresses acute pancreatitis induced by obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary duct in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Izumi; Yoshimura, Kuniko; Ishii, Ken-ichiro; Soma, Kazui; Ohwada, Takashi; Kakita, Akira; Majima, Masataka

    2002-01-01

    1. The involvement of bradykinin (BK) B(2) receptor in acute pancreatitis induced by pancreaticobiliary duct ligation was investigated in rats. 2. The activities of amylase and lipase in the serum, the water content of the pancreas, and vacuolization of the acinar cells were significantly increased 2 h after obstruction of the duct in Sprague-Dawley rats. 3. Elevated serum amylase activity, increased pancreatic oedema, and damage of the pancreatic tissue were significantly less marked in plasma kininogen-deficient, B/N-Katholiek rats than in the normal strain, B/N-Kitasato rats 2 h after the ligation. 4. Obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary duct augmented the level of (1-5)-BK (Arg(1)-Pro(2)-Pro(3)-Gly(4)-Phe(5)), a stable BK metabolite, in the blood from 73.0+/-21.7 pg ml(-1) at 0 h to 149.8+/-38.0 pg ml(-1) at 2 h after the induction of pancreatitis in SD rats. 5. Administration of a BK B(2) receptor antagonist, FR173657 (100 mg kg(-1), p.o.) or Hoe140 (100 nmol kg(-1), s.c.), reduced the elevation of amylase and lipase activities in the serum and of pancreatic water content in a dose-dependent manner. The effective attenuation of oedema formation and vacuolization by the antagonists was also confirmed light-microscopically. In contrast, treatment with gabexate mesilate or indomethacin did not cause significant suppression of the pancreatitis. 6. These findings suggest a possible involvement of kinin B(2) receptor in the present pancreatitis model. Furthermore, they point to the potential usefulness of the B(2) receptor in clinical acute pancreatitis.

  2. Bile duct stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile duct Damage or scarring after gallbladder removal Pancreatitis Primary sclerosing cholangitis ... your health care provider if symptoms recur after pancreatitis, cholecystectomy , or other biliary surgery.

  3. Changes in gene expression of pancreatitis-associated protein and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors in experimental pancreatitis produced by pancreatic duct occlusion in rats: comparison with gene expression of cholecystokinin and secretin.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Jimi, A; Nakamura, E; Teraoka, H

    1995-08-01

    Pancreatic duct occlusion is known to produce a sustained increase in the plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) concentration and to affect the tissue content of CCK in the rat. The tissue content of CCK is correlated with regenerative changes in the pancreas after pancreatic duct occlusion. In the present study, we examined the changes in mRNA levels of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors (PSTIs), pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP), and amylase in the pancreas in comparison with changes in CCK and secretin mRNA levels in the intestine and the histological changes produced by pancreatic duct ligation. Rats with an internal bile fistula and with obstruction of pancreatic flow were prepared and were sacrificed 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 28 days later. Then mRNA levels of CCK, secretin, PSTIs, PAP, and amylase were determined by slot-blot analysis. The CCK mRNA level gradually increased to a peak on day 10, was slightly lower on day 14, and returned to the control level on day 28. The level of secretin mRNA did not change. The mRNA levels of PSTIs increased significantly on day 3 after occlusion. PAP mRNA was detectable on days 1 and 3, being maximal on day 1. The mRNA level of amylase was markedly decreased on days 1 and 3, then remained lower than the control level. Histological examination showed acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas on days 1 and 3 and regenerative changes from day 7. These results suggest that a change in gene expression of PAP reflects acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas most sensitively.

  4. [Common channel for bile and pancreatic ducts. Presentation of 12 cases and discussion].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, F; Brunelle, F; Valayer, J

    1986-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1985, 11 girls and one boy underwent an elective operation for a congenital choledochal dilatation associated with an anomalous biliopancreatic junction. In 10 out of these 12 cases the children suffered several episodes of abdominal pain, and the diagnosis was missed since a jaundice appeared. The ultrasonographic examination demonstrated in all cases a dilatation of both extra- and intrahepatic bile ducts. The preoperative diagnosis was always established by the mean of a transhepatic cholangiography (8 cases) or a percutaneous cholecystography (4 cases), which showed in every case a dilated choledochus, and a common biliopancreatic channel, 15 to 35 mm long. A high amylase level was found in the bile in 10/10 cases when it was measured. A cholecystokinin test was performed in 4 cases, resulting in each case in a considerable increase of amylase and lipase levels in bile. All children were treated by excision of the dilated choledochus and gallbladder, followed by an hepaticojejunostomy with a Roux en Y loop. The follow-up is 6 months to 5 years for 9 children: 8 are cured, and on girl, who had a major dilatation of the left intrahepatic bile ducts, suffered from episodic abdominal pain and an episode od cholangitis 6 years after the operation. The role of such a common channel in the pathogeny of congenital choledochal cysts, acute pancreatitis in children, and biliary carcinomas in young adults is discussed according to the literatures of the last 10 years.

  5. Multiple small "imaging" branch-duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in familial pancreatic cancer: indicator for concomitant high grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Bartsch, D K; Dietzel, K; Bargello, M; Matthaei, E; Kloeppel, G; Esposito, I; Heverhagen, J T; Gress, T M; Slater, E P; Langer, P

    2013-03-01

    Most screening programs for familial pancreatic cancer are currently based on endoscopic ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cystic lesions, especially those suspicious for small intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the branch ducts, can be visualized in up to 40 % of individuals at risk, but their pathological importance in the setting of FPC is yet not well established. Individuals at risk from a prospective screening program for familial pancreatic cancer with small "imaging" IPMNs of the branch-duct type (BD-IPMN) who underwent pancreatic resection were analysed regarding clinico-pathological data and the locations of pancreatic lesions. Five of 125 individuals at risk who underwent screening had multiple small (size 2-10 mm) unicystic lesions and/or multicystic single lesions in the pancreatic body and tail suspicious for BD-IPMNs upon MRI imaging and decided to undergo surgical resection after interdisciplinary counselling, although none fulfilled the consensus criteria for IPMN resection. Histological examination revealed BD-IPMNs with low or moderate dysplasia of the gastric type in combination with multifocal PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions in 4 individuals. The remaining patient had only tiny ductectasias in the pancreatic tail with multifocal PanIN 2 lesions in the entire gland and one PanIN3 lesion in the pancreatic head. Intriguingly, the location of the most dysplastic histological lesions (PanIN3) did not correspond to the preoperatively detected lesions and were not visible in preoperative imaging. In the setting of FPC, the presence of multiple small "imaging" BD-IPMNs may indicate the presence of high-grade PanIN lesions elsewhere in the pancreas.

  6. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tandan, Manu; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  7. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  8. Self-expanding metal stents for palliative treatment of malignant biliary and duodenal stenoses.

    PubMed

    Maetani, I; Ogawa, S; Hoshi, H; Sato, M; Yoshioka, H; Igarashi, Y; Sakai, Y

    1994-10-01

    Patients with malignant biliary stenosis due to pancreatic head cancer often have the associated problem of duodenal obstruction. We report here the case of a 78-year-old woman with this clinical situation, who was treated with self-expanding Gianturco metal stents placed in the distal common bile duct and, nine months later, placed in the descending duodenum. The patient's frequent vomiting resolved, and she was able to tolerate peroral solid food; jaundice also decreased (bilirubin pre-stenting: 7.8; post-stenting: 1.2). Self-expanding metal stents therefore appear to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant duodenal stenosis as well as biliary stenosis.

  9. Endoscopic therapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic therapy is recommended as the first-line therapy for painful chronic pancreatitis with an obstacle on the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The clinical response should be evaluated at 6 to 8 weeks. Calcified stones that obstruct the MPD are first treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy; dominant MPD strictures are optimally treated with a single, large, plastic stent that should be exchanged within 1 year even in asymptomatic patients. Pancreatic pseudocysts for which therapy is indicated and are within endoscopic reach should be treated by endoscopy.

  10. A novel biodegradable biliary stent in the normal duct hepaticojejunal anastomosis: an 18-month follow-up in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Laukkarinen, Johanna M; Sand, Juhani A; Chow, Pierce; Juuti, Hanne; Kellomäki, Minna; Kärkkäinen, Päivi; Isola, Jorma; Yu, Sidney; Somanesan, Satchithanantham; Kee, Irene; Song, In Chin; Ng, Teck Hin; Nordback, Isto H

    2007-06-01

    Creating a well-functioning hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) anastomosis with nondilated bile ducts remains a challenge. Our aim was to study the use in a large animal model of a novel, braided polylactide barium sulfate biodegradable biliary stent (BDBS) without external connection and with no need for later removal. Fifty swine were randomly operated on for Roux-Y HJ with or without BDBS in the anastomosis, and followed up (dynamic biligraphy, x-ray, serum determinations, anastomosis inner diameter, and histology) for 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. During the follow-up, one nonstented animal died because of anastomotic leakage. In x-ray BDBS was seen in place until 1.5 months in all of the stented animals. In the nonstented animals HJ anastomosis inner diameter was decreased at 18 months [6.3 (5.0-7.0) mm vs 7.4 (7.0-9.0) mm, p = 0.05] and liver clearance reduced at 12 and 18 months compared to stented animals. Serum liver values and liver and bile duct histology did not differ between the groups. We conclude that this novel BDBS is easy to insert into the HJ anastomosis with nondilated ducts. It is nontoxic, dissolves safely, and may be associated with a larger and better draining anastomosis at 18-month follow-up. These results encourage us to proceed to clinical studies. PMID:17436052

  11. [Targeting of type IV carbonic anhydrases in Capan-1 human pancreatic duct cells is concomitant of the polarization].

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Fanjul, M; Hollande, E

    1996-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases II and IV play an essential role in the synthesis and secretion of HCO3- ions in pancreatic duct cells. Secretion of these ions is regulated by the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) chloride channel. In the present study, the expression of carbonic anhydrases IV and their targeting to plasma membranes were examined during the growth of human pancreatic duct cells in vitro. Human cancerous pancreatic duct cells of Capan-1 cell line which polarize during their growth were used. We show that: a) these cells express carbonic anhydrases IV continuously during growth in culture, and the expression depends on the stage of growth and the conformation of the cells; b) carbonic anhydrases IV are seen in the cytoplasm in non-polarized cells, but become progressively anchored to plasma membranes as the cells polarize, being targeted to the apical membranes of polarized cells; c) the subcellular distribution of carbonic anhydrases IV indicates that these enzymes are synthetized in rough endoplasmic reticulum and then transported towards the plasma membrane using the classical secretory pathway through the Golgi apparatus. The results indicated that targeting of carbonic anhydrases IV in Capan-1 cells is linked to cellular polarization. PMID:8881572

  12. The nerves of the accessory pancreatic ducts of the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris): an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, R M; Kendall, M D

    1984-01-01

    An ultrastructural and light microscopic study was undertaken to examine the nerves of the accessory pancreatic ducts of the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), previously noted (Vinnicombe, 1982) to have a particularly dense innervation. Large numbers of nerves were found in the ducts, predominantly in the lamina propria, and all contained exclusively unmyelinated axons. Probable neuron cell bodies were observed in the smooth muscle layer, but not in the lamina propria. Schwann cells invested all the axons, and these displayed terminal swellings in a 'synapse en passage' arrangement. The nerves of the lamina propria were most numerous in the region immediately beneath the epithelium and were present in the epithelial folds. One axon was observed to have penetrated the epithelial basal lamina and to lie between two epithelial cells. Examination of the terminal profiles and their contained synaptic vesicles showed the innervation to have probable pain afferent, cholinergic, adrenergic and perhaps peptidergic components. The results of this study were compared with reports on pancreatic duct innervation in other species, mostly as parts of wider studies on pancreatic innervation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6490527

  13. Endoscopic Stenting and Sphincterotomy of the Minor Papilla in Symptomatic Pancreas Divisum: Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Seth A.; Rutkovsky, Frederick D.; Kasmin, Franklin E.

    1995-01-01

    Pancreas divisum has been postulated as a cause of acute pancreatitis and a chronic pain syndrome in a small subgroup of patients and can be treated with endoscopic dorsal pancreatic duct stent placement and minor papilla sphincterotomy. Twenty patients (9 with at least one attack of idiopathic pancreatitis, and 11 with severe pancreatic-type pain) were treated endoscopically. Dorsal duct stents were placed in 19 patients with subsequent needle knife sphincterotomy of the minor papilla over the stent. Clinical response was judged by comparison of symptoms (using a 0-to-l0 scale and the patient's overall assessment). The symptom score improved from 9.3 to 5.1 in the pancreatitis group and from 9.3 to 5.7 in the pain group. A good clinical response was observed in 3 of 7 patients in the pancreatitis group and in 6 of 11 in the pain group at a mean follow-up of 22 months. Complications of sphincterotomy were limited to pancreatitis in 6 patients (29%), 5 mild and 1 moderate according to published criteria. No patient required more than 4 days hospitalization. Two of 39 stents migrated into the pancreas, and another stent fractured and remained lodged in the pancreas. Eight of 9 patients evaluated demonstrated new morphologic duct changes on follow-up pancreatograms. Endoscopic stenting and sphincterotomy of the minor papilla are feasible and may be effective in some patients with pancreas divisum but carries a significant complication rate. The subjective improvement in patients with chronic pain warrants further controlled study. PMID:18493355

  14. Pancreatitis-Associated Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Endovascular Treatment with Self-Expandable Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Vagenas, Kostantinos; Apostolopoulou, Sotiria C.; Panagiotou, Irene; Lymberopoulou, Dimitra; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2003-02-15

    We present a patient with a splenic arterypseudoaneurysm (SAPA) treated with placement of self-expandable stent-grafts. The procedure was complicated by stent-graft migration,but successful management resulted in lasting exclusion of the SAPA,while the patency of the splenic artery was preserved. This is the first report of self-expandable stent-graft treatment of SAPA.

  15. Incomplete Annular Pancreas with Ectopic Opening of the Pancreatic and Bile Ducts into the Pyloric Ring: First Report of a Rare Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Hoshino, Horoyuki; Segami, Kouhei; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ooike, Nobuyuki; Otsubo, Takehito

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 56-year-old woman who had experienced epigastralgia and dorsal pain several times over the last 20 years. She was admitted for a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, and severe intra- and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation with inner air density was noted. No papilla of Vater was present in the descending duodenum, and 2 small holes were present in the pyloric ring. Bile excretion from one of the small holes was observed under forward-viewing endoscope. It was considered that the pancreatic and bile ducts separately opened into the pyloric ring. Based on these findings, malformation of the pancreaticobiliary duct was diagnosed. She did not wish treatment, but the obstruction associated with duodenal stenosis was noted after 2 years. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed as curative treatment for duodenal stenosis and retrograde biliary infection through the bile duct opening in the pyloric ring. The ventral pancreas encompassed almost the entire circumference of the pyloric ring, suggesting a subtype of annular pancreas. Generally, lesions are present in the descending part of the duodenum in an annular pancreas, and the pancreatic and bile ducts join in the papillary region. However, in this patient, (1) the pancreas encompassed the pyloric ring, (2) the pancreatic and bile ducts opened separately, and (3) the openings of the pancreatic and bile ducts were present in the pyloric ring. The pancreas and biliary tract develop through a complex process, which may cause various types of malformation of the pancreaticobiliary system, but no similar case report was found on a literature search. This case was very rare and could not be classified in any type of congenital anomaly of the pancreas. We would classify it as a subtype of annular pancreas with separate ectopic opening of the pancreatic and bile ducts into the pyloric ring. PMID:27721721

  16. Transpapillary drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Smoczyński, Marian; Jabłońska, Anna; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) often coexists with disruption of the main pancreatic duct that manifests as a leak of contrast medium into the necrotic collection during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. Aim To assess the efficacy and safety of treatment of patients with symptomatic WOPN and disruption of the main pancreatic duct, who underwent endoscopic transpapillary drainage as the only access to the necrosis cavity. Material and methods In 22 patients with symptomatic WOPN, active endoscopic transpapillary drainage was performed. During endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP), partial disruption of the main pancreatic duct was observed in 14 patients and complete disruption in 8 patients. After the active drainage was finished, a transpapillary pancreatic stent was inserted into the main pancreatic duct, which was later exchanged after 6, 12 and 24 months or when no extravasation of contrast from the pancreatic duct was observed. The results of treatment and complications were compared retrospectively. Results The mean duration of active drainage was 22 (range: 7–94) days. Complications of endotherapy occurred in 3/22 patients. The mean time of the main pancreatic duct stenting was 304 (range: 85–519) days. Success of endoscopic treatment of WOPN and pancreatic duct disruption was achieved in 20/22 patients. During a 1-year follow-up, recurrence of the collection was noted in 4/20 patients. Long-term success was achieved in 16/22 patients. Conclusions In patients with WOPN who cannot undergo transmural drainage when there is a communication between the necrotic collection and the main pancreatic duct, transpapillary access may be an effective and safe method of treatment. PMID:26865888

  17. Motion--pancreatic endoscopy is useful for the pain of chronic pancreatitis: arguments for the motion.

    PubMed

    Branch, Stanley M

    2003-01-01

    Pain is the dominant clinical problem in patients with chronic pancreatitis. It can be due to pseudocysts, as well as strictures and stones in the pancreatic ducts. Most experts agree that obstruction could cause increased pressure within the main pancreatic duct or its branches, resulting in pain. Endoscopic therapy aims to alleviate pain by reducing the pressure within the ductal system and draining pseudocysts. Approaches vary according to the specific nature of the problem, and include transgastric, transduodenal and transpapillary stenting and drainage. Additional techniques for the removal of stones from the pancreatic duct include extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Success rates for stone extraction and stenting of strictures are high in specialized centres that employ experienced endoscopists, but pain often recurs during long term follow-up. Complications include pancreatitis, bleeding, infection and perforation. In the case of pancreatic pseudocysts, percutaneous or even surgical drainage should be considered if septae or large amounts of debris are present within the lesion. This article describes the techniques, indications and results of endoscopic therapy of pancreatic lesions.

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and SLC26 transporters in HCO₃⁻ secretion by pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Steward, Martin; Naruse, Satoru

    2007-08-25

    Pancreatic duct cells secrete HCO3(-) ions into a HCO3(-)-rich luminal fluid (~140 mmol/L in human) against at least a 6-fold concentration gradient. Candidate mechanisms for HCO3(-) transport across the apical membrane include Cl(-)-HCO3(-)exchange by an SLC26 anion transporter and diffusion via the HCO3(-) conductance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Members of the SLC26 family are known to mediate Cl(-)-HCO3(-) exchange across the apical membrane of other epithelia and both SLC26A6 and SLC26A3 have been detected in pancreatic ducts. Co-expression studies have also revealed that murine slc26a6 and slc26a3 physically interact with CFTR through the STAS domain of slc26 and the R domain of CFTR, resulting in mutually enhanced activity. Other studies have indicated that these exchangers are electrogenic: slc26a6 mediating 1Cl(-)-2HCO3(-) exchange and slc26a3 mediating 2Cl(-)-1HCO3(-) exchange. Recent experiments using isolated pancreatic ducts from slc26a6(-)/(-) mice suggest that slc26a6 mediates most of the Cl(-)-dependent secretion of HCO3(-) across the apical membrane in the mouse and the data are consistent with the reported electrogenicity of slc26a6. However, the role of SLC26A6 in human pancreatic HCO3(-) secretion is less clear because human ducts are capable of secreting much higher concentrations of HCO3(-). The role of SLC26A6 must now be evaluated in a species such as the guinea pig which, like the human, is capable of secreting HCO3(-) at a concentration of ~140 mmol/L. From existing guinea pig data we calculate that a 1Cl(-)-2HCO3(-) exchanger such as slc26a6 would be unable to secrete HCO3(-) against such a steep gradient. On the other hand, the HCO3(-) conductance of CFTR could theoretically support secretion of HCO3(-) to a much higher concentrations. CFTR may therefore play a more important role than SLC26A6 in HCO3(-) secretion by the guinea pig and human pancreas.

  19. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Graft Pancreas Divisum in a Patient with Modified Multi-Visceral Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Slivka, Adam

    2014-01-01

    A patient with modified multivisceral transplant developed recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) 1 year after transplant and was found to have graft pancreas divisum with otherwise negative work-up for identifying the etiology of RAP. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed with minor papilla sphincterotomy and pancreatic duct stent placement of the graft pancreas. The patient's symptoms resolved following endotherapy for a follow-up period of 2 years. This is a unique case of graft pancreatitis secondary to pancreas divisum. PMID:26157839

  20. Pancreaticoureteral Fistula: A Rare Complication of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiren G.; Cavanagh, Yana; Shaikh, Sohail N.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may result in progressive parenchymal damage and fibrosis which can ultimately lead to destruction of pancreatic tissue. Fistulas to the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, and peripancreatic organs may form as a complications of pancreatitis. This case report describes an exceedingly rare complication, pancreaticoureteral fistula (PUF). Only two additional cases of PUF have been reported. However, they evolved following traumatic injury to the ureter or pancreatic duct. No published reports describe PUF as a complication of pancreatitis. Case Report: A 69-year-old Hispanic female with a past medical history of cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst, and recurrent episodes of pancreatitis presented with severe, sharp, and constant abdominal pain. Upon imaging, a fistulous tract was visualized between the left renal pelvis (at the level of an upper pole calyx) and the pancreatic duct and a ureteral stent was placed to facilitate fistula closure. Following the procedure, the patient attained symptomatic relief and oral intake was resumed. A left retrograde pyelogram was repeated 2 months after the initial stent placement and demonstrating no evidence of a persistent fistulous tract. Conclusion: Due to PUF's unclear etiology and possible variance of presentation, it is important for physicians to keep this rare complication of pancreatitis in mind, especially, when evaluating a patient with recurrent pancreatitis, urinary symptoms and abnormal imaging within the urinary collecting system and pancreas. PMID:27114974

  1. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks.

  2. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  3. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure.

    PubMed

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-08-10

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  4. Neogenesis and proliferation of {beta}-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    SciTech Connect

    Tokui, Yae . E-mail: ytokui@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kozawa, Junji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Zhang, Jun; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro |

    2006-12-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of {beta}-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a {beta}-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of {beta}-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of {beta}-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted {beta}-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing {beta}-cells, resulting in an increase of the {beta}-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice.

  5. Characterization of H+ and HCO3- transporters in CFPAC-1 human pancreatic duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Jr, Zoltán Rakonczay; Fearn, Amy; Hegyi, Péter; Boros, Imre; Gray, Michael A; Argent, Barry E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize H+ and HCO3- transporters in polarized CFPAC-1 human pancreatic duct cells, which were derived from a cystic fibrosis patient with the ΔF508 CFTR mutation. METHODS: CFPAC-1 cells were seeded at high density onto permeable supports and grown to confluence. The cells were loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and mounted into a perfusion chamber, which allowed the simultaneous perfusion of the basolateral and apical membranes. Transmembrane base flux was calculated from the changes in intracellular pH and the buffering capacity of the cells. RESULTS: Our results showed differential permeability to HCO3-/CO2 at the apical and basolateral membranes of CFPAC-1 cells. Na+/HCO3- co-transporters (NBCs) and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers (AEs) were present on the basolateral membrane, and Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) on both the apical and basolateral membranes of the cells. Basolateral HCO3- uptake was sensitive to variations of extracellular K+ concentration, the membrane permeable carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors acetazolamide (100 µmol/L) and ethoxyzolamide (100 µmol/L), and was partially inhibited by H2-DIDS (600 µmol/L). The membrane-impermeable CA inhibitor 1-N-(4-sulfamoylphenylethyl)-2,4,6-trimethylpyridine perchlorate did not have any effect on HCO3- uptake. The basolateral AE had a much higher activity than that in the apical membrane, whereas there was no such difference with the NHE under resting conditions. Also, 10 µmol/L forskolin did not significantly influence Cl-/HCO3- exchange on the apical and basolateral membranes. The administration of 250 µmol/L H2-DIDS significantly inhibited the basolateral AE. Amiloride (300 µmol/L) completely inhibited NHEs on both membranes of the cells. RT-PCR revealed the expression of pNBC1, AE2, and NHE1 mRNA. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that apart from the lack of CFTR and apical Cl-/HCO3- exchanger activity, CFPAC-1 cells express similar H+ and HCO3- transporters to those observed in native

  6. High Uptake of FDG Along a Biliary Stent

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Yasunari; Yamane, Hiromichi; Ochi, Nobuaki; Honda, Yoshihiro; Takigawa, Nagio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 66-year-old woman presented with abdominal discomfort. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed a mass in the pancreas and multiple liver metastases. Pathological examination confirmed the mass to be primary pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic insertion of a biliary stent was performed to prevent common bile duct obstruction. Subsequently, she received combination chemotherapy, which resulted in a complete response. FDG-PET-CT after chemotherapy revealed a high uptake of FDG along the outline of the biliary stent, with complete disappearance of both the primary and metastatic tumors. PMID:27607171

  7. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Presenting with Mass and Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Frank, Amber A; Morse, Michael D; Smith, Benjamin R; Shaffer, Kitt

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of autoimmune pancreatitis in a 31-year-old man with signs and symptoms of biliary tract obstruction. Evaluation with sonography, computed tomography, and ultimately endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, demonstrated a 5 by 2 cm hypoechoic, hypodense mass near the head of the pancreas that extended into the porta hepatis. Common bile duct obstruction with proximal dilatation was present. Following fine needle aspiration of the mass, cytology showed findings consistent with autoimmune pancreatitis. Treatment with common bile duct stent was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms.

  8. Early Gastric Cancer Recurrence Following Curative Resection Presenting as Biliary Tract Dilatation, Pancreatic Duct Dilatation and Intestinal Wall Thickening.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yukiko; Tanaka, Eri; Noguchi, Kensaku; Yamamoto, Shinzo; Taniguchi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Hideo; Kumasaka, Toshio; Nakata, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Early gastric cancer, especially cancer confined to the mucosa (stage T1a), is known to have a high cure rate with rare recurrence. We herein report the case of a 40-year-old female who initially presented with biliary tract dilatation, pancreatic duct dilatation and intestinal wall thickening 3 years after curative resection of pT1aN0 stage gastric cancer. The intestinal resection specimen revealed tumor cells spreading through the subserosa to the submucosa sparing mucosal membrane, which made exploratory laparotomy the only approach to confirm the diagnosis. It is always important to be aware of malignancy recurrence and clinicians should not hesitate to choose exploratory laparotomy to avoid any delay in the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27041158

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  11. Prophylaxis of post-ERCP pancreatitis: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline - updated June 2014.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Andriulli, Angelo; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Mariani, Alberto; Meister, Tobias; Deviere, Jacques; Marek, Tomasz; Baron, Todd H; Hassan, Cesare; Testoni, Pier A; Kapral, Christine

    2014-09-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the prophylaxis of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (post-ERCP) pancreatitis. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends routine rectal administration of 100 mg of diclofenac or indomethacin immediately before or after ERCP in all patients without contraindication. In addition to this, in the case of high risk for post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP), the placement of a 5-Fr prophylactic pancreatic stent should be strongly considered. Sublingually administered glyceryl trinitrate or 250 µg somatostatin given in bolus injection might be considered as an option in high risk cases if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are contraindicated and if prophylactic pancreatic stenting is not possible or successful. 2 ESGE recommends keeping the number of cannulation attempts as low as possible. 3 ESGE suggests restricting the use of a pancreatic guidewire as a backup technique for biliary cannulation to cases with repeated inadvertent cannulation of the pancreatic duct; if this method is used, deep biliary cannulation should be attempted using a guidewire rather than the contrast-assisted method and a prophylactic pancreatic stent should be placed. 4 ESGE suggests that needle-knife fistulotomy should be the preferred precut technique in patients with a bile duct dilated down to the papilla. Conventional precut and transpancreatic sphincterotomy present similar success and complication rates; if conventional precut is selected and pancreatic cannulation is easily obtained, ESGE suggests attempting to place a small-diameter (3-Fr or 5-Fr) pancreatic stent to guide the cut and leaving the pancreatic stent in place at the end of ERCP for a minimum of 12 - 24 hours. 4 ESGE does not recommend endoscopic papillary balloon dilation as an alternative to sphincterotomy in routine ERCP, but it may be advantageous in selected patients; if this

  12. Extraperitoneal Fluid Collection due to Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takeo; Kamei, Keiko; Araki, Mariko; Nakata, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Hajime; Yamazaki, Mitsuo; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Nakai, Takuya; Takeyama, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    A 39-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of abdominal fluid collection. He was pointed out to have alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Laboratory data showed inflammation and slightly elevated serum direct bilirubin and amylase. An abdominal computed tomography demonstrated huge fluid collection, multiple pancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic calcification. The fluid showed a high level of amylase at 4,490 IU/l. Under the diagnosis of pancreatic ascites, endoscopic pancreatic stent insertion was attempted but was unsuccessful, so surgical treatment (Frey procedure and cystojejunostomy) was performed. During the operation, a huge amount of fluid containing bile acid (amylase at 1,474 IU/l and bilirubin at 13.5 mg/dl) was found to exist in the extraperitoneal space (over the peritoneum), but no ascites was found. His postoperative course was uneventful and he shows no recurrence of the fluid. Pancreatic ascites is thought to result from the disruption of the main pancreatic duct, the rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst, or possibly leakage from an unknown site. In our extremely rare case, the pancreatic pseudocyst penetrated into the hepatoduodenal ligament with communication to the common bile duct, and the fluid flowed into the round ligament of the liver and next into the extraperitoneal space.

  13. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related adverse events: post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and not uncommonly is the reason behind ERCP-related lawsuits. Patients at high risk for PEP include young women with abdominal pain, normal liver tests, and unremarkable imaging. Procedure-related factors include traumatic and persistent cannulation attempts, multiple injections of the pancreatic duct, pancreatic sphincterotomy, and, possibly, use of precut sphincterotomy. Aggressive hydration, use of rectal indomethacin, and prophylactic pancreatic stenting can diminish the risk (and likely severity) of PEP. Though hugely beneficial, these measures do not supersede careful patient selection and technique.

  14. Acute portal vein thrombosis due to chronic relapsing pancreatitis: a fistula between a pancreatic pseudocyst and the splenic vein.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Nishizaki, Yasuhiro; Tsuruya, Kota; Hamada, Ikuko; Higashi, Toru; Sakuma, Keiko; Shiozawa, Hirokazu; Aoki, Jun; Nagashima, Rena; Koizumi, Jun; Arase, Yoshitaka; Shiraishi, Koichi; Matsushima, Masashi; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a relatively common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis, but several other causes might play an important role in PVT pathogenesis. We present a case of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis complicated by acute extensive PVT. The patient was managed conservatively with danaparoid sodium at first, but the thrombosis gradually extended. We then tried radiological intervention using the direct transhepatic and transjugular intrahepatic postsystemic shunt approaches. Although we were able to successfully catheterize the percutaneous transhepatic portal vein (PTP), we could not achieve recanalization of the portal vein. Therefore, PTP catheterization and systemic intravenous infusion of urokinase and heparin was performed to prevent further progression of the thrombosis and cavernous transformation was finally achieved. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed a pancreatic stone which had possibly induced dilatation of the tail duct and formation of a pancreatic pseudocyst and caused intractable pancreatitis. We performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and placed a stent in the pancreatic duct, which completely cured the pancreatitis. Retrospectively, the previous CT with curved multi-planar reconstruction was reviewed and a fistula was detected between the pancreatic pseudocyst and splenic vein. We concluded that the etiology of the PVT was not only inflammatory extension from pancreatitis but also a fistula between the pancreatic duct and the splenic vein.

