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Sample records for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

  1. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  2. Medical treatment for gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Partelli, Stefano; Rinaldi, Silvia; Caramanti, Miriam; Ferrini, Consuelo; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) represents a various family of rare tumours. Surgery is the first choice in GEP-NENs patients with localized disease whilst in the metastatic setting many other treatment options are available. Somatostatin analogues are indicated for symptoms control in functioning tumours. Furthermore they may be effective to inhibit tumour progression. GEP-NENs pathogenesis has been extensively studied in the last years therefore several driver mutations pathway genes have been identified as crucial factors in their tumourigenesis. GEP-NENs can over-express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic-fibroblastic growth factor, transforming growth factor (TGF-α and -β), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors PDGF receptor, IGF-1 receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, VEGF receptor, and c-kit (stem cell factor receptor) that can be considered as potential targets. The availability of new targeted agents, such as everolimus and sunitinib that are effective in advanced and metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, has provided new treatment opportunities. Many trials combing new drugs are ongoing. PMID:27096034

  3. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms.

  4. Case report. Peripancreatic intranodal haemangioma mimicking pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, A D; Arellano, R; Baker, G

    2011-12-01

    Haemangiomas are common benign tumours that are generally detected within the skin, mucosal surfaces and soft tissues. However, intranodal haemangiomas are extremely rare and are among the benign primary vascular abnormalities of the lymph nodes that include lymphangioma, haemangioendothelioma, angiomyomatous hamartoma and haemangiomas. In this case report, we present the imaging and pathological findings of an intranodal haemangioma in the pancreatic head simulating a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intranodal haemangioma in this location.

  5. Pathogenic PALB2 mutation in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, DAVID; CLARKE, STEPHEN; GILL, ANTHONY J.; CHANTRILL, LORRAINE; SAMRA, JAS; LI, BOB T.; BARNES, TRISTAN; NAHAR, KAZI; PAVLAKIS, NICK

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) comprise ~3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and they are more heterogeneous in their histological character and outcome. This is the case report of a 73-year-old female patient with synchronously diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNET, which is likely associated with a pathogenic partner and localizer of breast cancer 2, early onset (PALB2) mutation. The potential pathogenic significance of PALB2 and its association with various malignancies were investigated and the potential role of PALB2 in conferring sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin C and cisplatin, was discussed. This case report highlights the significance of ongoing research into the molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which may help guide the selection of optimal treatments for this disease, as well as the need for ongoing study of PALB2 as a possible predictive marker of response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:26171187

  6. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Fazio, Nicola; Orsi, Franco

    2011-04-15

    We describe the use of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for ablation of two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs; insulinomas) in two inoperable young female patients. Both suffered from episodes of severe nightly hypoglycemia that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After HIFU ablation, local disease control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 9-month follow-up. The lesions appeared to be decreased in volume, and there was decreased enhancing pattern in the multidetector computed tomography control (MDCT). HIFU is likely to be a valid alternative for symptoms control in patients with pancreatic NETs. However, currently the procedure should be reserved for inoperable patients for whom symptoms cannot be controlled by medical therapy.

  7. Challenges and controversies in management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours in patients with MEN1.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christopher J; Newey, Paul J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-11-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), an autosomal dominant disorder, is characterised by the occurrence of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs) in association with parathyroid and pituitary tumours. P-NETs, which include gastrinomas, insulinomas, and non-functioning tumours, occur in more than 80% of MEN1 patients and account for 50% of disease-specific deaths. However, there is no consensus about the optimal methods for detecting and treating P-NETs in MEN1 patients, and extrapolations from approaches used in patients with non-familial (sporadic) P-NETs require caution because of differences, such as the younger age of onset, multi-focality of P-NETs, and concomitant presence of other tumours in MEN1 patients. Thus, the early detection of P-NETs by circulating biomarkers and imaging modalities, and their appropriate treatments by surgical approaches and/or radionuclide therapy, chemotherapy, and biotherapy pose challenges and controversies. These challenges and controversies will be reviewed and possible approaches proposed. PMID:26165399

  8. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  9. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  10. Filamin-A is required to mediate SST2 effects in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Eleonora; Cambiaghi, Valeria; Zerbi, Alessandro; Carnaghi, Carlo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea G

    2016-03-01

    Somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) is the main pharmacological target of somatostatin (SS) analogues widely used in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs), this treatment being ineffective in a subset of patients. Since it has been demonstrated that Filamin A (FLNA) is involved in mediating GPCR expression, membrane anchoring and signalling, we investigated the role of this cytoskeleton protein in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in human P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line. We demonstrated that FLNA silencing was not able to affect SST2 expression in P-NET cells in basal conditions. Conversely, a significant reduction in SST2 expression (-43 ± 21%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was observed in FLNA silenced QGP1 cells after long term SST2 activation with BIM23120. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cyclin D1 expression (-46 ± 18%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), P-ERK1/2 levels (-42 ± 14%; P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), cAMP accumulation (-24 ± 3%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), VEGF expression (-31 ± 5%, P < 0.01 vs untreated cells) and in vitro release (-40 ± 24%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was completely lost after FLNA silencing. Interestingly, BIM23120 promoted cell adhesion (+86 ± 45%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) and inhibited cell migration (-24 ± 2%, P < 0.00001 vs untreated cells) in P-NETs cells and these effects were abolished in FLNA silenced cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that FLNA plays a crucial role in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line, suggesting a possible role of FLNA in determining the different responsiveness to SS analogues observed in P-NET patients. PMID:26733502

  11. Current Status of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours (GEP-NETs)

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Cappucci, Matteo; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Tipaldi, Marcello Andrea; Hatzidakis, Adam; Rebonato, Alberto; Rossi, Michele

    2015-02-15

    Within the group of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs), several heterogeneous malignancies are included with a variety of clinical manifestations and imaging characteristics. Often these cases are inoperable and minimal invasive treatment offered by image-guided procedures appears to be the only option. Interventional radiology offers a valid solution in the management of primary and metastatic GEP-NETs. The purpose of this review article is to describe the current status of the role of Interventional Radiology in the management of GEP-NETs.

  12. Screening for malnutrition in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sheharyar A; Burch, Nicola; Druce, Maralyn; Hattersley, John G; Khan, Saboor; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Darby, Catherine; Wong, John L H; Davies, Louise; Fletcher, Simon; Shatwell, William; Sothi, Sharmila; Randeva, Harpal S; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether screening for malnutrition using the validated malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST) identifies specific characteristics of patients at risk, in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust; European Neuroendocrine Tumour Society Centre of Excellence. Participants Patients with confirmed GEP-NET (n=161) of varying primary tumour sites, functioning status, grading, staging and treatment modalities. Main outcome measure To identify disease and treatment-related characteristics of patients with GEP-NET who score using MUST, and should be directed to detailed nutritional assessment. Results MUST score was positive (≥1) in 14% of outpatients with GEP-NET. MUST-positive patients had lower faecal elastase concentrations compared to MUST-negative patients (244±37 vs 383±20 µg/g stool; p=0.018), and were more likely to be on treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogues (65 vs 38%, p=0.021). MUST-positive patients were also more likely to have rectal or unknown primary NET, whereas, frequencies of other GEP-NET including pancreatic NET were comparable between MUST-positive and MUST-negative patients. Conclusions Given the frequency of patients identified at malnutrition risk using MUST in our relatively large and diverse GEP-NET cohort and the clinical implications of detecting malnutrition early, we recommend routine use of malnutrition screening in all patients with GEP-NET, and particularly in patients who are treated with long-acting somatostatin analogues. PMID:27147385

  13. The use of targeted therapies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: patient assessment, treatment administration, and management of adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Pavlakis, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Together with the use of novel oral targeted therapies, a multidisciplinary approach can be used to effectively treat patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs). Here we review the integration of the oncology nurse to the newly developed oral treatment setting for patients with pNETs. From the outset, the nurse must be involved in various processes, including performance of baseline assessments (e.g. blood pathology, cardiac and lung function testing, patient history) and general medical observations, treatment administration, dietary guidance, evaluation of comorbidities, and review of concomitant medications. Patient education and establishment of a strong partnership in care before the start of pNET therapy ultimately increase treatment adherence and reduce potential toxicities. Regular review of general patient status and disease progression and continuous monitoring of adverse events also help enhance treatment outcomes and subsequently improve quality of life. Nurses’ knowledge of agent-specific toxicities and prompt, proactive management is a critical aspect of care. In essence, as the pNET treatment landscape evolves, the role of the healthcare professional in overall patient care must shift accordingly. PMID:23997829

  14. A Phase II Study of BEZ235 in Patients with Everolimus-resistant, Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    FAZIO, NICOLA; BUZZONI, ROBERTO; BAUDIN, ERIC; ANTONUZZO, LORENZO; HUBNER, RICHARD A.; LAHNER, HARALD; DE HERDER, WOUTER W.; RADERER, MARKUS; TEULÉ, ALEXANDRE; CAPDEVILA, JAUME; LIBUTTI, STEVEN K.; KULKE, MATTHEW H.; SHAH, MANISHA; DEY, DEBARSHI; TURRI, SABINE; AIMONE, PAOLA; MASSACESI, CRISTIAN; VERSLYPE, CHRIS

    2016-01-01

    Background This was a two-stage, phase II trial of the dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor BEZ235 in patients with everolimus-resistant pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) (NCT01658436). Patients and Methods In stage 1, 11 patients received 400 mg BEZ235 orally twice daily (bid). Due to tolerability concerns, a further 20 patients received BEZ235 300 mg bid. Stage 2 would be triggered by a 16-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate of ≥60% in stage 1. Results As of 30 June, 2014, 29/31 patients had discontinued treatment. Treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were reported in eight (72.7%) patients at 400 mg and eight (40.0%) patients at 300 mg, including hyperglycaemia, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting. The estimated 16-week PFS rate was 51.6% (90% confidence interval=35.7–67.3%). Conclusion BEZ235 was poorly tolerated by patients with everolimus-resistant pNETs at 400 and 300 mg bid doses. Although evidence of disease stability was observed, the study did not proceed to stage 2. PMID:26851029

  15. CT/MRI of neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Reznek, Rodney H

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are often thought to be rare and rather recherché cancers which are of little concern to the general physician, surgeon or radiologist because of their rarity and esoteric nature. In fact, while relatively uncommon, the total group of gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumours incorporates the spectrum of all types of carcinoids, incuding bronchial carcinoids, and the whole gamut of islet-cell tumours. Some of these may present as functioning tumours, with a plethora of hormonal secretions and concomitant clinical syndromes, and GEPs in general have an incidence around 30 per million population per year. This means that in the whole European Union, for example, there will be in the region of 12000 new patients every year presenting with one or another manifestation of these tumours. Furthermore, the comparatively long survival of many of these patients, compared to more common adenocarcinomas or epithelial tumours, implies that the point prevalence is also not inconsiderable. However, it is undoubtedly true that these tumours can be difficult to identify, especially in their early stages, and it is then that radiological investigation becomes of paramount importance. Having taken into account all these considerations, most investigators would initiate investigation of a suspected or biochemically proven islet-cell tumour with cross-sectional imaging—either CT or MRI. This will clearly identify the larger lesions, allow assessment of the entire abdomen, and provide valuable information on the presence of hepatic metastates. PMID:17114072

  16. Neuroendocrine tumours - Medical therapy: Biological.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Anja; Krug, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) are well established antisecretory drugs that have been used as first line treatment for symptomatic control in hormonally active neuroendocrine tumours (NET) for three decades. Both available depot formulations of SSA, long-acting repeatable (LAR) octreotide and lanreotide autogel, seem similarly effective and well tolerated, although comparative trials in NET have not been performed. The importance of SSA as antiproliferative treatment has been increasingly recognized during recent years. Two placebo-controlled trials demonstrated significant prolongation of progression free survival under SSA treatment. However, objective response as assessed by imaging is rare. Interferon-α (IFNα) also has antisecretory and antiproliferative efficacy in NET. Due to the less favourable toxicity profile it mainly has a role as add-on option in the refractory setting, especially in carcinoid syndrome patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate the antiproliferative efficacy of the multiligand SSA pasireotide and the role of pegylated IFNα. PMID:26971845

  17. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  18. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the (68)Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUVmax reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three (68)Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these (68)Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On (68)Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUVmax) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUVmax-values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUVmax-data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients. Therefore, follow-up with (68)Ga

  19. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Leotlela, P D; Jauch, A; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Thakker, R V

    2003-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) originate in tissues that contain cells derived from the embryonic neural crest, neuroectoderm and endoderm. Thus, NETs occur at many sites in the body, although the majority occur within the gastro-entero-pancreatic axis and can be subdivided into those of foregut, midgut and hindgut origin. Amongst these, only those of midgut origin are generally argentaffin positive and secrete serotonin, and hence only these should be referred to as carcinoid tumours. NETs may occur as part of complex familial endocrine cancer syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), although the majority occur as non-familial (i.e. sporadic) isolated tumours. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that the development of NETs may involve different genes, each of which may be associated with several different abnormalities that include point mutations, gene deletions, DNA methylation, chromosomal losses and chromosomal gains. Indeed, the foregut, midgut and hindgut NETs develop via different molecular pathways. For example, foregut NETs have frequent deletions and mutations of the MEN1 gene, whereas midgut NETs have losses of chromosome 18, 11q and 16q and hindgut NETs express transforming growth factor-alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, in lung NETs, a loss of chromosome 3p is the most frequent change and p53 mutations and chromosomal loss of 5q21 are associated with more aggressive tumours and poor survival. In addition, methylation frequencies of retinoic acid receptor-beta, E-cadherin and RAS-associated domain family genes increase with the severity of lung NETs. Thus the development and progression of NETs is associated with specific genetic abnormalities that indicate the likely involvement of different molecular pathways.

  20. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  1. [Surgery for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Chikashi; Egawa, Shin-Ichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Morikawa, Takanori; Naitoh, Takeshi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasaki, Iwao

    2012-11-01

    Approximately half of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are nonfunctioning, and insulinoma and gastrinoma are frequent forms of functioning tumors. The treatment of patients with PNETs should be based on the consideration that more than half are malignant except for insulinomas. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is often complicated with gastrinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound and somatostain receptor scintigraphy are useful in diagnosing PNETs, and the selective arterial secretagogue injection test is performed if necessary. WHO2010 is available as a histopathologic grading system of malignancy. Although surgical resection should first be considered as a treatment for PNETs, liver metastasis is a major factor hindering resection. In Japan, the choices of drugs to treat liver metastases are too few. In patients with MEN1 in whom PNETS are frequently multiple, we should perform procedures that preserve pancreatic function, although some patients may require total pancreatectomy for the complete resection of tumors. The indications for total pancreatectomy should be determined individually based on the tumor status and patient age. PMID:23330458

  2. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  3. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  4. Histopathologically Proven Autoimmune Pancreatitis Mimicking Neuroendocrine Tumor or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

  5. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a primary hindgut neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Okines, Alicia F C; Hawkes, Eliza A; Rao, Sheela; VAN As, Nicholas; Marsh, Henry; Riddell, Angela; Wilson, Philip O G; Osin, Peter; Wotherspoon, Andrew C; Wetherspoon, Andrew C

    2010-07-01

    The examination of limited, potentially non-representative fragments of tumour tissue from a core biopsy can be misleading and misdirect subsequent treatment, especially in cases where a primary tumour has not been identified. This case report is of a 65-year-old woman presenting with a destructive sacral mass, diagnosed on radiological imaging and core biopsy as a hindgut neuroendocrine tumour, which on histopathological review of the subsequently resected tumour was found instead to represent a metastasis from an occult hormone-positive breast cancer with neuroendocrine features.

  6. Surgical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Tezuka, Koji; Hirai, Ichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study outlines the surgical management and clinicopathological findings of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). There are various surgical options, such as enucleation of the tumor, spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, and duodenum-preserving pancreas head resection. Lymph node dissection is performed for malignant cases. New guidelines and classifications have been proposed and are now being used in clinical practice. However, there are still no clear indications for organ-preserving pancreatic resection or lymph node dissection. Hepatectomy is the first choice for liver metastases of well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma without extrahepatic metastases. On the other hand, cisplatin-based combination therapy is performed as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Other treatment options are radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolization/embolization, and liver transplantation. Systematic chemotherapy and biotherapy, such as that with somatostatin analogue and interferon-α, are used for recurrence after surgery. The precise surgical techniques for enucleation of the tumor and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy are described. PMID:21922354

  7. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: biology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Cynthia; Chai, Wanxing; Yu, Victoria E.; Yu, Run

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), a group of endocrine tumors arising in the pancreas, are among the most common neuroendocrine tumors. The genetic causes of familial and sporadic PNETs are somewhat understood, but their molecular pathogenesis remains unknown. Most PNETs are indolent but have malignant potential. The biological behavior of an individual PNET is unpredictable; higher tumor grade, lymph node and liver metastasis, and larger tumor size generally indicate a less favorable prognosis. Endocrine testing, imaging, and histological evidence are necessary to accurately diagnose PNETs. A 4-pronged aggressive treatment approach consisting of surgery, locoregional therapy, systemic therapy, and complication control has become popular in academic centers around the world. The optimal application of the multiple systemic therapeutic modalities is under development; efficacy, safety, availability, and cost should be considered when treating a specific patient. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of specific types of PNETs and familial PNET syndromes, including the novel Mahvash disease, are summarized. PMID:23237225

  8. A case of insulin and ACTH co-secretion by a neuroendocrine tumour

    PubMed Central

    Solomou, S; Khan, R; Propper, D; Berney, D; Druce, M

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 33-year-old male was diagnosed with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of uncertain primary. He defaulted from follow-up without therapy and some months later developed episodic severe hypoglycaemia, which was found to be associated with inappropriately elevated insulin and C-peptide levels. It was considered likely that the neuroendocrine tumour was the source of the insulin secretion. Diazoxide and somatostatin analogue were used to control hypoglycaemia. Much later in the course of the disease, he developed metabolic derangement, increased skin pigmentation and psychological disturbance, without frankly Cushingoid physical findings. Investigations revealed highly elevated cortisol levels (the levels having previously been normal) with markedly raised ACTH levels, consistent with the co-secretion of ACTH and insulin by the tumour. Treatment with metyrapone improved his psychological state and electrolyte imbalance. Unfortunately, despite several cycles of first-, second- and third-line chemotherapy from the start of the first hormonal presentation onwards, imaging revealed widespread progressive metastatic disease and the patient eventually passed away. This case highlights the importance of keeping in mind the biochemical heterogeneity of endocrine tumours during their treatment. Learning points The clinical presentation of insulin-secreting tumours includes symptoms of neuroglycopaenia and sympathetic overstimulation.Tumour-associated hypoglycaemia can be due to pancreatic insulinomas, and although ectopic hormone production occurs in a number of tumours, ectopic secretion of insulin is rare.A possible switch in the type of hormone produced can occur during the growth and progression of neuroendocrine tumours and, when treating neuroendocrine tumours, it is important to keep in mind their biochemical heterogeneity. PMID:24683485

  9. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Immunohistochemical study of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in Panthera tigris tigris.

    PubMed

    Nyska, A; Goldstein, J; Eshkar, G; Klein, B

    1996-07-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a case of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor are described in a 14-yr-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) housed at the New Biblical Zoo of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994. The neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically negative for insulin and glucagon, slightly positive for neuron-specific enolase, moderately positive for serotonin and somatostatin, and markedly positive for chromogranine A and gastrin. This is the first documentation of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tiger.

  11. Immunohistochemical study of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in Panthera tigris tigris.

    PubMed

    Nyska, A; Goldstein, J; Eshkar, G; Klein, B

    1996-07-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a case of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor are described in a 14-yr-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) housed at the New Biblical Zoo of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994. The neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically negative for insulin and glucagon, slightly positive for neuron-specific enolase, moderately positive for serotonin and somatostatin, and markedly positive for chromogranine A and gastrin. This is the first documentation of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tiger. PMID:8827685

  12. A retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor in ectopic pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Al-Bassiouni, Fahim; El-Ela, Monir Abo; Al-Gemeie, Emad Hamza; Ezzat, Reem

    2013-07-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. We report a case of abdominal pain due to retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue between the duodenal wall and the head of the pancreas. Patient underwent surgical enucleation of the tumor.

  13. A Retroperitoneal Neuroendocrine Tumor in Ectopic Pancreatic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Al-Bassiouni, Fahim; El-Ela, Monir Abo; Al-Gemeie, Emad Hamza; Ezzat, Reem

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. We report a case of abdominal pain due to retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue between the duodenal wall and the head of the pancreas. Patient underwent surgical enucleation of the tumor. PMID:24949389

  14. TNM Staging of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  15. [Medical treatment of digestive neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Panzuto, F; Nasoni, S; Delle Fave, G

    2001-09-01

    Surgery is the only therapy able to cure patients with digestive neuroendocrine tumor. However, due to the presence of diffuse metastases, radical surgery is often not feasible. In these cases, medical treatment plays a critical role, because of its ability to control symptoms in functioning tumors and to inhibit tumor growth. Different therapeutic approaches, such as chemotherapy, hepatic artery chemoembolization and targeted radio-nuclide therapy can be used alone or combined to the biologic treatment with somatostatin analogues and interferon. However, an accurate staging by imaging procedures plus a histological, immunohistochemical and biomolecular examination must be performed before planning an optimal medical treatment. PMID:11753237

  16. Treatment of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours with etoposide and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, E; Baudin, E; Ducreux, M; Sabourin, J-C; Rufié, P; Aparicio, T; Lasser, P; Elias, D; Duvillard, P; Schlumberger, M; Rougier, P

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate by a retrospective analysis of 53 patients the efficacy of chemotherapy combining etoposide and cisplatin in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours. The regimen was a combination of etoposide 100 mg m–2 day–1 for 3 days and cisplatin 100 mg m–2 on day 1, given by 2-h intravenous infusion, administered every 21 days. Twelve patients had a well-differentiated and 41 a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour. Toxicity of treatment was assessed in 50 patients and efficacy in 52 patients. Among the 11 patients with a well-differentiated tumour evaluable for tumoural response, only one (9.4%) had a partial response for 8.5 months. Forty-one patients with a poorly differentiated tumour showed an objective response rate of 41.5% (four complete and 13 partial responses); the median duration of response was 9.2 months, the median overall survival 15 months and the median progression-free survival 8.9 months. Haematological grade 3–4 toxicity was observed in 60% of the cases with one treatment-related death, digestive grade 3–4 toxicity in 40% and grade 3 alopecia was constant. No severe renal, hearing and neurological toxicities were observed (grade 1 in 6%, 14%, 72% respectively and no grade >1). We confirm that poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours are chemosensitive to the etoposide plus cisplatin combination. However, the prognosis remains poor with a 2-year survival lower than 20% confirming that new therapeutic strategies have to be developed. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10604732

  17. [Surgical treatment for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Wu, Junli; Guo, Feng; Wei, Jishu; Lu, Zipeng; Chen, Jianmin; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong; Dai, Cuncai; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasmas (PNENs) are classified into functioning & non-functioning tumors. The radical surgery is the only effective way for the cure & long-term survival. For the locoregional resectable tumors, the surgical resection is the first choice of treatment; the surgical procedures include local resection (enucleation) and standard resection. For the insulinomas and non-functioning tumors less than 2 cm, local resection (enucleation),distal pancreatectomy with spleen-preservation or segmental pancreatectomy are the commonly selected procedures. The radical resections with regional lymph nodes dissection, including pancreaticoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy and middle segmental pancreatectomy, should be applied for tumors more than 2 cm or malignant ones. For the locoregional advanced or unresectable functioning tumors, debulking surgery should be performed and more than 90% of the lesions including primary and metastatic tumors should be removed; for the non-functioning tumors, if complicated with biliary & digestive tract obstruction or hemorrhage, the primary tumors should be resected. The liver is the most frequent site of metastases for PNENs and three types of metastases are defined. For typeⅠmetastasis, patients are recommended for surgery if there are no contraindications; For type II metastasis, debulking surgery should be applied and at least 90% of metastatic lesions should be resected, and for patients with primary tumors removed and no extrahepatic metastases, or for patients with well-differentiated (G1/G2) tumors, liver transplantation may be indicated. For the unresectable type Ⅲ metastasis, multiple adjuvant therapies should be chosen. PMID:27045238

  18. Lutetium-labelled peptides for therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Kam, B L R; Teunissen, J J M; Krenning, E P; de Herder, W W; Khan, S; van Vliet, E I; Kwekkeboom, D J

    2012-02-01

    Treatment with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising new tool in the management of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). The results obtained with (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) are very encouraging in terms of tumour regression. Dosimetry studies with (177)Lu-DOTATATE as well as the limited side effects with additional cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE suggest that more cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE can be safely given. Also, if kidney-protective agents are used, the side effects of this therapy are few and mild and less than those from the use of (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC). Besides objective tumour responses, the median progression-free survival is more than 40 months. The patients' self-assessed quality of life increases significantly after treatment with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Lastly, compared to historical controls, there is a benefit in overall survival of several years from the time of diagnosis in patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. These findings compare favourably with the limited number of alternative therapeutic approaches. If more widespread use of PRRT can be guaranteed, such therapy may well become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine tumours.

  19. Medical management of secretory syndromes related to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal S; Kaltsas, Gregory; Grossman, Ashley

    2016-09-01

    Although recent epidemiological evidence indicates that the prevalence of non-functioning gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is rising, a significant number of GEP-NETs still present with symptoms related to the secretion of biologically active substances leading to the development of distinct clinical syndromes. In the past, these syndromes were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific therapies; however, since the introduction of long-acting somatostatin analogues and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, their control has been greatly improved. As a result, nowadays, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in GEP-NETs is mostly directly related to tumour growth and the extent of metastatic disease. However, in some patients with functioning tumours and extensive disease, control of the secretory syndrome still remains problematic, necessitating the employment of several cytoreductive techniques, which may not always be sufficient. Recently, new agents directed against tumour growth, or exerting increased binding activity to receptors expressed in these tumours, or interfering with the synthetic pathway of some of the compounds secreted by these tumours, have been developed. Since there are no specific guidelines addressing the totality of the management of the secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs, this review aims at critically analysing the medical management of previously recognised secretory syndromes; it also addresses areas of uncertainty, assesses the newer therapeutic developments and also addresses recently described but poorly characterised secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs. PMID:27461388

  20. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy.

  1. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy. PMID:27621748

  2. Clinical applications of 68Ga-DOTANOC in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Lopci, E; Nanni, C; Rampin, L; Rubello, D; Fanti, S

    2008-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are relatively rare neoplasms affecting principally the gastroenteropancreatic tract, but with potential ubiquitary location, as the neural crest cells, origin of this group of tumours, are dispersed in various organs and tissues. After the discovery of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) over-expression in this group of neoplasms, NET management has significantly improved. This is witnessed by the development of new tracers in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of NETs belonging to the family of radio-labelled somatostatin analogues, that significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosis and, more recently, opened the way to the innovative targeted radionuclide therapies. First introduced in clinical application in 2005, 68Ga-DOTANOC (one of the most used radio-labelled somatostatin analog for PET imaging) has revealed promising results in preliminary studies for the main clinical indications: staging NET; suspected NET of unknown primary; follow-up, restaging and, finally, for pre- and post-treatment evaluation of receptor radionuclide therapies. Due to its technically simple production, favourable biodistribution, biokinetics, dosimetry and high affinity for SSTR and thanks to the possibility of hybrid scans PET/computed tomography (CT) with better spatial resolution and localisation of the lesions, 68Ga-DOTANOC can advance as the new gold standard for imaging in neuroendocrine tumours.

  3. Melatonin Immunoreactivity in Malignant Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Rasmusson, Annica J.; Ali, Abir; Stridsberg, Mats; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are derived from enterochromaffin cells. After demonstrating melatonin in enterochromaffin cells, we hypothesized that SI-NETs may express and secrete melatonin, which may have an impact on clinical factors and treatment response. Methods Tumour tissue from 26 patients with SI-NETs, representing paired sections of primary tumour and metastasis, were immunohistochemically stained for melatonin and its receptors, MT1 and MT2. Plasma melatonin and immunoreactivity (IR) for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 in tumour cells were compared to other tumour markers and clinical parameters. Melatonin was measured at two time points in fasting morning plasma from 43 patients with SI-NETs. Results Melatonin IR was found in all SI-NETS. Melatonin IR intensity in primary tumours correlated inversely to proliferation index (p = 0.022) and patients reported less diarrhoea when melatonin IR was high (p = 0.012). MT1 IR was low or absent in tumours. MT2 expression was medium to high in primary tumours and generally reduced in metastases (p = 0.007). Plasma-melatonin ranged from 4.5 to 220.0 pg/L. Higher levels were associated with nausea at both time points (p = 0.027 and p = 0.006) and flush at the second sampling. In cases with disease stabilization or remission (n = 34), circulating melatonin levels were reduced in the second sample (p = 0.038). Conclusion Immunoreactive melatonin is present in SI-NETs. Circulating levels of melatonin in patients with SI-NETs are reduced after treatment. Our results are congruent with recent understanding of melatonin’s endocrine and paracrine functions and SI-NETs may provide a model for further studies of melatonin function. PMID:27736994

  4. Hitting the target: where do molecularly targeted therapies fit in the treatment scheduling of neuroendocrine tumours?

    PubMed

    Karpathakis, Anna; Caplin, Martyn; Thirlwell, Christina

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumours whose incidence is increasing and their prevalence is now greater than that of any other upper gastrointestinal tumour. Diagnosis can be challenging, and up to 25% of patients present with metastatic disease. Following the recent FDA approval of two new molecularly targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced pancreatic NETs (pNETs), the first in 25 years, we review all systemic therapies and suggest where these newer targeted therapies fit in the treatment schedule for these challenging tumours. Clinical trial data relating to the routine use of sunitinib and everolimus in low-intermediate-grade pNETs are summarised alongside newer molecularly targeted agents undergoing clinical assessment in NETs. We particularly focus on the challenge of optimal scheduling of molecularly targeted treatments around existing systemic and localised treatment such as chemotherapy or radiotargeted therapy. We also discuss application of current evidence to subgroups of patients who have not so far been directly addressed such as those with poorer performance status or patients receiving radical surgery who may benefit from adjuvant treatment.

  5. Validation of the EORTC QLQ-GINET21 questionnaire for assessing quality of life of patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yadegarfar, G; Friend, L; Jones, L; Plum, L M; Ardill, J; Taal, B; Larsson, G; Jeziorski, K; Kwekkeboom, D; Ramage, J K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quality of life is an important end point in clinical trials, yet there are few quality of life questionnaires for neuroendocrine tumours. Methods: This international multicentre validation study assesses the QLQ-GINET21 Quality of Life Questionnaire in 253 patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours. All patients were requested to complete two quality of life questionnaires – the EORTC Core Quality of Life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the QLQ-GINET21 – at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months post-baseline; the psychometric properties of the questionnaire were then analysed. Results: Analysis of QLQ-GINET21 scales confirmed appropriate aggregation of the items, except for treatment-related symptoms, where weight gain showed low correlation with other questions in the scale; weight gain was therefore analysed as a single item. Internal consistency of scales using Cronbach's α coefficient was >0.7 for all parts of the QLQ-GINET21 at 6 months. Intraclass correlation was >0.85 for all scales. Discriminant validity was confirmed, with values <0.70 for all scales compared with each other. Scores changed in accordance with alterations in performance status and in response to expected clinical changes after therapies. Mean scores were similar for pancreatic and other tumours. Conclusion: The QLQ-GINET21 is a valid and responsive tool for assessing quality of life in the gut, pancreas and liver neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:23322194

  6. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs. PMID:26666705

  7. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs.

  8. Pazopanib and depot octreotide in advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a multicentre, single-group, phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Alexandria T; Halperin, Daniel M; Chan, Jennifer A; Fogelman, David R; Hess, Kenneth R; Malinowski, Paige; Regan, Eileen; Ng, Chaan S; Yao, James C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment options for advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) remain scarce. Pazopanib is an orally bioavailable, small molecule, multitargeted kinase inhibitor that inhibits VEGF receptors 1, 2, and 3. We did a study of the efficacy of pazopanib with depot octreotide in patients with advanced NETs. Methods We did a parallel cohort study of patients with metastatic or locally advanced grade 1–2 carcinoid tumours or pancreatic NETs, by use of a single-group, two-stage design. Patients received pazopanib 800 mg orally once per day and octreotide at their preprotocol dosage. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving an objective response, as assessed by investigators, by intention-to-treat analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT00454363, and was completed in March, 2014. Findings Between April 12, 2007, and July 2, 2009, we enrolled 52 patients, including 32 individuals with pancreatic NETs and 20 individuals with carcinoid tumours. Seven (21.9%, 95% CI 11.0–38.8) of 32 patients with pancreatic NETs achieved an objective response. We detected no responses in the first stage of the cohort with carcinoid tumours, and we terminated accrual at 20 patients. Toxic effects included one patient with grade 4 hypertriglyceridaemia and one with grade 4 thrombosis, with the most common grade three events being aminotransferase increases and neutropenia, each of which happened in 3 patients. In all 52 patients, the most frequently observed toxic effects were fatigue (39 [75%]), nausea (33 [63%]), diarrhoea (33 [63%]), and hypertension (28 [54%]). Interpretation Treatment with pazopanib is associated with tumour response for patients with pancreatic NETs, but not for carcinoid tumours; a randomised controlled phase 3 study to assess pazopanib in advanced pancreatic NETs is warranted. Funding US National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. PMID:25956795

  9. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  10. An unusual case of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour of the ileum with peritoneal carcinomatosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celotti, Andrea; Pulcini, Giuseppe; Schieppati, Mattia; Ministrini, Silvia; Berruti, Alfredo; Ronconi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a family of neoplasms that come from neuroendocrine cells and express neural markers, such as synaptophysin or chromogranin A.The current classifications of these tumours are presented by the WHO 2000 classification, based on histological parameters, and the WHO 2010 classification, based on the proliferative index, that divides the NETs into a neuroendocrine tumour of a low grade, neuroendocrine tumour of a intermediate grade and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of a high grade.We are reporting a very rare case of a G1 low-grade neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the ileum with a peritoneal carcinomatosis.This case is challenging because the tumour expresses low proliferative index as G1 tumours, but it has an aggressive clinical behaviour such as node metastasis and peritoneal carcinomatosis.The peritoneal carcinomatosis is not actually considered by the current classifications of NETs, so it is difficult to predict the prognosis of this patient.

  11. GEP-NETS update: functional localisation and scintigraphy in neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-05-01

    For patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP) (GEP-NETs), excellent care should ideally be provided by a multidisciplinary team of skilled health care professionals. In these patients, a combination of nuclear medicine imaging and conventional radiological imaging techniques is usually mandatory for primary tumour visualisation, tumour staging and evaluation of treatment. In specific cases, as in patients with occult insulinomas, sampling procedures can provide a clue as to where to localise the insulin-hypersecreting pancreatic NETs. Recent developments in these fields have led to an increase in the detection rate of primary GEP-NETs and their metastatic deposits. Radiopharmaceuticals targeted at specific tumour cell properties and processes can be used to provide sensitive and specific whole-body imaging. Functional imaging also allows for patient selection for receptor-based therapies and prediction of the efficacy of such therapies. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) and single-photon emission CT/CT are used to map functional images with anatomical localisations. As a result, tumour imaging and tumour follow-up strategies can be optimised for every individual GEP-NET patient. In some cases, functional imaging might give indications with regard to future tumour behaviour and prognosis.

  12. [What is new in the pathology of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors?].

    PubMed

    Komminoth, P; Perren, A

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostics of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNEN) have changed in recent years especially concerning the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, TNM staging and grading. Furthermore, some new prognostic and predictive immunohistochemical markers have been introduced. Most progress, however, has been made in the molecular pathogenesis of these neoplasms. Using next generation sequencing techniques, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, hypoxia and epigenetic changes were identified as key players in tumorigenesis. In this article the most important developments of morphological as well as immunohistochemical diagnostics together with the molecular background of PanNEN are summarized.

  13. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Avid Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Vamadevan, Shankar; Shetty, Deepa; Le, Ken; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Loh, Han

    2016-10-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate recurrent prostatic malignancy due to its high specificity. A 75-year-old man with a previous history of treated prostate cancer 3 years earlier presented with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT which demonstrated a PSMA-avid focus in the neck of the pancreas. Triple-phase abdominal CT demonstrated enhancement in the arterial phase and to a lesser extent the venous phase of a soft tissue mass in the neck of the pancreas. Cytological and histopathological examination of the soft tissue mass confirmed a low-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

  14. Ki-67 index and response to chemotherapy in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Childs, Alexa; Kirkwood, Amy; Edeline, Julien; Luong, Tu Vinh; Watkins, Jennifer; Lamarca, Angela; Alrifai, Doraid; Nsiah-Sarbeng, Phyllis; Gillmore, Roopinder; Mayer, Astrid; Thirlwell, Christina; Sarker, Debashis; Valle, Juan W; Meyer, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Chemotherapy (CT) is widely used for neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), but there are no validated biomarkers to predict response. The Ki-67 proliferation index has been proposed as a means of selecting patients for CT, but robust data are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between response to chemotherapy and Ki-67 in NET. We reviewed data from 222 NET patients treated with CT. Tumours were graded according to Ki-67 index: G1 ≤2%, G2 3-20% and G3 >20%. Response was assessed according to RECIST and survival calculated from start of chemotherapy to death. To explore Ki-67 as a marker of response, we calculated the likelihood ratio and performed receiver operating characteristic analysis. Overall, 193 patients had a documented Ki-67 index, of which 173 were also evaluable for radiological response: 10% were G1, 46% G2 and 43% G3; 46% were pancreatic NET (PNET). Median overall survival was 22.1 months. Overall response rate was 30% (39% in PNET vs 22% in non-PNET) and 43% of patients had stable disease. Response rate increased with grade: 6% in G1 tumours, 24% in G2 and 43% in G3. However, maximum likelihood ratio was 2.3 at Ki-67=35%, and the area under the ROC curve was 0.60. As reported previously, a high Ki-67 was an adverse prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, response to CT increases with Ki-67 index, but Ki-67 alone is an unreliable means to select patients for CT. Improved methods to stratify patients for systemic therapy are required. PMID:27412968

  15. AACE/ACE disease state clinical review: pancreatic neuroendocrine incidentalomas.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Miguel F; Åkerström, Göran; Angelos, Peter; Grant, Clive S; Hoff, Ana O; Pantoja, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Johnston, Rocio; Sahani, Dushyant V; Wong, Richard J; Randolph, Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Incidental detection of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has substantially increased over the last decade due to widespread use of advanced imaging studies. Reliable initial imaging-based characterization is crucial for the differential diagnosis from other exocrine neoplasms and to determine the appropriate management plan. Measurements of chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide, and calcitonin are recommended for the biochemical evaluation. A thorough medical history needs to be performed to rule out multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1. The European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS)/Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) staging system together with a grading based on the Ki-67 proliferation index and mitotic counts has proven to give more appropriate prognostic information than the World Health Organization (WHO)/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging but may still fail to safely differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Poorly differentiated PNETs generally present with metastases and are rarely amenable for resection. Well- or intermediately differentiated tumors ≥2 cm with imaging evidence of malignancy or with a Ki-67 >2% should be resected. It has been suggested that non-MEN related, nonfunctioning, and asymptomatic PNETs <2 cm with a Ki-67 index ≤2% carry a low risk of metastasis and may be observed in the absence of clinical or radiologic criteria of malignancy or progression, especially in older patients. However, because metastases may occur with long delay with smaller PNETS, physicians should consider patient age, lesion location, and the risks of operation, and patients not undergoing surgery need to be closely followed closely.

  16. Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulenchyn, K Y; Yao, X; Asa, S L; Singh, S; Law, C

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in patients with different types of advanced neuroendocrine tumour (NETs). A literature search was carried out in MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1998 to November 2010. The Cochrane Library (to Issue 10, 2010) and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence Inventory of Cancer Guidelines, including over 1100 English-language cancer guidelines from January 2003 to June 2010, were also checked. No existing systematic reviews or clinical practice guidelines based on a systematic review or randomised controlled trials focusing on this topic were found. Twenty-four fully published articles were abstracted and summarised: 16 articles focused on five peptide receptor radionuclide therapy ((111)In-DTPAOC, (90)Y-DOTALAN, (90)Y-DOTATOC, (90)Y-DOTATATE, and (177)Lu-DOTATATE) and eight focused on (131)I-MIBG treatment. Limited evidence from a historical comparison of studies in one centre supported that (177)Lu-DOTATATE might be associated with greater clinical outcomes compared with (90)Y-DOTATOC or (111)In-DTPAOC. The severe toxicities for (177)Lu-DOTATATE included hepatic insufficiency in 0.6%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 0.8% and renal insufficiency in 0.4% of patients in this study. Insufficient evidence suggested efficacy of (131)I-MIBG in adult NET patients, but the overall tumour response rate from (131)I-MIBG was 27-75% for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma. Haematological toxicities were the main severe side-effects after (131)I-MIBG and 4% of patients developed secondary malignancies in one study. To date, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy seems to be an acceptable option and is relatively safe in adult advanced NET patients with receptor uptake positive on scintigraphy, but patients' renal function must be monitored. (131)I-MIBG may be effective for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma, but its side-effects need to be

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of a rare sinonasal neuroendocrine tumour: adding to the evidence.

    PubMed

    Gudlavalleti, Aashrai; Dean, Ryan; Liu, Yuxin; Dhamoon, Amit S

    2016-01-01

    Sinonasal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, aggressive neoplasms with a high recurrence potential. There are no robust protocols for the management of these tumours. An 81-year-old man presented with an incidental sinonasal mass visualised on CT scan of head. Over the next few weeks he developed new onset, progressively worsening headache, right eye ptosis and restricted extraocular movements. Imaging confirmed a rapidly enlarging tumour involving the right nasal cavity and the orbit. Biopsy showed a large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the right ethmoidal sinus. The patient was treated with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation. Repeat imaging showed decrease in tumour volume. The patient continues to do well and follows up regularly with our oncology service. Current protocols comprising chemotherapy after radiation are based on limited studies. A regimen involving concurrent chemoradiation also appears to aid in tumour volume reduction. Additional studies are required to formulate robust clinical protocols for management of sinonasal NETs. PMID:27624450

  18. Endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Farrell, James J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare pancreatic neoplasms comprising only 1% to 2% of all pancreatic tumors. In recent years, the number of incidentally discovered PNETs has greatly increased given the widespread use of axial imaging. However, a significant proportion of PNETs may not be visualized on conventional imaging such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an integral part of the diagnosis of PNETs because of its high sensitivity for detecting, localizing, and diagnosing PNETs. EUS-guided tissue acquisition provides histologic and immunologic confirmation, and may also allow prognostication about tumor behavior. In addition to preoperative assessment of these tumors, EUS has also been shown to have an important role in nonoperative management of small nonfunctional PNETs. Finally, recent developments suggest that interventional EUS may be used to aid intraoperative localization of PNETs and to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of PNETs. This review will discuss the endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of PNETs, with focus on recent advances in the utility of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors.

