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Sample records for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

  1. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  2. Whole-genome landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Aldo; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Corbo, Vincenzo; Patch, Ann-Marie; Bailey, Peter; Lawlor, Rita T; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Mafficini, Andrea; Rusev, Borislav; Scardoni, Maria; Antonello, Davide; Barbi, Stefano; Sikora, Katarzyna O; Cingarlini, Sara; Vicentini, Caterina; McKay, Skye; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; McLean, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew J; Fink, J Lynn; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen H; Leonard, Conrad; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nagaraj, Shivashankar Hiriyur; Amato, Eliana; Dalai, Irene; Bersani, Samantha; Cataldo, Ivana; Dei Tos, Angelo P; Capelli, Paola; Davì, Maria Vittoria; Landoni, Luca; Malpaga, Anna; Miotto, Marco; Whitehall, Vicki L J; Leggett, Barbara A; Harris, Janelle L; Harris, Jonathan; Jones, Marc D; Humphris, Jeremy; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Chin, Venessa; Nagrial, Adnan M; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia; Rooman, Ilse; Toon, Christopher; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark; Barbour, Andrew; Mawson, Amanda; Humphrey, Emily S; Colvin, Emily K; Chou, Angela; Lovell, Jessica A; Jamieson, Nigel B; Duthie, Fraser; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Fisher, William E; Dagg, Rebecca A; Lau, Loretta M S; Lee, Michael; Pickett, Hilda A; Reddel, Roger R; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Zeps, Nikolajs; Falconi, Massimo; Simbolo, Michele; Butturini, Giovanni; Van Buren, George; Partelli, Stefano; Fassan, Matteo; Khanna, Kum Kum; Gill, Anthony J; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bassi, Claudio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Pederzoli, Paolo; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2017-03-02

    The diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) is increasing owing to more sensitive detection methods, and this increase is creating challenges for clinical management. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 102 primary PanNETs and defined the genomic events that characterize their pathogenesis. Here we describe the mutational signatures they harbour, including a deficiency in G:C > T:A base excision repair due to inactivation of MUTYH, which encodes a DNA glycosylase. Clinically sporadic PanNETs contain a larger-than-expected proportion of germline mutations, including previously unreported mutations in the DNA repair genes MUTYH, CHEK2 and BRCA2. Together with mutations in MEN1 and VHL, these mutations occur in 17% of patients. Somatic mutations, including point mutations and gene fusions, were commonly found in genes involved in four main pathways: chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, activation of mTOR signalling (including previously undescribed EWSR1 gene fusions), and telomere maintenance. In addition, our gene expression analyses identified a subgroup of tumours associated with hypoxia and HIF signalling.

  3. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms.

  4. Case report. Peripancreatic intranodal haemangioma mimicking pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, A D; Arellano, R; Baker, G

    2011-12-01

    Haemangiomas are common benign tumours that are generally detected within the skin, mucosal surfaces and soft tissues. However, intranodal haemangiomas are extremely rare and are among the benign primary vascular abnormalities of the lymph nodes that include lymphangioma, haemangioendothelioma, angiomyomatous hamartoma and haemangiomas. In this case report, we present the imaging and pathological findings of an intranodal haemangioma in the pancreatic head simulating a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intranodal haemangioma in this location.

  5. Pathogenic PALB2 mutation in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, DAVID; CLARKE, STEPHEN; GILL, ANTHONY J.; CHANTRILL, LORRAINE; SAMRA, JAS; LI, BOB T.; BARNES, TRISTAN; NAHAR, KAZI; PAVLAKIS, NICK

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) comprise ~3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and they are more heterogeneous in their histological character and outcome. This is the case report of a 73-year-old female patient with synchronously diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNET, which is likely associated with a pathogenic partner and localizer of breast cancer 2, early onset (PALB2) mutation. The potential pathogenic significance of PALB2 and its association with various malignancies were investigated and the potential role of PALB2 in conferring sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin C and cisplatin, was discussed. This case report highlights the significance of ongoing research into the molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which may help guide the selection of optimal treatments for this disease, as well as the need for ongoing study of PALB2 as a possible predictive marker of response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:26171187

  6. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Fazio, Nicola; Orsi, Franco

    2011-04-15

    We describe the use of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for ablation of two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs; insulinomas) in two inoperable young female patients. Both suffered from episodes of severe nightly hypoglycemia that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After HIFU ablation, local disease control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 9-month follow-up. The lesions appeared to be decreased in volume, and there was decreased enhancing pattern in the multidetector computed tomography control (MDCT). HIFU is likely to be a valid alternative for symptoms control in patients with pancreatic NETs. However, currently the procedure should be reserved for inoperable patients for whom symptoms cannot be controlled by medical therapy.

  7. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study

    PubMed Central

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n=101) or placebo (n=103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n=41; placebo, n=47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. PMID:26743120

  8. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  9. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation.

  10. Current Status of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours (GEP-NETs)

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Cappucci, Matteo; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Tipaldi, Marcello Andrea; Hatzidakis, Adam; Rebonato, Alberto; Rossi, Michele

    2015-02-15

    Within the group of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs), several heterogeneous malignancies are included with a variety of clinical manifestations and imaging characteristics. Often these cases are inoperable and minimal invasive treatment offered by image-guided procedures appears to be the only option. Interventional radiology offers a valid solution in the management of primary and metastatic GEP-NETs. The purpose of this review article is to describe the current status of the role of Interventional Radiology in the management of GEP-NETs.

  11. Screening for malnutrition in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sheharyar A; Burch, Nicola; Druce, Maralyn; Hattersley, John G; Khan, Saboor; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Darby, Catherine; Wong, John L H; Davies, Louise; Fletcher, Simon; Shatwell, William; Sothi, Sharmila; Randeva, Harpal S; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether screening for malnutrition using the validated malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST) identifies specific characteristics of patients at risk, in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust; European Neuroendocrine Tumour Society Centre of Excellence. Participants Patients with confirmed GEP-NET (n=161) of varying primary tumour sites, functioning status, grading, staging and treatment modalities. Main outcome measure To identify disease and treatment-related characteristics of patients with GEP-NET who score using MUST, and should be directed to detailed nutritional assessment. Results MUST score was positive (≥1) in 14% of outpatients with GEP-NET. MUST-positive patients had lower faecal elastase concentrations compared to MUST-negative patients (244±37 vs 383±20 µg/g stool; p=0.018), and were more likely to be on treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogues (65 vs 38%, p=0.021). MUST-positive patients were also more likely to have rectal or unknown primary NET, whereas, frequencies of other GEP-NET including pancreatic NET were comparable between MUST-positive and MUST-negative patients. Conclusions Given the frequency of patients identified at malnutrition risk using MUST in our relatively large and diverse GEP-NET cohort and the clinical implications of detecting malnutrition early, we recommend routine use of malnutrition screening in all patients with GEP-NET, and particularly in patients who are treated with long-acting somatostatin analogues. PMID:27147385

  12. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors including well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (pNECs). The incidence of pNENs has increased over the past few decades. Although, the understanding and interest for this tumor have also increased significantly, the debate about classification and diagnosis continues. Although the primary treatment for pNENs is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pNENs. Although many therapeutic methods have proven effective, the choice of treatment and specific programs are still unclear. Our article presents an overview of pNENs, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. PMID:28357177

  13. A Phase II Study of BEZ235 in Patients with Everolimus-resistant, Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    FAZIO, NICOLA; BUZZONI, ROBERTO; BAUDIN, ERIC; ANTONUZZO, LORENZO; HUBNER, RICHARD A.; LAHNER, HARALD; DE HERDER, WOUTER W.; RADERER, MARKUS; TEULÉ, ALEXANDRE; CAPDEVILA, JAUME; LIBUTTI, STEVEN K.; KULKE, MATTHEW H.; SHAH, MANISHA; DEY, DEBARSHI; TURRI, SABINE; AIMONE, PAOLA; MASSACESI, CRISTIAN; VERSLYPE, CHRIS

    2016-01-01

    Background This was a two-stage, phase II trial of the dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor BEZ235 in patients with everolimus-resistant pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) (NCT01658436). Patients and Methods In stage 1, 11 patients received 400 mg BEZ235 orally twice daily (bid). Due to tolerability concerns, a further 20 patients received BEZ235 300 mg bid. Stage 2 would be triggered by a 16-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate of ≥60% in stage 1. Results As of 30 June, 2014, 29/31 patients had discontinued treatment. Treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were reported in eight (72.7%) patients at 400 mg and eight (40.0%) patients at 300 mg, including hyperglycaemia, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting. The estimated 16-week PFS rate was 51.6% (90% confidence interval=35.7–67.3%). Conclusion BEZ235 was poorly tolerated by patients with everolimus-resistant pNETs at 400 and 300 mg bid doses. Although evidence of disease stability was observed, the study did not proceed to stage 2. PMID:26851029

  14. Symptomatic Control of Neuroendocrine Tumours with Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Hannah E; Larbi, Emmanuel; Middleton, Gary

    2015-12-01

    Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, increases progression-free survival in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Patients with neuroendocrine tumours and symptomatic carcinoid have inferior health-related quality of life than those without symptoms. We aimed to evaluate the effect of everolimus on symptomatic control of neuroendocrine tumours. Fifteen patients with metastatic neuroendocrine disease pre-treated with depot octreotide received combination everolimus and octreotide (midgut = 8, pancreatic = 3, other = 4). Reasons for initiation of everolimus were progressive disease (PD) by response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (n = 5), worsening syndromic symptomology (n = 5), or both (n = 5). Symptomatic and objective response and toxicity were evaluated using standard criteria. 7/10 patients who were syndromic had improvements in symptomology, with a mean duration of symptom control 13.9 months (range 1-39). All 10 symptomatic patients had non pancreatic neuroendocrine (pNET) primaries, and with everolimus, 6/10 had reduced stool frequency, 3/7 had a reduction of asthenia, and 5/7 had reduced frequency and severity of flushing. Sixty percent of patients experienced any grade toxicities, including the following: 40% grade 1/2 stomatitis, 7% grade 3/4 stomatitis, 20% grade 1/2 rash, 13% diarrhoea, and one case of pneumonitis. In this cohort of 15 patients, we demonstrated that 70% of non pNET individuals with common carcinoid syndrome symptoms resistant to depot octreotide had improvement in these symptoms on institution of everolimus, with meaningful durations of symptom control. Although this data is observational, to our knowledge, this represents the largest analysis of carcinoid syndrome control with combined everolimus and octreotide.

  15. A short history of neuroendocrine tumours and their peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W; Rehfeld, Jens F; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas started in 1870, when Rudolf Heidenhain discovered the neuroendocrine cells, which can lead to the development of these tumours. Siegfried Oberndorfer was the first to introduce the term carcinoid in 1907. The pancreatic islet cells were first described in 1869 by Paul Langerhans. In 1924, Seale Harris was the first to describe endogenous hyperinsulinism/insulinoma. In 1942 William Becker and colleagues were the first to describe the glucagonoma syndrome. The first description of gastrinoma by Robert Zollinger and Edwin Ellison dates from 1955. The first description of the VIPoma syndrome by John Verner and Ashton Morrison dates from 1958. In 1977, the groups of Lars-Inge Larsson and Jens Rehfeld, and of Om Ganda reported the first cases of somatostatinoma. But only in 2013, Jens Rehfeld and colleagues described the CCK-oma syndrome. The most recently updated WHO classification for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours dates from 2010.

  16. Long-term acquired everolimus resistance in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours can be overcome with novel PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Timon; Beyens, Matthias; de Beeck, Ken Op; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Pauwels, Patrick; Mortier, Geert; Vangestel, Christel; de Herder, Wouter; Van Camp, Guy; Peeters, Marc; Hofland, Leo J

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mTOR-inhibitor everolimus improves progression-free survival in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs). However, adaptive resistance to mTOR inhibition is described. Methods: QGP-1 and BON-1, two human PNET cell lines, were cultured with increasing concentrations of everolimus up to 22 weeks to reach a dose of 1 μM everolimus, respectively, 1000-fold and 250-fold initial IC50. Using total DNA content as a measure of cell number, growth inhibitory dose–response curves of everolimus were determined at the end of resistance induction and over time after everolimus withdrawal. Response to ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors OSI-027 and AZD2014, and PI3K-mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 was studied. Gene expression of 10 PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway-related genes was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (RT–qPCR). Results: Long-term everolimus-treated BON-1/R and QGP-1/R showed a significant reduction in everolimus sensitivity. During a drug holiday, gradual return of everolimus sensitivity in BON-1/R and QGP-1/R led to complete reversal of resistance after 10–12 weeks. Treatment with AZD2014, OSI-027 and NVP-BEZ235 had an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation in both sensitive and resistant cell lines. Gene expression in BON-1/R revealed downregulation of MTOR, RICTOR, RAPTOR, AKT and HIF1A, whereas 4EBP1 was upregulated. In QGP-1/R, a downregulation of HIF1A and an upregulation of ERK2 were observed. Conclusions: Long-term everolimus resistance was induced in two human PNET cell lines. Novel PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway-targeting drugs can overcome everolimus resistance. Differential gene expression profiles suggest different mechanisms of everolimus resistance in BON-1 and QGP-1. PMID:26978006

  17. Systemic Therapies for Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Nitya; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare tumor type, and comprise 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. When nonfunctional (i.e. nonhormone secreting), these tumors generally cause few symptoms and often go unnoticed for several years; for this reason, they are rarely localized at presentation, and are typically diagnosed in the presence of metastatic disease, most commonly to the liver. Although pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors can be less aggressive than other tumor types, the management poses a significant challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentations and varying degrees of aggressiveness. The therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors includes a multimodality approach and can often include surgery, liver-directed therapies (i.e. embolization), as well as targeted and cytotoxic systemic treatments. A variety of systemic therapies have been developed for the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. These therapies include somatostatin analogs (octreotide or lanreotide), a select group of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (alkylating, fluorouracil and platinum drugs), as well as targeted or biologic agents (everolimus and sunitinib). This chapter will review the available systemic therapy options for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26614372

  18. Everolimus in the management of metastatic neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Chan, David L.; Segelov, Eva; Singh, Simron

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are increasing in incidence and cause a variety of symptoms. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a key role in neuroendocrine tumour (NET) pathogenesis, leading to increased lipid synthesis, protein synthesis and cellular growth. Upregulation of this pathway is noted in both hereditary and sporadic NETs. This understanding has led to investigations of mTOR inhibitors as therapy for metastatic NETs. After promising preclinical findings, everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, was trialled in the RADIANT-1−4 studies on patients with advanced, well differentiated NETs. RADIANT-3 and RADIANT-4 established the efficacy of everolimus in improving progression-free survival (PFS) for metastatic NET of pancreatic, lung and gastrointestinal origin, leading to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its use in tumour control in those settings. Everolimus treatment is generally well tolerated; common adverse events include stomatitis, diarrhoea, rash and hyperglycaemia. Although discontinuation rates are low, many patients may require dose modification to successfully continue therapy. The combination of everolimus with somatostatin analogues (SSAs) (such as octreotide or pasireotide) or other targeted agents such as bevacizumab has not produced additional incremental benefit, and dual biologic therapy is not used widely. Ongoing trials are investigating everolimus compared with chemotherapy, optimal sequencing of therapy and combination of everolimus with radiotherapy. Future research should concentrate on identification of predictive biomarkers for benefit from mTOR therapy and include quality of life as a measure. PMID:28286565

  19. Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Contessa, Joseph N.; Griffith, Kent A.; Wolff, Elizabeth; Ensminger, William; Zalupski, Mark; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients, 23 had radiographic follow-up data, which were used to determine the tumor response rate and freedom from local progression. Long-term toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The overall response rate to RT was 39% (13% complete response, 26% partial response, 56% stable disease, and 4% progressive disease). A significant difference in the freedom from local progression between the groups receiving either greater than or less than the median 2 Gy/fraction biologically equivalent dose of 49.6 Gy was found, with all radiographic progression occurring in patients who had received <=32 Gy. The actuarial 3-year local freedom from progression rate was 49%. Palliation was achieved in 90% of patients, with either improvement or resolution of symptoms after RT. Of 35 patients, 33 had metastatic disease at their referral for RT, and the median overall survival for this patient population was 2 years. Three long-term Grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Conclusion: RT is an effective modality for achieving local control in patients with PNTs. RT produces high rates of symptomatic palliation and freedom from local progression. Prospective trials of radiotherapy for PNTs are warranted.

  20. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: biology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Cynthia; Chai, Wanxing; Yu, Victoria E.; Yu, Run

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), a group of endocrine tumors arising in the pancreas, are among the most common neuroendocrine tumors. The genetic causes of familial and sporadic PNETs are somewhat understood, but their molecular pathogenesis remains unknown. Most PNETs are indolent but have malignant potential. The biological behavior of an individual PNET is unpredictable; higher tumor grade, lymph node and liver metastasis, and larger tumor size generally indicate a less favorable prognosis. Endocrine testing, imaging, and histological evidence are necessary to accurately diagnose PNETs. A 4-pronged aggressive treatment approach consisting of surgery, locoregional therapy, systemic therapy, and complication control has become popular in academic centers around the world. The optimal application of the multiple systemic therapeutic modalities is under development; efficacy, safety, availability, and cost should be considered when treating a specific patient. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of specific types of PNETs and familial PNET syndromes, including the novel Mahvash disease, are summarized. PMID:23237225

  1. Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound of pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; Dal Corso, Flavia; Barbi, Emilio; Canestrini, Stefano; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Indication/purpose: To review contrast‐enhanced ultrasound features of the most common pancreatic tumours. Methods: Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can provide distinctive features of pancreatic tumours that are reported in the present paper, providing radiologic‐pathological correlations and clarifying the main differential diagnosis. Conclusion: Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound plays a well‐established role in the evaluation of pancreatic tumours. When possible, CEUS should be always performed after the initial US diagnosis, in order to improve the accuracy of the first line examination. PMID:28191218

  2. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: does chemotherapy work?

    PubMed

    Tejani, Mohamedtaki Abdulaziz; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare well-differentiated neoplasms which can be functional or non-functional. They tend to have a worse prognosis than their counterpart carcinoid tumors. Current systemic treatment options for advanced, unresectable disease include somatostatin analogs, everolimus and sunitinib. Low response rates and toxicity profiles have, thus far, limited the widespread use of cytotoxic chemotherapy in this setting. In this update, we review three abstracts from the 2014 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium that present outcomes of the use of combination capecitabine and temozolomide in patients with advanced pNET. We summarize their results and discuss the role of this regimen in treatment algorithms for metastatic pNET.

  3. Targeted Therapies Improve Survival for Patients with Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    In 2011, based on initial findings from two clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration approved sunitinib and everolimus for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Updated results from the everolimus trial were published in September 2016.

  4. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T

    2012-12-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behaviour and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumour treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume.

  5. Renal neuroendocrine tumour and synchronous pancreas metastasis: histopathological diagnosis using prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Keishi; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Yoshio; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-11-01

    A woman aged 56 years developed 2 synchronous tumours: one, 1.2 cm in diameter at the head of the pancreas; and the other, 4.0 cm in diameter, at the left side of her horseshoe kidney. Preoperative differential diagnosis of these hypovascular lesions included pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) with renal metastasis, PDC with renal angiomyolipoma, renal cell carcinoma with pancreatic metastasis or PDC and renal cell carcinoma. Following pancreaticoduodenectomy and left nephrectomy, both specimens were diagnosed as grade 2 neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Immunohistochemistry revealed that both were positive for prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), which is specific to hindgut-derived NET, including renal NET. Accordingly, the renal tumour was diagnosed as the primary lesion, and the pancreatic tumour as a metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a renal NET with a synchronous pancreas metastasis. Immunohistochemical staining for PAP was a useful diagnostic marker for synchronous NETs in the kidney and pancreas.

  6. A retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor in ectopic pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Al-Bassiouni, Fahim; El-Ela, Monir Abo; Al-Gemeie, Emad Hamza; Ezzat, Reem

    2013-07-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. We report a case of abdominal pain due to retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue between the duodenal wall and the head of the pancreas. Patient underwent surgical enucleation of the tumor.