  15. Acute portal vein thrombosis due to chronic relapsing pancreatitis: a fistula between a pancreatic pseudocyst and the splenic vein.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Nishizaki, Yasuhiro; Tsuruya, Kota; Hamada, Ikuko; Higashi, Toru; Sakuma, Keiko; Shiozawa, Hirokazu; Aoki, Jun; Nagashima, Rena; Koizumi, Jun; Arase, Yoshitaka; Shiraishi, Koichi; Matsushima, Masashi; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a relatively common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis, but several other causes might play an important role in PVT pathogenesis. We present a case of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis complicated by acute extensive PVT. The patient was managed conservatively with danaparoid sodium at first, but the thrombosis gradually extended. We then tried radiological intervention using the direct transhepatic and transjugular intrahepatic postsystemic shunt approaches. Although we were able to successfully catheterize the percutaneous transhepatic portal vein (PTP), we could not achieve recanalization of the portal vein. Therefore, PTP catheterization and systemic intravenous infusion of urokinase and heparin was performed to prevent further progression of the thrombosis and cavernous transformation was finally achieved. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed a pancreatic stone which had possibly induced dilatation of the tail duct and formation of a pancreatic pseudocyst and caused intractable pancreatitis. We performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and placed a stent in the pancreatic duct, which completely cured the pancreatitis. Retrospectively, the previous CT with curved multi-planar reconstruction was reviewed and a fistula was detected between the pancreatic pseudocyst and splenic vein. We concluded that the etiology of the PVT was not only inflammatory extension from pancreatitis but also a fistula between the pancreatic duct and the splenic vein. PMID:26183509

  16. Frey operation for chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Skórzewska, Magdalena; Romanowicz, Tomasz; Mielko, Jerzy; Kurylcio, Andrzej; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Zymon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas, which increases susceptibility to recurrent pancreatitis. Usually, after failure of initial endoscopic therapies, surgical treatment combining pancreatic resection or drainage is used. The Frey procedure is used for chronic pancreatitis, but it has not been reported to be applied in an adult patient with PD-associated pancreatitis. The purpose of the paper was to describe effective treatment of this rare condition by the Frey procedure after failure of interventional endoscopic treatment. A 39-year-old female patient was initially treated for recurrent acute pancreatitis. After endoscopic diagnosis of PD, the minor duodenal papilla was incised and a plastic stent was inserted into the dorsal pancreatic duct. During the following 36 months, the patient was hospitalised several times because of recurrent episodes of pancreatitis. Thereafter, local resection of the pancreatic head combined with lateral pancreaticojejunostomy was performed with no complications. After 54 months of follow-up, the patient demonstrates abnormal glucose metabolism, with a need for enzyme supplementation, and she is free of pain. Local resection of the pancreatic head combined with lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Frey procedure) offers a favourable outcome after failure of endoscopic papillotomy and duct stenting for pancreatitis associated with PD. PMID:25097717

  17. Management of pancreatic fluid collections: A comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Karia, Kunal; Gabr, Moamen; Desai, Amit; Doshi, Rushabh; Gaidhane, Monica; Sharaiha, Reem Z; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are a frequent complication of pancreatitis. It is important to classify PFCs to guide management. The revised Atlanta criteria classifies PFCs as acute or chronic, with chronic fluid collections subdivided into pseudocysts and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN). Establishing adequate nutritional support is an essential step in the management of PFCs. Early attempts at oral feeding can be trialed in patients with mild pancreatitis. Enteral feeding should be implemented in patients with moderate to severe pancreatitis. Jejunal feeding remains the preferred route of enteral nutrition. Symptomatic PFCs require drainage; options include surgical, percutaneous, or endoscopic approaches. With the advent of newer and more advanced endoscopic tools and expertise, and an associated reduction in health care costs, minimally invasive endoscopic drainage has become the preferable approach. An endoscopic ultrasonography-guided approach using a seldinger technique is the preferred endoscopic approach. Both plastic stents and metal stents are efficacious and safe; however, metal stents may offer an advantage, especially in infected pseudocysts and in WOPN. Direct endoscopic necrosectomy is often required in WOPN. Lumen apposing metal stents that allow for direct endoscopic necrosectomy and debridement through the stent lumen are preferred in these patients. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography with pancreatic duct (PD) exploration should be performed concurrent to PFC drainage. PD disruption is associated with an increased severity of pancreatitis, an increased risk of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis and long-term complications, and a decreased rate of PFC resolution after drainage. Any pancreatic ductal disruption should be bridged with endoscopic stenting. PMID:26900288

  18. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation for Clearance of Occluded Metal Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Madhava; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Doros, Attila; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Habib, Nagy

    2013-07-11

    PurposeThe major complication occurring with biliary stents is stent occlusion, frequently seen because of tumour in-growth, epithelial hyperplasia, and sludge deposits, resulting in recurrent jaundice and cholangitis. We report a prospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation to clear the blocked metal stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a novel bipolar RF catheter.MethodsNine patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary RF ablation through the blocked metal stent following external biliary decompression with an internal–external biliary drainage.ResultsAll nine patients had their stent patency restored successfully without the use of secondary stents. Following this intervention, there was no 30-day mortality, haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the nine patients, six are alive and three patients are dead with a median follow-up of 122 (range 50–488) days and a median stent patency of 102.5 (range 50–321) days. Six patients had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. Three patients with stent blockage at 321, 290, and 65 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and repeat ablation.ConclusionsIn this selective group of patients, it appears that this new approach is safe and feasible. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  19. Control of Granule Mobility and Exocytosis by Ca2+-Dependent Formation of F-Actin in Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Kim, Mean-Hwan; Hille, Bertil; Koh, Duk-Su

    2009-01-01

    Elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) triggers exocytosis of secretory granules in pancreatic duct epithelia. In this study, we find that the signal also controls granule movement. Motions of fluorescently labeled granules stopped abruptly after a [Ca2+]i increase, kinetically coincident with formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) in the whole cytoplasm. At high resolution, the new F-actin meshwork was so dense that cellular structures of granule size appeared physically trapped in it. Depolymerization of F-actin with latrunculin B blocked both the F-actin formation and the arrest of granules. Interestingly, when monitored with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, the immobilized granules still moved slowly and concertedly toward the plasma membrane. This group translocation was abolished by blockers of myosin. Exocytosis measured by microamperometry suggested that formation of a dense F-actin meshwork inhibited exocytosis at small Ca2+ rises <1 μm. Larger [Ca2+]i rises increased exocytosis because of the co-ordinate translocation of granules and fusion to the membrane. We propose that the Ca2+-dependent freezing of granules filters out weak inputs but allows exocytosis under stronger inputs by controlling granule movements. PMID:19192247

  20. A Double-Layered Covered Biliary Metal Stent for the Management of Unresectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Multicenter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Kyu Taek; Dong, Seok Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The covered self-expandable metal stent (CMS) was developed to prevent tumor ingrowth-induced stent occlusion during the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, complications such as cholecystitis, pancreatitis, and stent migration can occur after the endoscopic insertion of CMSs. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a double-layered CMS (DCMS) for the management of malignant bile duct obstruction. Methods DCMSs were endoscopically introduced into 59 patients with unresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction at four tertiary referral centers, and the patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Results Both the technical and functional success rates were 100%. Procedure-related complications including pancreatitis, cholangitis, stent migration, and liver abscess occurred in five patients (8.5%). The median follow-up period was 265 days (range, 31 to 752 days). Cumulative stent patency rates were 68.2% and 40.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At the final follow-up, the rate of stent occlusion was 33.9% (20/59), and the median stent patency period was 276 days (range, 2 to 706 days). Conclusions The clinical outcomes of DCMSs were comparable to the outcomes previously reported for CMSs with respect to stent patency period and complication rates. PMID:27172927

  1. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  2. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brugge, William R; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  3. The Crosstalk between Nrf2 and TGF-β1 in the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Arfmann-Knübel, Sarah; Struck, Birte; Genrich, Geeske; Helm, Ole; Sipos, Bence; Sebens, Susanne; Schäfer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Nrf2 and TGF-β1 both affect tumorigenesis in a dual fashion, either by preventing carcinogen induced carcinogenesis and suppressing tumor growth, respectively, or by conferring cytoprotection and invasiveness to tumor cells during malignant transformation. Given the involvement of Nrf2 and TGF-β1 in the adaptation of epithelial cells to persistent inflammatory stress, e.g. of the pancreatic duct epithelium during chronic pancreatitis, a crosstalk between Nrf2 and TGF-β1 can be envisaged. By using premalignant human pancreatic duct cells (HPDE) and the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line Colo357, we could show that Nrf2 and TGF-β1 independently but additively conferred an invasive phenotype to HPDE cells, whereas acting synergistically in Colo357 cells. This was accompanied by differential regulation of EMT markers like vimentin, Slug, L1CAM and E-cadherin. Nrf2 activation suppressed E-cadherin expression through an as yet unidentified ARE related site in the E-cadherin promoter, attenuated TGF-β1 induced Smad2/3-activity and enhanced JNK-signaling. In Colo357 cells, TGF-β1 itself was capable of inducing Nrf2 whereas in HPDE cells TGF-β1 per-se did not affect Nrf2 activity, but enhanced Nrf2 induction by tBHQ. In Colo357, but not in HPDE cells, the effects of TGF-β1 on invasion were sensitive to Nrf2 knock-down. In both cell lines, E-cadherin re-expression inhibited the proinvasive effect of Nrf2. Thus, the increased invasion of both cell lines relates to the Nrf2-dependent downregulation of E-cadherin expression. In line, immunohistochemistry analysis of human pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias in pancreatic tissues from chronic pancreatitis patients revealed strong Nrf2 activity already in premalignant epithelial duct cells, accompanied by partial loss of E-cadherin expression. Our findings indicate that Nrf2 and TGF-β1 both contribute to malignant transformation through distinct EMT related mechanisms accounting for an invasive phenotype

  4. [Nutrition, probiotics, antibiotics, antioxidative therapy, endoscopy in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mössner, J

    2006-10-18

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis is dependent on the stage of the disease and consists of several arms: treatment of pain when ever possible according to its pathogenesis; treatment of complications primarily by interventional endoscopy, in cases of failure by surgery; therapy of exocrine insufficiency with porcine pancreatic extracts; treatment of endocrine insufficiency with insulin. Pseudocysts can be drained according to their location by either the transgastric, transduodenal, transpapillary or transcutaneous route. Distal prepapillary stenoses of the main pancreatic duct can be handled by placement of a plastic stent; similarily to treatment of biliary strictures. Stones leading to obstruction of the main pancreatic duct can be disintegrated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and the fragments removed by endoscopy after papillotomy. Transgastral endoscopic drainage of retroperitoneal necroses is still experimental. Prospective randomized multicenter trials comparing surgery with interventional endoscopy are still lacking. Failure of endoscopic therapy or suspicion of tumor is clearly an indication for surgery. There is no need for a specific diet in patients with chronic pancreatitis without having diabetes. In severe attacks, clinically similar to acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition via a jejunal tube is replacing parenteral nutrition. However, prospective comparative trials are still mandatory. Prophylactic application of antibiotics in patients with pancreatic necrosis is again under debate. Whether probiotics are capable to decrease the risk of secondary pancreatic infection of necrosis has not been thoroughly studied. The hypothesis that capture of oxygen free radicals by drugs such as selenium may prevent frequency and severity of acute relapses has also not been proven.

  5. Retroperitoneal perforation of the duodenum from biliary stent erosion.

    PubMed

    Miller, George; Yim, Duke; Macari, Michael; Harris, Marsha; Shamamian, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopically placed biliary stents have supplanted surgical decompression as the preferred treatment option for patients with obstructive jaundice from advanced pancreatic cancer. An unusual complication of indewelling biliary stents is duodenal perforation into the retroperitoneum. We describe the case of a patient with end-stage pancreatic cancer who presented with an acute abdomen from erosion of a previously placed bile duct stent through the wall of the second portion of the duodenum. Although our patient presented with advanced symptoms, clinical presentations can vary from mild abdominal discomfort and general malaise to overt septic shock. Definitive diagnosis is best made with computed tomography (CT) imaging, which can detect traces of retroperitoneal air and fluid. Treatment options vary from nonoperative management with antibiotics, bowel rest, and parenteral alimentation in the most stable patients to definitive surgery with complete diversion of gastric contents and biliary flow from the affected area in patients with clinical symptoms or radiologic evidence suggesting extensive contamination. Complications of management can include duodenal fistulization, residual retroperitoneal or intrabdominal abscess, and ongoing sepsis. This report highlights the salient issues in the presentation, diagnosis, and modern management of patients with this rare complication of indwelling biliary stents.

  6. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  7. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  8. Surgical Injury to the Mouse Pancreas through Ligation of the Pancreatic Duct as a Model for Endocrine and Exocrine Reprogramming and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Van Gassen, Naomi; Staels, Willem; Cai, Ying; Yuchi, Yixing; Coppens, Violette; De Leu, Nico; Heremans, Yves; Baeyens, Luc; Van de Casteele, Mark; Heimberg, Harry

    2015-08-07

    Expansion of pancreatic beta cells in vivo or ex vivo, or generation of beta cells by differentiation from an embryonic or adult stem cell, can provide new expandable sources of beta cells to alleviate the donor scarcity in human islet transplantation as therapy for diabetes. Although recent advances have been made towards this aim, mechanisms that regulate beta cell expansion and differentiation from a stem/progenitor cell remain to be characterized. Here, we describe a protocol for an injury model in the adult mouse pancreas that can function as a tool to study mechanisms of tissue remodeling and beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Partial duct ligation (PDL) is an experimentally induced injury of the rodent pancreas involving surgical ligation of the main pancreatic duct resulting in an obstruction of drainage of exocrine products out of the tail region of the pancreas. The inflicted damage induces acinar atrophy, immune cell infiltration and severe tissue remodeling. We have previously reported the activation of Neurogenin (Ngn) 3 expressing endogenous progenitor-like cells and an increase in beta cell proliferation after PDL. Therefore, PDL provides a basis to study signals involved in beta cell dynamics and the properties of an endocrine progenitor in adult pancreas. Since, it still remains largely unclear, which factors and pathways contribute to beta cell neogenesis and proliferation in PDL, a standardized protocol for PDL will allow for comparison across laboratories.

  9. Endoscopic treatment of large pancreatic fluid collections (PFC) using self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) – a two-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Dalton Marques; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Carneiro, Fred; Medrado, Bruno; dos Santos, Marcos; Wodak, Stephanie; Reimão, Sílvia; Sakai, Paulo; de Moura, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background/study aim: During the last several years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic fluid collections’ (PFC) drainage has evolved into the preferred drainage technique. Recently, self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) have been used as an alternative to double pigtail stents, with the advantage of providing a larger diameter fistula, thereby decreasing the risk of early obstruction and also allowing for direct endoscopic exploration of the cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success, safety, and outcome of patients undergoing EUS-guided drainage of complex PFC using SEMS. Patients/materials and methods: The study was conducted at two tertiary hospitals from January 2010 to January 2013. All patients with PFC referred for endoscopic drainage were enrolled in a prospective database. The inclusion criteria were: (1) patients with pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis based on the revised Atlanta classification; (2) symptomatic patients with thick PFC; (3) PFC that persisted more than 6 weeks; and (4) large PFC diameter (≥ 9 cm). The exclusion criteria consisted of coagulation disorders, PFC bleeding or infection, and failure-to-inform written consent. Results: A total of 16 patients (9 females, 7 males; mean age 52.6, range 20 – 82) underwent EUS drainage with SEMS. There were 14 cases of pseudocysts and 2 cases of walled-off necrosis. The etiologies of the PFC were mainly gallstones (8 of 16 patients, 50 %) and alcohol (5 of 16 patients, 31 %). Technical success was achieved in 100 % of the cases. All patients had a complete resolution of the PFC. Conclusion: Transmural EUS-guided drainage of complex PFC using SEMS is feasible, appears safe, and is efficacious. However, the exchange of the UC (uncovered)-SEMS for plastic stents is mandatory within 1 week. Future prospective studies, preferably multicenter studies, comparing SEMS versus traditional plastic stents for the drainage of PFC are

  10. Palliative Portal Vein Stent Placement in Malignant and Symptomatic Extrinsic Portal Vein Stenosis or Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Novellas, Sebastien; Denys, Alban Bize, Pierre; Brunner, Philippe; Motamedi, Jean Paul; Gugenheim, Jean; Caroli, Francois-Xavier; Chevallier, Patrick

    2009-05-15

    This article evaluates the results of portal vein (PV) stent placement in patients with malignant extrinsic lesions stenosing or obstructing the PV and causing symptomatic PV hypertension (PVHT). Fourteen patients with bile duct cancer (n = 7), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 4), or another cancer (n = 3) underwent percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement because of gastroesophageal or jejunal varices (n = 9), ascites (n = 7), and/or thrombocytopenia (n = 2). Concurrent tumoral obstruction of the main bile duct was treated via the transhepatic route in the same session in four patients. Changes in portal venous pressure, complications, stent patency, and survival were evaluated. Mean {+-} standard deviation (SD) gradient of portal venous pressure decreased significantly immediately after stent placement from 11.2 mmHg {+-} 4.6 to 1.1 mmHg {+-} 1.0 (P < 0.00001). Three patients had minor complications, and one developed a liver abscess. During a mean {+-} SD follow-up of 134.4 {+-} 123.3 days, portal stents remained patent in 11 patients (78.6%); stent occlusion occurred in 3 patients, 2 of whom had undergone previous major hepatectomy. After stent placement, PVHT symptoms were relieved in four (57.1%) of seven patients who died (mean survival, 97 {+-} 71.2 days), and relieved in six (85.7%) of seven patients still alive at the end of follow-up (mean follow-up, 171.7 {+-} 153.5 days). Stent placement in the PV is feasible and relatively safe. It helped to relieve PVHT symptoms in a single session.

  11. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  12. Impaired pancreatic duct-cell growth in focal areas of regeneration after partial pancreatectomy in the adult Goto-Kakizaki rat, a spontaneous model of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Plachot, C; Portha, B

    2001-03-01

    The Paris colony of adult Goto-Kakizaki (GK/Par) rat, a genetic model of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, is characterized by a restriction of the beta-cell mass and reduced beta-cell regeneration capacity. In order to have a better understanding of the impaired mechanism(s) leading to reduced beta-cell plasticity in the GK/Par rat, we have investigated duct-cell growth capacity following 90% pancreatectomy, a well-defined procedure leading in non-diabetic rats, to sequential duct proliferation and subsequent differentiation. To this aim, we have performed pancreatectomy in 8-10-week-old male normoglycaemic Wistar and diabetic GK rats. Duct-cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated at different time points: day 0 (D0), day 2 (D2), day 7 (D7) and day 14 (D14) after pancreatectomy. A transient wave of duct-cell proliferation was observed on D2 in both small and main ducts in the pancreatectomized Wistar rats. A similar increase occurred in the similarly treated GK rats, but to a higher extent as compared to the Wistar rats. Thereafter, duct-cell proliferation from main or small ducts returned to non-pancreatectomized values on D7 and remained at this level on D14 in both the Wistar and GK pancreatectomized groups. In the common pancreatic duct, the number of proliferative duct-cells was higher in GK rats compared to Wistar on D0. In both the operated Wistar and GK rats, duct-cell proliferation from the common pancreatic duct similarly decreased on D2. On D7 and D14, the same parameter returned to non-pancreatectomized values in the Wistar rats, while it was maintained lower in the GK rats as compared to the GK values on D0. In focal areas of regeneration, duct-cell proliferation was significantly lower in the pancreatectomized GK group compared to the age-related Wistar group on D7 (Wistar: 5.85+/-0.98%, GK: 3.02+/-0.69%; p < 0.01) and D14 (Wistar: 3.82+/-0.29%, GK: 2.62+/-0.27%; ns). Only a few apoptotic duct-cells were observed, with no difference

  13. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  14. One-step endosonography-guided drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst: a new technique of stent delivery through the echo endoscope.

    PubMed

    Vilmann, P; Hancke, S; Pless, T; Schell-Hincke, J D; Henriksen, F W

    1998-10-01

    We report here the first case of a one-step endosonography(EUS)-guided pseudocyst drainage. A prototype large channel curved array echo endoscope (Pentax FG-38 UX) and a prototype delivery system for placement of an endoprosthesis was used for the procedure. The delivery system (GIP MedicinTechnik GmbH/Medi-Globe Corporation) consists of a handle part with a piston, a metal ring sheath, a plastic catheter with a diathermy needle and a double pigtail endoprosthesis (8.5 Fr). When mounted on the endoscope the endoprosthesis can be advanced out of the distal end of the endoscope. The introduction of the stent as well as the stent release can be monitored entirely by ultrasound. The procedure was tested in a 76-year-old woman with a pseudocyst measuring 60 mm in diameter located in the tail of the pancreas. The procedure was well tolerated by the patient, and there were no procedural complications. The advantage of a large channel echo endoscope and our new prototype delivery system is that the endoprosthesis can be inserted in to a pancreatic cyst guided exclusively by EUS without exchange of endoscopes, catheters or guide wires. Further studies are warranted. PMID:9865567

  15. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  17. In vitro expansion and differentiation of rat pancreatic duct-derived stem cells into insulin secreting cells using a dynamicthree-dimensional cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Chen, X C; Liu, H; Li, H; Cheng, Y; Yang, L; Liu, Y F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture technology was used to expand and differentiate rat pancreatic duct-derived stem cells (PDSCs) into islet-like cell clusters that can secrete insulin. PDSCs were isolated from rat pancreatic tissues by in situ collagenase digestion and density gradient centrifugation. Using a dynamic three-dimensional culture technique, the cells were expanded and differentiated into functional islet-like cell clusters, which were characterized by morphological and phenotype analyses. After maintaining 1 x 108 isolated rat PDSCs in a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture for 7 days, 1.5 x 109 cells could be harvested. Passaged PDSCs expressed markers of pancreatic endocrine progenitors, including CD29 (86.17%), CD73 (90.73%), CD90 (84.13%), CD105 (78.28%), and Pdx-1. Following 14 additional days of culture in serum-free medium with nicotinamide, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and b fibroblast growth factor (FGF), the cells were differentiated into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). The ICC morphology reflected that of fused cell clusters. During the late stage of differentiation, representative clusters were non-adherent and expressed insulin indicated by dithizone (DTZ)-positive staining. Insulin was detected in the extracellular fluid and cytoplasm of ICCs after 14 days of differentiation. Additionally, insulin levels were significantly higher at this time compared with the levels exhibited by PDSCs before differentiation (P < 0.01). By using a dynamic three-dimensional cell culture system, PDSCs can be expanded in vitro and can differentiate into functional islet-like cell clusters. PMID:27420984

  18. The three-dimensional microanatomy of the pancreatic duct system in the Japanese monkey, Macaca fuscata, with special reference to fine proximal passages of a high species-specificity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Iwanaga, Hiromi

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown the duct system in the rat pancreas to consist of two parts: a fine proximal (intercalated) duct and thicker distal (intralobular and interlobular) duct, with the latter part displaying morphological signs indicative of a bicarbonate-rich fluid secretion. In this study the pancreatic duct system in the Japanese monkey Macaca fuscata was observed by scanning electron microscopy after the hydrolytic exposure of cell surfaces as well as by transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections. Cellular expression of the water channel aquaporin 1 (AQP1) was also examined immunohistochemically. In contrast to the segmented duct system in the rat, all the duct cells in the monkey pancreas consistently displayed rich mitochondria in the cytoplasm, elaborate interdigitations of cell processes, and an intense immunoreactivity for AQP1 on the apical and basolateral cell membrane to favor active ion transport and osmotic water movement across the epithelium. Both the existence of secretory canaliculi and basal trabeculae in the duct epithelium and randomized localization of primary cilia on the luminal cell surfaces were demonstrated for the first time in monkeys, and the physiological implications of these phenomena are discussed.

  19. Stent Scraping for Histology: An Alternative Method for Obtaining Tissue to Rule out Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Veerappan, Annamali; Prudente, Romulo; Kasmin, Franklin E.; Cohen, Seth A.

    1994-01-01

    Despite improvement in diagnostic modalities, confirmation of a histologic diagnosis of cancer of the biliary tree and pancreas remains elusive. Attempts to collect positive cytology specimens from vigorous brushings or washings obtained at endoscopy or percutaneously are often unsuccessful. In our unit, we have increased the yield by obtaining tissue scraped from prostheses that have been previously placed in either the bile duct or the pancreatic duct. The stents are first flushed with saline to collect cytology specimens, after which, they are bisected and scraped, and these contents are prepared in a manner similar to that used to prepare biopsy samples. Twelve of 16 scraped samples, 9 bile duct and 3 pancreas, were positive for adenocarcinoma. The cytology specimens were positive in only 4 of the 12. We recommend this method of sampling from material contained within prostheses as an adjunct when previous brushings, washings, or biopsies are negative. PMID:18493350

  20. Oral Supplementation with a Special Additive of Retinyl Palmitate and Alpha Tocopherol Reduces Growth Retardation in Young Pancreatic Duct Ligated Pigs Used as a Model for Children Suffering from Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mößeler, Anne; Schmicke, Marion; Höltershinken, Martin; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) is a disease of diverse aetiology—e.g., majority of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) show PEI congenitally. Malnutrition and malabsorption of nutrients impair growth and nutritional status. As reduced fat digestion leads to a deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins the supplementation is standard, but absorption is a critical point in PEI-patients. The pancreatic duct ligated (PL) pig is an established model for PEI in humans and has been proven to be a suitable model to compare different vitamin additives for supplementation. In a former study, PEI caused distinct growth retardation in young piglets, but did not affect growth in older ones. Our study hypothesised that this age-dependent effect is caused by exhausted body reserves of fat-soluble vitamins and, therefore, extra supply reduces growth retardation. PEI was induced by PL at the age of seven (PL-7) or 16 weeks (PL-16). Controls (C) underwent a sham surgery. Some PL-7 pigs (PL-7 + Vit) were fed a special vitamin additive. PEI reduced the mean final body weight (kg) at 26 weeks of age significantly with lower effect in PL-16-pigs (C:117; PL-7:49.5; PL-7 + Vit:77.1; PL-16:96.4). Extra vitamin supply resulted in an increased growth and normalised serum concentration of alpha-tocopherol, underlining the importance of special supplementation in PEI-patients. PMID:27690005

  1. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  3. Stages of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  4. Obstructing pseudocyst of the duct of Santorini in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Browder, W; Gravois, E; Vega, P; Ertan, A

    1987-03-01

    Pancreas divisum is a pancreatic duct anomaly that occurs due to failure of fusion of the dorsal and ventral ducts. While recognition of this anomaly is increasing due to more aggressive endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, its significance remains unclear. A patient with chronic pancreatitis and a history of alcohol abuse was noted to have pancreas divisum. At surgical exploration, intraoperative pancreatography revealed an obstructing pseudocyst of the duct of Santorini. Extended sphincteroplasty and cystduodenostomy as well as Roux-en-Y pancreatojejunostomy were necessary to insure adequate accessory duct drainage. Surgical therapy of pancreas divisum in chronic pancreatitis should be designed to correct existing pancreatic duct obstruction.

  5. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  6. 3,5,3'-Triiodo-L-thyronine enhances the differentiation of a human pancreatic duct cell line (hPANC-1) towards a beta-cell-Like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Silvia; Anastasi, Emanuela; Sciacchitano, Salvatore; Verga Falzacappa, Cecilia; Panacchia, Laura; Bucci, Barbara; Khouri, Daniele; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Brunetti, Ercole; Di Mario, Umberto; Toscano, Vincenzo; Perfetti, Riccardo

    2005-07-01

    The thyroid hormone, 3,5,3'-Triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), is essential for growth, differentiation, and regulation of metabolic functions in multicellular organisms, although the specific mechanisms of this control are still unknown. In this study, treatment of a human pancreatic duct cell line (hPANC-1) with T3 blocks cell growth by an increase of cells in G(0)/G(1) cell cycle phase and enhances morphological and functional changes as indicated by the marked increase in the synthesis of insulin and the parallel decrease of the ductal differentiation marker cytokeratin19. Expression analysis of some of the genes regulating pancreatic beta-cell differentiation revealed a time-dependent increase in insulin and glut2 mRNA levels in response to T3. As last step of the acquisition of a beta-cell-like phenotype, we present evidence that thyroid hormones are able to increase the release of insulin into the culture medium. In conclusion, our results suggest, for the first time, that thyroid hormones induce cell cycle perturbations and play an important role in the process of transdifferentiation of a human pancreatic duct line (hPANC-1) into pancreatic-beta-cell-like cells. These findings have important implications in cell-therapy based treatment of diabetes and may provide important insights in the designing of novel therapeutic agents to restore normal glycemia in subjects with diabetes.

  7. Endoscopic pancreatic and biliary manometry in pancreatic, biliary, and papillary disease, and after endoscopic sphincterotomy and surgical sphincteroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, J A; Carr-Locke, D L

    1984-01-01

    Endoscopic manometry was used to measure pancreatic duct, common bile duct, pancreatic duct sphincter and bile duct sphincter pressures in 43 healthy volunteers and 162 patients with a variety of papillary, pancreatic and biliary disorders. Common bile duct pressure was significantly raised after cholecystectomy, with common bile duct stones and papillary stenosis but pancreatic duct pressure only in papillary stenosis. After endoscopic sphincterotomy mean common bile duct pressure fell from 11.2 to 1.1 mmHg and pancreatic duct pressure from 18.0 to 11.2 mmHg. Distinct pancreatic duct sphincter and bile duct sphincter zones were identified as phasic pressures of 3-12 waves/minute on pull-through from pancreatic duct and common bile duct to duodenum. Pancreatic duct sphincter pressures were higher with common bile duct stones and stenosis whereas bile duct sphincter pressures were higher in pancreatitis and stenosis. Bile duct sphincter activity was present in 60% of patients after surgical sphincteroplasty but 21% of patients after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic manometry facilitated the diagnosis of papillary stenosis, has allowed study of papillary pathophysiology and has shown a functional inter-relationship between the two sphincteric zones. PMID:6500363

  8. Deciphering Autoimmune Pancreatitis, a Great Mimicker: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sageer, Mohammed; Sterling, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an atypical chronic inflammatory pancreatic disease that appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms. In recent years, AIP has presented as a new clinical entity with its protean pancreaticobiliary and systemic presentations. Its unique pathology and overlap of clinical and radiological features and absence of serological markers foster the disease's unique position. We report a case of diffuse type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis with obstructive jaundice managed with biliary sphincterotomy, stent placement, and corticosteroids. A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice. Workup showed elevated liver function tests (LFT) suggestive of obstructive jaundice, MRCP done showed diffusely enlarged abnormal appearing pancreas with loss of normal lobulated contours, and IgG4 antibody level was 765 mg/dL. EUS revealed a diffusely hypoechoic and rounded pancreatic parenchyma with distal common bile duct (CBD) stricture and dilated proximal CBD and common hepatic duct (CHD). ERCP showed tight mid to distal CBD stricture that needed dilatation, sphincterotomy, and placement of stent that led to significant improvement in the symptoms and bilirubin level. Based on clinical, radiological, and immunological findings, a definitive diagnosis of AIP was made. Patient was started on prednisone 40 mg/day and she clinically responded in 4 weeks. PMID:25705529

  9. Combined use of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging for improved monitoring of stenting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysewska-Sobusiak, A. R.; Sowier, A.; Skrzywanek, P.

    2005-09-01

    The subject of this paper concerns advanced techniques of procedures and imaging used in minimally invasive surgery and in non-operable cases of the alimentary tract tumor therapy. Examples of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging used for the application of stents (prostheses) and catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and endo-therapeutic procedures are described. The possibility was indicated to elaborate a new method of proceeding in tumor therapy in the patients for whom the methods used so far were ineffective. In the paper examples of combined imaging the application of metallic stents and plastic catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are presented. The cases shown refer to tumor located in the esophagus and in the bile and pancreatic ducts.

  10. Belgian consensus on chronic pancreatitis in adults and children: statements on diagnosis and nutritional, medical, and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Delhaye, Myriam; Van Steenbergen, Werner; Cesmeli, Ercan; Pelckmans, Paul; Putzeys, Virginie; Roeyen, Geert; Berrevoet, Frederik; Scheers, Isabelle; Ausloos, Floriane; Gast, Pierrette; Ysebaert, Dirk; Plat, Laurence; van der Wijst, Edwin; Hans, Guy; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Deprez, Pierre H

    2014-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disorder characterized by inflammation and fibrosis, resulting in a progressive and irreversible destruction of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic tissue. Clinicians should attempt to classify patients into one of the six etiologic groups according to the TIGARO classification system. MRI/MRCP, if possible with secretin enhancement, is considered the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of early-stage disease.In CP, pain is the most disabling symptom, with a significant impact on quality of life. Pain should be assessed using the Izbicki score and preferably treated using the "pain ladder" approach. In painful CP, endoscopic therapy (ET) can be considered as early as possible. This procedure can be combined with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the presence of large (> 4 mm), obstructive stone(s) in the pancreatic head, and with ductal stenting in the presence of a single main pancreatic duct (MPD) stricture in the pancreatic head with a markedly dilated MPD. Pancreatic stenting should be pursued for at least 12 months in patients with persistent pain relief. On-demand stent exchange should be the preferred strategy. The simultaneous placement of multiple, side-by-side, pancreatic stents can be recommended in patients with MPD strictures persisting after 12 months of single plastic stenting. We recommend surgery in the following cases: a) technical failure of ET ; b) early (6 to 8 weeks) clinical failure ; c) definitive biliary drainage at a later time point; d) pancreatic ductal drainage when repetitive ET is considered unsuitable for young patients; e) resection of an inflammatory pancreatic head when pancreatic cancer cannot be ruled out; f) duodenal obstruction. Duodenopancreatectomy or oncological distal pancreatectomy should be considered for patients with suspected malignancy. Pediatricians should be aware of and systematically search for CP in the differential diagnosis of chronic abdominal

  11. Surgical palliation of advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bahra, M; Jacob, D

    2008-01-01

    In about 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is not feasible at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, palliative treatment plays a key role in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The defined goals of palliative treatment are: reduction of symptoms, reduction of in-hospital stays, and an adequate control of pain. In patients with nonresectable pancreatic carcinoma the leading goal of palliative strategies should be the control of biliary and duodenal obstructions such as jaundice-associated pruritus or sustained nausea and vomiting due to gastric outlet obstruction. Although the role of endoscopy for palliation has been increasing, operative palliation is still indicated in selected cases. Obstructive jaundice is found in approximately 70% of patients suffering from carcinoma of the pancreatic head at diagnosis and has to be eliminated to avoid progressive liver dysfunction and liver failure. In up to 50% of patients with pancreatic cancer, clinical symptoms such as nausea and vomiting occur. For the treatment of malignant biliary obstructions in patients with pancreatic carcinoma, endoscopic biliary drainage is the option of first choice. In case of persistent stent-problems such as occlusion or recurrent cholangitis, a hepaticojejunostomy should be considered. The role of a prophylactic gastroenterostomy is still under discussion. In patients with combined biliary and gastric obstruction a combined bypass should be performed to avoid a second operation. The significance of laparoscopic biliary bypass is not yet clear. A surgical, minimally invasive approach for treating bile duct obstruction is not the standard nowadays. The role of surgical pain relief is mostly negligible today. Computed tomography (CT)- or EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis has replaced surgical intervention today. The significance of palliative resections is currently a controversial topic. However, beyond controlled randomized studies, a palliative pancreaticoduodenectomy

  12. A two-center comparative study of plastic and lumen-apposing large diameter self-expandable metallic stents in endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Orkoonsawat, Piyachai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of walled-off pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) (pseudocyst [PC]; walled-off necrosis [WON]) utilizes double pigtail plastic stents (PS) and the newer large diameter fully covered self-expandable stents (FCSEMS) customized for PFC drainage. This study examined the impact of type of stent on clinical outcomes and costs. Patients and Methods: Retrospective two-center study. Outcome variables were technical and clinical success, need for repeat procedures, need for direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN), and procedure-related costs. Results: A total of 49 (PC: 31, WON: 18) patients were analyzed. Initially, PS was used in 37 and FCSEMS in 12. Repeat transmural drainage was required in 14 (PS: 13 [9 treated with PS, 4 treated with FCSEMS]; FCSEMS: 1 [treated with PS]) due to stent migration (PS: 3; FCSEMS: 1) or inadequate drainage (PS: 10). Technical success was 100%. Initial clinical success was 64.9% (25/38) for PS versus 91.7% (11/12) for FCSEMS (P = 0.074). With repeat transmural stenting, final clinical success was achieved in 94.6% and 100%, respectively (P = 0.411). Compared to FCSEMS, PS was associated with greater need for repeat drainage (34.2% vs. 6.3%, P = 0.032). The need for and frequency of DEN was similar between both groups, but PS required more frequent balloon dilatation. PS was significantly cheaper for noninfected PC. Costs were similar for infected PC and WON. Conclusion: PS was associated with a higher need for a second drainage procedure to achieve clinical success. The use of FCSEMS did not increase procedural costs for infected PC and WON. PMID:27803905

  13. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  15. Histopathologically Proven Autoimmune Pancreatitis Mimicking Neuroendocrine Tumor or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

  16. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  17. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  19. Wirsung and Santorini: the men behind the ducts.