  19. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor accompanied with multiple liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Takaori, Kyoichi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (P-NET) is rare and slow-growing. Current classifications predict its prognosis and postoperative recurrence. Curative resection is ideal, although often difficult, because over 80% of patients have unresectable multiple liver metastases and extrahepatic metastasis. Aggressive surgery for liver metastases is important to improve survival. Aggressive or cytoreductive surgery for liver metastases is indicated to reduce hormone levels and improve symptoms and prognosis. Liver transplantation was originally conceived as an ideal therapy for unresectable liver metastases. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus on the role and timing of surgery for primary tumor and liver metastases. Surgeons still face questions in deciding the best surgical scenario in patients with P-NET with unresectable liver metastases. PMID:25232452

  20. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  1. Somatostatin analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥ 5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  2. Surgical Treatment and Clinical Outcome of Nonfunctional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, An-ping; Yue, Peng-ju; Tian, Bo-le

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our primary aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (non-F-P-NETs), with an emphasis on evaluating the prognostic value of the newly updated 2010 grading classification of the World Health Organization (WHO). Data of 55 consecutive patients who were surgically treated and pathologically diagnosed as non-F-P-NETs in our single institution from January 2000 to December 2013 were retrospectively collected. This entirety comprised of 55 patients (31 males and 24 females), with a mean age of 51.24 ± 12.95 years. Manifestations of non-F-P-NETs were nonspecific. Distal pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and local resection of pancreatic tumor were the most frequent surgical procedures, while pancreatic fistula was the most common but acceptable complication (30.3%). The overall 5-year survival rate of this entire cohort was 41.0%, with a median survival time of 60.4 months. Patients who underwent R0 resections obtained a better survival than those who did not (P < 0.005). As for the prognostic analysis, tumor size and lymph invasion were only statistically significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.046 and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas the newly updated 2010 grading classification of WHO (G1 and G2 vs G3), distant metastasis, and surgical margin were all meaningful in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P = 0.045, 0.001, and 0.042, respectively). Non-F-P-NETs are a kind of rare neoplasm, with mostly indolent malignancy. Patients with non-F-P-NETs could benefit from the radical resections. The new WHO criteria, distant metastasis and surgical margin, might be independent predictors for the prognosis of non-F-P-NETs. PMID:25396335

  3. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  4. Rare neuroendocrine tumours: results of the surveillance of rare cancers in Europe project.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Trama, Annalisa; Otter, Renée; Larrañaga, Nerea; Tavilla, Andrea; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Baudin, Eric; Poston, Graeme; Links, Thera

    2013-07-01

    Because of the low incidence, and limited opportunities for large patient volume experiences, there are very few relevant studies of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). A large population-based database (including cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002 and registered in 76 population-based cancer registries [CRs]), provided by the project 'surveillance of rare cancers in Europe' (RARECARE) is used to describe the basic indicators of incidence, prevalence and survival of NETs, giving a unique overview on the burden of NETs in Europe. NETs at all cancer sites, excluding lung, were analysed in this study. In total over 20,000 incident cases of NETs were analysed and a data quality check upon specific NETs was performed. The overall incidence rate for NETs was 25/1,000,000 and was highest in patients aged 65 years and older with well differentiated endocrine carcinomas (non-functioning pancreatic and gastrointestinal) (40 per 1,000,000). We estimated that slightly more than 100,000 people were diagnosed with NETs and still alive in EU27 at the beginning of 2008. Overall, NETs had a 5 year relative survival of 50%; survival was low (12%) for poorly differentiated endocrine carcinoma, and relatively high (64%) for well differentiated carcinoma (not functioning of the pancreas and digestive organs). Within NETs, endocrine carcinoma of thyroid gland had the best 5-year relative survival (82%). Because of the complexity and number of the different disciplines involved with NETs (as they arise in many organs), a multidisciplinary approach delivered in highly qualified reference centres and an international network between those centres is recommended.

  5. Preoperative glucose abnormalities in patients with pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Durlik, Marek; Kałuża, Bernadetta; Milczarczyk, Alicja; Franek, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a neoplasm characterised by poor prognosis. The only effective, possible treatment is radical surgery, but most patients do not qualify for surgery because of delayed diagnosis. Aim To determine if assessment of endocrine pancreatic function could serve as a means of screening for pancreatic cancer. Material and methods This prospective study was conducted on a group of 50 patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumour, who were qualified for surgery. Results From 1.07.2010 to 4.07.2011 a further 50 patients were added to the study group. They had been admitted to the hospital with pancreatic tumours. During the preoperative period, nine of these people had been treated for diabetes, 14 were newly diagnosed with diabetes and 15 had been diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance, but only 12 had a normal glucose profile. Afterwards, patients underwent the surgical treatment. Histopathological examination revealed that out of the 50 operated patients, 36 suffered from malignant disease, and of these only four had no impaired glucose tolerance before treatment. Conclusions In most cases, patients with pancreatic tumours have impaired glucose tolerance. Screening patients over 50 years of age could speed up diagnosis and surgical treatment. PMID:25061491

  6. Everolimus in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Yao, James C; Phan, Alexandria T; Jehl, Valentine; Shah, Gaurav; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) has increased dramatically in the past 30 years. This information has revitalized basic and clinical research into the molecular biology of NET and has resulted in the recent approval of new therapies for pancreatic NET (pNET), including the oral inhibitor of the mTOR everolimus. Everolimus significantly improved progression-free survival among patients with pNET in the phase III RADIANT-3 study. Here, we review the clinical studies showing the efficacy of everolimus in pNET and summarize the translational science from these studies. To understand the mechanisms of resistance and cause of treatment failure, we compared the type of progression events observed in the everolimus and placebo arms of the RADIANT-3 study. Comparison of the everolimus arm to the placebo arm indicated the fractions of progression events due to new metastasis only (21% vs. 22%), growth of preexisting lesions only (54% vs. 49%), and new metastasis along with growth of preexisting lesions (24% vs. 27%) were similar. These results suggest that although everolimus delays disease progression in patients with pNET, patients who experience disease progression while on everolimus do not appear to have a more aggressive metastatic phenotype than those whose disease progresses while on placebo.

  7. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  9. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine (including carcinoid) tumours (NETs)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A; Ardill, J; Bax, N; Breen, D J; Caplin, M E; Corrie, P; Davar, J; Davies, A H; Lewington, V; Meyer, T; Newell-Price, J; Poston, G; Reed, N; Rockall, A; Steward, W; Thakker, R V; Toubanakis, C; Valle, J; Verbeke, C; Grossman, A B

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines update previous guidance published in 2005. They have been revised by a group who are members of the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society with endorsement from the clinical committees of the British Society of Gastroenterology, the Society for Endocrinology, the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (and its Surgical Specialty Associations), the British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology and others. The authorship represents leaders of the various groups in the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society, but a large amount of work has been carried out by other specialists, many of whom attended a guidelines conference in May 2009. We have attempted to represent this work in the acknowledgements section. Over the past few years, there have been advances in the management of neuroendocrine tumours, which have included clearer characterisation, more specific and therapeutically relevant diagnosis, and improved treatments. However, there remain few randomised trials in the field and the disease is uncommon, hence all evidence must be considered weak in comparison with other more common cancers. PMID:22052063

  10. MGMT expression predicts response to temozolomide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cros, J; Hentic, O; Rebours, V; Zappa, M; Gille, N; Theou-Anton, N; Vernerey, D; Maire, F; Lévy, P; Bedossa, P; Paradis, V; Hammel, P; Ruszniewski, P; Couvelard, A

    2016-08-01

    Temozolomide (TEM) showed encouraging results in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WDPNETs). Low O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression and MGMT promoter methylation within tumors correlate with a better outcome under TEM-based chemotherapy in glioblastoma. We aimed to assess whether MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation could help predict the efficacy of TEM-based chemotherapy in patients with WDPNET. Consecutive patients with progressive WDPNET and/or liver involvement over 50% who received TEM between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Tumor response was assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guidelines. Nuclear expression of MGMT was assessed by immunochemistry (H-score, 0-300) and MGMT promoter methylation by pyrosequencing. Forty-three patients (21 men, 58years (27-84)) with grade 1 WDPNET (n=6) or 2 (n=36) were analyzed. Objective response, stable disease, and progression rates were seen in 17 patients (39.5%), 18 patients (41.9%), and 8 patients (18.6%), respectively. Low MGMT expression (≤50) was associated with radiological objective response (P=0.04) and better progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=0.35 (0.15-0.81), P=0.01). Disease control rate at 18months of treatment remained satisfying with an MGMT score up to 100 (74%) but dropped with a higher expression. High MGMT promoter methylation was associated with a low MGMT expression and longer PFS (HR=0.37 (0.29-1.08), P=0.05). Low MGMT score (≤50) appears to predict an objective tumor response, whereas an intermediate MGMT score (50-100) seems to be associated with prolonged stable disease. PMID:27353036

  11. MGMT expression predicts response to temozolomide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cros, J; Hentic, O; Rebours, V; Zappa, M; Gille, N; Theou-Anton, N; Vernerey, D; Maire, F; Lévy, P; Bedossa, P; Paradis, V; Hammel, P; Ruszniewski, P; Couvelard, A

    2016-08-01

    Temozolomide (TEM) showed encouraging results in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WDPNETs). Low O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression and MGMT promoter methylation within tumors correlate with a better outcome under TEM-based chemotherapy in glioblastoma. We aimed to assess whether MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation could help predict the efficacy of TEM-based chemotherapy in patients with WDPNET. Consecutive patients with progressive WDPNET and/or liver involvement over 50% who received TEM between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Tumor response was assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guidelines. Nuclear expression of MGMT was assessed by immunochemistry (H-score, 0-300) and MGMT promoter methylation by pyrosequencing. Forty-three patients (21 men, 58years (27-84)) with grade 1 WDPNET (n=6) or 2 (n=36) were analyzed. Objective response, stable disease, and progression rates were seen in 17 patients (39.5%), 18 patients (41.9%), and 8 patients (18.6%), respectively. Low MGMT expression (≤50) was associated with radiological objective response (P=0.04) and better progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=0.35 (0.15-0.81), P=0.01). Disease control rate at 18months of treatment remained satisfying with an MGMT score up to 100 (74%) but dropped with a higher expression. High MGMT promoter methylation was associated with a low MGMT expression and longer PFS (HR=0.37 (0.29-1.08), P=0.05). Low MGMT score (≤50) appears to predict an objective tumor response, whereas an intermediate MGMT score (50-100) seems to be associated with prolonged stable disease.

  12. Elevated CA 19-9 levels observed in association with a pulmonary neuroendocrine tumour and amyloid.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Gumparthy, Krishna; Wahbi, Zaroug

    2013-01-01

    Investigations completed in a 77-year-old ex-smoker presenting with weight loss showed raised CA 19-9 levels. The findings of chest radiograph, abdominal computed tomography (CT) and gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations were all normal. On follow-up, the patient developed left upper lobe collapse on chest radiograph with increasing CA 19-9 levels. Chest CT findings suggested the presence of a left upper lobe tumour. The results of a biopsy of the left upper lobe nodule seen on bronchoscopy suggested a diagnosis of amyloidosis; however, this was not the only diagnosis. The left upper lobe mass comprised a neuroendocrine tumour with amyloid deposition just beneath the bronchial epithelium and focally between the nests of the tumour cells. We report and discuss this uncommon association and presentation.

  13. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  14. Bowel parasitosis and neuroendocrine tumours of the appendix. A report from the Italian TREP project.

    PubMed

    Virgone, C; Cecchetto, G; Besutti, V; Ferrari, A; Buffa, P; Alaggio, R; Alessandrini, L; Dall'Igna, P

    2015-05-01

    Five children with a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the appendix associated with a parasitic bowel infection are described, and the possibility of inflammation-triggered carcinogenesis is discussed. Schistosoma haematobium is linked primarily to bladder cancer but it has been reported in association with several other histotypes, including NETs of the gastrointestinal tract. Conversely, Enterobius vermicularis has not yet been claimed to participate in the onset of pre-cancerous conditions or tumours. The rare occurrence of contemporary appendiceal NETs and parasitic infection, raises the intriguing hypothesis of an inflammation-related carcinogenesis, although a cause-effect relationship cannot be established. Larger international series of childhood appendiceal NETs, which also include countries with higher prevalence of parasitic bowel infections, are needed to further clarify this possible cause-effect relationship.

  15. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. Methods This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Results Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Conclusion Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18. PMID:24053191

  16. [Von Hippel-Lindau disease type 2-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    Dolzhansky, O V; Morozova, M M; Korostelev, S A; Kanivets, I V; Chardarov, N K; Shatveryan, G A; Pal'tseva, E M; Fedorov, D N

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a case of von Hippel--Lindau-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma in a 44-year-old woman. The pancreatic tumor and a left retroperitoneal mass were removed in the women in July 2014 and May 2015. Histological examination of the pancreatic tumor revealed that the latter consisted of clear cells forming tubular and tubercular structures showing the expression of chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and cytokeratins 18 and 19 and a negative response to CD10 and RCC. The adrenal medullary mass presented as clear-cell alveolar structures with inclusions of adipose tissue mixed with erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cells. The clear-cell component of the adrenal gland expressed neuroendocrine markers with a negative response to cytokeratins, CD10, and RCC. Molecular genetic examination yielded a signal corresponding to two copies of the VHL gene. No deletions or amplifications of the gene were detected. Cases of von Hippel--Lindau disease concurrent with adrenal pheochromocytoma and myelolipoma and simultaneous pancreatic involvement were not found in the literature. PMID:26978235

  17. Metronomic temozolomide as second line treatment for metastatic poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Divitiis, C; von Arx, C; Grimaldi, A M; Cicala, D; Tatangelo, F; Arcella, A; Romano, G M; Simeone, E; Iaffaioli, R V; Ascierto, P A; Tafuto, S

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) are a group of heterogeneous malignancies derived from neuroendocrine cell compartment, with different roles in both endocrine and nervous system. Most NETs have gastroentero-pancreatic (GEP) origin, arising in the foregut, midgut, or hindgut. The 2010 WHO classification divides GEP-NETs into two main subgroups, neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC), according with Ki-67 levels. NET are tumors with low (<20 %) Ki-67 value, and NECs, including small cell lung carcinomas and Merkel Cell carcinomas, are all NETs with high Ki-67 levels (>20 %-G3). Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) are usually treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here we present a case of a patient with pancreatic NEC progressing after cisplatin and etoposide, treated with temozolomide as palliative, second line treatment. According with the poor Performance Status (PS = 2) and to reduce the toxicity of the treatment was chosen an intermittent dosing regimen of metronomic temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day-one-week-on/on-week-off). MGMT resulted methylated. On July 2014 the patient started the treatment. On August 2014 the patient obtained a significant clinical benefit (PS = 0) and the total body CT scan performed on October 2014 showed a RECIST partial response on all the sites of disease. No drug-related side effects were reported by the patient. After 18 months of therapy the treatment continues without significant toxicity, and with further remission of the metastases. Treatment with metronomic "one-week-on/on-week-off" Temozolomide can be considered a good treatment option in patients with poor performance status, affected by pNEC with MGMT methylation. PMID:27142424

  18. MicroRNAs associated with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen C; Frampton, Adam E; Malczewska, Anna; Ottaviani, Silvia; Stronach, Euan A; Flora, Rashpal; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Schwach, Gert; Pfragner, Roswitha; Faiz, Omar; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Hanna, George B; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro; Frilling, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Novel molecular analytes are needed in small bowel neuroendocrine tumours (SBNETs) to better determine disease aggressiveness and predict treatment response. In this study, we aimed to profile the global miRNome of SBNETs, and identify microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in tumour progression for use as potential biomarkers. Two independent miRNA profiling experiments were performed (n=90), including primary SBNETs (n=28), adjacent normal small bowel (NSB; n=14), matched lymph node (LN) metastases (n=24), normal LNs (n=7), normal liver (n=2) and liver metastases (n=15). We then evaluated potentially targeted genes by performing integrated computational analyses. We discovered 39 miRNAs significantly deregulated in SBNETs compared with adjacent NSB. The most upregulated (miR-204-5p, miR-7-5p and miR-375) were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Two miRNAs (miR-1 and miR-143-3p) were significantly downregulated in LN and liver metastases compared with primary tumours. Furthermore, we identified upregulated gene targets for miR-1 and miR-143-3p in an existing SBNET dataset, which could contribute to disease progression, and show that these miRNAs directly regulate FOSB and NUAK2 oncogenes. Our study represents the largest global miRNA profiling of SBNETs using matched primary tumour and metastatic samples. We revealed novel miRNAs deregulated during SBNET disease progression, and important miRNA-mRNA interactions. These miRNAs have the potential to act as biomarkers for patient stratification and may also be able to guide treatment decisions. Further experiments to define molecular mechanisms and validate these miRNAs in larger tissue cohorts and in biofluids are now warranted. PMID:27353039

  19. Hypercalcemia from metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor secreting 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Viola; de las Morenas, Antonio; Janicek, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hypercalcemia occurs in about 20-30% of patients with cancer, both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. The secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-rP) is the most common cause and has been shown to be the etiology of hypercalcemia associated with neuroendocrine tumors. Here we report the case of a patient with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor who developed hypercalcemia more than 4 years after the initial diagnosis as a result of secretion of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, a mechanism only commonly seen in lymphomas. The successful control of the patient’s disease with capecitabine and temozolomide led to the alleviation of this paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:25083313

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Small Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation is gaining popularity for the treatment of focal pancreatic lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and treatment response after EUS-guided ethanol injection for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database including 11 consecutive patients with p-NETs who underwent EUS-guided ethanol injection. Results EUS-guided ethanol injection was successfully performed in 11 patients with 14 tumors. The final diagnosis was based on histology and clinical signs as follows: 10 non-functioning neuroendocrine tumors and four insulinomas. During follow-up (median, 370 days; range, 152 to 730 days), 10 patients underwent clinical follow-up after treatment, and one patient was excluded because of loss to follow-up. A single treatment session with an injection of 0.5 to 3.8 mL of ethanol resulted in complete responses (CRs) at the 3-month radiologic imaging for seven of 13 tumors (response rate, 53.8%). Multiple treatment sessions performed in three tumors with residual viable enhancing tissue increased the number of tumors with CRs to eight of 13 (response rate, 61.5%). Mild pancreatitis occurred in three of 11 patients. Conclusions EUS-guided ethanol injection appears to be a safe, feasible, and potentially effective method for treating small p-NETs in patients who are poor surgical candidates. PMID:25844345

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Ethanol Ablation Therapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Mizukawa, Sho; Yabe, Syuntaro; Seki, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) has been reported. However, the efficacy and safety of the technique remain unclear. We have launched a prospective pilot study of EUS-guided ethanol ablation for p-NETs. The major eligibility criteria are the presence of a pathologically diagnosed grade (G) 1 or G2 p-NET, a tumor size of 2cm, and being a poor candidate for surgery. A total of 5 patients will be treated. The primary endpoint will be the complete ablation rate at 1 month after treatment. PMID:27549680

  2. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropin production: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Forum B; Khagi, Simon; Daly, Kevin P; Lechan, Ronald M; Ummaritchot, Vorawan; Saif, Muhammad W

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) entail a vast array of tumors, which can vary from benign neoplastic growths to rapidly aggressive malignancies. Such is the case with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing p-NETs. These tumors have been found to be quite aggressive and a challenge to treat, especially due to the occurrence of metastatic disease even after resection of the primary tumor. We discuss the case of a 44-year-old female who initially presented with vague, non-specific symptoms, in which a malignant p-NET was found to be the cause of her clinical presentation. Although resection of the pancreatic mass was performed, the patient presented again with metastatic disease to the liver. PMID:24023341

  3. Primary neuroendocrine tumour of the right ventricle presenting with heart failure and cyanosis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Henry, David; Furukawa, Satoshi; Haber, Howard

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented to the emergency department owing to exertional dyspnoea and bilateral leg oedema for 3 weeks. Her vital signs included the following: heart rate of 95 bpm, respiratory rate of 24 breaths/min, oxygen saturation of 73% on room air and a blood pressure of 184/108 mm Hg. Physical examination revealed tachypnoea with clear lungs to auscultation, elevated jugular veins, cyanosis and bilateral pitting oedema. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly without obvious pulmonary oedema. A CT of the chest was negative for pulmonary embolus; however, the scan did reveal a large right ventricular (RV) mass. An echocardiogram with bubble study confirmed a patent foramen ovale with significant right-to-left shunting and a large RV mass that significantly obstructed the pulmonary outflow tract. A cardiac biopsy revealed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumour. The patient underwent successful debridement and adjuvant chemotherapy. She improved greatly and was asymptomatic at a 9-month follow-up visit. PMID:26969366

  4. Malignant neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Qureshi, Asim; Saparamadu, Anna; Kumar, Shiyam

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented to a tertiary care centre with signs and symptoms of acute cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and diagnoses of a high-grade neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder primarily with peritoneal and liver metastases. She had a liver abscess secondary to Salmonella and Enterococcus fecalis that was drained and treated with appropriate antibiotics. Interestingly, the serum chromogranin A levels were within normal limits, but carcinoembryonic antigen was elevated, which helped evaluate responses and pick progression. She was treated with 10 cycles of palliative chemotherapy when malignancy associated complications started to recur, that is, cholangitis, worsening pain, cachexia, intestinal obstruction, etc leading to chemotherapy delays. Her disease progressed during these times with rapid deterioration of performance status. She died of septic complications postlaparotomy for intestinal obstruction. Her progression-free survival remained for 8 months with subjective and objective improvements, and her overall survival remained at 13 months. We describe the course of her illness and give a brief review of the literature. PMID:23661652

  5. The matricellular protein CYR61 interferes with normal pancreatic islets architecture and promotes pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Lan, Qiang; Ponsonnet, Lionel; Blanquet, Marisa; Christofori, Gerhard; Zaric, Jelena; Rüegg, Curzio

    2016-01-12

    The significance of matricellular proteins during development and cancer progression is widely recognized. However, how these proteins actively contribute to physiological development and pathological cancer progression is only partially elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of the matricellular protein Cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61) in pancreatic islet development and carcinogenesis. Transgenic expression of CYR61 in β cells (Rip1CYR mice) caused irregular islets morphology and distorted sorting of α cells, but did not alter islets size, number or vascularization. To investigate the function of CYR61 during carcinogenesis, we crossed Rip1CYR mice with Rip1Tag2 mice, a well-established model of β cell carcinogenesis. Beta tumors in Rip1Tag2CYR mice were larger, more invasive and more vascularized compared to tumors in Rip1Tag2 mice. The effect of CYR61 on angiogenesis was fully abrogated by treating mice with the anti-VEGFR2 mAb DC101. Results from in vitro assays demonstrated that CYR61 modulated integrin α6β1-dependent invasion and adhesion without altering its expression. Taken together, these results show that CYR61 expression in pancreatic β cells interferes with normal islet architecture, promotes islet tumor growth, invasion and VEGF/VERGFR-2-dependent tumor angiogenesis. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that CYR61 acts as a tumor-promoting gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  6. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor

  7. Capsaicin induces cytotoxicity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells via mitochondrial action.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, M; Sassek, M; Abdelmessih, S; Mergler, S; Grötzinger, C; Metzke, D; Wojciechowicz, T; Nowak, K W; Strowski, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, inhibits growth of various solid cancers via TRPV1 as well as TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Recently, we showed that TRPV1 regulates intracellular calcium level and chromogranin A secretion in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cells. In the present study, we characterize the role of the TRPV1 agonist - CAP - in controlling proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic BON and QGP-1 NET cells. We demonstrate that CAP reduces viability and proliferation, and stimulates apoptotic death of NET cells. CAP causes mitochondrial membrane potential loss, inhibits ATP synthesis and reduces mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein production. In addition, CAP increases cytochrome c and cleaved caspase 3 levels in cytoplasm. CAP reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) acts synergistically with CAP to reduce ROS generation, without affecting CAP-induced toxicity. TRPV1 protein reduction by 75% reduction fails to attenuate CAP-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, these results suggest that CAP induces cytotoxicity by disturbing mitochondrial potential, and inhibits ATP synthesis in NET cells. Stimulation of ROS generation by CAP appears to be a secondary effect, not related to CAP-induced cytotoxicity. These results justify further evaluation of CAP in modulating pancreatic NETs in vivo. PMID:24075930

  8. Incidence of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, M; Kim, M; Faggiano, A; de Herder, W W; Valk, G D

    2014-06-01

    Based on the current medical literature, the worldwide incidence of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) seems to have increased; however, a systematic literature overview is lacking. This study aimed to collect all available data on the incidence of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP)-NETs and characteristics of population to establish their epidemiology. A sensitive MEDLINE search was carried out. The papers were selected via a cascade process that restricted the initial pool of 7991 articles to 33, using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Original articles evaluating the incidence of sporadic GEP-NETs in regional, institutional and national registries were considered. The majority of data originated from the US National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database and from national cancer registries in Western Europe. Generally, because of the retrospective nature of existing databases the outcomes of studies might be biased, which hinders the drawing of firm conclusions. The age-adjusted incidence of GEP-NETs has increased steadily over the past four decades (1973-2007), increasing 3.65-fold in the USA and 3.8- to 4.8-fold in the UK. Incidence has changed variably from one anatomical site to another. The greatest increase in incidence occurred for gastric and rectal NETs, while the smallest increase occurred for small intestine NETs. There were gender and racial differences, which differed site by site and, in some cases, changed over time. The incidence rates (IRs) of GEP-NETs have increased significantly in the last 40 years. Data are only available from North America, Western Europe and Japan. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the IRs of some NETs increased more than those of others.

  9. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  10. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farah, G; Stokes, V J; Wang, L M; Grossman, A B

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking. Learning points Ectopic corticotrophin (ACTH) secretion should always be considered in the diagnostic workup of young patients with Cushing’s syndrome There is a small but growing body of literature describing the correlation between ectopic ACTH secretion and thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) The possibility of a MEN-1 syndrome should be considered in all patients with thymic NETs, and we note the observational association with male gender and cigarette smoking in this cohort An exception to these associations is the finding of relatively high incidence of thymic NETs among female non-smoking MEN-1 patients in the Japanese compared with Western populations The relapsing and remitting course of our patient’s symptoms is noteworthy, given the paucity of this finding among other published cases PMID:27252866

  11. Risk Factors for Sporadic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben, Qiwen; Zhong, Jie; Fei, Jian; Chen, Haitao; Yv, Lifen; Tan, Jihong; Yuan, Yaozong

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined risk factors for sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), including smoking, alcohol use, first-degree family history of any cancer (FHC), and diabetes in the Han Chinese ethnic group. In this clinic-based case-control analysis on 385 patients with sporadic PNETs and 614 age- and sex-matched controls, we interviewed subjects using a specific questionnaire on demographics and potential risk factors. An unconditional multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs). No significant differences were found between patients and controls in terms of demographic variables. Most of the patients with PNETs had well-differentiated PNETs (G1, 62.9%) and non-advanced European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) stage (stage I or II, 83.9%). Ever/heavy smoking, a history of diabetes and a first-degree FHC were independent risk factors for non-functional PNETs. Only heavy drinking was found to be an independent risk factor for functional PNETs (AOR = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–3.51). Ever/heavy smoking was also associated with advanced ENETS staging (stage III or IV) at the time of diagnosis. This study identified first-degree FHC, ever/heavy smoking, and diabetes as risk factors for non-functional PNETs, while heavy drinking as a risk factor for functional PNETs. PMID:27782199

  12. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  13. GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Marta; Rodrigues, Pedro; Pereira, Sofia S; Nora, Mário; Gonçalves, Gil; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Wewer; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-prandial hypoglycemia is frequently found after bariatric surgery. Although rare, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), which occasionally are mixed hormone secreting, can lead to atypical clinical manifestations, including reactive hypoglycemia. Two years after gastric bypass surgery for the treatment of severe obesity, a 54-year-old female with previous type 2 diabetes, developed post-prandial sweating, fainting and hypoglycemic episodes, which eventually led to the finding by ultrasound of a 1.8-cm solid mass in the pancreatic head. The 72-h fast test and the plasma chromogranin A levels were normal but octreotide scintigraphy showed a single focus of abnormal radiotracer uptake at the site of the nodule. There were no other clinical signs of hormone secreting pNET and gastrointestinal hormone measurements were not performed. The patient underwent surgical enucleation with complete remission of the hypoglycemic episodes. Histopathology revealed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with low-grade malignancy with positive chromogranin A and glucagon immunostaining. An extract of the resected tumor contained a high concentration of glucagon (26.707 pmol/g tissue), in addition to traces of GLP1 (471 pmol/g), insulin (139 pmol/g) and somatostatin (23 pmol/g). This is the first report of a GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pNET presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass surgery. Although pNET are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the clinical approach to the post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia patient. Learning points pNETs can be multihormonal-secreting, leading to atypical clinical manifestations.Reactive hypoglycemic episodes are frequent after gastric bypass.pNETs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery. PMID:26266036

  14. Well-Differentiated Grade 2, Type 3 Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour with Bilateral Metastatic Ovarian Involvement: Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Manneh, Ray; Castellano, Daniel; Caso, Oscar; Loinaz, Carmelo; Jiménez, Jesús; Estenoz, Juana; Calatayud, Maria; Sepúlveda, Juan M.; García-Carbonero, Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is challenging. In oligometastatic cases, surgical resection is recommended whenever possible. Somatostatin analogues have been used to decrease gastrin levels, and available evidence suggests that these drugs can also reduce recurrences. Here we present a highly unusual case involving a patient with a well-differentiated grade 2, type 3 gastric NET with exclusive metastatic bilateral ovarian involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature, as the cause of ovarian involvement is usually due to local invasion rather than metastasis. We believe this case is of interest not only due to the unusual presentation, but also because it makes us consider adjuvant treatment with somatostatin analogues in patients with low-grade tumours and a positive postoperative octreoscan. PMID:27239181

  15. INSL5 is a novel marker for human enteroendocrine cells of the large intestine and neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Hammje, Katrin; Adham, Ibrahim; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Del Bigio, Marc R; Krcek, Jerry; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time the distribution of human INSL5 and its cognate leucine rich G-protein coupled receptor RXFP4 in the large intestine and in neuroendocrine/carcinoid tissues. Immunoreactive INSL5 was uniquely expressed by enteroendocrine cells (EECs) located within the colonic mucosa, whereas colonocytes were immunopositive for RXFP4. INSL5+ and RXFP4+ cells were also detected in human neuroendocrine/carcinoid tissues. We employed a recently described Insl5 knockout mouse model and 2 mouse models of induced colitis to address the relevance of Insl5 in EEC development and in acute inflammation of the colon. We identified INSL5 as a specific marker for synaptophysin+ EECs in the mucosa of the normal human and mouse colon. Insl5 was not essential for the development of mouse synaptophysin+ EECs. The mouse models of chemically induced colitis (dextran sulfate sodium and dinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid) failed to show changes in the numbers of Insl5+ EECs at inflammatory sites during the acute phase of colitis. In conclusion, we showed that INSL5 is a novel marker of colorectal EECs and provide first evidence for the presence of a potentially autocrine/paracrine INSL5-RXFP4 signaling system in the normal human and mouse colon and in rare human neuroendocrine tumours.

  16. Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the small intestine and the appendix - management guidelines (recommended by the Polish Network of Neuroendocrine Tumours).

    PubMed

    Bolanowski, Marek; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara; Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Steinhof-Radwańska, Katarzyna; Zajęcki, Wojciech; Zemczak, Anna; Kos-Kudła, Beata

    2013-01-01

    We present revised Polish guidelines regarding the management of patients harbouring neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the small intestine and appendix. The small intestine, especially the ileum, is the most common origin of these neoplasms. Most of them are well differentiated with slow growth. Rarely, they are less differentiated, growing fast with a poor prognosis. Since symptoms can be atypical, the diagnosis is often accidental. Typical symptoms of carcinoid syndrome occur in less than 10% of patients. The most useful laboratory marker is chromogranin A; 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is helpful in the monitoring of carcinoid syndrome. Ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, colonoscopy, video capsule endoscopy, balloon enteroscopy and somatostatin receptors scintigraphy are used in the visualisation. A histological report is crucial for the proper diagnostics and therapy of NENs, and it has been extensively described. The treatment of choice is surgery, either radical or palliative. Somatostatin analogues are crucial in the pharmacological treatment of the hormonally active and non-active small intestine NENs and NENs of the appendix. Radioisotope therapy is possible in patients with a good expression of somatostatin receptors. Chemotherapy is not effective in general. Everolimus therapy can be applied in patients with generalised NENs of the small intestine in progression and where there has been a failure or an inability to use other treatment options. Finally, we make recommendations regarding the monitoring of patients with NENs of the small intestine and appendix.

  17. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  18. [Treatment Strategy for Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (P-NETs) at Kurume University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Hisaka, Toru; Okuda, Kouji; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs) are relatively rare. Approximately 50-90% of non-functioning P-NETs are malignant, and the only curative treatment is surgical resection. Liver and lymph node metastases often occur. In Japan, the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is now covered by the national health insurance for treatment of P-NETs, including advanced and unresectable tumors. We present a case of P-NETs with liver metastases seen at our hospital and discuss our treatment strategy for this disease. Patients with tumors≤1 cm receive follow-up observation. For G1 and G2 (other than G3) tumors, if their size is >1 cm when first discovered, resection of the primary lesion along with lymph node dissection (as for pancreatic cancer) is performed. In G1 and G2 tumors with synchronous distant metastases, the primary lesion is first resected, and depending on the pathological findings, chemotherapy (LAR plus everolimus) may be administered. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the response is assessed, and if further resection is possible, resection is performed. When there are synchronous liver metastases, if partial resection and local treatment (such as RFA) are possible, the primary lesion and synchronous lesions are resected. If a major hepatic resection procedure such as a segmentectomy or lobectomy is possible, the primary lesion is resected, followed by chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the response is assessed, and if further resection is possible, hepatic resection is performed. G3 tumors are usually highly malignant, advanced, and often associated with metastases at the time of diagnosis. Chemotherapy may be an option for treating patients with G3 tumors. PMID:26809536

  19. Pasireotide and octreotide antiproliferative effects and sst2 trafficking in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cultures.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amira; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Albertelli, Manuela; Barbieri, Federica; Brue, Thierry; Niccoli, Patricia; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Garcia, Stephane; Ferone, Diego; Florio, Tullio; Enjalbert, Alain; Moutardier, Vincent; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Gerard, Corinne; Barlier, Anne; Saveanu, Alexandru

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) raise difficult therapeutic problems despite the emergence of targeted therapies. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) remain pivotal therapeutic drugs. However, the tachyphylaxis and the limited antitumoral effects observed with the classical somatostatin 2 (sst2) agonists (octreotide and lanreotide) led to the development of new SSA, such as the pan sst receptor agonist pasireotide. Our aim was to compare the effects of pasireotide and octreotide on cell survival, chromogranin A (CgA) secretion, and sst2 phosphorylation/trafficking in pancreatic NET (pNET) primary cells from 15 tumors. We established and characterized the primary cultures of human pancreatic tumors (pNETs) as powerful preclinical models for understanding the biological effects of SSA. At clinically relevant concentrations (1-10 nM), pasireotide was at least as efficient as octreotide in inhibiting CgA secretion and cell viability through caspase-dependent apoptosis during short treatments, irrespective of the expression levels of the different sst receptors or the WHO grade of the parental tumor. Interestingly, unlike octreotide, which induces a rapid and persistent partial internalization of sst2 associated with its phosphorylation on Ser341/343, pasireotide did not phosphorylate sst2 and induced a rapid and transient internalization of the receptor followed by a persistent recycling at the cell surface. These results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of striking differences in the dynamics of sst2 trafficking in pNET cells treated with the two SSAs, but with similar efficiency in the control of CgA secretion and cell viability.

  20. Primary pancreatic lymphoma – pancreatic tumours that are potentially curable without resection, a retrospective review of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Grimison, Peter S; Chin, Melvin T; Harrison, Michelle L; Goldstein, David

    2006-01-01

    Background Primary pancreatic lymphomas (PPL) are rare tumours of the pancreas. Symptoms, imaging and tumour markers can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but they are much more amenable to treatment. Treatment for PPL remains controversial, particularly the role of surgical resection. Methods Four cases of primary pancreatic lymphoma were identified at Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. A literature review of cases of PPL reported between 1985 and 2005 was conducted, and outcomes were contrasted. Results All four patients presented with upper abdominal symptoms associated with weight loss. One case was diagnosed without surgery. No patients underwent pancreatectomy. All patients were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and two of four patients received rituximab. One patient died at 32 months. Three patients are disease free at 15, 25 and 64 months, one after successful retreatment. Literature review identified a further 103 patients in 11 case series. Outcomes in our series and other series of chemotherapy and radiotherapy compared favourably to surgical series. Conclusion Biopsy of all pancreatic masses is essential, to exclude potentially curable conditions such as PPL, and can be performed without laparotomy. Combined multimodality treatment, utilising chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without surgical resection is advocated but a cooperative prospective study would lead to further improvement in treatment outcomes. PMID:16674812

  1. Transformation of the tumour microenvironment by a CD40 agonist antibody correlates with improved responses to PD-L1 blockade in a mouse orthotopic pancreatic tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Stefanie; Sulikowski, Michal G.; Martin, Philip; Brown, Lee; Lewis, Arthur; Davies, Gareth; Morrow, Michelle; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of recently developed chemotherapy regimens, survival times for pancreatic cancer patients remain poor. These patients also respond poorly to immune checkpoint blockade therapies (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-L1, anti-PD-1), which suggests the presence of additional immunosuppressive mechanisms in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment (TME). CD40 agonist antibodies (αCD40) promote antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation and enhance macrophage tumouricidal activity, and may therefore alter the pancreatic TME to increase sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we test whether αCD40 transforms the TME in a mouse syngeneic orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer, to increase sensitivity to PD-L1 blockade. We found that whilst mice bearing orthotopic Pan02 tumours responded poorly to PD-L1 blockade, αCD40 improved overall survival. αCD40 transformed the TME, upregulating Th1 chemokines, increasing cytotoxic T cell infiltration and promoting formation of an immune cell-rich capsule separating the tumour from the normal pancreas. Furthermore, αCD40 drove systemic APC maturation, memory T cell expansion, and upregulated tumour and systemic PD-L1 expression. Combining αCD40 with PD-L1 blockade enhanced anti-tumour immunity and improved overall survival versus either monotherapy. These data provide further support for the potential of combining αCD40 with immune checkpoint blockade to promote anti-tumour immunity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26918344

  2. p53 status determines the role of autophagy in pancreatic tumour development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeldt, Mathias T.; O'Prey, Jim; Morton, Jennifer P.; Nixon, Colin; Mackay, Gillian; Mrowinska, Agata; Au, Amy; Rai, Taranjit Singh; Zheng, Liang; Ridgway, Rachel; Adams, Peter D.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Sansom, Owen J.; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a process in which organelles termed autophagosomes deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy has a major role in cellular homeostasis and has been implicated in various forms of human disease. The role of autophagy in cancer seems to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumour-suppressive roles. Here we show, in a humanized genetically-modified mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), that autophagy's role in tumour development is intrinsically connected to the status of the tumour suppressor p53. Mice with pancreases containing an activated oncogenic allele of Kras (also called Ki-Ras)--the most common mutational event in PDAC--develop a small number of pre-cancerous lesions that stochastically develop into PDAC over time. However, mice also lacking the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7 accumulate low-grade, pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, but progression to high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias and PDAC is blocked. In marked contrast, in mice containing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53, loss of autophagy no longer blocks tumour progression, but actually accelerates tumour onset, with metabolic analysis revealing enhanced glucose uptake and enrichment of anabolic pathways, which can fuel tumour growth. These findings provide considerable insight into the role of autophagy in cancer and have important implications for autophagy inhibition in cancer therapy. In this regard, we also show that treatment of mice with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine, which is currently being used in several clinical trials, significantly accelerates tumour formation in mice containing oncogenic Kras but lacking p53.

  3. Heterogeneity for IGF-II production maintained by public goods dynamics in neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Archetti, Marco; Ferraro, Daniela A; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-02-10

    The extensive intratumor heterogeneity revealed by sequencing cancer genomes is an essential determinant of tumor progression, diagnosis, and treatment. What maintains heterogeneity remains an open question because competition within a tumor leads to a strong selection for the fittest subclone. Cancer cells also cooperate by sharing molecules with paracrine effects, such as growth factors, and heterogeneity can be maintained if subclones depend on each other for survival. Without strict interdependence between subclones, however, nonproducer cells can free-ride on the growth factors produced by neighboring producer cells, a collective action problem known in game theory as the "tragedy of the commons," which has been observed in microbial cell populations. Here, we report that similar dynamics occur in cancer cell populations. Neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer (insulinoma) cells that do not produce insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) grow slowly in pure cultures but have a proliferation advantage in mixed cultures, where they can use the IGF-II provided by producer cells. We show that, as predicted by evolutionary game theory, producer cells do not go extinct because IGF-II acts as a nonlinear public good, creating negative frequency-dependent selection that leads to a stable coexistence of the two cell types. Intratumor cell heterogeneity can therefore be maintained even without strict interdependence between cell subclones. Reducing the amount of growth factors available within a tumor may lead to a reduction in growth followed by a new equilibrium, which may explain relapse in therapies that target growth factors.

  4. Prolonged clinical benefit of everolimus therapy in the management of high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paula J; Uriol, Esther; Galván, José A; Alvarez, Carlos; Pérez, Quionia; Villanueva, Noemi; Berros, José P; Izquierdo, Marta; Viéitez, José M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are limited, especially for those with progressive disease and for those who experience treatment failure. Everolimus, an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has been approved for the treatment of patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET. In the randomized phase III RADIANT-3 study in patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET, everolimus significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) and decreased the relative risk for disease progression by 65% over placebo. This case report describes a heavily pretreated patient with high-grade pNET and liver and peritoneal metastases who achieved prolonged PFS, clinically relevant partial radiologic tumor response, and resolution of constitutional symptoms with improvement in Karnofsky performance status while receiving a combination of everolimus and octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR). Radiologic and clinical responses were maintained for 19 months, with minimal toxicity over the course of treatment. This case supports the findings that the combination of everolimus plus octreotide LAR may be considered for use in patients with high-grade pNET and progressive disease. Although behavior and aggressiveness are different between low- or intermediate-grade and high-grade pNET, some high-grade pNET may express mTOR; hence, everolimus should be considered in a clinical trial.