  7. Treatment of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours with etoposide and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, E; Baudin, E; Ducreux, M; Sabourin, J-C; Rufié, P; Aparicio, T; Lasser, P; Elias, D; Duvillard, P; Schlumberger, M; Rougier, P

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate by a retrospective analysis of 53 patients the efficacy of chemotherapy combining etoposide and cisplatin in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours. The regimen was a combination of etoposide 100 mg m–2 day–1 for 3 days and cisplatin 100 mg m–2 on day 1, given by 2-h intravenous infusion, administered every 21 days. Twelve patients had a well-differentiated and 41 a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour. Toxicity of treatment was assessed in 50 patients and efficacy in 52 patients. Among the 11 patients with a well-differentiated tumour evaluable for tumoural response, only one (9.4%) had a partial response for 8.5 months. Forty-one patients with a poorly differentiated tumour showed an objective response rate of 41.5% (four complete and 13 partial responses); the median duration of response was 9.2 months, the median overall survival 15 months and the median progression-free survival 8.9 months. Haematological grade 3–4 toxicity was observed in 60% of the cases with one treatment-related death, digestive grade 3–4 toxicity in 40% and grade 3 alopecia was constant. No severe renal, hearing and neurological toxicities were observed (grade 1 in 6%, 14%, 72% respectively and no grade >1). We confirm that poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours are chemosensitive to the etoposide plus cisplatin combination. However, the prognosis remains poor with a 2-year survival lower than 20% confirming that new therapeutic strategies have to be developed. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10604732

  8. Pregnant with metastatic neuroendocrine tumour of the ovary: what now?

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, B; Grana, CM; Fazio, N; Cavaliere, A; Ferrari, ME; Bodei, L; Baio, SM; Scambia, G; Paganelli, G; Peccatori, FA

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms commonly occurring in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs but can occur in other regions. Primary ovarian NET account for 5% of all NET and 0.1% of all ovarian malignancies. In metastatic disease, the therapeutic goal is to extend survival and to improve quality of life. As these tumours express somatostatin receptors, somatostatin analogues are frequently used to control symptoms. Here we present a case of a pregnant woman with an ovarian NET with liver metastases and carcinoid syndrome who was treated with the somatostatin analogue, Octreotide LAR. We also summarize reported data of the use of somatostatin analogues during pregnancy. PMID:22331988

  9. Current medical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Suayib; Oyan, Basak; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) consist of a wide group of neoplasms, with different biological behaviors in terms of aggressiveness and hormone production. In the last two decades, significant progress has been observed in our understanding of their biology, diagnosis and treatment. Surgery remains to be the only curative approach, but unfortunately the diagnosis is often delayed due to the slow growth of these tumors and the difficulty in identifying the symptoms related to the tumor-released hormones. In addition to surgery, other approaches to control the disease are biological therapy consisting of somatostatin analogs and interferon (IFN), systemic chemotherapy, radioligand therapy and local therapy with chemoembolization. Several newer cytotoxic agents, including irinotecan, gemcitabine, taxanes, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and PS-341 have been studied in metastatic patients. Considering the high vascularity of these tumors, antiangiogenic agents like endostatin and thalidomide have also been evaluated in advanced NETs. Although these agents seem to have potential activity in NETs and may increase progression free survival, none of these currently available medical therapeutic options are curative. While more efficient novel strategies are to be developed, the rationale use of the current therapeutic options may improve quality of life, control the symptoms related to the hypersecretion of hormones and/or peptides, control tumor proliferation and prolong survival in patients suffering from NETs.

  10. Lutetium-labelled peptides for therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Kam, B L R; Teunissen, J J M; Krenning, E P; de Herder, W W; Khan, S; van Vliet, E I; Kwekkeboom, D J

    2012-02-01

    Treatment with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising new tool in the management of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). The results obtained with (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) are very encouraging in terms of tumour regression. Dosimetry studies with (177)Lu-DOTATATE as well as the limited side effects with additional cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE suggest that more cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE can be safely given. Also, if kidney-protective agents are used, the side effects of this therapy are few and mild and less than those from the use of (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC). Besides objective tumour responses, the median progression-free survival is more than 40 months. The patients' self-assessed quality of life increases significantly after treatment with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Lastly, compared to historical controls, there is a benefit in overall survival of several years from the time of diagnosis in patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. These findings compare favourably with the limited number of alternative therapeutic approaches. If more widespread use of PRRT can be guaranteed, such therapy may well become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine tumours.

  11. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  12. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-05-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells.

  13. [Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and helpfulness of targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Vaysse, Thibaut; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-06-01

    The neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are rare tumors, but their incidence is constantly rising. Even if the management of these tumors has to be surgical as soon as possible, the disease is most often metastatic at the stage of the diagnostic. The prognostic and the therapeutic options differ from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Available treatments have evolved over the last years with recent publications of studies that bring to light the benefits of targeted therapies in this pathology. This has resulted in modifications of both practices and either French and international guidelines. Therefore, we focus on the management of the grade 1 and grade 2 well-differentiated neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors as classified in new WHO classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms published in 2010.

  14. Biochemical prognostic indicators for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and small bowel neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cavaness, Keith; Celinski, Scott; Preskitt, John

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) and small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (SBNETs) are rare tumors that are frequently diagnosed late in the course of the disease. Several biomarkers have been proposed in the literature as prognostic factors for patients with these tumors. This article discusses a recent publication in Annals of Surgical Oncology from the University of Iowa analyzing the effect of different biomarkers on survival in patients with PNETs and SBNETs. PMID:25493250

  15. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy. PMID:27621748

  16. Is visual radiological evaluation of liver tumour burden in patients with neuroendocrine tumours reproducible?

    PubMed Central

    Hentic, Olivia; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre; Lagadec, Matthieu; Ronot, Maxime; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Background Visual semi-quantitative assessment of liver tumour burden for neuroendocrine tumour liver metastases is often used in patient management and outcome. However, published data on the reproducibility of these evaluations are lacking. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the interobserver and intraobserver agreement of a visual semi-quantitative assessment of liver tumour burden using CT scan. Methods Fifty consecutive patients (24 men and 26 women, mean aged 54 years) were retrospectively reviewed by four readers (two senior radiologists, one junior radiologist and one gastroenterologist) who assessed the liver tumour burden based on a visual semi-quantitative method with four classes (0–10, 11–25, 26–50 and ≥50%). Interobserver and intraobserver agreement were assessed by weighted kappa coefficient and percentage of agreement. The intraclass correlation was calculated. Results Agreement among the four observers for the evaluation of liver tumour burden was substantial, ranging from 0.62 to 0.73 (P < 0.0001). The intraclass coefficient was 0.977 (P < 0.0001). Intraobserver agreement was 0.78 and ICC was 0.97. Conclusion Reproducibility of the visual semi-quantitative evaluation of liver tumour burden is good and is independent of the level of experience of the readers. We therefore suggest that clinical studies in patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases use this method to categorise liver tumour burden. PMID:28069898

  17. Melatonin Immunoreactivity in Malignant Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Rasmusson, Annica J.; Ali, Abir; Stridsberg, Mats; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are derived from enterochromaffin cells. After demonstrating melatonin in enterochromaffin cells, we hypothesized that SI-NETs may express and secrete melatonin, which may have an impact on clinical factors and treatment response. Methods Tumour tissue from 26 patients with SI-NETs, representing paired sections of primary tumour and metastasis, were immunohistochemically stained for melatonin and its receptors, MT1 and MT2. Plasma melatonin and immunoreactivity (IR) for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 in tumour cells were compared to other tumour markers and clinical parameters. Melatonin was measured at two time points in fasting morning plasma from 43 patients with SI-NETs. Results Melatonin IR was found in all SI-NETS. Melatonin IR intensity in primary tumours correlated inversely to proliferation index (p = 0.022) and patients reported less diarrhoea when melatonin IR was high (p = 0.012). MT1 IR was low or absent in tumours. MT2 expression was medium to high in primary tumours and generally reduced in metastases (p = 0.007). Plasma-melatonin ranged from 4.5 to 220.0 pg/L. Higher levels were associated with nausea at both time points (p = 0.027 and p = 0.006) and flush at the second sampling. In cases with disease stabilization or remission (n = 34), circulating melatonin levels were reduced in the second sample (p = 0.038). Conclusion Immunoreactive melatonin is present in SI-NETs. Circulating levels of melatonin in patients with SI-NETs are reduced after treatment. Our results are congruent with recent understanding of melatonin’s endocrine and paracrine functions and SI-NETs may provide a model for further studies of melatonin function. PMID:27736994

  18. Guidelines for the management of neuroendocrine tumours by the Brazilian gastrointestinal tumour group

    PubMed Central

    Riechelmann, Rachel P; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Costa, Frederico P; Andrade, Aline Chaves; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch; Quidute, Ana Rosa P; dos Santos, Allan; Hoff, Ana Amélia O; Gumz, Brenda; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Vilhena Pereira, Bruno S; Lourenço Junior, Delmar Muniz; da Rocha Filho, Duilio Reis; Fonseca, Eduardo Antunes; Riello Mello, Eduardo Linhares; Makdissi, Fabio Ferrari; Waechter, Fabio Luiz; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Coura-Filho, George B; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Girotto, Gustavo Colagiovanni; Neto, João Evangelista Bezerra; Glasberg, João; Casali-da-Rocha, Jose Claudio; Rego, Juliana Florinda M; de Meirelles, Luciana Rodrigues; Hajjar, Ludhmila; Menezes, Marcos; Bronstein, Marcello D; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Barros, Milton; Forones, Nora Manoukian; do Amaral, Paulo Cezar Galvão; de Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Araujo, Raphael L C; Bezerra, Regis Otaviano França; Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino; Aguiar, Samuel; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Pfiffer, Tulio; Hoff, Paulo M; Coutinho, Anelisa K

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are a heterogeneous group of diseases with a significant variety of diagnostic tests and treatment modalities. Guidelines were developed by North American and European groups to recommend their best management. However, local particularities and relativisms found worldwide led us to create Brazilian guidelines. Our consensus considered the best feasible strategies in an environment involving more limited resources. We believe that our recommendations may be extended to other countries with similar economic standards. PMID:28194228

  19. Guidelines for the management of neuroendocrine tumours by the Brazilian gastrointestinal tumour group.

    PubMed

    Riechelmann, Rachel P; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Costa, Frederico P; Andrade, Aline Chaves; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch; Quidute, Ana Rosa P; Dos Santos, Allan; Hoff, Ana Amélia O; Gumz, Brenda; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Vilhena Pereira, Bruno S; Lourenço Junior, Delmar Muniz; da Rocha Filho, Duilio Reis; Fonseca, Eduardo Antunes; Riello Mello, Eduardo Linhares; Makdissi, Fabio Ferrari; Waechter, Fabio Luiz; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Coura-Filho, George B; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Girotto, Gustavo Colagiovanni; Neto, João Evangelista Bezerra; Glasberg, João; Casali-da-Rocha, Jose Claudio; Rego, Juliana Florinda M; de Meirelles, Luciana Rodrigues; Hajjar, Ludhmila; Menezes, Marcos; Bronstein, Marcello D; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Barros, Milton; Forones, Nora Manoukian; do Amaral, Paulo Cezar Galvão; de Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Araujo, Raphael L C; Bezerra, Regis Otaviano França; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; Aguiar, Samuel; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Pfiffer, Tulio; Hoff, Paulo M; Coutinho, Anelisa K

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are a heterogeneous group of diseases with a significant variety of diagnostic tests and treatment modalities. Guidelines were developed by North American and European groups to recommend their best management. However, local particularities and relativisms found worldwide led us to create Brazilian guidelines. Our consensus considered the best feasible strategies in an environment involving more limited resources. We believe that our recommendations may be extended to other countries with similar economic standards.

  20. Disseminated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasm (NEN) with an Uncommon Localisation in the Central Nervous System. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Białkowska, Joanna; Kolasińska-Ćwikła, Agnieszka; Mroczkowska, Dorota; Sowa, Mariusz; Grabarczyk, Łukasz; Maksymowicz, Wojciech; Cichocki, Andrzej; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) are rare neoplasms that originate from neuroendocrine cells and are characterized by the potential of hormonal activity. Approximately 70% of these tumours are located in the gastrointestinal system (GI), followed by the bronchi, endocrine glands-like C cells of the thyroid (medullary carcinoma), the parasympathetic and sympathetic system (paragangliomas, pheochromocytoma) and other very rare locations. The prevalence of cerebral metastases in neuroendocrine tumours is estimated by various authors to be approximately 1.5–5%. When the primary tumour is located in the pancreas, it is associated with a risk of cerebral metastases lower than 2%. Case Report We describe a patient with a disseminated pancreatic NEN that presented with an isolated lesion in the brain. We gathered the important data via medical history,, observation, analysis of medical records, imaging and others diagnostic tests. Despite the fairly rare prevalence of cerebral metastases in NENs, a neurological work-up should be performed. This should include neuroimaging of the brain, preferably with MR, together with the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), in each clinically suspicious case. A histopathological examination of the CNS tumour can confirm a dedifferentiation of NEN in the direction of a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC – neuroednocrine carcinoma) with a poor prognosis. Conclusions Cerebral metastases are diagnosed in 1.5–5% of patients with a neuroendocrine neoplasm. In each case suggestive of a dissemination into the central nervous system, MRI of the brain should be performed. PMID:28344687

  1. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs.

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking Klatskin tumour on radiology.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Sohail, Abdul Malik Amir Humza; Haider, Zishan

    2015-04-09

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is categorised into two distinct types, AIP type 1 and 2. Although there can be multisystem involvement, rarely, the cholangitis associated with AIP can present radiologically in a manner similar to that of Klatskin tumour. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who was almost misdiagnosed with a Klatskin tumour because of the similarity in radiological features of the two aforementioned clinical entities. The patient presented with a history of jaundice, pruritus and abdominal pain, and work up showed deranged liver function tests, elevated cancer antigen 19-9 levels and positive antinuclear antibodies. CT scan of the abdomen showed findings suggestive of Klatskin tumour but due to diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding low-attenuation halo found on a closer review, a diagnosis of AIP was performed. The patient was started on standard corticosteroid therapy and responded well, with complete resolution of the radiological findings.

  3. Pazopanib and depot octreotide in advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a multicentre, single-group, phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Alexandria T; Halperin, Daniel M; Chan, Jennifer A; Fogelman, David R; Hess, Kenneth R; Malinowski, Paige; Regan, Eileen; Ng, Chaan S; Yao, James C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment options for advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) remain scarce. Pazopanib is an orally bioavailable, small molecule, multitargeted kinase inhibitor that inhibits VEGF receptors 1, 2, and 3. We did a study of the efficacy of pazopanib with depot octreotide in patients with advanced NETs. Methods We did a parallel cohort study of patients with metastatic or locally advanced grade 1–2 carcinoid tumours or pancreatic NETs, by use of a single-group, two-stage design. Patients received pazopanib 800 mg orally once per day and octreotide at their preprotocol dosage. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving an objective response, as assessed by investigators, by intention-to-treat analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT00454363, and was completed in March, 2014. Findings Between April 12, 2007, and July 2, 2009, we enrolled 52 patients, including 32 individuals with pancreatic NETs and 20 individuals with carcinoid tumours. Seven (21.9%, 95% CI 11.0–38.8) of 32 patients with pancreatic NETs achieved an objective response. We detected no responses in the first stage of the cohort with carcinoid tumours, and we terminated accrual at 20 patients. Toxic effects included one patient with grade 4 hypertriglyceridaemia and one with grade 4 thrombosis, with the most common grade three events being aminotransferase increases and neutropenia, each of which happened in 3 patients. In all 52 patients, the most frequently observed toxic effects were fatigue (39 [75%]), nausea (33 [63%]), diarrhoea (33 [63%]), and hypertension (28 [54%]). Interpretation Treatment with pazopanib is associated with tumour response for patients with pancreatic NETs, but not for carcinoid tumours; a randomised controlled phase 3 study to assess pazopanib in advanced pancreatic NETs is warranted. Funding US National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. PMID:25956795

  4. Genetics and epigenetics in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Stålberg, P; Westin, G; Thirlwell, C

    2016-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumour of the small intestine (SI-NET), formerly known as midgut carcinoid tumour, is the most common small intestinal malignancy. The incidence is rising, with recent reports of 0.67 per 100 000 in the USA and 1.12 per 100 000 in Sweden. SI-NETs often present a challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment, as patients often have widespread disease and are beyond cure by surgery. Somatostatin analogues provide the mainstay of medical treatment to control hormonal excess and increase the time to progression. Despite overall favourable prognosis (5-year overall survival of 65%), there is a need to find markers to identify both patients with worse outcome and new targets for therapy. Loss on chromosome 18 has been reported in 60-90% of SI-NETs, but mutated genes on this chromosome have failed detection. Recently, a putative tumour suppressor role has been suggested for TCEB3C occurring at 18q21 (encoding elongin A3), which may undergo epigenetic repression. CDKN1B has recently been revealed as the only recurrently mutated gene in SI-NETs but, with a frequency as low as 8%, its role as a driver in SI-NET development may be questioned. Integrated genomewide analysis including exome and whole-genome sequencing, gene expression, DNA methylation and copy number analysis has identified three novel molecular subtypes of SI-NET with differing clinical outcome. DNA methylation analysis has demonstrated that SI-NETs have significant epigenetic dysregulation in 70-80% of tumours. In this review, we focus on understanding of the genetic, epigenetic and molecular events that lead to development and progression of SI-NETs.

  5. [Surgical treatment and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J W; Che, X; Lan, Z M; Chen, Y T; Huang, X H; Jiang, Q L; Wang, C F

    2016-12-23

    Objective: Pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (pNEC) is a highly malignant tumor.This study aimed to evaluate the role of surgery and the prognosis for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (pNEC). Methods: We collected and reviewed all clinical data of patients who underwent radical surgery for pNEC from Jan 2000 through Jan 2016 in our hospital. Cox-regression analysis wasused to evaluate the factors potentially influencing survival. Results: Twenty patients including 11 males and 9 females (median age, 62.5 years) were included in this study. All patients underwent radical surgery and 17 cases received postoperative platinum-based chemotherapy.The median follow-up time was 41 months (range, 1 to 127 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of the patients were 66.7%, 51.5% and 28.1%, with a median survival time of 75.3 months.The multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size and Ki-67 index were of prognostic significance. Conclusions: Pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare but increasing in incidence. Patients with localized nonmetastatic primary tumors seem to benefit from surgery. Early diagnosis and multimodality therapy are key points of an improved survival.

  6. Genetics of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: implications for the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pea, Antonio; Hruban, Ralph H.; Wood, Laura D.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a common and deadly neoplasm of the pancreas. Although the importance of genetic alterations in PanNETs has been known for many years, recent comprehensive sequencing studies have greatly expanded our knowledge of neuroendocrine tumorigenesis in the pancreas. These studies have identified specific cellular processes that are altered in PanNETs, highlighted alterations with prognostic implications, and pointed to pathways for targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the genetic alterations that play a key role in PanNET tumorigenesis, with a specific focus on those alterations with the potential to change the way patients with these neoplasms are diagnosed and treated. PMID:26413978

  7. A renaissance in therapeutic options for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Pamela L

    2012-01-01

    The field of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has seen a remarkable renaissance in recent years with exponential increases in published research, clinical trials, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments. Surgical resection remains the foundation for management of locoregional disease. However, for patients with advanced disease, novel therapeutic options have emerged. Two separate randomized placebo-controlled studies have shown prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) with everolimus or sunitinib. Future studies are designed to answer questions about the role of somatostatin analogs as antiproliferative agents, combinations of biologic therapies, and new cytotoxic chemotherapy backbones.