    PubMed

    Flati, Giancarlo; Andrén-Sandberg, Ake

    2002-01-01

    During the 16th and 17th centuries, several important discoveries were accomplished by anatomists whose contribution has enlightened the most important anatomic structures of the pancreas. Following the earliest discoveries, researchers of several medical specialities further investigated the ductal pancreatic system. The accessory pancreatic duct with its minor papilla, the main pancreatic duct and the papilla major along with the confluence of the main pancreatic duct with the bile duct and pancreas divisum, have been the objects of interest of several personalities of the medical history. Eponyms in pancreatic anatomy were given to remember some of them, although anatomical misattributions are frequent and controversial. The aim of the authors was to dedicate a small tribute to the researchers who have written, during the last 500 years, important chapters of the medical history and who dedicated their lives to study the pancreatic ducts and their duodenal endings. Furthermore, a brief outlook was dedicated to the impact of anatomic variations and of embryologic anomalies of the pancreatic ducts in our clinical practice and in our actual understanding of duct-related diseases. The authors are confident that the genial curiosity of few extraordinary personalities of the past and the opportunities provided by modern technology continue to play a major role that may finally add wisdom to decision-making in dealing with duct-related biliopancreatic diseases and safety to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures employed.

  20. Polymeric photosensitizer-embedded self-expanding metal stent for repeatable endoscopic photodynamic therapy of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bae, Byoung-chan; Yang, Su-Geun; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Na, Kun; Kim, Joon Mee; Costamagna, Guido; Kozarek, Richard A; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Deviere, Jacques; Seo, Dong Wan; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new therapeutic approach for the palliative treatment of malignant bile duct obstruction. In this study, we designed photosensitizer-embedded self-expanding nonvascular metal stent (PDT-stent) which allows repeatable photodynamic treatment of cholangiocarcinoma without systemic injection of photosensitizer. Polymeric photosensitizer (pullulan acetate-conjugated pheophorbide A; PPA) was incorporated in self-expanding nonvascular metal stent. Residence of PPA in the stent was estimated in buffer solution and subcutaneous implantation on mouse. Photodynamic activity of PDT-stent was evaluated through laserexposure on stent-layered tumor cell lines, HCT-116 tumor-xenograft mouse models and endoscopic intervention of PDT-stent on bile duct of mini pigs. Photo-fluorescence imaging of the PDT-stent demonstrated homogeneous embedding of polymeric Pheo-A (PPA) on stent membrane. PDT-stent sustained its photodynamic activities at least for 2 month. And which implies repeatable endoscopic PDT is possible after stent emplacement. The PDT-stent after light exposure successfully generated cytotoxic singlet oxygen in the surrounding tissues, inducing apoptotic degradation of tumor cells and regression of xenograft tumors on mouse models. Endoscopic biliary in-stent photodynamic treatments on minipigs also suggested the potential efficacy of PDT-stent on cholangiocarcinoma. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed our PDT-stent, allows repeatable endoscopic biliary PDT, has the potential for the combination therapy (stent plus PDT) of cholangiocarcinoma.

  1. Risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis: a systematic review of clinical trials with a large sample size in the past 10 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common and most severe complication associated with diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP. A multivariate analysis of risk factors for PEP is essential for identifying patients at high risk and subsequently choosing other suitable diagnoses. Methods Pertinent publications were identified through systematic searches of MEDLINE, Elsevier, and Springer; we performed a systematic review of 12 clinical studies published in the past ten years, selected out of 451 reviewed articles, in which risk factors for pancreatitis were identified. Seven probable risk factors were evaluated, and outcomes expressed in the case of dichotomous variables, as an odds ratio (OR) (with a 95% confidence interval, 95% CI). Results When the risk factors were analyzed, the OR for female gender was 1.40 (95% CI 1.24 to 1.58); the OR for previous PEP was 3.23 (95% CI 2.48 to 4.22); the OR for previous pancreatitis was 2.00 (95% CI 1.72 to 2.33); the OR for endoscopic sphincterotomy was 1.42 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.78); the OR for precut sphincterotomy was 2.11 (95% CI 1.72 to 2.59); the OR for Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction was 4.37 (95% CI 3.75 to 5.09); and the OR for non-prophylactic pancreatic duct stent was 2.10 (95% CI 1.63 to 2.69). Conclusions It appears that female gender, previous PEP, previous pancreatitis, endoscopic sphincterotomy, precut sphincterotomy, Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and non-prophylactic pancreatic duct stent are the risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:24886445

  2. Marked effect of octreotide acetate in a case of pancreatic pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Takeo, C; Myojo, S

    2000-01-01

    A pancreaticopleural effusion is a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. Fasting, a protease inhibitor, and/or a surgical intervention are generally selected for the treatment of the pancreatic effusion. We reported here the case, in which octreotide acetate was effective for resolving pancreatic effusion. A 67-year-old man was admitted with a massive pleural effusion. This effusion contained a high level of amylase. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography followed by computed tomography revealed a pancreaticopleural fistula. The pleural effusion was not improved by the treatment of the protease inhibitor with total parenteral nutrition and fasting. A pancreatic stent could not be emplaced because the major pancreatic duct was coiled. Administration of octreotide acetate, a long-acting somatostatin analogue, markedly diminished the effusion and closed the pancreaticopleural fistula. Transient eosinophilia of peripheral blood was seen on admission, but the number of eosinophils decreased after the octreotide therapy and normalised when pleural effusion disappeared. Octreotide is one of the effective options for the treatment of pancreatic pleural effusion.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  5. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Alisertib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents.

  8. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic calculi].

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T

    1990-05-01

    Using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) pancreatic stones may be disintegrated. Acute adverse effects directly attributably to shock wave lithotripsy are rare. More than half of the patients will exhibit complete clearance of the pancreatic duct system after ESWL, endoscopic sphincterotomy and extraction of fragments. Most of the patients in whom the ducts could be cleared from the stones also showed improvement of chronic pancreatic pain. These findings, however, have to be substantiated by larger clinical studies with longer follow-up periods.

  9. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L.

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  10. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells.

    PubMed

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-12-01

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and produce cytopathic effect in human pancreatic ductal cells. Furthermore, the viral factors that affect these capabilities were studied. The pancreatic ductal cells were highly susceptible to enterovirus infections. Both viral growth and cytolysis were detected for several enterovirus serotypes. However, the viral growth and capability to induce cytopathic effect (cpe) did not correlate completely. Some of the virus strains replicated in ductal cells without apparent cpe. Furthermore, there were strain-specific differences in the growth kinetics and the ability to cause cpe within some serotypes. Viral adaptation experiments were carried out to study the potential genetic determinants behind these phenotypic differences. The blind-passage of non-lytic CV-B6-Schmitt strain in HPDE-cells resulted in lytic phenotype and increased progeny production. This was associated with the substitution of a single amino acid (K257E) in the virus capsid protein VP1 and the viral ability to use decay accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor. This study demonstrates considerable plasticity in the cell tropism, receptor usage and cytolytic properties of enteroviruses and underlines the strong effect of single or few amino acid substitutions in cell tropism and lytic capabilities of a given enterovirus. Since ductal cells are anatomically close to pancreatic islets, the capability of enteroviruses to infect and destroy pancreatic ductal cells may also implicate in respect to enterovirus induced type 1

  11. Small pancreatic cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology.

    PubMed

    Obana, Takashi; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Go; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun; Takasawa, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sawai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of small pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum preoperatively diagnosed by pancreatic juice cytology. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD). A small and poorly reproducible low-echoic lesion in the pancreas was suspected by ultrasonography (US) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) failed to visualize the ventral pancreatic duct, and the upstream dorsal pancreatic duct was dilated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was indicative of pancreas divisum, and complete obstruction of the MPD in the pancreatic head was seen. Cytology of pancreatic juice obtained from the dorsal pancreas after minor papilla sphincterotomy revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma cells. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pancreatic head cancer with pancreas divisum. Histological examination revealed moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma 20 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic head. Dilatation of the dorsal pancreatic duct is sometimes observed in cases with pancreas divisum without the presence of tumors. When pancreatic duct stenosis also exists in such cases, even if a tumor is not clearly visualized by diagnostic imaging, vigorous examinations such as pancreatic juice cytology are recommended to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  13. Transpapillary drainage of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Smoczyński, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades the strategy of treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed. Endoscopic therapy of patients with symptomatic walled-off pancreatic necrosis has a high rate of efficiency. Here we present a description of a patient with parenchymal limited necrosis of the pancreas and a disruption of the main pancreatic duct. In the treatment, active transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic necrosis (through the major duodenal papilla) was performed and insertion of an endoprosthesis into the main pancreatic duct (through the minor duodenal papilla) was applied, which enabled a bypass over the infiltration and resulted in complete resolution. PMID:26649102

  14. AAST grade III pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Laing, G L; Jeetoo, S D; Oosthuizen, G; Clarke, D

    2012-08-01

    Isolated pancreatic trauma with major pancreatic duct disruption is a rare finding; it can present with equivocal clinical signs. Serum amylase levels and diagnostic contrast-enhanced computed tomography can facilitate the diagnostic process.

  15. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  16. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. False-positive radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging following cystic duct stone removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zagoria, R.J.; Cowan, R.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Herrera, M.

    1989-03-01

    The authors report a case in which a radionuclide hepatobiliary image was falsely indicative of cystic duct obstruction in a patient with an indwelling cholecystostomy tube and an externalized gallbladder-duodenal stent. Cystic duct patency was demonstrated radiographically shortly before and after the radionuclide study. The authors recommend that cystic duct obstruction indicated by a radionuclide hepatobiliary image be confirmed by another means if a cholecystostomy tube is present, or if the patient recently has undergone percutaneous gallbladder or cystic duct manipulations.

  18. Aberrant pancreatic ductal organisation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shivi; Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Saha, Susmita; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-07-01

    Anomalous pancreatic ductal system has always enthralled the anatomists, surgeons, gastroenterologists and radiologists alike. With the growing use of MRCP, ERCP and endoscopic and surgical procedures, the knowledge of anatomical aberrations of pancreaticobiliary tract becomes extremely important. Moreover, the anomalous pancreatic duct morphology may be responsible for atypical gastrointestinal complains. We report an exceptionally rare case of two accessory ventral pancreatic ducts opening separately into the common bile duct proximal to the hepato pancreatic ampulla. Concomitant occurrence of an ectopic major duodenal papilla, 3.8 cm distal to the pyloric end of stomach was also seen. Moreover, the accessory pancreatic duct and the minor duodenal papilla were absent. Clinical implications and embryological description of these rare anomalies are discussed. Awareness of such rare morphological variants can go a long way in assisting effective patient management.

  19. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  20. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  1. The potent activation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current by NVP-AUY922 in the human pancreatic duct cell line (PANC-1) possibly independent of heat shock protein 90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Nai-Jung; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2015-04-01

    NVP-AUY922 (AUY) is a potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Whether this compound can exert additional effects on membrane ion channels remains elusive. We investigated the effect of AUY on ion currents in human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (PDECs), including PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. AUY increased the amplitude of the K(+) current (IK) in PANC-1 cells shown by whole-cell configuration. Single-channel recordings revealed a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel in PANC-1, but not in MIA PaCa-2. In cell-attached mode, AUY increased the probability of BKCa channel opening and also potentiated the activity of stretch-induced channels. However, other HSP inhibitors, 17-AAG or BIIB021 only slightly increased the activity of BKCa channels. In inside-out recordings, sodium hydrosulphide or caffeic acid phenethyl ester increased the activity of BKCa channels, but AUY did not. We further evaluated whether conductance of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (IK(Ca)) influenced secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid in PDECs by using a modified Whitcomb-Ermentrout model. Simulation studies showed that an increase in IK(Ca) resulted in additional secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid by mimicking the effect of AUY in PDECs. Collectively, AUY can interact with the BKCa channel to largely increase IK(Ca) in PDECs. PMID:25953267

  2. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  3. Does pancreatic ductal anatomy play a role in determining outcomes of pancreatic anastomoses?

    PubMed

    Shukla, P J; Sakpal, S V; Maharaj, R

    2011-02-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is the surgical procedure performed for cancers of the head of the pancreas. Despite a substantial reduction in mortality rates following PD, morbidity remains high secondary to major post-operative complications. Post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF), the commonest major complication following PD, results from the failure of the pancreato-enteric anastomosis. There appears to be a correlation between intrinsic pancreatic features like the texture of the gland and duct size and the outcome of the pancreatic anastomosis. Based on current clinical research data, we propose a new hypothesis called the "pancreatic ductal anatomy" concept. We hypothesize that morphological variations, anomalies or aberrations of the main pancreatic duct play a role in the outcome of the pancreatic anastomosis, irrespective of its type. The consequence of aberrant ductal anatomy is that certain areas of the remnant pancreas remain either undrained or partially drained, or have blocked ductules/ducts. This results in localized obstructive pancreatitis causing an inflammatory reaction which jeopardizes the anastomosis. We also propose two maneuvers which could possibly play a role in predicting potential problems and also planning the surgical resection and reconstruction in order to reduce the incidence of POPF. The first modality is the use of pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pancreatic duct, and the second maneuver is the gentle cannulation test of the pancreatic duct with a soft, narrow tube following transection of the pancreatic neck. These factors would alert the surgeon about potential ductal variations and could facilitate the surgical approach.

  4. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  5. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  6. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  7. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  8. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  9. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.

  10. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma.

  11. Pancreatic calculi superimposed upon slow growing pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Noda, A; Takeuchi, K; Ibuki, E; Murayama, H; Kobayashi, T; Nonogaki, T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a 59 year old male patient with cancer of the head of the pancreas, upon which pancreatic calculi were superimposed during the 3 year clinical course. Pancreatic calculi were noted in the main pancreatic duct (MPD) on both computed tomographic scans and ultrasonographs of the abdomen approximately 10 months after the recognizable dilatation of the MPD. Existence of the calculi was confirmed by autopsy. Elemental analysis and infrared spectrophotometry of the calculi demonstrated that the main constituent of the calculi was calcium carbonate. Histopathological examination showed that the pancreatic cancer was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that pancreatic stone protein (lithostathine) was present in the cytoplasm of tumour cells. In this case, pancreatic cancer progressed to obstruct the MPD unusually slowly, resulting in stagnation of pancreatic secretion and subsequent formation of the calculi.

  12. Pseudocyst of the head of the pancreas: relationship to the duct of Santorini.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M C

    1979-12-01

    A series of 14 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is presented which illustrates that cysts originating in the superior segment of the head of the pancreas communicate with the duct of Santorini which normally drains this area of the gland. Cysts in this location do not communicate with the major pancreatic duct (Wirsung) in most instances, and therefore may be overlooked in the standard retrograde drainage procedures employed to relieve pancreatic exocrine obstruction.

  13. [Organ saving intervention for pancreatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Chanis, William; Pataki, István; Mohos, György; Soultan, Thabet Ghayth; Al-Hamadi, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 25 year old male patient who suffered a traffic accident. He was admitted to the ICU of our hospital and underwent a two step intervention for main pancreatic duct transection. PMID:27644927

  14. Surgical treatment of the pancreatic stump: preventive strategies of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    TERSIGNI, R.; CAPALDI, M.; IALONGO, P.; GRILLO, L.R.; ANSELMO, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The institutions with high volume of pancreatic surgery report morbidity rate from 30% to 50% and mortality less than 5% after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). At the present, the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality is pancreatic fistula (PF). Aim The purpose of the study is to identify the most important clinical factors which may predict PF development and eventually suggest alternative approaches to the pancreatic stump management. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of a clinical data base of a tertiary care Hospital was performed. From 2002 to 2012 a single Surgeon prospectively performed 150 pancreaticoduodenectomies for cancer. Four different techniques were used: end to end pancreaticojejunostomy, end to side pancreaticojejunostomy, pancreatic duct occlusion and duct to mucosa anastomosis. The intraoperative gland texture was classified as soft, firm and hard. The duct size was preoperatively (CT scan) and intraoperatively recorded and classified: < 3 mm small, 3–6 mm medium, > 6 mm large. The histopathological characteristic of the gland fibrosis was graduate as low 1, moderate 2, high 3. Conclusion Relationships between pre and intraoperative duct size measurement, pancreatic texture and pancreatic fibrosis grading were highly significant. Small duct and soft pancreas with low grade fibrosis are the most important risk factors for pancreatic fistula development. The proper selection of pancreatic stump management or the decision to refer the high risk patients to high volume Center can be suggested by the elevated correspondence of pre and intraoperative duct diameter with the related pancreatic fibrosis grade and gland consistency. Preoperative assessment of the pancreatic duct makes possible to predict the risk of pancreatic fistula. PMID:25419587

  15. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  16. Longitudinal stent deformation during coronary bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Sharma, Prafull; Gupta, Ankush; Goyal, Praveg; Panda, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    A distortion of implanted coronary stent along its longitudinal axis during coronary intervention is known as longitudinal stent deformation (LSD). LSD is frequently seen with newer drug eluting stents (DES), specifically with PROMUS Element stent. It is usually caused by impact of guide catheter tip, or following passage of catheters like balloon catheter, IVUS catheter, guideliner, etc. We hereby report a case of LSD during coronary bifurcation lesion intervention, using two-stents technique. Patient had acute stent thrombosis as a complication of LSD, which was successfully managed. PMID:26811144

  17. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  19. Pancreatic fluid collections: What is the ideal imaging technique?

    PubMed

    Dhaka, Narendra; Samanta, Jayanta; Kochhar, Suman; Kalra, Navin; Appasani, Sreekanth; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-12-28

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are seen in up to 50% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The Revised Atlanta classification categorized these collections on the basis of duration of disease and contents, whether liquid alone or a mixture of fluid and necrotic debris. Management of these different types of collections differs because of the variable quantity of debris; while patients with pseudocysts can be drained by straight-forward stent placement, walled-off necrosis requires multi-disciplinary approach. Differentiating these collections on the basis of clinical severity alone is not reliable, so imaging is primarily performed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the commonly used modality for the diagnosis and assessment of proportion of solid contents in PFCs; however with certain limitations such as use of iodinated contrast material especially in renal failure patients and radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performs better than computed tomography (CT) in characterization of pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections especially for quantification of solid debris and fat necrosis (seen as fat density globules), and is an alternative in those situations where CT is contraindicated. Also magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is highly sensitive for detecting pancreatic duct disruption and choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic ultrasound is an evolving technique with higher reproducibility for fluid-to-debris component estimation with the added advantage of being a single stage procedure for both diagnosis (solid debris delineation) and management (drainage of collection) in the same sitting. Recently role of diffusion weighted MRI and positron emission tomography/CT with (18)F-FDG labeled autologous leukocytes is also emerging for detection of infection noninvasively. Comparative studies between these imaging modalities are still limited. However we look forward to a time when this gap in literature will be fulfilled.

  20. Pancreatic fluid collections: What is the ideal imaging technique?

    PubMed Central

    Dhaka, Narendra; Samanta, Jayanta; Kochhar, Suman; Kalra, Navin; Appasani, Sreekanth; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are seen in up to 50% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The Revised Atlanta classification categorized these collections on the basis of duration of disease and contents, whether liquid alone or a mixture of fluid and necrotic debris. Management of these different types of collections differs because of the variable quantity of debris; while patients with pseudocysts can be drained by straight-forward stent placement, walled-off necrosis requires multi-disciplinary approach. Differentiating these collections on the basis of clinical severity alone is not reliable, so imaging is primarily performed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the commonly used modality for the diagnosis and assessment of proportion of solid contents in PFCs; however with certain limitations such as use of iodinated contrast material especially in renal failure patients and radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performs better than computed tomography (CT) in characterization of pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections especially for quantification of solid debris and fat necrosis (seen as fat density globules), and is an alternative in those situations where CT is contraindicated. Also magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is highly sensitive for detecting pancreatic duct disruption and choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic ultrasound is an evolving technique with higher reproducibility for fluid-to-debris component estimation with the added advantage of being a single stage procedure for both diagnosis (solid debris delineation) and management (drainage of collection) in the same sitting. Recently role of diffusion weighted MRI and positron emission tomography/CT with 18F-FDG labeled autologous leukocytes is also emerging for detection of infection noninvasively. Comparative studies between these imaging modalities are still limited. However we look forward to a time when this gap in literature will be fulfilled. PMID:26730150

  1. β-Cell regeneration through the transdifferentiation of pancreatic cells: Pancreatic progenitor cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic progenitor cell research has been in the spotlight, as these cells have the potential to replace pancreatic β-cells for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetic patients with the absence or reduction of pancreatic β-cells. During the past few decades, the successful treatment of diabetes through transplantation of the whole pancreas or isolated islets has nearly been achieved. However, novel sources of pancreatic islets or insulin-producing cells are required to provide sufficient amounts of donor tissues. To overcome this limitation, the use of pancreatic progenitor cells is gaining more attention. In particular, pancreatic exocrine cells, such as duct epithelial cells and acinar cells, are attractive candidates for β-cell regeneration because of their differentiation potential and pancreatic lineage characteristics. It has been assumed that β-cell neogenesis from pancreatic progenitor cells could occur in pancreatic ducts in the postnatal stage. Several studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can arise in the duct tissue of the adult pancreas. Acinar cells also might have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. The present review summarizes recent progress in research on the transdifferentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, especially duct and acinar cells. PMID:27330712

  2. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis: a multicentre, international analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Phil A; Kamisawa, Terumi; Brugge, William R; Chung, Jae Bock; Culver, Emma L; Czakó, László; Frulloni, Luca; Go, Vay Liang W; Gress, Thomas M; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lerch, Markus M; Liao, Wei-Chih; Löhr, Matthias; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ryu, Ji Kon; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Soetikno, Roy; Webster, George; Yadav, Dhiraj; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2013-01-01

    Objective Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a treatable form of chronic pancreatitis that has been increasingly recognised over the last decade. We set out to better understand the current burden of AIP at several academic institutions diagnosed using the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria, and to describe long-term outcomes, including organs involved, treatments, relapse frequency and long-term sequelae. Design 23 institutions from 10 different countries participated in this multinational analysis. A total of 1064 patients meeting the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for type 1 (n=978) or type 2 (n=86) AIP were included. Data regarding treatments, relapses and sequelae were obtained. Results The majority of patients with type 1 (99%) and type 2 (92%) AIP who were treated with steroids went into clinical remission. Most patients with jaundice required biliary stent placement (71% of type 1 and 77% of type 2 AIP). Relapses were more common in patients with type 1 (31%) versus type 2 AIP (9%, p<0.001), especially those with IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (56% vs 26%, p<0.001). Relapses typically occurred in the pancreas or biliary tree. Retreatment with steroids remained effective at inducing remission with or without alternative treatment, such as azathioprine. Pancreatic duct stones and cancer were uncommon sequelae in type 1 AIP and did not occur in type 2 AIP during the study period. Conclusions AIP is a global disease which uniformly displays a high response to steroid treatment and tendency to relapse in the pancreas and biliary tree. Potential long-term sequelae include pancreatic duct stones and malignancy, however they were uncommon during the study period and require additional follow-up. Additional studies investigating prevention and treatment of disease relapses are needed. PMID:23232048

  3. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Anatomy-shaped design of a fully-covered, biliary, self-expandable metal stent for treatment of benign distal biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Weigt, Jochen; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The treatment success of benign biliary strictures with fully covered metal stents (CSEMS) is altered by high stent dislocation rates. We aimed to evaluate a new stent design to prevent dislocation. Patients and methods: Patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with a newly designed double-coned stent (dcSEMS). Mechanical analysis of the new stent was performed and it was compared with a cylindrical stent. Results: A total of 13 dcCSEMS were implanted in 11 patients (2 female, 9 male, median age 47, range 33 – 71). All patients had distal biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis. No stent migration occurred. In all but one patient the stents were removed. One patient refused stent extraction and was lost to follow up. Stent occlusion occurred twice leading to cholangitis in both cases. The duration of stent treatment was 170 days (range 61 – 254). After extraction only one patient had early recurrent stricture and received the same stent again. Three stents showed minimal tissue granulation at the papilla. One stent presented ingrowth at the proximal end and was removed after implantation of a second fully covered stent. Mechanical examination revealed significantly lower radial expansion force of the new stent as compared to the cylindrical stent. Conclusions: The new stent design has a low rate of migration. Biomechanical properties may explain this effect. PMID:26793789

  5. CT pancreatogram in carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, E.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; London, S.S.

    1983-08-01

    CT has made it possible to determine the contour of the pancreatic duct, to measure its caliber, and to detect dilatation of the duct. CT scans of 75 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and of 45 patients with chronic pancreatitis were obtained. Dilatation of the pancreatic duct was seen in 56% of patients with carcinoma, and in 70% of those with tumors confined to the pancreatic head and body. Smooth dilatation (43%) or beaded dilatation (40%) were most commonly associated with carcinoma. Ductal dilatation was present in 58% of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, and irregular dilatation was seen in 73% of the patients in this group. About half of the patients who had irregular dilatation had calculi within the ducts. Eight cases of dilatation of the duct with no detectible pancreatic mass were seen in a subgroup of 13 patients who had small carcinomas of the pancreas (tumor size of 3 cm or less). Our findings indicate that a dilated pancreatic duct with a smooth contour and a ratio of duct to total gland width of 0.50 or greater suggests carcinoma as the underlying pathology.

  6. Palliative interventional and surgical therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

    2011-02-14

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually.

  7. [Unresectable pancreatic cancer--palliative interventional and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Hüser, N; Assfalg, V; Michalski, C W; Gillen, S; Kleeff, J; Friess, H

    2010-12-01

    In most cases pancreatic cancer appears in a non-curatively resectable stage at time the diagnosis is made. Thus, palliative treatment concepts come to the fore in these patients. Patients without metastases, but presenting with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumours should not be treated in a palliative therapeutic scheme. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials. After finishing treatment and restaging, a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of these patients. Within the scope of the best possible palliative care, excision of metastases together with resection of the primary cancer represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. For distinct locally unresectable or metastasised advanced pancreatic cancer, treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction is an essential part of the comprehensive palliative therapy. However, both endoscopic / percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass makeshifts constitute safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives in this context. In the case of operative drainage of the biliary tract the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision on a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends considerably on the tumour stage and the estimated prognosis and has to be determined interdisciplinary and individually in each case.

  8. Double Sigmoid colon perforation due to migration of a biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Malgras, B; Pierret, C; Tourtier, J-P; Olagui, G; Nizou, C; Duverger, V

    2011-10-01

    Migration of pancreatico-biliary stents is a rare event, usually benign, but which can lead to severe complications such as digestive tube perforation. We report the case of a patient with double sigmoid perforation due to distal migration of a biliary stent placed to decompress a pancreatic head carcinoma.

  9. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis-sonographic pictorial essay on four pediatric cases with acute biliary colic.

    PubMed

    Lynser, Donboklang; Marbaniang, Evarisalin

    2016-04-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis occur due to migration of the round worm ascaris lumbricoides through the bile duct orifice finally reaching the common bile duct, main pancreatic duct, intrahepatic ducts or gallbladder. These resulted in acute epigastric and right hypochondriac region colicky pain. Ultrasound is the investigation of choice in hepatobiliary ascariasis. We present here sonographic images on four pediatric patients with acute biliary colic. PMID:26690772

  10. Wharton's duct repair after combined sialolithectomy: is ductoplasty necessary?

    PubMed

    Pagliuca, Giulio; Martellucci, Salvatore; de Vincentiis, Marco; Greco, Antonio; Fusconi, Massimo; De Virgilio, Armando; Rosato, Chiara; Gallo, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this prospective study is to establish whether ductoplasty is necessary to repair the Wharton's duct after a combined endoscopic and external approach to remove large submandibular gland stones or if simple suturing of the oral floor mucosa after stent placement may be sufficient to achieve proper duct healing. Ten patients were enrolled. Ductoplasty was performed in 6 cases, whereas in 4 cases, only the mucosa of the oral floor was sutured. The stent was removed about 3 weeks after surgery. Sialoliths were completely removed in all cases. During follow-up, patient symptom evaluation, ultrasound, and physical examination showed no signs of recurrence or complications. In our limited experience, ductoplasty after the combined approach was not necessary. After stent placement, the mere suture of the oral mucosa overlying the damaged ductal wall allowed a correct recanalization of the ductal lumen as commonly observed after careful ductoplasty. PMID:23396595

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Antegrade Stenting in an Occluded Biliary Self-expandable Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almadi, Majid A.; Eltayeb, Mohanned; Thaniah, Salem

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an attractive option for patients who cannot undergo conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and do not want surgery or percutaneous drainage procedures. We present the use of EUS-antegrade (EUS-AG) insertion of a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) in a patient with a common hepatic duct cholangiocarcinoma, as well as a huge gastric lipoma, after recurrent biliary obstruction of a prior SEMS inserted via ERCP in the same session as a duodenal stent insertion for gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:27488330

  12. Acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis: a sonographic pictorial essay on four cases.

    PubMed

    Lynser, Donboklang; Thangkhiew, R S; Laloo, Demitrost; Hek, M D; Marbaniang, Evarisalin; Tariang, Satisfy

    2016-06-01

    Ascariasis is the commonest helminthic disease to infect humans. Due to their wandering nature, the roundworms from the second part of the duodenum migrate through the biliary opening into the hepatobiliary and pancreatic ducts. Ascariasis is the most common parasitic cause of pancreatitis in endemic region. Pancreatitis can result due to pancreatic ascariasis, biliary ascariasis or both. Pancreatitis due to ascariasis can be severe and life-threatening. We present a pictorial essay of acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis on four cases.

  13. In Vivo Study of Polyurethane-Coated Gianturco-Rosch Biliary Z-Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Severini, Aldo; Mantero, Sara; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Cigada, Alberto; Addis, Flaminio; Cozzi, Guido; Salvetti, Monica; Andreola, Salvatore; Motta, Antonella; Regalia, Enrico; Pulvirenti, Andrea; De Pedri, Enrico; Doci, Roberto

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: Prototypes of Gianturco-Rosch Z-stents coated with polycarbonate urethane (PCU) were placed in the biliary tree of pigs, in order to test their biomechanical behavior, stability, and biocompatibility. Methods: The stents were surgically implanted in the common bile duct of three pairs of pigs, which were killed after 1, 3, and 6 months respectively. Explanted livers from pigs of the same race, age, and size were used to provide comparative data. The bile ducts were radiologically and histopathologically examined; the stents were processed and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: No complications occurred and the animals showed a normal weight gain. The main bile duct appeared radiologically and macroscopically dilated, but the stents proved to be in place. Histologically, the bile duct epithelium was destroyed, but neither hyperplastic nor inflammatory fibrotic reactions of the wall were evident. Both the metallic structure and the polymeric coating of the stents were intact. A layer of organic material with a maximum thickness of approximately 3 {mu}m was evident on the inner surface of the stents. Conclusion: The present in vivo study demonstrates the biocompatibility, efficacy, and stability of PCU-coated Gianturco-Rosch stents in the biliary environment.