  5. Prolonged Clinical Benefit of Everolimus Therapy in the Management of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paula J.; Uriol, Esther; Galván, José A.; Álvarez, Carlos; Pérez, Quionia; Villanueva, Noemi; Berros, José P.; Izquierdo, Marta; Viéitez, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are limited, especially for those with progressive disease and for those who experience treatment failure. Everolimus, an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has been approved for the treatment of patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET. In the randomized phase III RADIANT-3 study in patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pNET, everolimus significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) and decreased the relative risk for disease progression by 65% over placebo. This case report describes a heavily pretreated patient with high-grade pNET and liver and peritoneal metastases who achieved prolonged PFS, clinically relevant partial radiologic tumor response, and resolution of constitutional symptoms with improvement in Karnofsky performance status while receiving a combination of everolimus and octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR). Radiologic and clinical responses were maintained for 19 months, with minimal toxicity over the course of treatment. This case supports the findings that the combination of everolimus plus octreotide LAR may be considered for use in patients with high-grade pNET and progressive disease. Although behavior and aggressiveness are different between low- or intermediate-grade and high-grade pNET, some high-grade pNET may express mTOR; hence, everolimus should be considered in a clinical trial. PMID:24019785

  6. Heterogeneity for IGF-II production maintained by public goods dynamics in neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Archetti, Marco; Ferraro, Daniela A; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-02-10

    The extensive intratumor heterogeneity revealed by sequencing cancer genomes is an essential determinant of tumor progression, diagnosis, and treatment. What maintains heterogeneity remains an open question because competition within a tumor leads to a strong selection for the fittest subclone. Cancer cells also cooperate by sharing molecules with paracrine effects, such as growth factors, and heterogeneity can be maintained if subclones depend on each other for survival. Without strict interdependence between subclones, however, nonproducer cells can free-ride on the growth factors produced by neighboring producer cells, a collective action problem known in game theory as the "tragedy of the commons," which has been observed in microbial cell populations. Here, we report that similar dynamics occur in cancer cell populations. Neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer (insulinoma) cells that do not produce insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) grow slowly in pure cultures but have a proliferation advantage in mixed cultures, where they can use the IGF-II provided by producer cells. We show that, as predicted by evolutionary game theory, producer cells do not go extinct because IGF-II acts as a nonlinear public good, creating negative frequency-dependent selection that leads to a stable coexistence of the two cell types. Intratumor cell heterogeneity can therefore be maintained even without strict interdependence between cell subclones. Reducing the amount of growth factors available within a tumor may lead to a reduction in growth followed by a new equilibrium, which may explain relapse in therapies that target growth factors. PMID:25624490

  7. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm: Key immunohistochemical profiles for differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Satomi, Kaishi; Morishita, Yukio; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To reveal better diagnostic markers for differentiating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) from solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN), focusing primarily on immunohistochemical analysis. METHODS We reviewed 30 pancreatic surgical specimens of NET (24 cases) and SPN (6 cases). We carried out comprehensive immunohistochemical profiling using 9 markers: Synaptophysin, chromogranin A, pan-cytokeratin, E-cadherin, progesterone receptor, vimentin, α-1-antitrypsin, CD10, and β-catenin. RESULTS E-cadherin staining in NETs, and nuclear labeling of β-catenin in SPNs were the most sensitive and specific markers. Dot-like staining of chromogranin A might indicate the possibility of SPNs rather than NETs. The other six markers were not useful because their expression overlapped widely between NETs and SPNs. Moreover, two cases that had been initially diagnosed as NETs on the basis of their morphological features, demonstrated SPN-like immunohistochemical profiles. Careful diagnosis is crucial as we actually found two confusing cases showing disagreement between the tumor morphology and immunohistochemical profiles. CONCLUSION E-cadherin, chromogranin A, and β-catenin were the most useful markers which should be employed for differentiating between NET and SPN.

  8. Comparison of methods for proliferative index analysis for grading pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Pamela P; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Davison, Jon M; Hartman, Douglas J

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of proliferative activity is required for grading well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, a standardized method for obtaining the Ki-67 proliferative index is lacking. This study compared proliferative activity obtained by 3 methods: single-field hot spot (Ki-67 HS) and 10 consecutive field average (Ki-67 CFA) using the Ventana image analysis system (Ventana Medical Systems, Tucson, AZ) and mitotic index (MI). These methods resulted in discrepant grades in 30 (67%) of our 45 cases. With the current Ki-67 cutoff of more than 2% for intermediate-grade tumors, MI, CFA, and HS resulted in specificities of 91%, 94%, and 31%, respectively, for detecting metastasis, with positive predictive values (PPVs) of 25%, 67%, and 31%, respectively. At a higher Ki-67 cutoff of 7.5%, HS analysis resulted in a specificity of 94% and PPV of 71% for predicting metastasis. While single-field HS analysis may be practical and reliable at a higher cutoff, this study emphasizes the variability that can exist when different methods of assessment are used.

  9. Analysis of potential response predictors to capecitabine/temozolomide in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cives, M; Ghayouri, M; Morse, B; Brelsford, M; Black, M; Rizzo, A; Meeker, A; Strosberg, J

    2016-09-01

    The capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM) regimen is active in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), with response rates ranging from 30 to 70%. Small retrospective studies suggest that O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency predicts response to temozolomide. High tumor proliferative activity is also commonly perceived as a significant predictor of response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is unclear whether chromosomal instability (CIN), which correlates with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), is a predictive factor. In this study, we evaluated 143 patients with advanced pNET who underwent treatment with CAPTEM for radiographic and biochemical response. MGMT expression (n=52), grade (n=128) and ALT activation (n=46) were investigated as potential predictive biomarkers. Treatment with CAPTEM was associated with an overall response rate (ORR) of 54% by RECIST 1.1. Response to CAPTEM was not influenced by MGMT expression, proliferative activity or ALT pathway activation. Based on these results, no biomarker-driven selection criteria for use of the CAPTEM regimen can be recommended at this time.

  10. PDX-1, CDX-2, TTF-1, and CK7: a reliable immunohistochemical panel for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elaine S; Alexander, Jacob; Swanson, Paul E; Jain, Dhanpat; Yeh, Matthew M

    2012-05-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) occur in virtually all sites of the body. As NETs arising in different organs share similar morphologic features, distinguishing metastatic from primary NETs on the basis of morphologic grounds alone is difficult. Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1) is a Hox-type transcription factor that is essential for both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic differentiation and maintenance of β-cell function. We investigated PDX-1 as an immunohistochemical (IHC) marker in primary pancreatic NETs. Eighty primary NETs [25 pancreatic, 29 bronchopulmonary, and 26 in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract] and 13 metastatic NETs in the liver were studied. Clinical and radiologic data were reviewed to confirm the stated primary sites. IHC analysis for PDX-1, CDX-2, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), keratin 7 (CK7), and keratin 20 (CK20) was performed, and the results were based on review blinded to the primary sites. PDX-1 was seen in 18 of 25 (72%) pancreatic NETs; in contrast, only 3 of 29 (10%) bronchopulmonary NETs and 1 of 26 (4%) GI NETs were positive. PDX-1 was therefore 93% specific and 72% sensitive for pancreatic NETs. TTF-1 was expressed only in bronchopulmonary NETs; all other NETs were negative for TTF-1. CK7 was also very specific (92%) and moderately sensitive (66%) for bronchopulmonary NETs. CDX-2 was seen in 22 of 26 (85%) cases of GI NETs and in only 1 of 51 (2%) cases of extra-GI NETs. Thus, CDX-2 was 98% specific and 85% sensitive for GI NETs. In terms of metastatic NETs found in the liver, PDX-1 was positive in 5 of 5 cases of metastatic pancreatic NETs and 2 of 2 cases of metastatic duodenal NETs. PDX-1 is highly specific, with very good overall diagnostic accuracy for pancreatic NETs. An IHC panel including PDX-1, CDX-2, TTF-1, CK7, and CK20 may be useful in distinguishing NETs of pancreatic origin from other primaries.

  11. The insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 is a promising target for novel treatment approaches in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumours.

    PubMed

    Höpfner, Michael; Baradari, Viola; Huether, Alexander; Schöfl, Christof; Scherübl, Hans

    2006-03-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NET) represent a heterogeneous tumour entity. The anti-neoplastic therapy of advanced NET disease is still unsatisfactory and innovative therapeutic approaches are needed. As NET frequently express insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors (IGFR), known to promote survival, oncogenic transformation, tumour growth and spreading, the inhibition of the IGF/IGF-receptor system may offer possibilities for novel targeted treatment strategies of NET. Here, we studied the anti-neoplastic effects of an inhibition of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) signalling in NET cells by the novel IGF-1R tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor NVP-AEW541, whose anti-neoplastic potency has not yet been tested in NET disease. Using two human NET cell lines with different growth characteristics, we demonstrated that NVP-AEW541 dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of NET cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Anti-neoplastic effects of NVP-AEW541 were also detected in primary cultures of human neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumours. Apoptosis was characterized by activation of the apoptotic key enzyme, caspase-3, as well as by detection of changes in the expression of the pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, BAX and Bcl-2, after NVP-AEW541 treatment. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1/S checkpoint. The anti-neoplastic effects of NVP-AEW541 involved the inactivation of ERK1/2. Induction of immediate cytotoxicity did not account for the anti-neoplastic effects of NVP-AEW541, as shown by measurement of lactate dehydrogenase release. Moreover, additive anti-neoplastic effects were observed when NVP-AEW541 was combined with cytostatics such as doxorubicin or the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, fluvastatin. This is the first report on the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by the IGF-1R-TK inhibitor, NVP-AEW541, in NET cells. The inhibition of the IGF/IGFR system appears to be a promising novel approach

  12. Pro-tumour activity of interleukin-22 in HPAFII human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Curd, L M; Favors, S E; Gregg, R K

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a cytokine involved in inflammatory and wound healing processes that is secreted primarily by T helper type 17 (Th17) cells. IL-22 receptor (IL-22R) expression is limited to epithelial cells of the digestive organs, respiratory tract and skin. Most tumours originating in these sites over-express IL-22R. Interestingly, there is an increase in Th17 frequency within the peripheral blood and tumour microenvironment of advanced cancer patients. Subsequently, IL-17 has been shown to display both pro-tumour and anti-tumour functions. Because many tumours lack expression of the IL-17 receptor, the effects of IL-17 on tumour growth are generated by cells that surround the tumour cells. Like IL-17, high levels of IL-22 have been detected in tumour tissues and the peripheral blood of cancer patients; however, the direct effect of IL-22 on tumour cells has remained largely unknown. In this report, we show that IL-22 stimulated production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-XL in IL-22R-positive HPAFII human pancreatic cancer cells. Additionally, IL-22 augmented HPAFII cell production of immunosuppressive cytokines. We show further that IL-22 activation of HPAFII cells diminished T cell production of interferon (IFN)-γ through the action of IL-10. Strikingly, we show for the first time that IL-22 can fully protect cancer cells from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity by stimulating tumour production of IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Our data support the idea that IL-22 may act to promote the pathogenesis of cancers rather than function in anti-tumour immunity. PMID:22471280

  13. The novel Raf inhibitor Raf265 decreases Bcl-2 levels and confers TRAIL-sensitivity to neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; de Toni, Enrico; von Rüden, Janina; Brand, Stephan; Göke, Burkhard; Laubender, Rüdiger P; Auernhammer, Christoph J

    2011-04-01

    The tumour-selective death receptor ligand tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising agent for the treatment of human cancer. However, many tumours have evolved mechanisms to resist TRAIL-induced apoptosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that aberrant PI(3)K-Akt-mTOR survival signalling may confer TRAIL resistance by altering the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Here, we show that neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cell lines of heterogeneous origin exhibit a range of TRAIL sensitivities and that TRAIL sensitivity correlates with the expression of FLIP(S), caspase-8, and Bcl-2. Neither single mTOR inhibition by everolimus nor dual mTOR/PI(3)K inhibition by NVP-BEZ235 was able to enhance TRAIL susceptibility in any of the tested cell lines. In contrast, dual PI(3)K-Akt-mTOR and Raf-MEK-Erk pathway inhibition by the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 effectively restored TRAIL sensitivity in NCI-H727 bronchus carcinoid cells. Furthermore, blocking Raf-MEK-Erk signalling by the novel Raf inhibitor Raf265 significantly enhanced TRAIL sensitivity in NCI-H727 and CM insulinoma cells. While having no effect on FLIP(S) or caspase-8 expression, Raf265 strongly decreased Bcl-2 levels in those cell lines susceptible to its TRAIL-sensitizing action. Taken together, our findings suggest that combinations of Raf-MEK-Erk pathway inhibitors and TRAIL might offer a novel therapeutic strategy in NET disease.

  14. NOTE: Image analysis can be used to detect spatial changes in the histopathology of pancreatic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, A. J.; Bennett, M. K.; Murray, A.

    2003-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is frequently associated with intense growth of fibrous tissue at the periphery of tumours, but the histopathological quantification of this stromal reaction has not yet been used as a prognostic factor because of the difficulty of obtaining quantitative measures using manual methods. Manual histological grading is a poor indicator of outcome in this type of cancer and there is a clinical need to establish a more sensitive indicator. Recent pancreatic tumour biology research has focused upon the stromal reaction and there is an indication that its histopathological quantification may lead to a new prognostic indicator. Histological samples from 21 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were stained using the sirius red, light-green method. Multiple images from the centre and periphery of each tumour were automatically segmented using colour cluster analysis to subdivide each image into representative colours. These were classified manually as stroma, cell cytoplasm or lumen in order to measure the area of each component in each image. Measured areas were analysed to determine whether the technique could detect spatial differences in the area of each tissue component over all samples, and within individual samples. Over all 21 cases, the area of stromal tissue at the periphery of the tumours exceeded that at the centre by an average of 10.0 percentage points (P < 0.001). Within individual tumours, the algorithm was able to detect significantly more stroma (P < 0.05) at the periphery than the centre in 11 cases, whilst none of the remaining cases had significantly more stromal tissue at the centre than the periphery. The results demonstrate that semi-automated analysis can be used to detect spatial differences in the area of fibrous tissue in routinely stained sections of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Clinical implications of genomic alterations in the tumour and circulation of pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Adleff, Vilmos; Jones, Siân; Leary, Rebecca J; Barrett, Michael T; Anagnostou, Valsamo; Parpart-Li, Sonya; Murphy, Derek; Kay Li, Qing; Hruban, Carolyn A; Scharpf, Rob; White, James R; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Allen, Peter J; Eshleman, James R; Thompson, Craig B; Klimstra, David S; Linehan, David C; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H; Diaz, Luis A; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Johansen, Julia S; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Velculescu, Victor E

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst mortality of any solid cancer. In this study, to evaluate the clinical implications of genomic alterations in this tumour type, we perform whole-exome analyses of 24 tumours, targeted genomic analyses of 77 tumours, and use non-invasive approaches to examine tumour-specific mutations in the circulation of these patients. These analyses reveal somatic mutations in chromatin-regulating genes MLL, MLL2, MLL3 and ARID1A in 20% of patients that are associated with improved survival. We observe alterations in genes with potential therapeutic utility in over a third of cases. Liquid biopsy analyses demonstrate that 43% of patients with localized disease have detectable circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) at diagnosis. Detection of ctDNA after resection predicts clinical relapse and poor outcome, with recurrence by ctDNA detected 6.5 months earlier than with CT imaging. These observations provide genetic predictors of outcome in pancreatic cancer and have implications for new avenues of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26154128

  16. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  17. Whole-exome characterization of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell lines BON-1 and QGP-1.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Timon; Peeters, Marc; Dogan, Fadime; Pauwels, Patrick; Van Assche, Elvire; Beyens, Matthias; Mortier, Geert; Vandeweyer, Geert; de Herder, Wouter; Van Camp, Guy; Hofland, Leo J; Op de Beeck, Ken

    2015-04-01

    The human BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines are two frequently used models in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) research. Data on the whole-exome genetic constitution of these cell lines is largely lacking. This study presents, to our knowledge, the first whole-exome profile of the BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines. Cell line identity was confirmed by short tandem repeat profiling. Using GTG-banding and a CytoSNP-12v2 Beadchip array, cell line ploidy and chromosomal alterations were determined in BON-1 and QGP-1. The exomes of both cell lines were sequenced on Ilumina's HiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform. Single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertions and deletions (indels) were detected using the Genome Analysis ToolKit. SNVs were validated by Sanger sequencing. Ploidy of BON-1 and QGP-1 was 3 and 4 respectively, with long stretches of loss of heterozygosity across multiple chromosomes, which is associated with aggressive tumor behavior. In BON-1, 57 frameshift indels and 1725 possible protein-altering SNVs were identified in the NGS data. In the QGP-1 cell line, 56 frameshift indels and 1095 SNVs were identified. ATRX, a PNET-associated gene, was mutated in both cell lines, while mutation of TSC2 was detected in BON-1. A mutation in NRAS was detected in BON-1, while KRAS was mutated in QGP-1, implicating aberrations in the RAS pathway in both cell lines. Homozygous mutations in TP53 with possible loss of function were identified in both cell lines. Various MUC genes, implicated in cell signaling, lubrication and chemical barriers, which are frequently expressed in PNET tissue samples, showed homozygous protein-altering SNVs in the BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines.

  18. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K.; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P.; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis. PMID:26831065

  19. A pilot study to explore circulating tumour cells in pancreatic cancer as a novel biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, L; Backen, A; Sloane, R; Menasce, L; Ryder, D; Krebs, M; Board, R; Clack, G; Hughes, A; Blackhall, F; Valle, J W; Dive, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obtaining tissue for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis and biomarker assessment to aid drug development is challenging. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) may represent a potential biomarker to address these unmet needs. We compared prospectively the utility of two platforms for CTC enumeration and characterisation in pancreatic cancer patients in a pilot exploratory study. Patients and methods: Blood samples were obtained prospectively from 54 consenting patients and analysed by CellSearch and isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET). CellSearch exploits immunomagnetic capture of CTCs-expressing epithelial markers, whereas ISET is a marker independent, blood filtration device. Circulating tumour cell expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was assessed to explore any discrepancy in CTC number between the two platforms. Results: ISET detected CTCs in more patients than CellSearch (93% vs 40%) and in higher numbers (median CTCs/7.5 ml, 9 (range 0–240) vs 0 (range 0–144)). Heterogeneity observed for epithelial cell adhesion molecule, pan-cytokeratin (CK), E-Cadherin, Vimentin and CK 7 expression in CTCs may account for discrepancy in CTC number between platforms. Conclusion: ISET detects more CTCs than CellSearch and offers flexible CTC characterisation with potential to investigate CTC biology and develop biomarkers for pancreatic cancer patient management. PMID:22187035

  20. Laparoscopic Resection of Pancreatic Tail Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour in a Young Male

    PubMed Central

    Shaminda, R. A. A.; Galketiya, K. B.; Pinto, V.; Walisinghe, D.; Wijetunge, S.; Heendeniya, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumours of the pancreas are a rare entity and more commonly seen in women than in men. These tumours have typically reached large sizes when clinically detected. Case Description. A 21-year-old male was found to have a left hypochondrial mass on physical examination following a trivial soft tissue injury. Contrast-enhanced computed topography (CT) of the abdomen showed a 10.3 × 7.6 × 10.3 cm size arising from the body and the tail of the pancreas. He underwent laparoscopic resection of distal pancreatic tumour en bloc with spleen. Large tumour was noted originating from the body and tail of the pancreas with dilated veins surrounding the tumour. Histology revealed a clear cell variant of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm with steatotic pattern. Resection margin was free of tumour. Discussion. Several studies have shown significant short term advantages using laparoscopic approach compared to open surgery, in terms of lower blood loss, resumption of oral intake, and hospital stay. This case and few other case reports published in world literature have shown that laparoscopic approach is safe and oncologically adequate. PMID:27747112

  1. Exome sequencing identifies ATP4A gene as responsible of an atypical familial type I gastric neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Oriol; Reyes, Jose; Zuñiga, Sheila; Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Fernández, Victoria; Bujanda, Luís; Rodriguez-Pinilla, María S; Palacios, Jose; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Cañamero, Marta; Pritchard, D Mark; Benítez, Javier

    2015-05-15

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) arise from enterochromaffin-like cells, which are located in oxyntic glands within the stomach. Type I tumours represent 70-80% of gastric NETs and are associated with hypergastrinaemia, chronic atrophic gastritis and achlorhydria. Gastrin is involved in the endocrine regulation of gastric acid production. Most type I gastric NETs are sporadic, have a good prognosis and their genetic basis are unknown. We performed an exome sequencing study in a family with consanguineous parents and 10 children, five of whom were affected by type I gastric NET. Atypical clinical traits included an earlier age of onset (around 30 years), aggressiveness (three had nodal infiltration requiring total gastrectomy and one an adenocarcinoma) and iron-deficiency rather than megaloblastic anaemia. We identified a homozygous missense mutation in the 14th exon of the ATP4A gene (c.2107C>T), which encodes the proton pump responsible for acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. The amino acid p.Arg703Cys is highly conserved across species and originates a change of one of the transmembrane domains that avoids the liberation of protons from cells to stomach. This is consistent with the achlorhydria that was observed in the affected individuals. No germline or somatic mutations in the ATP4A gene were found in sporadic gastric NET patients. Based on the results of this large family, it seems that this atypical form of gastric NET has an earlier age of onset, behaves more aggressively and has atypical clinical traits that differentiated from other studied cases. PMID:25678551

  2. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs. Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1–2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1–3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga–b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1. The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05). Stratifying patients well

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Vivian; Dueber, Julie; Wright, Jesse P; Cates, Justin; Revetta, Frank; Parikh, Alexander A; Merchant, Nipun B; Shi, Chanjuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). METHODS Tissue microarrays containing 88 PanNENs were immunohistochemically labeled with antibodies to β-catenin, E-cadherin, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), chromogranin and synaptophysin. One case had only metastatic tumors resected, whereas others (n = 87) received pancreatectomy with or without partial hepatectomy. Pathology slides, demographic, clinicopathologic, and follow up data were reviewed. Patients’ demographics, clinicopathologic features, and immunohistochemical results from 87 primary tumors were compared between patients with low stage (stage I/II) and high stage (stage III/IV) tumors. In addition, correlation of immunohistochemical results from primary tumors with disease-specific survival (DSS) was evaluated. RESULTS Strong membranous β-catenin staining in the primary tumor was observed in all 13 stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 47% (35/74) of stage I/II tumors (P < 0.01). However, the strong membranous β-catenin staining was unassociated with tumor grade or DSS. Decreased membranous β-catenin staining was associated with decreased membranous E-cadherin labeling. Nuclear β-catenin staining was seen in 15% (2/13) of stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 0% (0/74) of stage I/II tumors (P = 0.02). The case with metastasectomy only also showed nuclear β-catenin staining. Two of the three cases with nuclear β-catenin staining were familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. Lack of APC expression was seen in 70% (57/81) of the cases, including the 3 cases with nuclear β-catenin staining. Expression of E-cadherin and APC in primary tumor was not correlated with tumor grade, tumor stage, or disease specific survival. CONCLUSION The Wnt/β-catenin pathway was altered in some PanNENs, but did not Impact DSS. PanNENs in FAP patients demonstrated nuclear β-catenin accumulation and loss of APC. PMID:27574554

  4. High Expression of MicroRNA-196a Indicates Poor Prognosis in Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Lee, Jong-Chan; Paik, Kyu-Hyun; Kang, Jingu; Kim, Jaihwan; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Han, Ho-Seong; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is limited data on miRNA expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). In this study, we aimed to identify miRNAs that could be potential prognostic biomarkers of PanNETs in patients who underwent curative surgery. For miRNA target screening, 2 primary PanNETs and corresponding liver metastases were screened for miRNA expression by the NanoString nCounter analysis. Candidate miRNAs were selected by ≥2-fold difference of expression between metastatic versus primary tumor. For miRNA target validation, quantitative real-time PCR was performed for candidate miRNAs on 37 PanNETs and matched nonneoplastic pancreata, and the miRNA levels were correlated with the clinicopathological features and patient survival data. Eight miRNAs (miRNA-27b, -122, -142–5p, -196a, -223, -590–5p, -630, and -944) were selected as candidate miRNAs. Only miR-196a level was significantly associated with stage, and mitotic count. When PanNETs were stratified into high (n = 10) and low (n = 27) miRNA-196a expression groups, miRNA-196a-high PanNETs were significantly associated with advanced pathologic T stage (50.0% vs 7.4%), N stage (50.0% vs 3.7%), higher mitotic counts (60.0% vs 3.7%), and higher Ki-67-labeling indices (60.0% vs 22.2%). In addition, high miRNA-196a expression was significantly associated with decreased overall survival (P = 0.046) and disease-free survival (P < 0.001) during a median follow-up of 37.9 months with the hazard ratio for recurrence of 16.267 (95% confidence interval = 1.732–153.789; P = 0.015). MiRNA-196a level may be a promising prognostic marker of recurrence in resected PanNETs, although further experimental investigation would be required. PMID:26683934

  5. Cisplatin and Etoposide or Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Gastrointestinal Tract or Pancreas That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Colorectal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gallbladder Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Pancreatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Small Intestinal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

  6. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  7. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  8. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management.

  9. [177Lu-DOTA]0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (177Lu-DOTATOC) For Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumours: A Phase-II Study

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Richard P.; Kluge, Andreas W.; Kulkarni, Harshad; Schorr-Neufing, Ulrike; Niepsch, Karin; Bitterlich, Norman; van Echteld, Cees J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterise efficacy and safety of 177Lu-DOTATOC as agent for peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT) of advanced neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Patients and methods: Fifty-six subjects with metastasized and progressive NET (50% gastroenteral, 26.8% pancreatic, 23.2% other primary sites) treated consecutively with 177Lu-DOTATOC were analysed retrospectively. Subjects were administered 177Lu-DOTATOC (mean 2.1 cycles; range 1-4) as 7.0GBq (median) doses at three-monthly intervals. Efficacy was analysed using CT and/or MRI according to RECIST 1.1 criteria and results were stratified for the number of administered cycles and the primary tumour origin. Results: In the total NET population (A), median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 17.4 and 34.2 months, respectively, assessed in a follow-up time (mean ± SD) of 16.1 ± 12.4 months. In patients receiving more than one cycle, mean follow-up time was 22.4 ± 11.0 months for all NETs (B) and PFS was 32.0 months for all NETs (B), 34.5 months for GEP-NET (C), and 11.9 months for other NETs (D). Objective response rates (Complete/Partial Responses) were 33.9%, 40.6%, 54.2%, and 0% for A, B, C, and D groups, respectively, while disease control rates in the same were 66.1%, 93.8%, 100%, and 75%. Complete responses (16.1%, 18.8% and 25.0% for groups A, B and C) were high, 78% of which were maintained throughout the follow up. There were no serious adverse events. One case of self-limiting grade 3 myelotoxicity was reported. Although 20% of patients had mild renal insufficiency at baseline, there was no evidence of exacerbated or de novo renal toxicity after treatment. Conclusion: 177Lu-DOTATOC is a novel agent for PRRT with major potential to induce objective tumour responses and sustained disease control in progressive neuroendocrine tumours, even when administered in moderate activities. The observed safety profile suggests a particularly favourable therapeutic index, including in patients with

  10. Anti-Tumour Efficacy of Capecitabine in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Courtin, Aurélie; Richards, Frances M.; Bapiro, Tashinga E.; Bramhall, Jo L.; Neesse, Albrecht; Cook, Natalie; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Tuveson, David A.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2013-01-01

    Capecitabine (CAP) is a 5-FU pro-drug approved for the treatment of several cancers and it is used in combination with gemcitabine (GEM) in the treatment of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, limited pre-clinical data of the effects of CAP in PDAC are available to support the use of the GEMCAP combination in clinic. Therefore, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and the efficacy of CAP as a single agent first and then in combination with GEM to assess the utility of the GEMCAP therapy in clinic. Using a model of spontaneous PDAC occurring in KrasG12D; p53R172H; Pdx1-Cre (KPC) mice and subcutaneous allografts of a KPC PDAC-derived cell line (K8484), we showed that CAP achieved tumour concentrations (∼25 µM) of 5-FU in both models, as a single agent, and induced survival similar to GEM in KPC mice, suggesting similar efficacy. In vitro studies performed in K8484 cells as well as in human pancreatic cell lines showed an additive effect of the GEMCAP combination however, it increased toxicity in vivo and no benefit of a tolerable GEMCAP combination was identified in the allograft model when compared to GEM alone. Our work provides pre-clinical evidence of 5-FU delivery to tumours and anti-tumour efficacy following oral CAP administration that was similar to effects of GEM. Nevertheless, the GEMCAP combination does not improve the therapeutic index compared to GEM alone. These data suggest that CAP could be considered as an alternative to GEM in future, rationally designed, combination treatment strategies for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23840665

  11. Emerging therapies and latest development in the treatment of unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an update for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jaya; Duque, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) differ in their clinical behavior, presentation and prognosis based on their initial histological features and disease stage. While small resectable tumors can be treated surgically, metastatic and locally advanced disease carries a significant mortality and treatment options have been limited in terms of their efficacy. Streptozocin-based regimens were the only agents available before but recent advances have improved the armamentarium to treat pNETs. Newer chemotherapeutic agents such as temozolomide, somatostatin analogs and targeted therapies including everolimus and sunitinib are now available to treat these tumors. Several combination regimens with targeted therapies and newer agents such as pazopanib are being developed and tested in ongoing trials. PMID:24179483

  12. A new immunohistochemistry prognostic score (IPS) for recurrence and survival in resected pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET)

    PubMed Central

    Viúdez, Antonio; Carvalho, Filipe L.F.; Maleki, Zahra; Zahurak, Marianna; Laheru, Daniel; Stark, Alejandro; Azad, Nilofer Z.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Baylin, Stephen; Herman, James G.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PanNET) is a neoplastic entity in which few prognostic factors are well-known. Here, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of N-myc downstream-regulated gen-1 (NDRG-1), O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 3 (PHLDA-3) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and methylation analysis in 92 patients with resected PanNET and follow-up longer than 24 months. In multivariate analyses, ki-67 and our immunohistochemistry prognostic score (IPS-based on MGMT, NDRG-1 and PHLDA-3 IHC expression) were independent prognostic factors for disease-free-survival (DFS), while age and IPS were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Our IPS could be a useful prognostic biomarker for recurrence and survival in patients following resection for PanNET. PMID:26894863

  13. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdry, Rajasree P; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A; Lee, Daniel J; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  14. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chowdry, Rajasree P.; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A.; Lee, Daniel J.; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  15. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  16. Long-Term Disease Control of a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Lanreotide Autogel®: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel®. A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel® dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel® injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  17. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pancreas: a new member of the small group of mesenchymal pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lüttges, J; Mentzel, T; Hübner, G; Klöppel, G

    1999-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours usually occur in the pleura, but occasionally they appear in extraserosal soft tissues or parenchymatous organs, where their diagnosis often causes problems. This report describes a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pancreas in a 50-year-old woman treated by left-side pancreatectomy. The tumour showed immunocytochemical reactivity for CD34, CD99 and bcl-2. Because of its favourable prognosis, SFT must be clearly distinguished from leiomyosarcoma, the most frequent nonepithelial tumour of the pancreas. Other mesenchymal tumours that may occur in the pancreas include tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath, fibrous histiocytic tumours and rare vascular tumours.

  18. Surgical treatment and clinical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a 14-year experience from one single center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, An-Ping; Yue, Peng-Ju; Tian, Bo-le

    2014-11-01

    Our primary aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (non-F-P-NETs), with an emphasis on evaluating the prognostic value of the newly updated 2010 grading classification of the World Health Organization (WHO).Data of 55 consecutive patients who were surgically treated and pathologically diagnosed as non-F-P-NETs in our single institution from January 2000 to December 2013 were retrospectively collected.This entirety comprised of 55 patients (31 males and 24 females), with a mean age of 51.24 ± 12.95 years. Manifestations of non-F-P-NETs were nonspecific. Distal pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and local resection of pancreatic tumor were the most frequent surgical procedures, while pancreatic fistula was the most common but acceptable complication (30.3%). The overall 5-year survival rate of this entire cohort was 41.0%, with a median survival time of 60.4 months. Patients who underwent R0 resections obtained a better survival than those who did not (P < 0.005). As for the prognostic analysis, tumor size and lymph invasion were only statistically significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.046 and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas the newly updated 2010 grading classification of WHO (G1 and G2 vs G3), distant metastasis, and surgical margin were all meaningful in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P = 0.045, 0.001, and 0.042, respectively).Non-F-P-NETs are a kind of rare neoplasm, with mostly indolent malignancy. Patients with non-F-P-NETs could benefit from the radical resections. The new WHO criteria, distant metastasis and surgical margin, might be independent predictors for the prognosis of non-F-P-NETs. PMID:25396335

  19. Resolution of Hyperreninemia, Secondary Hyperaldosteronism, and Hypokalemia With 177Lu-DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy in a Patient With Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-11-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented with a history of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and recurrent episodes of severe hypokalemia requiring hospitalization. Imaging revealed a pancreatic mass with liver metastases, histologically confirmed to be a neuroendocrine tumor. Elevated active renin and aldosterone levels were identified, and the patient was treated with 4 induction cycles of Lu-DOTATATE, which resolved the diarrhea, nausea, and hypokalemia, and normalized the renin and aldosterone levels. After 3 additional maintenance Lu-DOTATATE treatments, the pancreatic tumor had decreased in size, was deemed operable, and was resected. She remains on maintenance Lu-DOTATATE therapy with progression-free survival of 45 months thus far.

  20. Hotspot detection in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: density approximation by α-shape maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. K. K.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Pantanowitz, Liron; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    The grading of neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system is dependent on accurate and reproducible assessment of the proliferation with the tumor, either by counting mitotic figures or counting Ki-67 positive nuclei. At the moment, most pathologists manually identify the hotspots, a practice which is tedious and irreproducible. To better help pathologists, we present an automatic method to detect all potential hotspots in neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system. The method starts by segmenting Ki-67 positive nuclei by entropy based thresholding, followed by detection of centroids for all Ki-67 positive nuclei. Based on geodesic distance, approximated by the nuclei centroids, we compute two maps: an amoeba map and a weighted amoeba map. These maps are later combined to generate the heat map, the segmentation of which results in the hotspots. The method was trained on three and tested on nine whole slide images of neuroendocrine tumors. When evaluated by two expert pathologists, the method reached an accuracy of 92.6%. The current method does not discriminate between tumor, stromal and inflammatory nuclei. The results show that α-shape maps may represent how hotspots are perceived.

  1. A G-quadruplex-binding compound showing anti-tumour activity in an in vivo model for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohnmacht, Stephan A; Marchetti, Chiara; Gunaratnam, Mekala; Besser, Rachael J; Haider, Shozeb M; Di Vita, Gloria; Lowe, Helen L; Mellinas-Gomez, Maria; Diocou, Seckou; Robson, Mathew; Šponer, Jiri; Islam, Barira; Barbara Pedley, R; Hartley, John A; Neidle, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report here that a tetra-substituted naphthalene-diimide derivative (MM41) has significant in vivo anti-tumour activity against the MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer xenograft model. IV administration with a twice-weekly 15 mg/kg dose produces ca 80% tumour growth decrease in a group of tumour-bearing animals. Two animals survived tumour-free after 279 days. High levels of MM41 are rapidly transported into cell nuclei and were found to accumulate in the tumour. MM41 is a quadruplex-interactive compound which binds strongly to the quadruplexes encoded in the promoter sequences of the BCL-2 and k-RAS genes, both of which are dis-regulated in many human pancreatic cancers. Levels of BCL-2 were reduced by ca 40% in tumours from MM41-treated animals relative to controls, consistent with BCL-2 being a target for MM41. Molecular modelling suggests that MM41 binds to a BCL-2 quadruplex in a manner resembling that previously observed in co-crystal structures with human telomeric quadruplexes. This supports the concept that MM41 (and by implication other quadruplex-targeting small molecules) can bind to quadruplex-forming promoter regions in a number of genes and down-regulate their transcription. We suggest that quadruplexes within those master genes that are up-regulated drivers for particular cancers, may be selective targets for compounds such as MM41. PMID:26077929

  2. A G-quadruplex-binding compound showing anti-tumour activity in an in vivo model for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohnmacht, Stephan A; Marchetti, Chiara; Gunaratnam, Mekala; Besser, Rachael J; Haider, Shozeb M; Di Vita, Gloria; Lowe, Helen L; Mellinas-Gomez, Maria; Diocou, Seckou; Robson, Mathew; Šponer, Jiri; Islam, Barira; Pedley, R Barbara; Hartley, John A; Neidle, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report here that a tetra-substituted naphthalene-diimide derivative (MM41) has significant in vivo anti-tumour activity against the MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer xenograft model. IV administration with a twice-weekly 15 mg/kg dose produces ca 80% tumour growth decrease in a group of tumour-bearing animals. Two animals survived tumour-free after 279 days. High levels of MM41 are rapidly transported into cell nuclei and were found to accumulate in the tumour. MM41 is a quadruplex-interactive compound which binds strongly to the quadruplexes encoded in the promoter sequences of the BCL-2 and k-RAS genes, both of which are dis-regulated in many human pancreatic cancers. Levels of BCL-2 were reduced by ca 40% in tumours from MM41-treated animals relative to controls, consistent with BCL-2 being a target for MM41. Molecular modelling suggests that MM41 binds to a BCL-2 quadruplex in a manner resembling that previously observed in co-crystal structures with human telomeric quadruplexes. This supports the concept that MM41 (and by implication other quadruplex-targeting small molecules) can bind to quadruplex-forming promoter regions in a number of genes and down-regulate their transcription. We suggest that quadruplexes within those master genes that are up-regulated drivers for particular cancers, may be selective targets for compounds such as MM41. PMID:26077929

  3. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  4. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Elevated Tumour Markers Predict Worse Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salmiheimo, Aino; Mustonen, Harri; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kemppainen, Esko; Seppänen, Hanna; Haglund, Caj

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimation of the prognosis of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) currently relies on tumour-related factors such as resection margins and on lymph-node ratio (LNR) both inconveniently available only postoperatively. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of preoperative laboratory data in predicting PDAC prognosis. Methods Collection of laboratory and clinical data was retrospective from 265 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for PDAC at Helsinki University Hospital. Cancer-specific survival assessment utilized Kaplan-Meier analysis, and independent associations between factors were by the Cox regression model. Results During follow-up, 76% of the patients died of PDAC, with a median survival time of 19.6 months. In univariate analysis, CRP, albumin, CEA, and CA19-9 were significantly associated with postoperative cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, taking into account age, gender, LNR, resection margins, tumour status, and adjuvant chemotherapy, the preoperative biomarkers independently associated with adverse prognosis were hypoalbuminemia (< 36 g/L, hazard ratio (HR) 1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–2.19, p = 0.011), elevated CRP (> 5 mg/L, HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.03–2.02, p = 0.036), CEA (> 5 μg/L, HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.07–2.53, p = 0.047), and CA19-9 (≥555 kU/L, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.18–3.08, p = 0.008). Conclusion For patients with resectable PDAC, preoperative CRP, along with albumin and tumour markers, is useful for predicting prognosis. PMID:27632196

  5. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  6. Mutation-targeted therapy with sunitinib or everolimus in patients with advanced low-grade or intermediate-grade neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas with or without cytoreductive surgery: protocol for a phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Neychev, Vladimir; Steinberg, Seth M; Cottle-Delisle, Candice; Merkel, Roxanne; Nilubol, Naris; Yao, Jianhua; Meltzer, Paul; Pacak, Karel; Marx, Stephen; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Finding the optimal management strategy for patients with advanced, metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas is a work in progress. Sunitinib and everolimus are currently approved for the treatment of progressive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic low-grade or intermediate-grade pancreatic NETs. However, mutation-targeted therapy with sunitinib or everolimus has not been studied in this patient population. Methods and analysis This prospective, open-label phase II clinical trial was designed to determine if mutation-targeting therapy with sunitinib or everolimus for patients with advanced low-grade or intermediate-grade NETs is more effective than historically expected results with progression-free survival (PFS) as the primary end point. Patients ≥18 years of age with progressive, low-grade or intermediate-grade locally advanced or metastatic NETs are eligible for this study. Patients will undergo tumour biopsy (if they are not a surgical candidate) for tumour genotyping. Patients will be assigned to sunitininb or everolimus based on somatic/germline mutations profile. Patients who have disease progression on either sunitinib or everolimus will crossover to the other drug. Treatment will continue until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or consent to withdrawal. Using the proposed criteria, 44 patients will be accrued within each treatment group during a 48-month period (a total of 88 patients for the 2 treatments), and followed for up to an additional 12 months (a total of 60 months from entry of the first patient) to achieve 80% power in order to test whether there is an improvement in PFS compared to historically expected results, with a 0.10 α level one-sided significance test. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the institutional review board of the National Cancer Institute (NCI-IRB Number 15C0040; iRIS Reference Number 339636). The results will be

  7. Reduced expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma signifies tumour progression and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Fristedt, Richard; Elebro, Jacob; Gaber, Alexander; Jonsson, Liv; Heby, Margareta; Yudina, Yulyana; Nodin, Björn; Uhlén, Mathias; Eberhard, Jakob; Jirström, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) is a key component of the mucosal immune system that mediates epithelial transcytosis of immunoglobulins. High pIgR expression has been reported to correlate with a less aggressive tumour phenotype and an improved prognosis in several human cancer types. Here, we examined the expression and prognostic significance of pIgR in pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma. The study cohort encompasses a consecutive series of 175 patients surgically treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma in Malmö and Lund University Hospitals, Sweden, between 2001-2011. Tissue microarrays were constructed from primary tumours (n = 175) and paired lymph node metastases (n = 105). A multiplied score was calculated from the fraction and intensity of pIgR staining. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to select the prognostic cut-off. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for death and recurrence within 5 years were calculated. pIgR expression could be evaluated in 172/175 (98.3%) primary tumours and in 96/105 (91.4%) lymph node metastases. pIgR expression was significantly down-regulated in lymph node metastases as compared with primary tumours (p = 0.018). Low pIgR expression was significantly associated with poor differentiation grade (p < 0.001), perineural growth (p = 0.027), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.016), vascular invasion (p = 0.033) and infiltration of the peripancreatic fat (p = 0.039). In the entire cohort, low pIgR expression was significantly associated with an impaired 5-year survival (HR = 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.71-5.25) and early recurrence (HR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.67-4.98). This association remained significant for survival after adjustment for conventional clinicopathological factors, tumour origin and adjuvant treatment (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.10-3.57). These results demonstrate, for the first time, that high tumour-specific pIgR expression signifies a

  8. Biokinetics and dosimetry with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Ferro-Flores, Ge; Pedraza-López, M.; Murphy-Stack, E.

    Malignant pancreatic tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to determine biokinetic parameters in mice, in order to estimate the induced pancreatic tumour absorbed doses and to evaluate an `in house' 177Lu-DOTA-TATE radiopharmaceutical as part of preclinical studies for targeted therapy in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (nD22) to obtain biokinetic and dosimetric data of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. The mean tumour uptake 2 h post injection was 14.76±1.9% I.A./g; kidney and pancreas uptake, at the same time, were 7.27±1.1% I.A./g (1.71±0.90%/organ) and 4.20±0.98% I.A./g (0.42±0.03%/organ), respectively. The mean absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 0.58±0.02 Gy/MBq; 0.23±0.01 Gy/MBq and 0.14±0.01 Gy/MBq, respectively. These studies justify further dosimetric estimations to ensure that 177Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in humans.

  9. Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Is now time for a new approach?