  8. Update on surgical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Jan G; Tosolini, Chiara; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare and account for only 2%-4% of all pancreatic neoplasms. All PNENs are potential (neurendocrine tumors PNETs) or overt (neuroendocrine carcinomas PNECs) malignant, but a subset of PNETs is low-risk. Even in case of low-risk PNETs surgical resection is frequently required to treat hormone-related symptoms and to obtain an appropriate pathological diagnosis. Low-risk PNETs in the body and the tail are ideal for minimally-invasive approaches which should be tailored to the individual patient. Generally, surgeons must aim for parenchyma sparing in these cases. In high-risk and malignant PNENs, indications for tumor resection are much wider than for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, in many cases due to the relatively benign tumor biology. Thus, patients with locally advanced and metastatic PNETs may benefit from extensive resection. In experienced hands, even multi-organ resections are accomplished with acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and are associated with excellent long term survival. However, poorly differentiated neoplasms with high proliferation rates are associated with a dismal prognosis and may frequently only be treated with chemotherapy. The evidence on surgical treatment of PNENs stems from reviews of mostly single-center series and some analyses of nation-wide tumor registries. No randomized trial has been performed to compare surgical and non-surgical therapies in potentially resectable PNEN. Though such a trial would principally be desirable, ethical considerations and the heterogeneity of PNENs preclude realization of such a study. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the surgical treatment of PNENs. PMID:25320524

  9. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  10. A new human chromogranin 'A' immunoradiometric assay for the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bernini, G P; Moretti, A; Ferdeghini, M; Ricci, S; Letizia, C; D'Erasmo, E; Argenio, G F; Salvetti, A

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether plasma chromogranin A (CgA), measured by a new immunoradiometric assay, may be a sensitive and specific marker of phaeochromocytoma and of other neuroendocrine tumours. This study involved 121 patients of whom 20 with phaeochromocytoma, 28 with other neuroendocrine tumours (19 gastroenteropancreatic tumors, 3 medullary thyroid and 6 small cell lung carcinomas), 25 with solid nonfunctioning adrenocortical tumours and 48 with essential hypertension. In addition, 130 normal subjects were taken as controls. Plasma catecholamines were measured by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and CgA by a two-site sandwich immunoradiometric assay involving monoclonal antibodies raised against the unprocessed central domain (145–245) of human CgA. Plasma CgA in controls (49.0 ± 3.1 ng ml–1, mean ± SE) and in essential hypertensives (50.8 ± 3.5 ng ml–1) was lower (P< 0.0001) than in adrenocortical tumours (91.8 ± 13.2 ng ml–1), in phaeochromocytomas (254 ± 49 ng ml–1) and in patients with other neuroendocrine tumours (469 ± 84 ng ml–1). Plasma CgA and catecholamines identified 13 and 18 out of 20 phaeochromocytomas with sensitivity of 65% and 90%, respectively. Combined measurement of both markers improved sensitivity up to 100%. In the other neuroendocrine tumours, CgA was abnormal in 23/28 cases (sensitivity 82%) and in 6 it was the only circulating marker of disease. In gastroenteropancreatic tumours, CgA measurement identified all cases (sensitivity 100%). Specificity of CgA in patients with essential hypertension was 98%. In conclusion, CgA determination showed high sensitivity in identifying gastroenteropancreatic tumours and, in association with catecholamines, in detecting patients with phaeochromocytoma. CgA sometimes appeared to be the only circulating marker of disease. Since the specificity of CgA proved to be excellent, this assay may be useful for diagnosis both of functioning and non

  11. Extra pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumour in a young male.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Naima; Qureshi, Asim; Dian, Asifa

    2016-10-01

    Solid pseudo-papillary tumour of pancreas is a rare neoplasm having a low malignant potential. It mostly affects young adolescent females. We report an unusual case of an 18 year old male with a mass in the mesocolon which was reported as solid pseudo-papillary tumour of pancreas. This case is unusual by virtue of extra pancreatic location and male gender of the patient.

  12. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in the Setting of Dorsal Agenesis of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) is an uncommon embryological abnormality where there is absence of the distal pancreas. DAP is mostly asymptomatic, but common presenting symptoms include diabetes mellitus, abdominal pain, pancreatitis, enlarged pancreatic head, and, in a few cases, polysplenia. MRCP and ERCP are the gold standard imaging techniques to demonstrate the absence of the dorsal pancreatic duct. The literature on the association of pancreatic neoplasia and DAP is limited. We present the case of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with dorsal agenesis of the pancreas, with a review of the related literature. PMID:27738535

  13. Molecular pathogenesis and targeted therapy of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    Over the past few years, knowledge regarding the molecular pathology of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has increased substantially, and a number of targeted agents have been tested in clinical trials in this tumor type. For some of these agents there is a strong biological rationale. Among them, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor Everolimus and the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib have both been approved for the treatment of PNETs. However, there is lack of knowledge regarding biomarkers able to predict their efficacy, and mechanisms of resistance. Other angiogenesis inhibitors, such as Pazopanib, inhibitors of Src, Hedgehog or of PI3K might all be useful in association or sequence with approved agents. On the other hand, the clinical significance, and potential for treatment of the most common mutations occurring in sporadic PNETs, in the MEN-1 gene and in ATRX and DAXX, remains uncertain. The present paper reviews the main molecular changes occurring in PNETs and how they might be linked with treatment options.

  14. 24-Hydroxycholesterol participates in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Matias; Corna, Gianfranca; Moresco, Marta; Coltella, Nadia; Restuccia, Umberto; Maggioni, Daniela; Raccosta, Laura; Lin, Chin-Yo; Invernizzi, Francesca; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Doglioni, Claudio; Traversari, Catia; Bachi, Angela; Bernardi, Rosa; Bordignon, Claudio; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the tumor microenvironment may be reprogrammed by tumor-derived metabolites. Cholesterol-oxidized products, namely oxysterols, have been shown to favor tumor growth directly by promoting tumor cell growth and indirectly by dampening antitumor immune responses. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing oxysterol generation within tumor microenvironments remain elusive. We recently showed that tumor-derived oxysterols recruit neutrophils endowed with protumoral activities, such as neoangiogenesis. Here, we show that hypoxia inducible factor-1a (HIF-1α) controls the overexpression of the enzyme Cyp46a1, which generates the oxysterol 24-hydroxycholesterol (24S-HC) in a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) model commonly used to study neoangiogenesis. The activation of the HIF-1α–24S-HC axis ultimately leads to the induction of the angiogenic switch through the positioning of proangiogenic neutrophils in proximity to Cyp46a1+ islets. Pharmacologic blockade or genetic inactivation of oxysterols controls pNET tumorigenesis by dampening the 24S-HC–neutrophil axis. Finally, we show that in some human pNET samples Cyp46a1 transcripts are overexpressed, which correlate with the HIF-1α target VEGF and with tumor diameter. This study reveals a layer in the angiogenic switch of pNETs and identifies a therapeutic target for pNET patients. PMID:27671648

  15. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  16. A Step-by-Step Clinical Approach for the Management of Neuroendocrine Tumours.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, A; Ahmadzadehfar, H; Gonzalez-Carmona, M; Strassburg, C; Mayer, K; Feldmann, G; Schmidt-Wolf, I; Lingohr, P; Fischer, S; Kristiansen, G; Essler, M

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are rare neoplasms, but the incidence is permanently increasing. Most of the NETs are slow proliferating and clinically silent, and for that reason, they are often diagnosed at a stage with advanced disease. The complexity and diversity of the NET-biology require the treatment of patients in specialised centres to guarantee a qualified, multidisciplinary treatment planning. At our institution, we developed an interdisciplinary model for the assessment and treatment of NET. The aim was to adapt the guidelines to the clinical practice, exchange of current knowledge, and a tailored approach to the individual patient. In our team are included medical professionals from pathology, radiology, oncology, gastroenterology, oncological surgery, and nuclear medicine. In this paper, we describe step-by-step a procedural algorithm for the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours, focusing on midgut-NETs in terms of therapy.

  17. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine (including carcinoid) tumours (NETs)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A; Ardill, J; Bax, N; Breen, D J; Caplin, M E; Corrie, P; Davar, J; Davies, A H; Lewington, V; Meyer, T; Newell-Price, J; Poston, G; Reed, N; Rockall, A; Steward, W; Thakker, R V; Toubanakis, C; Valle, J; Verbeke, C; Grossman, A B

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines update previous guidance published in 2005. They have been revised by a group who are members of the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society with endorsement from the clinical committees of the British Society of Gastroenterology, the Society for Endocrinology, the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (and its Surgical Specialty Associations), the British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology and others. The authorship represents leaders of the various groups in the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society, but a large amount of work has been carried out by other specialists, many of whom attended a guidelines conference in May 2009. We have attempted to represent this work in the acknowledgements section. Over the past few years, there have been advances in the management of neuroendocrine tumours, which have included clearer characterisation, more specific and therapeutically relevant diagnosis, and improved treatments. However, there remain few randomised trials in the field and the disease is uncommon, hence all evidence must be considered weak in comparison with other more common cancers. PMID:22052063

  18. MGMT expression predicts response to temozolomide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cros, J; Hentic, O; Rebours, V; Zappa, M; Gille, N; Theou-Anton, N; Vernerey, D; Maire, F; Lévy, P; Bedossa, P; Paradis, V; Hammel, P; Ruszniewski, P; Couvelard, A

    2016-08-01

    Temozolomide (TEM) showed encouraging results in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WDPNETs). Low O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression and MGMT promoter methylation within tumors correlate with a better outcome under TEM-based chemotherapy in glioblastoma. We aimed to assess whether MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation could help predict the efficacy of TEM-based chemotherapy in patients with WDPNET. Consecutive patients with progressive WDPNET and/or liver involvement over 50% who received TEM between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Tumor response was assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guidelines. Nuclear expression of MGMT was assessed by immunochemistry (H-score, 0-300) and MGMT promoter methylation by pyrosequencing. Forty-three patients (21 men, 58years (27-84)) with grade 1 WDPNET (n=6) or 2 (n=36) were analyzed. Objective response, stable disease, and progression rates were seen in 17 patients (39.5%), 18 patients (41.9%), and 8 patients (18.6%), respectively. Low MGMT expression (≤50) was associated with radiological objective response (P=0.04) and better progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=0.35 (0.15-0.81), P=0.01). Disease control rate at 18months of treatment remained satisfying with an MGMT score up to 100 (74%) but dropped with a higher expression. High MGMT promoter methylation was associated with a low MGMT expression and longer PFS (HR=0.37 (0.29-1.08), P=0.05). Low MGMT score (≤50) appears to predict an objective tumor response, whereas an intermediate MGMT score (50-100) seems to be associated with prolonged stable disease.

  19. The Somatostatin Analogue Octreotide Inhibits Growth of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Martijn, Cécile; Cui, Tao; Essaghir, Ahmed; Luque, Raúl M.; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Castaño, Justo P.; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Octreotide is a widely used synthetic somatostatin analogue that significantly improves the management of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Octreotide acts through somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). However, the molecular mechanisms leading to successful disease control or symptom management, especially when SSTRs levels are low, are largely unknown. We provide novel insights into how octreotide controls NET cells. CNDT2.5 cells were treated from 1 day up to 16 months with octreotide and then were profiled using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analyses were used to validate microarray profiling in silico data. WST-1 cell proliferation assay was applied to evaluate cell growth of CNDT2.5 cells in the presence or absence of 1 µM octreotide at different time points. Moreover, laser capture microdissected tumour cells and paraffin embedded tissue slides from SI-NETs at different stages of disease were used to identify transcriptional and translational expression. Microarrays analyses did not reveal relevant changes in SSTR expression levels. Unexpectedly, six novel genes were found to be upregulated by octreotide: annexin A1 (ANXA1), rho GTPase-activating protein 18 (ARHGAP18), epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1), growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), TGF-beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) and tumour necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 15 (TNFSF15). Furthermore, these novel genes were expressed in tumour tissues at transcript and protein levels. We suggest that octreotide may use a potential novel framework to exert its beneficial effect as a drug and to convey its action on neuroendocrine cells. Thus, six novel genes may regulate cell growth and differentiation in normal and tumour neuroendocrine cells and have a role in a novel octreotide mechanism system. PMID:23119007

  20. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  1. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer with liver metastases and multiple peritoneal metastases: report of one case

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) is a rare pancreatic tumor, with its incidence showing a rising trend in recent years. Most of its distant metastases are found in the liver. This article describes a 59-year-old male patient with pNET with liver metastasis and multiple abdominal metastases, focusing on the management of this tumor in its advanced stage. PMID:28138631

  2. Metformin with everolimus and octreotide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; Buzzoni, Roberto; Vernieri, Claudio; Concas, Laura; Marceglia, Sara; Giacomelli, Luca; Milione, Massimo; Leuzzi, Livia; Femia, Daniela; Formisano, Barbara; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo

    2016-05-01

    A bidirectional relationship seems to exist between diabetes mellitus and development of pancreatic tumors. Metformin, the most widely used drug in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, has recently emerged as a potentially active agent in cancer chemoprevention and treatment. In this article, we discuss the potential correlation between glycemic status, administration of antiglycemic treatments, such as metformin or insulin, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors patients treated with everolimus and octreotide, on the basis of existing evidence and our experience.

  3. Autocrine growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wimmel, A; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: The role of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in neuroendocrine tumour biology is currently unknown. We therefore examined the expression and biological significance of TGFβ signalling components in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract. Methods: Expression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors, Smads and Smad regulated proteins, was examined in surgically resected NET specimens and human NET cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and ELISA. Activation of TGFβ-1 dependent promoters was tested by transactivation assays. Growth regulation was evaluated by cell numbers, soft agar assays, and cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry. The role of endogenous TGFβ was assessed by a TGFβ neutralising antibody and stable transfection of a dominant negative TGFβR II receptor construct. Results: Coexpression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors TGFβR I and TGFβR II was detected in 67% of human NETs and in all three NET cell lines examined. NET cell lines expressed the TGFβ signal transducers Smad 2, 3, and 4. In two of the three cell lines, TGFβ-1 treatment resulted in transactivation of a TGFβ responsive reporter construct as well as inhibition of c-myc and induction of p21(WAF1) expression. TGFβ-1 inhibited anchorage dependent and independent growth in a time and dose dependent manner in TGFβ-1 responsive cell lines. TGFβ-1 mediated growth inhibition was due to G1 arrest without evidence of induction of apoptosis. Functional inactivation of endogenous TGFβ revealed the existence of an autocrine antiproliferative loop in NET cells. Conclusions: Neuroendocrine tumour cells of the gastroenteropancreatic tract are subject to paracrine and autocrine growth inhibition by TGFβ-1, which may account in part for the low proliferative index of this tumour entity. PMID:12912863

  4. Bowel parasitosis and neuroendocrine tumours of the appendix. A report from the Italian TREP project.

    PubMed

    Virgone, C; Cecchetto, G; Besutti, V; Ferrari, A; Buffa, P; Alaggio, R; Alessandrini, L; Dall'Igna, P

    2015-05-01

    Five children with a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the appendix associated with a parasitic bowel infection are described, and the possibility of inflammation-triggered carcinogenesis is discussed. Schistosoma haematobium is linked primarily to bladder cancer but it has been reported in association with several other histotypes, including NETs of the gastrointestinal tract. Conversely, Enterobius vermicularis has not yet been claimed to participate in the onset of pre-cancerous conditions or tumours. The rare occurrence of contemporary appendiceal NETs and parasitic infection, raises the intriguing hypothesis of an inflammation-related carcinogenesis, although a cause-effect relationship cannot be established. Larger international series of childhood appendiceal NETs, which also include countries with higher prevalence of parasitic bowel infections, are needed to further clarify this possible cause-effect relationship.

  5. B-mode and contrast-enhancement characteristics of small nonincidental neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Barbara; Jenssen, Christian; D’Onofrio, Mirko; Hocke, Michael; Will, Uwe; Möller, Kathleen; Ignee, Andre; Dong, Yi; Cui, Xin-Wu; Săftoiu, Adrian; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Imaging of the pancreas for detection of neuroendocrine tumors is indicated as surveillance in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) or if typical clinical symptoms combined with hormone production raise the suspicion of a neuroendocrine tumor. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered the best imaging modality to detect small pancreatic tumors. However, little is known about how small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) present on EUS. Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, we retrospectively analyzed the endosonographic characteristics of small pNETs which had been detected due to typical biochemistry and clinical symptoms or during surveillance of MEN 1. Only small pancreatic tumors ≤15 mm with histological confirmation as pNET were included. B-mode and contrast-enhanced ultrasound- and EUS patterns were analyzed. Results: Among 32 patients with histologically proven small pNETs, 7 patients had known MEN1. Among the pNETs, 20 were insulinoma, 2 gastrinoma, 3 glucagonoma, 6 nonfunctional in MEN1, and one PPoma. 94% of the pNET appeared hypoechogenic, only 1 isoechogenic and 1 hyperechogenic. After contrast injection, 90% of the pNETS showed hyperenhancement compared to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma. Conclusion: The high spatial resolution of EUS allows detection and even cytological confirmation of pNET <7 mm diameter. Hypoechogenicity in B-mode and hyperenhancement after injection of contrast agents are endosonographic characteristics of small pNET and present in >90% of pNETs. PMID:28218201

  6. Resection of postoperative liver metastasis from pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: report of one case

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Ren, Hu; Chi, Yihebali; He, Shun; Huang, Zhen; Hu, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) is a rare type of pancreatic tumors. The incidence of pNET shows a gradually increasing trend in recent years. Except insulinoma, majority of pNET are metastatic when diagnosis. And liver is the most common organ of distant metastases. Liver metastases are the main determinant for long-term survival and quality of life of patients with pNET. A case of liver metastases of pNET of a 44-year-old female patient is presented in this study. Then we have a brief discussion of the diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of advanced pNET. PMID:28138614

  7. Everolimus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs): Activity, resistance and how to overcome it.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Monica; Caterina, Ieranò; De Divitiis, Chiara; von Arx, Claudia; Maiolino, Piera; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Di Girolamo, Elena; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania; Tafuto, Salvatore

    2015-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare malignancies, with the most common site of origin being from the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the pancreas, small bowel and appendix. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) can be functional, hormone secreting tumors, and can have distinctive symptoms leading to the diagnosis. In contrast nonfunctional tumors, the majority of PNETs, usually present later either incidentally or due to tumor bulk symptoms. Currently Everolimus, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is the most promising drug for patients with unresectable, metastatic disease, in progressive well-differentiated PNETs and many studies are ongoing to demonstrate its effects on the other neuroendocrine histotipes. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) registered Everolimus in advanced/metastatic breast cancer, in advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma and in well/moderately differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Nevertheless only a subset of patients respond to the therapy due to the development of drug resistance. Thus the powerful Everolimus antitumor activity have prompted extensive efforts to overcome drug resistance and to maximize clinical benefit. In this review we aim to summarize current knowledge on mechanisms of Everolimus and other mTOR inhibitors molecules resistance with the intent to overcome it.

  8. Pancreatic mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with clear cells leading to diagnosis of von Hippel Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Yadav, Rajni; Panwar, Rajesh; Mathur, Sandeep R; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Sahni, Peush

    2016-08-01

    Mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasms are extremely rare tumors that are usually seen in female patients and are often associated with von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease. We describe the case of a 38-year-old male who presented with complaints of anorexia, weight loss, and abdominal pain. CT abdomen showed a mass in the head of the pancreas, multiple small nodules in the body of pancreas, and bilateral adrenal masses. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) from the mass showed features of a neuroendocrine tumor, with many of the cells demonstrating abundant clear cytoplasm. Histopathological examination of the pancreaticoduodenectomy specimen showed a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with two components viz. serous cystadenoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) World Health Organization (WHO) grade 2. In addition, he was diagnosed to have bilateral pheochromocytomas and a paraganglioma. The synchronicity of these tumors suggested the possibility of VHL disease. Thus, identification of a NET with clear cells or of a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm should raise suspicion of VHL disease. In a mixed tumor, FNAC may identify only one of the two components. Thorough processing of all pancreatic serous tumors for pathological examination is recommended, as NET may occur as a small nodule within the serous cystadenoma.

  9. Neuroendocrine tumours of the digestive tract report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nouira, Ramzi; Janabi, Iman; Ben Achour, Jamel; Guesmi, Fethi; Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Cherif, Ali; Daghfous, Mounir; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Zribi, Riadh; Ben Osman, Samia; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2003-07-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the digestive system are rare. They comprise only 1% of all the tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study is to report two cases of exceptional localization of non secretary neuroendocrine tumors. Their difficulty in diagnosis, treatment and controversy in chemotherapy merit their study in depth. These are two patients that were treated in the department of general surgery (Beau Séjour) in Charles Nicolle Hospital for non secretary (NET) of the pancreas and stomach. The first was presented as a painless epigastria mass with frequent diarrhea. The second was presented as a painful mass in the left hypochondriac area without any other symptoms. Biochemical evaluation confirmed their non secretary properties. Surgery remains the first line of treatment. It was possible for the gastric, but not for the pancreatic tumor. Both were very advanced and had metastasis. Histopathological evaluation and immunohistochemical study using the method of peroxydase antiperoxydase (PAP) complexes for some special monoclonal antibodies confirmed the diagnosis. Chemotherapy of both cases was mal tolerated and was discussed in details.