  14. T-EUS for Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Multicenter Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Biliary Stricture; Biliary Obstruction; Stent Obstruction; Proximal Duct Stricture; Distal Duct Stricture; Ampullary Cancer; Biliary Sphincter Stenosis; Impacted Stones; Chronic Pancreatitis; Peri-ampullary Diverticula; Altered Anatomy

  15. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic visceral pain secondary to chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kapural, Leonardo; Rakic, Mladen

    2008-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) suppresses visceral response to colon distension in an animal model. In humans, it may be an effective therapy for chronic pain of pelvic origin, irritable bowel syndrome, and persistent unspecified abdominal pain. Described here is the case of SCS for 38-year-old woman with visceral pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis. Previous therapies included numerous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies, multiple pancreatic duct stenting, chemical and surgical sympathectomies with short-lasting pain relief. After the initial evaluation, the patient underwent retrograde epidural differential block to determine possible source of pain. Delay in pain recurrence after block suggested that the origin of her pain was visceral. After the psychologic evaluation, the patient underwent SCS trial over 14 days. She had 2 trial leads placed epidurally via T9-T10 paramedian entry with the tips of both leads positioned at T6 vertebral body. During the trial, visual analog scale pain score decreased from 8 to 1 cm, Pain Disability Index from 62 to 14, and opioid use from 150 to 0 mg of morphine sulfate equivalent a day. After the completion of successful SCS trial, she was implanted with dual octrode leads and rechargeable pulse generator. Median pain scores decreased from 8 to 1 at 3 months after the implant. Pain Disability Index changed from 62 to 15. Opiate use decreased to none. It seems that SCS may have a significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of visceral pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis. PMID:18496389

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  17. Treating bilio-duodenal obstruction: combining new endoscopic technique with 6 Fr stent introducer.

    PubMed

    Maetani, Iruru; Nambu, Tomoko; Omuta, Shigefumi; Ukita, Takeo; Shigoka, Hiroaki

    2010-06-14

    Periampullary cancer may cause not only biliary but also duodenal obstructions. In patients with concomitant duodenal obstructions, endoscopic biliary stenting remains technically difficult and may often require percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. We describe a method of metal stent placement via a thin forward-viewing endoscope in patients with simultaneous biliary and duodenal obstruction. In two consecutive patients with biliary and duodenal obstruction due to pancreatic cancer, a new biliary metal stent mounted in a slim delivery catheter was placed via a thin forward viewing endoscope after passage across the duodenal stenosis without balloon dilation. In both patients, with our new placement technique, metallic stents were successfully placed in a short time without adverse events. After biliary stenting, one patient received curative resection and the other received duodenal stenting for palliation. Metallic stent placement with a forward-viewing thin endoscope is a beneficial technique, which can avoid percutaneous drainage in patients with bilio-duodenal obstructions due to periampullary cancer.

  18. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  19. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Soehendra, N; Grimm, H; Meyer, H W; Schreiber, H W

    1989-09-15

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy was performed on eight patients (six men, two women; mean age 46.3 years, range 36-58) with predominantly stone-induced obstructive pancreatitis. Stones in the pancreatic duct were smashed in one session to such an extent that the fragments were eliminated spontaneously via the ostium which had previously been split endoscopically. Repeat lithotripsy to achieve complete removal was necessary in only two patients. In one there were multiple concrements along the entire length of the main pancreatic duct; the other had a cherry-sized stone near the bifurcation of the accessory pancreatic duct. There were no serious complications. After successful removal of the stones all patients were free of pain which before had required strong analgesics to control. Six patients remained pain-free during a follow-up period of two eight months. Pain again occurred in the other two, but it was less frequent and milder.

  20. Morphohistological Features of Pancreatic Stump Are the Main Determinant of Pancreatic Fistula after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ridolfi, Cristina; Angiolini, Maria Rachele; Gavazzi, Francesca; Spaggiari, Paola; Tinti, Maria Carla; Uccelli, Fara; Madonini, Marco; Montorsi, Marco; Zerbi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic surgery is challenging and associated with high morbidity, mainly represented by postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and its further consequences. Identification of risk factors for POPF is essential for proper postoperative management. Aim of the Study. Evaluation of the role of morphological and histological features of pancreatic stump, other than main pancreatic duct diameter and glandular texture, in POPF occurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Patients and Methods. Between March 2011 and April 2013, we performed 145 consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies. We intraoperatively recorded morphological features of pancreatic stump and collected data about postoperative morbidity. Our dedicated pathologist designed a score to quantify fibrosis and inflammation of pancreatic tissue. Results. Overall morbidity was 59,3%. Mortality was 4,1%. POPF rate was 28,3%, while clinically significant POPF were 15,8%. Male sex (P = 0.009), BMI ≥ 25 (P = 0.002), prolonged surgery (P = 0.001), soft pancreatic texture (P < 0.001), small pancreatic duct (P < 0.001), pancreatic duct decentralization on stump anteroposterior axis, especially if close to the posterior margin (P = 0.031), large stump area (P = 0.001), and extended stump mobilization (P = 0.001) were related to higher POPF rate. Our fibrosis-and-inflammation score is strongly associated with POPF (P = 0.001). Discussion and Conclusions. Pancreatic stump features evaluation, including histology, can help the surgeon in fitting postoperative management to patient individual risk after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:24900974

  1. Metallic stents in malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. Retrospective analysis of our results with metallic stent placement for malignant biliary strictures. We sought to determine parameters that influence stent patency. Methods. A total of 95 Wallstents were implanted in 65 patients (38 men, 27 women; mean age, 65.1 years) with malignant biliary obstruction. Serum bilirubin levels were assessed in 48 patients; the mean value prior to intervention was 15.0 mg/dl. Results. In 12 patients (21%) complications occurred as a result of percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Stent implantation was complicated in 13 patients, but was possible in all patients. A significant decrease in bilirubin level was seen in 83.3% of patients following stent implantation. Approximately 30% of patients developed recurrent jaundice after a mean 97.1 days. In 9 patients (15%) the recurrent jaundice was caused by stent occlusion due to tumor growth. The mean follow-up was 141.8 days, the mean survival 118.7 days. Patients with cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas had the best results. Worse results were seen in patients with pancreatic tumors and with lymph node metastases of colon and gastric cancers. Conclusions. The main predictive factors for occlusion rate and survival are the type of primary tumor, tumor stage, the decrease in bilirubin level, and the general condition of the patient.

  2. Biomedical engineering in design and application of nitinol stents with shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryklina, E. P.; Khmelevskaya, I. Y.; Morozova, Tamara V.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    1996-04-01

    Our studies in the field of endosurgery in collaboration with the physicians of the National Research Center of Surgery of the Academy of Medical Sciences are carried out beginning in 1983. These studies laid the foundation for the new direction of X-ray surgery--X-ray Nitinol stenting of vessels and tubular structures. X-ray nitinol stents are unique self-fixing shells based on the shape memory effect and superelasticity of nickel-titanium alloys self- reconstructed under human body temperature. Applied for stenting of arteries in cases of stenosis etc., bile ducts in cases of benign and malignant stenoses, digestive tract in cases of oesophageal cancer and cervical canal uterus in cases of postsurgical atresiss and strictures of uterine. The purpose of stenting is restoration of the shape of artery or tubular structure by a cylinder frame formation. The especially elaborated original method of stenting allows to avoid the traditional surgical operation, i.e. the stenting is performed without blood, narcosis and surgical knife. The stent to be implanted is transported into the affected zone through the puncture under the X-ray control. Clinical applications of X-ray endovascular stenting has been started in March 1984. During this period nearly 400 operations on stenting have been performed on femoral, iliac, brachio-cephalic, subclavian arteries, bile ducts, tracheas, digestive tract and cervical canal uterus.

  3. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  4. Opium-related sphincter of Oddi dysfunction causing double duct sign

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder Singh; Chaudhary, Vinita; Dhaka, Narendra; Manrai, Manish; Sivalingam, Jegan; Sharma, Ravi; Dutta, Usha; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Double duct sign where there is a simultaneous dilatation of both the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct is usually associated with sinister causes like malignancies of pancreatic head or ampulla. Occasionally, benign causes like chronic pancreatitis or sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) may cause double duct sign. Chronic opium abuse is a rare cause of the double duct sign, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings of this rare entity have been occasionally reported. We report about a 54-year-old male with a history of chronic alcohol and opioid abuse evaluated for episodes of abdominal pain and found to have opioid-related SOD and improved with biliary sphincterotomy. EUS was done to rule out malignancy and revealed hypoechoic prominence around terminal CBD suggestive of hypertrophied muscle. PMID:27503161

  5. Opium-related sphincter of Oddi dysfunction causing double duct sign.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder Singh; Chaudhary, Vinita; Dhaka, Narendra; Manrai, Manish; Sivalingam, Jegan; Sharma, Ravi; Dutta, Usha; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Double duct sign where there is a simultaneous dilatation of both the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct is usually associated with sinister causes like malignancies of pancreatic head or ampulla. Occasionally, benign causes like chronic pancreatitis or sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) may cause double duct sign. Chronic opium abuse is a rare cause of the double duct sign, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings of this rare entity have been occasionally reported. We report about a 54-year-old male with a history of chronic alcohol and opioid abuse evaluated for episodes of abdominal pain and found to have opioid-related SOD and improved with biliary sphincterotomy. EUS was done to rule out malignancy and revealed hypoechoic prominence around terminal CBD suggestive of hypertrophied muscle. PMID:27503161

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer.

  7. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Hollow lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Mitchell, Scott; Lang, John; Maderas, Dennis; Speth, Joel; Payne, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    A hollow lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of focusing using a spherical or cylindrical lens followed by reflective waveguiding. The hollow duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side consisting of a lens that may be coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The inside surfaces of the hollow lens duct are appropriately coated to be reflective, preventing light from escaping by reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The hollow duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials.

  9. Echinococcal Cyst of the Pancreas with Cystopancreatic Duct Fistula Successfully Treated by Partial Cystectomy and Cystogastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Elaffand, Ahmed; Vijay, Adarsh; Mohamed, Samah; Al-Battah, Hassan Hani; Youssef, Ayda; Farahat, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The primary pancreatic hydatid (echinococcal) cyst is extremely rare with a reported incidence of <1%. Owing to its rareness and a considerable overlap of imaging features, a preoperative diagnosis is usually difficult. The dilemma in confirming this benign diagnosis has often questioned the extent of radical pancreatic resection. The involvement of pancreatic duct (cystopancreatic duct fistula) further complicates the management of such cystic lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated hydatid cyst of the pancreatic body and tail communicating with the pancreatic duct. Cystogastrostomy preceded by partial cystectomy in the same setting has never been reported to date. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and follow-up showed no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination. We consider this a safe surgical option in longstanding large cysts, especially if a cystopancreatic fistula is detected beforehand. The success of such a procedure however may rely on the size and thickness of the cyst wall to support this anastomosis. PMID:27512554

  10. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  11. Application of chemokine receptor antagonist with stents reduces local inflammation and suppresses cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ai-Wu; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Sun, Xian-Jun; Peng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Severe pain and obstructive jaundice resulting from invasive cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic carcinoma can be alleviated by implantation of biliary and duodenal stents. However, stents may cause local inflammation to have an adverse effect on the patients' condition and survival. So far, no efficient approaches have been applied to prevent the occurrence of stents-related inflammation. Here, we reported significantly higher levels of serum stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in the patients that developed stents-associated inflammation. A higher number of inflammatory cells have been detected in the cancer close to stent in the patients with high serum SDF-1. Since chemokine plays a pivotal role in the development of inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump with the stents to gradually release AMD3100, a specific inhibitor binding of SDF-1 and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), at the site of stents in mice that had developed pancreatic cancer. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation and significantly inhibited cancer cell growth, resulting in improved survival of the mice that bore cancer. Moreover, the suppression of cancer growth may be conducted through modulation of CyclinD1, p21, and p27 in the cancer cells. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of stents may substantially improve survival through suppression of stent-related inflammation and tumor growth.

  12. Bioresorbable Stents in PCI.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Daniel; James, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of percutaneous coronary intervention has been considerable. Coronary stents were introduced to avoid vessel recoil and reduce acute and late vessel complications. Later, drug-eluting stents were developed to decrease the neointimal hyperplasia associated with bare metal stents in order to reduce restenosis. However, very late stent thrombosis remains problematic, and the permanent presence of a metal stent could be associated with local inflammation and impaired vascular physiology. Thus, bioresorbable stents have been developed, to prevent recoil initially when this risk is the highest, with subsequent degradation over time, to avoid long-term complications of the presence of stents in the coronary vasculature. Here, we review the current status of bioresorbable stents in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with focus on the platforms that have been studied the most: ABSORB, DESolve, and DREAMS. In terms of clinical outcomes, bioresorbable stents have not yet shown superiority compared with current generation drug-eluting stents, but rather a signal of increased stent thrombosis. Further development and longer-term studies are needed before the routine implementation of bioresorbable stents in clinical practice. PMID:27312934

  13. Salivary duct stones

    MedlinePlus

    Spit (saliva) is produced by the salivary glands in the mouth. The chemicals in saliva can form a hard crystal that can block the salivary ducts. When saliva cannot exit a blocked duct, it backs up ...

  14. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  15. Shrinking the Supply Chain for Implantable Coronary Stent Devices.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean S; O'Sullivan, Kevin J; Verdecchia, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Stenting treatments for the management of disease in the heart, arterial and venous systems, biliary ducts, urethras, ureters, oesophageal tract and prostate have made enormous technical advances since their introduction into clinical use. The progression from metallic to polymer based bio-absorbable stents, coupled with the advances in additive manufacturing techniques, present a unique opportunity to completely re-envision the design, manufacture, and supply chain of stents. This paper looks at current stenting trends and proposes a future where the stent supply chain is condensed from ~150 days to ~20 min. The Cardiologist therefore has the opportunity to become a designer, manufacturer and user with patients receiving custom stents specific to their unique pathology that will be generated, delivered and deployed in the Cath-lab. The paper will outline this potentially revolutionary development and consider the technical challenges that will need to be overcome in order to achieve these ambitious goals. A high level overview of the generating eluting stents in situ program-GENESIS-is outlined including some early experimental work. PMID:26438449

  16. Shrinking the Supply Chain for Implantable Coronary Stent Devices.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean S; O'Sullivan, Kevin J; Verdecchia, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Stenting treatments for the management of disease in the heart, arterial and venous systems, biliary ducts, urethras, ureters, oesophageal tract and prostate have made enormous technical advances since their introduction into clinical use. The progression from metallic to polymer based bio-absorbable stents, coupled with the advances in additive manufacturing techniques, present a unique opportunity to completely re-envision the design, manufacture, and supply chain of stents. This paper looks at current stenting trends and proposes a future where the stent supply chain is condensed from ~150 days to ~20 min. The Cardiologist therefore has the opportunity to become a designer, manufacturer and user with patients receiving custom stents specific to their unique pathology that will be generated, delivered and deployed in the Cath-lab. The paper will outline this potentially revolutionary development and consider the technical challenges that will need to be overcome in order to achieve these ambitious goals. A high level overview of the generating eluting stents in situ program-GENESIS-is outlined including some early experimental work.

  17. A Minimally Invasive Approach for Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Shintaro Kuramoto, Kenmei; Itoh, Yutaka; Watanabe, Yoshika; Ueda, Toshisada

    2003-11-15

    Pancreas fistula is a well-known and severe complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy. It is difficult to control with conservative therapy, inducing further complications and severe morbidity. Until now, re-operation has been the only way to resolve pancreatic fistula causing complete dehiscence of the pancreatic-enteric anastomosis (complete pancreatic fistula). Percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage is one of the treatments for pancreatic fistula. This procedure allows both pancreas juice drainage and anastomosis re-construction at the same time. This is effective and minimally invasive but difficult to adapt to a long or complicated fistula. In particular, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct is indispensable. This paper reports the successful resolution of a postoperative pancreatic fistula by a two-way-approach percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage procedure. Using a snare catheter from the fistula and a flexible guidewire from the transgastric puncture needle, it can be performed either with or without main pancreatic duct dilatation.

  18. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  19. [Pain in chronic pancreatitis: recent pathogenetic findings].

    PubMed

    Manes, G; Pieramico, O; Uomo, G

    1992-01-01

    Pain is the major symptom in chronic pancreatitis. Its intensity frequently necessitates partial or complete pancreatectomy. The mechanisms of pain are not yet fully understood and, thereby, the therapeutic management is still controversial. Possible causes of pain include outflow obstruction with increased ductal and parenchymal pressure within the pancreas, and inflammatory involvement of intrapancreatic nerve fibres. Possible extrapancreatic causes are common bile duct and duodenal stenosis. The first theory has recently been substantiated by the demonstration of a definite relationship between intrapancreatic pressure, as measured intraoperatively, and intensity of pain. Infiltration of inflammatory cells around the nerves together with an increase in the number of nerve fibres in the fibrotic pancreatic tissue has been proposed as a possible cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, immunohistological studies have shown that the amount of neurotransmitters, such as substance P, is increased in afferent pancreatic nerves. Stenosis of the common bile duct and duodenum has been reported to be associated with severe abdominal pain. Common bile duct and duodenal stenosis in chronic pancreatitis may be caused by extension of fibrosis and active inflammation of the pancreas within the wall of duodenum and bile duct. This article updates the different pathogenetic mechanisms in pancreatic pain and the current therapeutic possibilities with their advantages and shortcomings.

  20. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  1. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  2. [Stent, endovascular prosthesis, net or strut? What would British dentist Charles Stent (1807-1885) have to say on all this?].

    PubMed

    Lukenda, Josip; Biocina-Lukenda, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The word stent appears in the Index Medicus as of 1952, while in Croatian articles as of 1993. The origin of the word has been attributed to British dentist Charles. T. Stent (1807-1885), maker of the compound for dental impressions (Stent's compound). Viennese surgeon, Johannes F. S. Esser (1877-1946) used the compound in plastic surgery of the face calling it an eponym Stent's mould. During the 1950's, William H. ReMine and John H. Grindlay used Stent's principle for omentum lined plastic tubes in the bile duct of a dog. The development of today's vascular stents began in 1912 when French Nobel Prize winner Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) implanted glass tubes in the arteries of dogs. The first metal spirals were implanted in the arteries of dogs by Charles T. Dotter (1920-1985), while the first stents in human arteries were implanted by French doctors Ulrich Sigwart and Jacques Puel in Toulouse in 1986. Some authors claim that the origin of the word stent is associated with the Scotish word stynt or stent, meaning stretched out river fishing nets. PMID:19348354

  3. Transcystic Approach to Laparoscopic Common Bile Duct Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Zhewei; Huang, Xia; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: One-stage laparoscopic management for common bile duct stones in patients with gallbladder stones has gained wide acceptance. We developed a novel technique using a transcystic approach for common bile duct exploration as an alternative to the existing procedures. Methods: From April 2010 to June 2012, 9 consecutive patients diagnosed with cholelithiasis and common bile duct stones were enrolled in this study. The main inclusion criteria included no upper abdominal surgical history and the presence of a stone measuring <5 mm. After the gallbladder was dissected free from the liver connections in a retrograde fashion, the fundus of the gallbladder was extracted via the port incision in the right epigastrium. The choledochoscope was inserted into the gallbladder through the small opening in the fundus of the gallbladder extracorporeally and was advanced toward the common bile duct via the cystic duct under the guidance of both laparoscopic imaging and endoscopic imaging. After stones were retrieved under direct choledochoscopic vision, a drainage tube was placed in the subhepatic space. Results: Of 9 patients, 7 had successful transcystic common bile duct stone clearance. A narrow cystic duct and the unfavorable anatomy of the junction of the cystic duct and common bile duct resulted in losing access to the common bile duct. No bile leakage, hemobilia, or pancreatitis occurred. Wound infection occurred in 2 patients. Transient epigastric colic pain occurred in 2 patients and was relieved by use of anisodamine. A transient increase in the amylase level was observed in 3 patients. Short-term follow-up did not show any recurrence of common bile duct stones. Conclusion: Our novel transcystic approach to laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is feasible and efficient. PMID:25516702

  4. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  5. [Three cases of childhood-onset autoimmune pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Murata, Shinya; Yoden, Atsushi; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Inoue, Keisuke; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Here we present 3 cases of childhood-onset autoimmune pancreatitis: 2 cases in boys aged 4 and 16 years, diagnosed with ulcerative colitis; 1 case in a previously healthy 10-year-old boy. All 3 boys presented with abdominal pain associated with elevated pancreatic enzyme levels. Immunoglobulin G4 levels were elevated only in the 16-year-old boy. However, pancreatic enlargement together with narrowing of the main pancreatic duct was evident on computed tomography in all 3 cases. Autoimmune pancreatitis is an uncommon disease in childhood, and only 3 cases affecting patients under 17 years of age have previously been reported in Japan. Autoimmune pancreatitis may be latent in children with pancreatitis who have chronic or intermittent abdominal symptoms. In addition, it is necessary to recognize autoimmune pancreatitis as a complication of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. The clinical features of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis remain unclear, and an accumulation of cases is necessary. PMID:25100354

  6. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shruti; Shahzad, Ghulamullah; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Viswanathan, Prakash; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  7. A case study of a collision tumor composed of cancers of the bile duct and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Furukawa, Daisuke; Yazawa, Naoki; Masuoka, Yoshihito; Yamada, Misuzu; Tobita, Kosuke; Kawashima, Yohei; Ogawa, Masami; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Nakagohri, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    In this case report, we describe the extremely rare case of a collision tumor comprising cancers of the bile duct and the pancreas. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of obstructive jaundice. He was diagnosed with pancreatic head cancer, and we performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. At laparotomy, there were two palpable masses in the vicinity of the confluence of the cystic duct and the head of the pancreas. The resected specimen demonstrated tumors at the confluence of the cystic duct and in the pancreatic head. Histopathological examination demonstrated a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head and a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma at the confluence of the cystic duct. Immunostaining was negative for p53 and MUC6 in the pancreatic head tumor; however, immunostaining was positive for both in the tumor located at the confluence of the cystic duct. The two tumors were histologically different and were diagnosed as collision cancer caused by the collision of the bile duct and pancreatic cancers. PMID:26943405

  8. Pathophysiology of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently discovered form of pancreatitis and represents one of the diseases of the pancreas which can be cured and healed medically. International consensus diagnostic criteria have been developed, and the clinical phenotypes associated with the histopathologic patterns of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis should be referred to as type 1 and type 2 AIP, respectively. Most importantly, in type 1 AIP, the pancreatic manifestations are associated with other extrapancreatic disorders, resembling an immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease. In addition, the pancreas of a patient with AIP is often infiltrated by various types of immune cells; the cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 or CD8 T lymphocytes and IgG4-bearing plasma cells have been found in the pancreatic parenchyma and other involved organs in AIP and factors regulating T-cell function may influence the development of AIP. From a genetic point of view, it has also been reported that DRB1*0405 and DQB1*0401 mutations are significantly more frequent in patients with AIP when compared to those with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and that only DQB1*0302 had a significant association with the relapse of AIP. Finally, it has been found that the polymorphic genes encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, a key negative regulator of the T-cell immune response, are associated with AIP in a Chinese population. Even if these data are not concordant, it is possible that physiological IgG4 responses are induced by prolonged antigen exposure and controlled by type 2 helper T cells. We reviewed the current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of this intriguing disease, focusing on the importance of the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:24891971

  9. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Utility of Stent-Grafts in Treatment of Porto-Biliary Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-12-15

    A porto-biliary fistula causing hemobilia is a known complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). We present two patients with hemobilia secondary to porto-biliary fistula, treated successfully by percutaneous placement of stent-grafts. In one case, the stent-graft was placed in the bile duct, and in the other case, it was placed in the intrahepatic portal vein branch. Hemobilia stopped and there were no complications except a small area of hepatic infarction, distal to the stent-graft in the portal vein.

  11. Lightweight Valve Closes Duct Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Walter L.; Burgy, N. Frank

    1991-01-01

    Expanding balloon serves as lightweight emergency valve to close wide duct. Uninflated balloon stored in housing of duct. Pad resting on burst diaphragm protects balloon from hot gases in duct. Once control system triggers valve, balloon inflates rapidly to block duct. Weighs much less than does conventional butterfly, hot-gas, or poppet valve capable of closing duct of equal diameter.

  12. Spectrum of Use and Effectiveness of Endoscopic and Surgical Therapies for Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Kennard, Elizabeth; Slivka, Adam A.; Brand, Randal E.; Anderson, Michelle; Banks, Peter A.; Lewis, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; O’Connell, Michael; Gelrud, Andres; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to describe the frequency of use and reported effectiveness of endoscopic and surgical therapies in patients with CP treated at US referral centers. METHODS Five hundred fifteen patients were enrolled prospectively in the North American Pancreatitis II Study 2, where patients and treating physicians reported previous therapeutic interventions and their perceived effectiveness. We evaluated the frequency and effectiveness of endoscopic (biliary or pancreatic sphincterotomy, biliary or pancreatic stent placement) and surgical (pancreatic cyst removal, pancreatic drainage procedure, pancreatic resection, surgical sphincterotomy) therapies. RESULTS Biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy (42%) were the most commonly attempted endoscopic procedure (biliary stent, 14%; pancreatic stent, 36%; P<0.001). Endoscopic procedures were equally effective (biliary sphincterotomy, 40.0%; biliary stent, 40.8%; pancreatic stent, 47.0%; P=0.34). On multivariable analysis, the presence of abdominal pain (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% 95% confidence interval, 1.15–2.88) predicted endoscopy, whereas exocrine insufficiency (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.94) deterred endoscopy. Surgical therapies were attempted equally (cyst removal, 7%; drainage procedure, 10%; resection procedure, 12%) except for surgical sphincteroplasty (4%; P<0.001). Surgical sphincteroplasty was the least effective therapy (46%; P<0.001) versus cyst removal (76% drainage [71%] and resection [73%]). CONCLUSIONS Although surgical therapies were performed less frequently than endoscopic therapies, they were more often reported to be effective. PMID:24717802

  13. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  14. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  15. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and

  16. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  17. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ashraf; Kowdley, Gopal C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals is typically performed by endoscopic ultrasound and should begin at least 10 years prior to the age of the youngest affected relative. Disease states known to be associated with increased risk of hepatocellular cancer include hereditary hemochromatosis, autoimmune hepatitis, porphyria, and α1-antitrypsin deficiency, with relative risks as high as 36-fold. Although much less is known about hereditary bile-duct cancers, Muir-Torre syndrome and bile salt export pump deficiency are diseases whose association with hereditary carcinogenesis is under investigation. PMID:22312493

  18. Intrahepatic Duct Stones Harboring Ascariasis Ova

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Lee, Wei-Chen; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ascariasis lumbricoides is one of the most common helminthic infestations in humans. Despite the fact that the prevalence of ascariasis in developed countries has been decreasing, biliary ascariasis can cause serious complications, such as acute cholangitis, pancreatitis, and liver abscess. Here we presented a rare ascariasis-related complication—hepatolithiasis. A 60-year-old female patient had symptoms of recurrent cholangitis. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed left intrahepatic duct stones with left liver lobe atrophy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed, but the stones could not be removed due to left main intrahepatic duct stenosis. The patient was treated with left hemi-hepatectomy. Unexpectedly, Ascaris ova were found on the histopathological examination. She received antihelminthic therapy orally and was on regular follow-up without any complications. Our study indicates that clinicians should be aware of biliary ascariasis in patients with hepatolithiasis, though not living in endemic areas. PMID:27015193

  19. Expandable Metal Stents for the Palliation of Malignant Gastroduodenal Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaq, Rubeena; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; England, Ruth; Marriott, Angie; Martin, Derrick

    2001-09-15

    Purpose: Gastric outlet obstruction is a debilitating complication of upper gastrointestinal malignancy. We present our experience with insertion of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS).Methods: Twenty-eight patients were referred, stenting being attempted in 23. Two patients had esophageal Wallstents inserted through a gastrostomy; 21 had an endoscopic approach with enteral Wallstents.Results: One stent insertion failed, ten patients (45%) returned to a normal diet, ten patients (45%) managed semi-solid food and two patients (9%) had no significant improvement. No immediate complications were seen. One patient subsequently developed pancreatitis. Reintervention (4 stents, 1 jejunostomy, 1 gastro jejunostomy) was required in six of 22 patients (27%) for inadequate stent expansion (1), second stricture (2), stent migration (1), and tumor ingrowth (2). The mean survival was 95.4 days (SD 78.8 days, range 3-230 days). The mean follow-up time was 98.9 days (SD 86.7 days, range 3-309 days).Conclusions: SEMS are effective in palliating malignant gastric outlet obstruction. A combined endoscopic/fluoroscopic approach allows the most complete assessment of the stricture and removes the need for gastrostomy insertion. Careful assessment of the gastrointestinal tract distal to the lesion is important.

  20. Synchronous gallbladder and pancreatic cancer associated with pancreaticobiliary maljunction.

    PubMed

    Rungsakulkij, Narongsak; Boonsakan, Paisarn

    2014-10-21

    We report the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with chronic intermittent abdominal pain without jaundice; abdominal ultrasonography showed thickening of the gallbladder wall and dilatation of the bile duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography showed pancreatobiliary maljunction with proximal common bile duct dilatation. Pancreatobiliary maljunction was diagnosed. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed suspected gallbladder cancer and distal common bile duct obstruction. A pancreatic head mass was incidentally found intraoperative. Radical cholecystectomy with pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. The pathological report showed gallbladder cancer that was synchronous with pancreatic head cancer. In the pancreatobiliary maljunction with pancreatobiliary reflux condition, double primary cancer of the pancreatobiliary system should be awared.

  1. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected

  2. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  3. Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent and 6-Year Follow-Up of Biliary Complication After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Doros, Attila Nemeth, Andrea; Deak, Akos Pal; Hartmann, Erika; Gerlei, Zsuzsa; Fazakas, Janos; Kobori, Laszlo

    2010-04-15

    The role of covered stent in the management of biliary complications is not yet defined in liver transplant recipients. This Case Report presents a patient with anastomotic stricture and leakage with biloma treated with a covered stent 32 months following liver transplantation. Signs of in-stent restenosis developed 52 months following covered stent placement, which was resolved by balloon dilation. There were no complications during the interventions. The latest follow-up, at 69 months following primary and 19 months following secondary percutaneous intervention, shows a patent covered stent without any clinical or morphological sign of further restenosis. The clinical success with long-term follow-up data suggests that covered stent implantation can be a rational, minimally invasive option for simultaneous treatment of bile duct stenosis and bile leak following liver transplantation in selected cases.

  4. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  5. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  6. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  7. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  8. Low loss duct burner

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, H. M.; Reider, S. B.

    1985-07-09

    A jet propulsion engine with a fan bypass duct includes a duct burner with a plurality of flame stabilizers therein each mounted to inner case and outer case members through spherical bearings. Each of the stabilizers consists of two blade members having integral arms thereon actuated by fore and aft motion of an external actuating ring to assume an expanded position to increase duct turbulence for mixing air flow therethrough with a fuel supply and into a retracted position against each other to reduce pressure drop under nonafterburning operation. Each of the flame stabilizer blades has a platform that controls communication between a hot air source and a duct for improving fuel vaporization during afterburner operation thereby to increase afterburning limits; the platforms close communication between the hot air source and the duct during nonafterburning operation when flame stabilization is not required.