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Rinaldi, Silvia; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare neoplasms often characterized by an overexpression of somatostatin receptors. Thus, radiolabeled somatostatin analogues have showed an increasing relevance both in diagnosis and treatment, especially in low- and intermediate-differentiated GEP-NETs. These evidences have led to a growing development of new functional imaging techniques as 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) proved useful in the management of these neoplasms. However these tumors have a heterogeneous behavior also modifying their aggressiveness through time. Therefore sometimes 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT appears to be more appropriate to obtain a better assessment of the disease. According to these considerations, the combination of different functional imaging techniques should be considered in the management of GEP-NETs patients allowing clinicians to choose the tailored therapeutic approach among available options. PMID:27081635

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of the lncRNA MEG3 and Its Target c-MET in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Modali, Sita D.; Parekh, Vaishali I.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of MEN1 encoding menin in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) associated with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is well established, but how menin loss/inactivation initiates tumorigenesis is not well understood. We show that menin activates the long noncoding RNA maternally expressed gene 3 (Meg3) by histone-H3 lysine-4 trimethylation and CpG hypomethylation at the Meg3 promoter CRE site, to allow binding of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein. We found that Meg3 has tumor-suppressor activity in PNET cells because the overexpression of Meg3 in MIN6 cells (insulin-secreting mouse PNET cell line) blocked cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle progression. Gene expression microarray analysis showed that Meg3 overexpression in MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells down-regulated the expression of the protooncogene c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), and these cells showed significantly reduced cell migration/invasion. Compared with normal islets, mouse or human MEN1-associated PNETs expressed less MEG3 and more c-MET. Therefore, a tumor-suppressor long noncoding RNA (MEG3) and suppressed protooncogene (c-MET) combination could elicit menin's tumor-suppressor activity. Interestingly, MEG3 and c-MET expression was also altered in human sporadic insulinomas (insulin secreting PNETs) with hypermethylation at the MEG3 promoter CRE-site coinciding with reduced MEG3 expression. These data provide insights into the β-cell proliferation mechanisms that could retain their functional status. Furthermore, in MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells, DNA-demethylating drugs blocked cell proliferation and activated Meg3 expression. Our data suggest that the epigenetic activation of lncRNA MEG3 and/or inactivation of c-MET could be therapeutic for treating PNETs and insulinomas. PMID:25565142

  11. Altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, CHGB, and TP53 expression are associated with aggressive VHL-associated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Allison B; Zhang, Lisa; Jain, Meenu; Barak, Stephanie; Quezado, Martha M; Kebebew, Electron

    2013-06-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome in which 8-17 % of germline mutation carriers develop pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). There is limited data on prognostic markers for PNETs other than Ki-67, which is included in the World Health Organization classification system. Recently, specific genes and pathways have been identified by whole exome sequencing which may be involved in the tumorigenesis of PNETs and may be markers of disease aggressiveness. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers of aggressive disease in VHL-associated PNETs. The protein expression of eight genes (PTEN, CHGA, CHGB, ATRX, DAXX, CC-3, VEGF, and TP53) was analyzed in PNETs by immunohistochemistry and compared to clinical data, VHL genotype, functional imaging results, and pathologic findings. Subcellular distribution of phosphatase and tensin (PTEN), chromogranin A (CHGA), and alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) were significantly different by WHO classifications (p ≤ 0.05). There was decreased PTEN nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio (p < 0.01) and decreased CHGA nuclear expression (p = 0.03) in malignant samples as compared to benign. Lower cytoplasmic chromogranin B (CHGB) expression (p = 0.03) was associated with malignant tumors and metastasis. Higher nuclear expression of PTEN was associated with VHL mutations in exon 3 (p = 0.04). Higher PTEN and CHGB expression was associated with higher FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.05). Cytoplasmic expression of CC-3 was associated with higher serum chromogranin A levels (ρ = 0.72, p = 0.02). Lastly, greater cytoplasmic expression of p53 was associated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, and CHGB expression are associated with aggressive PNET phenotype in VHL and may serve as useful adjunct prognostic markers to Ki-67 in PNETs.

  12. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S T; Jones, C A; Sexton, S; LeVea, C M; Caraker, S M; Hajduczok, G; Gross, K W

    2014-12-11

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene, although classically associated with expression in the kidney, is also expressed in many other extrarenal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within rennin-specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon; furthermore, an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum, identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to the lymph nodes and the liver, mimicking human disease, and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides an unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying cooperating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease.

  13. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Sexton, Sandra; LeVea, Charles M.; Caraker, Susan M.; Hajduczok, George; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene while classically associated with expression in the kidney is also expressed in many other extra-renal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within renin specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon, furthermore an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to lymph nodes and liver, mimicking human disease and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides a unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying co-operating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease. PMID:24292676

  14. Chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors: the Beatson Oncology Centre experience.

    PubMed

    Hatton, M Q; Reed, N S

    1997-01-01

    The role of chemotherapy in malignant neuroendocrine tumours is difficult to assess because of their rarity and variation in biological behaviour. We present a retrospective review of chemotherapy given to 18 patients with metastatic and one with locally advanced neuroendocrine tumours. There were eight poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours, six thyroid medullary carcinomas, two phaeochromocytomas, two pancreatic islet cell tumours and one undifferentiated neuroblastoma. Four patients were given 3-weekly dacarbazine, vincristine and cyclophosphamide (DOC) chemotherapy. In eight patients, this regimen was modified by substituting the dacarbazine and cisplatin and etoposide (OPEC). A further six patients were treated with dacarbazine reintroduced into the 3-weekly regimen (DOPEC). The remaining patient received cisplatin and etoposide. There were two complete responses (both with OPEC) and eight partial responses (two with DOC, three with OPEC and three with DOPEC). Five patients had stable disease and four progressed. Four received further chemotherapy on relapse, producing one complete and one partial response. The median response duration to initial chemotherapy was 10 months (range 3-34). The median survival was 12 months (range 1-42). The main toxicity was haematological, with grade 3-4 neutropenia in 12 patients; eight suffered episodes of sepsis. One death was treatment related. Other toxicity was mild although three patients discontinued vincristine with grade 2 neurotoxicity. The response rate and side effects of these three regimens appear comparable. We conclude that, although these patient numbers are small, combination chemotherapy produces an encouraging response rate (53%; 95% CI 30-75) in malignant neuroendocrine tumours, with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9448967

  15. Differences and Similarities in the Clinicopathological Features of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in China and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Ming; Tang, Laura; Qiao, Xin-Wei; Wolin, Edward; Nissen, Nicholas N.; Dhall, Deepti; Chen, Jie; Shen, Lin; Chi, Yihebali; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Ben, Qi-Wen; Lv, Bin; Zhou, Ya-Ru; Bai, Chun-Mei; Chen, Jie; Song, Yu-Li; Song, Tian-Tian; Lu, Chong-Mei; Yu, Run; Chen, Yuan-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The presentation, pathology, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) in Asian patients have not been studied in large cohorts. We hypothesized that the clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese patients might be different from those of US patients. The objectives of this study were to address whether PNETs in Chinese patients exhibit unique clinicopathological features and natural history, and can be graded and staged using the WHO/ENETS criteria. This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients with PNETs in multiple academic medical centers in China (7) and the United States (2). Tumor grading and staging were based on WHO/ENETS criteria. The clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese and US patients were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to find associations between survival and patient demographics, tumor grade and stage, and other clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 977 (527 Chinese and 450 US) patients with PNETs were studied. In general, Chinese patients were younger than US patients (median age 46 vs 56 years). In Chinese patients, insulinomas were the most common (52.2%), followed by nonfunctional tumors (39.7%), whereas the order was reversed in US patients. Tumor grade distribution was similar in the 2 countries (G1: 57.5% vs 55.0%; G2: 38.5% vs 41.3%; and G3: 4.0% vs 3.7%). However, age, primary tumor size, primary tumor location, grade, and stage of subtypes of PNETs were significantly different between the 2 countries. The Chinese nonfunctional tumors were significantly larger than US ones (median size 4 vs 3 cm) and more frequently located in the head/neck region (54.9% vs 34.8%). The Chinese and US insulinomas were similar in size (median 1.5 cm) but the Chinese insulinomas relatively more frequently located in the head/neck region (48.3% vs 26.1%). Higher grade, advanced stage, metastasis, and larger primary tumor size were significantly associated with

  16. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05).The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome

  17. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs. The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could

  18. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05).The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome

  19. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  20. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  1. Neuroendocrine pancreatic carcinoma after initial diagnosis of acute postpartal coeliac disease in a 37-year old woman - fatal coincidence or result of a neglected disease?

    PubMed

    Gundling, Felix; Nerlich, Andreas; Heitland, Wolf; Schepp, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    An acute presentation after pregnancy of coeliac disease (CD) in the puerperium is a rare condition which has been described mostly in primigravidae in patients highly suspicious of latent CD. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who was referred to our Hospital because of refractory watery diarrhea and malnutrition syndrome. Endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed the classic visual features of CD and in addition, some duodenal ulcers negative for Helicobacter pylori, which seems to be another clinical feature in patients with CD. The diagnosis of acute onset of fulminant postpartal CD (Marsh score stage 3c) was confirmed histologically. Remarkably, simultaneous well-differentiated neuroendocrine non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNET) was diagnosed on radiological abdominal imaging which was performed since serum gastrin was remarkably high, treated by distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. This report is, to our knowledge, the first description of the two entities, CD and PNET occurring together. Since results of antral histological studies showed diffuse hyperplasia of G-cells, probably in response to hypergastrinaemia, enterochromaffin cell carcinogenesis might have served as a possible link between both diseases.

  2. The Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Solid Pseudopapillary Tumors of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals ERO1Lβ as a New Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junjie; Zhu, Yi; Chen, Hao; Shi, Minmin; Gu, Jiangning; Zhang, Jiaqiang; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Zhan, Xi; Peng, Chenghong

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP) is a class of low-grade malignant tumors that carry a favorable prognosis after surgery. Our group has reported that dysfunctions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein processing pathway may play a role in tumor development. However, alterations of this pathway in other pancreatic tumors had not been well investigated. In this study, we collected 35 SPTP and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) specimens and described the clinicopathological features of them. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) for 6 representative proteins (ERO1Lβ, TRAM1, GRP94, BIP, P4HB, and PDIA4) involved in the ER pathway in both SPTP and PNET specimens. We compared the IHC scoring results of tumors and matched normal pancreas tissues and demonstrated that these proteins were downregulated in SPTP specimens. Five of these proteins (TRAM1, GRP94, BIP, P4HB, and PDIA4) did not display significant changes between PNET and normal pancreas tissue. However, ERO1Lβ was upregulated in PNET tissues compared to the normal tissues, which could be used as a pathological biomarker in the future.

  3. Postoperative Complications, In-Hospital Mortality and 5-Year Survival After Surgical Resection for Patients with a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jilesen, Anneke P J; van Eijck, Casper H J; in't Hof, K H; van Dieren, S; Gouma, Dirk J; van Dijkum, Els J M Nieveen

    2016-03-01

    Studies on postoperative complications and survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are sparse and randomized controlled trials are not available. We reviewed all studies on postoperative complications and survival after resection of pNET. A systematic search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE from 2000-2013. Inclusion criteria were studies of resected pNET, which described postoperative complications separately for each surgical procedure and/or 5-year survival after resection. Prospective and retrospective studies were pooled separately and overall pooled if heterogeneity was below 75%. The random-effect model was used. Overall, 2643 studies were identified and after full-text analysis 62 studies were included. Pancreatic fistula (PF) rate of the prospective studies after tumor enucleation was 45%; PF-rates after distal pancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, or central pancreatectomy were, respectively, 14-14-58%. Delayed gastric emptying rates were, respectively, 5-5-18-16%. Postoperative hemorrhage rates were, respectively, 6-1-7-4%. In-hospital mortality rates were, respectively, 3-4-6-4%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) of resected pNET without synchronous resected liver metastases were, respectively, 85-93%. Heterogeneity between included studies on 5-year OS in patients with synchronous resected liver metastases was too high to pool all studies. The 5-year DSS in patients with liver metastases was 80%. Morbidity after pancreatic resection for pNET was mainly caused by PF. Liver resection in patients with liver metastases seems to have a positive effect on DSS. To reduce heterogeneity, ISGPS criteria and uniform patient groups should be used in the analysis of postoperative outcome and survival.

  4. Oral bacteria in pancreatic cancer: mutagenesis of the p53 tumour suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Öğrendik, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, worldwide. The prevalence of this disease is very high in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Orodigestive cancers are frequently seen in patients with periodontitis. These findings suggest that this type of cancer may have some bacterial origins. This study hypothesizes that the peptidyl arginine deaminase (PAD) enzymes found in oral bacteria may be responsible for the p53 point mutations that occur in patients with pancreatic cancer. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola possess the PAD enzyme, and p53 arginine mutations have been detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the Pro allele p53Arg72-Pro is a risk factor for the development of this cancer. Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers have been found to be higher in patients with pancreatic cancer as compared to healthy controls. The hypothesis in question can be tested if the DNA of P. gingivalis or the antibodies against P. gingivalis can be detected in patients with the p53 arginine mutation.If this hypothesis is true, it could reveal the real cause of pancreatic cancer, which is a fatal disease. Further studies are necessary in order to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26617937

  5. Oral bacteria in pancreatic cancer: mutagenesis of the p53 tumour suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Öğrendik, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, worldwide. The prevalence of this disease is very high in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Orodigestive cancers are frequently seen in patients with periodontitis. These findings suggest that this type of cancer may have some bacterial origins. This study hypothesizes that the peptidyl arginine deaminase (PAD) enzymes found in oral bacteria may be responsible for the p53 point mutations that occur in patients with pancreatic cancer. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola possess the PAD enzyme, and p53 arginine mutations have been detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the Pro allele p53Arg72-Pro is a risk factor for the development of this cancer. Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers have been found to be higher in patients with pancreatic cancer as compared to healthy controls. The hypothesis in question can be tested if the DNA of P. gingivalis or the antibodies against P. gingivalis can be detected in patients with the p53 arginine mutation.If this hypothesis is true, it could reveal the real cause of pancreatic cancer, which is a fatal disease. Further studies are necessary in order to confirm this hypothesis.

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  7. TNM staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an observational analysis and comparison by both AJCC and ENETS systems from 1 single institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  8. Ki-67 cytological index can distinguish well-differentiated from poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a comparative cytohistological study of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Carlinfante, Gabriele; Baccarini, Paola; Berretti, Debora; Cassetti, Tiziana; Cavina, Maurizio; Conigliaro, Rita; De Pellegrin, Alessandro; Di Tommaso, Luca; Fabbri, Carlo; Fornelli, Adele; Frasoldati, Andrea; Gardini, Giorgio; Losi, Luisa; Maccio, Livia; Manta, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico; Sassatelli, Romano; Serra, Silvia; Camellini, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    The Ki-67 labeling index has been found to bear prognostic significance in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and it was recently incorporated in NET histological grading. Nevertheless, a reliable preoperative determination of NET grading could be useful in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to compare the results of Ki-67 labeling index, as measured on cytological samples and on surgical specimens of patients with pancreatic NETs (P-NETs). We also investigated whether concordance might be improved, using a 5 % (instead of 2 %) cutoff value for defining G2 tumors. We retrospectively identified 48 consecutive patients with 53 P-NETs, from our five institutions, and we measured Ki-67 labeling index on their cytological samples and surgical specimens. The traditional 2 % and the alternative 5 % cutoff values were used to classify G2 tumors. The concordance rate between cytological and histological grading was 46/53 (86.8 %; weighted κ statistic 0.77; 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 0.60-0.94). No cases of cytological G1-G2 NETs were upgraded to G3 neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) at histological grading. Cytology was found to be highly specific in the diagnosis of both G2 (94.1 %; 95 % CI 80.3-99.3) and G3 tumors (100.0 %; 95 % CI 92.8-100), but the sensitivity was poor for G2 NETs (66.7 %; 95 % CI 38.4-88.2) and high for the prediction of G3 NECs (100 %; 95 % CI 39.8-100.0). When the 5 % cutoff value was adopted, concordance rate was 49/53 (92.4 %; weighted κ 0.82; 95 % CI 0.64-1.00). In conclusion, Ki-67 cytological expression can distinguish well-differentiated (both G1 and G2) from poorly differentiated P-NETs, and it may be useful for their preoperative classification. PMID:24807732

  9. Hormonally defined pancreatic and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors differ in their transcription factor signatures: expression of ISL1, PDX1, NGN3, and CDX2.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gratiana; Konukiewitz, Björn; Schmitt, Anja; Perren, Aurel; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-08-01

    We recently identified the transcription factor (TF) islet 1 gene product (ISL1) as a marker for well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). In order to better understand the expression of the four TFs, ISL1, pancreatico-duodenal homeobox 1 gene product (PDX1), neurogenin 3 gene product (NGN3), and CDX-2 homeobox gene product (CDX2), that mainly govern the development and differentiation of the pancreas and duodenum, we studied their expression in hormonally defined P-NETs and duodenal (D-) NETs. Thirty-six P-NETs and 14 D-NETs were immunostained with antibodies against the four pancreatic hormones, gastrin, serotonin, calcitonin, ISL1, PDX1, NGN3, and CDX2. The TF expression pattern of each case was correlated with the tumor's hormonal profile. Insulin-positive NETs expressed only ISL1 (10/10) and PDX1 (9/10). Glucagon-positive tumors expressed ISL1 (7/7) and were almost negative for the other TFs. Gastrin-positive NETs, whether of duodenal or pancreatic origin, frequently expressed PDX1 (17/18), ISL1 (14/18), and NGN3 (14/18). CDX2 was mainly found in the gastrin-positive P-NETs (5/8) and rarely in the D-NETs (1/10). Somatostatin-positive NETs, whether duodenal or pancreatic in origin, expressed ISL1 (9/9), PDX1 (3/9), and NGN3 (3/9). The remaining tumors showed labeling for ISL1 in addition to NGN3. There was no association between a particular TF pattern and NET features such as grade, size, location, presence of metastases, and functional activity. We conclude from our data that there is a correlation between TF expression patterns and certain hormonally defined P-NET and D-NET types, suggesting that most of the tumor types originate from embryologically determined precursor cells. The observed TF signatures do not allow us to distinguish P-NETs from D-NETs. PMID:21739268

  10. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P; Falls, Kelly C; Reed, Sara M; Taghiyev, Agshin F; Quelle, Frederick W; Gourronc, Francoise A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Major, Heather J; Askeland, Ryan W; Sherman, Scott K; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Howe, James R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-11-15

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood, and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs (PNET) that correlated with high-level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor-suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating that RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A-knockdown cells, although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients.

  11. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  12. Differential screening of a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library has identified increased transcription of elongation factor EF-1 alpha in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Grant, A G; Flomen, R M; Tizard, M L; Grant, D A

    1992-03-12

    A human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library was differentially screened with mRNA derived from normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues. Five clones preferentially hybridized with pancreatic adenocarcinoma mRNA. cDNA inserts from 4 of these clones were amplified by PCR, labelled with alpha 32P and used in Northern blot analysis against mRNA prepared from a variety of tumour and normal tissues. lambda GER-4 identified a pancreas-associated mRNA (greater than 10 kb) with no homology with known sequences at either the nucleic or amino-acid level. lambda GER-2 identified a 1.7-kb mRNA transcript that was over-expressed in mRNA prepared from pancreas, colon, breast, lung and gastric tumours relative to normal tissues. Sequence analysis and restriction-enzyme mapping showed that this clone was completely homologous with the active form of human elongation factor EF-1 alpha. This high level of EF-1 alpha-mRNA expression in tumour tissues lends support to the increasing evidence that EF-1 alpha is an important regulator of the cell cycle. PMID:1544708

  13. [Hepatic and pancreatic laparoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Pardo, F; Rotellar, F; Valentí, V; Pastor, C; Poveda, I; Martí-Cruchaga, P; Zozaya, G

    2005-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic surgery also includes the more complex procedures of abdominal surgery such as those that affect the liver and the pancreas. From diagnostic laparoscopy, accompanied by laparoscopic echography, to major hepatic or pancreatic resections, the laparoscopic approach has spread and today encompasses practically all of the surgical procedures in hepatopancreatic pathology. Without forgetting that the aim of minimally invasive surgery is not a better aesthetic result but the reduction of postoperative complications, it is undeniable that the laparoscopic approach has brought great benefits for the patient in every type of surgery except, for the time being, in the case of big resections such as left or right hepatectomy or resections of segments VII and VIII. Pancreatic surgery has undergone a great development with laparoscopy, especially in the field of distal pancreatectomy due to cystic and neuroendocrine tumours where the approach of choice is laparoscopic. Laparoscopy similarly plays an important role, together with echolaparoscopy, in staging pancreatic tumours, prior to open surgery or for indicating suitable treatment. In coming years, it is to be hoped that it will continue to undergo an exponential development and, together with the advances in robotics, it will be possible to witness a greater impact of the laparoscopic approach on the field of hepatic and pancreatic surgery. PMID:16511579

  14. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  15. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  16. Anti-VEGF antibody therapy does not promote metastasis in genetically engineered mouse tumour models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mallika; Couto, Suzana S; Forrest, William F; Lima, Anthony; Cheng, Jason H; Molina, Rafael; Long, Jason E; Hamilton, Patricia; McNutt, Angela; Kasman, Ian; Nannini, Michelle A; Reslan, Hani Bou; Cao, Tim C; Ho, Calvin C K; Barck, Kai H; Carano, Richard A D; Foreman, Oded; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Jubb, Adrian M; Ferrara, Napoleone; Johnson, Leisa

    2012-08-01

    Resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy can occur via several potential mechanisms. Unexpectedly, recent studies showed that short-term inhibition of either VEGF or VEGFR enhanced tumour invasiveness and metastatic spread in preclinical models. In an effort to evaluate the translational relevance of these findings, we examined the consequences of long-term anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody therapy in several well-validated genetically engineered mouse tumour models of either neuroendocrine or epithelial origin. Anti-VEGF therapy decreased tumour burden and increased overall survival, either as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy, in all four models examined. Importantly, neither short- nor long-term exposure to anti-VEGF therapy altered the incidence of metastasis in any of these autochthonous models, consistent with retrospective analyses of clinical trials. In contrast, we observed that sunitinib treatment recapitulated previously reported effects on tumour invasiveness and metastasis in a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) model. Consistent with these results, sunitinib treatment resulted in an up-regulation of the hypoxia marker GLUT1 in PNETs, whereas anti-VEGF did not. These results indicate that anti-VEGF mediates anti-tumour effects and therapeutic benefits without a paradoxical increase in metastasis. Moreover, these data underscore the concept that drugs targeting VEGF ligands and receptors may affect tumour metastasis in a context-dependent manner and are mechanistically distinct from one another.

  17. Sexual dimorphism of liver metastasis by murine pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is affected by expression of complement C5

    PubMed Central

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Kobayashi, Shinta; da Silva, Edaise; Clausen, Richard; Chan, Chang; Vosburgh, Evan; Tang, Laura H.; Levine, Arnold J.; Harris, Chris R.

    2016-01-01

    In a mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PanNETs), liver metastasis occurred at a higher frequency in males. Male mice also had higher serum and intratumoral levels of the innate immunity protein complement C5. In mice that lost the ability to express complement C5, there was a lower frequency of metastasis, and males no longer had a higher frequency of metastasis than females. Treatment with PMX53, a small molecule antagonist of C5aR1/CD88, the receptor for complement C5a, also reduced metastasis. Mice lacking a functional gene for complement C5 had smaller primary tumors, which were less invasive and lacked the CD68+ macrophages that have previously been associated with metastasis in this type of tumor. This is the first report of a gene that causes sexual dimorphism of metastasis in a mouse model. In the human disease, which also shows sexual dimorphism for metastasis, clinically advanced tumors expressed more complement C5 than less advanced tumors. PMID:27105526

  18. PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Buddha; Hua, Xianxin; Runske, Melissa; Bennett, Bonita; LiVolsi, Virginia; Roses, Robert; Fraker, Douglas A; Metz, David C

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the HH signaling pathway is similarly upregulated in human PNETs. We performed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PTCH1 in human fresh and archival PNET specimens to examine whether human sporadic and MEN-1-associated PNETs revealed similar abnormalities as in our mouse model and correlated the results with clinical and demographic factors of the study cohort. PTCH1 staining was positive in 12 of 22 PNET patients (55%). Four of 5 MEN-1 patients stained for PTCH1 (p = 0.32 as compared with sporadic disease patients). Nine of 16 patients with metastatic disease stained for PTCH1 as compared with zero of 3 with localized disease only (p = 0.21). No demographic or clinical features appeared to be predictive of PTCH 1 positivity and PTCH 1 positivity per se was not predictive of clinical outcome. PTCH1, a marker of HH pathway up regulation, is detectable in both primary and metastatic tumors in more than 50% of PNET patients. Although no clinical or demographic factors predict PTCH1 positivity and PTCH1 positivity does not predict clinical outcome, the frequency of expression alone indicates that perturbation of this pathway with agents such as Vismodegib, an inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO), should be examined in future clinical trials. PMID:25482929

  19. hERG1 channels drive tumour malignancy and may serve as prognostic factor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lastraioli, E; Perrone, G; Sette, A; Fiore, A; Crociani, O; Manoli, S; D'Amico, M; Masselli, M; Iorio, J; Callea, M; Borzomati, D; Nappo, G; Bartolozzi, F; Santini, D; Bencini, L; Farsi, M; Boni, L; Di Costanzo, F; Schwab, A; Onetti Muda, A; Coppola, R; Arcangeli, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: hERG1 channels are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. The expression, functional role and clinical significance of hERG1 channels in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is lacking. Methods: hERG1 expression was tested in PDAC primary samples assembled as tissue microarray by immunohistochemistry using an anti-hERG1 monoclonal antibody (α-hERG1-MoAb). The functional role of hERG1 was studied in PDAC cell lines and primary cultures. ERG1 expression during PDAC progression was studied in Pdx-1-Cre,LSL-KrasG12D/+,LSL-Trp53R175H/+ transgenic (KPC) mice. ERG1 expression in vivo was determined by optical imaging using Alexa-680-labelled α-hERG1-MoAb. Results: (i) hERG1 was expressed at high levels in 59% of primary PDAC; (ii) hERG1 blockade decreased PDAC cell growth and migration; (iii) hERG1 was physically and functionally linked to the Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor pathway; (iv) in transgenic mice, ERG1 was expressed in PanIN lesions, reaching high expression levels in PDAC; (v) PDAC patients whose primary tumour showed high hERG1 expression had a worse prognosis; (vi) the α-hERG1-MoAb could detect PDAC in vivo. Conclusions: hERG1 regulates PDAC malignancy and its expression, once validated in a larger cohort also comprising of late-stage, non-surgically resected cases, may be exploited for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in PDAC either ex vivo or in vivo. PMID:25719829

  20. Solid-cystic (papillary-cystic) tumours within and outside the pancreas in men: report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, G; Maurer, R; Hofmann, E; Lüthold, K; Oscarson, J; Forsby, N; Ihse, I; Ljungberg, O; Heitz, P U

    1991-01-01

    Solid-cystic (papillary-cystic) tumours (SCT) of the pancreas are distinctive neoplasms with a predilection for young female patients. This is the first detailed report describing the occurrence of SCT in two young male patients. Except for the extapancreatic occurrence of one of the tumours (in the retroperitoneal region behind the head of the pancreas), all other clinicopathological features were identical to those characterizing the SCT in women. Immunostaining was (at least focally) positive for Lu 5 (broad spectrum keratin marker), vimentin and alpha-1-antitrypsin. The tumours were negative for neuroendocrine markers (except for neuron-specific enolase), pancreatic hormones and enzymes, pancreatic stone protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, CA 19-9 and nuclear oestrogen and progesterone receptors. This report does not support the suggested female sex hormone dependence of SCT.

  1. Neuroendocrine tumor targeting: study of novel gallium-labeled somatostatin radiopeptides in a rat pancreatic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Froidevaux, Sylvie; Eberle, Alex N; Christe, Martine; Sumanovski, Lazar; Heppeler, Axel; Schmitt, Jörg S; Eisenwiener, Klaus; Beglinger, Christoph; Mäcke, Helmut R

    2002-04-20

    Somatostatin analogs labeled with radionuclides are of considerable interest in the diagnosis and therapy of SSTR-expressing tumors, such as gastroenteropancreatic, small cell lung, breast and frequently nervous system tumors. In view of the favorable physical characteristics of the Ga isotopes (67)Ga and (68)Ga, enabling conventional tumor scintigraphy, PET and possibly internal radiotherapy, we focused on the development of a Ga-labeled somatostatin analog suitable for targeting SSTR-expressing tumors. For this purpose, 3 somatostatin analogs, OC, TOC and TATE were conjugated to the metal chelator DOTA and labeled with the radiometals (111)In, (90)Y and (67)Ga. They were then evaluated for their performance in the AR4-2J pancreatic tumor model by testing SSTR2-binding affinity, internalization/externalization in isolated cells and biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice. Surprisingly, we found that, compared to (111)In or (90)Y, labeling with (67)Ga considerably improved the biologic performance of the tested somatostatin analogs with respect to SSTR2 affinity and tissue distribution. (67)Ga-labeled DOTA-somatostatin analogs were rapidly excreted from nontarget tissues, leading to excellent tumor-to-nontarget tissue uptake ratios. Of interest for radiotherapeutic application, [(67)Ga]DOTATOC was strongly internalized by AR4-2J cells. Furthermore, our results suggest a link between the radioligand charge and its kidney retention. The excellent tumor selectivity of Ga-DOTA somatostatin analogs together with the different applications of Ga in nuclear oncology suggests that Ga-DOTA somatostatin analogs will become an important tool in the management of SSTR-positive tumors.

  2. ARID1B, a member of the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, exhibits tumour-suppressor activities in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Khursheed, M; Kolla, J N; Kotapalli, V; Gupta, N; Gowrishankar, S; Uppin, S G; Sastry, R A; Koganti, S; Sundaram, C; Pollack, J R; Bashyam, M D

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human ATP-dependent SWItch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF) complex functions as a primary chromatin remodeler during ontogeny, as well as in adult life. Several components of the complex have been suggested to function as important regulators of tumorigenesis in various cancers. In the current study, we have characterised a possible tumour suppressor role for the largest subunit of the complex, namely the AT-rich interaction domain 1B (ARID1B). Methods: We performed Azacytidine and Trichostatin A treatments, followed by bisulphite sequencing to determine the possible DNA methylation-induced transcription repression of the gene in pancreatic cancer (PaCa) cell lines. Functional characterisation of effect of ARID1B ectopic expression in MiaPaCa2 PaCa cell line, which harboured ARID1B homozygous deletion, was carried out. Finally, we evaluated ARID1B protein expression in pancreatic tumour samples using immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray. Results: ARID1B was transcriptionally repressed due to promoter hypermethylation, and ectopic expression severely compromised the ability of MiaPaCa2 cells to form colonies in liquid culture and soft agar. In addition, ARID1B exhibited significantly reduced/loss of expression in PaCa tissue, especially in samples from advanced-stage tumours, when compared with normal pancreas. Conclusion: The results therefore suggest a possible tumour-suppressor function for ARID1B in PaCa, thus adding to the growing list of SWI/SNF components with a similar function. Given the urgent need to design efficient targeted therapies for PaCa, our study assumes significance. PMID:23660946

  3. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of surgical patients from a Chinese institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-07-01

    The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory.We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs.Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1-2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1-3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga-b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1.The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05).Stratifying patients well, the current

  4. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of surgical patients from a Chinese institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-07-01

    The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory.We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs.Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1-2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1-3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga-b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1.The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05).Stratifying patients well, the current

  5. Fountain of steroid from an ectopic ACTH-producing tumour

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2013-01-01

    This case is of a 39-year-old Filipino woman who within 2 months developed, Cushing's features she had no known comorbidities and no history of steroid intake. The patient also presented with hyperpigmentation of knuckles and toes, metabolic alkalosis and persistent hypokalaemia noted as proximal muscle weakness. The patient was referred to our institution for acutely worsening behavioural and psychiatric changes. Work-up for endogenous Cushing's syndrome revealed a significant adrenocorticotropic hormone production from an ectopic source. Further imaging was requested to locate the tumour, but the patient eventually succumbed to the drastic complications of hypercortisolism. On autopsy, the patient was found to have an ectopic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour located at the pancreatic head with metastasis to the right hepatic lobe. PMID:23861274

  6. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  7. Stages of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound. Tissue may also be removed during a laparoscopy (a surgical incision made in the wall of ... The instrument may be used during surgery or laparoscopy or inserted through the skin. This procedure is ...

  8. Pharmacological targeting of the protein synthesis mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway in cancer-associated fibroblasts abrogates pancreatic tumour chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Duluc, Camille; Moatassim-Billah, Siham; Chalabi-Dchar, Mounira; Perraud, Aurélie; Samain, Rémi; Breibach, Florence; Gayral, Marion; Cordelier, Pierre; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre; Tomasini, Richard; Schmid, Herbert; Mathonnet, Muriel; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Martineau, Yvan; Bousquet, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is extremely stroma-rich. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) secrete proteins that activate survival and promote chemoresistance of cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAF secretome-triggered chemoresistance is abolished upon inhibition of the protein synthesis mTOR/4E-BP1 regulatory pathway which we found highly activated in primary cultures of α-SMA-positive CAFs, isolated from human PDAC resections. CAFs selectively express the sst1 somatostatin receptor. The SOM230 analogue (Pasireotide) activates the sst1 receptor and inhibits the mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway and the resultant synthesis of secreted proteins including IL-6. Consequently, tumour growth and chemoresistance in nude mice xenografted with pancreatic cancer cells and CAFs, or with pieces of resected human PDACs, are reduced when chemotherapy (gemcitabine) is combined with SOM230 treatment. While gemcitabine alone has marginal effects, SOM230 is permissive to gemcitabine-induced cancer cell apoptosis and acts as an antifibrotic agent. We propose that selective inhibition of CAF protein synthesis with sst1-directed pharmacological compounds represents an anti-stromal-targeted therapy with promising chemosensitization potential. PMID:25834145

  9. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  10. Epidemiology of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Merav; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Valk, Gerlof D

    2015-01-01

    Formerly named carcinoids, neuroendocrine tumors originate from diffuse endocrine cells, can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, endocrine pancreas and bronchopulmonary (BP) tree, and have a wide range of malignant potential. This chapter summarizes the data available on the epidemiology of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN) from around the world, including the relative frequency according to organ of origin, annual incidence rates (IR) and trends in IR at the various anatomic sites, age and stage at presentation, racial and gender differences in IR and 5-year survival rates. Over time, changes have been made in the classification and registration of NEN, both in the same registry and across the globe, thus confounding the possibility to draw conclusions as to the true rise in IR of NEN that is observed all over the world. BP NEN has become the most common site in many western countries, while NEN of the rectum is more common in the Far East. In some countries, appendiceal NEN is the most common site in females. When compared to adenocarcinoma of the same location, the prognosis of NEN patients is better. Five-year survival rates are highest for NEN originating in the rectum and appendix, but lower in small intestinal and pancreatic NEN. Future research is needed to understand the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to NEN epidemiology. PMID:26303701

  11. Survival Benefit With Proapoptotic Molecular and Pathologic Responses From Dual Targeting of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in a Preclinical Model of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Christopher W.; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), although rare, often metastasize, such that surgery, the only potentially curative therapy, is not possible. There is no effective systemic therapy for patients with advanced PNETs. Therefore, new strategies are needed. Toward that end, we investigated the potential benefit of dual therapeutic targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases, using a preclinical mouse model of PNET. Materials and Methods Rapamycin and erlotinib, inhibitors of mTOR and EGFR, respectively, were used to treat RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice bearing advanced multifocal PNET. Tumor growth and survival were monitored, and tumors were surveyed for potential biomarkers of response to the therapeutics. Results Rapamycin monotherapy was notably efficacious, prolonging survival concomitant with tumor stasis (stable disease). However, the tumors developed resistance, as evidenced by eventual relapse to progressive tumor growth. Erlotinib monotherapy slowed tumor growth and elicited a marginal survival benefit. In combination, there was an unprecedented survival benefit in the face of this aggressive multifocal cancer and, in contrast to either monotherapy, the development of adaptive resistance was not apparent. Additionally, the antiapoptotic protein survivin was implicated as a biomarker of sensitivity and beneficial responses to the dual targeted therapy. Conclusion Preclinical trials in a mouse model of endogenous PNET suggest that combined targeting of the mTOR and EGFR signaling pathways could have potential clinical benefit in treating PNET. These results have encouraged development of an ongoing phase II clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment regimen in human neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:20823411

  12. Metastatic Insulinoma Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Treated With 177Lu-DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: A Suggested Protocol.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with frequent episodes of hypoglycemia. Imaging revealed a 6-cm pancreatic mass with several liver lesions. The pancreatic mass was resected and confirmed to be a well-differentiated insulinoma. Surgery improved but did not resolve her hypoglycemic episodes, and she was referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE to treat her residual disease. A modified protocol with a continuous IV dextrose infusion was used, and the treatments were well tolerated. After 4 induction and 2 maintenance treatments, her hypoglycemic symptoms resolved completely and her disease stabilized. She has been progression free for 24 months. PMID:26562579

  13. Clinical utility of indigenously formulated single-vial lyophilized HYNIC-TOC kit in evaluating Gastro-entero Pancreatic neuro endocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K; Vyshak, K; Sudhakar, Natarajan; Banerjee, Sharmila; Korde, Aruna; Samuel, Grace; Mallia, Madhav

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and utility of 99mTc HYNIC-TOC planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GPNETs). Methods: 22 patients (median age, 46 years) with histologically proven gastro- entero- pancreatic NETs underwent 99mTc HYNIC-TOC whole body scintigraphy and regional SPECT/CT as indicated. Scanning was performed after injection of 370-550 MBq (10-15 mCi) of 99mTc HYNIC-TOC intravenously. Images were evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians both qualitatively as well as semi quantitatively (tumor to background and tumor to normal liver ratios on SPECT -CT images). Results of SPECT/CT were compared with the results of conventional imaging. Histopathology results and follow-up somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc HYNIC TOC or conventional imaging with biochemical markers were considered to be the reference standards. Results: 99mTc HYNIC TOC showed sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 85.7%, respectively, for primary tumor and 100% and 86% for metastases. It was better than conventional imaging modalities for the detection of both primary tumor (P<0.001) and metastases (P<0.0001). It changed the management strategy in 6 patients (31.8%) and supported management decisions in 8 patients (36.3%). Conclusion: 99mTc HYNIC TOC SPECT/CT appears to be a highly sensitive and specific modality for the detection and staging of GPNETs. It is better than conventional imaging for the evaluation of GPNETs and can have a significant impact on patient management and planning further therapeutic options. PMID:27408857

  14. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  15. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  16. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McGinness, Sam; Coleman, Hedley; Varikatt, Winny; da Cruz, Melville

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours. PMID:27429819

  17. [A Case of Von Hippel-Lindau Disease with Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Treated by Duodenum-Preserving Resection of the Head of the Pancreas and Spleen-Preserving Resection of the Tail of the Pancreas].

    PubMed

    Umehara, Yutaka; Umehara, Minoru; Tokura, Tomohisa; Yachi, Takafumi; Takahashi, Kenichi; Morita, Takayuki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented to our department with a diagnosis of multiple nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. She had a family history of pheochromocytoma and a medical history of bilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma at the age of 25 years. During follow-up treatment for adrenal insufficiency after the surgery, highly enhanced tumors in the pancreas were detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Other examinations found that the patient did not satisfy the clinical criteria for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Considering her age and risk of developing multiple heterotopic and heterochronous tumors, we performed a duodenum-preserving resection of the head of the pancreas and spleen-preserving resection of the tail of the pancreas with informed consent. The histopathological findings revealed that all of the tumors were NET G1. She underwent genetic testing postoperatively and was diagnosed with VHL disease. This diagnosis meant that we were able to create an optimal treatment plan for the patient. If a tumor predisposition syndrome is suspected, VHL disease should be borne in mind and genetic testing after genetic counseling should be duly considered.

  18. Retroperitoneal cystic neuroendocrine tumor. A case report.

    PubMed

    Scapinello, A; D'Amore, E S; Cavazzana, A O; Gramegna, V; Ninfo, V

    1995-10-01

    A 21 cm retroperitoneal cystic mass was excised from a 71 year old woman. The cyst was filled with a hemorrhagic fluid and contained a 5 cm parietal hemorrhagic nodule. On histology, the nodule was composed of a uniform population of round cells arranged in trabeculae and nests. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to cytokeratin, EMA, NSE, chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and Gastrin (G). Ultrastructural observation of neurosecretory granules confirmed the neuroendocrine nature of the tumor. No other lesions were detected and a diagnosis of primary epithelial neuroendocrine tumor was rendered. The histogenesis of the tumor including the possibility of a paraganglionic origin is discussed.

  19. [Anorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma: observations on a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Messinetti, S; Giacomelli, L; Drudi, F M; Innocenzi, D; Porcelli, C; Fabrizio, G; Finizio, R; Manno, A; Granai, A V

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours of the anorectum are rare (0.7% of malignant rectal tumours). Because of this rarity several aspects of the management of these tumours remain controversial. Diagnosis may be delayed because of failure to recognize their morphological characteristics and histological appearance may not reflect their biological behaviour. Immunocytochemistry for neuroendocrine-cells are essential to identify different types of carcinoid tumours and to do differential diagnosis from other malignant tumours. All that allow an exact therapeutic approach to these tumours. The tumours less than cm 1 in diameter can be safely treated by local excision; the tumours more than cm 1 in diameter are treated by radical surgery (AAP).

  20. A phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Paolorossi, F; Tancini, G; Ardizzoia, A; Barni, S; Brivio, F; Maestroni, G J; Chilelli, M

    1996-11-01

    Preliminary data would suggest that the pineal hormone, melatonin (MLT), may enhance tamoxifen (TMX) anti-tumour efficacy. Both MLT and TMX have been used as single agents in the palliative treatment of metastatic neoplasms, other than the classical hormone-dependent tumours, without, however, any clear efficacy. On this basis, a phase II study with TMX plus MLT has been performed in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients. The study included 25 metastatic solid tumour patients other than breast cancer and prostate cancer (six unknown primary tumour; four melanoma; four uterine cervix carcinoma; five pancreatic cancer; three hepatocarcinoma; two ovarian cancer; one non-small-cell lung cancer), for whom no other effective standard therapy was available, because of poor clinical conditions, no response to previous chemotherapies and/or chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Both drugs were given orally every day until disease progression (TMX, 20 mg day-1 at noon; MLT, 20 mg day-1 in the evening). Three patients had a partial response (PR) (12%; 95% confidence limits 2-24%) (one cervix carcinoma; one melanoma; one unknown primary tumour). A stable disease (SD) was achieved in 13 other patients, whereas the remaining nine patients progressed. Performance status (PS) improved in 9/25 patients, whose median score increased from 50% to 70%. Finally, a survival longer than 1 year was observed in 7/25 (28%) patients. This phase II study would suggest that the neuroendocrine combination with TMX plus MLT may have some benefit in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients, either in controlling cancer cell proliferation or improving the PS.

  1. A phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lissoni, P.; Paolorossi, F.; Tancini, G.; Ardizzoia, A.; Barni, S.; Brivio, F.; Maestroni, G. J.; Chilelli, M.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary data would suggest that the pineal hormone, melatonin (MLT), may enhance tamoxifen (TMX) anti-tumour efficacy. Both MLT and TMX have been used as single agents in the palliative treatment of metastatic neoplasms, other than the classical hormone-dependent tumours, without, however, any clear efficacy. On this basis, a phase II study with TMX plus MLT has been performed in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients. The study included 25 metastatic solid tumour patients other than breast cancer and prostate cancer (six unknown primary tumour; four melanoma; four uterine cervix carcinoma; five pancreatic cancer; three hepatocarcinoma; two ovarian cancer; one non-small-cell lung cancer), for whom no other effective standard therapy was available, because of poor clinical conditions, no response to previous chemotherapies and/or chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Both drugs were given orally every day until disease progression (TMX, 20 mg day-1 at noon; MLT, 20 mg day-1 in the evening). Three patients had a partial response (PR) (12%; 95% confidence limits 2-24%) (one cervix carcinoma; one melanoma; one unknown primary tumour). A stable disease (SD) was achieved in 13 other patients, whereas the remaining nine patients progressed. Performance status (PS) improved in 9/25 patients, whose median score increased from 50% to 70%. Finally, a survival longer than 1 year was observed in 7/25 (28%) patients. This phase II study would suggest that the neuroendocrine combination with TMX plus MLT may have some benefit in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients, either in controlling cancer cell proliferation or improving the PS. PMID:8912546

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  3. Generalised hyperpigmentation caused by ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome with recurrent thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hye-Rim; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a rare cause of generalised hyperpigmentation. The clinical features are due to the excessive ectopic secretion of adenocorticotropin by diverse neuroendocrine or non-endocrine tumours. Here, we describe a rare case of ectopic ACTH syndrome developing from recurring thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma, which first presented as generalised hyperpigmentation.