  10. Neuron-specific enolase and chromogranin A as markers of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Baudin, E.; Gigliotti, A.; Ducreux, M.; Ropers, J.; Comoy, E.; Sabourin, J. C.; Bidart, J. M.; Cailleux, A. F.; Bonacci, R.; Ruffié, P.; Schlumberger, M.

    1998-01-01

    Circulating neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and chromogranin A (CgA) were measured in 128 patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET) to compare their sensitivity and specificity, to investigate factors associated with elevated serum levels and to determine the usefulness of these markers in the follow-up of NET patients. NSE (Cispack NSE, Cis Bio International, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; normal <12.5 microg l(-1)), and chromogranin A (CgA-Riact, Cis Bio International, normal <100 microg l(-1)) were measured in 128 patients without renal insufficiency. There were 99 patients with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) NET, 19 with medullary thyroid carcinoma and ten with phaeochromocytoma. Fifty-three patients with non-NET were studied as controls. Serum NSE and CgA levels were elevated in 48 (38%) and 76 (59%) of the 128 NET patients respectively. In all groups of NET patients, CgA proved to be more sensitive than NSE. NSE and CgA had a specificity of 73% and 68% respectively. Immunostaining for NSE was positive in three out of eight controls with elevated CgA levels, whereas immunostaining for CgA and synaptophysin was negative in all cases. Elevated CgA levels were significantly associated with two independent parameters, namely the presence of other secretions (P = 0.0001) and a heavy tumour burden (P = 0.001). Elevated NSE levels were exclusively associated with poor tumour differentiation (P = 0.01). Among six patients with NET followed for 11-37 months, CgA appeared to be a better marker of tumour evolution than NSE. We suggest that CgA ought to be the only general marker screened in NET patients. PMID:9792158

  11. Von Hippel Lindau disease with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Kepicoglu, Hasan; Rusen, Elif; Kabasakal, Levent; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    We present a 39-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with Von Hippel Lindau Disease (VHLD). She had surgery and radiotherapy for cranial hemangioblastoma (HA) 11 years ago and had unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma in another hospital 6 month prior to her admission to our center. Moon face, buffalo hump, central obesity, progressive weight gain and menstrual irregularities persisted after adrenalectomy. Her laboratory results were consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome (ECS). A pancreatic solid mass with a nodule on the left lung were revealed upon computed tomography. In addition, Gallium-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET confirmed the pancreatic involvement and demonstrated additional lesions on the left lung and in the aortocaval lymphatic system on the right side, suggesting metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3] octreotate was performed on the patient, with no side effects observed. She was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the first cycle.

  12. Amenorrhea as a rare drug-related adverse event associated with everolimus for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Maruno, Atsuko; Kawashima, Yohei; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-11-14

    The patient was an asymptomatic 43-year-old woman. Abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced computed tomography showed a tumor lesion accompanied by multiple cystic changes in the liver and the pancreatic tail. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle aspiration was performed on the pancreatic tumor lesion and revealed pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). As it was unresectable due to multiple liver metastases, the decision was made to initiate treatment with everolimus and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The patient ceased menstruating after the start of everolimus administration. When the administration was discontinued due to interstitial lung disease, menstruation resumed, but then again stopped with everolimus resumption. An association between everolimus and amenorrhea was highly suspected. Amenorrhea occurred as a rare adverse event of everolimus. As the younger women might be included in PNETs patients, we should put this adverse event into consideration.

  13. Methods to assess the biodistribution of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and treatment response of neuroendocrine tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    Introduction: During the past decade, proof of the principle that somatostatin receptors can be successfully used for in vivo targeting of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has been provided. These tumours are imaged with 111Indium-pentetreotide and treated with 90Yttrium labeled somatostatin analogues. The aim of this study was to assess (a) the biodistribution and residency of 90Y labelled agents using the brehmsstrahlung imaging technique (b) the tumour response to various treatment modalities using a simplified scintigraphic method [Functional SPECT tumour volume (STV)]. Material and methods: 1) 19 patients with NETs were imaged with 111In-pentetreotide and 14 of them underwent treatment with 90Y-lanreotide. The rest underwent treatment with 90Y-SMT. All the patients were imaged 24 hours post-therapy. Brehmsstrahlung images obtained post therapies were used to assess the 90Y-lanreotide biodistribution in 14 patients and the 5 patients treated with 90Y-SMT, comparing them with 111In-pentetreotide. 2) In 42 patients with NETs a retrospective analysis was performed of the 111In-pentetreotide imaging and CT scan in patients treated with different therapies. A simplified scintigraphic method using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT liver imaging was used to monitor changes in tumour response and to determine how this correlates with CT scan and clinical response. Results: 1) 90Y-lanreotide and 90Y-SMT (with amino acids) have much lower uptake in the kidney (p 0.000 and 0.041 respectively) than 111In-pentetreotide. G Gnanasegaran MD 2 2) 22/42 patients had a good clinical response. A mean fall in total functional STV of 37% was seen in patients with symptomatic relief and a mean increase of 72 % was seen in patients with no symptomatic relief STV predicted the clinical outcome in 34 patients (81%) and CT predicted the outcome in 21 (50%) patients. Conclusion: There was a difference in biodistribution between 111In-pentetreotide and 90Y-lanreotide/ 90Y-SMT, especially in the

  14. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Basic Biology, Current Treatment Strategies and Prospects for the Future.

    PubMed

    Ohmoto, Akihiro; Rokutan, Hirofumi; Yachida, Shinichi

    2017-01-13

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are rare tumors accounting for only 1%-2% of all pancreatic tumors. pNENs are pathologically heterogeneous and are categorized into three groups (neuroendocrine tumor: NET G1, NET G2; and neuroendocrine carcinoma: NEC) on the basis of the Ki-67 proliferation index and the mitotic count according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of gastroenteropancreatic NENs. NEC in this classification includes both histologically well-differentiated and poorly differentiated subtypes, and modification of the WHO 2010 classification is under discussion based on genetic and clinical data. Genomic analysis has revealed NETs G1/G2 have genetic alterations in chromatin remodeling genes such as MEN1, DAXX and ATRX, whereas NECs have an inactivation of TP53 and RB1, and these data suggest that different treatment approaches would be required for NET G1/G2 and NEC. While there are promising molecular targeted drugs, such as everolimus or sunitinib, for advanced NET G1/G2, treatment stratification based on appropriate predictive and prognostic biomarkers is becoming an important issue. The clinical outcome of NEC is still dismal, and a more detailed understanding of the genetic background together with preclinical studies to develop new agents, including those already under investigation for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), will be needed to improve the prognosis.

  15. Ki67 Scoring in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors By a New Method.

    PubMed

    Öztürk Sari, Şule; Taşkin, Orhun Çiğ; Yegen, Gülçin; Özlük, Yasemin; Güllüoğlu, Mine

    2016-07-06

    Ki67 scoring is required for the grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Ongoing debate exists about the best scoring method in terms of accuracy and practicality. Manual counting of cells in camera-captured/printed images is a widely used and accepted method and considered the most reliable one among the manual methods. It requires counting 500 to 2000 cells to determine the Ki67 score accurately and it is time and energy consuming. We investigated the possibility of achieving the same results by counting only a particular fraction of tumor cells in a printed image in a series of 45 (24 grade 1 and 21 grade 2) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. After counting Ki67-positive tumor cells in the whole image, the tumor cells were counted within one-tenth of the same image with the aid of a previously prepared grid on an acetate sheet. The cell number obtained was multiplied by 10 to estimate the total cell count and the Ki67 score was calculated. The agreement between the results of the acetate grid and conventional whole-image counting method was assessed. Near-perfect agreement was achieved regarding the total cell count and Ki67 score. The agreement on tumor grade between the two methods was perfect. The time spent on the process was significantly less than that spent on the conventional method. Although it needs to be validated in a larger series, the acetate grid method might be considered an alternative method for Ki67 scoring in neuroendocrine tumors.

  16. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Basic Biology, Current Treatment Strategies and Prospects for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Ohmoto, Akihiro; Rokutan, Hirofumi; Yachida, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are rare tumors accounting for only 1%–2% of all pancreatic tumors. pNENs are pathologically heterogeneous and are categorized into three groups (neuroendocrine tumor: NET G1, NET G2; and neuroendocrine carcinoma: NEC) on the basis of the Ki-67 proliferation index and the mitotic count according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of gastroenteropancreatic NENs. NEC in this classification includes both histologically well-differentiated and poorly differentiated subtypes, and modification of the WHO 2010 classification is under discussion based on genetic and clinical data. Genomic analysis has revealed NETs G1/G2 have genetic alterations in chromatin remodeling genes such as MEN1, DAXX and ATRX, whereas NECs have an inactivation of TP53 and RB1, and these data suggest that different treatment approaches would be required for NET G1/G2 and NEC. While there are promising molecular targeted drugs, such as everolimus or sunitinib, for advanced NET G1/G2, treatment stratification based on appropriate predictive and prognostic biomarkers is becoming an important issue. The clinical outcome of NEC is still dismal, and a more detailed understanding of the genetic background together with preclinical studies to develop new agents, including those already under investigation for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), will be needed to improve the prognosis. PMID:28098761

  17. Gene Amplifications in Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Inactivate the p53 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui; Modica, Ippolito; Klimstra, David S.; Song, Lin; Allen, Peter J.; Brennan, Murray F.; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a group of rare tumors derived from the diffuse neuroendocrine system or islet endocrine cells of the pancreas. The molecular mechanisms underlying NETs are largely unknown. The tumor suppressor p53 plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability and tumor prevention. The p53 pathway is tightly regulated by a number of proteins, among which MDM2, MDM4, and WIP1 are key negative regulators of p53 protein levels or activity. Aberrant activation of these negative regulators can attenuate the p53 function that serves as an important mechanism of tumorigenesis. In this study, several genetic alterations in pancreatic NETs were studied. These tumors exhibit various chromosomal aberrations throughout the whole genome as examined by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Although p53 mutations are rare in NETs (<3%), this study presents evidence that the p53 pathway is altered in pancreatic NETs through aberrant activation of its negative regulators. A high percentage of pancreatic NETs contain extra gene copies of MDM2 (22%), MDM4 (30%), and WIP1 (51%), which are correlated with expression of corresponding mRNAs and proteins. In addition, there is a higher frequency (23% v. 15% in the control population) of the G/G genotype of MDM2 SNP309, a functional single-nucleotide polymorphism in the MDM2 gene that attenuates the function of the p53 protein. Overall, approximately 70% of pancreatic NETs have one or more of these genetic changes. These findings suggest that the negative regulation of p53 function could be an important mechanism for the initiation and/or progression of pancreatic NETs, and reactivation of p53 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with this disease. PMID:20871795

  18. Molar pregnancy after tubal ligation in a patient with neuroendocrine tumour: when a rare condition coincides with an unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Semenya, Afi Mansa; Roberts, Caroline; Mounsey, Anne

    2014-04-30

    A 40-year-old woman with a history of bilateral tubal ligation and a recent diagnosis of metastatic neuroendocrine tumour in the liver presented with severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and dehydration. She had an inconclusive urine pregnancy test in the emergency department that was followed by an extremely high serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin. Transvaginal ultrasound, MRI and subsequent pathology from a dilation and curettage (D&C) revealed that the patient had a complete molar pregnancy. This is a case of an unusual patient who reminds us that one person can have a rare diagnosis and an unexpected obstetrical outcome. We could find no evidence in the medical literature of a causal link between these two diagnoses but present this case report of a reproductive age woman with neuroendocrine tumour and complete molar pregnancy. This case also serves as an example of the phenomenon of the 'hook effect.'

  19. New Genetics and Genomic Data on Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Implications for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja M; Marinoni, Ilaria; Blank, Annika; Perren, Aurel

    2016-09-01

    The recent findings on the roles of death-associated protein 6/α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked (DAXX/ATRX) in the development of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) have led to major advances in the molecular understanding of these rare tumors and open up completely new therapeutic windows. This overview aims at giving a simplified view on these findings and their possible therapeutic implications. The importance of epigenetic changes in PanNET is also underlined by recent findings of a cross-species study on microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles in PanNETs.

  20. [Patients' Priorities in the Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumours: An Analytical Hierarchy Process].

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, A C; Juhnke, C; Kaczynski, A

    2016-10-01

    Background: Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are relatively rare, usually slow-growing malignant tumours. So far there are no data on the patient preferences/priorities regarding the therapy for NET. This empirical study aimed at the elicitation of patient priorities in the drug treatment of NET. Method: Qualitative patient interviews (N=9) were conducted. To elicit the patient's perspective regarding various treatment aspects of NET a self-administered questionnaire using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was developed. The data collection was carried out using paper questionnaires supported by an item response system in a group discussion. To evaluate the patient-relevant outcomes, the eigenvector method was applied. Results: N=24 patients, experts and relatives participated in the AHP survey. In the AHP all respondents had clear priorities for all considered attributes. The attribute "overall survival" was the most significant feature of a drug therapy for all respondents. As in the qualitative interviews, "efficacy attributes" dominated the side effects in the AHP as well. The evaluation of all participants thus showed the attributes "overall survival" (Wglobal:0.418), "progression-free survival" (Wglobal:0.172) and "response to treatment" (Wglobal:0.161) to be most relevant. "Occurrence of abdominal pain" (Wglobal:0.051) was ranked sixth, with "tiredness/fatigue" and "risk of a hypoglycaemia" (Wglobal:0.034) in a shared seventh place. Conclusion: The results thus provide evidence about how much influence a treatment capacity has on therapeutic decisions. Using the AHP major aspects of drug therapy from the perspective of those affected were captured, and positive and negative therapeutic properties could be related against each other. Based on the assessment of the patient's perspective further investigation must elicit patient preferences for NET drug therapy. In the context of a discrete choice experiment or another choice-based method of preference

  1. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor

  2. Capsaicin induces cytotoxicity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells via mitochondrial action.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, M; Sassek, M; Abdelmessih, S; Mergler, S; Grötzinger, C; Metzke, D; Wojciechowicz, T; Nowak, K W; Strowski, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, inhibits growth of various solid cancers via TRPV1 as well as TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Recently, we showed that TRPV1 regulates intracellular calcium level and chromogranin A secretion in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cells. In the present study, we characterize the role of the TRPV1 agonist - CAP - in controlling proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic BON and QGP-1 NET cells. We demonstrate that CAP reduces viability and proliferation, and stimulates apoptotic death of NET cells. CAP causes mitochondrial membrane potential loss, inhibits ATP synthesis and reduces mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein production. In addition, CAP increases cytochrome c and cleaved caspase 3 levels in cytoplasm. CAP reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) acts synergistically with CAP to reduce ROS generation, without affecting CAP-induced toxicity. TRPV1 protein reduction by 75% reduction fails to attenuate CAP-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, these results suggest that CAP induces cytotoxicity by disturbing mitochondrial potential, and inhibits ATP synthesis in NET cells. Stimulation of ROS generation by CAP appears to be a secondary effect, not related to CAP-induced cytotoxicity. These results justify further evaluation of CAP in modulating pancreatic NETs in vivo.

  3. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zagar, Timothy M.; White, Rebekah R.; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Papalezova, Katia T.; Guy, Cynthia D.; Broadwater, Gloria; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  4. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  5. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of human pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n = 12) with storage phosphor autoradiography using radioligands. CCK-B receptors, present in control pancreata, were not detected in any of the pancreatic cancers. BBS receptors were visualized in control pancreata, but they were absent in 10 of 12 pancreatic cancers. In 5 of 12 pancreatic cancers, receptors for secretin were visualized, while binding for secretin was present in all tumour-free pancreata. Conversely, no specific binding of VIP was detected in control pancreata but was identified in 3 of 12 pancreatic cancer specimens. It is concluded that the expression of gut peptide receptors in pancreatic cancer differs from that in tumour-free pancreas. Receptors for these peptides are present in only a minority of pancreatic cancer specimens. Images Figure 1 PMID:9166939

  6. Risk Factors for Sporadic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben, Qiwen; Zhong, Jie; Fei, Jian; Chen, Haitao; Yv, Lifen; Tan, Jihong; Yuan, Yaozong

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined risk factors for sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), including smoking, alcohol use, first-degree family history of any cancer (FHC), and diabetes in the Han Chinese ethnic group. In this clinic-based case-control analysis on 385 patients with sporadic PNETs and 614 age- and sex-matched controls, we interviewed subjects using a specific questionnaire on demographics and potential risk factors. An unconditional multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs). No significant differences were found between patients and controls in terms of demographic variables. Most of the patients with PNETs had well-differentiated PNETs (G1, 62.9%) and non-advanced European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) stage (stage I or II, 83.9%). Ever/heavy smoking, a history of diabetes and a first-degree FHC were independent risk factors for non-functional PNETs. Only heavy drinking was found to be an independent risk factor for functional PNETs (AOR = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–3.51). Ever/heavy smoking was also associated with advanced ENETS staging (stage III or IV) at the time of diagnosis. This study identified first-degree FHC, ever/heavy smoking, and diabetes as risk factors for non-functional PNETs, while heavy drinking as a risk factor for functional PNETs. PMID:27782199

  7. Case Report of Cirrhosis following Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Loree, Jonathan M.; Hiruki, Tadaaki; Kennecke, Hagen F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Management options for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) metastatic to the liver include surgical, ablative, cytotoxic, and radioisotope approaches. One potential local treatment option includes selective internal radiotherapy utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres. 90Y has also been used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and tumors metastatic to the liver. It appears to be well tolerated; however, there is no randomized controlled trial reporting long-term toxicities. Previous retrospective reports have described biliary damage as a potential complication of therapy with 90Y and chemoembolization; however, the long-term sequelae of 90Y treatment are poorly understood. Case Presentation We present the case of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman who suffered biliary damage following 90Y administration for metastatic pNETs and subsequently developed cirrhosis. Given the timeline of her various treatments and the lack of any other identifiable etiology for her cirrhosis, we believe this to be a potential long-term complication of 90Y therapy. Conclusion This case provides pathologic confirmation of cirrhosis as a potential long-term sequela of 90Y treatment. This long-term risk needs to be considered when sequencing therapy for patients with neuroendocrine tumors who have a good prognosis. There are now several other systemic and ablative treatment options available to these patients, and long-term complications must be considered during treatment. PMID:26933423

  8. RSUME is implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yonghe; Tedesco, Lucas; Lucia, Kristin; Schlitter, Anna M.; Garcia, Jose Monteserin; Esposito, Irene; Auernhammer, Christoph J.; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Arzt, Eduardo; Renner, Ulrich; Stalla, Günter K.

    2016-01-01

    The factors triggering pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PanNET) progression are largely unknown. Here we investigated the role and mechanisms of the sumoylation enhancing protein RSUME in PanNET tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical studies showed that RSUME is strongly expressed in normal human pancreas, in particular in β-cells. RSUME expression is reduced in insulinomas and is nearly absent in other types of PanNETs suggesting a role in PanNET tumorigenesis. In human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON1 cells, RSUME stimulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), which are key components of tumor neovascularisation. In contrast, RSUME suppresses nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its target interleukin-8 (IL-8). Correspondingly, PanNET cells with RSUME knockdown showed decreased HIF-1α activity and increased NF-κB and IL-8 production leading to a moderate reduction of VEGF-A release as reduced HIF-1α/VEGF-A production is partly compensated by NF-κB/IL-8-induced VEGF-A. Notably, RSUME stabilizes the tumor suppressor PTEN, which is frequently lost in PanNETs and whose absence is associated with metastasis formation. In vivo orthotopic transplantation of PanNET cells with or without RSUME expression into nude mice showed that PanNETs without RSUME have reduced PTEN expression, grow faster and form multiple liver metastases. In sum, RSUME differentially regulates key components of PanNET formation suggesting that the observed loss of RSUME in advanced PanNETs is critically involved in PanNET tumorigenesis, particularly in metastasis formation. PMID:27506944

  9. GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Marta; Rodrigues, Pedro; Pereira, Sofia S; Nora, Mário; Gonçalves, Gil; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Wewer; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-prandial hypoglycemia is frequently found after bariatric surgery. Although rare, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), which occasionally are mixed hormone secreting, can lead to atypical clinical manifestations, including reactive hypoglycemia. Two years after gastric bypass surgery for the treatment of severe obesity, a 54-year-old female with previous type 2 diabetes, developed post-prandial sweating, fainting and hypoglycemic episodes, which eventually led to the finding by ultrasound of a 1.8-cm solid mass in the pancreatic head. The 72-h fast test and the plasma chromogranin A levels were normal but octreotide scintigraphy showed a single focus of abnormal radiotracer uptake at the site of the nodule. There were no other clinical signs of hormone secreting pNET and gastrointestinal hormone measurements were not performed. The patient underwent surgical enucleation with complete remission of the hypoglycemic episodes. Histopathology revealed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with low-grade malignancy with positive chromogranin A and glucagon immunostaining. An extract of the resected tumor contained a high concentration of glucagon (26.707 pmol/g tissue), in addition to traces of GLP1 (471 pmol/g), insulin (139 pmol/g) and somatostatin (23 pmol/g). This is the first report of a GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pNET presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass surgery. Although pNET are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the clinical approach to the post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia patient. Learning points pNETs can be multihormonal-secreting, leading to atypical clinical manifestations.Reactive hypoglycemic episodes are frequent after gastric bypass.pNETs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery. PMID:26266036

  10. An intestinal neuroendocrine tumour associated with paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia and melaena in a 10-year-old boxer.