  9. Polyurethane-Covered Nitinol Strecker Stents as Primary Palliative Treatment of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira; Kane, Teruyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyurethane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n = 5), pancreatic cancer (n = 6), gallbladder cancer (n = 4), metastatic lymph nodes (n = 2), and tumor of the papilla (n 1).Results: The mean patency period of the stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  10. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Burrus, R G; Burns, R P; Chandler, K E; Barker, D E

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has emerged as the treatment of choice for uncomplicated cholelithiasis. Despite early concerns, many surgeons have applied this new technique to more complicated biliary tract disease states, including biliary pancreatitis. To evaluate the safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in this setting, we retrospectively reviewed 29 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of biliary pancreatitis who underwent this procedure between March 1990 and December 1992. The severity of pancreatitis was determined by Ranson's criteria. Two patients had a Ranson's score of 6, one of 5, one of 4, five scored 3, nine scored 2, nine also scored 1, and two patients scored 0. The mean serum amylase level on admission was 1,610 (range 148 to 7680). All patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission for biliary pancreatitis, with the mean time of operation being 5.5 days from admission. Operative time averaged 123 minutes (range 60-220 minutes). Intraoperative cholangiography was obtained in 76 per cent of patients. Three patients had choledocholithiasis on intraoperative cholangiography and were treated with choledochoscopy, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, and saline flushing of the duct. The mean length of hospital stay was 11 days (range 5-32 days). There were seven postoperative complications requiring prolonged hospitalization with all but one treated non-operatively. One patient with a preoperative Ranson score of 6 developed necrotizing pancreatitis and subsequently required operative pancreatic debridement and drainage. There were no deaths in this series and no postoperative wound infections. The average recovery period for return to work was 2 weeks. These statistics compare favorably with literature reports for open cholecystectomy in biliary pancreatitis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Postoperative pancreatitis as a complication of biliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D M; House, A K; Garcia-Webb, P

    1979-08-01

    Forty patients who underwent biliary surgery were investigated for postoperative pancreatic disturbance as measured by the amylase creatinine clearance ration (ACCR). Its relevance to preoperative pancreatitis, exploration of the common bile duct, and operative cholangiography were examined. The results suggested that a recent clinically proven episode of pancreatitis did not predispose to a postoperative recurrence following biliary surgery. Similarly, cholecystectomy alone did not produce a postoperative pancreatic disturbance. However, exploration of the common bile duct did frequently cause a postoperative elevated ACCR, and hence we recommend that duct exploration should be performed as carefully and as atraumatically as possible. The small number of patients who did not have operative cholangiograms prevented statistical evaluation of the effect of this procedure on the pancreas. However, information from elsewhere suggests that the plasma amylase level is not likely to be raised by cholangiography. PMID:291412

  12. Communicating bronchopulmonary pancreatic foregut malformation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, G F; Bhardwaj, N; Suster, B; Arliss, J J; Connery, C P

    1999-12-01

    Bronchopulmonary foregut malformations include intralobar and extralobar pulmonary sequestrations, bronchogenic cysts, and communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformations (CBPFM). These malformations, formes frustes, originate as developmental abnormalities of ventral foregut budding of the tracheobronchial tree or the gastrointestinal tract. The communication's patency with the parent viscus determines if a contained malformation occurs, or if an abnormal communication persists as a CBPFM. This case demonstrates a unique example of a CBPFM in which the main pancreatic duct communicated with pulmonary parenchyma through a retroperitoneal fistula.

  13. Laparoscopic retrieval of a missing pancreatic pseudocyst drain.

    PubMed

    Randall, Jonathan; Mee, Anthony; Jones, Adam

    2008-02-01

    A 20-year woman who presented with acute pancreatitis developed a pseudocyst that was successfully drained by endoscopic placement of a stent as a cystogastrostomy. The first stent used went fully into the cyst and was irretrievable. Two years later a computed tomography showed the stent lying anterior to the left kidney. The stent was later successfully retrieved using a retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach, with the help of an image intensifier. Although high technical success rates of endoscopic drainage of pseudocysts are reported complications have been described including hemorrhage, secondary infection, and stent migration. We believe this is the first case described where a pseudocyst drain has migrated into the retroperitoneum and then been retrieved laparoscopically.

  14. Endovascular Exclusion of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Stent-Grafts: Technique and Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Citone, Michele; David, Vincenzo

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes four cases of visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs) successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts and discusses the endovascular approach to VAAs and the long-term results. Four balloon expandable stent-grafts were used to treat three splenic artery aneurysms and one bleeding common hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. The percutaneous access site and the materials were chosen on the basis of CT angiography findings. In all cases the aneurysms were successfully excluded. In one case a splenic infarction occurred, with nonrelevant clinical findings. At 16- to 24-month follow-up three patients had patent stents and complete exclusion and shrinkage of the aneurysms. One patient died due to pancreatitis and sepsis, 16 days after successful stenting and exclusion of a bleeding pseudoaneurysm. We conclude that endovascular treatment using covered stent-grafts is a valid therapeutic option for VAAs. Multislice CT preoperative study helps in planning stent-graft positioning.

  15. New modalities for treating chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grimm, H; Meyer, W H; Nam, V C; Soehendra, N

    1989-03-01

    Over the last few years, a new method, neither medical nor surgical, has been developed for treating often difficult-to-treat chronic pancreatitis. In the case of obstructive pancreatitis, endoscopy permits both drainage and calculus extraction. Even encrusted concrements and calcifications can be removed from the pancreatic duct with the aid of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The first aim is to relieve pain by restoring a free flow of secretion. Perhaps the use of endoscopic treatment in the early stages will break the vicious circle of chronic inflammation and ultimate gland destruction.

  16. Risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula: Analysis of 539 successive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bing-Yang; Wan, Tao; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the risk factors for pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy. METHODS We conducted a retrospective analysis of 539 successive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed at our hospital from March 2012 to October 2015. Pancreatic fistula was diagnosed in strict accordance with the definition of pancreatic fistula from the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula. The risk factors for pancreatic fistula were analyzed by univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 269 (49.9%) cases of pancreatic fistula occurred after pancreaticoduodenectomy, including 71 (13.17%) cases of grade A pancreatic fistula, 178 (33.02%) cases of grade B, and 20 (3.71%) cases of grade C. Univariate analysis showed no significant correlation between postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and the following factors: age, hypertension, alcohol consumption, smoking, history of upper abdominal surgery, preoperative jaundice management, preoperative bilirubin, preoperative albumin, pancreatic duct drainage, intraoperative blood loss, operative time, intraoperative blood transfusion, Braun anastomosis, and pancreaticoduodenectomy (with or without pylorus preservation). Conversely, a significant correlation was observed between POPF and the following factors: gender (male vs female: 54.23% vs 42.35%, P = 0.008), diabetes (non-diabetic vs diabetic: 51.61% vs 39.19%, P = 0.047), body mass index (BMI) (≤ 25 vs > 25: 46.94% vs 57.82%, P = 0.024), blood glucose level (≤ 6.0 mmol/L vs > 6.0 mmol/L: 54.75% vs 41.14%, P = 0.002), pancreaticojejunal anastomosis technique (pancreatic duct-jejunum double-layer mucosa-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunal anastomosis vs pancreatic-jejunum single-layer mucosa-to-mucosa anastomosis: 57.54% vs 35.46%, P = 0.000), diameter of the pancreatic duct (≤ 3 mm vs > 3 mm: 57.81% vs 38.36%, P = 0.000), and pancreatic texture (soft vs hard: 56.72% vs 29.93%, P = 0.000). Multivariate logistic regression

  17. Risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula: Analysis of 539 successive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bing-Yang; Wan, Tao; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the risk factors for pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy. METHODS We conducted a retrospective analysis of 539 successive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed at our hospital from March 2012 to October 2015. Pancreatic fistula was diagnosed in strict accordance with the definition of pancreatic fistula from the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula. The risk factors for pancreatic fistula were analyzed by univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 269 (49.9%) cases of pancreatic fistula occurred after pancreaticoduodenectomy, including 71 (13.17%) cases of grade A pancreatic fistula, 178 (33.02%) cases of grade B, and 20 (3.71%) cases of grade C. Univariate analysis showed no significant correlation between postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and the following factors: age, hypertension, alcohol consumption, smoking, history of upper abdominal surgery, preoperative jaundice management, preoperative bilirubin, preoperative albumin, pancreatic duct drainage, intraoperative blood loss, operative time, intraoperative blood transfusion, Braun anastomosis, and pancreaticoduodenectomy (with or without pylorus preservation). Conversely, a significant correlation was observed between POPF and the following factors: gender (male vs female: 54.23% vs 42.35%, P = 0.008), diabetes (non-diabetic vs diabetic: 51.61% vs 39.19%, P = 0.047), body mass index (BMI) (≤ 25 vs > 25: 46.94% vs 57.82%, P = 0.024), blood glucose level (≤ 6.0 mmol/L vs > 6.0 mmol/L: 54.75% vs 41.14%, P = 0.002), pancreaticojejunal anastomosis technique (pancreatic duct-jejunum double-layer mucosa-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunal anastomosis vs pancreatic-jejunum single-layer mucosa-to-mucosa anastomosis: 57.54% vs 35.46%, P = 0.000), diameter of the pancreatic duct (≤ 3 mm vs > 3 mm: 57.81% vs 38.36%, P = 0.000), and pancreatic texture (soft vs hard: 56.72% vs 29.93%, P = 0.000). Multivariate logistic regression

  18. Initial study of sediment antagonism and characteristics of silver nanoparticle-coated biliary stents in an experimental animal model

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yigeng; Xia, Mingfeng; Zhang, Shuai; Fu, Zhen; Wen, Qingbin; Liu, Feng; Xu, Zongzhen; Li, Tao; Tian, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Plastic biliary stents used to relieve obstructive jaundice are frequently blocked by sediment, resulting in loss of drainage. We prepared stents coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and compared their ability to resist sedimentation with Teflon stents in a beagle model of obstructive jaundice. Methods AgNP-coated Teflon biliary stents were prepared by chemical oxidation–reduction and evaluated in an obstructive jaundice model that was produced by ligation of common bile duct (CBD); animals were randomized to two equal groups for placement of AgNP-coated or Teflon control stents. Liver function and inflammatory index were found to be similar in the two groups, and the obstruction was relieved. Stents were removed 21 days after insertion and observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The AgNP coating was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), and the composition of sediment was assayed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Results Electron microscopy revealed a black, closely adherent AgNP stent coating, with thicknesses of 1.5–6 µm. Sediment thickness and density were greater on Teflon than on AgNP-coated stents. EDXA confirmed the stability and integrity of the AgNP coating before and after in vivo animal experimentation. FTIR spectroscopy identified stent sediment components including bilirubin, cholesterol, bile acid, protein, calcium, and other substances. Conclusion AgNP-coated biliary stents resisted sediment accumulation in this canine model of obstructive jaundice caused by ligation of the CBD. PMID:27217749

  19. Pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; di Mola, Fabio F; Buchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The pathophysiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is incompletely understood. Several hypotheses have been advanced, including pancreatic and extrapancreatic causes. The existence of different hypotheses to explain the genesis of pain in CP also reflects the different therapeutic approaches to pain in these patients. Increased intraductal pressure as a result of single or multiple strictures and/or calculi is believed to be a common cause of pain in CP patients with a dilated main pancreatic duct. Other suggested causes include pancreatic fibrosis, interstitial hypertension and pancreatic ischemia. Additionally, extrapancreatic causes like duodenal and common bile duct stenosis with scarring due to pancreatic inflammation are suggested as factors causing pain in CP. The 'neurogenic inflammation' hypothesis is a fascinating theory which is supported by different studies. Immunohistological reports have shown that the amount of neurotransmitters, such as substance P and its receptor, calcitonin gene-related peptide and other neurotransmitters, are increased in afferent pancreatic nerves and a correlation between pain and immune cell infiltration of the nerves has been reported in CP. In this review we will discuss the different pain hypotheses and will present the perspective that neuroimmune interaction is an important factor for pain generation in CP.

  20. Successful Treatment of Persistent Postcholecystectomy Bile Leak Using Percutaneous Cystic Duct Coiling

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Beckley, Akin; Fabre, Anna; Bellows, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed operations worldwide. Cystic duct is the most common site of bile leak after cholecystectomy. The treatment of choice is usually conservative. Using sufficient percutaneous drainage of the biloma cavity and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and/or stenting, the cure rate of bile leaks is greater than 90%. In very rare cases, all of these measures remain unsuccessful. We report a technique for the successful treatment of persistent cystic duct leak. After failed ERCP and stenting, bile leak was treated by coiling the cystic duct through a drain tract. This technique is safe and effective and helps avoid the morbidity of reoperation. PMID:26798539

  1. Isolated lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis involving the pancreatic tail.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tad; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Dixon, Lisa R; Hochwald, Steven N

    2008-07-01

    We present an interesting case of a 62-year-old woman with a 3-month history of vague, left-sided abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a hypodense lesion in the tail of the pancreas. The patient had no history of pancreatitis or autoimmune diseases. Laboratory testing revealed a normal CA19-9 (33 U/mL) and an elevated IgG4 (133 mg/dL). Due to concerns of pancreatic malignancy, she underwent operation. We found a dense, inflammatory mass in the tail of the pancreas, which was removed via an open distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy. Histologic analysis revealed a pancreas with sclerotic ducts and surrounding lymphoplasmacytic inflammation most consistent with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). LPSP, also termed autoimmune pancreatitis, is a benign disease of the pancreas, which can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. It is the most common benign finding diagnosed on pathology after pancreatic resection for presumed malignancy. LPSP most commonly involves the head and, more uncommonly, the tail of the pancreas. It can be successfully treated with steroids obviating the need for resection. IgG4 levels may assist in recognition of this disease. As our experience with utilization of IgG4 testing and knowledge of the systemic nature of LPSP increase, patients with this disease may be spared unnecessary resection.

  2. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation. PMID:26225356

  3. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  4. Management of fibrosing pancreatitis in children presenting with obstructive jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, F; Shuckett, B; Cutz, E; Durie, P; Marcon, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Children with fibrosing pancreatitis are conventionally treated surgically to relieve common bile duct (CBD) obstruction caused by pancreatic compression. Residual pancreatic function has not been formally tested in these patients. 
Aims—To evaluate the usefulness of non-surgical temporary drainage in children with fibrosing pancreatitis and to assess pancreatic function after resolution of their CBD obstruction. 
Patients—Four children (1.5-13 years; three girls). 
Methods and results—Abdominal sonography and computed tomography revealed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, predominantly the head. The CBD was dilated due to compression by the head of the pancreas. Pancreatic biopsy specimens obtained in three patients showed notable acinar cell atrophy and extensive fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis was excluded. No other cause of pancreatitis was identified. Pancreatic tissue from one patient contained viral DNA sequences for parvovirus B19 detected by polymerase chain reaction; serum IgM to parvovirus was positive. Three patients had temporary drainage of the CBD and one patient underwent a choledochojejunostomy. Serial imaging studies revealed resolution of the CBD obstruction with reduction in pancreatic size. Exocrine pancreatic function deteriorated. Three patients developed pancreatic insufficiency within two to four months of presentation. The fourth patient has notably diminished pancreatic function, but remains pancreatic sufficient. None has diabetes mellitus. 
Conclusions—Temporary drainage of the CBD obstruction is recommended in fibrosing pancreatitis in children along with close monitoring of the clinical course, before considering surgery. 

 Keywords: pancreatitis; jaundice; common bile duct obstruction; children PMID:9824357

  5. Laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Deie, Kyoichi; Uchida, Hiroo; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yujiro; Fujiogi, Michimasa; Amano, Hizuru; Murase, Naruhiko; Tainaka, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Surgical pancreatic duct (PD) drainage for chronic pancreatitis in children is relatively rare. It is indicated in cases of recurrent pancreatitis and PD dilatation that have not responded to medical therapy and therapeutic endoscopy. We performed laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy for two paediatric patients with chronic pancreatitis. The main PD was opened easily by electrocautery after locating the dilated PD by intraoperative ultrasonography. The dilated PD was split longitudinally from the pancreatic tail to the pancreatic head by laparoscopic coagulation shears or electrocautery after pancreatography. A laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy was performed by a one-layered technique using continuous 4-0 polydioxanone (PDS) sutures from the pancreatic tail to the pancreatic head. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications or recurrences. This procedure has cosmetic advantages compared with open surgery for chronic pancreatitis. Laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy in children is feasible and effective for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:27251846

  6. [Current strategy to cure pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2002-03-01

    For more than a decade extensive retroperitoneal dissection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy has not prolonged the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Two prospective randomized studies addressing the clinical significance of extensive dissection or pancreatic resection for advanced cancer are now in progress. Nonetheless, at present, resection offers the patient the only possibility of cure. Although the diagnosis of curable pancreatic cancer is difficult, recent evidences have given a few hints. The first is pancreatic duct dilatation caused by cancerous stricture. The second is diabetes as a sign of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective pancreatographic screening of diabetic patients selected by our criteria(Table 1) revealed 7 cancers in 98 patients(7.1%). Within 3 years from diagnosis, the prevalence was 15%. Although the 7 cancers were advanced, this suggests that earlier examinations in diabetic patients may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis. The third is a small cystic lesion as a sentinel of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytology of the pancreatic juice may show the presence of in situ cancer in patients with a pancreatic cyst. At the moment, careful checks for the presence of these hints seem to be the only strategy to offer a chance for cure to patients with pancreatic cancer.

  7. Pancreas divisum: a teenager with calculi in the duct of Santorini. Report of a case treated by double drainage procedure.

    PubMed

    Yvergneaux, J P; Van den Boer, H; De Keyser, R; Brys, R

    1985-01-01

    Since the age of sixteen, a teenager suffers from acute recurrent pancreatitis with a weight loss of 17 kg, without evident etiologic factor. At laparotomy the duct of Wirsung is absent; calculi are found in a grossly dilated duct of Santorini and the minor papilla is stenosed with periductal fibrosis and a large retention pseudocyst. Recurrent pancreatitis is cured by sphincteroplasty of the minor papilla and side-to-side pancreatico-jejunostomy. After a follow-up of 17 months the recurrent pancreatitis seems cured by sphincteroplasty of the minor papilla and side-to-side pancreatico-jejunostomy.

  8. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Materials and Methods In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent–cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P < .05) and showed the highest mean grading score (2.94 ± 0.94; P < .05) and contrast/noise ratio of in-stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P < .05) among all the modes. Conclusion Iodine (water) images can help reduce stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis. PMID:26731534

  9. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy.

  10. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy. PMID:27621748

  11. Endoscopic ultrasonography for evaluating patients with recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-02-21

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) is still a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. In up to 30% of cases of ARP, it is not possible to establish the etiology of the disease. In the other 70%, many factors play an etiological role in ARP: microlithiasis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), pancreas divisum, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, a choledochocele, annular pancreas, an anomalous pancreatobiliary junction, pancreatic tumors or chronic pancreatitis are diagnosed. EUS should be useful in ARP as it is sensitive for diagnosing bile duct stones, gallbladder sludge, pancreatic lesions, ductal abnormalities and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) appears to be diagnostic in the majority of patients with previously unexplained pancreatitis, and offers an alternative to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as the initial diagnostic test in patients with ARP.

  12. Process for making electroformed stents

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Richard A.

    2000-02-01

    This invention is directed to an expandable stent useful for implantation into an artery or the like. The stents are made using electroforming techniques in which an electrically-conductive mandrel is coated with a suitable resist material, after which the resist is exposed to an appropriate light pattern and frequency so as to form a stent pattern in the resist. The mandrel is then electroplated with a suitable stent material. The mandrel is etched away once a sufficient layer of stent material is deposited, leaving a completed stent.

  13. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae.

  15. Stent-grafts for the treatment of TIPS dysfunction: Fluency stent vs Wallgraft stent

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xue-Feng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Liu, Ling-Jun; Yu, Yang; Zhou, Biao; Tang, Cheng-Wei; Li, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an expanded polytetrafluoro-ethylene-covered Fluency stent compared with that of a polyethylene terephthalate-covered Wallgraft stent for the management of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) dysfunction. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients who underwent TIPS revision with stent-grafts between May 2007 and June 2011 was conducted. The patients were divided into two groups according to the stent-grafts implanted: the Fluency stent (Bard Incorporated, Karlsruhe, Germany) and the Wallgraft stent (Boston Scientific, Galway, Ireland). The primary patency rates were calculated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients were evaluated in this study: 33 with Fluency stents and 40 with Wallgraft stents. The primary patency rates at 12 and 24 mo were 91% and 85%, respectively, in the Fluency stent group and 78% and 63%, respectively, in the Wallgraft stent group. The primary shunt patency rates after TIPS revision were significantly better with the Fluency stent than with the Wallgraft stent (P = 0.033). CONCLUSION: TIPS revision with the Fluency stent has higher medium-term patency rates than that with the Wallgraft stent. PMID:23946607

  16. An apparent idiopathic case of relapsing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nocente, R; Silveri, N G; Gasbarrini, A; Cicconi, V; Caminiti, G; Mutignani, M; Manfredi, R; Gasbarrini, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of relapsing acute pancreatitis apparently idiopathic in a 55-year-old man. The patient did not smoke and was a modest and irregular drinker of wine. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an initial dilatation of secondary ducts like a chronic pancreatitis of class I of Cremer. Ultrasound and computed tomography resulted negative for pancreatic lesions. In the follow-up however, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography detected the presence of an intraductal mucin-hypersecreting neoplasm, a duct-ectatic mucinous cystic tumor of the pancreas, in the uncinate process. This is a benign lesion clearly recognized nowadays by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, because this radiological technique shows the grape-like clusters of cystic lesions in secondary ducts communicating with the main duct on the same plane. The radiological picture above excludes a malignant lesion and a biopsy specimen is not required. Furthermore, an intraductal mucin-hypersecreting neoplasm of the pancreas does not require an immediate surgical resection because of its slow evolution and can be followed-up. Conversely cystoadenocarcinoma spreads in peripheral ducts and does not communicate with the Wirsung duct. It requires both surgical resection and a biopsy specimen for histological diagnosis. In the last episode of acute pancreatitis, a sphincterotomy was performed at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and our patient had no more pain for one year.

  17. A case of cholecystohepatic duct with atrophic common hepatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, A; Hankins, J

    2003-01-01

    Background Cholecystohepatic ducts are rare congenital variants of the biliary tree. Case outline An 81-year-old woman presented with biliary colic and elevated liver function tests. An ERCP demonstrated a common bile duct stone and stricture of the common hepatic duct. An operative cholangiogram demonstrated an atrophic common hepatic duct and retrograde filling of the gallbladder through a large cholecystoheptic duct. The patient had a cholecystectomy and reconstructive cholecystohepatic duct jejunostomy. Discussion This case demonstrates a rare congenital anomaly where the gallbladder fills retrograde during an intraoperative cholangiogram despite clipping of the cystic duct. The major path of biliary drainage was through a large cholecystoheptic duct similar to a gallbladder interposition; however, the common hepatic duct was still present but atrophic. This anomaly has not been described previously. PMID:18332999

  18. The breadth of imaging findings of groove pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, John P; Neill Magarik, Meaghan Anne; Hardie, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of groove pancreatitis involves progressive cystic degeneration of hamartomatous pancreas rests which lie within the duodenal wall. Hamartomatous pancreatic rests can occur in other locations, but when located within the pancreaticoduodenal groove can lead to a particular clinical presentation following the development of fibrotic and inflammatory tissue. Although this is not a disease of the pancreas itself, the pancreatic duct and biliary system is frequently secondarily involved in this regional process. Identification of this entity and its varied appearances as a distinct pathology is essential given the unique management issues of groove pancreatitis.

  19. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described. PMID:26567863

  20. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis with histologically proven lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis with granulocytic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Takaoka, Makoto; Uchida, Kazushige; Shimatani, Masaaki; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Kusuda, Takeo; Kurishima, Akiko; Fukui, Yuri; Sumimoto, Kimi; Satoi, Sohei; Ohe, Chisato; Uemura, Yoshiko; Kwon, A-Hon; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    Recent histological and clinical studies have suggested the existence of 2 distinct types of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP): type 1 AIP related to IgG4, exhibiting lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), and type 2 AIP related to granulocyte epithelial lesions (GELs), exhibiting idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP). We herein present a case of type 1 AIP with histologically proven LPSP with GELs. This patient had neither serum IgG4 elevation nor MPD narrowing. In this case, the clinically and histologically atypical findings for type 1 AIP are intriguing. PMID:22466829

  2. Microsurgical anastomosis of sperm duct by laser tissue soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin M.; Teutu-Kengne, Alain-Fleury; Brkovic, Drasko; Henning, Thomas; Klee, Doris; Poprawe, Reinhart; Jakse, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    Connection of small vessels is usually done by suturing which is very cumbersome. Laser tissue soldering can circumvent that obstacle if a handy procedure can be defined. Our principle approach consists of a bioresorbable hollow stent with an expected degradation time of 3 weeks in combination with laser soldering. The stent is to be fed into the vessel to stabilize both ends and should allow percolation immediately after joining. The stents are made of Poly(D,L-lactid-co-glycolid) and solder is prepared from bovine serum albumin (BSA) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG) as chromophore to increase the absorption of laser light. After insertion, solder is applied onto the outer surface of the vessel and coagulated by laser radiation. The wavelength of 810 nm of a diode laser fits favorably to absorption properties of tissue and solder such that heating up of tissue is limited to prevent from necrosis and wound healing complications. In our study the preparation of stents, the consistency and doping of solder, a beam delivery instrument and the irradiation conditions are worked out. In-vitro tests are carried out on sperm ducts of Sprague-Dowlae (SD) rats. Different irradiation conditions are investigated and a micro-optical system consisting of a lens and a reflecting prism to ensure simultaneous irradiation of front and back side of the vessels tested. Under these conditions, the short-term rupture strength of laser anastomosis revealed as high as those achieved by suturing.

  3. Nanomaterial coatings applied on stent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mahsa; Mohammadi, Marzieh; Steele, Terry Wj; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The advent of percutaneous coronary intervention and intravascular stents has revolutionized the field of interventional cardiology. Nonetheless, in-stent restenosis, inflammation and late-stent thrombosis are the major obstacles with currently available stents. In order to enhance the hemocompatibility of stents, advances in the field of nanotechnology allow novel designs of nanoparticles and biomaterials toward localized drug/gene carriers or stent scaffolds. The current review focuses on promising polymers used in the fabrication of newer generations of stents with a short synopsis on atherosclerosis and current commercialized stents, nanotechnology's impact on stent development and recent advancements in stent biomaterials is discussed in context.

  4. Endoscopic lithotripsy for bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Leung, J W

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy and common duct stone extraction is successful in 85-90% of patients using conventional balloons and baskets. However, most patients with biliary stones > 2 cm will require mechanical, electrohydraulic, or laser lithotripsy prior to stone extraction. Mechanical lithotripsy is inexpensive, easy to perform, and effective in 80-90% of cases. Most failures result from inability to entrap the stone in the lithotripsy basket. These cases may be successfully treated using either electrohydraulic or laser lithotripsy (intraductal shockwave lithotripsy). In most cases, intraductal shockwave lithotripsy requires direct visual control. Due to difficulty with peroral cholangioscopy, these techniques will not be widely used until a smaller, more maneuverable "mother and baby scope" system is developed. We recommend mechanical lithotripsy as the initial treatment for large biliary stones. Failed cases should be referred to specialized centers for a repeat attempt with intraductal shockwave lithotripsy. With this approach, an experienced endoscopist is successful in removing biliary stones in over 95% of patients. Long term biliary stenting remains a viable option for the high risk patients with large common bile duct stones.

  5. Classification and management of bile duct injuries.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Miguel Angel; Domínguez, Ismael

    2011-04-27

    To review the classification and general guidelines for treatment of bile duct injury patients and their long term results. In a 20-year period, 510 complex circumferential injuries have been referred to our team for repair at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" hospital in Mexico City and 198 elsewhere (private practice). The records at the third level Academic University Hospital were analyzed and divided into three periods of time: GI-1990-99 (33 cases), GII- 2000-2004 (139 cases) and GIII- 2004-2008 (140 cases). All patients were treated with a Roux en Y hepatojejunostomy. A decrease in using transanastomotic stents was observed (78% vs 2%, P = 0.0001). Partial segment IV and V resection was more frequently carried out (45% vs 75%, P = 0.2) (to obtain a high bilioenteric anastomosis). Operative mortality (3% vs 0.7%, P = 0.09), postoperative cholangitis (54% vs 13%, P = 0.0001), anastomosis strictures (30% vs 5%, P = 0.0001), short and long term complications and need for reoperation (surgical or radiological) (45% vs 11%, P = 0.0001) were significantly less in the last period. The authors concluded that transition to a high volume center has improved long term results for bile duct injury repair. Even interested and tertiary care centers have a learning curve.

  6. Patent arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-07-10

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  7. Patent arterial duct

    PubMed Central

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  8. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  9. CORNICE DUCT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd; TC Howard

    2002-12-01

    SYNERGETICS, INC., is in the process of designing, developing, and testing an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building. Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. A patent has been submitted, refined based on feedback from the patent office, and resubmitted. Additional refinements to the design will lead to additional claims being added to the patent in the near future. Designs are being finalized for a refined version that will be fabricated and tested in the same residential laboratory house. Work is expected to be complete on this project in April of 2003.

  10. Animal models in alcoholic pancreatitis--what can we learn?

    PubMed

    Schneider, Alexander; Whitcomb, David C; Singer, Manfred V

    2002-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic pancreatitis present a history of excessive alcohol consumption, the pathophysiology underlying chronic alcoholic pancreatitis remains poorly defined. Since experimental animal models represent helpful tools in understanding human disease, numerous laboratory studies have been designed to study the effects of alcohol on the pancreas. In the present article we summarize the existing animal models that have been used to investigate the effects of acute and chronic alcohol application on the development of morphological alterations and pancreatic injury. Despite considerable experimental effort, acute or chronic ethanol feeding alone failed to cause acute or chronic pancreatitis in animals. However, ethanol-feeding and the combination with other procedures has demonstrated several mechanisms that play a role in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Among these ethanol-induced alterations and mechanisms are the reduction of pancreatic blood-flow and microcirculation, damaging effects of ethanol metabolites, increased pancreatic acinar cell expression of digestive and lysosomal enzymes, increased glandular enzyme content, additional nutritional factors, pancreatic duct obstruction, and limitations of pancreatic regeneration. Although no satisfactory animal model for alcoholic pancreatitis has been developed, these animal models have provided insights in several factors that predispose the pancreas to development of pancreatic injury and contribute to alcoholic pancreatitis.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  12. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  13. CT of fluid collections associated with pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Siegelman, S S; Copeland, B E; Saba, G P; Cameron, J L; Sanders, R C; Zerhouni, E A

    1980-06-01

    Fluid collections are an important component of severe pancreatitis because they may produce a detectable mass and may be responsible for prolongation of fever and pain. Among 59 cases of clinically verified pancreatitis, 32 were shown by CT to be complicated by pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic fluid collections. Pancreatic fluid collections, diagnosed in 16 patients, were typically on the anterior or anterolateral surface of the gland and were covered only by a thin layer of fibrous connective tissue. Extrapancreatic fluid collections were detected in the lesser sac (19 cases), anterior pararenal space (15), posterior pararenal space (six), in or around the left lobe of the liver (five), in the spleen (three), and in the mediastinum (one). The potential undesirable consequences of escape of pancreatic juice are necrosis, abscess formation, or prolonged inflammation of the peripancreatic tissues. Relative preservation of pancreatic integrity as observed by CT was regularly found in patients with large extrapancreatic fluid collections, suggesting that escape of pancreatic juice produces a beneficial decompression of the pancreatic duct system.

  14. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  15. [Iatrogenic bile duct injuries].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Gómez, Francisco; Ramia Ángel, José Manuel; García-Parreño Jofré, Jorge; Figueras, Joan

    2010-10-01

    Bile duct injuries can be caused by different reasons, with Iatrogenic Bile Duct Injuries (IBDI) being the most common factor. IBDI is a complex situation produced in apparently healthy patients and is associated with a high rate of morbidity and a low rate of mortality. A multidisciplinary approach between surgeons, radiologist and endoscopist offers the best chances for an initial diagnosis, therapeutic options, management and follow up of complications for the patient. The aim of this review is to describe the current medical literature with reference to IBDI, and discuss our therapeutic algorithm.

  16. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  17. Effectiveness of duct cleaning methods on newly installed duct surfaces.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, R; Asikainen, V; Tuomainen, M; Björkroth, M; Pasanen, P; Seppänen, O

    2003-09-01

    Two kinds of air duct cleaning methods, mechanical brushing with different brushes and compressed air cleaning, were compared in the laboratory and in newly built buildings. The ducts were contaminated either with test dust or with dust originated from a construction site. The amount of dust on the duct surface was measured with the vacuum test method and estimated visually before and after the cleaning. In addition, the cleaning times of the different techniques were compared and the amount of residual oil in the ducts was measured in the laboratory test. The brushing methods were more efficient in metal ducts, and compressed air cleaning was more efficient in plastic ducts. After the duct cleaning the mean amount of residual dust on the surface of the ducts was ducts contaminated at construction site and ducts cleaned in the laboratory or in the building site, respectively. The oil residues and the dust stuck onto the oil were difficult to scrape off and remove, and none of the cleaning methods were capable of cleaning the oily duct surfaces efficiently enough. Thus new installations should consist only of oil-free ducts.

  18. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 1: acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yener, Ö

    2015-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas that may also involve surrounding tissues or remote organs. The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Generally, imaging is recommended to confirm the clinical diagnosis, investigate the etiology, and grade the extend and severity of the acute pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality in most centers for the confirmation of the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and the ruling out of other causes of acute abdomen, but it has limitations in the acute clinical setting. Computed tomography not only establishes the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but also enables to stage severity of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging has earned an ever more important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. It is especially useful for imaging of patients with iodine allergies, characterizing collections and assessment of an abnormal or disconnected pancreatic duct. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the acute pancreatitis, clarify confusing terminology, underline the role of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging according to the proper clinical context and compare the advantages and limitations of each modality.