  4. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  5. Expression of collagenase (MMP2), stromelysin (MMP3) and tissue inhibitor of the metalloproteinases (TIMP1) in pancreatic and ampullary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, S. R.; Stamp, G. W.; Dunn, J.; Lemoine, N. R.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    It is now recognised that epithelial-stromal interactions are important in a wide range of disease processes including neoplasia and inflammation. Metalloproteinases are central to matrix degradation and remodelling, which are key events in tumour invasion and metastasis and may also be involved in tissue changes occurring in chronic inflammation. Immunohistochemistry was performed on sections from 50 patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 27), ampullary cancer (n = 12), low bile duct cancer (n = 3), neuroendocrine tumours (n = 3) and chronic pancreatitis (n = 5), using antibodies raised against collagenase (MMP2), stromelysin (MMP3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP1) and developed using the avidin-biotin complex method. Abundance of MMP2, MMP3 and TIMP1 was greater in pancreatic and ampullary cancer than any other pathology and immunoreactivity in the malignant epithelial cells in pancreatic and ampullary cancer was greater than in the stromal tissues (in pancreatic cancer: MMP2 100% vs 37%, MMP3 93% vs 15%, TIMP1 93% vs 4%, P < 0.0001). There were strong correlations between the immunoreactivity of the two antibodies for MMP2 (P < 0.0001), between MMP2 and TIMP1 (P < 0.0001) and between MMP3 and TIMP1 (P < 0.0001). The immunoreactivity for TIMP1 in pancreatic and ampullary cancers with lymph node metastases was significantly less compared with those cases without lymph node metastases (P < 0.02) and there was an association between increased immunoreactivity for MMP2 and the degree of tumour differentiation (P < 0.01). The results implicate MMP2, MMP3 and TIMP1 in the invasive phenotype of pancreatic and ampullary cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8611434

  6. Neuroendocrine hyperplasia —

    Cancer.gov

    Groups of uniform small cells with scant cytoplasm and round to oval nuclei with dense speckled chromatin form clusters thickening bronchiolar wall and/or protruding into the lumen. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of neuroendocrine differentiation, such as synaptophysin, CGRP and chromogranin, is required for accurate identification. Not reported to occur spontaneously. Neuroendocrine hyperplasia must be differentiated from normal groups of neuroendocrine cells found more prominently in some mouse strains.

  7. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Anja; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-α, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24213230

  8. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  9. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  10. Treatment Options for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound. Tissue may also be removed during a laparoscopy (a surgical incision made in the wall of ... The instrument may be used during surgery or laparoscopy or inserted through the skin. This procedure is ...

  11. Pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma in a four-month-old dog.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, S; Yamamura, H; Morita, T; Hasegawa, A

    1994-11-01

    A 4-month-old male Siberian Husky dog had a history of coughing, high fever and anorexia. Thoracic radiographs revealed increased radiographic density in the cranial and middle lobes of the right lung, with pleural effusion. Cytological examination of the pleural fluid suggested carcinomatous pleuritis. Right-side thoracotomy and resection of the cranial and middle lobes were performed. Histopathological examination of the resected tissue revealed an anaplastic large cell carcinoma. The tumour cells were positive for neuron specific enolase and also contained neuroendocrine granules. A particularly unusual feature of this case of pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma was the young age of the affected animal.

  12. [Neuroendocrine tumors: Peptide receptors radionuclide therapy (PRRT)].

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitris G; Exadaktylou, Paraskevi E; Chatzipavlidou, Vasiliki D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendocrine tumors-NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with a common embryological origin and diverse biological behavior, derived from cells of the neuroendocrine system, the system APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They are characterized by overexpression of all five somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5), particularly type 2 (SST2). Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment option, with a possibility of complete remission in patients with limited disease. Somatostatin analogs (octreotide and lanreotide) are the treatment of choice in patients with residual disease, particularly when it comes to NET non-pancreatic origin. Systemic chemotherapy is administered primarily to patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas. PRRT treatment is recommended in case of non-responsiveness of the disease. The ideal candidates for PRRT are patients with unresectable disease of high and intermediate differentiation. Somatostatine analogs radiolabelled with Indium-111 ((111)In), Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) and Bismuth-213 ((213)Bi), are selectively concentrated in the tumor cells, causing maximum tissue damage to tumors and with fewer effects on healthy tissue and the immune system. In the current review, it was demonstrated that patients with unresectable grade 1 or 2 disease showed increased PFS (progression free survival) and OS (overall survival), while quality of life was improved after PRRT treatment as compared to somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. PMID:27035909

  13. [Neuroendocrine tumors: Peptide receptors radionuclide therapy (PRRT)].

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitris G; Exadaktylou, Paraskevi E; Chatzipavlidou, Vasiliki D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendocrine tumors-NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with a common embryological origin and diverse biological behavior, derived from cells of the neuroendocrine system, the system APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They are characterized by overexpression of all five somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5), particularly type 2 (SST2). Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment option, with a possibility of complete remission in patients with limited disease. Somatostatin analogs (octreotide and lanreotide) are the treatment of choice in patients with residual disease, particularly when it comes to NET non-pancreatic origin. Systemic chemotherapy is administered primarily to patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas. PRRT treatment is recommended in case of non-responsiveness of the disease. The ideal candidates for PRRT are patients with unresectable disease of high and intermediate differentiation. Somatostatine analogs radiolabelled with Indium-111 ((111)In), Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) and Bismuth-213 ((213)Bi), are selectively concentrated in the tumor cells, causing maximum tissue damage to tumors and with fewer effects on healthy tissue and the immune system. In the current review, it was demonstrated that patients with unresectable grade 1 or 2 disease showed increased PFS (progression free survival) and OS (overall survival), while quality of life was improved after PRRT treatment as compared to somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies.

  14. Pancreatic calculi superimposed upon slow growing pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Noda, A; Takeuchi, K; Ibuki, E; Murayama, H; Kobayashi, T; Nonogaki, T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a 59 year old male patient with cancer of the head of the pancreas, upon which pancreatic calculi were superimposed during the 3 year clinical course. Pancreatic calculi were noted in the main pancreatic duct (MPD) on both computed tomographic scans and ultrasonographs of the abdomen approximately 10 months after the recognizable dilatation of the MPD. Existence of the calculi was confirmed by autopsy. Elemental analysis and infrared spectrophotometry of the calculi demonstrated that the main constituent of the calculi was calcium carbonate. Histopathological examination showed that the pancreatic cancer was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that pancreatic stone protein (lithostathine) was present in the cytoplasm of tumour cells. In this case, pancreatic cancer progressed to obstruct the MPD unusually slowly, resulting in stagnation of pancreatic secretion and subsequent formation of the calculi.

  15. Neuroendocrine-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J A; Scanes, C G

    1994-07-01

    The role of the neuroendocrine system in influencing both immune development and function has become an area of active research within many model systems, including the chicken. It is now clear that the neuroendocrine system can exert immediate feedback regulation on the immune system as well as control specific aspects of immune differentiation and development. The primary lymphoid organs of avian species (i.e., the thymus and the bursa of Fabricius) are also known to function as endocrine organs. These produce hormonal products that influence the development of lymphoid cells and that may feed back on the neuroendocrine system. In conjunction with the endocrine activities of the primary lymphoid organs, immune and accessory cells are known to produce a variety of secreted products or cytokines that have the potential not only for the regulation of immune function but also for mediating neuroendocrine activities. Finally, it has been demonstrated in a variety of species that leukocytes are capable of producing endocrine mediators previously believed to be produced only under the direct control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Thus, there are numerous possibilities for bidirectional interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. This discussion focuses primarily on these interactions with an emphasis on the means by which the hormonal mediators, growth hormone and thyroid hormone, may affect the thymus and the thymic microenvironment. The role of the adrenocorticoids and gonadal steroids in regulating immune function and their involvement in immune feedback circuits are also discussed.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Bean, A. G.; Bowles, M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years) and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship. PMID:9184877

  17. Biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine GEP tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine gut and pancreatic tumors are known to contain and secret different peptide hormones and amines. During the last two decades, many radioimmunoassays and Elizas have been developed to analyze these substances in blood and urine, which has enabled clinicians to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with various neuroendocrine tumors. Due to cost constraints in medical care, it is important to try to define the most useful biochemical markers from the clinical point of view. The glycoprotein chromogranin A has been shown to be a useful marker for diagnosing various neuroendocrine tumors, both by histopathology and circulating tumor markers. In patients with demonstrable endocrine tumors, about 90 percent of the patients present high circulating levels of chromogranin A. A hundred-fold increase of plasma chromogranin is seen in patients with midgut carcinoid tumors and liver metastases. The plasma levels of chromogranin A reflect the tumor mass and can be used for monitoring the patient during treatment and follow-up, although the day-to-day variation might be 30-40 percent. High circulating levels of the chromogranin A might be an indicator of bad prognosis in patients with malignant carcinoid tumors. Besides analyzing plasma chromogranin A, specific analyses such as urinary 5-HIAA in midgut carcinoid patients, serum gastrin in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and insulin/proinsulin in patients with hypoglycemia should be performed. In patients with small tumor masses or intermittent symptoms, provocative tests such as a meal stimulation test, secretin test or pentagastrin stimulation of tachykinin release can supplement the basal measurements of peptides and amines. To fully evaluate the growth potential in neuroendocrine tumors, traditional biochemical markers should be supplemented with indicators of growth proliferation (Ki-67, PCNA) and immunohistochemical staining for the adhesion molecule CD44 and the PDGF-alpha receptor

  18. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-05-10

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  19. A practical approach to the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Frulloni, Luca; Amodio, Antonio; Katsotourchi, Anna Maria; Vantini, Italo

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a disease characterized by specific pathological features, different from those of other forms of pancreatitis, that responds dramatically to steroid therapy. The pancreatic parenchyma may be diffusely or focally involved with the possibility of a low-density mass being present at imaging, mimicking pancreatic cancer. Clinically, the most relevant problems lie in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and in distinguishing autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Since in the presence of a pancreatic mass the probability of tumour is much higher than that of pancreatitis, the physician should be aware that in focal autoimmune pancreatitis the first step before using steroids is to exclude pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we briefly analyse the strategies to be followed for a correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:21547125

  20. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  1. Tumours of Oddi: Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeppsson, B.; El-Khoury, W.; Hannoun, L.; Frileux, P.; Huguet, C.; Malafosse, M.; Parc, R.

    1992-01-01

    .The sphincter of Oddi exactly delineates the junction between the bile duct, pancreatic duct and duodenum. We wanted to avoid using the anatomic term ampulla of Vater, since this structure rarely appears as an ampulla. This then excludes tumours in the head of pancreas, common bile duct above ths phincter of Oddi and tumours of the duodenal wall adjacent to the papilla. These tumours seem to behave differently from other pancreatic tumours, as they carry a different prognosis and need special attention. We have therefore reviewed retrospectively 56 patients with tumours of Oddi with special reference to diagnosis, histopathologic examination and surgical therapy. PMID:1351739

  2. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  3. Neuroendocrine Role for VGF

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jo E.; Brameld, John M.; Jethwa, Preeti H.

    2015-01-01

    The vgf gene (non-acronymic) is highly conserved and was identified on the basis of its rapid induction in vitro by nerve growth factor, although can also be induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial-derived growth factor. The VGF gene gives rise to a 68 kDa precursor polypeptide, which is induced robustly, relatively selectively and is synthesized exclusively in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Post-translational processing by neuroendocrine specific prohormone convertases in these cells results in the production of a number of smaller peptides. The VGF gene and peptides are widely expressed throughout the brain, particularly in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, in peripheral tissues including the pituitary gland, the adrenal glands, and the pancreas, and in the gastrointestinal tract in both the myenteric plexus and in endocrine cells. VGF peptides have been associated with a number of neuroendocrine roles, and in this review, we aim to describe these roles to highlight the importance of VGF as therapeutic target for a number of disorders, particularly those associated with energy metabolism, pain, reproduction, and cognition. PMID:25699015

  4. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25248600

  5. Classifying pancreatic cancer using gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ayars, Michael; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite some advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer, much more progress is needed. In a new study, RNA profiling of pancreatic cancers was used to identify gene signatures of tumour cells and stromal cells to help predict patient outcomes. PMID:26484444

  6. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Esmati, Ebrahim; Babaei, Mohammad; Matini, Amirhassan; Ashtiani, Monir Sadat Mirai; Hamed, Ehsan Akbari; Nosrati, Hassan; Razi, Farideh; Ganjalikhani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma usually originates from lung. Few data exist in the literature regarding neuroendocrine carcinoma of the tongue. Patient data including history, surgical procedure, histology, and radiology investigations were collected and summarized. A 40-year-old woman was referred after partial glossectomy. Squamous mucosa with neoplasm and cells with round nuclei and light cytoplasm was reported in the tongue biopsy. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was positive for cytokeratin, neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin and chromogranin and negative for leukocyte common antigen. This case showed a high proliferative activity (Ki-67 labeling index were 60%). These IHC findings were in favor of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. After surgery, she received chemotherapy and chemoradiation. The diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors in the present case is based on immunohistochemical markers and cellular shapes. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy is a critical element of therapy for head and neck high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas, our patient received this treatment after surgery. PMID:26458666

  7. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  9. Endocannabinoid Regulation of Neuroendocrine Systems.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Jeffrey G; Chen, Chun; Fisher, Marc O; Fu, Xin; Rainville, Jennifer R; Weiss, Grant L

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that is critical for sustaining life through its homeostatic control and integrative regulation of the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine systems. Neuroendocrine function in mammals is mediated mainly through the control of pituitary hormone secretion by diverse neuroendocrine cell groups in the hypothalamus. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed throughout the hypothalamus, and endocannabinoids have been found to exert pronounced regulatory effects on neuroendocrine function via modulation of the outputs of several neuroendocrine systems. Here, we review the physiological regulation of neuroendocrine function by endocannabinoids, focusing on the role of endocannabinoids in the neuroendocrine regulation of the stress response, food intake, fluid homeostasis, and reproductive function. Cannabis sativa (marijuana) has a long history of recreational and/or medicinal use dating back to ancient times. It was used as an analgesic, anesthetic, and antianxiety herb as early as 2600 B.C. The hedonic, anxiolytic, and mood-elevating properties of cannabis have also been cited in ancient records from different cultures. However, it was not until 1964 that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated and its chemical structure determined (Gaoni & Mechoulam, 1964). PMID:26638767

  10. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Wolstenholme, Jennifer T; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  11. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  12. Multidisciplinary management of nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Folkert, Ian W; Hernandez, Paul; Roses, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are a rare and diverse group of tumors; nonfunctional (NF) PNETs account for the majority of cases. Most patients with NF-PNETs have metastatic disease at the time of presentation. A variety of treatment modalities exist, including medical, liver directed, and surgical treatments. Aggressive surgical management is associated with prolonged survival, however available data are limited by selection bias and the frequent combination of PNETs with carcinoid tumors. Although few patients with metastatic disease will be cured, application of currently available therapies in a multidisciplinary setting can lead to excellent outcomes with prolonged patient survival. PMID:27003988

  13. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  14. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  15. CA 19-9 in pancreatic cancer: retrospective evaluation of patients with suspicion of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Molina, Victor; Visa, Laura; Conill, Carles; Navarro, Salvador; Escudero, Jose M; Auge, Jose M; Filella, Xavier; Lopez-Boado, Miguel A; Ferrer, Joana; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano; Molina, Rafael

    2012-06-01

    CA 19.9 serum levels were prospectively determined in 573 patients admitted to hospital for suspicion of pancreatic cancer. The final diagnosis was 77 patients with no malignancy, 389 patients with pancreatic cancer, 37 neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer, 28 cholangiocarcinomas, 4 gallbladder cancer, 27 ampullary carcinomas, and 11 periampullary carcinomas. CA 19.9 was determined using a commercial assay from Roche Diagnostics, and 37 U/ml was considered as the upper limit of normality. Abnormal CA 19.9 serum levels were found in 27%, 81.5%, 85.7%, 59.3%, 63.6%, and 18.9% of patients with benign diseases, pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinomas, and ampullary, periampullary, or neuroendocrine tumors. Significantly higher concentrations of CA 19.9 were found in patients with than in those without malignancy or with neuroendocrine tumors. CA 19.9 serum levels were higher in pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma than in other malignancies (p < 0.0001). CA 19.9 serum levels were also correlated with tumor stage, treatment (significantly lower concentrations in resectable tumors), and tumor location (the highest in those located in the body, the lowest in those in the tail or uncinate) and site of metastases (highest in liver metastases). A trend to higher CA 19.9 serum concentrations was found in patients with jaundice, but only with statistical significance in the early stages. Using 50 or 100 U/ml in patients with jaundice, CA 19.9 was useful as an aid in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (sensitivity 77.9%, specificity 95.9%) as well as tumor resectability in pancreatic cancer with different cutoffs according to tumor location and bilirubin serum levels with specificities ranging from 90% to 100%. CA 19.9 is the tumor marker of choice in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, with a clear relationship with tumor location, stage, and resectability.

  16. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Poorly differentiated tumours of the anal canal: a diagnostic strategy for the surgical pathologist.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, B; Marcus, V; Jass, J R

    2007-01-01

    Poorly differentiated malignancies affecting the anal canal are uncommon but pose diagnostic difficulties because of the wide range of normal cell types that may occur within a limited anatomical region. The range of lesions that may present as poorly differentiated tumours includes squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma expressing epithelial cytokeratins and other patterns of mixed differentiation, undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant melanoma, lymphoma and secondary tumours. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of these neoplasms with the aid of short illustrative case studies.

  18. [Symptoms and diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system].

    PubMed

    Gyökeres, Tibor

    2011-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system can cause very diverse clinical symptoms. Due to the secretion of biogenic amines, peptides and hormones secreted by the tumor cells, various paraneoplastic syndromes can evolve, on the other hand, the growth and spreading of hormonally inactive tumors can result in different local symptoms. Patients can be symptom-free for a long time or aspecific, often periodical symptoms can prevent recognition or lead to misdiagnosis for years. The symptomatology of hormonally active tumors, derived mainly from the pancreas is very characteristic. Carcinoid syndrome can be seen in 10-18% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. In this review, the critical appreciation of laboratory and imaging modalities is discussed. Among the major new developments in this field, the introduction of serum chromogranin A assay and new small bowel examination methods should be mentioned. Capsule endoscopy and balloon enteroscopy can provide possibility of much more earlier diagnosis, as previously. The worldwide spreading of endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle biopsy allows the detection and clear localization of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  19. A drug repositioning approach identifies tricyclic antidepressants as inhibitors of small cell lung cancer and other neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jahchan, Nadine S; Dudley, Joel T; Mazur, Pawel K; Flores, Natasha; Yang, Dian; Palmerton, Alec; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Vaka, Dedeepya; Tran, Kim QT; Zhou, Margaret; Krasinska, Karolina; Riess, Jonathan W; Neal, Joel W; Khatri, Purvesh; Park, Kwon S; Butte, Atul J; Sage, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer with high mortality. We used a systematic drug-repositioning bioinformatics approach querying a large compendium of gene expression profiles to identify candidate FDA-approved drugs to treat SCLC. We found that tricyclic antidepressants and related molecules potently induce apoptosis in both chemonaïve and chemoresistant SCLC cells in culture, in mouse and human SCLC tumors transplanted into immunocompromised mice, and in endogenous tumors from a mouse model for human SCLC. The candidate drugs activate stress pathways and induce cell death in SCLC cells, at least in part by disrupting autocrine survival signals involving neurotransmitters and their G protein-coupled receptors. The candidate drugs inhibit the growth of other neuroendocrine tumors, including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and Merkel cell carcinoma. These experiments identify novel targeted strategies that can be rapidly evaluated in patients with neuroendocrine tumors through the repurposing of approved drugs. PMID:24078773

  20. [Neuroendocrine disturbances in obesity].

    PubMed

    Isidro, M L; Alvarez, P; Martínez, T; Cordido, F

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with different disturbances in endocrine function. Both spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion and its response to several stimuli have shown to be reduced in obese patients. The GH responses to GH-releasing hormone and other challenges by pyridostigmine suggest that the reduction in GH secretion is related to an increased somatostatinergic tone. Other experiments point to a down-regulation of somatostatin receptors in the somatotroph cell. Ghrelin administration is followed by a massive GH release, but the possibility that ghrelin or GHRH deficiency are the cause of GH deficiency in obesity is unlikely. The increase in free fatty acids in obesity might be related to GH reduction, since acipimox administration is able to reverse GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men have low testosterone and gonadotrophin concentrations, specially in cases of morbid obesity. An increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and some resistance to dexamethasone suppression have been described in abdominal obesity. This effect may be due to neuroendocrine alterations related to a genetic origin. Adrenal hyperfunction may favour cardiovascular and metabolic complications. There are no disturbances in thyroid function. Sometimes a reduction in prolactin response to several stimuli has been reported. This effect may be due to hyperinsulinaemia or to disturbances in the dopaminergic tone.

  1. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  2. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  3. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  4. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  5. Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Kjell; Sundin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies with a very variable clinical expression and progression. They present unique properties that are important to consider for radiological and nuclear imaging, such as APUD-characteristics (amine precursor uptake and dearboxylation), as well as the expression of somatostatin receptors. The most common localizations are the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. The only curative treatment is surgery, but more than 50% present metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. The systemic treatment includes chemotherapy and targeted agents, as well as peptide receptor radiotherapy. The diagnosis and follow-up of these tumors necessitate a large number of different imaging methods, such as CT, MRI, US, SRS and PET. Ultrasonography offers the possibility to take guided biopsies from different lesions. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy was developed in the 1990s and nowadays presents the standard of care for NETs in most countries. The procedure offers a total body examination and a better staging of the disease. However, it has been replaced in most centers by PET/CT with 68Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analogues with a superior spatial resolution and faster imaging (one-stop procedure). Another tracer used for PET/CT is 18FDG, particularly for high-grade tumors. Other more specific tracers are 18F-L-DOPA, 11C-L-DOPA and 11C-5-hydroxytryptophan, which have demonstrated excellent imaging results. The new targeted agents present a challenge in the evaluation procedure of treatment and, therefore, new imaging techniques and an improvement of currently available techniques are mandatory. PMID:27002535

  6. Neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in soft tissue: three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hyer, Steve L; McAleese, Jonathan; Harmer, Clive L

    2007-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are tumours arising from neuroendocrine cells of neural crest origin. They are characterised by the presence of neurosecretory granules which react positively to silver stains and to specific markers including neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin and chromogranin. Metastasis to the skin occurs infrequently but primary soft tissue NET is excessively rare. Case presentation We report our experience with 3 such cases. In the first case, the NET originated in muscle and was treated with wide surgical excision and adjuvant radiotherapy. The second case presented as a subcutaneous mass in the foot and the tumour was positive on 123I mIBG scan. She has had prolonged recurrence-free survival following primary hypo-fractionated radiotherapy. In the third case, a cutaneous nodule proved to be a NET and at surgery, lymph node disease was present. He has remained disease-free after surgical excision without the need for external beam radiotherapy. Conclusion These tumours appear to have a good prognosis. Complete excision offers potentially curative treatment. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be helpful when the tumour margin is narrow. For patients with unresectable disease or where surgery would not be appropriate, radiotherapy appears to be an effective therapeutic option. PMID:17620120

  7. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  9. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    PubMed

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  10. Neuroendocrine dysfunction in Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Tsonis, John; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2008-01-01

    Interactions among the immune, nervous and endocrine systems, which are mediated by hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, cytokines and their receptors, appear to play an important role in modulating host susceptibility and resistance to inflammatory disease. The neuroendocrine system has two main components: the central and the peripheral. The central compartment is located in the locus ceruleus, the brainstem centers of the autonomic system and the paraventricular nucleus; the peripheral mainly consists of the sympathetic/adrenomedullary system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and the neuroendocrine tissue located in several organs throughout the body. Hormones and neuropeptides may influence the activities of lymphoid organs and cells via endocrine and local autocrine/paracrine pathways or alter the function of different cell types in target organs. Recent studies highlighted alterations of the neuroendocrine system in systemic autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren's syndrome (SS). SS, a prototype autoimmune disorder, has a wide clinical spectrum, extending from organ involvement (autoimmune exocrinopathy) to systemic disease and B cell lymphoma. In SS, several functions of the neuroendocrine system are impaired. First, the HPA axis appears to be disturbed, since significantly lower basal ACTH and cortisol levels were found in patients with SS and were associated with a blunted pituitary and adrenal response to ovine corticotropin-releasing factor compared to normal controls. Second, HPG axis is also involved, since lack of estrogens is associated with human disease and the development of autoimmune exocrinopathy in several experimental models. Finally, exocrine glands are enriched with neuroendocrine-related molecules, adjacent to local autoimmune lesions. Certain clinical manifestations of the disease, including the sicca manifestations

  11. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  12. Tumour biology: Senescence in premalignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Manuel; Gil, Jesús; Efeyan, Alejo; Guerra, Carmen; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Barradas, Marta; Benguría, Alberto; Zaballos, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Barbacid, Mariano; Beach, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a cellular response that may be crucial for protection against cancer development, but its investigation has so far been restricted to cultured cells that have been manipulated to overexpress an oncogene. Here we analyse tumours initiated by an endogenous oncogene, ras, and show that senescent cells exist in premalignant tumours but not in malignant ones. Senescence is therefore a defining feature of premalignant tumours that could prove valuable in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  13. Incidental Finding of a Neuroendocrine Tumor Arising from Meckel Diverticulum During Hernia Repair - A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Costin, Radu; Orban, Carmen; Iliescu, Laura; Hurjui, Ioan; Hurjui, Marcela; Niculescu, Nicoleta; Cristea, Mirela; Balescu, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Meckel diverticulum is the most common abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract arising from an incomplete obliteration of the vitelline duct during the intrauterine life. Although tumor development in Meckel diverticulum is not a common situation, it can occur due to the persistence of cellular islets with gastric, pancreatic or intestinal origin. The presence of a neuroendocrine tumor arising from Meckel diverticulum is even scarcer. We present the case of a 59-year-old patient in whom a Meckel diverticulum was found during surgery for inguinal hernia; the histopathological and immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor with low mitotic index. PMID:27069171

  14. Safety and Tolerability of Everolimus as Second-line Treatment in Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma / Neuroendocrine Carcinoma G3 (WHO 2010) and Neuroendocrine Tumor G3 - an Investigator Initiated Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma,; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 1 [Well-differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 2 [Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Tumor, Grade 3 and Disease Progression as Measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1.)

  15. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  16. Neuroendocrine regulation of maternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female's lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential processes that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female's lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals.

  17. Notch Signaling in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Judy S.; Singleton, Ciera S.; Miele, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoids and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from the neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract, endocrine pancreas, and the respiratory system. NETs remain significantly understudied with respect to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, particularly the role of cell fate signaling systems such as Notch. The abundance of literature on the Notch pathway is a testament to its complexity in different cellular environments. Notch receptors can function as oncogenes in some contexts and tumor suppressors in others. The genetic heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the roles and the potential therapeutic implications of Notch signaling in NETs, a comprehensive analysis of Notch expression patterns and potential roles across all NET subtypes is required. PMID:27148486

  18. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  19. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Brcic, L; Heidinger, M; Popper, H

    2016-09-01

    Primary neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the mediastinum are very rare and among them thymic NETs are the most common. They represent 5 % of all thymic and mediastinal tumors. The WHO classification from 2015 subdivides thymic NETs into three groups; low grade (typical carcinoid), intermediate grade (atypical carcinoid) and high grade (large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small cell carcinoma). Through this change of mediastinal/thymic NET classification into three groups of malignancy, the nomenclature was adapted to that of the lungs, while the histological criteria for each entity remained the same. Thymic NETs typically occur in middle-aged adults and predominantly in males. Approximately 30 % are asymptomatic and the rest present with symptoms caused by local tumor growth, distant metastases and/or endocrine manifestations. Carcinoids can also occur as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and at the time of diagnosis commonly present with regional lymph node or distant metastases, which most often affect the lungs and bones. For the correct diagnosis tumor cell morphology, mitotic count and/or necrosis are crucial. Patients with typical carcinoids have the best prognosis, whereas the prognosis is slightly worse for atypical carcinoids but very poor for large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. Small cell carcinomas have the worst prognosis and the shortest median survival time of approximately 14 months.

  20. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Brcic, L; Heidinger, M; Popper, H

    2016-09-01

    Primary neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the mediastinum are very rare and among them thymic NETs are the most common. They represent 5 % of all thymic and mediastinal tumors. The WHO classification from 2015 subdivides thymic NETs into three groups; low grade (typical carcinoid), intermediate grade (atypical carcinoid) and high grade (large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small cell carcinoma). Through this change of mediastinal/thymic NET classification into three groups of malignancy, the nomenclature was adapted to that of the lungs, while the histological criteria for each entity remained the same. Thymic NETs typically occur in middle-aged adults and predominantly in males. Approximately 30 % are asymptomatic and the rest present with symptoms caused by local tumor growth, distant metastases and/or endocrine manifestations. Carcinoids can also occur as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and at the time of diagnosis commonly present with regional lymph node or distant metastases, which most often affect the lungs and bones. For the correct diagnosis tumor cell morphology, mitotic count and/or necrosis are crucial. Patients with typical carcinoids have the best prognosis, whereas the prognosis is slightly worse for atypical carcinoids but very poor for large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. Small cell carcinomas have the worst prognosis and the shortest median survival time of approximately 14 months. PMID:27507161

  1. Neuroendocrine cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Byram W

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on neuroendocrine cancer vaccines that have been evaluated in human clinical trials within the last 5 years. The definition of what constitutes a neuroendocrine tumor requires clarification. Strategies and barriers common to cancer vaccines are highlighted. In general, neuroendocrine cancer is rare; however, special attention will be paid to neuroblastoma and small-cell-lung cancer owing to their relatively higher prevalence. A variety of other neuroendocrine tumor vaccine trials will also be addressed. The common problem of generating only sporadic tumor-specific immune responses that are of low-magnitude will be discussed in detail, with recommendations for future directions.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound. Tissue may also be removed during a laparoscopy (a surgical incision made in the wall of ... The instrument may be used during surgery or laparoscopy or inserted through the skin. This procedure is ...

  4. Endoscopic imaging in the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pellicano, Rinaldo; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Altruda, Fiorella; Bruno, Mauro; Saracco, Giorgio M; De Angelis, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors deriving from the gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine system. Since these neoplasms are usually very small, located deeply within the retroperitoneum or into an extramucosal site of the GI tract and, lastly, because they may be multi-sited, radiological imaging modalities, in combination with endoscopy, are the diagnostic workhorses in patients with GEP-NETs. Endoscopic approach is useful for detection, bioptic diagnosis and curative resection of small GEP-NETs of stomach, duodenum, jejuno-ileum, and colon-rectum. Moreover, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), associated with high frequency miniprobes, is a valuable procedure in regional staging of lesions of the GI wall and can provide information which has a remarkable impact on therapeutic choices. EUS is still the sole technique, in a substantial number of cases, providing a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic insulinoma and it detects and follows small lesions of the pancreas in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome. EUS should be performed in those cases in which morphological or molecular imaging modalities need to be supported because of negative or dubious results. In this review we describe the applications of endoscopic procedures in the management of GEP-NETs. PMID:27600643

  5. Histological characterisation and prognostic evaluation of 62 gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Ye, Yuhong; Shi, Xi; Zhu, Kunshou; Huang, Liming; Zhang, Sheng; Ying, Mingang; Lin, Xuede

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To determine the significance of expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67 and their association with clinicopathological parameters, and to find out the possible prognostic factors in gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma (G-NEC). Material and methods We investigated the immunohistochemical features and prognosis of 62 G-NECs, and evaluated the association among expressions of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67, clinicopathological variables, and outcome. Results Chromogranin A expression was found more commonly in small-cell NECs (9/9, 100%) than in large-cell NECs (27/53, 51%) (p = 0.008). No statistical significance was found in Ki-67 (p = 0.494) or synaptophysin (p > 0.1) expression between NEC cell types. Correlation analyses revealed that Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with mid-third disease of stomach (p = 0.005) and vascular involvement (p = 0.006), and had a trend of significant correlation with tumour relapse (p = 0.078). High expression of chromogranin A was significantly associated with histology of small-cell NECs (p = 0.008) and lesser tumour greatest dimension (p = 0.038). The prognostic significance was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests, and as a result, early TNM staging and postoperative chemotherapy were found to be correlated with longer overall survival (p < 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed associations between poor prognosis in NECs and several factors, including high TNM staging (p = 0.048), vascular involvement (p = 0.023), relapse (p = 0.004), and microscopic/macroscopic residual tumour (R1/2, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, relapse was identified as the sole independent prognostic factor. Conclusions No significant correlation between survival and expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, or Ki-67 has been determined in G-NECs. Our study indicated that early diagnosis, no-residual-tumour resection, and postoperative chemotherapy were

  6. GNA15 expression in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia: functional and signalling pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Sara; Giovinazzo, Francesco; Alaimo, Daniele; Lawrence, Ben; Pfragner, Roswitha; Bassi, Claudio; Modlin, Irvin; Kidd, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasia (GEP-NEN) comprises a heterogeneous group of tumours that exhibit widely divergent biological behaviour. The identification of new targetable GPCR-pathways involved in regulating cell function could help to identify new therapeutic strategies. We assessed the function of a haematopoietic stem cell heterotrimeric G-protein, Gα15, in gut neuroendocrine cell models and examined the clinical implications of its over expression. Functional assays were undertaken to define the role of GNA15 in the small intestinal NEN cell line KRJ-I and in clinical samples from small intestinal NENs using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot, proliferation and apoptosis assays, immunoprecipitation, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA). GNA15 was not expressed in normal neuroendocrine cells but was overexpressed in GEP-NEN cell lines. In KRJ-I cells, decreased expression of GNA15 was associated with inhibition of proliferation, activation of apoptosis and differential effects on pro-proliferative ERK, NFκB and Akt pathway signalling. Moreover, Gα15 was demonstrated to couple to the ß1 adrenergic receptor and modulated proliferative signals through this GPCR. Transcript and protein levels of GNA15 were significantly elevated in primary and metastatic tumours compared to normal mucosa and were particularly increased in low Ki-67 expressing tumours. IHC and AQUA revealed that a higher Gα15 expression was associated with a poorer survival. GNA15 may have a pathobiological role in SI-NENs. Targeting this signalling mediator could provide an opportunity for the development of new therapeutic strategies for this tumour type. PMID:25701539

  7. Bronchial mucous gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H

    1979-07-27

    Tumours arising in the bronchial mucous glands closely resemble tumours arising in the mixed salivary glands. Bronchial mucous gland tumours account for less than 0.5 per cent of all lung tumours. Twenty six tumours are reviewed and they have been divided into five types, (a) adenoidcystic carcinomas, (b) muco-epidermoid tumors, (c) mixed (pleomorphic) tumors, (d) cystadenomas and (f) oxyphilic adenoma. The clinical features, and postoperative course of the patients are reviewed. Adenocystic carcinomas, arising in the bronchus frequently involve the neighbouring trachea and spread mainly by direct infiltration. Most muco-epidermoid bronchial tumours were confined to young persons, and the only malignant muco-epidermoid tumour occurred in an elderly person. The prognosis in young persons is good provided the tumours are completely excised. The two mixed bronchial tumours resembled their salivary counterparts and one subsequently behaved as a carcinoma and metastasised. Bronchial cystadenomas all proved to be benign tumours but in two cases were associated with surface papillary proliferation. The only example of an oxyphil cell adenoma was discovered at post mortem examination. The histogenesis of the tumours is considered.

  8. Diffuse Idiopathic Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia and Neuroendocrine Hyperplasia of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Carr, Laurie L; Kern, Jeffrey A; Deutsch, Gail H

    2016-09-01

    Although incidental reactive pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (PNECH) is seen on biopsy specimens in adults with chronic lung disease, disorders characterized by marked PNECH are rare. Primary hyperplasia of neuroendocrine cells in the lung and obstructive lung disease related to remodeling or physiologic constriction of small airways define diffuse idiopathic neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) in the adult and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) in children. DIPENCH and NEHI share a similar physiology, typical imaging appearance, and increased neuroendocrine cells on biopsy. However, there are important differences related to the underlying disease mechanisms leading to disparate outcomes.

  9. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development. PMID:26909576

  10. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  12. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  13. Irradiation Decreases the Neuroendocrine Biomarker Pro-Opiomelanocortin in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Suzanne L.; Bryant, Jennifer L.; Babur, Muhammad; Riddell, Philip W.; Behrouzi, Roya; Williams, Kaye J.; White, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive disease, commonly displaying therapy-resistant relapse. We have previously identified neuroendocrine and epithelial phenotypes in SCLC tumours and the neuroendocrine marker, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), correlated with worse overall survival in patients. However, the effect of treatment on these phenotypes is not understood. The current study aimed to determine the effect of repeated irradiation treatment on SCLC cell phenotype, focussing on the neuroendocrine marker, POMC. Results Human SCLC cells (DMS 79) were established as subcutaneous xenograft tumours in CBA nude mice and then exposed to repeated 2Gy irradiation. In untreated animals, POMC in the blood closely mirrored tumour growth; an ideal characteristic for a circulating biomarker. Following repeated localised irradiation in vivo, circulating POMC decreased (p< 0.01), in parallel with a decrease in tumour size, but remained low even when the tumours re-established. The excised tumours displayed reduced and distinctly heterogeneous expression of POMC compared to untreated tumours. There was no difference in the epithelial marker, cytokeratin. However, there were significantly more N-cadherin positive cells in the irradiated tumours. To investigate the tumour response to irradiation, DMS79 cells were repeatedly irradiated in vitro and the surviving cells selected. POMC expression was reduced, while mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, β1-integrin, fibroblast-specific protein 1, β-catenin and Zeb1 expression were amplified in the more irradiation-primed cells. There were no consistent changes in epithelial marker expression. Cell morphology changed dramatically with repeatedly irradiated cells displaying a more elongated shape, suggesting a switch to a more mesenchymal phenotype. Conclusions In summary, POMC biomarker expression and secretion were reduced in SCLC tumours which regrew after irradiation and in repeatedly irradiation (irradiation

  14. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  15. Circulating tumour cells: insights into tumour heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D F; Paoletti, C

    2013-08-01

    Tumour heterogeneity is a major barrier to cure breast cancer. It can exist between patients with different intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer or within an individual patient with breast cancer. In the latter case, heterogeneity has been observed between different metastatic sites, between metastatic sites and the original primary tumour, and even within a single tumour at either a metastatic or a primary site. Tumour heterogeneity is a function of two separate, although linked, processes. First, genetic instability is a hallmark of malignancy, and results in 'fixed' genetic changes that are almost certainly carried forward through progression of the cancer over time, with increasingly complex additional genetic changes in new metastases as they arise. The second type of heterogeneity is due to differential but 'plastic' expression of various genes important in the biology and response to various therapies. Together, these processes result in highly variable cancers with differential response, and resistance, to both targeted (e.g. endocrine or anti-human epithelial growth receptor type 2 (HER2) agents) and nontargeted therapies (e.g. chemotherapy). Ideally, tumour heterogeneity would be monitored over time, especially in relation to therapeutic strategies. However, biopsies of metastases require invasive and costly procedures, and biopsies of multiple metastases, or serially over time, are impractical. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) represent a potential surrogate for tissue-based cancer and therefore might provide the opportunity to monitor serial changes in tumour biology. Recent advances have enabled accurate and reliable quantification and molecular characterization of CTCs with regard to a number of important biomarkers including oestrogen receptor alpha and HER2. Preliminary data have demonstrated that expression of these markers between CTCs in individual patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects the heterogeneity of the underlying tumours. Future

  16. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  17. Embolization of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor resulting in clinical manifestations of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH)

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Brown, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Complications after hepatic artery embolization are usually minor and transient. We report a patient with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastases that repeatedly developed clinical findings of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) with hyponatremia (sodium less than 130 mEq/L), low plasma osmolarity (lower than 275 mOsm/kg) and high urine osmolarity (above 500 mOsm/kg) after every session of hepatic artery embolization. PMID:25805538

  18. Electrochemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma treatment: pre-clinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Leongito, Maddalena; Granata, Vincenza; Barbieri, Antonio; del Vecchio, Vitale; Falco, Michela; Nasto, Aurelio; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Palaia, Raffaele; Amore, Alfonso; Giacomo, Raimondo di; Lastoria, Secondo; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Antonella; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is currently one of the deadliest cancers with high mortality rate. This disease leads to an aggressive local invasion and early metastases, and is poorly responsive to treatment with chemotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. Radical resection is still the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer, but it is generally accepted that a multimodality strategy is necessary for its management. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for local treatment. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic resistance in pancreatic cancer is associated to a low penetration of drugs into tumour cells due to the presence of fibrotic stroma surrounding cells. In order to increase the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into tumour cells, electrochemotherapy can be used for treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma leading to an increased tumour response rate. This review will summarize the published papers reported in literature on the efficacy and safety of electrochemotherapy in pre-clinical and clinical studies on pancreatic cancer. PMID:27069445

  19. Extensive multiarterial resection attending total duodenopancreatectomy and adrenalectomy for MEN-1-associated neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vyacheslav Ivanovich; Kharazov, Alexander Felixovich; Pavlovskaya, Alla Ivanovna; Petrov, Roman Valeryevich; Starostina, Natalia Sergeevna; Kondratiev, Eugeny Valerievich; Filippova, Ekaterina Mikhailovna

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are relatively uncommon although these neoplasms have been noted to grow in occurrence in recent decades. Surgical removal of locally advanced PNTs involving major vessels and adjacent organs is warranted by reason of an appreciably more favorable prognosis as compared to exocrine pancreas cancer. We are reporting a case of successful multi-organ resection combined with a wide excision of the superior mesenteric, common, proper, left and right hepatic arteries (in the presence of the hepatomesenteric trunk variant of aberrant arterial anatomy) for multifocal PNTs in the setting of multiple neuroendocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome. The procedure resulted in pain abolition, a significant improvement in the patient’s life quality and allowed her to return to work. Follow-up computed tomography at 15 mo post-surgery showed no evidence of disease recurrence. PMID:23443490

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  1. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Is a Rare but Important Tumour Found in the Oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Mohammad Murad Kasim; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Nordsmark, Marianne; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract that consists of a dual adenocarcinomatous and neuroendocrine differentiation, each component representing at least 30% of the tumour. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with two-month history of postprandial pain and vomiting. Gastric endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the lower part of the oesophagus. In contrast to the majority of these tumours, this biopsy was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and Ki-67 index was 50% and the tumour was diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the oesophagus. The patient underwent surgery and lower oesophagus resection was performed. Based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the tumour in the oesophagogastrectomy specimen, a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) was diagnosed. The objective of this case report is to advocate for the focus on the MANEC diagnosis as such patients need to be referred to a centre of excellence with expertise in NET tumours, to have the correct diagnostic work-up, treatment, and secondary diagnostic procedures performed at progression, as this will have paramount influence of the choice of treatment. PMID:26955490

  2. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Is a Rare but Important Tumour Found in the Oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kadhim, Mohammad Murad Kasim; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Nordsmark, Marianne; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract that consists of a dual adenocarcinomatous and neuroendocrine differentiation, each component representing at least 30% of the tumour. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with two-month history of postprandial pain and vomiting. Gastric endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the lower part of the oesophagus. In contrast to the majority of these tumours, this biopsy was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and Ki-67 index was 50% and the tumour was diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the oesophagus. The patient underwent surgery and lower oesophagus resection was performed. Based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the tumour in the oesophagogastrectomy specimen, a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) was diagnosed. The objective of this case report is to advocate for the focus on the MANEC diagnosis as such patients need to be referred to a centre of excellence with expertise in NET tumours, to have the correct diagnostic work-up, treatment, and secondary diagnostic procedures performed at progression, as this will have paramount influence of the choice of treatment. PMID:26955490

  3. A rare case of three different tumors in the same pancreatic specimen: a case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paiella, Salvatore; Luchini, Claudio; Amodio, Antonio; Rusev, Borislav; Bassi, Claudio; Manfredi, Riccardo; Frulloni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT) of the pancreas are rare neoplasms mainly affecting young women. Pancreatic serous cystadenomas (SCAs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) account for about 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. The combination of these three lesions, to our knowledge, has never been described in literature. Here we report a case of combined SPT, SCA and PanNET affecting a 33-year-old woman. PMID:27284489

  4. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  5. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  6. Pancreatic cancer chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal gastrointestinal tumour. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy in the majority of the patients whereas resection is the only chance of cure but only possible in 15-20% of all patients. The integration of radiotherapy into multimodal treatment concepts is heavily investigated. It is now commonly accepted that induction chemotherapy should precede radiotherapy. When fractionated conventionally it should be given as chemoradiotherapy. Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy emerged as an alternative, but will have to be carefully investigated in clinical trials. This review aims to give an overview of radiotherapeutic strategies with a focus on the latest developments in the field in the context of chemotherapy and surgery. PMID:27644909

  7. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... swelling of the pancreas include: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of ...