    PubMed

    Tappin, S; Brown, P; Ferasin, L

    2008-01-01

    A 10-year-old female neutered boxer was presented with a five-week history of episodic collapse and melaena. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiograph (Holter) analysis revealed the collapsing episodes to coincide with episodes of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. Investigation of the dog's melaena revealed a gastric ulcer which was treated medically and an ileocaecal mass which was surgically excised. Histopathological examination of the mass was consistent with a neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumour. The patient's recovery after surgery was unremarkable. At six-week follow-up, there had been no further episodes of melaena or collapse and repeat Holter analysis did not show any significant abnormalities. In this dog the gastric ulceration and paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia could be attributed to a paraneoplastic syndrome as a result of circulating vasoactive substances released by the tumour; this is supported by the evidence that all clinical signs resolved after surgical excision of the mass and the dog was clinically well 18 months after surgery.

  11. Comprehensive treatment of a functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with multifocal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Seeruttun, Sharvesh Raj; Fang, Cheng; Zhou, Zhiwei

    2014-08-01

    A 64-year-old man was admitted to the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center with chief complaints of recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea for about 3 years and with a history of surgical repair for intestinal perforation owing to stress ulcer. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a primary tumor on the pancreatic tail with multifocal liver metastases. Pathological and immunohistochemistry staining revealed the lesion to be a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET). According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO, 2013) classification, the tumor was classified as stage IV functional G1 pNET. After referral to the multidisciplinary treatment board (MDT), the patient was started on periodic dose of omeprazole, somatostatin analogues and Interferon α (IFNα) and had scanning follow-ups. Based upon the imaging results, CT-guided radioactive iodine-125 ((125)I) seeds implantation therapy, radiofrequency ablation therapy (RFA) or microwave ablation technique were chosen for the treatment of the primary tumor. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), RFA and microwave ablation techniques were decided upon for liver metastases. The patient showed beneficial response to the treatment with clinically manageable low-grade side effects and attained partial remission (RECIST criteria) with a good quality of life.

  12. Tumour-derived exosomes as a signature of pancreatic cancer - liquid biopsies as indicators of tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Zarin; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Sharma, Shayna; Rice, Gregory E; Joshi, Virendra; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer in the world. It is known to have a poor prognosis, mostly because early stages of the disease are generally asymptomatic. Progress in pancreatic cancer research has been slow, leaving several fundamental questions pertaining to diagnosis and treatment unanswered. Recent studies highlight the putative utility of tissue-specific vesicles (i.e. extracellular vesicles) in the diagnosis of disease onset and treatment monitoring in pancreatic cancer. Extracellular vesicles are membrane-limited structures derived from the cell membrane. They contain specific molecules including proteins, mRNA, microRNAs and non-coding RNAs that are secreted in the extracellular space. Extracellular vesicles can be classified according to their size and/or origin into microvesicles (~150-1000 nm) and exosomes (~40-120 nm). Microvesicles are released by budding from the plasmatic membrane, whereas exosomes are released via the endocytic pathway by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasmatic membrane. This endosomal origin means that exosomes contain an abundance of cell-specific biomolecules which may act as a 'fingerprint' of the cell of origin. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, particularly the potential role of EVs in these facets of disease management. In particular, we suggest that as exosomes contain cellular protein and RNA molecules in a cell type-specific manner, they may provide extensive information about the signature of the tumour and pancreatic cancer progression.

  13. A rare case of metastasized non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with a good long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Mirică, A; Bădărău, IA; Mirică, R; Păun, S; Păun, DL

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-functional neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (NF-pNETs) are a varied group of extremely rare malignancies. The majority of patients already have liver metastases at the diagnosis moment, thus, treatment options are restricted, and the survival rate is reserved. Case report: We presented the case of 59-year-old patient, diagnosed with non-functional well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor grade II (NET G2) with the presence of chromogranin A, synaptophysin and somatostatin receptor 2, together with liver and bone metastases. Patient underwent a surgical excision of the pancreatic tumor, started long-acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide), interferon therapy for liver metastases and local radiotherapy for bone metastases. After one year, the patient developed diabetes, needing insulin therapy. At approximately three years after the diagnosis, the patient was still living, had a good quality of life, and was free of local recurrence of the tumor or other metastases. Conclusion: Our case report presented a rare case of metastatic non-functional well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, involving a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach in order to obtain a good long-term survival. PMID:27928440

  14. Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; SUZUKI, YOSHIAKI; KYO, BUNSO; SUZUKI, SATORU; MATSUDO, TAKAAKI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO; AOKI, TATSUYA

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:22969935

  15. Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kyo, Bunso; Suzuki, Satoru; Matsudo, Takaaki; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya

    2012-04-01

    We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  16. A rare case of metastasized non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with a good long-term survival.

    PubMed

    A, Mirică; Ia, Bădărău; R, Mirică; S, Păun; Dl, Păun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-functional neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (NF-pNETs) are a varied group of extremely rare malignancies. The majority of patients already have liver metastases at the diagnosis moment, thus, treatment options are restricted, and the survival rate is reserved. Case report: We presented the case of 59-year-old patient, diagnosed with non-functional well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor grade II (NET G2) with the presence of chromogranin A, synaptophysin and somatostatin receptor 2, together with liver and bone metastases. Patient underwent a surgical excision of the pancreatic tumor, started long-acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide), interferon therapy for liver metastases and local radiotherapy for bone metastases. After one year, the patient developed diabetes, needing insulin therapy. At approximately three years after the diagnosis, the patient was still living, had a good quality of life, and was free of local recurrence of the tumor or other metastases. Conclusion: Our case report presented a rare case of metastatic non-functional well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, involving a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach in order to obtain a good long-term survival.

  17. Efficacy of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor grading

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Takagi, Tadayuki; Hikichi, Takuto; Suzuki, Rei; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Konno, Naoki; Waragai, Yuichi; Asama, Hiroyuki; Takasumi, Mika; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for grading pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). METHODS: A total of 22 patients were diagnosed with PNET by EUS-FNA between October 2001 and December 2013 at Fukushima Medical University Hospital. Among these cases, we targeted 10 PNET patients who were evaluated according to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2010 classification. Surgery was performed in eight patients, and chemotherapy was performed in two patients due to multiple liver metastases.Specimens obtained by EUS-FNA were first stained with hematoxylin and eosin and then stained with chromogranin, synaptophysin, CD56, and Ki-67. The specimens were graded by the Ki-67 index according to the WHO 2010 classification. Specimens obtained by surgery were graded by the Ki-67 index and mitotic count (WHO 2010 classification). For the eight specimens obtained by EUS-FNA, the Ki-67 index results were compared with those obtained by surgery. In the two cases treated with chemotherapy, the effects and prognoses were evaluated. RESULTS: The sampling rate for histological diagnosis by EUS-FNA was 100%. No adverse effects were observed. The concordance rate between specimens obtained by EUS-FNA and surgery was 87.5% (7/8). For the two cases treated with chemotherapy, case 1 received somatostatin analog therapy and transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) targeting multiple liver metastases. Subsequent treatment consisted of everolimus. During chemotherapy, the primary tumor remained unconfirmed, although the multiple liver metastases diminished dramatically. Case 2 was classified as neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) according to the Ki-67 index of a specimen obtained by EUS-FNA; therefore, cisplatin and irinotecan therapy was started. However, severe adverse effects, including renal failure and diarrhea, were observed, and the therapy regimen was changed to cisplatin and etoposide. TAI targeting multiple liver

  18. Pasireotide and octreotide antiproliferative effects and sst2 trafficking in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cultures.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amira; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Albertelli, Manuela; Barbieri, Federica; Brue, Thierry; Niccoli, Patricia; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Garcia, Stephane; Ferone, Diego; Florio, Tullio; Enjalbert, Alain; Moutardier, Vincent; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Gerard, Corinne; Barlier, Anne; Saveanu, Alexandru

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) raise difficult therapeutic problems despite the emergence of targeted therapies. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) remain pivotal therapeutic drugs. However, the tachyphylaxis and the limited antitumoral effects observed with the classical somatostatin 2 (sst2) agonists (octreotide and lanreotide) led to the development of new SSA, such as the pan sst receptor agonist pasireotide. Our aim was to compare the effects of pasireotide and octreotide on cell survival, chromogranin A (CgA) secretion, and sst2 phosphorylation/trafficking in pancreatic NET (pNET) primary cells from 15 tumors. We established and characterized the primary cultures of human pancreatic tumors (pNETs) as powerful preclinical models for understanding the biological effects of SSA. At clinically relevant concentrations (1-10 nM), pasireotide was at least as efficient as octreotide in inhibiting CgA secretion and cell viability through caspase-dependent apoptosis during short treatments, irrespective of the expression levels of the different sst receptors or the WHO grade of the parental tumor. Interestingly, unlike octreotide, which induces a rapid and persistent partial internalization of sst2 associated with its phosphorylation on Ser341/343, pasireotide did not phosphorylate sst2 and induced a rapid and transient internalization of the receptor followed by a persistent recycling at the cell surface. These results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of striking differences in the dynamics of sst2 trafficking in pNET cells treated with the two SSAs, but with similar efficiency in the control of CgA secretion and cell viability.

  19. Targeting Focal Adhesion Kinase and Resistance to mTOR Inhibition in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    François, Rony A.; Maeng, Kyungah; Nawab, Akbar; Kaye, Frederic J.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Zajac-Kaye, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates survival of normal pancreatic islets through activation of AKT. Upon malignant transformation of islet cells into pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), AKT is frequently overexpressed and mutations in the AKT/mTOR pathway are detected. Because mTOR inhibitors rarely induce PanNET tumor regression, partly because of feedback activation of AKT, novel combination strategies are needed to target FAK/AKT/mTOR signaling. Methods: We characterized the activation of FAK in PanNETs using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis and tested the FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 in human PanNET cells in vitro and in vivo (at least three mice per group). In addition, we evaluated the effect of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition on PanNET viability and apoptosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We found that FAK is overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in human PanNETs and that PF-04554878 strongly inhibited FAK (Tyr397) autophosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. We found that PF-04554878 inhibited cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in PanNET cells. Moreover, oral administration of PF-04554878 statistically significantly reduced tumor growth in a patient-derived xenograft model of PanNET (P = .02) and in a human PanNET xenograft model of peritoneal carcinomatosis (P = .03). Importantly, PF-04554878 synergized with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus by preventing feedback AKT activation. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that FAK is overexpressed in PanNETs and that inhibition of FAK activity induces apoptosis and inhibits PanNET proliferation. We found that the novel FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 synergizes with everolimus, a US Food and Drug Administration–approved agent for PanNETs. Our findings warrant the clinical investigation of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition in PanNETs. PMID:25971297

  20. p53 status determines the role of autophagy in pancreatic tumour development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeldt, Mathias T.; O'Prey, Jim; Morton, Jennifer P.; Nixon, Colin; Mackay, Gillian; Mrowinska, Agata; Au, Amy; Rai, Taranjit Singh; Zheng, Liang; Ridgway, Rachel; Adams, Peter D.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Sansom, Owen J.; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a process in which organelles termed autophagosomes deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy has a major role in cellular homeostasis and has been implicated in various forms of human disease. The role of autophagy in cancer seems to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumour-suppressive roles. Here we show, in a humanized genetically-modified mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), that autophagy's role in tumour development is intrinsically connected to the status of the tumour suppressor p53. Mice with pancreases containing an activated oncogenic allele of Kras (also called Ki-Ras)--the most common mutational event in PDAC--develop a small number of pre-cancerous lesions that stochastically develop into PDAC over time. However, mice also lacking the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7 accumulate low-grade, pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, but progression to high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias and PDAC is blocked. In marked contrast, in mice containing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53, loss of autophagy no longer blocks tumour progression, but actually accelerates tumour onset, with metabolic analysis revealing enhanced glucose uptake and enrichment of anabolic pathways, which can fuel tumour growth. These findings provide considerable insight into the role of autophagy in cancer and have important implications for autophagy inhibition in cancer therapy. In this regard, we also show that treatment of mice with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine, which is currently being used in several clinical trials, significantly accelerates tumour formation in mice containing oncogenic Kras but lacking p53.

  1. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. Targeted Therapies Provide Treatment Options for Poorly Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gilabert, Marine; Rho, Young Soo; Kavan, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PD pNECs) is a rare disease that has a poor prognosis and is treated with systemic chemotherapy as the standard of care. We present 6 cases of chemo-naïve patients diagnosed with PD pNECs who refused systemic chemotherapy and received targeted therapies with sunitinib (37.5 mg/day, 5 patients) or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus (10 mg/day, 1 patient) as the first-line treatment. We evaluated the drugs' toxicities and survival. The median age of the patients was 55 years (4 males, 2 females, functioning tumor in 1 of 6 patients). The median of the Ki67 index was 45% (range 20-80). Targeted therapies were combined with somatostatin analogues in 4 of 6 patients (30 mg Sandostatine LAR monthly). Toxicities (acute and late) were manageable and no toxicities necessitated cessation of treatment. All patients had progression-free survival during the 15-month treatment and an overall survival of more than 2 years after diagnosis. Even though this is a small cohort of selected patients, we conclude that sunitinib or everolimus are both feasible and safe and have encouraging results of efficacy as first-line therapies for PD pNEC.

  3. Heterogeneity for IGF-II production maintained by public goods dynamics in neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Archetti, Marco; Ferraro, Daniela A; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-02-10

    The extensive intratumor heterogeneity revealed by sequencing cancer genomes is an essential determinant of tumor progression, diagnosis, and treatment. What maintains heterogeneity remains an open question because competition within a tumor leads to a strong selection for the fittest subclone. Cancer cells also cooperate by sharing molecules with paracrine effects, such as growth factors, and heterogeneity can be maintained if subclones depend on each other for survival. Without strict interdependence between subclones, however, nonproducer cells can free-ride on the growth factors produced by neighboring producer cells, a collective action problem known in game theory as the "tragedy of the commons," which has been observed in microbial cell populations. Here, we report that similar dynamics occur in cancer cell populations. Neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer (insulinoma) cells that do not produce insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) grow slowly in pure cultures but have a proliferation advantage in mixed cultures, where they can use the IGF-II provided by producer cells. We show that, as predicted by evolutionary game theory, producer cells do not go extinct because IGF-II acts as a nonlinear public good, creating negative frequency-dependent selection that leads to a stable coexistence of the two cell types. Intratumor cell heterogeneity can therefore be maintained even without strict interdependence between cell subclones. Reducing the amount of growth factors available within a tumor may lead to a reduction in growth followed by a new equilibrium, which may explain relapse in therapies that target growth factors.

  4. Epidrug-induced upregulation of functional somatostatin type 2 receptors in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Marije J; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Dogan, Fadime; Farrell, William E; Feelders, Richard A; Lamberts, Steven W J; de Herder, Wouter W; Vitale, Giovanni; Hofland, Leo J

    2016-05-19

    Somatostatin receptors are a pivotal target for treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), either with somatostatin analogues (SSA) or radiolabeled SSA. The highest affinity target for the most commonly used SSA is the somatostatin receptor type 2 (sst2). An important factor that may complicate treatment efficacy, is the variable number of receptors expressed on pNETs. Gene expression is subject to complex regulation, in which epigenetics has a central role. In this study we explored the possible role of epigenetic modifications in the variations in sst2 expression levels in two human pNET cell lines, BON-1 and QGP-1. We found upregulation of sst2 mRNA after treatment with the epidrugs 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and valproic acid (VPA), an increased uptake of radiolabeled octreotide, as well as increased sensitivity to the SSA octreotide in functional cAMP inhibition. At epigenetic level we observed low methylation levels of the sst2 gene promoter region irrespective of expression. Activating histone mark H3K9Ac can be regulated with epidrug treatment, with an angle of effect corresponding to the effect on mRNA expression. Repressive histone mark H3K27me3 is not regulated by either 5-aza-dC or VPA. We conclude that epidrug treatment, in particular with combined 5-aza-dC and VPA treatment, might hold promise for improving and adding to current SSA treatment strategies of patients with pNETs.

  5. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm: Key immunohistochemical profiles for differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Satomi, Kaishi; Morishita, Yukio; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To reveal better diagnostic markers for differentiating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) from solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN), focusing primarily on immunohistochemical analysis. METHODS We reviewed 30 pancreatic surgical specimens of NET (24 cases) and SPN (6 cases). We carried out comprehensive immunohistochemical profiling using 9 markers: Synaptophysin, chromogranin A, pan-cytokeratin, E-cadherin, progesterone receptor, vimentin, α-1-antitrypsin, CD10, and β-catenin. RESULTS E-cadherin staining in NETs, and nuclear labeling of β-catenin in SPNs were the most sensitive and specific markers. Dot-like staining of chromogranin A might indicate the possibility of SPNs rather than NETs. The other six markers were not useful because their expression overlapped widely between NETs and SPNs. Moreover, two cases that had been initially diagnosed as NETs on the basis of their morphological features, demonstrated SPN-like immunohistochemical profiles. Careful diagnosis is crucial as we actually found two confusing cases showing disagreement between the tumor morphology and immunohistochemical profiles. CONCLUSION E-cadherin, chromogranin A, and β-catenin were the most useful markers which should be employed for differentiating between NET and SPN. PMID:27784972

  6. A case of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with neurofibromatosis-1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) sometime develop neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Although these NETs usually occur in the duodenum or peri-ampullary region, they occasionally grow in the pancreas (PNET). A 62-year-old man with NF-1 had mild liver dysfunction and was admitted to our hospital for further examination. An abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan demonstrated a 30-mm tumor in the head of the pancreas. The scan showed an invasion of the tumor into the duodenum, and biopsy under an endoscopic ultrasonography indicated that the tumor was a NET. A subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Macroscopically, the pancreatic tumor was white and elastic hard. Microscopically, tumor cells were composed of ribbons, cords, and solid nests with an acinus-like structure. The tumor was diagnosed as NET G2 according to the WHO classification (2010). The product of theNF-1 gene, i.e., neurofibromin, was weakly positive in the tumor cells, suggesting that the tumor was induced by a mutation in the NF-1 gene. This is the seventh case of PNET arising in NF-1 patients worldwide. PMID:22824559

  7. Role of nitric oxide in pancreatic tumour growth: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed Central

    Hajri, A.; Metzger, E.; Vallat, F.; Coffy, S.; Flatter, E.; Evrard, S.; Marescaux, J.; Aprahamian, M.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous free radical, has been implicated in a wide range of biological functions. NO is generated enzymatically from the terminal guanidinonitrogen of L-arginine by nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Despite intensive investigations, the role of NO--either as the primary product of the L-arginine/NOS pathway or provided from the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP)--in carcinogenesis and tumour cell growth remains unclear and controversial. The objective of this study was to examine the growth effects of NO on a ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the rat and on a human pancreatic tumour cell line (HA-hpc2). In vivo, both SNP and endogenous induction of NO by endotoxins [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] plus L-arginine significantly reduced the tumour growth. To investigate the mechanisms of NO anti-tumour growth action, the effects of either the SNP or L-arginine/NOS pathway were analysed on the HA-hpc2 cell line. Nitrite/nitrate production, NOS activity and iNOS expression [assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)] were tested and related to growth (assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation assay) and apoptosis (assessed by internucleosomal DNA cleavage). SNP exerted a dual effect on tumour cells: stimulation of the proliferation up to 1 mM and inhibition at higher concentrations. These effects were related to NO production. Both proliferative and cytostatic responses were inhibited by NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-hemidazoline-1-oxyl3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). The marked apoptotic DNA fragmentation induced by SNP was also abolished by PTIO association. Unlike macrophages, the human pancreatic tumour cells did not seem to express intrinsically the L-arginine/NOS pathway. Macrophages were activated by HA-hpc2 cells as well as by LPS plus cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta plus tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma]. In HA-hpc2/macrophage co-cultures, NOS activity and inducible NOS (i

  8. Cousins not twins: intra and inter-tumoral heterogeneity in syndromic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Aidan; Dwight, Trisha; Benn, Diana; Deb, Siddhartha; Colebatch, Andrew J; Fox, Stephen; Harris, Jessica; Duncan, Emma L; Robinson, Bruce; Hogg, Annette; Ellul, Jason; To, Henry; Duong, Cuong; Miller, Julie A; Yates, Christopher; James, Paul; Trainer, Alison; Gill, Anthony J; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Hicks, Rodney J; Tothill, Richard W

    2017-03-31

    Hereditary endocrine neoplasias, including phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma and medullary thyroid cancer, are caused by autosomal dominant mutations in several familial cancer genes. A common feature of these diseases is the presentation of multiple primary tumours, or multifocal disease representing independent tumour clones that have arisen from the same initiating genetic lesion, but have undergone independent clonal evolution. Such tumours provide an opportunity to discover common co-operative changes required for tumorigenesis, while controlling for the genetic background of the individual. We performed genomic analysis of synchronous and metachronous tumours from five patients bearing germline mutations in the genes SDHB, RET and MAX. Using whole exome sequencing and high-density SNP arrays, we analyzed two to four primary tumours from each patient. We also applied multi-regional sampling, to assess intra-tumoral heterogeneity and clonal evolution, in two cases involving phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma and medullary thyroid cancer, respectively. Heterogeneous patterns of genomic change existed between synchronous or metachronous tumours, with evidence of branching evolution. We observed striking examples of evolutionary convergence involving the same rare somatic copy-number events in synchronous primary phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma. Convergent events also occurred during clonal evolution of metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. These observations suggest that genetic or epigenetic changes acquired early within precursor cells, or pre-existing within the genetic background of the individual, create contingencies that determine the evolutionary trajectory of the tumour.