  19. Palliation of Malignant Biliary and Duodenal Obstruction with Combined Metallic Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Akhan, Okan; Ozkan, Fuat; Ciftci, Turkmen; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction with combined metallic stenting under fluoroscopy guidance. Materials and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 9 patients (6 men and 3 women) who underwent biliary and duodenal stenting was performed. The mean age of patients was 61 years (range: 42-80 years). The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma in 7 patients, cholangiocellular carcinoma in one, and duodenal carcinoma in the other. Biliary and duodenal stents were placed simultaneously in 4 patients. In other 5 patients dudodenal stents were placed after biliary stenting when the duodenal obstruction symptoms have developed. In two patients duodenal stents were advanced via transgastric approach. Results. Technical success rate was 100 %. After percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting bilirubin levels decreased to normal levels in 6 patients and in remaining 3 patients mean reduction of 71% in bilirubin levels was achieved. Tumoral ingrowth occurred in one patient and percutaneous biliary restenting was performed 90 days after the initial procedure. Of the 9 patients, 6 patients were able to tolerate solid diet, whereas 2 patients could tolerate liquid diet and one patient did not show any improvement. Mean survival periods were 111 and 73 days after biliary and duodenal stenting, respectively. Conclusion. Combined biliary and duodenal stent placement which can be performed under fluoroscopic guidance without assistance of endoscopy is feasible and an effective method of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions. If transoral and endoscopic approaches fail, percutaneous gastrostomy route allows duodenal stenting.

  20. The Use of a Hemostasis Introducer for Percutaneous Extraction of Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    Feisthammel, Juergen; Moche, Micheal; Mossner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Background Choledocholithiasis is defined as presence of at least one gallstone in the bile duct. Those bile duct stones (BDS) usually are extracted by ERCP. In case the bile duct is not accessible endoscopically (e.g. after major abdominal surgery), PTCD has to be performed. Extraction of the stones via PTCD has several risks as are hemorrhage, pancreatitis and injuries of the liver tissue. Methods We here report about our experience with a significant modification of this technique by use of a 13-french hemostasis introducer as a sheath to track the transhepatic access to the bile ducts in order to reduce time and risk. Results Three patients were treated by use of the reported modification. In all cases, the stones were successfully removable without complications. Conclusion We demonstrate that the use of a hemostasis introducer for percutaneous extraction of common bile duct stones seems to be promising in terms of shortening hospital stay and increasing patient safety.

  1. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  2. Fabrication of a silver particle-integrated silicone polymer-covered metal stent against sludge and biofilm formation and stent-induced tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Jang, Bong Seok; Jung, Min Kyo; Pack, Chan Gi; Choi, Jun-Ho; Park, Do Hyun

    2016-01-01

    To reduce tissue or tumor ingrowth, covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) have been developed. The effectiveness of covered SEMSs may be attenuated by sludge or stone formation or by stent clogging due to the formation of biofilm on the covering membrane. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a silicone membrane containing silver particles (Ag-P) would prevent sludge and biofilm formation on the covered SEMS. In vitro, the Ag-P-integrated silicone polymer-covered membrane exhibited sustained antibacterial activity, and there was no definite release of silver ions from the Ag-P-integrated silicone polymer membrane at any time point. Using a porcine stent model, in vivo analysis demonstrated that the Ag-P-integrated silicone polymer-covered SEMS reduced the thickness of the biofilm and the quantity of sludge formed, compared with a conventional silicone-covered SEMS. In vivo, the release of silver ions from an Ag-P-integrated silicone polymer-covered SEMS was not detected in porcine serum. The Ag-P-integrated silicone polymer-covered SEMS also resulted in significantly less stent-related bile duct and subepithelium tissue inflammation than a conventional silicone polymer-covered SEMS. Therefore, the Ag-P-integrated silicone polymer-covered SEMS reduced sludge and biofilm formation and stent-induced pathological changes in tissue. This novel SEMS may prolong the stent patency in clinical application. PMID:27739486

  3. Biodegradable stents with elastic memory.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subbu S; Tan, Lay Poh; Joso, Joe Ferry D; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Wang, Xintong

    2006-03-01

    This work reports, for the first time, the development of a fully biodegradable polymeric stent that can self-expand at body temperatures (approximately 37 degrees C), using the concept of elastic memory. This self-expansion is necessary in fully polymeric stents, to overcome the problem of elastic recoil following balloon expansion in a body vessel. Bi-layered biodegradable stent prototypes were produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and poly glycolic acid (PLGA) polymers. Elastic memory was imparted to the stents by temperature conditioning. The thickness and composition of each layer in the stents are critical parameters that affect the rate of self-expansion at 37 degrees C, as well as the collapse strengths of the stents. The rate of self-expansion of the stents, as measured at 37 degrees C, exhibits a maximum with layer thickness. The Tg of the outer layer is another significant parameter that affects the overall rate of expansion.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C. Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  6. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  7. Cornice Duct System

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

    2004-10-29

    SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

  8. Comparison of scanning electron microscopy findings regarding biofilm colonization with microbiological results in nasolacrimal stents for external, endoscopic and transcanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Balikoglu-Yilmaz, Melike; Yilmaz, Tolga; Cetinel, Sule; Taskin, Umit; Banu Esen, Ayse; Taskapili, Muhittin; Kose, Timur

    2014-01-01

    AIM To compare bacterial biofilm colonization in lacrimal stents following external dacryocystorhinostomy (EX-DCR), endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EN-DCR), and transcanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy (TC-DCR) with multidiode laser. METHODS This prospective study included 30 consecutive patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction who underwent EXT-, EN-, or TC-DCR. Thirty removed lacrimal stent fragments and conjunctival samples were cultured. The lacrimal stent biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RESULTS Eleven (36.7%) of the 30 lacrimal stent cultures were positive for aerobic bacteria (most commonly Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). However anaerobic bacteria and fungi were not identified in the lacrimal stent cultures. Twenty-seven (90%) patients had biofilm-positive lacrimal stents. The conjunctival culture positivity after the DCR, biofilm positivity on stents, the grade of biofilm colonization, and the presence of mucus and coccoid and rod-shaped organisms did not significantly differ between any of the groups (P>0.05). However, a significant difference was found when the SEM results were compared to the results of the lacrimal stent and conjunctival cultures (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Type of dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery did not affect the biofilm colonization of the lacrimal stents. SEM also appears to be more precise than microbiological culture for evaluating the presence of biofilms on lacrimal stents. PMID:24967205

  9. Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform into Chronic Pancreatitis: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of 73 Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Ozaki, Yayoi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Some patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) form pancreatic stones suggestive of transformation into chronic pancreatitis (CP). The present study examined the underlying risk factors and mechanism of AIP progression to confirmed CP. We compared the clinical and laboratory parameters of subjects who progressed to confirmed CP with those of the subjucts who did not in a cohort of 73 type 1 AIP patients. A total of 16 (22%) AIP patients progressed to CP. Univariate analysis revealed that relapse was significantly more frequent in the progression group, and multivariate analysis indicated that pancreatic head swelling (OR 12.7, P = 0.023) and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body (OR 12.6, P = 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for progression to CP. Kaplan-Meier testing showed that the progression rate to CP was approximately 10% at 3 years and 30% at 10 years in total AIP patients and 30% at 3 years and 60% at 10 years in subjects with both risk factors. AIP with pancreatic head swelling and a history of relapse may cause pancreatic juice stagnation and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body, which can progress to advanced stage chronic pancreatitis. PMID:23762066

  10. Unique presentation of heterotopic pancreatic tissue arising from small-bowel mesentery.

    PubMed

    Koshinaga, T; Okabe, I; Kurosu, Y

    1996-03-01

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the small-bowel mesentery is an extremely rare anomaly: no such case has been reported in the English literature. We report a 5-year-old boy in whom the aberrant tissue formed a retroperitoneal cyst. The condition was further complicated by a ventral pancreatic duct defect. The unique clinical manifestations and difficulty in making the diagnosis are discussed.

  11. Groove Pancreatitis: Four Cases from a Single Center and Brief Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Cynthia D.; White, Rebekah R.; Obando, Jorge; Burbridge, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis that affects the groove anatomical area between the head of the pancreas, duodenum, and common bile duct. We provide a summary of the clinical findings of 4 groove pancreatitis cases diagnosed at a tertiary academic medical center over a 5-year period. A detailed review of the current literature surrounding this clinical entity is also provided. Although rare, groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with pancreatic head mass lesions, as appropriate diagnosis can help avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:26157859

  12. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  13. Utility of preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas in diagnosing tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Tsuneoka, Noritsugu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and tumor-forming pancreatitis remains difficult, and this situation can cause serious problems because the management and prognosis of these two focal pancreatic masses are entirely different. We herein report a case of tumor-forming pancreatitis that mimics pancreatic carcinoma in an 80-year-old woman. Computed tomography showed a solid mass in the head of the pancreas, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a complete obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. Dynamic contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a time-signal intensity curve (TIC) with a slow rise to a peak (1 min after the administration of the contrast material), followed by a slow decline at the pancreatic mass, indicating a fibrotic pancreas. Under the diagnosis of tumor-forming pancreatitis, the patient underwent a segmental pancreatectomy instead of a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathology of the pancreatic mass was chronic pancreatitis without malignancy. The pancreatic TIC obtained from dynamiccontrast MRI can be helpful to differentiate tumor-forming pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma and to avoid any unnecessary major pancreatic surgery.

  14. Overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Nishihori, Masahiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Izumi, Takashi; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our aim was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting. The study was conducted between July 2008 and February 2015. A database of consecutive carotid artery stenting procedures was retrospectively assessed to identify the cases of in-stent restenosis that were treated with overlap stenting under proximal or distal protection. The clinical and radiological records of the patients were then reviewed. Of the 155 CAS procedures in 149 patients from the database, 6 patients met the inclusion criteria. All the 6 patients were initially treated with moderate dilatation because of the presence of an unstable plaque. The technical success rate of the overlap stenting was 100%, with no 30-day mortality or morbidity. In addition, there was no further in-stent restenosis during a follow-up period of over 12 months. These results indicated that overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting was both safe and effective in our cohort. PMID:27303101

  15. Overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Nishihori, Masahiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Izumi, Takashi; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting. The study was conducted between July 2008 and February 2015. A database of consecutive carotid artery stenting procedures was retrospectively assessed to identify the cases of in-stent restenosis that were treated with overlap stenting under proximal or distal protection. The clinical and radiological records of the patients were then reviewed. Of the 155 CAS procedures in 149 patients from the database, 6 patients met the inclusion criteria. All the 6 patients were initially treated with moderate dilatation because of the presence of an unstable plaque. The technical success rate of the overlap stenting was 100%, with no 30-day mortality or morbidity. In addition, there was no further in-stent restenosis during a follow-up period of over 12 months. These results indicated that overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting was both safe and effective in our cohort. PMID:27303101

  16. Right intrahepatic pseudocyst following acute pancreatitis: an unusual location after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Silvio; Kianmanesh, Reza; Farges, Olivier; Sauvanet, Alain; O'toole, Dermot; Levy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Ogata, Satoshi; Belghiti, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The location of a pseudocyst (PC) in the liver is an exceptional event, and intrahepatic PCs are mainly located in the left lobe. We report here a case of right intrahepatic PC following acute pancreatitis associated with cystic (aberrant pancreatic) dystrophy of the duodenal wall (CDDW) and chronic pancreatitis. Morphological assessment (ultrasound, computed tomography [CT] scan, and cholangio-magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) revealed a 10-cm right intrahepatic collection and rupture of the main pancreatic duct. Percutaneous puncture permitted us to detect a high level of amylase in the collection, confirming the diagnosis of intrahepatic PC. Surgical drainage concomitant with pancreatico-duodenectomy for the treatment of CDDW resulted in disappearance of the collection. The mechanism involved in this patient was rupture of the pancreatic duct in the retroperitoneal cavity and erosion reaching the right hepatic parenchyma. Although intrahepatic PCs are rare, the diagnosis of intrahepatic PC complicating acute pancreatitis can be confirmed by a high level of amylase in the collection. Asymptomatic intrahepatic PCs can be treated conservatively, and symptomatic intrahepatic PCs can be managed either transcutaneously or surgically.

  17. Transhepatic Insertion of a Metallic Stent for the Relief of Malignant Afferent Loop Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Caldicott, David G.E.; Ziprin, Paul; Morgan, Robert

    2000-03-15

    A 65-year-old man with a polya gastrectomy presented with biliary obstruction. Percutaneous cholangiography indicated strictures of the distal common bile duct and afferent duodenal loop due to an inoperable carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. The patient was unfit for bypass surgery, and a previous gastrectomy precluded endoscopic intervention. Successful palliation of the biliary obstruction was achieved by placing metallic stents across the duodenal and biliary strictures via the transhepatic route. The use of stents for gastrointestinal stricture is reviewed.

  18. [Stenting and redilatation of the ductus arteriosus in univentricular heart with pulmonary atresia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Martha; Solorio, Sergio; Martínez-Sánchez, Arturo; Abundes, Arturo; Ledesma, Mariano; Alva, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Complex congenital heart disease with pulmonary atresia is ductus arteriosus-dependent. Two palliative treatments have been available for years: a systemic pulmonary shunt and prostaglandin E1 infusion. Recently, interventional cardiology has offered a new procedure for these patients: stenting of the patent arterial duct. We report a case with univentricular heart and pulmonary atresia in which percutaneous balloon angioplasty and stenting of the arterial ductus were performed successfully. Nineteen months later the patient is in good clinical conditions with 75% of oxygen saturation.

  19. Cylindrical dilatation of the choledochus: a special type of congenital bile duct dilatation.

    PubMed

    Todani, T; Watanabe, Y; Fujii, T; Toki, A; Uemura, S; Koike, Y

    1985-11-01

    Cylindrical dilatation of the choledochus develops in 20% of patients with congenital bile duct dilatation and usually has acute-angled unions of the pancreatobiliary ductal system. Symptoms generally develop in patients over 1 year of age. The patients frequently complain of abdominal pain, vomiting, and fever as in those with acute pancreatitis. Ultrasonography and infusion cholangiography are the most useful tools in making a correct diagnosis. A high amylase level in the bile caused by the refluxing of pancreatic juice through anomalous ductal unions is commonly observed. This is responsible for biliary perforation in infancy and possibly carcinoma arising in the bile duct. The amylase concentration in the serum at the time of epigastric pain often is high, which leads to the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. However, evidence of pancreatic inflammation is seldom noted. Accordingly, amylase in the bile may enter the circulating blood through the denuded epithelium or sinusoids of the liver. Excision of the whole extrahepatic duct along with hepaticoenterostomy would be essential for the treatment of cylindrical dilatation of the bile duct, especially when an anomalous ductal union is present.

  20. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Ulriikka; Vienne, Ariane; Audureau, Etienne; Bauret, Paul; Bichard, Philippe; Coumaros, Dimitri; Napoléon, Bertrand; Ponchon, Thierry; Duchmann, Jean-Christophe; Laugier, René; Lamouliatte, Hervé; Védrenne, Bruno; Gaudric, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas; Robin, Françoise; Leblanc, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) can be challenging. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) in BBS. Methods Ninety-two consecutive patients with BBS (chronic pancreatitis (n = 42), anastomotic after liver transplantation (n = 36), and post biliary surgical procedure (n = 14)) were included. FCSEMS were placed across strictures for 6 months before endoscopic extraction. Early success rate was defined as the absence of biliary stricture or as a minimal residual anomaly on post-stent removal endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Secondary outcomes were the final success and stricture recurrence rates as well as procedure-related morbidity. Results Stenting was successful in all patients. Stenting associated complications were minor and occurred in 22 (23.9%) patients. Migration occurred in 23 (25%) patients. Stent extraction was successful in all but two patients with proximal stent migration. ERCP after the 6 months stenting showed an early success in 84.9% patients (chronic pancreatitis patients: 94.7%, liver transplant: 87.9%, post-surgical: 61.5%) (p = 0.01). Final success was observed in 57/73 (78.1%) patients with a median follow-up of 12 ± 3.56 months. Recurrence of biliary stricture occurred in 16/73 (21.9%) patients. Conclusions FCSEMS placement is efficient for patients with BBS, in particular for chronic pancreatitis patients. Stent extraction after 6 months indwelling, although generally feasible, may fail in a few cases. PMID:27403307

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  2. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a particular type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Currently, AIP should be diagnosed based on combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. When diagnosing AIP, it is most important to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. Diagnostic criteria for AIP, proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society in 2002 first in the world, were revised in 2006. The criteria are based on the minimum consensus of AIP and aim to avoid misdiagnosing pancreatic cancer as far as possible, but not for screening AIP. The criteria consist of the following radiological, serological, and histopathological items: (1) radiological imaging showing narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and enlargement of the pancreas, which are characteristic of the disease; (2) laboratory data showing abnormally elevated levels of serum γ-globulin, IgG or IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies; (3) histopathological examination of the pancreas demonstrating marked fibrosis and prominent infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells, which is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). For a diagnosis of AIP, criterion 1 must be present, together with criterion 2 and/or criterion 3. However, it is necessary to exclude malignant diseases such as pancreatic or biliary cancer. PMID:18763279

  3. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27621576

  4. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27621576

  5. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy.

  6. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  7. Stent-Induced Esophageal Perforation: Treatment by Means of Placing a Second Stent After Removal of the Original Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Gyoo-Sik Park, Sung-Dal; Cho, Young Duk

    2008-05-15

    A case of esophageal perforation caused by a retrievable covered stent is presented. The distal end of the stent was protruding into the mediastinum, which made it impossible to negotiate a guidewire through the stent into the distal esophagus. The stent was successfully removed with use of a stent retrieval set, and esophageal perforation was treated with a second, covered stent with a good result. Fatality associated with this complication might be prevented by virtue of the retrievability of the stent we used. This result points to the effectiveness of a retrievable stent for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal stricture.

  8. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes. PMID:26855923

  9. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christopher G; Siddiqui, Uzma D

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes. PMID:26855923

  10. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christopher G; Siddiqui, Uzma D

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes.

  11. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing

  12. Mediastinal thoracic duct cyst.

    PubMed Central

    Gowar, F J

    1978-01-01

    A case of mediastinal thoracic duct cyst is described; it is believed to be the first to be reported in Britain. Five surgically treated cases have been reported but in none was the diagnosis made before operation. Symptoms are caused by pressure of the cyst on the trachea and oesophagus and my be aggravted by eating a fatty meal. Differential diagnosis from other mediastinal tumours, especially bronchogenic cyst and neurofibroma, could perhaps be established before operation by lymphangiography. Images PMID:746509

  13. Rhinosporidiosis of parotid duct.

    PubMed

    Sivapathasundharam, B; Saraswathi, T R; Manjunath, K; Sriram, G

    2009-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis is a benign chronic granulomatous infection caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi. Rhinosporidiosis is endemic in south Asia, notably in southern India and Sri Lanka. Majority of the cases have been reported to occur in upper respiratory sites, notably anterior nares, nasal cavity, nasopharynx, larynx and soft palate. Only two rare cases of involvement of parotid duct, have been reported in literature. Hence, this case will probably be the third to be reported.

  14. Liver repopulation and correction of metabolic liver disease by transplanted adult mouse pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Al-Dhalimy, M; Lagasse, E; Finegold, M; Grompe, M

    2001-02-01

    The emergence of cells with hepatocellular properties in the adult pancreas has been described in several experimental models. To determine whether adult pancreas contains cells that can give rise to therapeutically useful and biochemically normal hepatocytes, we transplanted suspensions of wild-type mouse pancreatic cells into syngeneic recipients deficient in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and manifesting tyrosinemia. Four of 34 (12%) mutant mice analyzed were fully rescued by donor-derived cells and had normal liver function. Ten additional mice (29%) showed histological evidence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the liver. Previous work has suggested that pancreatic liver precursors reside within or close to pancreatic ducts. We therefore performed additional transplantations using either primary cell suspensions enriched for ducts or cultured ducts. Forty-four mutant mice were transplanted with cells enriched for pancreatic duct cells, but only three of the 34 (9%) recipients analyzed displayed donor-derived hepatocytes. In addition, 28 of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient mice were transplanted with cultured pancreatic duct cells, but no donor-derived hepatocytes were observed. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult mouse pancreas contains hepatocyte progenitor cells capable of significant therapeutic liver reconstitution. However, contrary to previous reports, we were unable to detect these cells within the duct compartment. PMID:11159194

  15. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal.

  16. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management. PMID:24524952

  17. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management.

  18. Primary salivary duct carcinoma arising from the Stensen duct.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kenji; Hirano, Takashi; Okamoto, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    This report describes a salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) arising from the extraglandular portion of the Stensen duct. The patient was a 56-year-old man who presented with a palpable, elastic, hard mass without tenderness in the right cheek. Computed tomography revealed a tumor of the extraglandular portion of the Stensen duct. Supraomohyoid right neck dissection and total right parotidectomy were performed, and the histologic diagnosis was SDC of the Stensen duct. Postoperatively, the patient received no additional treatment. Neither recurrence nor metastasis was observed during 4 years of follow-up examination. SDC of the Stensen duct is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there is no report that describes primary SDC arising from that location. We also believe this is the first report that describes the clinical course of primary SDC arising from a Stensen duct. PMID:27657321

  19. Does hyperamylasemia in choledochal cyst indicate true pancreatitis? An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Urushihara, N; Todani, T; Watanabe, Y; Uemura, S; Morotomi, Y; Wang, Z Q

    1995-06-01

    Patients with choledochal cyst often have repeated attacks of abdominal pain accompanied by hyperamylasemia, and they may be diagnosed as having acute pancreatitis. However, the attacks generally tend to subside in a short period by conservative treatment, and evidence of pancreatitis is rarely observed at the time of surgery. Choledochal cyst is commonly associated with pancreatobiliary maljunction, and high concentrations of pancreatic enzymes in bile are usually observed. When the bile duct pressure increases due to obstructive cholangitis, pancreatic enzymes in bile may regurgitate into the blood stream. Cholangiovenous reflux of amylase might cause hyperamylasemia. In order to investigate the mechanism of hyperamylasemia by cholangiovenous reflux, canine pancreatic juice or bile from a patient with choledochal cyst was injected into the obstructed common bile duct in dogs. The pancreatic enzymes in bile could readily enter into the blood stream at the pressure level of 15 mmHg or more in the bile duct. The peak amylase level in the thoracic lymph was observed to be more than 4 times higher than that in the blood serum, and the lymph flow during 30 minutes increased significantly from 8.1 to 20.4 ml at the bile duct pressure level of 20 mmHg. The reflux of amylase in bile into the blood stream via both the hepatic vein and thoracic duct might result in hyperamylasemia in the patients with choledochal cyst.

  20. Wave reflection at a stent.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Antonio; García, Javier; Manuel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical expression has been derived to calculate the characteristics of a wave that reflects at a stent implanted in a uniform vessel. The stent is characterized by its length and the wave velocity in the stented region. The reflected wave is proportional to the time derivative of the incident wave. The reflection coefficient is a small quantity of the order of the length of the stent divided by the wavelength of the unstented vessel. The results obtained coincide with those obtained numerically by Charonko et al. The main simplifications used are small amplitude of the waves so that equations can be linearized and that the length of the stent is small enough so that the values of the wave functions are nearly uniform along the stent. Both assumptions hold in typical situations. PMID:23516957

  1. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  2. Wave reflection at a stent.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Antonio; García, Javier; Manuel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical expression has been derived to calculate the characteristics of a wave that reflects at a stent implanted in a uniform vessel. The stent is characterized by its length and the wave velocity in the stented region. The reflected wave is proportional to the time derivative of the incident wave. The reflection coefficient is a small quantity of the order of the length of the stent divided by the wavelength of the unstented vessel. The results obtained coincide with those obtained numerically by Charonko et al. The main simplifications used are small amplitude of the waves so that equations can be linearized and that the length of the stent is small enough so that the values of the wave functions are nearly uniform along the stent. Both assumptions hold in typical situations.

  3. Time course and cellular source of pancreatic regeneration following acute pancreatitis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, H.P.A.; Adler, G.; Kern, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the different cell types in the rat exocrine pancreas has been studied in a model of hormone-induced acute pancreatitis in which pancreatic edema, inflammation, and acinar cell destruction were induced within 12 h of infusion of supramaximal concentrations of cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/h). A sequential biochemical and structural analysis of the pancreas in daily intervals was combined with the autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices of five cell populations following /sup 3/H-thymidine injection at days 1-7 after induction of pancreatitis. Desquamation of acinar cell apical cytoplasm and release of cytoplasmic segments into the acinar lumen on the first day following induction of pancreatitis led to formation of duct-like tubular complexes. Enzyme content in the pancreas decreased progressively following the formation of the edema to levels 15-20% of controls and remained reduced during the initial 5 days. Thymidine incorporation into total DNA showed a biphasic pattern with a distinct peak at day 1 and a second broader peak between days 4 and 7. Autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices demonstrated the exclusive incorporation into intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells during the initial 24 h, while the second peak was predominantly due to labeling of acinar cells. Larger interlobular ducts and islets did not show changes in labeling index. In vivo labeling with /sup 3/H-thymidine during the first day and analysis of labeling indices 14 days later showed the persistence of label in intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells and argued against the stem cell hypothesis and against transformation of duct cells into acinar cells.

  4. Stent-Graft Treatment for Bleeding Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2009-07-15

    We report two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding from superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic head carcinoma. In both cases, a stent-graft was deployed on the main SMA to exclude pseudoaneurysm and to preserve blood flow to the bowel. Bleeding stopped after the procedure. One patient was able to be discharged but died from carcinoma recurrence 4 months later. The other patient died of sepsis and stent-graft infection 5 months later. These patients remained free of intraperitoneal rebleeding during the follow-up period.

  5. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... swelling of the pancreas include: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of ...

  6. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  7. Pancreatic abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Gartell, P C

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatic abscess are described to show the difficulties in diagnosis and that inadequate treatment is invariably fatal. Early recognition and prompt surgical drainage, together with biliary decompression if indicated, are advised. PMID:7069670

  8. Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Chugh, Ankur; Cordova, Jonathon; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a strong family history of hereditary pancreatitis was found to have a PRSS1 mutation after being tested at age 5 years during his first documented incident of pancreatitis. Since then, a multidisciplinary team has been treating him for the diagnosis of hereditary pancreatitis. His pain episodes increased in severity over the past several months such that the pain began to severely interfere with his daily life. After extensive discussion, a total pancreatectomy with auto islet cell transplant was performed. He is now pain free and does not require any insulin. This leads us to the questions of what is hereditary pancreatitis and how is it diagnosed? What are the management and follow-up strategies needed for these patients? This article addresses these questions and informs the reader about this diagnosis and the importance of having a high index of clinical suspicion. PMID:26878183

  9. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Management of Postcholecystectomy Mirizzi Syndrome from a Remnant Cystic Duct Stone: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Amin, Arpit; Zhurov, Yuriy; Ibrahim, George; Maffei, Anthony; Giannone, Jonathan; Cerabona, Thomas; Kaul, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome has been defined in the literature as common bile duct obstruction resulting from calculi within Hartmann's pouch or cystic duct. We present a case of a 78-year-old female, who developed postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome from a remnant cystic duct stone. Diagnosis of postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome was made on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) performed postoperatively. The patient was treated with a novel strategy by combining advanced endoscopic and laparoscopic techniques in three stages as follows: Stage 1 (initial presentation): endoscopic sphincterotomy with common bile duct stent placement; Stage 2 (6 weeks after Stage 1): laparoscopic ultrasonography to locate the remnant cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic retrieval of the calculi and intracorporeal closure of cystic duct stump; Stage 3 (6 weeks after Stage 2): endoscopic removal of common bile duct stent along with performance of completion endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram. In addition, we have performed an extensive review of the various endoscopic and laparoscopic management techniques described in the literature for the treatment of postcholecystectomy syndrome occurring from retained cystic duct stones.

  10. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Management of Postcholecystectomy Mirizzi Syndrome from a Remnant Cystic Duct Stone: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Arpit; Zhurov, Yuriy; Ibrahim, George; Maffei, Anthony; Giannone, Jonathan; Cerabona, Thomas; Kaul, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome has been defined in the literature as common bile duct obstruction resulting from calculi within Hartmann's pouch or cystic duct. We present a case of a 78-year-old female, who developed postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome from a remnant cystic duct stone. Diagnosis of postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome was made on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) performed postoperatively. The patient was treated with a novel strategy by combining advanced endoscopic and laparoscopic techniques in three stages as follows: Stage 1 (initial presentation): endoscopic sphincterotomy with common bile duct stent placement; Stage 2 (6 weeks after Stage 1): laparoscopic ultrasonography to locate the remnant cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic retrieval of the calculi and intracorporeal closure of cystic duct stump; Stage 3 (6 weeks after Stage 2): endoscopic removal of common bile duct stent along with performance of completion endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram. In addition, we have performed an extensive review of the various endoscopic and laparoscopic management techniques described in the literature for the treatment of postcholecystectomy syndrome occurring from retained cystic duct stones. PMID:27047698

  11. The role of bile carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing bile duct cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kwang Ro; Kim, Do Ha; Park, Jong Ho; Bang, Sung-Jo; Shin, Jung Woo; Park, Neung Hwa; Park, Jae Hoo

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the fluids bathing tumors might contain a higher level of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) than those found in the blood. Therefore, we evaluated the role of bile CEA in diagnosing bile duct cancer. One hundred and thirty two patients were prospectively studied. The patients were divided into 3 groups: the bile duct cancer (n=32), pancreatic cancer (n=16), and benign biliary diseases (n=84) groups. Bile samples were obtained on the next day of the biliary drainage procedures. The mean bile CEA level in those with bile duct cancer (120.6 +/- 156.9 ng/mL) was significantly higher than those with pancreatic cancer and benign biliary diseases (32.0 +/- 28.5 ng/mL, 29.3 +/- 56.3 ng/mL). Using the level of 20 ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity of bile CEA in the diagnosis of bile duct cancer from benign biliary diseases were 65.6% and 66.7%, respectively. Both the bile CEA and total bilirubin level were found to be an independent factor linked to bile duct cancer. This study result suggests that bile CEA level is a useful supplementary test for diagnosing bile duct cancer. PMID:14676443

  12. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  13. A Rare Anomaly of Biliary System: MRCP Evidence of a Cystic Duct Cyst.

    PubMed

    Goya, Cemil; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Hamidi, Cihad; Kuday, Suzan; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Cystic duct cysts are a rare congenital anomaly. While the other bile duct cysts (choledochus and the intrahepatic bile ducts) are classified according to the classification described by Tadoni, there is no classification method described by the cystic duct cysts, although it is claimed that the cystic duct cysts may constitute a new "Type 6" category. Only a limited number of patients with cystic duct cysts have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis is usually made in the neonatal period or during childhood. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and usually include pain in the right upper quadrant and jaundice. The condition may also present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, or pancreatitis. In our case, the abdominal ultrasonography (US) performed on a 6-year-old female patient who presented with pain in the right upper quadrant pointed out an anechoic cyst at the neck of the gall bladder. Based on the magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) results, a cystic dilatation was diagnosed in the cystic duct. The aim of this case-report presentation was to discuss the US and MRCP findings of the cystic dilatation of cystic duct, which is an extremely rare condition, in the light of the literature information. PMID:24987540

  14. Accidental Stenting Out of Stent: A Lesson from No-Reflow after New Stent Deployment Outside the Prior Stent

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Szu-Ling; Lu, Tse-Min

    2016-01-01

    An operator can be unaware that the guide wire has accidentally advanced into space outside the previous stent, which can result in deformation of the previous stent when a new stent is deployed outside the prior stent. We herein have reported a case of accidental guide wire advancement into a previously dissected lumen of right coronary artery (RCA), resulting in a new stent deploying outside the prior stent, resulting in deformity of the prior stent. Thrombus and friable atheromatous plaques dislodged and migrated to occlude distal RCA when attempting to restore the proximal luminal diameter by balloon inflation, resulting in profound shock with asystole. IVUS was successful in identifying the cause, and the thrombus was removed successfully by manual aspiration. Due to the poor endothelization of a recent stenting, clinicians should be particularly careful of possible wire advancing outside the stent structure, which can result in prominent thrombus or atheromatous debris occluding the distal vessel, and IVUS may be useful in confirming the cause of no-reflow. PMID:27274180

  15. Transjugular Portal Venous Stenting in Inflammatory Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, Rolf; Textor, Jochen; Decker, Pan; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans

    2002-12-15

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man with necrotizing pancreatitis associated with inflammatory extrahepatic portal vein stenosis and progressive ascites. Four months after the acute onset, when no signs of infection were present, portal decompression was performed to treat refractory ascites. Transjugulartranshepatic venoplasty failed to dilate the stenosis in the extrahepatic portion of the portal vein sufficiently. Therefore a Wallstent was implanted, resulting in almost normal diameter of the vessel. In follow-up imaging studies the stent and the portal vein were still patent 12 months after the intervention and total resolution of the ascites was observed.

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  17. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-06-28

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  18. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  19. Small Arteriovenous Malformation of the Common Bile Duct Causing Hemobilia in a Patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Sadao Baba, Yasutaka; Ueno, Kazuto; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2008-07-15

    We report a 54-year-old male patient with arteriovenous malformation located at the common bile duct and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The patient was treated as gallstone pancreatitis at first. Three days after endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) for biliary drainage to subside gallstone pancreatitis, hemobilia was drained from the ENBD tube and the serum hemoglobin level gradually decreased. Cholangioscopy and angiography revealed that hemobilia was due to a small arteriovenous malformation located at the common bile duct. Subsequently, the patient was successfully treated by endovascular intervention.