  8. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  9. Pancreatic abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Gartell, P C

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatic abscess are described to show the difficulties in diagnosis and that inadequate treatment is invariably fatal. Early recognition and prompt surgical drainage, together with biliary decompression if indicated, are advised. PMID:7069670

  10. Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Chugh, Ankur; Cordova, Jonathon; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a strong family history of hereditary pancreatitis was found to have a PRSS1 mutation after being tested at age 5 years during his first documented incident of pancreatitis. Since then, a multidisciplinary team has been treating him for the diagnosis of hereditary pancreatitis. His pain episodes increased in severity over the past several months such that the pain began to severely interfere with his daily life. After extensive discussion, a total pancreatectomy with auto islet cell transplant was performed. He is now pain free and does not require any insulin. This leads us to the questions of what is hereditary pancreatitis and how is it diagnosed? What are the management and follow-up strategies needed for these patients? This article addresses these questions and informs the reader about this diagnosis and the importance of having a high index of clinical suspicion. PMID:26878183

  11. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Da Silva, R; Gravekamp, C; Libutti, S K; Abraham, T; Dadachova, E

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides, which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. Although a lot of progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled (90)Y and (177)Lu somatostatin peptide analogs, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  16. Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Alekshun, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Case: A 63-year-old male presented with unintentional weight loss of 20 pounds over a 4-month duration. He reported loss of appetite, intermittent post-prandial nausea, bloating and early satiety. He also complained of dyspepsia and had been treated for reflux during the previous 2 years. He denied vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, abdominal pain, melena, hematochezia, or alterations in bowel habits. Additionally, he denied fevers, night sweats, cough, or dyspnea. He quit smoking 25 years ago, and denied alcohol use. His past medical history was significant for basal cell carcinoma treated with local curative therapy and he was without recurrence on surveillance. Pertinent family history included a paternal uncle with lung cancer at the age of 74. Physical examination was unremarkable except for occult heme-positive stools. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (ALT-112, AST-81, AlkPhos-364). CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse heterogeneous liver with extensive nodularity, raising the concern for metastases. Serum tumor-markers: PSA, CEA, CA 19-9, and AFP were all within normal limits. Screening colonoscopy was normal, but esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a malignant-appearing ulcerative lesion involving the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric cardia. Pathology confirmed an invasive gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of a hepatic lesion revealed malignant cells with cytologic features consistent with large-cell type carcinoma and positive immunostaining for synaptophysin favoring neuroendocrine differentiation. A PET-CT demonstrated intense diffuse FDG uptake of the liver, suggesting diffuse hepatic parenchymal infiltration by tumor. There were multiple foci of intense osseous FDG uptake with corresponding osteolytic lesions seen on CT scan. The remaining intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic structures were unremarkable. The patient will receive palliative systemic therapy

  17. Impact by pancreatic stellate cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition and pancreatic cancer cell invasion: Adding a third dimension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karnevi, Emelie; Rosendahl, Ann H; Hilmersson, Katarzyna Said; Saleem, Moin A; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with a highly abundant stroma and low-grade inflammation. In the local tumour microenvironment, elevated glucose levels, the presence of tumour-associated stellate cells and macrophages are hypothesised to promote the tumour progression and invasion. The present study investigated the influence by the microenvironment on pancreatic cancer cell invasion in vitro. After co-culture with tumour-associated pancreatic stellate cells (TPSCs), pancreatic cancer cells displayed up to 8-fold reduction in levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers E-cadherin and ZO-1, while β-catenin and vimentin levels were increased. A 3D organotypic model showed that TPSCs stimulated pancreatic cancer cell invasion, both as single cell (PANC-1) and cohort (MIAPaCa-2) invasion. The combined presence of TPSCs and M2-like macrophages induced invasion of the non-invasive BxPC-3 cells. High glucose conditions further enhanced changes in EMT markers as well as the cancer cell invasion. In summary, co-culture with TPSCs induced molecular changes associated with EMT in pancreatic cancer cells, regardless of differentiation status, and the organotypic model demonstrated the influence of microenvironmental factors, such as glucose, stellate cells and macrophages, on pancreatic cancer cell invasion. PMID:27443257

  18. Synchronous neuroendocrine tumors in both the pancreas and ileum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsunenari, Takazumi; Aosasa, Suefumi; Ogata, Sho; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Nishikawa, Makoto; Noro, Takuji; Shinto, Eiji; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Ueno, Hideki; Hamabe, Fumiko; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Hase, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although it is well-known that in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) disease, multiple endocrine lesions frequently occur, synchronous or metachronous neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in non-MEN 1 patients are extremely rare. Presentation of case An asymptomatic 72-year-old woman with an ileal NET was referred to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography revealed another circular tumor within the pancreatic head. She was classified as a non-MEN 1 patient. An operative procedure was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of synchronous NET, which was confirmed by pathological examination. Discussion Both morphologic and immunophenotypic findings were different between in the ileum and pancreas. Therefore, it was reasonable to consider that both tumors were primary tumors. The synchronous occurrence of these tumors is unusual, and it may be considered as a chance occurrence. Conclusion We here report the first case of synchronous pancreatic NET and ileal NET in a non-MEN 1 patient. PMID:27046104

  19. Accessory spleen mimicking pancreatic tumour: evaluation by 99mTc-labelled colloid SPECT/CT study. Report of two cases and a review of nuclear medicine methods utility.

    PubMed

    Pachowicz, M; Mocarska, A; Starosławska, E; Pietrzyk, Ł; Chrapko, B

    2015-01-01

    The accessory spleen is a common congenital anomaly, typically asymptomatic and harmless to the patient. However, in some clinical cases, this anomaly beco-mes significant as it can be mistaken for a tumour or lymph node and be missed during a therapeutic splenectomy. There are nuclear medicine modalities which can be applied in the identification and localisation of an accessory spleen. They include scintigraphy with radiolabelled colloids or heat damaged red blood cells, which are trapped in the splenic tissue. Modern techniques, including hybrid imaging, enable simultaneous structure and tracer distribution evaluations. Additionally, radiation-guided surgery can be used in cases where the accessory spleen, which is usually small (not exceeding 1 cm) and difficult to find among other tissues, has to be removed. In the study, we would like to present 2 cases of patients in which the malignancy had to be excluded for the reason that the multiple accessory spleens were very closely related to the pancreas. There was a lack of certainty in the multi-phase computed tomography (CT) evaluation; however, this situation was clearly resolved by using the 99mTc-stannous colloid single photon emission computed tomography/ CT study. We would also like to briefly analyse the clinical applications of nuclear medicine in case of an accessory spleen. PMID:26620518

  20. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-08-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial. PMID:27656450

  1. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial. PMID:27656450

  2. Uveal tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Char, D.; Miller, T.; Crawford, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To review the ocular retention rates, visual results, and metastases in uveal tumours managed with eye wall resection techniques.
METHODS—This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive local uveal tumour resections performed by a single surgeon. All enucleation specimens were reviewed by one author. Both parametric and non-parametric analysis of data were performed.
RESULTS—138 eyes were scheduled for eye wall resection surgery. The mean age was 52 years (range 11-86 years). Tumours involved predominantly the iris in 14 cases, iris-ciliary body in 57, ciliary body alone in 18 patients, and in 49 cases the choroid was involved (ciliochoroidal, iris-ciliary body-choroid, or choroid). 125 eyes harboured melanomas; posterior tumours were more likely to have epithelioid cells (p<0.05). The mean follow up was 6 years. The mean clock hours in iris and iris-ciliary body tumours was 3.5. In tumours that involved the choroid the mean largest diameter was 12.9 mm and the mean thickness 8.5 mm. 105 of 138 (76%) eyes were retained. Histological assessment of surgical margins did not correlate evidence of tumour in enucleated eyes or metastatic disease. Surgical margins of more anterior tumours were more likely to be clear on histological evaluation (p<0.05). Approximately 53% of retained eyes had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40; visual results were significantly better in more anteriorly located tumours (p<0.05). All retained iris tumour cases had ⩾20/40 final visual acuity. In tumours that involved the choroid nine of 31 retained eyes kept that level of visual acuity. Eight patients developed metastases; all metastatic events developed in patients with tumours that involved the choroid, and seven of eight were mixed cell melanomas.
CONCLUSIONS—76% of eyes were retained and 53% of these had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40. Only 7% of uveal melanoma patients developed metastatic disease with a mean follow up of 6 years. Survival did not

  3. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  4. [Pancreatic pseudocysts].

    PubMed

    Stăncescu, M; Ciurea, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical, evolutive and therapeutical aspects were studied, of 66 cases of patients with pancreatic pseudocysts hospitalized in the clinic over a period of 27 years. Particular modalities of onset were, those of patients with duodenal stenosis, mechanical jaundice, ascites and pleurisy, those in whom symptomatology suggested kidney or cholecystic disease. The intraoperative diagnosis raises the problem of differentiating a retroperitoneal tumor, identifying the possible association with a pancreatic cancer, and the condition when the pseudocysts are found at a certain distance from the pancreas itself. The therapeutical methods are codified, but recidives are possible. Cholecystectomy removes the biliary cause of pancreatitis which can determine the development of pseudocysts. The death rate of these cases was 6.3%.

  5. A Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of the Head of Pancreas: A Rare Case Report Diagnosed by Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Archana Hemant; Chhadi, Shyam Atmaram; Kumbhalkar, Dinkar T; Raut, Waman K

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPPT) is a distinctive tumour of low malignant potential with a striking and unexplained predilection for adolescent girls and young women. Hence it is important to distinguish this rare tumour from other pancreatic tumours with similar cytomorphologic features because an accurate preoperative diagnosis is highly desirable since these patients can have long survival with adequate surgery. We report a case of the rare SPPT of the pancreas in a young girl who presented with nonspecific pain in the abdomen. Radiological investigations revealed a solid cystic mass in relation to the uncinate process of pancreas and third part of duodenum. The mass was diagnosed to be a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas on ultrasound guided FNAC. Surgical removal of the pancreatic tumour and detailed histologic study confirmed the cytologic diagnosis. We present this case because, to date, there are few case reports on the cytological diagnosis of this tumour, about 60 cases, diagnosed by Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) are reported in the literature. With widespread availability of high-quality imaging systems and a better understanding of its pathology, the number of cases reported in the literature has been steadily increasing in recent years. In our case, the cytological diagnosis was done even before the detailed imaging findings were available, the cytological features of this tumour are highly characteristic and it is possible to differentiate it from other pancreatic tumours with relative ease. PMID:27504299

  6. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  7. Histological characterisation and prognostic evaluation of 62 gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Ye, Yuhong; Shi, Xi; Zhu, Kunshou; Huang, Liming; Zhang, Sheng; Ying, Mingang; Lin, Xuede

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To determine the significance of expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67 and their association with clinicopathological parameters, and to find out the possible prognostic factors in gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma (G-NEC). Material and methods We investigated the immunohistochemical features and prognosis of 62 G-NECs, and evaluated the association among expressions of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67, clinicopathological variables, and outcome. Results Chromogranin A expression was found more commonly in small-cell NECs (9/9, 100%) than in large-cell NECs (27/53, 51%) (p = 0.008). No statistical significance was found in Ki-67 (p = 0.494) or synaptophysin (p > 0.1) expression between NEC cell types. Correlation analyses revealed that Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with mid-third disease of stomach (p = 0.005) and vascular involvement (p = 0.006), and had a trend of significant correlation with tumour relapse (p = 0.078). High expression of chromogranin A was significantly associated with histology of small-cell NECs (p = 0.008) and lesser tumour greatest dimension (p = 0.038). The prognostic significance was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests, and as a result, early TNM staging and postoperative chemotherapy were found to be correlated with longer overall survival (p < 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed associations between poor prognosis in NECs and several factors, including high TNM staging (p = 0.048), vascular involvement (p = 0.023), relapse (p = 0.004), and microscopic/macroscopic residual tumour (R1/2, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, relapse was identified as the sole independent prognostic factor. Conclusions No significant correlation between survival and expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, or Ki-67 has been determined in G-NECs. Our study indicated that early diagnosis, no-residual-tumour resection, and postoperative chemotherapy were

  8. Transgenerational neuroendocrine disruption of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deena M.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is associated with dysfunctions of metabolism, energy balance, thyroid function and reproduction, and an increased risk of endocrine cancers. These multifactorial disorders can be ‘programmed’ through molecular epigenetic changes induced by exposure to EDCs early in life, the expression of which may not manifest until adulthood. In some cases, EDCs have detrimental effects on subsequent generations, which indicates that traits for disease predisposition may be passed to future generations by nongenomic inheritance. This Review discusses current understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that underlie sexual differentiation of reproductive neuroendocrine systems in mammals and summarizes the literature on transgenerational epigenetic effects of representative EDCs: vinclozolin, diethylstilbesterol, bisphenol A and polychlorinated biphenyls. The article differentiates between context-dependent epigenetic transgenerational changes—namely, those that require environmental exposure, either via the EDC itself or through behavioral or physiological differences in parents—and germline-dependent epigenetic mechanisms. These processes, albeit discrete, are not mutually exclusive and can involve similar molecular mechanisms including DNA methylation and histone modifications and may predispose exposed individuals to transgenerational disruption of reproductive processes. New insights stress the crucial need to develop a clear understanding of how EDCs may program the epigenome of exposed individuals and their descendants. PMID:21263448

  9. Retroperitoneal dermoid presenting as an infected pancreatic cyst.

    PubMed

    Dewar, G; Arnold, M; Li, A K

    1990-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis infection of a juxtapancreatic benign cystic retroperitoneal teratoma in a 28 year old Chinese male is reported. Preliminary drainage was followed by excision. The radiological and pathological findings of this rare tumour are reported with emphasis on the differential diagnosis which includes inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic cysts.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  11. A bipartite graph of Neuroendocrine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhong-Wei; Zou, Sheng-Rong; Peng, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Ta; Gu, Chang-Gui; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    We present an empirical investigation on the neuroendocrine system and suggest describe it by a bipartite graph. In the net the cells can be regarded as collaboration acts and the mediators can be regarded as collaboration actors. The act degree stands for the number of the cells that secrete a single mediator. Among them bFGF (the basic fibroblast growth factor) has the largest node act degree. It is the most important mitogenic cytokine, followed by TGF-beta, IL-6, IL1-beta, VEGF, IGF-1and so on. They are critical in neuroendocrine system to maintain bodily healthiness, emotional stabilization and endocrine harmony. The act degree distribution shows a shifted power law (SPL) function forms [1]. The average act degree of neuroendocrine network is h=3.01, It means that each mediator is secreted by three cells on average. The similarity, which stands for the average probability of secreting the same mediators by all neuroendocrine cells, is observed as s=0.14. Our results may be used in the research of the medical treatment of neuroendocrine diseases. [1] Assortativity and act degree distribution of some collaboration networks, Hui Chang, Bei-Bei Su, Yue-Ping Zhou, Daren He, Physica A, 383 (2007) 687-702

  12. Immune-Neuroendocrine Interactions and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis J.; Navarro, Carmen; Medina, Gabriela; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Blanco, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between immune-neuroendocrine system is firmly established. The messengers of this connection are hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and cytokines. The immune-neuroendocrine system have the capacity to synthesize and release these molecules, which, in turn, can stimulate or suppress the activity of immune or neuroendocrine cells by binding to receptors. In fact, hormones, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters participate in innate and adaptive immune response.Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are a potent activator of the HPA axis. In consequence, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones such as estrogens and prolactin, and low levels of glucocorticoids, an anti-inflammatory hormone, have been described in the active phase of ARD. In addition, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones and cytokines have also been frequently detected in organ involvement of patients with ARD, suggesting an abnormal local neuroendocrine immune interaction. There is evidence that hormonal changes may appear before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Therefore, it is possible that a pro-inflammatory hormone favors the rupture of tolerance, which is a key feature of autoimmune diseases. The interactions between the immune-neuroendocrine system have a major impact on our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy of ARD. PMID:17162354

  13. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  14. Pancreatic endocrine tumors: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R T

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET's) can be divided on a clinical and pathologic basis into ten classes [insulinomas, gastrinomas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), VIPomas (Verner-Morrison syndrome, WDHA, pancreatic cholera), glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, ACTH-releasing tumors (ACTHomas), growth hormone-releasing factor secreting tumors (GRFomas), nonfunctioning or pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (non-functioning PET), PET's causing carcinoid syndrome and PET's causing hypercalcemia)]. Recent reports suggest calcitonin-secreting PET's also rarely occur but whether they cause a distinct clinical syndrome is unclear. PET's resemble carcinoid tumors histologically; in their ability to synthesize and frequently secrete multiple peptides such as neuroendocrine cell markers (chromogranins); their biologic behavior and their tumor growth patterns. Both groups of tumors are highly vascular, have high densities of somatostatin receptors and similar tumor localization studies including somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are used for both. PET's, similar to carcinoids causing the carcinoid syndrome, require two separate treatment options be considered: treatment directed against the hormone-excess state and treatment directed against the tumor per se because of their malignant nature. In the last few years there have been advances in tumor diagnosis, localization methods, treatment approaches particularly related to the use of synthetic somatostatin analogues, and the definition of the role of surgical procedures in these diseases. Important other advances include insights into the long-term natural history of PET's particularly from studies of gastrinomas, which allow prognostic factors to be identified and the timing of treatment options to better planned, as well as insights into the molecular basis of these disorders. The latter includes both a description of the molecular basis of the genetic inherited syndromes associated with PET's or carcinoid tumors, as well as

  15. Neuroendocrine aspects of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martino, Davide; Macerollo, Antonella; Leckman, James F

    2013-01-01

    There is sparse evidence suggesting the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms, mainly involving sex and stress steroid hormones, to the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Tourette syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients with TS exhibit a sex-specific variability in gender distribution (male/female ratio=3-4/1) and in its natural history, with a severity peak in the period around puberty. The administration of exogenous androgens may worsen tics in males with TS, whereas drugs counteracting the action of testosterone might show some antitic efficacy. This suggests a higher susceptibility of patients with TS to androgen steroids. There are insufficient data on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in TS. However, preliminary evidence suggests that a subgroup of women with TS might be more sensitive to the premenstrual trough of estrogen levels. Patients with TS exhibit differences in a number of behavioral, cognitive, and anatomical traits that appear to be sex related. There is a body of evidence supporting, albeit indirectly, the hypothesis of an increased exposure to androgenic steroids during the very early phases of neural development. Animal models in rodents suggest a complex role of gonadal hormones upon the modulation of anxiety-related and stereotyped behaviors during adult life. Patients with TS exhibit an enhanced reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to external stressors, despite a preserved diurnal cortisol rhythm and a normal restoration of the baseline activity of the axis following the acute stress response. Preliminary evidence suggests the possible implication of oxytocin (OT) in disorders related to the TS spectrum, especially non-tic-related OCD. The injection of OT in the amygdala of rodents was shown to be able to induce hypergrooming, suggesting the possible involvement of this neuropeptide in the pathophysiology of complex, stereotyped behaviors. In

  16. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  17. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  18. Salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, P M; Barrett, A W

    2002-09-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare and morphologically diverse group of lesions. Although most clinicians and pathologists will have encountered the more common benign neoplasms, few have experience of the full range of salivary cancers, which are best managed in specialist centres. This review considers some current areas of difficulty and controversy in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. The classification of these lesions is complex, encompassing nearly 40 different entities, but precise classification and terminology is essential for an accurate diagnosis and for the allocation of tumours to prognostic groups. For many salivary tumours diagnosis is straightforward but the wide range of morphological diversity between and within tumour types means that a diagnosis may not be possible on small incisional biopsies and careful consideration of the clinical and pathological features together is essential. Although tumour grading is important and helpful, it is not an independent prognostic indicator and must be considered in the context of stage. Large malignancies tend to have a poor prognosis regardless of grade and even high-grade neoplasms may do well when they are small. A helpful guide to management of salivary cancers is the '4 cm rule'.

  19. Structural pathology underlying neuroendocrine dysfunction in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Morris B.; Wang, Lei; Wachi, Carly; Daudi, Sheeraz; Csernansky, John; Marlow-O'Connor, Megan; Keedy, Sarah; Torres, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Polydipsic hyponatremic schizophrenic (PHS) patients exhibit altered neuroendocrine activity that has been linked to their life-threatening water imbalance, as well as to impaired function and reduced volume of the anterior hippocampus. Polydipsic patients without hyponatremia (polydipsic normonatremic schizophrenics: PNS) exhibit similar, albeit less marked, changes in neuroendocrine activity and anterior hippocampal function, but not reduced anterior hippocampal volume. Indeed, reduced anterior hippocampal volume is seen in patients with normal water balance (nonpolydipsic normonatremic schizophrenics: NNS) whose neuroendocrine activity and anterior hippocampal function differ markedly from those with polydipsia. In an effort to reconcile these findings we measured hippocampal, amygdala and 3rd ventricle shapes in 26 schizophrenic patients (10 PNS, 7 PHS, 9 NNS) and 12 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Bilateral inward deformations were localized to the anterior lateral hippocampal surface (part of a neurocircuit which modulates neuroendocrine responses to psychological stimuli) in PHS and to a lesser extent in PNS, while deformations in NNS were restricted to the medial surface. Proportional deformations of the right medial amygdala, a key segment of this neurocircuit, were seen in both polydipsic groups, and correlated with the volume of the 3rd ventricle, which lies adjacent to the neuroendocrine nuclei. Finally, these structural findings were most marked in those with impaired hippocampal-mediated stress responses. These results reconcile previously conflicting data, and support the view that anterior lateral hippocampal pathology disrupts neuroendocrine function in polydipsic patients with and without hyponatremia. The relationship of these findings to the underlying mental illness remains to be established. PMID:21093493

  20. Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer. Can We Fight It?

    PubMed Central

    Merika, E. E.; Syrigos, K. N.; Saif, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    The hallmark of pancreatic tumours, the desmoplastic reaction, provides a unique microenvironment that affects pancreatic tumour behaviour, its ability to grow and metastasize as well as resist the effects of chemotherapy. Complex molecular interactions and pathways give rise to the desmoplastic reaction. Breakdown or penetration of the desmoplastic reaction may hold the key to overcoming the limits of delivery of efficacious chemotherapy or the development of new targeted treatments. Herein we discuss such new developments to fight the desmoplastic reaction, including inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, the hedgehog pathway, as well as new molecular targets like CD40 agonist and its effects on T cells, extracellular matrix modifying enzymes such as LOXL2 inhibitor and novel tumour penetrating peptides for delivery of drugs. PMID:23125850

  1. Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumor Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark A.; Hobday, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    In the care of patients with hepatic neuroendocrine metastases, medical oncologists should work in multidisciplinary fashion with surgeons, interventional radiologists, and radiation oncologists to assess the potential utility of liver-directed and systemic therapies. This paper addresses the various roles and evidence basis for cytoreductive surgery, thermal ablation (radiofrequency, microwave, and cryoablation), and embolization (bland embolization (HAE), chemoembolization (HACE), and radioembolization) as liver-directed therapies. Somatostatin analogues, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and the newer agents everolimus and suntinib are discussed as a means for controlling intra- and extrahepatic disease, along with peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT). Finally, the experience with orthotopic liver transplant for neuroendocrine tumors is described. PMID:23227348

  2. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences.

  3. Neuroendocrine Disruption: More than Hormones are Upset

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  4. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  5. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  6. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  7. Oxygen carrying microbubbles for enhanced sonodynamic therapy of hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Conor; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor; Fowley, Colin; Nesbitt, Heather; Cochrane, David; Coussios, Constantin C; Borden, M; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F

    2015-04-10

    Tumour hypoxia represents a major challenge in the effective treatment of solid cancerous tumours using conventional approaches. As oxygen is a key substrate for Photo-/Sono-dynamic Therapy (PDT/SDT), hypoxia is also problematic for the treatment of solid tumours using these techniques. The ability to deliver oxygen to the vicinity of the tumour increases its local partial pressure improving the possibility of ROS generation in PDT/SDT. In this manuscript, we investigate the use of oxygen-loaded, lipid-stabilised microbubbles (MBs), decorated with a Rose Bengal sensitiser, for SDT-based treatment of a pancreatic cancer model (BxPc-3) in vitro and in vivo. We directly compare the effectiveness of the oxygen-loaded MBs with sulphur hexafluoride (SF6)-loaded MBs and reveal a significant improvement in therapeutic efficacy. The combination of oxygen-carrying, ultrasound-responsive MBs, with an ultrasound-responsive therapeutic sensitiser, offers the possibility of delivering and activating the MB-sensitiser conjugate at the tumour site in a non-invasive manner, providing enhanced sonodynamic activation at that site.

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  9. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  10. Primary retroperitoneal tumours and cysts.

    PubMed

    Bors, G; Polyák, L; Frang, D

    1986-01-01

    The authors give a summarizing report on retroperitoneal tumours and cysts. They review the origin and classification of tumours and cysts, their diagnostic and differential diagnostic possibilities as well as the therapeutic measures. Finally, their own 3 cases are reported.

  11. Pulmonary Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Morena; Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Papaccio, Federica; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Lung neuroendocrine tumors are a heterogeneous subtype of pulmonary cancers representing approximately 20% of all lung cancers, including small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC). The frequency appears to be approximately 3% for LCNEC. Diagnosis of LCNEC requires attention to neuroendocrine features by light microscopy and confirmation by immunohistochemical staining for neuroendocrine markers. Both SCLC and pulmonary LCNEC are high-grade and poor-prognosis tumors, with higher incidence in males and smokers and peripheral localization. LCNEC is very rare, and the precise diagnosis on small specimens is very difficult, so we have still too few data to define a standard of treatment for pulmonary LCNECs. Data of literature, most based on retrospective analysis, indicated a poor 5-year overall survival, with a high incidence of recurrence after surgery, even in stage I disease. Primary surgery should be the first option in all operable patients because there is no validate therapeutic approach for LCNEC due to lack of clinical trials in this setting. Neoadjuvant platinum-based regimens remain only an option for potentially resectable tumors. In advanced stages, SCLC-like chemotherapy seems the best option of treatment, with a good response rate but a poor overall survival (from 8 to 16 months in different case series). New agents are under clinical investigation to improve LCNEC patients’ outcome. We reviewed all data on treatment options feasible for pulmonary LCNEC, both for localized and extensive disease. PMID:26039012

  12. Skin manifestations of endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jonathan S; Braverman, Irwin M

    2016-06-01

    The skin signs of benign and malignant endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors are manifold and early identification of these dermatologic features is crucial in initiating timely diagnosis and management. This article reviews the salient cutaneous features of these tumors that arise in the classic endocrine glands, lung and gastrointestinal tract either as individual neoplasms or as part of a syndrome.

  13. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  14. NEUROENDOCRINE AND REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuroendocrine and Reproductive Effects of Pesticides

    1Stoker, TE, Goldman 2, JM and Cooper 2, RL.

    1Gamete and Early Embryogenesis Biology Branch and 2 Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborat...

  15. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  16. Elastosis in malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, C; Greeff, H; Murray, J F; Posen, J; Schmaman, A

    1985-07-01

    Elastosis is common in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast, occurring in approximately 90% of cases. It is also well described in some benign lesions of the breast and tumours of the salivary gland. Reports of venous elastosis in association with large-bowel carcinomas are rare. We describe elastosis in single cases of prostatic, gastric, bronchiolar-alveolar and cervical carcinoma.

  17. Development of neuroendocrine tumors in the gastrointestinal tract of transgenic mice. Heterogeneity of hormone expression.

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, G.; Grant, S. G.; Yiangou, Y.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S. R.; Bautch, V. L.; Solcia, E.; Polak, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Expression of hormones in endocrine tumors and derived cell lines of transgenic mice carrying insulin-promoted oncogenes has been investigated by histochemical, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and radioimmunologic means. Tumors of the pancreas, small intestine, mesentery, and liver were examined. Insulin-immunoreactive cells were prevalent in pancreatic tumors, with a significant subpopulation of pancreatic polypeptide-immunoreactive elements. Conventional ultrastructural and immunogold analysis identified insulin-storing beta granules in pancreatic tumor cells. In contrast, the largest immunoreactive subpopulation of intestinal tumors expressed secretin (53% of total cells), followed by proglucagon-related peptides (15%), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (7%), gastrin (7%), pancreatic polypeptide (2%), neurotensin (2%), and somatostatin (1%). No detectable immunoreactivity for either insulin or serotonin was observed. Electron microscopy and immunogold labeling showed that intestinal tumor cells contained secretin-storing S-type granules. Lymph node and liver tumors contained secretin-immunoreactive cells with ultrastructural features similar to those of intestinal tumors. In addition, high levels of circulating insulinlike and secretinlike immunoreactants were detectable. Analogous hormone profiles were identified in tumor cell lines and culture media. Large T-antigen immunoreactivity was detected in all the nuclei of neoplastic cells, as well as in insulin-immunoreactive elements of non-neoplastic islets and pancreatic ducts and in some secretin-immunoreactive cells of small intestinal mucosa. These data indicate that neuroendocrine tumors arise both in beta cell and S-cell subpopulations of transgenic mice. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2162628

  18. Frequent loss of Fas expression and function in human lung tumours with overexpression of FasL in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Viard-Leveugle, Isabelle; Veyrenc, Sylvie; French, Lars E; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth

    2003-10-01

    Fas (CD95) and its ligand FasL signal apoptosis and are involved in tissue homeostasis and the elimination of target cells by cytotoxic T cells. Corruption of this signalling pathway in tumour cells, for example by reduced Fas expression or increased FasL expression, can participate in tumour development and immune escape. The present study has analysed Fas/FasL expression and Fas death signalling function in vivo in lung tumour tissues [57 non-small cell lung carcinomas and 64 neuroendocrine lung tumours including small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC)] in comparison with normal lung tissue, and in vitro in neuroendocrine tumour cell lines in comparison with normal human bronchial epithelial cells. The Fas expression score was markedly decreased compared with normal lung tissue in 90% of the 121 lung tumours and was completely lost in 24%. The Fas staining pattern suggested cytoplasmic Fas expression in tumours, whereas membrane expression was observed in normal lung tissue. Loss of Fas at the cell surface was also shown in vitro by FACS analysis of neuroendocrine tumour cell lines and was concomitant with the resistance of tumour cells to FasL-mediated apoptosis according to in vitro cell viability. The lack of cell surface Fas expression in tumour cell lines resulted from the lack of intracellular Fas protein due to impaired Fas gene transcription. The FasL expression score was also decreased in most non-small cell lung carcinomas compared with normal bronchial cells, whereas 91% of SCLCs had higher expression than normal cells. FasL overexpression was related to advanced tumour stage as well as to a Fas/FasL ratio less than 1. It is concluded that a marked decrease in Fas expression may be part of lung tumourigenesis allowing tumour cells to escape from apoptosis. FasL overexpression in the context of Fas down-regulation in SCLC predicts the ability of SCLC cells to induce paracrine killing of Fas-expressing cytotoxic T cells. In lung tumours, Fas restoration may

  19. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  20. Contrast-Enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography of Solid Pancreatic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Ang, Tiing Leong; Seo, Dong Wan; Imazu, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography is the best modality for pancreatic lesion evaluation as its superior spatial resolution allows small lesions to be identified and fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology performed under ultrasound-guidance. Despite this, differentiating benign from malignant lesions remains a challenge as conventional ultrasound imaging is unable to differentiate lesions accurately and tissue yield is poorly diagnostic or limited in patients with the chronic inflammation. Contrast-harmonic technology uses a wide-band transducer capable of inducing sufficient acoustic energy to create harmonic microbubble oscillations of the newer second-generation ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). These microbubbles are more stable, remaining within the intravascular component longer and emit significantly more harmonic content than surrounding tissue, thus allowing pancreatic parenchymal differentiation and microvascular architecture visualization. The use of UCAs is generally safe, but should be especially avoided in patients with unstable ischemic heart disease. During CH endosonography, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is commonly seen as an inhomogenous hypoenhancing lesion, focal pancreatitis as a hypo- or iso-enhancing lesion and neuroendocrine tumor as a hyperenhancing lesion. The presence of hyperenhancement is a strong predictor of non-adenocarcinoma etiology. Furthermore, in patients with the chronic pancreatitis or biliary stents that may obscure pancreatic inspection, the addition of contrast-harmonic endosonography to guide FNA cytology improves its diagnostic yield and accuracy. Quantitative analysis of perfusion through the time intensity curve is promising as an objective and accurate method to differentiate pancreatic lesions. Furthermore, studies are required to fully determine the role of contrast harmonic endosonography in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. PMID:24949382

  1. Laryngeal solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Stomeo, Francesco; Padovani, Davide; Bozzo, Corrado; Pastore, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are rare neoplasms, with an uncommon laryngeal involvement. Only five cases of laryngeal localization have been described in literature. The following is a case of a 75-year-old man with a supraglottic neoplasm of the larynx; after the biopsy immunohistochemical study demonstrated a strong positivity for vimentin, CD34 and Bcl-2. The neoplasm was consequently classified as a SFT. CO(2) laser surgery of the supraglottic larynx, with a wide excision of the neoplasm, was performed. Twenty-four months on, the patient is alive, well and free of disease. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for laryngeal SFT, but tumour-free resection margins must be achieved to prevent the possibility of local recurrence. Endoscopic resection by means of the CO(2) laser must be accurately planned with MRI or CT imaging to confirm of this kind of surgery.

  2. PDX-1 is a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia using a novel RNA interference platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-He; Rao, Donald D; Nemunaitis, John; Senzer, Neil; Zhou, Guisheng; Dawson, David; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Wang, Zhaohui; Gibbs, Richard; Norman, Michael; Templeton, Nancy S; Demayo, Francesco J; O'Malley, Bert; Sanchez, Robbi; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) is a transcription factor that regulates insulin expression and islet maintenance in the adult pancreas. Our recent studies demonstrate that PDX-1 is an oncogene for pancreatic cancer and is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that PDX-1 is a therapeutic target for both hormonal symptoms and tumor volume in mouse models of pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia. Immunohistochemistry of human pancreatic and islet neoplasia specimens revealed marked PDX-1 overexpression, suggesting PDX-1 as a "drugable" target within these diseases. To do so, a novel RNA interference effector platform, bifunctional shRNA(PDX-1), was developed and studied in mouse and human cell lines as well as in mouse models of pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia. Systemic delivery of bi-shRNA(humanPDX-1) lipoplexes resulted in marked reduction of tumor volume and improved survival in a human pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model. bi-shRNA(mousePDX-1) lipoplexes prevented death from hyperinsulinemia and hypoglycemia in an insulinoma mouse model. shRNA(mousePDX-1) lipoplexes reversed hyperinsulinemia and hypoglycemia in an immune-competent mouse model of islet neoplasia. PDX-1 was overexpressed in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and nesidioblastosis. These data demonstrate that PDX-1 RNAi therapy controls hormonal symptoms and tumor volume in mouse models of pancreatic cancer, insulinoma and islet neoplasia, therefore, PDX-1 is a potential therapeutic target for these pancreatic diseases.

  3. Electrochemotherapy of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combined use of certain chemotherapeutic drugs and electric pulses applied to the treated tumour nodule. Local application of electric pulses to the tumour increases drug delivery into cells, specifically at the site of electric pulse application. Drug uptake by delivery of electric pulses is increased for only those chemotherapeutic drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical use. Clinical data collected within a number of clinical studies indicate that approximately 80% of the treated cutaneous and subcutaneous tumour nodules of different malignancies are in an objective response, from these, approximately 70% in complete response after a single application of electrochemotherapy. Usually only one treatment is needed, however, electrochemotherapy can be repeated several times every few weeks with equal effectiveness each time. The treatment results in an effective eradication of the treated nodules, with a good cosmetic effect without tissue scarring. PMID:19229171

  4. Superficial necrolytic dermatitis in a dog with an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isidoro-Ayza, M; Lloret, A; Bardagí, M; Ferrer, L; Martínez, J

    2014-07-01

    A 10-year-old dog presented with convulsive crisis and symmetrical hyperkeratotic cutaneous lesions affecting the abdomen, inguinal area, eyelids, muzzles, both pinnae, and all the paw pads. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were the main biochemical findings. A mass 2 cm in diameter was detected within the left pancreatic lobe by ultrasonography. It was surgically removed and histologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. The animal was eventually euthanized due to lack of clinical improvement. At necropsy, metastatic nodules were observed in the pancreatic lymph nodes and liver. Histopathological findings of cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of superficial necrolytic dermatitis and were interpreted as a paraneoplastic syndrome derived from the islet cell carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of superficial necrolytic dermatitis associated with an insulin-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma in dogs.

  5. Pancreaticogastrostomy: a salvage procedure for pancreatic body and neck resection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Prasoon, Pankaj; Hong, Wu; Lu, Hui Min; Zhang, Zhao Da; Zhaoda, Zhang

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the technological viability, basic safety and consequence of central pancreatectomy (CP) with pancreaticogastrostomy in properly chosen sufferers with noncancerous central pancreatic pathology. This research is centered on the infirmary charts of West China hospital. We recruited 20 individuals from 2007 to 2009 diagnosed with benign cancerous growth of pancreatic body and neck. They underwent pancreatic body and neck resection adhering to pancreaticogastrostomy. We carried out central pancreatectomy following pancreaticogastrostomy in 20 patients: 8 with serous cyst adenomas, 11 with mucinous cystadenomas, and 1 with neuroendocrine tumor. The position of all tumors was restricted to body and neck of the pancreas, measuring a mean ± standard deviation of 2.6±1.3cm. The mean post-operative hospital stay was 7 days (ranging from 6 to 16 days).There was no intraoperative additional complications. From a technical perspective, CP is a safe and sound, pancreas-preserving pancreatectomy for non-enucleable non-cancerous pancreatic pathology restricted to the pancreatic body. PMID:23396710

  6. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  7. Neuroendocrine Profile in the Night Eating Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birketvedt, Grethe Støa; Geliebter, Allan; Florholmen, Jon; Gluck, Marci E

    2014-03-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) has recently been getting more attention as a recognized eating disorder. NES is characterized by a delay in the circadian pattern of food intake, associated with morning anorexia, evening hyperphagia, awakenings from sleep with ingestion of food, depressed mood, and obesity. Although the behavioral characteristics of NES were first described in 1955, the neuroendocrine characteristics have only been described recently. Researchers have examined several hormones that appear to differ in night eaters compared to controls, including melatonin, leptin, and cortisol. Researchers have more recently examined the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in more detail, with emphasis on corticotrophin releasing hormone. Further studies have examined ghrelin, growth hormone, prolactin, and IGF-1, with differences observed in the circadian pattern of these hormones in those with NES compared to controls. Despite increasing interest in the neuroendocrine profile of night eating behavior, the biological basis of NES is still not well understood.

  8. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences. PMID:26391503

  9. Neuroendocrine Causes of Amenorrhea—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Lindsay T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Secondary amenorrhea—the absence of menses for three consecutive cycles—affects approximately 3–4% of reproductive age women, and infertility—the failure to conceive after 12 months of regular intercourse—affects approximately 6–10%. Neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility, including functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia, constitute a majority of these cases. Objective: In this review, we discuss the physiologic, pathologic, and iatrogenic causes of amenorrhea and infertility arising from perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, including potential genetic causes. We focus extensively on the hormonal mechanisms involved in disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility is critical for properly assessing patients presenting with these complaints. Prompt evaluation and treatment are essential to prevent loss of bone mass due to hypoestrogenemia and/or to achieve the time-sensitive treatment goal of conception. PMID:25581597

  10. Network of immune-neuroendocrine interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Besedovsky, H; Sorkin, E

    1977-01-01

    In order to bring the self-regulated immune system into conformity with other body systems its functioning within the context of an immune-neuroendocrine network is proposed. This hypothesis is based on the existence of afferent--efferent pathways between immune and neuroendocrine structures. Major endocrine responses occur as a consequence of antigenic stimulation and changes in the electrical activity of the hypothalamus also take place; both of these alterations are temporally related to the immune response itself. This endocrine response has meaningful implications for immunoregulation and for immunospecificity. During ontogeny, there is also evidence for the operations of a complex network between the endocrine and immune system, a bidirectional interrelationship that may well affect each developmental stage of both functions. As sequels the functioning of the immune system and the outcome of this interrelation could be decisive in lymphoid cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and could also have significant implications for pathology. PMID:849642

  11. Pancreatic cancer and its stroma: a conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Pothula, Srinivasa P; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by a prominent desmoplastic/stromal reaction that has received little attention until recent times. Given that treatments focusing on pancreatic cancer cells alone have failed to significantly improve patient outcome over many decades, research efforts have now moved to understanding the pathophysiology of the stromal reaction and its role in cancer progression. In this regard, our Group was the first to identify the cells (pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) that produced the collagenous stroma of pancreatic cancer and to demonstrate that these cells interacted closely with cancer cells to facilitate local tumour growth and distant metastasis. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that stromal PSCs may also mediate angiogenesis, immune evasion and the well known resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This review will summarise current knowledge regarding the critical role of pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma in pancreatic cancer biology and the therapeutic approaches being developed to target the stroma in a bid to improve the outcome of this devastating disease. PMID:25170206

  12. Cutaneous Metastasis of Neuroendocrine Carcinoma with Unknown Primary Site: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Gustavo Moreira; Quintella, Danielle; Cuzzi, Tullia; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of neuroendocrine carcinoma for which it was not possible to find the primary site until now. The recent medical literature about skin metastasis of neuroendocrine carcinoma (neuroendocrine tumor) is discussed. PMID:26557073

  13. Neuroendocrine regulation of appetitive ingestive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Ondek, Katelynn; Schneider, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    Food availability in nature is often irregular, and famine is commonplace. Increased motivation to engage in ingestive behaviors increases the chance of survival, providing additional potential opportunities for reproduction. Because of the advantages conferred by entraining ingestive behavior to environmental conditions, neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating the motivation to acquire and ingest food have evolved to be responsive to exogenous (i.e., food stored for future consumption) and endogenous (i.e., body fat stores) fuel availability. Motivated behaviors like eating occur in two phases. The appetitive phase brings animals into contact with food (e.g., foraging, food hoarding), and the more reflexive consummatory phase results in ingestion (e.g., chewing, swallowing). Quantifiable appetitive behaviors are part of the natural ingestive behavioral repertoire of species such as hamsters and humans. This review summarizes current knowledge about neuroendocrine regulators of ingestive behavior, with an emphasis appetitive behavior. We will discuss hormonal regulators of appetitive ingestive behaviors, including the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, which potently stimulates foraging and food hoarding in Siberian hamsters. This section includes a discussion of the hormone leptin, its relation to endogenous fat stores, and its role in food deprivation-induced increases in appetitive ingestive behaviors. Next, we discuss how hormonal regulators interact with neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of ingestive behaviors, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), to regulate ingestive behavior. Finally, we discuss the potential impact that perinatal nutrient availability can have on the neuroendocrine regulation of ingestive behavior. Understanding the hormonal mechanisms that connect metabolic fuel availability to central appetite regulatory circuits should provide a better understanding of the

  14. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  15. Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

  16. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  17. Analysis of tumour cell composition in tumours composed of paired mixtures of mammary tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, F. R.; Wilburn, D. J.; Heppner, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to quantitate the effects of tumour subpopulation interactions, we have devised a method to determine the subpopulation composition of tumours by using paired tumour cell lines able to grow in different selective media. Line 4T07 forms colonies in thioguanine but not in HAT and line 168 forms colonies in HAT but not in thioguanine. An independent technique of determining tumour cell content was used to validate this method: line 168 and 4T07 cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide for DNA content. Mixtures of cell suspensions prepared from each unmixed tumour, as well as from tumours arising from mixtures of these lines, were analysed by both the colony formation assay and by the DNA content assay. The colony formation assay yielded values in good agreement with the DNA content assay, but was considerably more sensitive in that it was able to quantitate minority subpopulations that constituted less than 10% of the tumour. Both methods revealed that in tumours arising from mixtures, the tumour cells were almost entirely line 4T07, even when the inoculum had contained a high proportion of 168 cells. Since line 168 cells are very tumorigenic per se, these results suggest that line 4T07 cells are capable of interfering with 168 proliferation in mixed tumours, either directly or through a host-mediated mechanism. PMID:3426919

  18. Molecular targeted therapy in enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: from biology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fazio, N; Scarpa, A; Falconi, M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced enteropancreatic (EP) neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with several different therapies, including chemotherapy, biotherapy, and locoregional treatments. Over the last few decades, impressive progress has been made in the biotherapy field. Three main druggable molecular targets have been studied and developed in terms of therapy: somatostatin receptor (sstr), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and angiogenic factors. In particular, research has moved from the old somatostatin analogs (SSAs), such as octreotide (OCT) and lanreotide (LAN), specifically binding to the sstr-2, to the newer pasireotide (PAS), which presents a wider sstr spectrum. Over the last ten years, several molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been studied in phase II trials, and very few of them have reached phase III. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the multitargeted inhibitor sunitinib have been approved for clinical use by the FDA and EMA in advanced well/moderately-differentiated (WD, MD) progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), on the basis of the positive results of two international large randomized phase III trials vs. placebo. Bevacizumab has been studied in a large US phase III trial vs. interferon (IFN)-alfa2b, and results are pending. In this review, the biological and clinical aspects of MTAs introduced into clinical practice or which are currently in an advanced phase of clinical investigation are addressed.