  9. The prognostic influence of the proliferative discordance in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma revealed by peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Montanier, Nathanaëlle; Joubert-Zakeyh, Juliette; Pétorin, Caroline; Montoriol, Pierre François; Maqdasy, Salwan; Kelly, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare slowly growing tumors with a high metastatic potential. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with radiolabeled analogues has been developed as a new tool for the management of metastatic well-differentiated (grade 1 and 2) neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptor (SSTR2). Chemotherapy is the mainstay in the management of grade 3 (G3) unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (pNEC). To date, no study has evaluated the efficacy of PRRT in such tumors. Diagnoses and interventions: We describe a case of a progressive G3 pNEC with huge liver metastases successfully treated with PRRT (177Lu DOTATATE). Outcomes: Complete remission was obtained for 3 years. Indeed, the mitotic index was low (as G2 tumors) but with a very high Ki-67 index (45%–70%). Such discordance between the proliferative markers should consider the use of PRRT before chemotherapy in unresectable metastatic G3 tumors expressing SSTR2. Lessons: This case supports the hypotheses highlighting the heterogeneity of G3 pNEC. The latter should be subdivided into 2 distinct categories: proliferation-discordant (well differentiated) and concordant (poorly differentiated) NEC. PRRT could be suggested for the former group before the conventional chemotherapy. PMID:28178157

  10. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms at magnetic resonance imaging: comparison between grade 3 and grade 1/2 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuangen; Chen, Xiao; Xiao, Wenbo; Wang, Qidong; Sun, Ke; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2017-01-01

    Background The grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) is associated with the choice of treatment strategy. The aim of this study is to identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in differentiating pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) grade 1/2 (G1/G2) and pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma grade 3 (PanNEC G3). Patients and methods A total of 59 patients with histologically proven PanNENs and who underwent pretreatment MRI were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor location, size, boundary, cystic or solid appearance, enhancement degree, pancreatic duct dilatation, metastases and MRI signal were evaluated. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured on ADC maps. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the cut off values and the sensitivity and specificity of prediction. Spearman correlation and logistic regression analysis were adopted to identify the association between MRI features and pathological parameters. Results A total of 47 lesions were PanNETs G1/G2 and 12 lesions were PanNEC G3. G1/G2 tumors were more common with well-circumscribed border compared with PanNEC G3. Ill- defined boundary, big size, necrosis, low-moderate enhancement, pancreatic duct dilatation, metastases and high diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) intensity were more common in PanNEC G3 than in PanNETs G1/G2. The ADC values of PanNEC G3 were also significantly lower compared with the PanNETs G1/G2 and normal pancreatic parenchyma. The cut off value of ADC was 0.95×10−3 mm2/s for differentiating PanNEC G3 from PanNETs G1/G2 with 72.3% sensitivity and 91.6% specificity, respectively. Ki-67 index and mitosis count positively correlated with tumor size, pancreatic duct dilatation and metastases (P<0.05) and negatively correlated with ADC values (P<0.01), respectively. Regression analysis further showed that metastases and ADC value were associated with PanNENs grade. Conclusion Metastases and ADC value may have potential for

  11. Pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a bleeding duodenal mass

    PubMed Central

    Wegge, Jacqueline; Bartholomew, David M; Burke, Leandra H; Miller, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 55-year-old man presenting to our institution with a gastrointestinal bleed. He was found to have a 5 cm pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumours (EGISTs) eroding into the duodenum and ampulla of Vater. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and the tumour was noted to be positive for CD117 and CD34 with six mitotic figures per 50/high-powered field. At 5 months postoperatively he is receiving treatment with imatinib and doing well. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is only the 18th case reported in the literature to date. PMID:23087281

  12. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  13. Periampullary mass--a rare presentation of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer of duodenum in a young adult: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Nayak, Hemanta K; Bagchi, Avishek; Kar, Premashis

    2012-10-09

    Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour in the periampullary region of the duodenum is a rare entity. This entity usually present in old men. Here we report a periampullary poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer (PDEC) of duodenum presenting in a young man with subacute history of jaundice, abdominal pain, pancreatitis and constitutional symptoms. MRI localised the tumour and endoscopy-guided biopsy of the lesion proved the diagnosis. Although palliative surgery and chemotherapy were planned, the patient opted to leave against medical advice.

  14. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-02-16

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis.

  15. Whole-exome characterization of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell lines BON-1 and QGP-1.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Timon; Peeters, Marc; Dogan, Fadime; Pauwels, Patrick; Van Assche, Elvire; Beyens, Matthias; Mortier, Geert; Vandeweyer, Geert; de Herder, Wouter; Van Camp, Guy; Hofland, Leo J; Op de Beeck, Ken

    2015-04-01

    The human BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines are two frequently used models in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) research. Data on the whole-exome genetic constitution of these cell lines is largely lacking. This study presents, to our knowledge, the first whole-exome profile of the BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines. Cell line identity was confirmed by short tandem repeat profiling. Using GTG-banding and a CytoSNP-12v2 Beadchip array, cell line ploidy and chromosomal alterations were determined in BON-1 and QGP-1. The exomes of both cell lines were sequenced on Ilumina's HiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform. Single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertions and deletions (indels) were detected using the Genome Analysis ToolKit. SNVs were validated by Sanger sequencing. Ploidy of BON-1 and QGP-1 was 3 and 4 respectively, with long stretches of loss of heterozygosity across multiple chromosomes, which is associated with aggressive tumor behavior. In BON-1, 57 frameshift indels and 1725 possible protein-altering SNVs were identified in the NGS data. In the QGP-1 cell line, 56 frameshift indels and 1095 SNVs were identified. ATRX, a PNET-associated gene, was mutated in both cell lines, while mutation of TSC2 was detected in BON-1. A mutation in NRAS was detected in BON-1, while KRAS was mutated in QGP-1, implicating aberrations in the RAS pathway in both cell lines. Homozygous mutations in TP53 with possible loss of function were identified in both cell lines. Various MUC genes, implicated in cell signaling, lubrication and chemical barriers, which are frequently expressed in PNET tissue samples, showed homozygous protein-altering SNVs in the BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines.

  16. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K.; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P.; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis. PMID:26831065

  17. Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor that Progressed to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Syndrome with Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) Production

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Rie; Sato, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fumiko; Ueno, Makoto; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Katakami, Hideki; Taniyama, Matsuo; Nagasaka, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who had a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with lymph node metastasis. After 15 months of octreotide treatment, glucose control deteriorated and pigmentation of the tongue and moon face developed, leading to the diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. An abnormal secretion of growth hormone (GH) was identified, and the plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) level was elevated. A tumor biopsy specimen positively immunostained for ACTH and GHRH. Ectopic hormone secretion seems to have evolved along with the progression of the PNET. PMID:27746436

  18. Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor that Progressed to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Syndrome with Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) Production.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Rie; Sato, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fumiko; Ueno, Makoto; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Katakami, Hideki; Taniyama, Matsuo; Nagasaka, Shoichiro

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who had a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with lymph node metastasis. After 15 months of octreotide treatment, glucose control deteriorated and pigmentation of the tongue and moon face developed, leading to the diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. An abnormal secretion of growth hormone (GH) was identified, and the plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) level was elevated. A tumor biopsy specimen positively immunostained for ACTH and GHRH. Ectopic hormone secretion seems to have evolved along with the progression of the PNET.

  19. A pilot study to explore circulating tumour cells in pancreatic cancer as a novel biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, L; Backen, A; Sloane, R; Menasce, L; Ryder, D; Krebs, M; Board, R; Clack, G; Hughes, A; Blackhall, F; Valle, J W; Dive, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obtaining tissue for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis and biomarker assessment to aid drug development is challenging. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) may represent a potential biomarker to address these unmet needs. We compared prospectively the utility of two platforms for CTC enumeration and characterisation in pancreatic cancer patients in a pilot exploratory study. Patients and methods: Blood samples were obtained prospectively from 54 consenting patients and analysed by CellSearch and isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET). CellSearch exploits immunomagnetic capture of CTCs-expressing epithelial markers, whereas ISET is a marker independent, blood filtration device. Circulating tumour cell expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was assessed to explore any discrepancy in CTC number between the two platforms. Results: ISET detected CTCs in more patients than CellSearch (93% vs 40%) and in higher numbers (median CTCs/7.5 ml, 9 (range 0–240) vs 0 (range 0–144)). Heterogeneity observed for epithelial cell adhesion molecule, pan-cytokeratin (CK), E-Cadherin, Vimentin and CK 7 expression in CTCs may account for discrepancy in CTC number between platforms. Conclusion: ISET detects more CTCs than CellSearch and offers flexible CTC characterisation with potential to investigate CTC biology and develop biomarkers for pancreatic cancer patient management. PMID:22187035

  20. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: Magnetic resonance imaging features according to grade and stage

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Cingarlini, Sara; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Ortolani, Silvia; Butturini, Giovanni; Landoni, Luca; Regi, Paolo; Girelli, Roberto; Capelli, Paola; Gobbo, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    AIM To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) according to their grade and tumor-nodes-metastases stage by comparing them to histopathology and to determine the accuracy of MR imaging features in predicting their biological behavior. METHODS This study was approved by our institutional review board; requirement for informed patient consent was waived due to the retrospective nature of the study. Preoperative MR examinations of 55 PanNEN patients (29 men, 26 women; mean age of 57.6 years, range 21-83 years) performed between June 2013 and December 2015 were reviewed. Qualitative and quantitative features were compared between tumor grades and stages determined by histopathological analysis. RESULTS Ill defined margins were more common in G2-3 and stage III-IV PanNENs than in G1 and low-stage tumors (P < 0.001); this feature had high specificity in the identification of G2-3 and stage III-IV tumors (90.3% and 96%, 95%CI: 73.1-97.5 and 77.7-99.8). The mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly lower in G2-3 and stage III-IV lesions compared to well differentiated and low-stage tumors (1.09 × 10-3 mm2/s vs 1.45 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.10 × 10-3 mm2/s vs 1.53 × 10-3 mm2/s, P = 0.003 and 0.001). Receiving operator characteristic analysis determined optimal cut-offs of 1.21 and 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s for the identification of G2-3 and stage III-IV tumors, with sensitivity and specificity values of 70.8/80.7% and 64.5/64% (95%CI: 48.7-86.6/60-92.7 and 45.4-80.2/42.6-81.3). CONCLUSION MR features of PanNENs vary according to their grade of differentiation and their stage at diagnosis and could predict the biological behavior of these tumors. PMID:28127201

  1. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Willett, Christopher G.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Deshpande, Vikram; Niemierko, Andrzej; Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  2. Long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in 78 Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single-center retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lingaku; Igarashi, Hisato; Fujimori, Nao; Hijioka, Masayuki; Kawabe, Ken; Oda, Yoshinao; Jensen, Robert T.; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite an increase in the number of Japanese patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, long-term outcomes and prognostic factors, especially for those with advanced disease, remain unclear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 78 patients with unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms treated at our hospital from January 1987 to March 2015. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Prognostic significance of several clinicopathological factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses using a Cox regression model. Results Median overall survivals of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (n = 64) and pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (n = 14) were 83.7 and 9.1 months, respectively (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.01–0.08, P < 0.001). Although no significant differences were observed using a Ki-67 cut-off value of 2% (hazard ratio: 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.16–1.13, P = 0.0989), a Ki-67 cut-off of 10% was a significant predictor in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (hazard ratio: 9.95, 95% confidence interval, 3.01–32.97, P < 0.001). Treatment after the advent of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.03–0.19, P < 0.001) and the presence of bone metastases (hazard ratio: 4.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.42–11.29, P = 0.013) were significant prognostic factors in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor evaluated by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis also revealed that a Ki-67 index ≥10% (hazard ratio: 38.8, 95% confidence interval: 8.42–226.62, P < 0.001), approval of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.00–0.11, P < 0.001) and bone metastases (hazard ratio: 5.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–24.00, P = 0.039) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions We elucidated the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic

  3. Cisplatin and Etoposide or Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Gastrointestinal Tract or Pancreas That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Colorectal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gallbladder Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Pancreatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Small Intestinal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

  4. [177Lu-DOTA]0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (177Lu-DOTATOC) For Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumours: A Phase-II Study

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Richard P.; Kluge, Andreas W.; Kulkarni, Harshad; Schorr-Neufing, Ulrike; Niepsch, Karin; Bitterlich, Norman; van Echteld, Cees J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterise efficacy and safety of 177Lu-DOTATOC as agent for peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT) of advanced neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Patients and methods: Fifty-six subjects with metastasized and progressive NET (50% gastroenteral, 26.8% pancreatic, 23.2% other primary sites) treated consecutively with 177Lu-DOTATOC were analysed retrospectively. Subjects were administered 177Lu-DOTATOC (mean 2.1 cycles; range 1-4) as 7.0GBq (median) doses at three-monthly intervals. Efficacy was analysed using CT and/or MRI according to RECIST 1.1 criteria and results were stratified for the number of administered cycles and the primary tumour origin. Results: In the total NET population (A), median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 17.4 and 34.2 months, respectively, assessed in a follow-up time (mean ± SD) of 16.1 ± 12.4 months. In patients receiving more than one cycle, mean follow-up time was 22.4 ± 11.0 months for all NETs (B) and PFS was 32.0 months for all NETs (B), 34.5 months for GEP-NET (C), and 11.9 months for other NETs (D). Objective response rates (Complete/Partial Responses) were 33.9%, 40.6%, 54.2%, and 0% for A, B, C, and D groups, respectively, while disease control rates in the same were 66.1%, 93.8%, 100%, and 75%. Complete responses (16.1%, 18.8% and 25.0% for groups A, B and C) were high, 78% of which were maintained throughout the follow up. There were no serious adverse events. One case of self-limiting grade 3 myelotoxicity was reported. Although 20% of patients had mild renal insufficiency at baseline, there was no evidence of exacerbated or de novo renal toxicity after treatment. Conclusion: 177Lu-DOTATOC is a novel agent for PRRT with major potential to induce objective tumour responses and sustained disease control in progressive neuroendocrine tumours, even when administered in moderate activities. The observed safety profile suggests a particularly favourable therapeutic index, including in patients with

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of inflammatory response gene TNF-α and its influence on sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors predisposition risk.

    PubMed

    Karakaxas, Dimitrios; Gazouli, Maria; Coker, Ahmet; Agalianos, Christos; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Patapis, Pavlos; Liakakos, Theodoros; Dervenis, Christos

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosed incidence of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) is increasing; however, their etiology remains poorly understood. PNETs are a rare, heterogeneous group of tumors arising from the endocrine cells of the pancreas, and genetic risk factors for sporadic pNETs are inadequately understood. It is known that pNETs secrete biogenic amines, hormones and growth factors, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) being one of them. Furthermore, cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators have been implicated in inflammatory pancreatic diseases including pancreatitis and cancer. The aim of our study was to analyze TNF-α promoter gene polymorphisms as risk factors for pNETs using germline DNA collected in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer [42 pNET cases, 78 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases, 17 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 98 healthy controls] conducted in the Athens, Greece and Izmir, Turkey areas. For subsequent analysis, we excluded cases and controls with known genetic syndromes. The CC genotype at the -1031 position was more frequent in pNET and IPMN patients (p=0.0002 and p=0.009, respectively), suggesting its possible role in pNET development. Furthermore, the AA genotype at the -308 position was overrepresented in IPMN cases (p=0.03), and AA genotype at the -238 position was more frequent in PDAC cases (p=0.03) compared to healthy individuals. With regard to tumor characteristics, no statistically significant association was detected. Our findings suggest the putative role of TNF-α -1031 polymorphism in the development of pNET and IPMN, whereas the -308 polymorphism seems to be overrepresented among IPMN cases and -238 polymorphism among PDAC cases.

  6. In vivo imaging of pancreatic tumours and liver metastases using 7 Tesla MRI in a murine orthotopic pancreatic cancer model and a liver metastases model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of tumour death in the western world. However, appropriate tumour models are scarce. Here we present a syngeneic murine pancreatic cancer model using 7 Tesla MRI and evaluate its clinical relevance and applicability. Methods 6606PDA murine pancreatic cancer cells were orthotopically injected into the pancreatic head. Liver metastases were induced through splenic injection. Animals were analyzed by MRI three and five weeks following injection. Tumours were detected using T2-weighted high resolution sequences. Tumour volumes were determined by callipers and MRI. Liver metastases were analyzed using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA and T1-weighted 3D-Flash sequences. Tumour blood flow was measured using low molecular gadobutrol and high molecular gadolinium-DTPA. Results MRI handling and applicability was similar to human systems, resolution as low as 0.1 mm. After 5 weeks tumour volumes differed significantly (p < 0.01) when comparing calliper measurments (n = 5, mean 1065 mm3+/-243 mm3) with MRI (mean 918 mm3+/-193 mm3) with MRI being more precise. Histology (n = 5) confirmed MRI tumour measurements (mean size MRI 38.5 mm2+/-22.8 mm2 versus 32.6 mm2+/-22.6 mm2 (histology), p < 0,0004) with differences due to fixation and processing of specimens. After splenic injection all mice developed liver metastases with a mean of 8 metastases and a mean volume of 173.8 mm3+/-56.7 mm3 after 5 weeks. Lymphnodes were also easily identified. Tumour accumulation of gadobutrol was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than gadolinium-DTPA. All imaging experiments could be done repeatedly to comply with the 3R-principle thus reducing the number of experimental animals. Conclusions This model permits monitoring of tumour growth and metastasis formation in longitudinal non-invasive high-resolution MR studies including using contrast agents comparable to human pancreatic cancer. This multidisciplinary environment enables radiologists, surgeons and

  7. Genetic deletion of the desmosomal component desmoplakin promotes tumor microinvasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chun, Matthew G H; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-09-16

    We used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2) mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to profile the transcriptome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) that were either non-invasive or highly invasive, seeking to identify pro- and anti-invasive molecules. Expression of multiple components of desmosomes, structures that help maintain cellular adhesion, was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas. Genetic deletion of one of these desmosomal components, desmoplakin, resulted in increased local tumor invasion without affecting tumor growth parameters in RT2 PNETs. Expression of cadherin 1, a component of the adherens junction adhesion complex, was maintained in these tumors despite the genetic deletion of desmoplakin. Our results demonstrate that loss of desmoplakin expression and resultant disruption of desmosomal adhesion can promote increased local tumor invasion independent of adherens junction status.