  20. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  1. Noise reduction of spiral ducts.

    PubMed

    Lapka, Wojciech; Cempel, Czesław

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents noise reduction (NR) of spiral ducts as a result of computational modeling of acoustic wave propagation. Three-dimensional models were created with the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics version 3.3. Nine models of spiral ducts with 1-9 spiral leads were considered. Time-harmonic analysis was used to predict NR, which was shown in spectral and interval frequency bands. Spiral duct performance can be seen as a comparison of NR before and after a change from a circular to a spiral duct.

  2. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS.

  3. Zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost

    PubMed Central

    Arat Ozkan, Alev; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Gurmen, Aziz T

    2016-01-01

    Stent fracture is a rare complication of drug-eluting stent implantation with a reported rate of 0.84%–3.2% in various clinical studies with first-generation drug-eluting stents and 29% in autopsy studies. Sirolimus-eluting stents with their closed cell design were reported to be more prone to fracture compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents. Other risk factors for stent fracture are multiple stenting, longer stent length, chronic renal failure, right coronary artery intervention, and a higher maximal inflation pressure. The role of angiography in diagnosing stent fracture is limited, a fact also questioning the reliability of angiographic data. Image enhancement techniques like StentBoost are widely available in new-generation angiography systems and are used to assess stent expansion, overlap size, or to localize the postdilation balloon. Here, we report a case of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost. PMID:27489714

  4. Zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost.

    PubMed

    Arat Ozkan, Alev; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Gurmen, Aziz T

    2016-01-01

    Stent fracture is a rare complication of drug-eluting stent implantation with a reported rate of 0.84%-3.2% in various clinical studies with first-generation drug-eluting stents and 29% in autopsy studies. Sirolimus-eluting stents with their closed cell design were reported to be more prone to fracture compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents. Other risk factors for stent fracture are multiple stenting, longer stent length, chronic renal failure, right coronary artery intervention, and a higher maximal inflation pressure. The role of angiography in diagnosing stent fracture is limited, a fact also questioning the reliability of angiographic data. Image enhancement techniques like StentBoost are widely available in new-generation angiography systems and are used to assess stent expansion, overlap size, or to localize the postdilation balloon. Here, we report a case of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost. PMID:27489714

  5. Treatment of malignant gastric outlet obstruction with endoscopically placed self-expandable metal stents.

    PubMed

    Gaidos, Jill K J; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-09-21

    Malignant gastroduodenal obstruction can occur in up to 20% of patients with primary pancreatic, gastric or duodenal carcinomas. Presenting symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, pain and decreased oral intake which can lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and poor quality of life. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary therapeutic modality because it is safe, minimally invasive, and a cost-effective option for palliation. Stents can be successfully deployed in the majority of patients. Stent placement appears to lead to a shorter time to symptomatic improvement, shorter time to resumption of an oral diet, and shorter hospital stays as compared with surgical options. Recurrence of the obstructive symptoms resulting from stent occlusion, due to tumor ingrowth or overgrowth, can be successfully treated with repeat endoscopic stent placement in the majority of the cases. Both endoscopic stenting and surgical bypass are considered palliative treatments and, to date, no improvement in survival with either modality has been demonstrated. A tailored therapeutic approach, taking into consideration patient preferences and involving a multidisciplinary team including the therapeutic endoscopist, surgeon, medical oncologist, radiation therapist, and interventional radiologist, should be considered in all cases. PMID:19764086

  6. A Newly Designed Stent for Management of Malignant Distal Duodenal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei-Zhong Yang, Zheng-Qiang Liu, Sheng Zhou, Chun-Gao Xia, Jin-Guo Zhao, Lin-Bo Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a newly designed stent for the treatment of malignant distal duodenal stenosis.MethodsFrom March 2011 to May 2013, six patients with malignant duodenal stenosis underwent fluoroscopically guided placement of the new duodenal stent consisting of braided, nested stent wires, and a delivery system with a metallic mesh inner layer. Primary diseases were pancreatic cancer in three patients, gastric cancer in two patients, and endometrial stromal sarcoma in one patient. Duodenal obstructions were located in the horizontal part in two patients, the ascending part in two patients, and the duodenojejunal flexure in two patients. Technical success, defined as the successful stent deployment, clinical symptoms before and after the procedure, and complications were evaluated.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all patients. No major complications were observed. Before treatment, two patients could not take any food and the gastric outlet obstruction scoring system (GOOSS) score was 0; the other four patients could take only liquids orally (GOOSS score = 1). After treatment, five patients could take soft food (GOOSS score = 2) and one patient could take a full diet (GOOSS score = 3). The mean duration of primary stent patency was 115.7 days.ConclusionsThe newly designed stent is associated with a high degree of technical success and good clinical outcome and may be clinically effective in the management of malignant distal duodenal obstruction.

  7. iStent® Trabecular Microbypass Stent: An Update.

    PubMed

    Resende, Arthur Fernandes; Patel, Neal Sanjay; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L Jay

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high rates of complications and failure experienced with current glaucoma procedures, there is a continuous search for a safer and more effective glaucoma surgery. A new class of procedures termed minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) aim to fill this void by offering an alternative method of IOP reduction associated with markedly reduced complication rates and shorter recovery times. The iStent, a trabecular microbypass stent, is a MIGS device that has quickly gained popularity. The device allows aqueous humor to directly drain from the anterior chamber into Schlemm's canal by bypassing an obstructed trabecular meshwork. This review examines publications about the iStent, focusing on the device's efficacy, safety, and cost when a single iStent or multiple iStents are implanted in combination with cataract surgery or as a solo procedure. Current data suggest that the iStent is a safe and effective tool in the management of mild-to-moderate glaucoma, notable for its limited complications and absence of serious adverse events following implantation. As valuable experience is gained performing ab interno MIGS, increasing familiarity with angle anatomy and iStent placement, and as newer stent designs are developed, there is promise of continual improvement in the surgical management of glaucoma.

  8. iStent® Trabecular Microbypass Stent: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Arthur Fernandes; Patel, Neal Sanjay; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L. Jay

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high rates of complications and failure experienced with current glaucoma procedures, there is a continuous search for a safer and more effective glaucoma surgery. A new class of procedures termed minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) aim to fill this void by offering an alternative method of IOP reduction associated with markedly reduced complication rates and shorter recovery times. The iStent, a trabecular microbypass stent, is a MIGS device that has quickly gained popularity. The device allows aqueous humor to directly drain from the anterior chamber into Schlemm's canal by bypassing an obstructed trabecular meshwork. This review examines publications about the iStent, focusing on the device's efficacy, safety, and cost when a single iStent or multiple iStents are implanted in combination with cataract surgery or as a solo procedure. Current data suggest that the iStent is a safe and effective tool in the management of mild-to-moderate glaucoma, notable for its limited complications and absence of serious adverse events following implantation. As valuable experience is gained performing ab interno MIGS, increasing familiarity with angle anatomy and iStent placement, and as newer stent designs are developed, there is promise of continual improvement in the surgical management of glaucoma. PMID:27413541

  9. Hemodynamics in Idealized Stented Coronary Arteries: Important Stent Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, John; Webster, Mark; Cater, John; Norris, Stuart; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett

    2016-02-01

    Stent induced hemodynamic changes in the coronary arteries are associated with higher risk of adverse clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on wall shear stress (WSS), time average WSS, and WSS gradient (WSSG), in idealized stent geometries using computational fluid dynamics. Strut spacing, thickness, luminal protrusion, and malapposition were systematically investigated and a comparison made between two commercially available stents (Omega and Biomatrix). Narrower strut spacing led to larger areas of adverse low WSS and high WSSG but these effects were mitigated when strut size was reduced, particularly for WSSG. Local hemodynamics worsened with luminal protrusion of the stent and with stent malapposition, adverse high WSS and WSSG were identified around peak flow and throughout the cardiac cycle respectively. For the Biomatrix stent, the adverse effect of thicker struts was mitigated by greater strut spacing, radial cell offset and flow-aligned struts. In conclusion, adverse hemodynamic effects of specific design features (such as strut size and narrow spacing) can be mitigated when combined with other hemodynamically beneficial design features but increased luminal protrusion can worsen the stent's hemodynamic profile significantly.

  10. Moulded calculus of common bile duct mimicking a stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brocki, Marian; Śmigielski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct stenosis, in most cases, appears to be the consequence of pancreatic head, ampulla of Vater and bile duct tumours, cholangitis sclerosans, as well as iatrogenic damages, which may all be diagnosed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In very rare cases the restriction may result from an atypically shaped wedged stone. This situation creates many diagnostic problems, which in the majority of cases can be solved using imaging studies. However, in some patients even a significant extension of diagnostic procedures may not lead to a correct diagnosis. We present a diagnostically difficult case of a deposit imitating restriction. We present a 70-year-old woman with common bile duct restriction undiagnosed despite several ultrasound examinations (USG), computed tomography (CT), double magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Only after the third ERCP examination a fragmented, by formerly introduced prosthesis, deposit, imitating narrowing, was revealed. Identification of bile duct deposits depends on their composition, localisation and the imaging techniques used. Pigment calculi with atypical shape, bile density, air density or surrounding tissue density are very difficult to diagnose. Thus, the sensitivity of common bile duct stone detection in USG, CT, MRCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is 5–88%; 6–88%; 73–97%; and 84–98%, respectively. Moreover, ERCP may not diagnose the character of the restriction even in 5.2% up to 30% of the patients. Consequently, assessment of diagnosis in a number of patients is difficult. A deposit imitating common bile duct (CBD) restriction is a rare, difficult to diagnose phenomenon, which should be taken into account during differential diagnosis of CBD restrictions. PMID:25061493

  11. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis in different animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, D.G.; Rao, M.S.; Reddy, J.K.

    1984-06-01

    Pancreatic carcinomas can be induced in rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters by a variety of carcinogens. The types of neoplasms which arise vary with the species of rodent. In the rat, they consist exclusively of acinar cells, in the other species the lesions are adenocarcinomas resembling those derived from pancreatic ductules and ducts, those in hamster more so than in guinea pigs. Careful sequential studies in the guinea pig and hamster suggest that acinar cells together with ductular and duct cells are involved in the genesis of duct adenocarcinomas. In each rodent model, the acinar cell appears to be quite sensitive to continued exposure to carcinogen. In each instance, acini undergo modulation, and in the guinea pig and hamster, permanent metaplastic transformation to ductlike structures. Such cells assume an enhanced capacity for cell proliferation which persists following cessation of carcinogen treatment. Other studies suggest that adult pancreatic acinar cells possess a surprising degree of plasticity. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of neoplasms resembling pancreatic ducts is not unlike other carcinogenic sequences where extensive cell modulation and metaplasia precede and are an integral part of the neoplastic transformation. 55 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Intrahepatic Duct Stones Harboring Ascariasis Ova: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Lee, Wei-Chen; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Ascariasis lumbricoides is one of the most common helminthic infestations in humans. Despite the fact that the prevalence of ascariasis in developed countries has been decreasing, biliary ascariasis can cause serious complications, such as acute cholangitis, pancreatitis, and liver abscess. Here we presented a rare ascariasis-related complication-hepatolithiasis.A 60-year-old female patient had symptoms of recurrent cholangitis. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed left intrahepatic duct stones with left liver lobe atrophy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed, but the stones could not be removed due to left main intrahepatic duct stenosis. The patient was treated with left hemi-hepatectomy. Unexpectedly, Ascaris ova were found on the histopathological examination. She received antihelminthic therapy orally and was on regular follow-up without any complications.Our study indicates that clinicians should be aware of biliary ascariasis in patients with hepatolithiasis, though not living in endemic areas. PMID:27015193

  13. Elemental diet and bile induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, M D; Tonkens, R M

    1976-08-01

    The effectiveness of an elemental diet was investigated as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in experimental canine pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by operative injection of a bile -saline solution mixture under pressure retrograde into the main pancreatic duct. In addition to a preinjection control sample, serial biopsies were obtained at 30 minute intervals for 90 minutes after injection and fixed for light and electron microscopic examinations. In addition, preoperative and postoperative blood samples were drawn and analyzed for amylase. After operation, half of the dogs from each original group were fed Vivonex-100, the other half from each group, regular laboratory chow, yielding four ultimate groups based on preoperative and postoperative diets. Successful induction of pancreatitis was evaluated by the difference between preoperative and postoperative amylase values, all of which were significant by group at the p less than 0.01 level. No ultrastructural evidence was found for the modification of zymogen granules with the pretreatment elemental diet nor were differences evident, histologically or ultrastructurally, in the severity of pancreatitis between the pretreated and nonpretreated groups. Finally, gross mortality figures demonstrated no efficacy of elemental diet for pretreatment prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Diagnostic strategies for early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihito; Hirano, Naomichi; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Teraoka, Yuji; Ikemoto, Juri; Kanemitsu, Kozue; Hino, Fumiaki; Fukuda, Toshikatsu; Yonehara, Shuji

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) at an early stage with curative surgery is the approach with the potential to significantly improve long-term patient outcome. Recently, some reports showed that patients with pancreatic tumors smaller than 10 mm showed a favorable prognosis. However, the rate of tumor detection on computed tomography in patients with small pancreatic tumors is low. For the diagnoses of PC with tumors smaller than 10 mm, the rate of tumor detection was higher on endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) than on computed tomography or other modalities, and histologic diagnosis using EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration was helpful in confirming the diagnosis. For the diagnosis of PC in situ, EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography may play important roles in detecting the local irregular stenosis of the pancreatic duct. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and sequential cytodiagnosis using pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage multiple times was useful in the final diagnosis of PC in situ. At present, improving survival lies in identifying those individuals with high-risk factors or precursor lesions through an effective screening method. For example, these should include ultrasonography, various biological markers, or national familial pancreatic cancer registration. Additionally, the relationship between specialists in PC from medical centers and practicing physicians plays an important role in the early diagnosis of PC. PMID:25501287

  15. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  16. Nephroureteral Stents: Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Makramalla, Abouelmagd; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Nephroureteral stents including antegrade, retrograde, or internal (double-J) stents are routinely placed by interventional radiologists. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed and comprehensive description of indications, contraindications, technique, and various technical challenges of these procedures. Also pre- and postprocedure management of patients will be discussed including routine follow-up and dealing with potential complications. PMID:23204635

  17. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  18. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    PubMed

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology.

  20. [Endosonography in tumors of the pancreas and bile ducts].

    PubMed

    Nattermann, C; Dancygier, H

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity of EUS in demonstrating pancreatic tumors lies above 90% and tumors smaller than 2 cm in diameter can be visualized. Therefore EUS can be applied e.g. in the early diagnosis of symptomatic endocrine tumors. However, it is not suited as a screening method for pancreatic carcinoma in asymptomatic patients. The EUS findings do not permit a clear differentiation between malignant and inflammatory (pseudo) tumors. The specificity for the demonstration of malignant tumors is 74%. Its main importance is in the locoregional staging of tumors. EUS is superior to all other imaging tools in determining tumor extension and infiltration into the portal or splenic vein. The pT-stage is determined correctly preoperatively in 90% and lymph node metastases (N1) in about 73% (sensitivity 80-90%/specificity 50%) of the cases. Malignant tumors of Vater's papilla (ampullary tumors) and of extrahepatic bile ducts can be demonstrated endosonographically in nearly all cases. However, tumors of the proximal bile ducts, especially of the right hepatic duct are difficult and sometimes impossible to visualize. The value of EUS in bile duct cancer is in local tumor staging. The pT-stage is determined correctly in 80-90%, the sensitivity and specificity for N1-stage is 80-90% and 30% respectively. Comparative studies with other methods are lacking at the present time. The value of EUS in gall bladder tumors is not yet determined. Stones in the gall bladder may hinder the visualization of the gall bladder wall. In one study the pT-stage for gall bladder carcinoma was determined correctly preoperatively in 76.9% and the N1-stage in 80.7% of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Coronary stent technology: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel; Jepson, Nigel

    2016-09-19

    Coronary angioplasty and coronary artery stents have revolutionised interventional cardiology. Contemporary coronary stent technology continues to seek to improve on the outcomes of the preceding generation of devices by refining their design, structure and component materials. These technologies include new generations of drug-eluting stents, non-polymeric stents, bioresorbable polymer-coated stents, and fully bioresorbable scaffolds. This review discusses the evolution of coronary stent technology, the efficacy and safety of currently available devices, and the rationale for new generation platforms as efforts continue to design the ideal coronary stent technology. PMID:27627940

  2. Intrahepatic Transposition of Bile Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Delić, Jasmin; Savković, Admedina; Isaković, Eldar; Marković, Sergije; Bajtarevic, Alma; Denjalić, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the intrahepatic bile duct transposition (anatomical variation occurring in intrahepatic ducts) and to determine the frequency of this variation. Material and Methods. The researches were performed randomly on 100 livers of adults, both sexes. Main research methods were anatomical macrodissection. As a criterion for determination of variations in some parts of bile tree, we used the classification of Segmentatio hepatis according to Couinaud (1957) according to Terminologia Anatomica, Thieme Stuugart: Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology, 1988. Results. Intrahepatic transposition of bile ducts was found in two cases (2%), out of total examined cases (100): right-left transposition (right segmental bile duct, originating from the segment VIII, joins the left liver duct-ductus hepaticus sinister) and left-right intrahepatic transposition (left segmental bile duct originating from the segment IV ends in right liver duct-ductus hepaticus dexter). Conclusion. Safety and success in liver transplantation to great extent depends on knowledge of anatomy and some common embryological anomalies in bile tree. Variations in bile tree were found in 24–43% of cases, out of which 1–22% are the variations of intrahepatic bile ducts. Therefore, good knowledge on ductal anatomy enables good planning, safe performance of therapeutic and operative procedures, and decreases the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:22550601

  3. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  4. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  5. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  6. [Pancreatic pseudocysts].

    PubMed

    Stăncescu, M; Ciurea, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical, evolutive and therapeutical aspects were studied, of 66 cases of patients with pancreatic pseudocysts hospitalized in the clinic over a period of 27 years. Particular modalities of onset were, those of patients with duodenal stenosis, mechanical jaundice, ascites and pleurisy, those in whom symptomatology suggested kidney or cholecystic disease. The intraoperative diagnosis raises the problem of differentiating a retroperitoneal tumor, identifying the possible association with a pancreatic cancer, and the condition when the pseudocysts are found at a certain distance from the pancreas itself. The therapeutical methods are codified, but recidives are possible. Cholecystectomy removes the biliary cause of pancreatitis which can determine the development of pseudocysts. The death rate of these cases was 6.3%.

  7. English language version of the S3-consensus guidelines on chronic pancreatitis: Definition, aetiology, diagnostic examinations, medical, endoscopic and surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, A; Mayerle, J; Beglinger, C; Büchler, M W; Bufler, P; Dathe, K; Fölsch, U R; Friess, H; Izbicki, J; Kahl, S; Klar, E; Keller, J; Knoefel, W T; Layer, P; Loehr, M; Meier, R; Riemann, J F; Rünzi, M; Schmid, R M; Schreyer, A; Tribl, B; Werner, J; Witt, H; Mössner, J; Lerch, M M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas in which recurrent inflammatory episodes result in replacement of pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous connective tissue. This fibrotic reorganization of the pancreas leads to a progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, characteristic complications arise, such as pseudocysts, pancreatic duct obstructions, duodenal obstruction, vascular complications, obstruction of the bile ducts, malnutrition and pain syndrome. Pain presents as the main symptom of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic carcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis significantly reduces the quality of life and the life expectancy of affected patients. These guidelines were researched and compiled by 74 representatives from 11 learned societies and their intention is to serve evidence-based professional training as well as continuing education. On this basis they shall improve the medical care of affected patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Chronic pancreatitis requires an adequate diagnostic workup and systematic management, given its severity, frequency, chronicity, and negative impact on the quality of life and life expectancy.

  8. Ureteral stents: new ideas, new designs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aown, Abdulrahman; Kyriazis, Iason; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Rigopoulos, Christos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Petsas, Theodore; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral stents represent a minimally invasive alternative to preserve urinary drainage whenever ureteral patency is deteriorated or is under a significant risk to be occluded due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. The ideal stent that would combine perfect long-term efficacy with no stent-related morbidity is still lacking and stent usage is associated with several adverse effects that limit its value as a tool for long-term urinary drainage. Several new ideas on stent design, composition material and stent coating currently under evaluation, foreseen to eliminate the aforementioned drawbacks of ureteral stent usage. In this article we review the currently applied novel ideas and new designs of ureteral stents. Moreover, we evaluate potential future prospects of ureteral stent development adopted mostly by the pioneering cardiovascular stent industry, focusing, however, on the differences between ureteral and endothelial tissue. PMID:21789086

  9. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26464570

  10. Repeating regional acute pancreatitis in the head of the pancreas caused by intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms in the tail: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Asari, Sadaki; Matsumoto, Ippei; Toyama, Hirochika; Shinzeki, Makoto; Goto, Tadahiro; Shirakawa, Sachiyo; Yamada, Isamu; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ito, Tomoo; Ku, Yonson

    2012-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a distinct entity characterized by papillary proliferations of mucin-producing epithelial cells with excessive mucin production and cystic dilatation of the pancreatic ducts. The clinical presentation often involves recurrent episodes of pancreatitis associated with the temporal obstruction of the main pancreatic duct caused by the hypersecretion of mucin. We herein describe a case in which the patient repeatedly experienced the occurrence of idiopathic acute pancreatitis in the head of the pancreas over a 9-year period, and who was ultimately was cured by distal pancreatectomy for IPMNs in the pancreatic tail. This case illustrates the potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of IPMNs owing to a discrepancy between the site of pancreatitis and that of the IPMN. The possible mechanisms linking acute pancreatitis with the formation of IPMNs are also reviewed.

  11. A Nonpancreatic Source of the Proteolytic-enzyme Amidase and Bacteriology in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, W. Milo

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies of human and experimental acute pancreatitis, three main assumptions have been made. First, that the disease is due to activation of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in the pancreas with resulting “autodigestion” of the gland. Second, that interstitial pancreatitis is a mild form of hemorrhagic pancreatitis into which it may progress, and third, that bacteria play little part, if any, in the initiation of the disease. These assumptions are now questioned. In the present study in dogs, levels of proteolytic enzymes in blood, thoracicduct lymph and peritoneal fluid were measured using benzoylarginine amide. Raised levels of amidase were found in hemorrhagic, but not with interstitial, pancreatitis, and biochemical examination of amidase suggested it was not a pancreatic protease, but with its broad specificity and stability derived from bacteria. Addition of antibiotic to the blind duodenal loop in hemorrhagic pancreatitis reduced the level of blood amidase, but Trasylol given intravenously did not, nor did it inhibit amidase in vitro. In all animals, histological examination was made of the pancreas at time of death. On bacteriology, it is concluded that experimental interstitial pancreatitis results from damage to the pancreatic duct system without infection, and haemorrhagic pancreatitis mainly from reflux of bacteria into the pancreatic ducts from the duodenum. Only bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Clostridium welchii that produce proteolytic enzymes and cytotoxins appear to be able to cause haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and these bacteria may explain the release of vasoactive polypeptides and the vascular effects. In hemorrhagic pancreatitis such bacteria were found in the pancreas, but none in interstitial pancreatitis. Evidence is given to suggest that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes are unlikely to cause the cell necrosis which is a pathological feature of hemorrhagic pancreatitis, and that “autodigestion” is likewise unlikely to be

  12. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  13. Stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction: Tandem, metal or metal-mesh stents.

    PubMed

    Elsamra, Sammy E; Leavitt, David A; Motato, Hector A; Friedlander, Justin I; Siev, Michael; Keheila, Mohamed; Hoenig, David M; Smith, Arthur D; Okeke, Zeph

    2015-07-01

    Extrinsic malignant compression of the ureter is not uncommon, often refractory to decompression with conventional polymeric ureteral stents, and frequently associated with limited survival. Alternative options for decompression include tandem ureteral stents, metallic stents and metal-mesh stents, though the preferred method remains controversial. We reviewed and updated our outcomes with tandem ureteral stents for malignant ureteral obstruction, and carried out a PubMed search using the terms "malignant ureteral obstruction," "tandem ureteral stents," "ipsilateral ureteral stents," "metal ureteral stent," "resonance stent," "silhouette stent" and "metal mesh stent." A comprehensive review of the literature and summary of outcomes is provided. The majority of studies encountered were retrospective with small sample sizes. The evidence is most robust for metal stents, whereas only limited data exists for tandem or metal-mesh stents. Metal and metal-mesh stents are considerably more expensive than tandem stenting, but the potential for less frequent stent exchanges makes them possibly cost-effective over time. Urinary tract infections have been associated with all stent types. A wide range of failure rates has been published for all types of stents, limiting direct comparison. Metal and metal-mesh stents show a high incidence of stent colic, migration and encrustation, whereas tandem stents appear to produce symptoms equivalent to single stents. Comparison is difficult given the limited evidence and heterogeneity of patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. It is clear that prospective, randomized studies are necessary to effectively scrutinize conventional, tandem, metallic ureteral and metal-mesh stents for their use in malignant ureteral obstruction.

  14. Biodegradable stents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Marín, Ingrid; Boix, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents (BDSs) are an attractive option to avoid ongoing dilation or surgery in patients with benign stenoses of the small and large intestines. The experience with the currently the only BDS for endoscopic placement, made of Poly-dioxanone, have shown promising results. However some aspects should be improved as are the fact that BDSs lose their radial force over time due to the degradable material, and that can cause stent-induced mucosal or parenchymal injury. This complication rate and modest clinical efficacy has to be carefully considered in individual patients prior to placement of BDSs. Otherwise, the price of these stents therefore it is nowadays an important limitation. PMID:24605020

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  16. Strategy to differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takuma, Kensuke; Kamisawa, Terumi; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Egawa, Naoto; Igarashi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly described entity of pancreatitis in which the pathogenesis appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms. Based on histological and immunohistochemical examinations of various organs of AIP patients, AIP appears to be a pancreatic lesion reflecting a systemic “IgG4-related sclerosing disease”. Clinically, AIP patients and patients with pancreatic cancer share many features, such as preponderance of elderly males, frequent initial symptom of painless jaundice, development of new-onset diabetes mellitus, and elevated levels of serum tumor markers. It is of uppermost importance not to misdiagnose AIP as pancreatic cancer. Since there is currently no diagnostic serological marker for AIP, and approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult, AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. Findings suggesting AIP rather than pancreatic cancer include: fluctuating obstructive jaundice; elevated serum IgG4 levels; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; delayed enhancement of the enlarged pancreas and presence of a capsule-like rim on dynamic computed tomography; low apparent diffusion coefficient values on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image; irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; less upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, presence of other organ involvement such as bilateral salivary gland swelling, retroperitoneal fibrosis and hilar or intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis; negative work-up for malignancy including endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration; and steroid responsiveness. Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy, accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection. PMID:22416175

  17. Basic tips for duct design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.; Tsal, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    During the last few years, ASHRAE Journal and other trade publications have presented lucid descriptions of the basic physics of airflow in ductwork, pressure drop and methods of sizing and optimization (Brooks 1995, Tsal et al. 1988a, Williams 1995). What is missing is a practical means for numerically modeling HVAC duct systems. This article is centered on the performance, economics and modeling of duct systems. Specific subjects examined include duct shape, fitting performance, leakage and appropriate oversizing. Computer modeling is discussed to provide a better grasp as to how it can be used as a practical design tool.

  18. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  19. Endovascular Stents and Stent-Grafts: Is Heparin Coating Desirable?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Stephen R.; Souza, Nandita M. de; Allison, David J.

    2000-07-15

    Heparins are glycosaminoglycans that, in addition to their anticoagulant activity, have interactions with growth factors and other glycoproteins. These interactions may stimulate neointimal hyperplasia when heparin is delivered locally on stents and stent-grafts. Modifying the structure of heparin to retain anticoagulant activity while minimizing these stimulatory effects on the vascular endothelium is desirable and may be achieved by understanding the relationships between the structure and function of the various parts of the heparin molecule.

  20. Hereditary pancreatitis of 3 Chinese children

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li-Na; Chen, Ying-Wei; Yan, Wei-Hui; Lu, Li-Na; Tao, Yi-Jing; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is quite rare and is distinguished by incomplete penetrance presentation as early-onset relapsing pancreatitis, usually beginning in childhood. HP is now known to be commonly relevant to mutations in the PRSS1 (gene-encoding cationic trypsinogen), SPINK1 (serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1), CFTR (cystic fibrosis), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes as reported in some Caucasian studies. HP has a variable spectrum of severity and may develop complications. Methods & Results: We describe the clinical course of 3 preschool children, hospitalized with postprandial abdominal pain, whose laboratory tests showed high serum amylase. Similar episodes of abdominal pain led to readmission, and the patients recovered quickly after using symptomatic therapy. The condition of the first boy, who developed a pancreatic tail pseudocyst and splenic infarction, was especially complicated. The boy underwent 2 endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies and stenting, along with a surgical procedure that completely relieved his symptoms for 3 months. The 3 patients and their parents were given genetic testing. All of the patients carried 1 or more gene mutations inherited from their mothers, fathers, or both parents; however, none of the parents were affected. Conclusion: For children with repeated pancreatitis, clinicians should consider HP in the differential diagnosis. It is reliable to perform gene sequencing on suspicious patients and their parents. Multidisciplinary and comprehensive treatment should be recommended to manage HP and its complications. Cholangiopancreatography and stenting is a relatively minimally invasive approach when compared with surgery and can be tried as an early intervention. Surgical procedures should be reserved for patients with complications. PMID:27603351

  1. A large mural nodule in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Koichiro; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Shiba, Hiroaki; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Indications for resection of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) remain controversial because of their low tendency to be malignant. Surgical resection should be recommended if any factors indicating malignancy are present. However, preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant tumors is very difficult, especially in cases of branch duct IPMNs. We herein report a case of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma (IPMA) of the pancreas with a large mural nodule of 25 mm. A 74-year-old woman was admitted for examination and treatment for a cystic tumor in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography showed a cystic lesion, 50 mm in diameter, with an irregular mural nodule in the pancreatic head. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a multicystic tumor connected with the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The mural nodule had a diameter of 18 mm, and the MPD had a slight dilation of 6 mm. These findings suggested a high potential for malignancy. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. The excised pancreas showed multiple cysts located in the branch pancreatic duct with a maximum diameter of 75 mm. The mural nodule had a maximum diameter of 25 mm. The tumor was diagnosed as an IPMA by pathological examination. After operation, the patient was discharged without any complications. Two years after resection, the patient remains in remission with no evidence of tumor recurrence.

  2. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  3. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  4. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline: prophylaxis of post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Andriulli, A; Deviere, J; Mariani, A; Rigaux, J; Baron, T H; Testoni, P A

    2010-06-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) are both patient-related and procedure-related. Identification of patients at high risk for PEP is important in order to target prophylactic measures. Prevention of PEP includes administration of nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), use of specific cannulation techniques, and placement of temporary pancreatic stents. The aim of this guideline commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to provide practical, graded, recommendations for the prevention of PEP.

  5. Mechanisms of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Di Sebastiano, P; Friess, H; Di Mola, F F; Innocenti, P; Büchler, M W

    2000-01-01

    Pain is a leading symptom in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and often its management necessitates surgical intervention. Nevertheless the presence of different hypotheses, the pathophysiology of pain is not understood, thus the indications for therapy remain controversial. Increased pressure within the ductal system and/or the parenchyma has been suggested to be one of the causes of pain. This controversial theory has been substantiated by the demonstration of a relationship between intrapancreatic pressure and intensity of pain. On the other hand, recent studies have shown the inflammatory involvement of intrapancreatic nerve fibres in a so called "neuroimmune interaction". In fact, infiltration of inflammatory cells around the nerves together with an increase in the number of nerve fibres in the fibrotic pancreatic tissue have been proposed as a possible cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, immunohistological studies have shown that the amount of neurotransmitters, such as substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide, is increased in afferent pancreatic nerves and a close interrelationship between pain and immune cell infiltration of the nerves has been reported in CP. In addition to these hypothesis, extrapancreatic causes such as common bile duct obstruction and duodenal stenosis are discussed. This article review points to the different pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatic pain in CP.

  6. Articulated transition duct in turbomachine

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-29

    Turbine systems are provided. A turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. The upstream portion extends from the inlet between an inlet end and an aft end. The downstream portion extends from the outlet between an outlet end and a head end. The turbine system further includes a joint coupling the aft end of the upstream portion and the head end of the downstream portion together. The joint is configured to allow movement of the upstream portion and the downstream portion relative to each other about or along at least one axis.