  19. A Rare Case of Mixed Neuroendocrine Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Xenaki, Sofia; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Andreou, Alexandros; Aggelaki, Sofia; Tzardi, Maria; Daskalaki, Anna; Chalkiadakis, George; Chrysos, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of pancreas is a rare tumor with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Its coexistence with adenocarcinoma poses significant clinical problems and has not been addressed in the literature. Methods. We describe a case of a 51-year-old male who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy due to pancreatic head tumor 1.5 × 1 × 1.4 cm. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a mixed neoplasm: (1) a well differentiated adenocarcinoma, neoplastic blasts of which are extended focally to the submucosa without invading the muscular layer, and (2) a low differentiated NEC consisting of solid clusters and pagetoid formations. All 18 lymph nodes of the specimen were free of neoplastic disease and the surgical margins of the specimen were tumor-free. No adjuvant treatment was administered and two months after the operation the patient developed liver metastasis. FNA cytology of the hepatic lesions revealed low grade carcinoma with neuroendocrine characteristics. Five lines of chemotherapy were administered: VP + CDDP, paclitaxel + ifosfamide + Mesna + CDDP, Folfox + Avastin, Folfiri + Avastin, and CAV. During his treatment he revealed PD and succumbed to his disease 13 months after the operation. Conclusion. Coexistence of NEC with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a very rare entity presenting significant challenges regarding its adjuvant treatment and the treatment of distant relapse. PMID:27610261

  20. A Rare Case of Mixed Neuroendocrine Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Andreou, Alexandros; Aggelaki, Sofia; Tzardi, Maria; Chalkiadakis, George; Chrysos, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of pancreas is a rare tumor with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Its coexistence with adenocarcinoma poses significant clinical problems and has not been addressed in the literature. Methods. We describe a case of a 51-year-old male who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy due to pancreatic head tumor 1.5 × 1 × 1.4 cm. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a mixed neoplasm: (1) a well differentiated adenocarcinoma, neoplastic blasts of which are extended focally to the submucosa without invading the muscular layer, and (2) a low differentiated NEC consisting of solid clusters and pagetoid formations. All 18 lymph nodes of the specimen were free of neoplastic disease and the surgical margins of the specimen were tumor-free. No adjuvant treatment was administered and two months after the operation the patient developed liver metastasis. FNA cytology of the hepatic lesions revealed low grade carcinoma with neuroendocrine characteristics. Five lines of chemotherapy were administered: VP + CDDP, paclitaxel + ifosfamide + Mesna + CDDP, Folfox + Avastin, Folfiri + Avastin, and CAV. During his treatment he revealed PD and succumbed to his disease 13 months after the operation. Conclusion. Coexistence of NEC with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a very rare entity presenting significant challenges regarding its adjuvant treatment and the treatment of distant relapse. PMID:27610261

  1. The neuroendocrine phenotype of gastric myofibroblasts and its loss with cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Silvia; Holmberg, Chris; Steele, Islay; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Rainbow, Lucille; Burdyga, Ted; McCaig, Cathy; Tiszlavicz, Lazso; Lertkowit, Nantaporn; Giger, Olivier T.; Oliver, Simon; Prior, Ian; Dimaline, Rod; Simpson, Deborah; Beynon, Rob; Hegyi, Peter; Wang, Timothy C.; Dockray, Graham J.; Varro, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells influence cancer progression. Myofibroblasts are an important stromal cell type, which influence the tumour microenvironment by release of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, proteases, cytokines and chemokines. The mechanisms of secretion are poorly understood. Here, we describe the secretion of marker proteins in gastric cancer and control myofibroblasts in response to insulin-like growth factor (IGF) stimulation and, using functional genomic approaches, we identify proteins influencing the secretory response. IGF rapidly increased myofibroblast secretion of an ECM protein, TGFβig-h3. The secretory response was not blocked by inhibition of protein synthesis and was partially mediated by increased intracellular calcium (Ca2+). The capacity for evoked secretion was associated with the presence of dense-core secretory vesicles and was lost in cells from patients with advanced gastric cancer. In cells responding to IGF-II, the expression of neuroendocrine marker proteins, including secretogranin-II and proenkephalin, was identified by gene array and LC-MS/MS respectively, and verified experimentally. The expression of proenkephalin was decreased in cancers from patients with advanced disease. Inhibition of secretogranin-II expression decreased the secretory response to IGF, and its over-expression recovered the secretory response consistent with a role in secretory vesicle biogenesis. We conclude that normal and some gastric cancer myofibroblasts have a neuroendocrine-like phenotype characterized by Ca2+-dependent regulated secretion, dense-core secretory vesicles and expression of neuroendocrine marker proteins; loss of the phenotype is associated with advanced cancer. A failure to regulate myofibroblast protein secretion may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:24710625

  2. Laparoscopic surgery for pancreatic insulinomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Aggeli, Chrysanthi; Nixon, Alexander M; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Kaltsas, Gregory; Zografos, George N

    2016-04-01

    Insulinomas are the most common functioning neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, occurring in almost 1-4 per 1 million persons each year. In contrast to other pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, they are usually benign and solitary at the time of diagnosis. Due to their benign nature, surgical excision is the treatment of choice, with excellent long-term results. The introduction of minimally invasive techniques in the surgical treatment of insulinoma has been gaining popularity due to shorter length of hospital stay and better cosmetic results, with serious complications being comparable to those of open surgery. Preoperative localization is of paramount importance in the determination of the appropriate surgical approach. Many invasive and non-invasive methods exist for localization of an insulinoma. A combination of these modalities is usually adequate to preoperatively localize the vast majority of tumors. Laparoscopic ultrasound is mandatory to localize these tumors intraoperatively. Despite extensive experience in highly specialized centers producing encouraging results, no randomized trials have been realized to conclusively validate these case series, this partly due to the rarity of insulinoma in the population. In this article we present the current state of laparoscopic management of insulinoma delineating still unanswered issues and we underscore some of the technical details of the most common laparoscopic procedures employed.

  3. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  4. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  6. Tumour imaging by the detection of fibrin clots in tumour stroma using an anti-fibrin Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Obonai, Toshifumi; Fuchigami, Hirobumi; Furuya, Fumiaki; Kozuka, Naoyuki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of early and aggressive types of cancer is important for providing effective cancer therapy. Cancer-induced fibrin clots exist only within lesions. Previously, we developed a monoclonal antibody (clone 102-10) that recognizes insoluble fibrin but not fibrinogen or soluble fibrin and confirmed that fibrin clots form continuously in various cancers. Here, we describe the development of a Fab fragment probe of clone 102-10 for tumour imaging. The distribution of 102-10 Fab was investigated in genetically engineered mice bearing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and its effect on blood coagulation was examined. Immunohistochemical and ex vivo imaging revealed that 102-10 Fab was distributed selectively in fibrin clots in PDAC tumours 3 h after injection and that it disappeared from the body after 24 h. 102-10 Fab had no influence on blood coagulation or fibrinolysis. Tumour imaging using anti-fibrin Fab may provide a safe and effective method for the diagnosis of invasive cancers by detecting fibrin clots in tumour stroma.

  7. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  8. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  9. Brain Tumours Simulating Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. E.

    1963-01-01

    Brain tumours may present with symptoms indistinguishable from psychiatric disease. The impression of most psychiatrists is that individuals suffering from brain tumour rarely appear among their patients. A priori reasoning based on evidence from neurological, neurosurgical and pathological sources suggests the contrary. The present study is a frequency analysis of cases of previously undiagnosed brain tumours admitted to either an open psychoneurotic ward or a mental hospital over a period of 15 years. The results support the impression held by psychiatrists that brain tumours are uncommon among psychiatric patients. PMID:13954870

  10. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  11. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  12. Pancreatic solitary fibrous tumor causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keigo; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Felizola, Saulo J A; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Takanami, Kentaro; Katakami, Hideki; Hirota, Seiichi; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-Ichi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-11-15

    Solitary fibrous tumors occasionally present with hypoglycemia because of the excessive release of insulin-like growth factor II. We report the first case of pancreatic solitary fibrous tumor causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. An 82-year-old Japanese man presented with lower limb edema, uncontrolled hypertension, hypokalemia, and baseline hypercortisolism. Distal pancreatectomy was performed after the clinical diagnosis of a neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone. On histological examination, the tumor showed spindle cells in a fascicular arrangement. The diagnosis of the solitary fibrous tumor was confirmed by the identification of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene and positive immuno-histochemical staining for STAT6 and CD34. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, mRNA that encoded proopiomelanocortin, precursor of adrenocorticotropic hormone, was detected. Proopiomelanocortin production through the demethylation of the promoter region Domain IV was detected. Pancreatic solitary fibrous tumors represent a new cause of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. PMID:27585487

  13. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivatable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities. PMID:26780659

  14. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  15. Programming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in the development of neuroendocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Geenen, Vincent; Bodart, Gwennaëlle; Henry, Séverine; Michaux, Hélène; Dardenne, Olivier; Charlet-Renard, Chantal; Martens, Henri; Hober, Didier

    2013-01-01

    For centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus was considered as only a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus first appeared in cartilaginous fishes some 500 million years ago, at the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was a necessity for the survival of species, given the potent evolutionary pressure imposed by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent in the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. A new paradigm of "neuroendocrine self-peptides" has been proposed, together with the definition of "neuroendocrine self." Neuroendocrine self-peptides are secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) not according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but are processed for presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells, which emerge during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). At the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that can inhibit, in the periphery, those self-reactive T cells that escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments indicate that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands results primarily from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic or

  16. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  17. Environmental toxicant effects on neuroendocrine function.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C

    2001-03-01

    Exposure to environmental toxicants can have profound effects on normal growth and development. However, the mechanisms by which these toxicants exert these effects are not well understood. Many environmental toxicants alter reproductive function and have effects on the central nervous system and behavior, yet the link between these reproductive and neurologic phenomena has not been systematically investigated. The neuroendocrine (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal) axis, which integrates inputs to and outputs from the nervous and reproductive systems, is functionally and anatomically situated to mediate effects of environmental toxicants, particularly those that are endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), on developmental processes. This article reviews the current literature on EDC effects on the neuroendocrine system, particularly at the level of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, the key cells involved in the regulation of reproductive function. The focus of this article is on two polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures (Aroclor 1221, Aroclor 1254) and two organochlorine pesticides (methoxychlor and chlorpyrifos). Some experimental data are presented for each of the four urban environmental toxicants on GnRH cells in vitro and in vivo. The results of in vitro experiments indicate that all four of the toxicants profoundly affect hypothalamic GnRH gene expression, cell survival, and neurite outgrowth, demonstrating direct effects of EDCs on a GnRH cell line. In in vivo experiments, three of the toxicants (Aroclor 1221, methoxychlor, and chlorpyrifos) caused significant alterations in GnRH mRNA levels in female rats. Both the in vitro and in vivo findings support the novel concept of chlorpyrifos as an EDC. The results, taken together with the literature, support the hypothesis that the neuroendocrine axis, and specifically GnRH neurons, are sensitive to urban environmental toxicants, and that reproductive and neurologic effects of EDCs may be

  18. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in pregnancy and parturition.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Felice; Imperatore, Alberto; Challis, John R G

    2010-12-01

    The complex mechanisms controlling human parturition involves mother, fetus, and placenta, and stress is a key element activating a series of physiological adaptive responses. Preterm birth is a clinical syndrome that shares several characteristics with term birth. A major role for the neuroendocrine mechanisms has been proposed, and placenta/membranes are sources for neurohormones and peptides. Oxytocin (OT) is the neurohormone whose major target is uterine contractility and placenta represents a novel source that contributes to the mechanisms of parturition. The CRH/urocortin (Ucn) family is another important neuroendocrine pathway involved in term and preterm birth. The CRH/Ucn family consists of four ligands: CRH, Ucn, Ucn2, and Ucn3. These peptides have a pleyotropic function and are expressed by human placenta and fetal membranes. Uterine contractility, blood vessel tone, and immune function are influenced by CRH/Ucns during pregnancy and undergo major changes at parturition. Among the others, neurohormones, relaxin, parathyroid hormone-related protein, opioids, neurosteroids, and monoamines are expressed and secreted from placental tissues at parturition. Preterm birth is the consequence of a premature and sustained activation of endocrine and immune responses. A preterm birth evidence for a premature activation of OT secretion as well as increased maternal plasma CRH levels suggests a pathogenic role of these neurohormones. A decrease of maternal serum CRH-binding protein is a concurrent event. At midgestation, placental hypersecretion of CRH or Ucn has been proposed as a predictive marker of subsequent preterm delivery. While placenta represents the major source for CRH, fetus abundantly secretes Ucn and adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone in women with preterm birth. The relevant role of neuroendocrine mechanisms in preterm birth is sustained by basic and clinic implications.

  19. Dural invasion by pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaffi, O M; Wrightson, P

    1975-04-23

    In 12 cases of pituitary tumour the dura mater of the sella turcica or diaphragma sellae in contact with the tumour was examined histologically. In nine cases tumour cells were found lying deep in the substance of the dura. Dura from the sella of seven subjects without pituitary disease, obtianed at autopsy, showed no inclusions of pituitary tissue. Four of the cases studied were known before death to suffer from an invasive pituitary adenoma. Of eight surviving cases operated upon in the last two years, five showed dural invasion by tumour. The present report suggests that the condition may be more frequent than expected and that with more study it may provide an index of prognosis. It also defines a requirement for the surgeon aiming to prevent recurrence of tumour after operation or to achieve a complete endocrine ablation.

  20. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Connie S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED), which is not uncommon in prostate cancer, is increases in prostate cancer after androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and generally appears in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Neuroendocrine cells, which are found in normal prostate tissue, are a small subset of cells and have unique function in regulating the growth of prostate cells. Prostate cancer with NED includes different types of tumor, including focal NED, pure neuroendocrine tumor or mixed neuroendocrine-adenocarcinoma. Although more and more studies are carried out on NED in prostate cancer, the molecular components that are involved in NED are still poorly elucidated. We review neuroendocrine cells in normal prostate tissue, NED in prostate cancer, terminology of NED and biomarkers used for detecting NED in routine pathological practice. Some recently reported molecular components which drive NED in prostate cancer are listed in the review. PMID:27041934

  1. Pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  2. Effects of morning hypoglycemia on neuroendocrine and metabolic responses to subsequent afternoon hypoglycemia in normal man.

    PubMed

    Davis, S N; Tate, D

    2001-05-01

    There is general agreement that prior hypoglycemia blunts subsequent hypoglycemic counterregulatory responses. However, there is considerable debate concerning the timing and number of prior hypoglycemic episodes required to cause this blunting effect. The aim of this study was to determine whether one episode of hypoglycemia could modify neuroendocrine, metabolic, and symptom responses to hypoglycemia induced 2 h later. A total of 24 (12 male and 12 female) young, healthy, overnight-fasted subjects participated in a series of glucose clamp studies. A total of 16 individuals underwent 2 randomized studies of either identical 2-h morning and afternoon hyperinsulinemic (490 +/- 60 pmol/L) hypoglycemia (2.9 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) separated by 2 h or, at least 2 months later, 2-h morning and afternoon hyperinsulinemic (492 +/- 45 pmol/L) euglycemia (5.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L). A total of 8 other subjects participated in a single experiment that consisted of 2-h morning hyperinsulinemic (516 +/- 60 pmol/L) euglycemia (5.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) and 2-h afternoon hyperinsulinemic (528 +/- 66 pmol/L) hypoglycemia (2.9 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) also separated by 2 h. Morning hypoglycemia significantly (P < 0.01) reduced (33-55%) the responses of epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, GH, cortisol, and pancreatic polypeptide during afternoon hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic symptoms (primarily neuroglycopenic) were also significantly (P < 0.01) reduced during afternoon hypoglycemia. Plasma glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, glycerol, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate (P < 0.01), GH, and cortisol (P < 0.05) levels were significantly increased at the start of afternoon hypoglycemia following morning hypoglycemia. Morning hypoglycemia created an insulin-resistant state during afternoon hypoglycemia. Despite blunted neuroendocrine responses, glucose infusion rates required to maintain hypoglycemia and increases in glucose oxidation were significantly attenuated during afternoon compared with morning

  3. A Rare Location of a Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Jonathan B; Zayat, Vania

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) arising in the duodenum are rare neoplasms that are often classified as indolent and have a low potential to metastasize. Although rare, multiple reports cite an increasing incidence of duodenal NETs. Symptoms are usually nonspecific and the diagnosis is made via endoscopy. Endoscopic resection is the mainstay of therapy. The prognosis is usually favorable. We describe a case of a duodenal NET that presented with vague symptoms in order to increase the awareness of this rare but increasing in frequency entity. PMID:27774362

  4. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  5. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential "liquid biopsy" in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  6. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential "liquid biopsy" in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice.

  7. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  8. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice.

  9. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: Searching the optimal treatment strategy--A literature review.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Rinaldi, Silvia; Torniai, Mariangela; Morgese, Francesca; Partelli, Stefano; Caramanti, Miriam; Onofri, Azzurra; Polenta, Vanessa; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastro-entero-pancreatic system (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with different malignant potential and behavior. Many treatment options are available. Surgery should be considered for localized tumors and in some selected cases of metastatic disease. Somatostatin analogs, useful for symptoms control in functioning tumors, are also effective to inhibit tumor progression in specific settings. The multi-TKI sunitinib and of the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus are efficacy for metastatic pancreatic NET (P-NET) treatment. Chemotherapy is generally used in symptomatic and progressive NETs. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) should be recommended after failure of medical therapy. For tumors confined to the liver ablative techniques should be considered. Nevertheless a shared therapeutic sequence for GEP-NET treatment still does not exist. In this review, we analyzed available data trying to identify the better treatment strategy and to suggest potential therapeutic algorithms distinguishing P-NETs from gastrointestinal NETs (GI-NETs). PMID:26643525

  10. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  11. Knowledge discovery for pancreatic cancer using inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yushan; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Maeshiro, Kensei; Ching, Wai-Ki; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Furuta, Koh

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease and predicting the status of the patients becomes an important and urgent issue. The authors explore the applicability of inductive logic programming (ILP) method in the disease and show that the accumulated clinical laboratory data can be used to predict disease characteristics, and this will contribute to the selection of therapeutic modalities of pancreatic cancer. The availability of a large amount of clinical laboratory data provides clues to aid in the knowledge discovery of diseases. In predicting the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer, using the ILP model, three rules are developed that are consistent with descriptions in the literature. The rules that are identified are useful to detect the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer and therefore contributed significantly to the decision of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the proposed method is compared with the other typical classification techniques and the results further confirm the superiority and merit of the proposed method. PMID:25075529

  12. Knowledge discovery for pancreatic cancer using inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yushan; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Maeshiro, Kensei; Ching, Wai-Ki; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Furuta, Koh

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease and predicting the status of the patients becomes an important and urgent issue. The authors explore the applicability of inductive logic programming (ILP) method in the disease and show that the accumulated clinical laboratory data can be used to predict disease characteristics, and this will contribute to the selection of therapeutic modalities of pancreatic cancer. The availability of a large amount of clinical laboratory data provides clues to aid in the knowledge discovery of diseases. In predicting the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer, using the ILP model, three rules are developed that are consistent with descriptions in the literature. The rules that are identified are useful to detect the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer and therefore contributed significantly to the decision of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the proposed method is compared with the other typical classification techniques and the results further confirm the superiority and merit of the proposed method.

  13. Advances in the Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Baum, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    Somatostatin receptor PET/CT using (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, is a mainstay for the evaluation of the somatostatin receptor status in neuroendocrine neoplasms. In addition, the assessment of glucose metabolism by (18)F-FDG PET/CT at diagnosis can overcome probable shortcomings of histopathologic grading. This offers a systematic theranostic approach for the management of neuroendocrine neoplasms, that is, patient selection for the appropriate treatment-surgery, somatostatin analogs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, targeted therapies like everolimus and sunitinib, or chemotherapy-and also for therapy response monitoring. Novel targets, for example, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in higher-grade tumors and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor in insulinomas, appear promising for imaging. Scandium-44 and Copper-64, especially on account of their longer half-life (for pretherapeutic dosimetry) and cyclotron production (which favors mass production), might be the potential alternatives to (68)Ga for PET/CT imaging. The future of molecular imaging lies in Radiomics, that is, qualitative and quantitative characterization of tumor phenotypes in correlation with tumor genomics and proteomics, for a personalized cancer management. PMID:27553465

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (PNT) encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including typical carcinoid (TC) and atypical (AC) tumors, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although no variety can be considered benign, AC and TC have a much lower metastatic potential, are usually diagnosed in early stages, and most are candidates for surgical treatment. Several chemotherapy (CT) regimens are available in the case of recurrence or in advanced stages, although scientific evidence is insufficient. LCNEC, which is currently classified alongside large-cell carcinomas, have molecular features, biological behavior and CT sensitivity profile closely resembling SCLC. Pathological diagnosis is often difficult, despite the availability of immunohistochemical techniques, and surgical specimens may be necessary. The diagnostic tests used are similar to those used in other lung tumors, with some differences in the optimal tracer in positron emission tomography. The new TNM classification is useful for staging these tumors. Carcinoid syndrome, very rare in PNT, may cause symptoms that are difficult to control and requires special therapy with somatostatin analogs and other drugs. Overall, with the exception of SCLC, new trials are needed to provide a response to the many questions arising with regard to the best treatment in each lineage and each stage.

  15. Neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging model for integrative physiological research. In this mini-review, we discuss recent advances in the neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in this species, and identify current knowledge gaps and issues that would benefit from further investigation. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-ionic environment and therefore are challenged by a continual loss of ions to the water. To maintain ionic homeostasis, they must actively take up ions from the water and reduce passive ion loss. The adult gill or the skin of larvae are the primary sites of ionic regulation. Current models for the uptake of major ions in zebrafish incorporate at least three types of ion transporting cells (also called ionocytes); H(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Na(+) uptake, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Ca(2+) uptake, and Na(+)/Cl(-)-cotransporter expressing cells for both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake. The precise molecular mechanisms regulating the paracellular loss of ions remain largely unknown. However, epithelial tight junction proteins, including claudins, are thought to play a critical role in reducing ion losses to the surrounding water. Using the zebrafish model, several key neuroendocrine factors were identified as regulators of epithelial ion movement, including the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline), cortisol, the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone and prolactin. Increasing evidence also suggests that gasotransmitters, such as H2S, are involved in regulating ion uptake.

  16. Gestational dexamethasone alters fetal neuroendocrine axis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    This study tested whether the maternal transport of dexamethasone (DEXA) may affect the development of the neuroendocrine system. DEXA (0.2mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injection) was administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In the DEXA-treated group, a decrease in maternal serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and increase in thyrotropin (TSH) levels (hypothyroid status) were observed at GDs 15 & 20 with respect to control group. The reverse pattern (hyperthyroid status) was observed in their fetuses at embryonic days (EDs) 15 & 20. Although the maternal body weight was diminished, the weight of the thyroid gland was increased at studied GDs as compared to the control group. The fetal growth retardation, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinism, and cytokines distortions (transforming growth factor-beta; TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF-α, and interferon-γ; IFN-γ) were noticed at examined EDs if compared to the control group. Alternatively, the maternofetal thyroid dysfunctions due to the maternal DEXA administration attenuated the levels of fetal cerebral norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), and elevated the levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) at considered days. These alterations were age-dependent and might damage the nerve transmission. Finally, maternal DEXA might act as neuroendocrine disruptor causing dyshormonogenesis and fetal cerebral dysfunction. PMID:27220267

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (PNT) encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including typical carcinoid (TC) and atypical (AC) tumors, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although no variety can be considered benign, AC and TC have a much lower metastatic potential, are usually diagnosed in early stages, and most are candidates for surgical treatment. Several chemotherapy (CT) regimens are available in the case of recurrence or in advanced stages, although scientific evidence is insufficient. LCNEC, which is currently classified alongside large-cell carcinomas, have molecular features, biological behavior and CT sensitivity profile closely resembling SCLC. Pathological diagnosis is often difficult, despite the availability of immunohistochemical techniques, and surgical specimens may be necessary. The diagnostic tests used are similar to those used in other lung tumors, with some differences in the optimal tracer in positron emission tomography. The new TNM classification is useful for staging these tumors. Carcinoid syndrome, very rare in PNT, may cause symptoms that are difficult to control and requires special therapy with somatostatin analogs and other drugs. Overall, with the exception of SCLC, new trials are needed to provide a response to the many questions arising with regard to the best treatment in each lineage and each stage. PMID:24685201

  18. From sequence to molecular pathology, and a mechanism driving the neuroendocrine phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lapuk, Anna V; Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Mo, Fan; Zoubeidi, Amina; Anderson, Shawn; Bell, Robert H; Haegert, Anne; Shukin, Robert; Wang, Yuzhuo; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Zhao, Yongjun; Marra, Marco A; Fanjul, Andrea; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A; Beltran, Himisha; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2012-07-01

    The current paradigm of cancer care relies on predictive nomograms which integrate detailed histopathology with clinical data. However, when predictions fail, the consequences for patients are often catastrophic, especially in prostate cancer where nomograms influence the decision to therapeutically intervene. We hypothesized that the high dimensional data afforded by massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is not only capable of providing biological insights, but may aid molecular pathology of prostate tumours. We assembled a cohort of six patients with high-risk disease, and performed deep RNA and shallow DNA sequencing in primary tumours and matched metastases where available. Our analysis identified copy number abnormalities, accurately profiled gene expression levels, and detected both differential splicing and expressed fusion genes. We revealed occult and potentially dormant metastases, unambiguously supporting the patients' clinical history, and implicated the REST transcriptional complex in the development of neuroendocrine prostate cancer, validating this finding in a large independent cohort. We massively expand on the number of novel fusion genes described in prostate cancer; provide fresh evidence for the growing link between fusion gene aetiology and gene expression profiles; and show the utility of fusion genes for molecular pathology. Finally, we identified chromothripsis in a patient with chronic prostatitis. Our results provide a strong foundation for further development of MPS-based molecular pathology.

  19. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  20. Review of endoscopic radiofrequency in biliopancreatic tumours with emphasis on clinical benefits, controversies and safety

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are unresectable at the time of diagnosis, and even in case of a resectable cancer, for elderly or patients with coexistent comorbidities, surgery is not an option. Current treatment alternatives in these scenarios are very limited. Biliary stenting with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is the mainstay palliative treatment of biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma. Nevertheless, more than 50% of SEMS become occluded after 6 mo due to tumour over- and ingrowth, leading to hospital readmissions and reinterventions that significantly impair quality of life. Regimes of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy also provide minimal survival benefits. Therefore, novel therapies are eagerly awaited. Radiofrequency (RF) energy causes coagulative necrosis leading to local destruction of the accessed malignant tissue and has an established role in the treatment of malignancies in several solid organs, especially liver cancers. However, pancreatic and extrahepatic biliary cancers are not easily accessed by a percutaneous route, making the procedure dangerous. Over the past five years, the development of dedicated devices compatible with endoscopic instruments has offered a minimally invasive option for RF energy delivery in biliopancreatic cancers. Emerging experience with endoscopic RF ablation (RFA) in this setting has been reported in the literature, but little is known about its feasibility, efficacy and safety. A literature review makes it clear that RFA in biliopancreatic tumours is feasible with high rates of technical success and acceptable safety profile. Although available data suggest a benefit of survival with RFA, there is not enough evidence to draw a firm conclusion about its efficacy. For this reason, prospective randomized trials comparing RFA with standard palliative treatments with quality-of-life and survival endpoints are required. Anecdotal reports have also

  1. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  2. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  5. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  6. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  7. AAVP displaying octreotide for ligand-directed therapeutic transgene delivery in neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tracey L.; Yuan, Ziqiang; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Sanchez Claros, Carmen; Adem, Asha; Cui, Min-Hui; Branch, Craig A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Libutti, Steven K.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inoperable or unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have limited treatment options. These rare human tumors often express somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and thus are clinically responsive to certain relatively stable somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide. Unfortunately, however, this tumor response is generally short-lived. Here we designed a hybrid adeno-associated virus and phage (AAVP) vector displaying biologically active octreotide on the viral surface for ligand-directed delivery, cell internalization, and transduction of an apoptosis-promoting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) transgene specifically to NETs. These functional attributes of AAVP-TNF particles displaying the octreotide peptide motif (termed Oct-AAVP-TNF) were confirmed in vitro, in SSTR type 2-expressing NET cells, and in vivo using cohorts of pancreatic NET-bearing Men1 tumor-suppressor gene KO mice, a transgenic model of functioning (i.e., insulin-secreting) tumors that genetically and clinically recapitulates the human disease. Finally, preclinical imaging and therapeutic experiments with pancreatic NET-bearing mice demonstrated that Oct-AAVP-TNF lowered tumor metabolism and insulin secretion, reduced tumor size, and improved mouse survival. Taken together, these proof-of-concept results establish Oct-AAVP-TNF as a strong therapeutic candidate for patients with NETs of the pancreas. More broadly, the demonstration that a known, short, biologically active motif can direct tumor targeting and receptor-mediated internalization of AAVP particles may streamline the potential utility of myriad other short peptide motifs and provide a blueprint for therapeutic applications in a variety of cancers and perhaps many nonmalignant diseases as well. PMID:26884209

  8. AAVP displaying octreotide for ligand-directed therapeutic transgene delivery in neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey L; Yuan, Ziqiang; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Sanchez Claros, Carmen; Adem, Asha; Cui, Min-Hui; Branch, Craig A; Gelovani, Juri G; Libutti, Steven K; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-03-01

    Patients with inoperable or unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have limited treatment options. These rare human tumors often express somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and thus are clinically responsive to certain relatively stable somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide. Unfortunately, however, this tumor response is generally short-lived. Here we designed a hybrid adeno-associated virus and phage (AAVP) vector displaying biologically active octreotide on the viral surface for ligand-directed delivery, cell internalization, and transduction of an apoptosis-promoting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) transgene specifically to NETs. These functional attributes of AAVP-TNF particles displaying the octreotide peptide motif (termed Oct-AAVP-TNF) were confirmed in vitro, in SSTR type 2-expressing NET cells, and in vivo using cohorts of pancreatic NET-bearing Men1 tumor-suppressor gene KO mice, a transgenic model of functioning (i.e., insulin-secreting) tumors that genetically and clinically recapitulates the human disease. Finally, preclinical imaging and therapeutic experiments with pancreatic NET-bearing mice demonstrated that Oct-AAVP-TNF lowered tumor metabolism and insulin secretion, reduced tumor size, and improved mouse survival. Taken together, these proof-of-concept results establish Oct-AAVP-TNF as a strong therapeutic candidate for patients with NETs of the pancreas. More broadly, the demonstration that a known, short, biologically active motif can direct tumor targeting and receptor-mediated internalization of AAVP particles may streamline the potential utility of myriad other short peptide motifs and provide a blueprint for therapeutic applications in a variety of cancers and perhaps many nonmalignant diseases as well. PMID:26884209

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  10. Intra-tumoural microvessel density in human solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, J; Byers, R; Jayson, G C

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade assessment of angiogenesis has emerged as a potentially useful biological prognostic and predictive factor in human solid tumours. With the development of highly specific endothelial markers that can be assessed in histological archival specimens, several quantitative studies have been performed in various solid tumours. The majority of published studies have shown a positive correlation between intra-tumoural microvessel density, a measure of tumour angiogenesis, and prognosis in solid tumours. A minority of studies have not demonstrated an association and this may be attributed to significant differences in the methodologies employed for sample selection, immunostaining techniques, vessel counting and statistical analysis, although a number of biological differences may account for the discrepancy. In this review we evaluate the quantification of angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, the relationship between tumour vascularity and metastasis, and the clinicopathological studies correlating intra-tumoral microvessel density with prognosis and response to anti-cancer therapy. In view of the extensive nature of this retrospective body of data, comparative studies are needed to identify the optimum technique and endothelial antigens (activated or pan-endothelial antigens) but subsequently prospective studies that allocate treatment on the basis of microvessel density are required. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1566–1577. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600315 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085206

  11. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nompleggi, D J

    1999-08-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis, but the exact mechanisms of these conditions are still poorly understood. Depending on the cause of the disorder, patients who have pancreatitis are usually not malnourished and are able to eat within 5 to 7 days of disease onset. In these patients, nutritional support is unnecessary. However, severe disease induces a catabolic state similar to that seen in trauma and sepsis, resulting in rapid weight loss and increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, vigorous nutritional support may be useful in the treatment of severe pancreatitis. Studies have shown that parenteral and enteral nutritional support are well tolerated and can maintain or improve nutritional status in patients with pancreatitis. This article reviews nutritional assessment and therapy in pancreatitis.

  12. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  13. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Thrower, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  14. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  15. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  16. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  17. Tumour of the juxtaoral organ.

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Rigau, V; Comoz, F; Benchemam, Y; Galateau, F; Compère, J F

    2003-02-01

    The juxtaoral organ is a normal and constant structure of the oral cavity. It consists of benign epithelial nests. We describe an intraoral tumour of the juxtaoral organ in a child. The tumour was not diagnosed after clinical and radiological examinations because it is extremely rare. A histological examination revealed a tumour of the juxtaoral organ, presumed to be neuroid hamartoma. This is only the second time that a tumour of the juxtaoral organ has been described in a child. We also describe the location, the embryology, the histology and the function of this organ. This is important because this structure can be confused with carcinomas of the oral cavity when examining frozen sections.

  18. Neuroendocrine and immune system responses with spaceflights.

    PubMed

    Tipton, C M; Greenleaf, J E; Jackson, C G

    1996-08-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldosterone, and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flights data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  19. Pancreatic paraganglioma - a rare and dangerous entity. Vascular anatomy and impact on management

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Martin; Soumarova, Renata; Migrova, Martina; Vojtek, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic paragangliomas are extremely rare with less than 20 cases ever described in the world literature. There is no detailed report of the vascular anatomy in this entity and its possible impact on patient management. We present a case of large pancreatic head paraganlioma in a 53-year-old woman. The tumour had a predominant arterial blood supply via both the hepatic artery and the superior mesenteric artery. Complex inflow was complemented by supplementary branches from the right renal artery. The arteriovenous communications within the lesion represented the most dangerous aspect of excision and the tumour removal was accompanied with a considerable blood loss. After pancreaticoduodenectomy, patient experienced transient elevation of liver function tests with no other identifiable cause than a change in portal haemodynamics. It is advisable that the precise knowledge of vascular anatomy in pancreatic head paraganglioma should be obtained prior to any intervention. PMID:25056378

  20. Pancreatic paraganglioma - a rare and dangerous entity. Vascular anatomy and impact on management.

    PubMed

    Straka, Martin; Soumarova, Renata; Migrova, Martina; Vojtek, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic paragangliomas are extremely rare with less than 20 cases ever described in the world literature. There is no detailed report of the vascular anatomy in this entity and its possible impact on patient management. We present a case of large pancreatic head paraganlioma in a 53-year-old woman. The tumour had a predominant arterial blood supply via both the hepatic artery and the superior mesenteric artery. Complex inflow was complemented by supplementary branches from the right renal artery. The arteriovenous communications within the lesion represented the most dangerous aspect of excision and the tumour removal was accompanied with a considerable blood loss. After pancreaticoduodenectomy, patient experienced transient elevation of liver function tests with no other identifiable cause than a change in portal haemodynamics. It is advisable that the precise knowledge of vascular anatomy in pancreatic head paraganglioma should be obtained prior to any intervention.

  1. Pituitary tumours: acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Cazabat, Laure; Young, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Excessive production of the growth hormone (GH) is responsible for acromegaly. It is related to a pituitary GH-secreting adenoma in most cases. Prevalence is estimated 40-130 per million inhabitants. It is characterised by slowly progressive acquired somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences determine its prognosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by an increased serum GH concentration, unsuppressible by an oral glucose load and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumour compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. When surgery, the usual first-line treatment, fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH-receptor antagonist (pegvisomant) is helpful in patients who are resistant to somatostatin analogues. Thanks to this multistep therapeutic strategy, adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a normal life expectancy. PMID:19945023

  2. Imaging of skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Yousry, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex and difficult to access anatomical region, which constitutes a relatively common site for neoplasms. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the differential diagnosis, to determine the anatomic tumour spread and for operative planning. All skull base imaging should be performed using thin-section multiplanar imaging, whereby CT and MRI can be considered complimentary. An interdisciplinary team approach is central to improve the outcome of these challenging tumours.

  3. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Wang, C C; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary mid-brain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  4. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an advanced endoscopic technique currently used in the staging and diagnosis of many gastrointestinal neoplasms. The proximity of the echoendoscope to the gastrointestinal tract lends itself to a detailed view of the luminal pathology and the pancreas. This unique ability enables endoscopists to use EUS in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Diagnostic EUS allows previously unidentified NETs to be localized. EUS also determines tumor management by staging the GEP-NETS, enabling the clinicians to choose the appropriate endoscopic or surgical management. The ability to obtain a tissue diagnosis with EUS guidance enables disease confirmation. Finally, recent developments suggest that EUS may be used to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of NETs. This review will highlight the advances in our knowledge of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors. PMID:23170141

  5. New pharmacologic therapies for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Ben; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin

    2010-09-01

    Successful treatment of unresectable and metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) requires the thoughtful choice of systemic therapy as a component of a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. The role of somatostatin analogues is established in symptom relief, but the efficacy of interferon and radiopeptide targeted therapy is not clear. The utility of a variety of tyrosine kinase and antiangiogenic agents is variable and under investigation, whereas the role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in poorly differentiated GEP-NETs is accepted. Overall, the ideal treatment of more indolent tumors is less certain. Reassessments of the GEP-NET pathology classification has provided improved logic for the role of a variety of agents, whereas the precise positioning of many new agents that target molecular pathways of angiogenesis and proliferation is under examination. This article describes the current options for systemic therapy for GEP-NETs within the framework of the current World Health Organization classification system. PMID:20951920

  6. Diagnosis of functioning pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Masayuki; Nakamoto, Yuji; Uose, Suguru; Komoto, Izumi; Awane, Masaaki; Taki, Yoshiro

    2015-08-01

    Functioning pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors (PD-NETs) are popular in a textbook, but they are still unfamiliar to a general clinician, and delay of diagnosis or misdiagnosis has been reported even today. It is a consensus that sporadic functioning PD-NET is cured only by surgical resection. So, early detection and early resection is the gold standard for the treatment of functioning PD-NET. Functioning PD-NETs in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) are often multiple. You should check about MEN 1 whenever you encountered multiple PD-NET. They are diagnosed in younger age than sporadic cases. In most cases they are accompanied with numerous microscopic or macroscopic nonfunctioning P-NETs, which are potentially metastatic and the most common cause of death in MEN 1 patients. PMID:25624017

  7. Octreotide and Lanreotide in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Fong, Mei Ka; Iyer, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are heterogeneous, rare malignancies that arise most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. They often secrete vasoactive substances resulting in carcinoid syndrome and the tumor cells exclusively express somatostatin receptors. Octreotide and lanreotide are the two synthetic somatostatin analogs used for the control of carcinoid symptoms and tumor progression in advanced inoperable disease. Recent pivotal trials (PROMID and CLARINET studies) established their antitumor activity. We discuss the available data to support their use as symptom controlling and antiproliferative agents. This article also reviews the guidelines (National Comprehensive Cancer Network and North American Neuro Endocrine Tumor Society), cost-analysis (suggesting the cost-effectiveness of lanreotide autogel compared to higher doses of octreotide long acting release formulation in refractory patients), and future directions of somatostatin analogs in the management of patients refractory to conventional doses of octreotide and lanreotide. PMID:26743514

  8. [Renal neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid) : a case report].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Nakai, Yasutomo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-11-01

    A 32-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of left renal cystic tumor, which was detected by computed tomographic (CT) scan 3 years ago. CT scan showed a multilocular cyst (5 cm in diameter) with a solid tumor in the left kidney which was enhanced with contrast. There was no evidence of extrarenal invasion or distant metastasis. We performed retroperitoneal laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. Pathological examinations revealed a cellular arrangement specific to carcinoid tumor and positive for CD56 (NCAM) and neuron-specific enolase. The cell proliferation rate was estimated to be under 2% with Ki67 staining. The pathological diagnosis was renal neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid). At the 9-month follow up, he had no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis.

  9. Oncocytic lesions of the neuroendocrine system.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Z W; LiVolsi, V A

    1999-05-01

    Oncocytic tumors are rare tumors that have been described in many organs throughout the body, mainly in salivary, parathyroid, thyroid, and adrenal glands and in the kidney. A wide spectrum of benign and malignant oncocytic tumors can arise in various organs of the neuroendocrine system. They are usually defined as tumors that are composed predominantly or exclusively of oncocytic cells. A majority of these tumors are benign; however, in some endocrine organs such as the thyroid the diagnosis of oncocytic/Hürthle cell carcinoma portends a more aggressive clinical course than non-Hürthle cell follicular carcinoma. Therefore, it is important to follow strict criteria to diagnose and differentiate between benign and malignant oncocytic tumors. In this review we will discuss the clinicopathologic features of various oncocytic tumors of the endocrine glands.