  8. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  9. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-11-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected.

  10. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; TANAKA, HIROAKI; OHTA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO

    2011-01-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected. PMID:22977618

  11. Safety and efficacy of doxorubicin-eluting superabsorbent polymer microspheres for the treatment of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumours: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Verslype, Chris; Laenen, Annouschka; Cornelissen, Sandra; Deroose, Christophe M.; Prenen, Hans; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Van Cutsem, Eric; Maleux, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the symptom control, tumour response, and complication rate in patients with liver-predominant metastatic neuroendocrine tumours treated with transarterial chemoembolization using doxorubicin-eluting superabsorbent polymer (SAP) microspheres. Patients and methods Patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases who underwent hepatic transarterial chemoembolization using doxorubicin-eluting SAP-microspheres (50–100 μm Hepasphere/Quadrasphere Microsphere® particles, Merit Medical, South Jordan, Utah, USA) were included in this study. Pre-and post-procedure imaging studies were evaluated to assess short and intermediate-term tumour response using modified RECIST criteria. Symptom relief and procedure-related complications were evaluated. Results A total of 27 embolization procedures were performed on 17 patients. Twelve of 17 patients (70%) were symptomatic, including carcinoid syndrome (n = 8) and severe, uncontrollable hypoglycemia (n = 4). Eight of 12 patients (67%) had complete symptom relief, and the remaining 4 (33%) had partial relief. One patient developed ischemic cholecystitis (6%). No other hepatobiliary complications occurred. Short-term and intermediate-term imaging follow-up was available for 15/17 patients (88%) and 12/14 patients (86%) respectively. At short-term follow-up (< 3 months), 14 patients (93%) showed partial response and the remaining patient had progressive disease (7%). At intermediate-term imaging follow-up (> 3 months), partial response, stable disease and progressive disease were found respectively in 7 (58%), 3 (25%) and 2 (17%) patients. Conclusions Chemoembolization with doxorubicin-eluting SAP-microspheres is a safe and effective treatment option for neuroendocrine liver metastases and is associated with a low complication rate. In particular, no clinically evident liver necrosis or bile duct complications were encountered. PMID:28265235

  12. Common germline variants within the CDKN2A/2B region affect risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Pastore, Manuela; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Milanetto, Anna Caterina; Landoni, Luca; Maiello, Evaristo; Lawlor, Rita T.; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Funel, Niccola; Gazouli, Maria; De Bonis, Antonio; Klüter, Harald; Rinzivillo, Maria; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Hackert, Thilo; Landi, Stefano; Bugert, Peter; Bambi, Franco; Archibugi, Livia; Scarpa, Aldo; Katzke, Verena; Dervenis, Christos; Liço, Valbona; Furlanello, Sara; Strobel, Oliver; Tavano, Francesca; Basso, Daniela; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pasquali, Claudio; Gentiluomo, Manuel; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are heterogeneous neoplasms which represent only 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms by incidence, but 10% by prevalence. Genetic risk factors could have an important role in the disease aetiology, however only a small number of case control studies have been performed yet. To further our knowledge, we genotyped 13 SNPs belonging to the pleiotropic CDKN2A/B gene region in 320 PNET cases and 4436 controls, the largest study on the disease so far. We observed a statistically significant association between the homozygotes for the minor allele of the rs2518719 SNP and an increased risk of developing PNET (ORhom = 2.08, 95% CI 1.05–4.11, p = 0.035). This SNP is in linkage disequilibrium with another polymorphic variant associated with increased risk of several cancer types. In silico analysis suggested that the SNP could alter the sequence recognized by the Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor (NRSF), whose deregulation has been associated with the development of several tumors. The mechanistic link between the allele and the disease has not been completely clarified yet but the epidemiologic evidences that link the DNA region to increased cancer risk are convincing. In conclusion, our results suggest rs2518719 as a pleiotropic CDKN2A variant associated with the risk of developing PNETs. PMID:28008994

  13. Hotspot detection in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: density approximation by α-shape maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. K. K.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Pantanowitz, Liron; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    The grading of neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system is dependent on accurate and reproducible assessment of the proliferation with the tumor, either by counting mitotic figures or counting Ki-67 positive nuclei. At the moment, most pathologists manually identify the hotspots, a practice which is tedious and irreproducible. To better help pathologists, we present an automatic method to detect all potential hotspots in neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system. The method starts by segmenting Ki-67 positive nuclei by entropy based thresholding, followed by detection of centroids for all Ki-67 positive nuclei. Based on geodesic distance, approximated by the nuclei centroids, we compute two maps: an amoeba map and a weighted amoeba map. These maps are later combined to generate the heat map, the segmentation of which results in the hotspots. The method was trained on three and tested on nine whole slide images of neuroendocrine tumors. When evaluated by two expert pathologists, the method reached an accuracy of 92.6%. The current method does not discriminate between tumor, stromal and inflammatory nuclei. The results show that α-shape maps may represent how hotspots are perceived.

  14. Anti-metastatic action of FAK inhibitor OXA-11 in combination with VEGFR-2 signaling blockade in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Ingrid; Gebre, Matthew; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Chen, Debbie; Epstein, David

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to determine the anti-tumor effects of OXA-11, a potent, novel small-molecule amino pyrimidine inhibitor (1.2 pM biochemical IC50) of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). In studies of cancer cell lines, OXA-11 inhibited FAK phosphorylation at phospho-tyrosine 397 with a mechanistic IC50 of 1 nM in TOV21G tumor cells, which translated into functional suppression of proliferation in 3-dimensional culture with an EC50 of 9 nM. Studies of OXA-11 activity in TOV21G tumor-cell xenografts in mice revealed a pharmacodynamic EC50 of 1.8 nM, indicative of mechanistic inhibition of pFAK [Y397] in these tumors. OXA-11 inhibited TOV21G tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner and also potentiated effects of cisplatin on tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro and on tumor growth in mice. Studies of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice revealed OXA-11 suppression of pFAK [Y397] and pFAK [Y861] in tumors and liver. OXA-11 given daily from age 14 to 17 weeks reduced tumor vascularity, invasion, and when given together with the anti-VEGFR-2 antibody DC101 reduced the incidence, abundance, and size of liver metastases. Liver micrometastases were found in 100 % of mice treated with vehicle, 84 % of mice treated with OXA-11, and 79 % of mice treated with DC101 (19–24 mice per group). In contrast, liver micrometastases were found in only 52 % of 21 mice treated with OXA-11 plus DC101, and those present were significantly smaller and less numerous. Together, these findings indicate that OXA-11 is a potent and selective inhibitor of FAK phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. OXA-11 slows tumor growth, potentiates the anti-tumor actions of cisplatin and—when combined with VEGFR-2 blockade—reduces metastasis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in RIP-Tag2 mice. PMID:26445848

  15. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Elevated Tumour Markers Predict Worse Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salmiheimo, Aino; Mustonen, Harri; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kemppainen, Esko; Seppänen, Hanna; Haglund, Caj

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimation of the prognosis of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) currently relies on tumour-related factors such as resection margins and on lymph-node ratio (LNR) both inconveniently available only postoperatively. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of preoperative laboratory data in predicting PDAC prognosis. Methods Collection of laboratory and clinical data was retrospective from 265 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for PDAC at Helsinki University Hospital. Cancer-specific survival assessment utilized Kaplan-Meier analysis, and independent associations between factors were by the Cox regression model. Results During follow-up, 76% of the patients died of PDAC, with a median survival time of 19.6 months. In univariate analysis, CRP, albumin, CEA, and CA19-9 were significantly associated with postoperative cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, taking into account age, gender, LNR, resection margins, tumour status, and adjuvant chemotherapy, the preoperative biomarkers independently associated with adverse prognosis were hypoalbuminemia (< 36 g/L, hazard ratio (HR) 1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–2.19, p = 0.011), elevated CRP (> 5 mg/L, HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.03–2.02, p = 0.036), CEA (> 5 μg/L, HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.07–2.53, p = 0.047), and CA19-9 (≥555 kU/L, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.18–3.08, p = 0.008). Conclusion For patients with resectable PDAC, preoperative CRP, along with albumin and tumour markers, is useful for predicting prognosis. PMID:27632196

  16. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  17. Identification of human somatostatin receptor 2 domains involved in internalization and signaling in QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Valeria; Vitali, Eleonora; Morone, Diego; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea Gerardo

    2016-07-12

    Somatostatin exerts inhibitory effects on hormone secretion and cell proliferation via five receptor subtypes (SST1-SST5), whose internalization is regulated by β-arrestins. The receptor domains involved in these effects have been only partially elucidated. The aim of the study is to characterize the molecular mechanism and determinants responsible for somatostatin receptor 2 internalization and signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine QGP-1 cell line, focusing on the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal domains. We demonstrated that in cells transfected with somatostatin receptor 2 third intracellular loop mutant, no differences in β-arrestins recruitment and receptor internalization were observed after somatostatin receptor 2 activation in comparison with cells bearing wild-type somatostatin receptor 2. Conversely, the truncated somatostatin receptor 2 failed to recruit β-arrestins and to internalize after somatostatin receptor 2 agonist (BIM23120) incubation. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression, P-ERK1/2 levels, apoptosis and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion was completely lost in cells transfected with either third intracellular loop or carboxyl terminal mutants. In conclusion, we demonstrated that somatostatin receptor 2 internalization requires intact carboxyl terminal while the effects of SS on cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis mediated by somatostatin receptor 2 need the integrity of both third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal.

  18. Dual Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR Signaling Pathways Decreases Human Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (PNET) Metastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Djukom, Clarisse; Porro, Laura J.; Mrazek, Amy; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Chao, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) have limited therapeutic options. RAD001, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, has been shown to increase progression-free survival, but not overall survival, indicating a need to identify additional therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mTORC1 by RAD001 may induce upstream AKT upregulation. We hypothesized that dual inhibition of AKT along with mTOR will overcome the limited activity of RAD001 alone. Methods The BON cell line has been used as a model to study PNET cell biology. Western blots and cell growth assays were performed with mTOR inhibitor RAD001 (50 nM), MEK inhibitor PD0325901 (50 nM), PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (25 μM) or vehicle control. Nude mice were treated daily for 6 weeks with RAD001 (oral gavage), LY29400 (SQ) one week after intrasplenic injection of BON cells. Results Cellular proliferation was most attenuated with the combination therapy LY29400 and RAD001. Similarly, the volume of liver metastasis was lowest in the group treated with both LY29400 (100 mg/kg/week, SQ) and RAD001 (2.5 mg/kg/d) compared to vehicle (p=0.04). Conclusion The combination LY29400 and RAD001 decreased the cell growth in vitro and progression of liver metastasis in vivo compared vehicle or to single drug. PMID:24263107

  19. Role of hepatic intra-arterial therapies in metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET): guidelines from the NET-Liver-Metastases Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew; Bester, Lourens; Salem, Riad; Sharma, Ricky A; Parks, Rowan W; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Liver metastasis from a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) represents a significant clinical entity. A multidisciplinary group of experts was convened to develop state-of-the-art recommendations for its management. Methods Peer-reviewed published reports on intra-arterial therapies for NET hepatic metastases were reviewed and the findings presented to a jury of peers. The therapies reviewed included transarterial embolization (TAE), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radioembolization (RE). Two systems were used to evaluate the level of evidence in each publication: (i) the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) system, and (ii) the GRADE system. Results Eighteen publications were reviewed. These comprised 11 reports on TAE or TACE and seven on RE. Four questions posed to the panel were answered and recommendations offered. Conclusions Studies of moderate quality support the use of TAE, TACE and RE in hepatic metastases of NETs. The quality and strength of the reports available do not allow any modality to be determined as superior in terms of imaging response, symptomatic response or impact on survival. Radioembolization may have advantages over TAE and TACE because it causes fewer side-effects and requires fewer treatments. Based on current European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) Consensus Guidelines, RE can be substituted for TAE or TACE in patients with either liver-only disease or those with limited extrahepatic metastases. PMID:25186181

  20. Reduced Expression of the Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor in Pancreatic and Periampullary Adenocarcinoma Signifies Tumour Progression and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Richard; Elebro, Jacob; Gaber, Alexander; Jonsson, Liv; Heby, Margareta; Yudina, Yulyana; Nodin, Björn; Uhlén, Mathias; Eberhard, Jakob; Jirström, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) is a key component of the mucosal immune system that mediates epithelial transcytosis of immunoglobulins. High pIgR expression has been reported to correlate with a less aggressive tumour phenotype and an improved prognosis in several human cancer types. Here, we examined the expression and prognostic significance of pIgR in pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma. The study cohort encompasses a consecutive series of 175 patients surgically treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma in Malmö and Lund University Hospitals, Sweden, between 2001–2011. Tissue microarrays were constructed from primary tumours (n = 175) and paired lymph node metastases (n = 105). A multiplied score was calculated from the fraction and intensity of pIgR staining. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to select the prognostic cut-off. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for death and recurrence within 5 years were calculated. pIgR expression could be evaluated in 172/175 (98.3%) primary tumours and in 96/105 (91.4%) lymph node metastases. pIgR expression was significantly down-regulated in lymph node metastases as compared with primary tumours (p = 0.018). Low pIgR expression was significantly associated with poor differentiation grade (p<0.001), perineural growth (p = 0.027), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.016), vascular invasion (p = 0.033) and infiltration of the peripancreatic fat (p = 0.039). In the entire cohort, low pIgR expression was significantly associated with an impaired 5-year survival (HR = 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.71–5.25) and early recurrence (HR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.67–4.98). This association remained significant for survival after adjustment for conventional clinicopathological factors, tumour origin and adjuvant treatment (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.10–3.57). These results demonstrate, for the first time, that high

  1. Growth hormone-releasing hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 family with an uncommon phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sala, Elisa; Ferrante, Emanuele; Verrua, Elisa; Malchiodi, Elena; Mantovani, Giovanna; Filopanti, Marcello; Ferrero, Stefano; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Vanoli, Alessandro; La Rosa, Stefano; Zatelli, Maria C; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Verga, Uberta

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) family characterized by primary hyperparathyroidism, in association with acromegaly because of ectopic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) secretion by a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a young man and with a bronchial carcinoid in his mother. We investigate the clinical, radiological imaging, histopathologic findings, and therapy. An 18-year-old man successfully underwent subtotal parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. A subsequent genetic analysis showed a MEN1 gene mutation. Three years later, acromegaly because of ectopic GHRH secretion was diagnosed (pituitary MRI negative and elevated GHRH levels). A search for an ectopic tumor was unsuccessful and somatostatin analog therapy was started. Successively, scintigraphy with somatostatin analogs (68-Ga-DOTATOC-PET) showed three focal areas in the pancreatic tail. Distal pancreatectomy showed multiple pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and hormonal status was normalized. Afterwards, the evaluation of the patient's mother, carrying the same mutation, indicated a primary hyperparathyroidism and a 4 cm lung mass. The patient underwent subtotal pneumonectomy and the histological analysis was consistent with the diagnosis of a typical bronchial carcinoid. In conclusion, an atypical phenotype may be recorded in MEN1 families, thus emphasizing the importance of the new imaging and surgical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of such a rare disease.

  2. Biokinetics and dosimetry with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Ferro-Flores, Ge; Pedraza-López, M.; Murphy-Stack, E.

    Malignant pancreatic tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to determine biokinetic parameters in mice, in order to estimate the induced pancreatic tumour absorbed doses and to evaluate an `in house' 177Lu-DOTA-TATE radiopharmaceutical as part of preclinical studies for targeted therapy in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (nD22) to obtain biokinetic and dosimetric data of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. The mean tumour uptake 2 h post injection was 14.76±1.9% I.A./g; kidney and pancreas uptake, at the same time, were 7.27±1.1% I.A./g (1.71±0.90%/organ) and 4.20±0.98% I.A./g (0.42±0.03%/organ), respectively. The mean absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 0.58±0.02 Gy/MBq; 0.23±0.01 Gy/MBq and 0.14±0.01 Gy/MBq, respectively. These studies justify further dosimetric estimations to ensure that 177Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in humans.

  3. Molecular imaging of late somatostatin receptor-positive metastases of renal cell carcinoma in the pancreas by 68Ga DOTATOC PET/CT: a rare differential diagnosis to multiple primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Peter, Luisa; Sänger, Jörg; Hommann, Merten; Baum, Richard Paul; Kaemmerer, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT, currently the most sensitive imaging modality for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, is based on the molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) that are expressed in different tumor entities such as neuroendocrine neoplasms, lymphomas, meningiomas, or renal cell cancer (RCC). Most neuroendocrine neoplasms show a high expression of SSTR subtypes 2A and 5, whereas the overexpression of SSTR2A in RCC is mainly seen in peritumoral vessels. Here we report a case with strongly SSTR-positive pancreatic lesions detected by Ga DOTATOC PET/CT, which histologically turned out to be ultralate metastases of a RCC.

  4. Genes involved in angiogenesis and mTOR pathways are frequently mutated in Asian patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Lin, Po-Han; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Fang, Wen-Liang; Wang, Shin-E; Liu, Chun-Yu; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Han; Hung, Yi-Ping; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Chen, Ming-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To address the issue of limited data on and inconsistent findings for genetic alterations in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), we analyzed sequences of known pNET-associated genes for their impact on clinical outcomes in a Taiwanese cohort. Methods: Tissue samples from 40 patients with sporadic pNETs were sequenced using a customized sequencing panel that analyzed 43 genes with either an established or potential association with pNETs. Genetic mutations and clinical outcomes were analyzed for potential associations. Results: Thirty-three patients (82.5%) survived for a median 5.9 years (range, 0.3-18.4) of follow up. The median number of mutations per patient was 3 (range, 0-16). The most frequent mutations were in ATRX (28%), MEN1 (28%), ASCL1 (28%), TP53 (20%), mTOR (20%), ARID1A (20%), and VHL (20%). The mutation frequencies in the MEN1 (including MEN1/PSIP1/ARID1A), mTOR (including mTOR/PIK3CA/AKT1/PTEN /TS1/TSC2/ATM), DAXX/ATRX, and angiogenesis (including VHL/ANGPT1/ANGPT2 /HIF1A) pathways were 48%, 48%, 38%, and 45%, respectively. Mutations in ATRX were associated with WHO grade I pNET (vs. grade II or III, p = 0.043), and so were those in genes involved in angiogenesis (p = 0.002). Patients with mutated MEN1 and DAXX/ATRX pathways showed a trend toward better survival, compared to patients with the wild-type genes (p = 0.08 and 0.12, respectively). Conclusion: Genetic profiles of Asian patients with pNETs were distinct from Caucasian patient profiles. Asian patients with pNETs were more frequently mutated for the mTOR and angiogenesis pathways. This could partially explain the better outcome observed for targeted therapy in Asian patients with pNETs. PMID:27994516

  5. Altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, CHGB & TP53 Expression are Associated with Aggressive VHL-Associated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Allison B.; Zhang, Lisa; Jain, Meenu; Barak, Stephanie; Quezado, Martha M.; Kebebew, Electron

    2013-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome in which 8-17% of germline mutation carriers develop pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). There is limited data on prognostic markers for PNETs other than Ki-67, which is included in the World Health Organization classification system. Recently, specific genes and pathways have been identified by whole exome sequencing which may be involved in the tumorigenesis of PNETs and may be markers of disease aggressiveness. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers of aggressive disease in VHL-associated PNETs. The protein expression of 8 genes (PTEN, CHGA, CHGB, ATRX, DAXX, CC-3, VEGF, TP53) was analyzed in PNETs by immunohistochemistry and compared to clinical data, VHL genotype, functional imaging results, and pathologic findings. Subcellular distribution of PTEN, CHGA and ATRX were significantly different by WHO classifications (p<0.05). There was decreased PTEN nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio (p<0.01) and decreased CHGA nuclear expression (p=0.03) in malignant samples as compared to benign. Lower cytoplasmic CHGB expression (p=0.03) was associated with malignant tumors and metastasis. Higher nuclear expression of PTEN was associated with VHL mutations in exon 3 (p=0.04). Higher PTEN and CHGB expression was associated with higher FDG-PET avidity (p<0.05). Cytoplasmic expression of CC-3 was associated with higher serum Chromogranin A levels (σ=0.72, p= 0.02). Lastly, greater cytoplasmic expression of p53 was associated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA and CHGB expression are associated with aggressive PNET phenotype in VHL and may serve as useful adjunct prognostic markers to Ki-67 in PNETs. PMID:23361940

  6. Lipid-rich variant of pancreatic endocrine tumour with inhibin positivity and microscopic foci of microcystic adenoma-like areas: emphasis on histopathology.