  7. Wave reflections from duct terminations.

    PubMed

    Selamet, A; Ji, Z L; Kach, R A

    2001-04-01

    The reflection coefficients and inertial end corrections of several duct terminations, including finite length duct extensions perpendicular to an infinite wall, as well as at a number of angles, curved interface surfaces, and annular cavities, are determined and analyzed in the absence of flow by employing the boundary element method. Predictions for the classical unflanged and flanged circular ducts show good agreement with analytical and computational results available in the literature. The predictions for curved interface surfaces (bellmouth or horn) are also consistent with the available experimental data. In view of its high reflection coefficient, the duct termination with an annular cavity may be suggested for the suppression of noise radiation in a specific frequency band or for an effective wave reflection from the termination. PMID:11325101

  8. Ductal branch-oriented pancreatic resection for an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in the uncinate process that caused recurrent acute pancreatitis: a case report of successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toshiyuki; Maruyama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Akitoshi; Shimizu, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Akinari; Ohta, Takumi; Sato, Yayoi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Aikawa, Mizuho; Otsuka, Ryota; Yanagihara, Akitoshi

    2013-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis reportedly occurs in about 15 % of cases of branch duct (BD)-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), with two-thirds of BD-IPMNs being located in the head or uncinate process of the pancreas. However, the surgical indications and optimal treatment methods for BD-IPMNs have not been established. A 59-year-old Japanese male with epigastralgia was admitted to our hospital. A multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scan disclosed grade I acute pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography disclosed a 1.5-cm BD-IPMN in the uncinate process. Two months after discharge, the epigastralgia recurred, and MDCT again revealed grade I pancreatitis. Due to the repeated episodes of pancreatitis, we performed ductal branch-oriented pancreatic resection. To detect the inferior branch of the Wirsung duct and avoid the development of a pancreatic fistula, we injected indigo carmine into the tumor which confirmed ligation of the inferior branch. Histopathologically, the tumor proved to be an adenoma. The postoperative course was uneventful in both the short- and long-term follow-up and, to date, there has been no recurrence of pancreatitis, or diabetes mellitus during the 6 years since pancreatectomy. This procedure is one of the methods that can be used for the successful resection of a BD-IPMN in the uncinate process that caused recurrent acute pancreatitis.

  9. Analysis of the stent expansion in a stenosed artery using finite element method: application to stent versus stent study.

    PubMed

    Imani, S Misagh; Goudarzi, A M; Ghasemi, S E; Kalani, A; Mahdinejad, J

    2014-10-01

    In this article, finite element method is used to investigate the mechanical behavior of a stent and to determine the biomechanical interaction between the stent and the artery in a stenting procedure. The main objective of this study is to reach to a model close to a real condition of coronary stent placement. Unlike most of the models proposed in the literature, all the steps of the deployment of a stent in the stenotic vessel (i.e. pressure increasing, constant load pressure and pressure decreasing) are simulated in this article to show the behavior of the stent in different stages of implantation. The results indicate that the first step of deployment, that is, pressure increasing, plays a main role in the success of stent implantation. So that, in order to compare the behavior of different types of stents, it is sufficient to compare their behavior at the end of pressure increasing step. In order to show the application of the findings in stent versus stent studies, three commercially available stents (the Palmaz-Schatz, Multi-Link and NIR stents) are modeled and their behavior is compared at the end of pressure increasing step. The effect of stent design on the restenosis rate is investigated. According to the findings, the possibility of restenosis is lower for Multi-Link and NIR stents in comparison with Palmaz-Schatz stent which is in good agreement with clinical results. Therefore, the testing methodology outlined here is proposed as a simple and economical alternative for "stent versus stent" complicated clinical trials.

  10. Polyorethaoe-covered nitinol strecker stents as primary palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira; Kane, Teruyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyure-thane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n=5), pancreatic Cancer (n=6), gallbladder Cancer (n=4), metastatic lymph nodes (n=2), and tumor of the papilla (n=1).Resulrs: The mean patency period of the Stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  11. Flexible Borescope For Inspecting Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozaki, Keith; Armstrong, Mike P.; Urquidi, Ron

    1995-01-01

    Borescope and associated equipment developed specifically for use in optical inspection of inside of flexible joints in rocket-engine fuel duct. Apparatus includes assembly, characterized as "mouse/canoe," at sensing end of 10-ft borescope cable. Borescope tip rides in mouse/canoe. The mouse/canoe made laterally compressible, to facilitate movement past constrictions and provides fixed distance from inspection point permitting accurate description in duct inspected.

  12. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  13. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear that are two histological types (Type-1 and Type-2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The histological pattern of Type-1 AIP, or traditional AIP, is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The histological pattern of Type-2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration in the epithelium of the pancreatic duct. In general, Type-2 AIP patients are younger, may not have a male preponderance, and rarely show elevation of serum IgG4 compared with Type-1 AIP patients. Unlike Type-1 AIP patients, Type-2 AIP patients rarely have associated sclerosing diseases, but they are more likely to have acute pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis. Although Type-2 AIP is sometimes observed in the USA and Europe, most AIP cases in Japan and Korea are Type-1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP comprise 5 cardinal features, and combinations of one or more of these features provide the basis for diagnoses of both Type-1 and Type-2 AIP. Due to the fact that steroid therapy is clinically, morphologically, and serologically effective in AIP patients, it is the standard therapy for AIP. The indications for steroid therapy in AIP include symptoms such as obstructive jaundice and the presence of symptomatic extrapancreatic lesions. Oral prednisolone (0.6 mg/kg/day) is administered for 2–4 weeks and gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over a period of 2–3 months. Maintenance therapy by low-dose prednisolone is usually performed for 1–3 years to prevent relapse of AIP. PMID:23060806

  14. Bile-pancreatic juice-independent increases in pancreatic proteases and intestinal cholecystokinin by dietary protein in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1998-02-01

    Luminal bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ) is involved in the induction of pancreatic proteases in rats fed a high-protein diet. Recently, we have demonstrated that a BPJ-independent mechanism is responsible for enhancement of pancreatic secretion after feeding of a dietary protein in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. The aim of the present study was to explore the existence of a BPJ-independent mechanism during adaptation of the exocrine pancreas to dietary protein. Rats, whose BPJ was diverted into the ileum through a common bile-pancreatic duct catheter for 5 days (PBD rat), were fed a fat-free diet containing 25% or 60% casein for 3 days. Messenger RNA levels for pancreatic enzymes, cholecystokinin, and secretin in the jejunal mucosa were evaluated by northern blotting method. Pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities and mRNA levels of their zymogens were higher in PBD rats than in rats whose diverted BPJ was returned into the duodenum (PBD returned rat). In the PBD groups, pancreatic protease activities were further increased by 3-day feeding of a high-protein diet without changes in mRNA levels of these proteases. Cholecystokinin mRNA was increased after feeding of a high-protein diet in the PBD rats. These results indicate that pancreatic proteases are induced by feeding a high-protein diet by a mechanism independent of luminal BPJ, which is associated with an increase in intestinal cholecystokinin mRNA level.

  15. Laminar flow in twisted ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.

    1993-11-01

    Fully developed flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through a duct in which the orientation of the cross section is twisted about an axis parallel to an imposed pressure gradient is analyzed here with the aid of the penalty/Galerkin/finite element method. When the axis of twist is located within the duct, flow approaches limits at low and high torsion, the spatial frequency τ by which the duct is twisted. For small torsion, flow is nearly rectilinear and solutions approach previous asymptotic results for an elliptical cross section. For large torsion, flow exhibits an internal layer structure: a rotating circular-cylinder core with a nearly parabolic axial velocity profile, an internal layer of thickness τ-1 along the perimeter of the largest circular cylinder that can be inscribed in the duct, and nearly quiescent flow outside of the circular cylinder. The maximum rate of swirl in the core of a square duct is found to be at moderate torsion. The primary effect of inertia is an increase in pressure with distance from the axis, due to centrifugal acceleration. When the duct is offset from the axis of twist, inertia leads to one, two, or three primary vortices without apparent bifurcation of steady states, although stability of steady flows is lost beyond detected Hopf points.

  16. Complications following repair of extrahepatic bile duct injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Montes, J A; Rojo, E; Martín, L G

    2001-10-01

    Extrahepatic bile duct traumatic injuries are extremely rare and their treatment is difficult and with several controversies. The aim of this study was to offer some more clinical information on their surgical repair and outcome. We present seven patients with extrahepatic biliary tract lesions after blunt abdominal trauma, (isolated gallbladder lesions were excluded) four males and three females from 23 to 51 years of age (mean age 35.1 years). All patients had suffered high-energy blunt abdominal trauma and presented associated injuries, mostly liver trauma and lung contusions. Six gallbladder lesions and six common bile duct injures were identified; a right hepatic duct laceration and a left hepatic duct transection were also present. Injuries were treated either with primary repair or with duct-jejunal anastomoses with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Principal complications were postoperative anastomotic leakage (1 case) and recurrent cholangitis (3 cases) with or without stricture. Not-diagnosed injuries caused substantial morbidity. We prefer and recommend the use of primary repair in partial ruptures with no significant tissue loss and biliary-enteric anastomoses in large injuries and complete transections because they offer the best long-term drainage with less risk of stricture formation than end-to-end anastomoses. We defend the use of long duration (6 to 9 months) transanastomotic stents. PMID:11596896

  17. Management of Pancreatic Calculi: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, Duvvur Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatolithiasis, or pancreatic calculi (PC), is a sequel of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and may occur in the main ducts, side branches or parenchyma. Calculi are the end result, irrespective of the etiology of CP. PC contains an inner nidus surrounded by successive layers of calcium carbonate. These calculi obstruct the pancreatic ducts and produce ductal hypertension, which leads to pain, the cardinal feature of CP. Both endoscopic therapy and surgery aim to clear these calculi and decrease ductal hypertension. In small PC, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) followed by sphincterotomy and extraction is the treatment of choice. Large calculi require fragmentation by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) prior to their extraction or spontaneous expulsion. In properly selected cases, ESWL followed by ERCP is the standard of care for the management of large PC. Long-term outcomes following ESWL have demonstrated good pain relief in approximately 60% of patients. However, ESWL has limitations. Per oral pancreatoscopy and intraductal lithotripsy represent techniques in evolution, and in current practice their use is limited to centers with considerable expertise. Surgery should be offered to all patients with extensive PC, associated multiple ductal strictures or following failed endotherapy. PMID:27784844

  18. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  19. Cholangiocarcinoma and malignant bile duct obstruction: A review of last decades advances in therapeutic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Helga; Frazzoni, Marzio; Mangiafico, Santi; Caruso, Angelo; Manno, Mauro; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Pigò, Flavia; Barbera, Carmelo; Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades many advances have been achieved in endoscopy, in the diagnosis and therapy of cholangiocarcinoma, however blood test, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scan may fail to detect neoplastic disease at early stage, thus the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma is achieved usually at unresectable stage. In the last decades the role of endoscopy has moved from a diagnostic role to an invaluable therapeutic tool for patients affected by malignant bile duct obstruction. One of the major issues for cholangiocarcinoma is bile ducts occlusion, leading to jaundice, cholangitis and hepatic failure. Currently, endoscopy has a key role in the work up of cholangiocarcinoma, both in patients amenable to surgical intervention as well as in those unfit for surgery or not amenable to immediate surgical curative resection owing to locally advanced or advanced disease, with palliative intention. Endoscopy allows successful biliary drainage and stenting in more than 90% of patients with malignant bile duct obstruction, and allows rapid reduction of jaundice decreasing the risk of biliary sepsis. When biliary drainage and stenting cannot be achieved with endoscopy alone, endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage represents an effective alternative method affording successful biliary drainage in more than 80% of cases. The purpose of this review is to focus on the currently available endoscopic management options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26078827

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a systemic immune complex mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Chicano, Sonia; Chiocca, Sonia; Finkelberg, Dmitry; Selig, Martin K; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Brugge, William R; Colvin, Robert B; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2006-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a mass forming inflammatory pancreatobiliary-centric disease. Recent reports of multiorgan inflammatory mass forming lesions with increased numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells suggest that AIP may have a systemic component. In this study, we explore the systemic nature of AIP, investigate the relevance of subtyping AIP, perform a systematic study of tissue IgG4 immunoperoxidase, and ultrastructurally evaluate the presence of immune complexes. Our study group consisted of 36 patients with AIP, 21 of whom underwent a Whipple procedure. On the basis of the pattern of inflammation, pancreatic involvement was subtyped as ductocentric (AIP-D) or lobulocentric (AIP-L). Extrapancreatic lesions included bile duct (n=3), salivary glands (n=3), lung (n=2), gallbladder (n=11), and kidney (n=4). Clinical and radiologic data was recorded. Immunohistochemistry for IgG4 was performed on both pancreatic and extrapancreatic tissues and the numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells were semiquantitatively scored. A control cohort composed of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n=19) and chronic pancreatitis-not otherwise specified (NOS) (n=14) was also evaluated. Eleven pancreatic specimens, including 2 cases of chronic pancreatitis-NOS and 4 kidneys were evaluated ultrastructurally. The pancreas, bile duct, gall bladder, salivary gland, kidney, and lung lesions were characterized by dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with reactive fibroblasts and venulitis. IgG4 positive plasma cells were identified in all pancreatic and extrapancreatic lesions. The AIP cases showed significantly more pancreatic IgG4 positive plasma cells than chronic pancreatitis-NOS or adenocarcinoma (P=0.001). However, IgG4 positive cells were identified in 57.1% of chronic pancreatitis-NOS and 47.4% of ductal adenocarcinoma. Fifteen of 21 resected cases were classified as AIP-D, and 6 as AIP-L, the latter notably showing significantly more IgG4 positive plasma cells than the former (P=0

  1. Effective screening for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihito; Hirano, Naomichi; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Minami, Tomoyuki; Ikemoto, Juri; Kanemitsu, Kozue; Hino, Fumiaki

    2015-12-01

    Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) at an early stage with curative surgery should improve long-term patient outcome. At present, improving survival should lie in identifying those cases with high-risk factors or precursor lesions through an effective screening including ultrasonography, some biological markers, or national familial pancreatic cancer registration. Recently, cases with PC < 10 mm with a favorable prognosis have been reported. For the diagnoses of cases with PC < 10 mm, the rate of tumor detection was higher on endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) than on CT or other modalities, and EUS-guided fine needle aspiration was helpful in confirming the histologic diagnosis. Additionally, for the diagnosis of cases with PC in situ, EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) may play important roles in detecting the local irregular stenosis of the pancreatic duct. Cytodiagnosis of pancreatic juice using endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage multiple times may be useful in the final diagnosis. PMID:26651254

  2. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  3. Endoscopic management of complications of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Macias-Gomez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Pseudocysts and biliary obstructions will affect approximately one third of patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). For CP-related, uncomplicated, pancreatic pseudocysts (PPC), endoscopy is the first-choice therapeutic option. Recent advances have focused on endosonography-guided PPC transmural drainage, which tends to replace the conventional, duodenoscope-based coma immediately approach. Ancillary material is being tested to facilitate the endosonography-guided procedure. In this review, the most adequate techniques depending on PPC characteristics are presented along with supporting evidence. For CP-related biliary obstructions, endoscopy and surgery are valid therapeutic options. Patient co-morbidities (e.g., portal cavernoma) and expected patient compliance to repeat endoscopic procedures are important factors when selecting the most adapted option. Malignancy should be reasonably ruled out before embarking on the endoscopic treatment of presumed CP-related biliary strictures. In endoscopy, the gold standard technique consists of placing simultaneous, multiple, side-by-side, plastic stents for a one-year period. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents are challenging this method and have provided 50% mid-term success. PMID:24259962

  4. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  5. Main Bile Duct Stricture Occurring After Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Ikeno, Hiroshi; Orito, Nobuaki; Notsumata, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Toya, Daisyu; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical course of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among 446 consecutive patients with HCC treated by TACE, main bile duct stricture developed in 18 (4.0%). All imaging and laboratory data, treatment course, and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had 1 to 2 tumors measuring 10 to 100 mm in diameter (mean {+-} SD 24.5 {+-} 5.4 mm) near the hepatic hilum fed by the caudate arterial branch (A1) and/or medial segmental artery (A4) of the liver. During the TACE procedure that caused bile duct injury, A1 was embolized in 8, A4 was embolized in 5, and both were embolized in 5 patients. Nine patients (50.0%) had a history of TACE in either A1 or A4. Iodized oil accumulation in the bile duct wall was seen in all patients on computed tomography obtained 1 week later. Bile duct dilatation caused by main bile duct stricture developed in both lobes (n = 9), in the right lobe (n = 3), in the left lobe (n = 4), in segment (S) 2 (n = 1), and in S3 (n = 1). Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase increased in 13 patients. Biloma requiring drainage developed in 2 patients; jaundice developed in 4 patients; and metallic stents were placed in 3 patients. Complications after additional TACE sessions, including biloma (n = 3) and/or jaundice (n = 5), occurred in 7 patients and were treated by additional intervention, including metallic stent placement in 2 patients. After initial TACE of A1 and/or A4, 8 patients (44.4%), including 5 with uncontrollable jaundice or cholangitis, died at 37.9 {+-} 34.9 months after TACE, and 10 (55.6%) have survived for 38.4 {+-} 37.9 months. Selective TACE of A1 and/or A4 carries a risk of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum. Biloma and jaundice are serious complications associated with bile duct strictures.

  6. The Influence of a Metal Stent on the Distribution of Thermal Energy during Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, Willemien; Neal, Robert E.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van der Geld, Cees W. M.; Meijerink, Martijn R.; Klaessens, John H.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses short duration, high-voltage electrical pulses to induce cell death via nanoscale defects resulting from altered transmembrane potential. The technique is gaining interest for ablations in unresectable pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancer. Metal stents are often used for palliative biliary drainage in these patients, but are currently seen as an absolute contraindication for IRE due to the perceived risk of direct heating of the metal and its surroundings. This study investigates the thermal and tissue viability changes due to a metal stent during IRE. Methods IRE was performed in a homogeneous tissue model (polyacrylamide gel), without and with a metal stent placed perpendicular and parallel to the electrodes, delivering 90 and 270 pulses (15–35 A, 90 μsec, 1.5 cm active tip exposure, 1.5 cm interelectrode distance, 1000–1500 V/cm, 90 pulses/min), and in-vivo in a porcine liver (4 ablations). Temperature changes were measured with an infrared thermal camera and with fiber-optic probes. Tissue viability after in-vivo IRE was investigated macroscopically using 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) vitality staining. Results In the gel, direct stent-heating was not observed. Contrarily, the presence of a stent between the electrodes caused a higher increase in median temperature near the electrodes (23.2 vs 13.3°C [90 pulses]; p = 0.021, and 33.1 vs 24.8°C [270 pulses]; p = 0.242). In-vivo, no temperature difference was observed for ablations with and without a stent. Tissue examination showed white coagulation 1mm around the electrodes only. A rim of vital tissue remained around the stent, whereas ablation without stent resulted in complete tissue avitality. Conclusion IRE in the vicinity of a metal stent does not cause notable direct heating of the metal, but results in higher temperatures around the electrodes and remnant viable tissue. Future studies should determine for which clinical indications IRE in the

  7. A new pathological scoring method for adrenal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Hui, Yuanjian; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Xincheng

    2014-12-01

    These studies investigated the appearance and function of adrenal glands in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and established a new histopathological score to evaluate adrenal histopathological changes. Severe acute pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The damage of SAP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A2 and pancreatic histopathology. Light and electron microscopy of adrenal gland, and the levels of serum corticosterone were investigated. These results showed that the generally ascending trend of adrenal pathological score was inversely proportional to the generally descending trend of serum corticosterone levels, but parallel with the changes of pancreatic histopathology. Herein, the new adrenal histopathological score was effective in the evaluation of adrenal injury following SAP. It may indirectly reflect the variation of serum cortisol levels and the severity of pancreatitis to a certain extent.

  8. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  9. The Development of Carotid Stent Material

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongsheng; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular angioplasty with stenting is a promising option for treating carotid artery stenosis. There exist a rapidly increasing number of different stent types with different materials. The bare-metal stent is the most commonly used stent with acceptable results, but it leaves us with the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. The drug-eluting stent is a breakthrough as it has the ability to reduce the restenosis rate, but the problem of late thrombosis still has to be addressed. The biodegradable stent disappears after having served its function. However, restenosis and degradation rates remain to be studied. In this article, we review every stent material with its characteristics, clinical results and complications and point out the standards of an ideal carotid stent. PMID:26019710

  10. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut ...

  11. Epithelial to Stromal Re-Distribution of Primary Cilia during Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schimmack, Simon; Kneller, Sarah; Dadabaeva, Nigora; Bergmann, Frank; Taylor, Andrew; Hackert, Thilo; Werner, Jens; Strobel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (HH) pathway is a mediator in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Surprisingly, previous studies suggested that primary cilia (PC), the essential organelles for HH signal transduction, were lost in PDAC. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of PC in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, and during carcinogenesis to PDAC with focus on both epithelia and stroma. Methods PC were analyzed in paraffin sections from normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, and PDAC, as well as in primary human pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) and pancreatic cancer cell lines by double immunofluorescence staining for acetylated α-tubuline and γ-tubuline. Co-staining for the HH receptors PTCH1, PTCH2 and SMO was also performed. Results PC are gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis in the epithelium: the fraction of cells with PC gradually and significantly decreased from 32% in ducts of normal pancreas, to 21% in ducts of chronic pancreatitis, to 18% in PanIN1a, 6% in PanIN2, 3% in PanIN3 and to 1.2% in invasive PDAC. However, this loss of PC in the neoplastic epithelium is accompanied by a gain of PC in the surrounding stroma. The fraction of stromal cells with PC significantly increased from 13% around normal ducts to about 30% around PanIN and PDAC. HH-receptors were detected in tumor stroma but not in epithelial cells. PC are also present in PSC and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Conclusion PC are not lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis but re-distributed from the epithelium to the stroma. This redistribution may explain the re-direction of HH signaling towards the stroma during pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:27783689

  12. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U.; Arnegger, F. U.; Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H.; Stampfl, S.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  13. Fluid mechanics in stented arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A.; Bosioc, A.; Crainic, N.; Hudrea, C.; Bernad, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. Strut shape, strut thickness and the distance between consecutive struts have been associated clinically with the with post-intervention clinical outcomes. Hemodynamically favorable designs according to computational modeling can reduced in-stent restenosis after coronary stenting intervention.

  14. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  15. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  16. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  17. Innovations in macroscopic evaluation of pancreatic specimens and radiologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Agalianos, Christos; Dervenis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a novel dissection technique of surgical specimens in different cases of pancreatic tumors and provide a radiologic pathologic correlation. In our hospital, that is a referral center for pancreatic diseases, the macroscopic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimens is performed by the pathologists using the axial slicing technique (instead of the traditional procedure with longitudinal opening of the main pancreatic and/or common bile duct and slicing along the plane defined by both ducts). The specimen is sliced in an axial plane that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the descending duodenum. The procedure results in a large number of thin slices (3-4 mm). This plane is identical to that of CT or MRI and correlation between pathology and imaging is straightforward. We studied 70 cases of suspected different solid and cystic pancreatic tumors and we correlated the tumor size and location, the structure-consistency (areas of necrosis-hemorrhage-fibrosis-inflammation), the degree of vessels' infiltration, the size of pancreatic and common bile duct and the distance from resection margins. Missed findings by imaging or pitfalls were recorded and we tried to explain all discrepancies between radiology evaluation and the histopathological findings. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is extremely important, adding crucial information on imaging limitations and enabling quality assessment of surgical specimens. The deep knowledge of different pancreatic tumors' consistency and way of extension helps to improve radiologists' diagnostic accuracy and minimize the radiological-surgical mismatching, preventing patients from unnecessary surgery. PMID:27069980

  18. Innovations in macroscopic evaluation of pancreatic specimens and radiologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Agalianos, Christos; Dervenis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a novel dissection technique of surgical specimens in different cases of pancreatic tumors and provide a radiologic pathologic correlation. In our hospital, that is a referral center for pancreatic diseases, the macroscopic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimens is performed by the pathologists using the axial slicing technique (instead of the traditional procedure with longitudinal opening of the main pancreatic and/or common bile duct and slicing along the plane defined by both ducts). The specimen is sliced in an axial plane that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the descending duodenum. The procedure results in a large number of thin slices (3–4 mm). This plane is identical to that of CT or MRI and correlation between pathology and imaging is straightforward. We studied 70 cases of suspected different solid and cystic pancreatic tumors and we correlated the tumor size and location, the structure—consistency (areas of necrosis—hemorrhage—fibrosis—inflammation), the degree of vessels’ infiltration, the size of pancreatic and common bile duct and the distance from resection margins. Missed findings by imaging or pitfalls were recorded and we tried to explain all discrepancies between radiology evaluation and the histopathological findings. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is extremely important, adding crucial information on imaging limitations and enabling quality assessment of surgical specimens. The deep knowledge of different pancreatic tumors’ consistency and way of extension helps to improve radiologists’ diagnostic accuracy and minimize the radiological-surgical mismatching, preventing patients from unnecessary surgery. PMID:27069980

  19. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; MacFadyen, Bruce V

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the procedure of choice in the management of choledocholithiasis in several laparoscopic centers. The increasing interest for this laparoscopic approach is due to the development of instrumentation and technique, allowing the procedure to be performed safely, and it is also the result of the revised role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which has been questioned because of its cost, risk of complications and effectiveness. Many surgeons, however, are still not familiar with this technique. In this article we discuss the technique and results of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Both the laparoscopic transcystic approach and choledochotomy are discussed, together with the results given in the literature. When one considers the costs, morbidity, mortality and the time required before the patient can return to work, it would appear that laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration is more favorable than open surgery or laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative or postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy. However, the technique requires advanced laparoscopic skills, including suturing, knot tying, the use of a choledochoscope, guidewire, dilators and balloon stone extractor. Although laparoscopic common bile duct exploration appears to be the most cost-effective method to treat common bile duct stones, it should be emphasized that this procedure is very challenging, and it should be performed by well-trained laparoscopic surgeons with experience in biliary surgery. PMID:11981684

  20. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  1. IgG4-unrelated type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Eriko; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hongo, Seiji; Miura, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Hamada, Shin; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Nakayama, Keisuke; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of hyperproteinemia. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed high fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the pancreas, bilateral lacrimal glands, submandibular glands, parotid glands, bilateral pulmonary hilar lymph nodes, and kidneys. Laboratory data showed an elevation of hepatobiliary enzymes, renal dysfunction, and remarkably high immunoglobulin (Ig) G levels, without elevated serum IgG4. Abdominal computed tomography revealed swelling of the pancreatic head and bilateral kidneys. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head and stricture of the lower common bile duct. Histological examination by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration revealed findings of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis without IgG4-positive plasma cells. Abnormal laboratory values and the swelling of several organs were improved by the treatment with steroids. The patient was diagnosed as having type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) based on the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria. Therefore, we encountered a case of compatible type 1 AIP without elevated levels of serum IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells. This case suggests that AIP phenotypes are not always associated with IgG4. PMID:26361429

  2. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC.

  3. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  4. Knotted stents: Case report and outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Na; Hwang, Hokyeong

    2015-01-01

    A knotted ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with fewer than 20 cases reported in the literature; however, it is difficult to treat. We report a case in which a folded Terumo guidewire was successfully used to remove a knotted stent percutaneously without anesthesia. We also review the current literature on predisposing factors and management strategies for knotted ureteral stents. PMID:25964843

  5. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  6. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  7. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  8. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  9. Mechanical properties of different airway stents.

    PubMed

    Ratnovsky, Anat; Regev, Noa; Wald, Shaily; Kramer, Mordechai; Naftali, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Airway stents improve pulmonary function and quality of life in patients suffering from airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare main types of stents (silicone, balloon-dilated metal, self-expanding metal, and covered self-expanding metal) in terms of their mechanical properties and the radial forces they exert on the trachea. Mechanical measurements were carried out using a force gauge and specially designed adaptors fabricated in our lab. Numerical simulations were performed for eight different stent geometries, inserted into trachea models. The results show a clear correlation between stent diameter (oversizing) and the levels of stress it exerts on the trachea. Compared with uncovered metal stents, metal stents that are covered with less stiff material exert significantly less stress on the trachea while still maintaining strong contact with it. The use of such stents may reduce formation of mucosa necrosis and fistulas while still preventing stent migration. Silicone stents produce the lowest levels of stress, which may be due to weak contact between the stent and the trachea and can explain their propensity for migration. Unexpectedly, stents made of the same materials exerted different stresses due to differences in their structure. Stenosis significantly increases stress levels in all stents.

  10. Rotational Atherectomy of Three Overlapping Stent Layers.

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Tiberio M; Friedman, Harold; O'Neill, William W

    2016-09-01

    A patient was referred to us for Canadian Cardiovascular Society class III refractory angina. He was found to have in-stent restenosis within three layers of underexpanded stents implanted in 2004, 2011, and 2014. Rotational atherectomy safely yielded stent strut ablation (reduced to one layer), lesion expansion, and very good angiographic and physiologic results. PMID:27591692

  11. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  12. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further. PMID:23905635

  13. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden.

  14. The mechanism of increased renal clearance of amylase in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lee, K H

    1976-09-01

    Amylase isoenzymes, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were measures in 25 normal persons (mean amylase to creatinine clearance ratio 3.0%), 15 patients with acute pancreatitis (mean clearance ratio 9.5%, P less than 0.0001), and 6 patients with hyperamylasemia due to common duct stones (mean clearance ratio 4.1%). Two isoamylases (P1, P2) resembling pancreatic isoenzymes and three isoamylases (S1, S2, S3) resembling salivary isoenzymes appeared regularly in normal serum and urine. Salivary amylases predominated in serum, but pancreatic amylases predominated in urine. This finding is consistent with renal clearance of pancreatic amylases exceeding that of salivary amylases under normal conditions. In patients with pancreatitis or common duct stones, essentially all of the increased amylase activity in serum and urine was due to pancreatic isoamylases (P1 and P2) in their normal proportions. No new or altered amylase isoenzymes were detected. The fraction of pancreatic amylases in the serum or urine was identical for the two diseases. Whereas the difference in amylase to creatinine clearance ratios observed between the two groups of patients is not a function of different amylase isoenzymes presented to the kidney, we conclude that the increased amylase clearance in acute pancreatitis is caused by an alteration of renal transfer of amylase, either at the glomerulus or tubule.

  15. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  16. Cluster hepaticojejunostomy with radial spreading anchoring traction technique for secure reconstruction of widely opened hilar bile ducts

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Secure reconstruction of multiple hepatic ducts that are severely damaged by tumor invasion or iatrogenic injury is a challenge. Failure of percutaneous or endoscopic biliary stenting requires lifelong placement of one or more percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tubes. For such difficult situations, we devised a surgical technique termed cluster hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), which can be coupled with palliative bile duct resection. The cluster HJ technique consisted of applying multiple internal biliary stents and a single wide porto-enterostomy to the surrounding connective tissues. The technique is described in detail in the present case report. Performing cluster HJ benefits from three technical tips as follows: making the multiple bile duct openings wide and parallel after sequential side-to-side unification; radially anchoring and traction of the suture materials at the anterior anastomotic suture line; and making multiple segmented continuous sutures at the posterior anastomotic suture line. Thus, cluster HJ with radial spreading anchoring traction technique is a useful surgical method for secure reconstruction of severely damaged hilar bile ducts. PMID:27212993

  17. Cluster hepaticojejunostomy with radial spreading anchoring traction technique for secure reconstruction of widely opened hilar bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Secure reconstruction of multiple hepatic ducts that are severely damaged by tumor invasion or iatrogenic injury is a challenge. Failure of percutaneous or endoscopic biliary stenting requires lifelong placement of one or more percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tubes. For such difficult situations, we devised a surgical technique termed cluster hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), which can be coupled with palliative bile duct resection. The cluster HJ technique consisted of applying multiple internal biliary stents and a single wide porto-enterostomy to the surrounding connective tissues. The technique is described in detail in the present case report. Performing cluster HJ benefits from three technical tips as follows: making the multiple bile duct openings wide and parallel after sequential side-to-side unification; radially anchoring and traction of the suture materials at the anterior anastomotic suture line; and making multiple segmented continuous sutures at the posterior anastomotic suture line. Thus, cluster HJ with radial spreading anchoring traction technique is a useful surgical method for secure reconstruction of severely damaged hilar bile ducts.

  18. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  19. Percutaneous coronary angioscopy and stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, Richard R.

    1994-05-01

    With the expanding array of therapies available for coronary intervention, the invasive cardiologist has many choices for treating a specific lesion in an individual patient. Certain types of lesions might respond more effectively with stents, particularly the rigid Palmax- Schatz device. Thrombus and dissection immediately following stent placement are associated with early occlusion, and the interventionist must be able to assess their presence pre- and post-stenting. Angiography is deficient in quantifying minimal disease and in defining lesion architecture and composition, as well as the plaque rupture and thrombosis associated with unstable angina. It is also imprecise in detecting dissection and thrombus. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images that delineate irregularities and other structures inside the lumen and within the vessel wall and surrounding tissues. Like angiography, IVUS has limited specificity for thrombus differentiation. Angioscopy is superior to angiography and IVUS in detecting thrombus and dissection. Angioscopy allows the clinician to assess the appearance of stent struts after deployment and at follow-up. This may aid in reducing acute complications as well as restenosis. Follow-up angioscopy of stents to detect thrombus or exposed struts may guide therapy in a patient who has clinical symptoms of restenosis.

  20. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.