  10. Photoreception for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, John P; Brainard, George C

    2007-03-01

    In the art and science of lighting, four traditional objectives have been to provide light that: 1) is optimum for visual performance; 2) is visually comfortable; 3) permits aesthetic appreciation of the space; and 4) conserves energy. Over the past 25 years, it has been demonstrated that there are nonvisual, systemic effects of light in healthy humans. Furthermore, light has been used to successfully treat patients with selected affective and sleep disorders as well as healthy individuals who have circadian disruption due to shift work, transcontinental jet travel, or space flight. Recently, there has been an upheaval in the understanding of photoreceptive input to the circadian system of humans and other mammals. Analytical action spectra in rodents, primates, and humans have identified 446-484 nm (predominantly the blue part of the spectrum) as the most potent wavelength region for neuroendocrine, circadian, and neurobehavioral responses. Those studies suggested that a novel photosensory system, distinct from the visual rods and cones, is primarily responsible for this regulation. Studies have now shown that this new photosensory system is based on a small population of widely dispersed retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically responsive to light, and project to the suprachiasmatic nuclei and other nonvisual centers in the brain. These light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells contain melanopsin, a vitamin A photopigment that mediates the cellular phototransduction cascade. Although light detection for circadian and neuroendocrine phototransduction seems to be mediated principally by a novel photosensory system in the eye, the classic rod and cone photoreceptors appear to play a role as well. These findings are important in understanding how humans adapt to lighting conditions in modern society and will provide the basis for major changes in future architectural lighting strategies.

  11. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-08-14

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  12. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  13. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on

  14. [Morphologic, morphometric and immunohistochemical studies on pancreatic intraductal hyperplasia and infiltrating carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, R

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer belongs to the neoplasms which are characterised by increasing morbidity and mortality. Five-year survival rates of about 0.4% are the norm, and little has changed in the last 70 years. Important etiological factors are age, sex, diet, tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse, occupation and chemical exposure, hereditary chronic pancreatitis, and previous surgery (cholecystectomy and gastrectomy). The majority of exocrine tumours of the pancreas are malignant and 80-90% of them comprise ductal adenocarcinomas. The development and growth of pancreatic carcinoma appears to be caused by a progressive accumulation of multiple genetic abnormalities. This includes oncogene (K-ras) activation, loss of tumour-suppressor p53 gene function and overexpression of growth factors and their ligands. The morphological background for the development of pancreatic carcinoma is ductal epithelial hyperplasia. Current molecular studies have resulted in the identification of cell clones exhibiting the same genetic alterations (K-ras and p53 mutations) as in infiltrating pancreatic carcinoma. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is only partially defined. The purpose of our study was to evaluate Ki-67 proliferative index and HER-2/neu gene expression in pancreatic intraepithelial proliferative lesions as a sign of increasing epithelial proliferation and dysplasia. Additionally we made an attempt to apply morphometry in demarcating between intraepithelial proliferations of "reactive" type and proliferations with tendency towards progression to cancer. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of bcl-2 and p53 genes in various types of pancreatic intraepithelial proliferations and in pancreatic cancer and to answer the question whether they interact in the process of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. We have also undertaken investigations aiming at determination of the CD44s gene and its v6 isoform expression in intraductal and invasive pancreatic carcinoma

  15. Vitamin D receptor activation induces peptide YY transcription in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mihwa; Ozeki, Jun; Hashizume, Masami; Kato, Shigeaki; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Makishima, Makoto

    2012-11-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a peptide hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine after food intake and regulates appetite and intestinal function. PYY is also expressed in the pancreas, but the mechanisms of regulation of pancreatic PYY expression have not been elucidated. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear receptor for the active form of vitamin D(3) and regulates numerous physiological processes. Because VDR is expressed in the pancreas, we investigated the role of pancreatic VDR activation and found that Pyy is a VDR target gene in the mouse pancreas. Treatment of mice with 1α-hydroxyvitamin D(3) increased plasma PYY levels. VDR activation increased mRNA and protein expression of PYY in the pancreatic islets of mice and pancreatic endocrine cell lines but did not change intestinal PYY expression. 1α-Hydroxyvitamin D(3)-dependent induction of pancreatic and plasma PYY was abolished in VDR-null mice. We identified a functional vitamin D-responsive element in the mouse Pyy promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, EMSA, and luciferase promoter assay. Thus, Pyy is a tissue-specific VDR target gene. The pancreatic VDR-PYY pathway may mediate a regulatory function of vitamin D in the neuroendocrine system.

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  17. Benign gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three snow leopards (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Dobson, Elizabeth C; Naydan, Dianne K; Raphael, Bonnie L; McAloose, Denise

    2013-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells that are distributed throughout the body and are predominant in the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes benign, well-differentiated gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia). All tumors were well circumscribed, were within the gastric mucosa or submucosa, and had histologic and immunohistochemical features of neuroendocrine tumors. Histologic features included packeted cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells that were arranged in palisades or pseudorosettes and contained finely granular cellular cytoplasm with centrally placed, round nuclei. Cytoplasmic granules of neoplastic cells strongly expressed chromogranin A, variably expressed neuron-specific enolase, and did not express synaptophysin or gastrin. Each leopard died or was euthanatized for reasons unrelated to its tumor.

  18. Cervical neuroendocrine tumor in a young female with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Ibraheem; Siyam, Fadi; Layfield, Lester; Freter, Carl; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors rarely occur in the cervix or other components of the reproductive system. These tumors have been associated with microsatellite instability, are very aggressive and often associated with poor outcome. Lynch syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome that has also been associated with microsatellite instability. Here we report a 34-year-old female with Lynch syndrome and a family history of loss of DNA mismatch of the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer repair gene expression who presented with a neuroendocrine tumor of her cervix as the first manifestation of Lynch syndrome. This is the first case reported of a neuroendocrine tumor of the cervix in a patient with Lynch syndrome. We also review the relationship between Lynch Syndrome and neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24878972

  19. Benign gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three snow leopards (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Dobson, Elizabeth C; Naydan, Dianne K; Raphael, Bonnie L; McAloose, Denise

    2013-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells that are distributed throughout the body and are predominant in the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes benign, well-differentiated gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia). All tumors were well circumscribed, were within the gastric mucosa or submucosa, and had histologic and immunohistochemical features of neuroendocrine tumors. Histologic features included packeted cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells that were arranged in palisades or pseudorosettes and contained finely granular cellular cytoplasm with centrally placed, round nuclei. Cytoplasmic granules of neoplastic cells strongly expressed chromogranin A, variably expressed neuron-specific enolase, and did not express synaptophysin or gastrin. Each leopard died or was euthanatized for reasons unrelated to its tumor. PMID:23805563

  20. Simultaneous Occurrence of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Brunner's Gland Adenoma in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Gombač, M; Dolenšek, T; Jaušovec, D; Kvapil, P; Švara, T; Pogačnik, M

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma in an 18-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) from the Ljubljana Zoo. The tiger was humanely destroyed due to weakness and progressive weight loss. Necropsy examination revealed a large, grey, predominantly necrotic mass replacing the major part of the pancreatic body. Microscopically, the mass was unencapsulated, poorly demarcated, highly cellular and composed of highly pleomorphic, cuboidal to tall columnar cells with basal, round or oval, moderately anisokaryotic nuclei with prominent nucleoli and moderate to large amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumour was diagnosed as pancreatic tubular adenocarcinoma with infiltration into the duodenum and mesentery. There were tumour emboli in mesenteric blood vessels and hepatic metastases. The non-affected part of the pancreas exhibited severe chronic pancreatitis. In addition, one firm white neoplastic nodule was observed in the duodenal wall. The nodule was set in the tunica muscularis and was unencapsulated, well demarcated and highly cellular, and consisted of a closely packed layer of normal Brunner's glands and a centrally positioned group of irregularly branched tubules with small amounts of debris in the lumen. The neoplastic nodule was diagnosed as Brunner's gland adenoma. The present case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of concurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma, most probably induced by chronic pancreatitis, either in man or animals. PMID:26422412

  1. Simultaneous Occurrence of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Brunner's Gland Adenoma in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Gombač, M; Dolenšek, T; Jaušovec, D; Kvapil, P; Švara, T; Pogačnik, M

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma in an 18-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) from the Ljubljana Zoo. The tiger was humanely destroyed due to weakness and progressive weight loss. Necropsy examination revealed a large, grey, predominantly necrotic mass replacing the major part of the pancreatic body. Microscopically, the mass was unencapsulated, poorly demarcated, highly cellular and composed of highly pleomorphic, cuboidal to tall columnar cells with basal, round or oval, moderately anisokaryotic nuclei with prominent nucleoli and moderate to large amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumour was diagnosed as pancreatic tubular adenocarcinoma with infiltration into the duodenum and mesentery. There were tumour emboli in mesenteric blood vessels and hepatic metastases. The non-affected part of the pancreas exhibited severe chronic pancreatitis. In addition, one firm white neoplastic nodule was observed in the duodenal wall. The nodule was set in the tunica muscularis and was unencapsulated, well demarcated and highly cellular, and consisted of a closely packed layer of normal Brunner's glands and a centrally positioned group of irregularly branched tubules with small amounts of debris in the lumen. The neoplastic nodule was diagnosed as Brunner's gland adenoma. The present case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of concurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma, most probably induced by chronic pancreatitis, either in man or animals.

  2. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  3. Fast-growing large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Olga; Gorbunkov, Stanislav; Dvorakovskaja, Ivetta; Varlamov, Vladimir; Akopov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas combine a heterogeneous group of tumors occurring in lungs on a rare occasion, and in some cases, they appear to have extraordinary quick growth and extrapulmonary localization. In this case we present a 42-year-old patient who underwent a right upper lobectomy for emphysema, and 6 months later, the tumor developed again into a giant neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mediastinum. PMID:21524479

  4. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Aarthi; Morton, Jennifer P; Jodrell, Duncan I; Sansom, Owen J

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the first stages of the drug development pipeline, prior to their transition to the clinical arena. GEMMs carry mutations in genes that are associated with specific human diseases and they can thus accurately mimic the genetic, phenotypic and physiological aspects of human pathologies. Here, we discuss different GEMMs of human pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the Lox-Stop-Lox (LSL)-Kras(G12D); LSL-Trp53(R172H); Pdx1-cre (KPC) model, one of the most widely used preclinical models for this disease. We describe its application in preclinical research, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, its potential for predicting clinical outcomes in humans and the factors that can affect such outcomes, and, finally, future developments that could advance the discovery of new therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  5. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  6. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  7. Profound duodenogastric reflux causes pancreatic growth in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gasslander, T; Mukaida, H; Herrington, M K; Hinder, R A; Adrian, T E

    1995-01-01

    Although duodenogastric reflux is a physiological event, excessive reflux may be a pathogenetic factor in several diseases of the foregut, including cancer. Long term profound duodenogastric reflux produces pancreatic and gastric tumours in rats. The trophic effect of surgically induced duodenogastric reflux on the pancreas was investigated and the mechanisms involved were examined. Rats with profound reflux from a split gastroenterostomy were compared with sham operated and unoperated controls after two and six weeks. In the six week experiment, one reflux and one sham group were given the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonist devazepide (25 nmol/kg/h). Duodenogastric reflux caused a significant increase in pancreatic weight, DNA, and plasma CCK and gastrin concentrations at both two and six weeks. Devazepide substantially reduced the pancreatic weight increase after six weeks but did not abolish it completely. CCK and gastrin were not affected by devazepide. These results suggest that CCK is largely responsible for the pancreatic growth induced by reflux but another factor may also be involved. The trophic effect of duodenogastric reflux may contribute to the increased incidence of pancreatic cancer reported after gastric surgery. PMID:7890218

  8. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Aarthi; Morton, Jennifer P.; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the first stages of the drug development pipeline, prior to their transition to the clinical arena. GEMMs carry mutations in genes that are associated with specific human diseases and they can thus accurately mimic the genetic, phenotypic and physiological aspects of human pathologies. Here, we discuss different GEMMs of human pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the Lox-Stop-Lox (LSL)-KrasG12D; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx1-cre (KPC) model, one of the most widely used preclinical models for this disease. We describe its application in preclinical research, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, its potential for predicting clinical outcomes in humans and the factors that can affect such outcomes, and, finally, future developments that could advance the discovery of new therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26438692

  9. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  10. [Contemporary management of neuroendocrine neoplasms of the female genital organs].

    PubMed

    Kuc-Rajca, Małgorzata; Dańska-Bidzińska, Anna

    2011-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a rare and heterogeneous group of diseases that account for only 2% of all gynecologic malignancies. The most common types are ovarian carcinoid tumor and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix. The tumors are staged according to FIGO clinical staging system. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after obtaining the results of histopathological evaluation of the primary tumor They rarely cause syndromes related to hormone overexpression. Neuroendocrine neoplasms are characterized by aggressive behaviour Even at an early stage there is high incidence of nodal and distant metastases. Survival is poor regardless of stage at diagnosis. The most important is to diagnose the neuroendocrine tumor accurately and treat it in multimodal, aggressive approach to control the disease better and reduce the incidence of reccurences. Apart from typical therapeutic approach, treatment may encompass isotope therapy using radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. This method should be reserved for patients with expression of somatostatin receptors detected by the somatostatin receptor scyntygraphy. Data concerning the management of neuroendocrin tumors are based mainly on retrospective studies and clinical case series. Lack of randomized trials makes it impossible to select the best treatment option. Better understanding of the biology of neuroendocrine tumors, especially the molecular genetics, will in the future help to determine the optimal treatment strategies for these tumors.

  11. Palliation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kruse, E James

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is rarely curable, and because of its location causes significant symptoms for patients in need of palliation. The common problems of incurable pancreatic cancer are biliary obstruction, duodenal obstruction, and pain. Approaches include surgical, endoscopic and radiologic interventions. This article discusses the palliative options and controversies related to these symptoms.

  12. Pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids.

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  14. Natural course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G; Rau, B; Mayer, J; Pralle, U

    1997-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis, biologically active compounds in pancreatic ascites, and infection of necrosis. Early in the course of acute pancreatitis multiple organ failure is the consequence of various inflammatory mediators that are released from the inflammatory process and from activated leukocytes attracted by pancreatic injury. During the late course, starting the second week, local and systemic septic complications are dominant. Around 80% of deaths in acute pancreatitis are caused by septic complications. The infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 8% to 12% of acute pancreatitis and in 30% to 40% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacteriologic analysis of intraoperative smears and aspirates reveals predominantly gram-negative germs deriving from the intestine, most frequently Escherichia coli. It has been confirmed that after necrotizing pancreatitis a considerable large group of patients suffer long-lasting exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

  15. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  16. Clinical nutrition in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, S A; Snider, H; Owens, N; Sexton, L K

    1997-10-01

    In patients with acute pancreatitis or an acute flare of chronic pancreatitis, a discrepancy exists between increased protein/calorie requirements induced by a hypermetabolic stress state and reduced ingestion/assimilation of exogenous nutrients, which promotes progressive nutritional deterioration. Patients with severe pancreatitis (defined by > or =3 Ranson criteria, an APACHE II score of > or =10, development of major organ failure, and/or presence of pancreatic necrosis) are more likely to require aggressive nutritional support than patients with mild disease. The type of formula and level of the gastrointestinal tract into which nutrients are infused determine the degree to which pancreatic exocrine secretion is stimulated. Animal studies and early prospective randomized controlled trials in humans suggest that total enteral nutrition via jejunal feeding may be the preferred route to parenteral alimentation in this disease setting.

  17. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  18. Tenascin in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Soini, Y; Pääkkö, P; Virtanen, I; Lehto, V P

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of tenascin immunoreactivity was analysed in salivary gland tissue and in various benign and malignant tumours of the salivary gland. In the non-neoplastic tissue, tenascin was seen in the areas of basement membranes of the ductal epithelium. No immunoreactivity could be observed in the serous or mucous glands. In pleomorphic adenomas, tenascin immunoreactivity could be seen in the stromal compartment. It was more pronounced in the dense stromal areas and chondroid elements than in the myxoid area. In Warthin's tumours, strong tenascin immunoreactivity could be observed in the basement membrane zone of the epithelial component. In the lymphatic component, faint reticular staining could be seen. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, acinic cell tumours and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, tenascin showed a linear stromal distribution. No intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity could be seen in any of the cases. The widespread tenascin positivity in salivary gland tumours suggests that tenascin may play a role in the induction and progression of salivary gland tumours, presumably by interfering with the normal parenchymal-mesenchymal interaction.

  19. Tuberculosis simulating brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, U R; Farooq, M; Rauf, F; Bhatti, S K

    2011-06-30

    The purpose of the study is to highlight the varied presentation of tuberculosis (TB) simulating a brain tumour. Headache and seizures are becoming frequent presenting complaints without any history of tuberculosis. The study comprises 1200 patients of both sexes with ages ranging from ten to sixty years. CT scan and MRI brain control with and without contrast medium were the investigations performed in these cases. In some patients Electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral angiography (DSA) and spectroscopy were also performed. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was made on the basis of craniotomy, stereotactic and burr hole biopsies with histopathology in most of the cases. Forty per cent of the patients were followed up for eight months. They were put on anti-tuberculosis treatment with symptomatic and anti-epileptic drugs. The incidence was 544 and 757 per 100,000 in Africa and Indo Pakistan respectively. The male to female ratio was 1:1. Tuberculosis, especially with CNS involvement, is not only common in immunosuppressed patients in our setting, but TB has been and remains an important public health problem. TB may involve the CNS either as meningitis or as parenchymal granulomas or abscesses. Patients with brain TB usually present with fever, multiple cranial nerve involvement and occasional behavioural changes. CSF findings remain non specific in most cases. The most common sites are the cerebral hemisphere and basal ganglion in adults and the cerebellum in children. Tuberculosis has unique findings on brain CT and MRI. Cortical and subcortical locations are typical whereas the brain stem is a less common site. Tuberculosis lesions are usually solitary but multiple in 10% to 35% of cases. In spite of all these facts some cases of brain TB still need aggressive neurointervention to reach the final diagnosis of brain TB. Tuberculosis in the CNS may manifest in many different ways. So one should always include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in the

  20. Parp-1 genetic ablation in Ela-myc mice unveils novel roles for Parp-1 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Iglesias, Mar; Munné-Collado, Jessica; Martínez-Cáceres, Carlos; Moreno, Mireia; Guerra, Carmen; Yélamos, Jose; Navarro, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. The inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1), the major protein responsible for poly(ADP-ribosy)lation in response to DNA damage, has emerged as a promising treatment for several tumour types. Here we aimed to elucidate the involvement of Parp-1 in pancreatic tumour progression. We assessed Parp-1 protein expression in normal, preneoplastic and pancreatic tumour samples from humans and from K-Ras- and c-myc-driven mouse models of pancreatic cancer. Parp-1 was highly expressed in acinar cells in normal and cancer tissues. In contrast, ductal cells expressed very low or undetectable levels of this protein, both in a normal and in a tumour context. The Parp-1 expression pattern was similar in human and mouse samples, thereby validating the use of animal models for further studies. To determine the in vivo effects of Parp-1 depletion on pancreatic cancer progression, Ela-myc-driven pancreatic tumour development was analysed in a Parp-1 knock-out background. Loss of Parp-1 resulted in increased tumour necrosis and decreased proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Interestingly, Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice displayed fewer ductal tumours than their Ela-myc:Parp-1(+/+) counterparts, suggesting that Parp-1 participates in promoting acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a key event in pancreatic cancer initiation. Moreover, impaired macrophage recruitment can be responsible for the ADM blockade found in the Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice. Finally, molecular analysis revealed that Parp-1 modulates ADM downstream of the Stat3-MMP7 axis and is also involved in transcriptional up-regulation of the MDM2, VEGFR1 and MMP28 cancer-related genes. In conclusion, the expression pattern of Parp-1 in normal and cancer tissue and the in vivo functional effects of Parp-1 depletion point to a novel role for this protein in pancreatic carcinogenesis and shed light

  1. Discrepancies between two alternative staging systems (European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society 2006 and American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control 2010) of neuroendocrine neoplasms of the pancreas. A study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Liszka, Łukasz; Pająk, Jacek; Mrowiec, Sławomir; Zielińska-Pająk, Ewa; Gołka, Dariusz; Lampe, Paweł

    2011-04-15

    The aim of our study was to identify and describe potential inconsistencies between two alternative staging systems of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs)--the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) system (2006) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC-UICC) system (2010). To address this issue, we performed a retrospective clinico-pathological study of 50 cases of pNENs. We found 9 (18%) cases of ENETS/AJCC-UICC discrepancies regarding the primary tumor stage. They included 7 cases of T2/T3 disagreement and 2 cases of T3/T4 disagreement. In addition, we discussed the issue of potential T1/T2 discrepancy (however, we did not observe any such a case). Another inconsistency was related to the application of different stage prognostic groupings between both systems. In conclusion, the discrepancies between ENETS and AJCC-UICC staging systems for pNENs are relatively frequent and heterogeneous. We believe that they should be rigorously recognized. This is necessary for the evaluation of prognostic factors and the effectiveness of therapeutic options used in patients with pNENs.

  2. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  3. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  4. Transfusion free radical antegrade modular pancreaticosplenectomy of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas in Jehovah's Witness patient.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Bae; Yun, Sangchul; Choi, Dongho

    2015-02-01

    In a popular sense, Jehovah's Witnesses (JW) have their creeds, one of which is refusal of blood transfusion. Such refusal may impinge on their proper management, especially in critical situations. We present a case of successful bloodless multimodality therapy, which was performed for a JW. The patient was a 49-year-old woman and JW who had general weakness 7 days before admission. She was diagnosed with a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with hepatic metastases. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and Sandostatin LAR injection were performed, and then she was given a transfusion-free Radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy sequentially. We gave recombinant human erythropoietin and iron hydroxide sucrose complex daily for five days after surgery. She was discharged at postoperative day 12 without any surgical complications. Multimodality therapy is very important for optimal treatment of PNET. Along with intimate interdepartmental cooperation, careful patient selection and appropriate perioperative management could possibly enhance the surgical outcome. PMID:25692122

  5. Evolution in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine neoplasms, focus on systemic therapeutic options: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; De Braud, Filippo; Festinese, Fabrizio; Bregant, Cristina; Lorenzoni, Alice; Maccauro, Marco; Milione, Massimo; Concas, Laura; Formisano, Barbara; Leuzzi, Livia; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors. The present review discusses current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of gastro-entero-pancreatic NEN. Several systemic options are currently available, including medical systemic chemotherapy, biological drugs, somatostatin analogs and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The carcinoid syndrome can be adequately controlled with somatostatin analogs; chemotherapy has shown positive outcomes in poor prognosis patients, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment based on the use of radioisotopes for advanced disease expressing somatostatin receptors. Targeted therapies, such as multikinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are also recommended or under evaluation for the treatment of advanced NENs, but some critical issues in clinical practice remain unresolved. Depending upon the development of the disease, a multimodal approach is recommended. The treatment strategy for metastatic patients should be planned by a multidisciplinary team in order to define the optimal sequence of treatments.

  6. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  7. Lgr5-expressing stem cells are not the cells of origin of pyloric neuroendocrine carcinomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Elena; Kronast, Mira; Tölge, Mariana; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In intestinal and pyloric epithelia, leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5)-expressing cells represent long-lived adult stem cells that give rise to all epithelial cell types, including endocrine cells. Ablation of the Apc gene in Lgr5-expressing cells leads to intestinal and pyloric adenomas. To assess whether all epithelial tumours of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from LGR5-positive stem cells, we crossed Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) mice, which express EGFP and Cre recombinase driven by the Lgr5 promoter, with CEA424-SV40-TAg mice, which develop pyloric neuroendocrine carcinomas of epithelial origin. In 19 day-old mice, single SV40 T antigen (TAg)-positive cells were identified preferentially at the the bases of pyloric glands, close to the stem cell compartment. However, contrary to previous publications describing subpopulations of LGR5-positive cells in gastrointestinal neoplasia, we could not detect Lgr5-EGFP-positive tumour cells in malignant lesions. The lack of expression of the Wnt target gene Lgr5 is probably not caused by suppression of Wnt signalling by TAg, since β-catenin-mediated Wnt signalling, as measured by the TOPflash assay, was not inhibited. To determine the cellular origin of CEA424-SV40-TAg tumours, we performed tracing experiments using Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2:CEA424-SV40-TAg:ROSA26-tdRFP mice. Following tamoxifen induction, it was possible to efficiently trace the progeny of Lgr5-expressing cells in gastrointestinal tissue via red fluorescent protein (RFP) expression. No RFP-positive tumour cells were detected, even when RFP gene activation occurred in 7 day-old mice well before the appearance of TAg-positive tumour cells. Hence, we conclude that Lgr5-expressing stem cells probably do not constitute the cells of origin in CEA424-SV40-TAg mice. Consequently, not all epithelial tumours in the pyloric region are initiated by transformation of LGR5-positive stem cells. Thus, additional long-lived LGR5

  8. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  9. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  10. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  11. Laparoscopic long sleeve pancreaticogastrostomy (LPG): a novel pancreatic anastomosis following central pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Tamara M. H.; Sodergren, Mikael H.; Fan, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    Background Central pancreatectomy (CP) is preferred to distal pancreatectomy (DP) for the excision of benign tumours at the neck or body of the pancreas, in order to preserve pancreatic function and the spleen. However, the pancreaticoenterostomy is technically difficult to perform laparoscopically and the postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) rate is high. Methods A novel laparoscopic reconstruction of the pancreatic stump during CP is described, the laparoscopic long sleeve pancreaticogastrostomy (LPG). Results Two males and two females with a median age of 49 years had a laparoscopic CP with LPG. After a median follow-up of 27.5 months, there was no mortality. One patient had a grade A POPF, managed conservatively. Conclusions The LPG is a safe and technically less demanding method to reconstruct pancreatic drainage laparoscopically. PMID:27275466

  12. CRABP1 provides high malignancy of transformed mesenchymal cells and contributes to the pathogenesis of mesenchymal and neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kainov, Yaroslav; Favorskaya, Irina; Delektorskaya, Vera; Chemeris, Galina; Komelkov, Andrei; Zhuravskaya, Anna; Trukhanova, Lyubov; Zueva, Elina; Tavitian, Bertrand; Dyakova, Natalya; Zborovskaya, Irina; Tchevkina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    CRABP1 (cellular retinoic acid binding protein 1) belongs to the family of fatty acid binding proteins. Retinoic acid binding is the only known functional activity of this protein. The role of CRABP1 in human carcinogenesis remains poorly understood. Here, for the first time we demonstrated pro-metastatic and pro-tumorigenic activity of CRABP1 in mesenchymal tumors. Further functional analysis revealed that the pro-tumorigenic effect of CRABP1 does not depend on retinoic acid binding activity. These results suggest that CRABP1 could have an alternative intracellular functional activity that contributes to the high malignancy of transformed mesenchymal cells. Microarray analysis detected CRABP1-mediated alterations in the expression of about 100 genes, including those encoding key regulatory proteins. CRABP1 is ubiquitously expressed in monophasic synovial sarcomas, while in biphasic synovial sarcomas it is expressed uniquely by the spindle cells of the aggressive mesenchymal component. High level of CRABP1 expression is associated with lymph node metastasis and poor differentiation/high grade of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). Presented data suggest CRABP1 as a promising biomarker of pNETs’ clinical behavior. Our results give the first evidence of pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic activity of CRABP1 in mesenchymal and neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24626200

  13. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of tracheostomy site in a patient with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Violet Wilmot, Victoria; Nixon, Iain James; Nixon, Ioanna Fragkandrea

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis is the commonest cause of benign epithelial tumours of the larynx. Following diagnostic biopsy, surgical debulking is the mainstay of therapy. The condition is often recurrent with further papillomas forming after debridement, requiring serial procedures and occasionally demanding tracheostomy. Rarely, the disease can undergo malignant transformation; most commonly to squamous cell carcinoma. We describe the first reported case of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma occurring in the previous tracheostomy site of a 29-year-old male with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis. The patient, with a background of multiple treatments for juvenile papillomas, presented with voice change, breathing difficultly and erythema at the site of previous tracheostomy. Induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation was used to treat the lesion with a good response to initial therapy. PMID:27507691

  14. Refining the care of patients with pancreatic cancer: the AGITG Pancreatic Cancer Workshop consensus.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Robert C; Barbour, Andrew P; Samra, Jaswinder; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Haghighi, Koroush; Kench, James G; Saxena, Payal; Goldstein, David

    2016-06-20

    A meeting of the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG) was held to develop a consensus statement defining when a patient with pancreatic cancer has disease that is clearly operable, is borderline, or is locally advanced/inoperable. Key issues included the need for multidisciplinary team consensus for all patients considered for surgical resection. Staging investigations, to be completed within 4 weeks of presentation, should include pancreatic protocol computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and, when possible, biopsy. Given marked differences in outcomes, the operability of tumours should be clearly identified by categories: those clearly resectable by standard means (group 1a), those requiring vascular resection but which are clearly operable (group 1b), and those of borderline operability requiring vascular resection (groups 2a and 2b). Patients who may require vascular reconstruction should be referred, before exploration, to a specialist unit. All patients should have a structured pathology report with standardised reporting of all seven surgical margins, which identifies an R0 (no tumour cells within a defined distance of the margin) if all surgical margins are clear from 1 mm. Neo-adjuvant therapy is increasingly recommended for borderline operable disease, while chemotherapy is recommended as initial therapy for patients with unresectable loco-regional pancreatic cancer. The value of adding radiation after initial chemotherapy remains uncertain. A small number of patients may be downstaged by chemoradiation, and trimodality therapy should only be considered as part of a clinical trial. Instituting these recommendations nationally will be an integral part of the process of improving quality of care and reducing geographic variation between centres in outcomes for patients. PMID:27318402

  15. ADAM8 as a drug target in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlomann, Uwe; Koller, Garrit; Conrad, Catharina; Ferdous, Taheera; Golfi, Panagiota; Garcia, Adolfo Molejon; Höfling, Sabrina; Parsons, Maddy; Costa, Patricia; Soper, Robin; Bossard, Maud; Hagemann, Thorsten; Roshani, Rozita; Sewald, Norbert; Ketchem, Randal R.; Moss, Marcia L.; Rasmussen, Fred H.; Miller, Miles A.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Tuveson, David A.; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a grim prognosis with less than 5% survivors after 5 years. High expression levels of ADAM8, a metalloprotease-disintegrin, are correlated with poor clinical outcome. We show that ADAM8 expression is associated with increased migration and invasiveness of PDAC cells caused by activation of ERK 1/2 and higher MMP activities. For biological function, ADAM8 requires multimerisation and associates with β1-integrin on the cell surface. A peptidomimetic ADAM8 inhibitor, BK-1361, designed by structural modelling of the disintegrin domain, prevents ADAM8 multimerisation. In PDAC cells, BK-1361 affects ADAM8 function leading to reduced invasiveness, and less ERK 1/2 and MMP activation. BK-1361 application in mice decreased tumour burden and metastasis of implanted pancreatic tumour cells and provides improved metrics of clinical symptoms and survival in a KrasG12D-driven mouse model of PDAC. Thus, our data integrate ADAM8 in pancreatic cancer signalling and validate ADAM8 as a target for PDAC therapy. PMID:25629724

  16. ADAM8 as a drug target in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlomann, Uwe; Koller, Garrit; Conrad, Catharina; Ferdous, Taheera; Golfi, Panagiota; Garcia, Adolfo Molejon; Höfling, Sabrina; Parsons, Maddy; Costa, Patricia; Soper, Robin; Bossard, Maud; Hagemann, Thorsten; Roshani, Rozita; Sewald, Norbert; Ketchem, Randal R; Moss, Marcia L; Rasmussen, Fred H; Miller, Miles A; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Tuveson, David A; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a grim prognosis with <5% survivors after 5 years. High expression levels of ADAM8, a metalloprotease disintegrin, are correlated with poor clinical outcome. We show that ADAM8 expression is associated with increased migration and invasiveness of PDAC cells caused by activation of ERK1/2 and higher MMP activities. For biological function, ADAM8 requires multimerization and associates with β1 integrin on the cell surface. A peptidomimetic ADAM8 inhibitor, BK-1361, designed by structural modelling of the disintegrin domain, prevents ADAM8 multimerization. In PDAC cells, BK-1361 affects ADAM8 function leading to reduced invasiveness, and less ERK1/2 and MMP activation. BK-1361 application in mice decreased tumour burden and metastasis of implanted pancreatic tumour cells and provides improved metrics of clinical symptoms and survival in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse model of PDAC. Thus, our data integrate ADAM8 in pancreatic cancer signalling and validate ADAM8 as a target for PDAC therapy.

  17. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  18. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  20. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation. PMID:17982246

  1. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  2. Observational study of patients with gastroenteropancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors in Argentina: Results from the large database of a multidisciplinary group clinical multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, JUAN MANUEL; MARMISSOLLE, FABIANA; BESTANI, CLAUDIA; PESCE, VERONICA; BELLI, SUSANA; DOMINICHINI, ENZO; MENDEZ, GUILLERMO; PRICE, PAOLA; GIACOMI, NORA; PAIROLA, ALEJANDRO; LORIA, FERNANDO SÁNCHEZ; HUERTAS, EDUARDO; MARTIN, CLAUDIO; PATANE, KARINA; POLERI, CLAUDIA; ROSENBERG, MOISES; CABANNE, ANA; KUJARUK, MIRTA; CAINO, ANALIA; ZAMORA, VICTOR; MARIANI, JAVIER; DIOCA, MARIANO; PARMA, PATRICIA; PODESTA, GUSTAVO; ANDRIANI, OSCAR; GONDOLESI, GABRIEL; ROCA, ENRIQUE

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) include a spectrum of malignancies arising from neuroendocrine cells throughout the body. The objective of this clinical investigation of retrospectively and prospectively collected data was to describe the prevalence, demographic data, clinical symptoms and methods of diagnosis of NET and the treatment and long-term follow-up of patients with NET. Data were provided by the participating centers and assessed for consistency by internal reviewers. All the cases were centrally evaluated (when necessary) by the pathologists in our group. The tissue samples were reviewed by hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining techniques to confirm the diagnosis of NET. In total, 532 cases were documented: 461 gastroenteropancreatic-NET (GEP-NET) and 71 bronchial NET (BNET). All the tumors were immunohistochemically defined according to the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society criteria. The most common initial symptoms in GEP-NET were abdominal pain, diarrhea, bowel obstruction, flushing, gastrointestinal bleeding and weight loss. The most common tumor types were carcinoid (58.0%), non-functional pancreatic tumor (23.0%), metastatic NET of unknown primary (16.0%) and functional pancreatic tumor (3.0%). Of the BNET, 89.0% were typical and 11.0% atypical carcinoids. Of the patients with GEP-NET, 59.2% had distant metastasis at diagnosis. The locations of the primary tumors in GEP-NET were the small bowel (26.9%), pancreas (25.2%), colon-rectum (12.4%), appendix (7.6%), stomach (6.9%), esophagus (2.8%), duodenum (2.0%) and unknown primary (16.3%). The histological subtypes based on the WHO classification were well-differentiated NET (20.1%), well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (66.5%) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (10.3%). Overall, 67.3% of the patients underwent surgery, 41.2% with curative intent and 26.1% for palliative purposes. The 5-year survival rates were 65.1% (95

  3. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  4. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S; Hayes, Daniel F; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 ± 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  5. Neuroendocrine aspects of aging in women.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Gill, S

    2001-09-01

    In women, the loss of ovarian function at menopause is associated with marked changes in hypothalamic and pituitary function. In addition, the steady decline in serum levels of LH, FSH, and FAS with age following menopause provides clear evidence for age-related neuroendocrine changes independent of the changes occurring owing to loss of ovarian feedback on the hypothalamic and pituitary components of the reproductive axis. An increase in the overall amount of GnRH secreted occurs despite a 30% decrease in GnRH pulse frequency with aging. This observation implies that the amount of GnRH secreted with each secretory bolus is greater in older postmenopausal women when compared with younger postmenopausal women. Thus, there may be a prominent pituitary component to the age-related decline in gonadotropin secretion. Recent studies indicate that the response to estrogen negative feedback at the hypothalamic level is preserved with aging, whereas the response to estrogen positive feedback may decrease with reproductive aging; however, the response to estrogen positive feedback in women has not been investigated with respect to aging, per se. It will be important to determine whether these age-related changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function contribute to reproductive senescence in normal women, as has been suggested for similar changes in animal models.

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder: neuroendocrine and pharmacotherapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Amihaesei, Ioana Cristina; Mungiu, O C

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is represented by the development of characteristic symptoms, that appear following direct/indirect exposure to a traumatic event in which physical harm was threatened, witnessed or experienced. PTSD can also occur after the unexpected death of a family member or close friend, following a serious harm or threat of death or injury to a loved one, or in case of divorce or unemplyoement. It occurs in 1%-4% of the population. As neuroendocrine pattern, PTSD is characterized by abnormal low cortisol levels and higher than normal epinephrine and norepinephrine levels. In chronique forms a total decrease of the hippocampal volume, was found, region of the brain involved in processing memories and in the memorization process. Symptoms are grouped in three main categories: re-experiencing the event, accompanied by anxiety, nightmares and flashbacks; persistent avoidance of any reminders of the event, feeling detached or estranged from others; persistent anxiety and/or physical reactivity. As treatment, besides various psychotherapy techniques, various classes of psychotropic drugs are used, such as morphine, antipsychotics, usual or atypical antidepressants, anticonvulsants, to reduce anxiety, avoidance, nightmares and hyperexcitability.

  7. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MORISHITA, ASAHIRO; YONEYAMA, HIROHITO; NOMURA, TAKAKO; SAKAMOTO, TEPPEI; FUJITA, KOJI; TANI, JOJI; MIYOSHI, HISAAKI; HABA, REIJI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of an 87-year-old patient with multiple liver tumors identified on abdominal ultrasound. The assessment performed on admission included physical examination, computed tomography (CT) during hepatic angiography and CT during arterial portography. The examination revealed contrast enhancement of a proportion of the liver tumors (20 mm maximum diameter) during the arterial phase and mild contrast washout of those tumors during the delayed phase. On contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, certain liver tumors exhibited contrast enhancement during the early phase and contrast washout during the hepatocyte phase in both lobes. By contrast, no lesions were identified during positron emission tomography imaging of the liver. A liver biopsy was performed and immunohistochemical staining revealed enhanced expression of cytokeratin AE1/AE3, synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 and no expression of hepatocyte antigen or CΚ7. The mindbomb E3 ubiquitin protein ligase-1 index was ~2% in most of the tumor. The liver tumors were finally diagnosed as multiple intrahepatic metastases from a primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor (PHNET). The patient underwent transarterial chemoembolisation with a combination of miriplatin (84 mg) mixed with gelatin sponge particles and lipiodol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of PHNET in an patient aged >85 years. PMID:27284429

  8. GEPNETs update: Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Wouter A; Bodei, Lisa; Mueller-Brand, Jan; de Herder, Wouter W; Kvols, Larry K; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2015-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a promising new treatment modality for inoperable or metastasized gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) patients. Most studies report objective response rates in 15-35% of patients. Also, outcome in terms of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival compares very favorably with that for somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy, or new, 'targeted' therapies. They also compare favorably to PFS data for liver-directed therapies. Two decades after the introduction of PRRT, there is a growing need for randomized controlled trials comparing PRRT to 'standard' treatment, that is treatment with agents that have proven benefit when tested in randomized trials. Combining PRRT with liver-directed therapies or with targeted therapies could improve treatment results. The question to be answered, however, is whether a combination of therapies performed within a limited time-span from one another results in a better PFS than a strategy in which other therapies are reserved until after (renewed) tumor progression. Randomized clinical trials comparing PRRT with other treatment modalities should be undertaken to determine the best treatment options and treatment sequelae for patients with GEPNETs.

  9. Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Feelders, Richard A; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Teunissen, Jaap J M

    2015-01-01

    An important role is reserved for nuclear imaging techniques in the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with (111)In-DTPA-octreotide is currently the most important tracer in the diagnosis, staging and selection for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In the past decade, different positron-emitting tomography (PET) tracers have been developed. The largest group is the (68)Gallium-labeled somatostatin analogs ((68)Ga-SSA). Several studies have demonstrated their superiority compared to SRS in sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, patient comfort and effective dose are favorable for (68)Ga-SSA. Other PET targets like β-[(11)C]-5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan ((11)C-5-HTP) and 6-(18)F-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) were developed recently. For insulinomas, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor imaging is a promising new technique. The evaluation of response after PRRT and other therapies is a challenge. Currently, the official follow-up is performed with radiological imaging techniques. The role of nuclear medicine may increase with the newest tracers for PET. In this review, the different nuclear imaging techniques and tracers for the imaging of NETs will be discussed.

  10. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. PMID:22738942

  11. Phyllodes tumour in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Way, Jeffrey C.; Culham, Beverley A.

    1998-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour (cystosarcoma phyllodes) is a rare breast tumour that grows rapidly and to a relatively large size, especially during pregnancy. These tumours may be classified as benign, borderline or malignant. They have a high incidence of local recurrence but little tendency to metastasize to distant organs. The question of whether the tumour is hormone dependent remains unresolved. This report describes the case of a patient who had a phyllodes tumour that first became apparent in her 31st week of pregnancy. After enucleation and subsequent wide excision she remained tumour free through a second pregnancy. Although the follow-up period is short, it appears that subsequent pregnancy is not necessarily associated with recurrent or new disease for patients who have had their initial tumour completely excised. The goal for the management of these tumours is complete surgical excision. PMID:9793511

  12. The treatment of sublingual gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, G; Yang, X; Tang, E; Wen, J; Lu, M; Hu, Q

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed the clinical and histological features and therapeutic efficacy of 25 cases of sublingual gland tumours from 1998 to 2008. There were 17 female patients and 8 male, the ratio of females to males was 2.1:1. The mean age was 48.6 years. 4 cases were benign tumours (16%). 21 cases were malignant sublingual gland tumours (84%) and of these, 18 were adenoid cystic carcinoma (86%). Adenoid cystic carcinoma was mainly of the histological type, and the other histological classifications included mucoepidermoid carcinoma, pleomorphic adenoma, myoepithelioma, oncocytoma and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Sublingual gland tumours are rare and most are malignant. For malignant sublingual gland tumours, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment, especially for tumours with nerve involvement, is the key to improving prognosis. Free radial forearm flap or pectoralis major myocutaneous flap are appropriate methods for mouth floor reconstruction. For benign sublingual gland tumours, the resection of tumour and sublingual gland is the preferred treatment.

  13. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  15. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  16. Phase II clinical trial of pasireotide long-acting repeatable in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cives, M; Kunz, P L; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Schell, M J; Campos, T; Nguyen, P T; Nandoskar, P; Khandelwal, V; Strosberg, J R

    2015-01-01

    Pasireotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) is a novel somatostatin analog (SSA) with avid binding affinity to somatostatin receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 (SSTR1,2,3) and 5 (SSTR5). Results from preclinical studies indicate that pasireotide can inhibit neuroendocrine tumor (NET) growth more robustly than octreotide in vitro. This open-label, phase II study assessed the clinical activity of pasireotide in treatment-naïve patients with metastatic grade 1 or 2 NETs. Patients with metastatic pancreatic and extra-pancreatic NETs were treated with pasireotide LAR (60 mg every 4 weeks). Previous systemic therapy, including octreotide and lanreotide, was not permitted. Tumor assessments were performed every 3 months using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), and safety. Twenty-nine patients were treated with pasireotide LAR (60 mg every 4 weeks) and 28 were evaluable for response. The median PFS was 11 months. The most favorable effect was observed in patients with