    PubMed

    Rao, Anuradha Calicut Kini; Monappa, Vidya; Shetty, Prashanth

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are uncommon tumours with typical morphology characterised by relatively uniform cuboidal cells arranged in nests and festoons, with distinctive nuclear salt-and-pepper chromatin. A lipid-rich variant poses diagnostic difficulties in the midst of other pancreatic tumours and metastatic goblet cell carcinoid. A 22-year-old man presented with symptoms of abdominal pain and jaundice. His liver function test and blood glucose level were normal, but computed tomography of the abdomen suggested the presence of a tumour in the head of the pancreas. Specimen obtained by pancreaticoduodenectomy revealed an infiltrating yellow-tan tumour composed of nests and a cribriform arrangement of polygonal vacuolated cells with pyknotic nuclei, along with focal classical areas of PET. Two foci of early serous microcystic adenoma were seen. Immunohistochemistry contributed to the arrival of a conclusive diagnosis. Von Hippel-Lindau disease was excluded in our patient, as other supportive classical features of the syndrome were absent.

  7. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S T; Jones, C A; Sexton, S; LeVea, C M; Caraker, S M; Hajduczok, G; Gross, K W

    2014-12-11

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene, although classically associated with expression in the kidney, is also expressed in many other extrarenal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within rennin-specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon; furthermore, an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum, identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to the lymph nodes and the liver, mimicking human disease, and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides an unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying cooperating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease.

  8. Src family kinase activity regulates adhesion, spreading and migration of pancreatic endocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Alessia; Capurso, Gabriele; Milione, Massimo; Panzuto, Francesco; Geremia, Raffaele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and 'indolent' neoplasms that usually develop metastatic lesions and exhibit poor response to standard medical treatments. Few studies have investigated pathways responsible for PET cell growth and invasion and no alternative therapeutic strategies have been proposed. In a recent microarray analysis for genes up-regulated in PETs, we have described the up-regulation of soluble Src family tyrosine kinases in this neoplasia, which may represent potentially promising candidates for therapy. Herein, we have investigated the expression and function of Src family kinases in PETS and PET cell lines. Western blot analysis indicated that Src is highly abundant in the PET cell lines CM and QGP-1. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed that Src is up-regulated also in human PET lesions. Pharmacological inhibition of Src family kinases by the specific inhibitor PP2 strongly interfered with adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cell lines. Accordingly, the actin cytoskeleton was profoundly altered after inhibition of Src kinases, whereas even prolonged incubation with PP2 exerted no effect on cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis of PET cells. A transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a subset of proteins was observed in QGP-1 cells adhering to the plate, with a peak at 75 min after seeding, when approximately 80% of cells were attached. Inhibition of Src kinases caused a dramatic reduction in the phosphorylation of proteins with different molecular weight that were isolated from the cell extracts by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation or pull-down with the SH2 domain of Src. Among them, the docking protein p130Cas interacted with Src and is a major substrate of the Src kinases in QGP-1 cells undergoing adhesion. Our results suggest that Src kinases play a specific role during adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cells and may indicate therapeutical approaches directed to limiting the metastatic

  9. Metastases of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver as extremely rare indication for liver transplantation in children. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hor; Broniszczak, Dorota; Markiewicz-Kijewska, Małgorzata; Ciopiński, Mateusz; Teisseyre, Joanna; Kluge, Przemysław; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Socha, Piotr; Kaliciński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are extremely rare in children (0.75 cases per 100,000 children and adolescents a year) and the majority of these tumors are benign or present low grade of malignancy. According to the American registry Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, less than 2% of all neuroendocrine tumors in children occur in the pancreas, making it a rare site for these tumors. The majority of them are found in children over 10years of age, especially those with malignant potential. Treatment of NET consists of different methods: surgery, somatostatin analogues and chemotherapy. Radical surgical resection remains the standard of treatment; however, it is not always feasible because of distant metastases. The authors present a case report of pancreatic NET with multiple metastases to the liver. The patient was treated with pancreatic resection and liver transplantation for liver metastases. Prior to liver transplantation, the patient was treated with somatostatin analogues, sunitinib and chemotherapy. Management of liver metastases with liver transplantation is discussed.

  10. Chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors: the Beatson Oncology Centre experience.

    PubMed

    Hatton, M Q; Reed, N S

    1997-01-01

    The role of chemotherapy in malignant neuroendocrine tumours is difficult to assess because of their rarity and variation in biological behaviour. We present a retrospective review of chemotherapy given to 18 patients with metastatic and one with locally advanced neuroendocrine tumours. There were eight poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours, six thyroid medullary carcinomas, two phaeochromocytomas, two pancreatic islet cell tumours and one undifferentiated neuroblastoma. Four patients were given 3-weekly dacarbazine, vincristine and cyclophosphamide (DOC) chemotherapy. In eight patients, this regimen was modified by substituting the dacarbazine and cisplatin and etoposide (OPEC). A further six patients were treated with dacarbazine reintroduced into the 3-weekly regimen (DOPEC). The remaining patient received cisplatin and etoposide. There were two complete responses (both with OPEC) and eight partial responses (two with DOC, three with OPEC and three with DOPEC). Five patients had stable disease and four progressed. Four received further chemotherapy on relapse, producing one complete and one partial response. The median response duration to initial chemotherapy was 10 months (range 3-34). The median survival was 12 months (range 1-42). The main toxicity was haematological, with grade 3-4 neutropenia in 12 patients; eight suffered episodes of sepsis. One death was treatment related. Other toxicity was mild although three patients discontinued vincristine with grade 2 neurotoxicity. The response rate and side effects of these three regimens appear comparable. We conclude that, although these patient numbers are small, combination chemotherapy produces an encouraging response rate (53%; 95% CI 30-75) in malignant neuroendocrine tumours, with acceptable toxicity.

  11. Induction of matrix metalloprotease-1 gene expression by retinoic acid in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Z von; Riecken, E-O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) gene expression in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G. 13-cis RA results in a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 protein concentration. These stimulatory effects were paralleled by a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 mRNA steady-state concentrations. Nuclear run-on analysis revealed that the increase of MMP-1 mRNA was partially due to an increase of MMP-1 gene transcription. In addition, 13-cis RA treatment results in an increase of MMP-1 mRNA stability. These data demonstrate that RA stimulates MMP-1 gene expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362099

  12. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres in Primary Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Is Associated with Aggressive Clinical Behavior and Poor Survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; An, Soyeon; Kim, Sung Joo; Song, Ki-Byung; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Mi-Ju; Hwang, Dae Wook; Meeker, Alan K; Yu, Eunsil; Kim, Song Cheol; Hruban, Ralph H; Heaphy, Christopher M; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism, is strongly associated with ATRX and DAXX alterations and occurs frequently in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET).Experimental Design: In a Korean cohort of 269 surgically resected primary PanNETs and 19 sporadic microadenomas, ALT status and nuclear ATRX and DAXX protein expression were assessed and compared with clinicopathologic factors.Results: In PanNETs, ALT or loss of ATRX/DAXX nuclear expression was observed in 20.8% and 19.3%, respectively, whereas microadenomas were not altered. ALT-positive PanNETs displayed a significantly higher grade, size, and pT classification (all, P < 0.001). ALT also strongly correlated with lymphovascular (P < 0.001) and perineural invasion (P = 0.001) and the presence of lymph node (P < 0.001) and distant metastases (P = 0.002). Furthermore, patients with ALT-positive primary PanNETs had a shorter recurrence-free survival [HR = 3.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.83-6.27; P < 0.001]. Interestingly, when limiting to patients with distant metastases, those with ALT-positive primary tumors had significantly better overall survival (HR = 0.23; 95% CI, 0.08-0.68; P = 0.008). Similarly, tumors with loss of ATRX/DAXX expression were significantly associated with ALT (P < 0.001), aggressive clinical behavior, and reduced recurrence-free survival (P < 0.001). However, similar to ALT, when limiting to patients with distant metastases, loss of ATRX/DAXX expression was associated with better overall survival (P = 0.003).Conclusions: Both primary ALT-positive and ATRX/DAXX-negative PanNETs are independently associated with aggressive clinicopathologic behavior and displayed reduced recurrence-free survival. In contrast, ALT activation and loss of ATRX/DAXX are both associated with better overall survival in patients with metastases. Therefore, these biomarkers may be used as prognostic markers depending on the context of

  13. Value of image fusion using single photon emission computed tomography with integrated low dose computed tomography in comparison with a retrospective voxel-based method in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Amthauer, H; Denecke, T; Rohlfing, T; Ruf, J; Böhmig, M; Gutberlet, M; Plöckinger, U; Felix, R; Lemke, A J

    2005-07-01

    The objective was the evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with integrated low dose computed tomography (CT) in comparison with a retrospective fusion of SPECT and high-resolution CT and a side-by-side analysis for lesion localisation in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Twenty-seven patients were examined by multidetector CT. Additionally, as part of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), an integrated SPECT-CT was performed. SPECT and CT data were fused using software with a registration algorithm based on normalised mutual information. The reliability of the topographic assignment of lesions in SPECT-CT, retrospective fusion and side-by-side analysis was evaluated by two blinded readers. Two patients were not enrolled in the final analysis because of misregistrations in the retrospective fusion. Eighty-seven foci were included in the analysis. For the anatomical assignment of foci, SPECT-CT and retrospective fusion revealed overall accuracies of 91 and 94% (side-by-side analysis 86%). The correct identification of foci as lymph node manifestations (n=25) was more accurate by retrospective fusion (88%) than from SPECT-CT images (76%) or by side-by-side analysis (60%). Both modalities of image fusion appear to be well suited for the localisation of SRS foci and are superior to side-by-side analysis of non-fused images especially concerning lymph node manifestations.

  14. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  15. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05).The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome

  16. [A Newly Diagnosed Case of Multiple Myeloma in Which Lenalidomide Was Continued after Surgery for a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor That Developed during Lenalidomide Maintenance Therapy].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Usami, Makoto; Shimoyama, Saori; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Yamada, Michiko; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Kanari, Yusuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Kato, Junji

    2015-08-01

    A 75-year-old woman was diagnosed with symptomatic IgG-l multiple myeloma (good-prognosis group) in December 2010. A stringent complete response (sCR) was achieved by using induction therapy with bortezomib (BOR, Velcade®)+ dexamethasone (DEX)(VD) and consolidation therapy with BOR+lenalidomide (LEN, Revlimid®)+DEX(VRD). Although maintenance therapy with Revlimid®+DEX(Rd) was initiated, a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was detected in April 2013. Therefore, LEN was discontinued and distal pancreatectomy was performed in September 2013. Because discontinuation of LEN was followed by exacerbation of myeloma, LEN was resumed with the consent of the patient; however, she became resistant to the treatment. The course of this case suggests that some patients must continue to receive LEN even if a sCR is achieved.

  17. Oral bacteria in pancreatic cancer: mutagenesis of the p53 tumour suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Öğrendik, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, worldwide. The prevalence of this disease is very high in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Orodigestive cancers are frequently seen in patients with periodontitis. These findings suggest that this type of cancer may have some bacterial origins. This study hypothesizes that the peptidyl arginine deaminase (PAD) enzymes found in oral bacteria may be responsible for the p53 point mutations that occur in patients with pancreatic cancer. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola possess the PAD enzyme, and p53 arginine mutations have been detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the Pro allele p53Arg72-Pro is a risk factor for the development of this cancer. Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers have been found to be higher in patients with pancreatic cancer as compared to healthy controls. The hypothesis in question can be tested if the DNA of P. gingivalis or the antibodies against P. gingivalis can be detected in patients with the p53 arginine mutation.If this hypothesis is true, it could reveal the real cause of pancreatic cancer, which is a fatal disease. Further studies are necessary in order to confirm this hypothesis.

  18. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  19. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: role of novel agents. Highlights from the "2011 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium". San Francisco, CA, USA. January 20-22, 2011.

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2011-03-09

    Neuroendocrine tumors of pancreas (PNET) are very rare, consisting of heterogeneous histological subtypes with a variable natural history and different clinical manifestations. Although the vast majority of these neoplasms are sporadic, it is possible to be part of a genetic syndrome such as multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) or tuberous sclerosis (TSC). When systemic treatment is required the options are limited and management strategy is generally based on experts' consensus or clinical experience. The prognosis is usually better than in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, though poorly differentiated PNET behave aggressively and survival is shortened. Since last year, there has been a significant advance in the management of PNET, after reported data confirmed the efficacy of everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in patients with advanced disease. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gastrointestinal Symposium, updated results of the phase III trial (RADIANT-3) regarding the efficacy of everolimus in PNET (Abstract #158) were reported, along with the results of a subgroup analysis of the Japanese patients enrolled in this study (Abstract #289). Another agent with promising activity in PNET which will be discussed in this review is sunitinib, a biological agent with multikinase inhibitor properties (Abstract #244).

  20. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  1. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P; Falls, Kelly C; Reed, Sara M; Taghiyev, Agshin F; Quelle, Frederick W; Gourronc, Francoise A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Major, Heather J; Askeland, Ryan W; Sherman, Scott K; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Howe, James R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-11-15

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood, and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs (PNET) that correlated with high-level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor-suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating that RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A-knockdown cells, although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients.

  2. Successful treatment of a case with pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma with focal hepatoid differentiation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Bao-Bao; Li, Jian-Ang; Han, Xu; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Yuan; Lou, Wen-Hui; Xu, Xue-Feng

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old Chinese woman was admitted to our hospital because of an elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (300 ng/mL) found in a regular medical checkup. Computed tomography imaging of the abdomen revealed a 1.6 × 2.2 cm low-attenuation mass in the head of the pancreas, with no enlarged lymph nodes and no metastatic liver nodules, and a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and the tumor was completely removed. The tumor was solid, unencapsulated and poorly demarcated, measuring 2 × 1.4 × 1.8 cm, and the cut surface was grey-yellowish. Histologically, most of the areas of the tumor were composed of small monotonous and round shaped neuroendocrine cells, and approximately 20% of the areas were cells with indistinct cytoplasmic borders, large oval nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, resembling the appearance of HCC. Immunohistochemical stains revealed that the neuroendocrine areas were diffusely positive for chromogranin, and the hepatoid areas showed diffuse and strong positive reaction to AFP. After surgery the AFP level reduced to normal. She received six cycles of postoperative chemotherapy and three years after the surgery was found to have an elevated serum AFP level again which gave rise to the suspicion of tumor recurrence, and a positron emission tomography-computed tomography confirmed the speculation by showing a hypermetabolic lymph node behind the body of the pancreas. She then underwent radiotherapy and the AFP level reduced to normal. Up till now she has survived 46 months since the initial diagnosis. This case and previous cases suggest that the serum AFP could be a useful marker for early detection of the disease, but careful differential diagnosis should be performed, and AFP could also be a marker for evaluation of therapeutic response and recurrence of the AFP-producing hepatoid carcinomas of pancreas. PMID:25419403

  3. Gene expression profiles of progressive pancreatic endocrine tumours and their liver metastases reveal potential novel markers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Capurso, G; Lattimore, S; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T; Panzuto, F; Milione, M; Bhakta, V; Campanini, N; Swift, S M; Bordi, C; Delle Fave, G; Lemoine, N R

    2006-06-01

    The intrinsic nature of tumour behaviour (stable vs progressive) and the presence of liver metastases are key factors in determining the outcome of patients with a pancreatic endocrine tumour (PET). Previous expression profile analyses of PETs were limited to non-homogeneous groups or to primary lesions only. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression profiles of a more uniform series of sporadic, non-functioning (NF) PETs with progressive disease and, for the first time, their liver metastases, on the Affymetrix human genome U133A and B GeneChip set. Thirteen NF PET samples (eight primaries and five liver metastases) from ten patients with progressive, metastatic disease, three cell lines (BON, QGP and CM) and four purified islet samples were analysed. The same samples were employed for confirmation of candidate gene expression by means of quantitative RT-PCR, while a further 37 PET and 15 carcinoid samples were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of genes differentially expressed between islets and primaries and metastases revealed 667 up- and 223 down-regulated genes, most of which have not previously been observed in PETs, and whose gene ontology molecular function has been detailed. Overexpression of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) and protein Z dependent protease inhibitor (SERPINA10) which may represent useful biomarkers, and of lymphocyte specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen (BST2) which could be used as therapeutic targets, has been validated. When primary tumours were compared with metastatic lesions, no significantly differentially expressed genes were found, in accord with cluster analysis which revealed a striking similarity between primary and metastatic lesions, with the cell lines clustering separately. We have provided a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes in a uniform set of aggressive NF PETs. A number of dysregulated genes deserve further in-depth study as potentially

  4. Deletion at 3p25.3-p23 is frequently encountered in endocrine pancreatic tumours and is associated with metastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Barghorn, A; Komminoth, P; Bachmann, D; Rütimann, K; Saremaslani, P; Muletta-Feurer, S; Perren, A; Roth, J; Heitz, P U; Speel, E J

    2001-08-01

    For several reasons, chromosome 3p is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic endocrine pancreatic tumours (EPTs): von Hippel-Lindau's disease (VHL gene at 3p25.5) is associated with EPTs; 3p is frequently involved in solid human tumours; and comparative genomic hybridization has identified frequent losses at 3p in EPTs. This study investigated 99 benign and malignant tumours, including 20 metastases, from 82 patients, by microsatellite loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in order to evaluate the importance of chromosome 3p deletions in the molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour of EPTs, to elaborate a common region of deletion, and to narrow down putative tumour suppressor gene loci. Allelic losses of 3p were found in 58/99 (58.6%) of tumours in 45/82 (54.9%) patients; analysis of seven microsatellite markers (3p26-p21) revealed a common region of LOH at 3p25.3-p23. The LOH frequency was significantly higher in malignant than in benign neoplasms (70.2% versus 28.0%; p=0.001). In addition, a strong correlation was found between the loss of alleles on chromosome 3p and clinically metastatic disease (LOH of 73.7% in metastasizing versus 41.5% in non-metastasizing tumours; p=0.008). EPTs from these patients showed a tendency towards losing large parts or the entire short arm of chromosome 3 with tumour progression. Furthermore, FISH analysis revealed complete loss of chromosome 3 in ten out of 37 EPTs (27%). These results indicate that a putative tumour suppressor gene at 3p25.3-p23 may play a role in the oncogenesis of sporadic EPTs and that losses of larger centromeric regions are associated with metastatic progression.

  5. Sexual dimorphism of liver metastasis by murine pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is affected by expression of complement C5.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Kobayashi, Shinta; da Silva, Edaise; Clausen, Richard; Chan, Chang; Vosburgh, Evan; Tang, Laura H; Levine, Arnold J; Harris, Chris R

    2016-05-24

    In a mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PanNETs), liver metastasis occurred at a higher frequency in males. Male mice also had higher serum and intratumoral levels of the innate immunity protein complement C5. In mice that lost the ability to express complement C5, there was a lower frequency of metastasis, and males no longer had a higher frequency of metastasis than females. Treatment with PMX53, a small molecule antagonist of C5aR1/CD88, the receptor for complement C5a, also reduced metastasis. Mice lacking a functional gene for complement C5 had smaller primary tumors, which were less invasive and lacked the CD68+ macrophages that have previously been associated with metastasis in this type of tumor. This is the first report of a gene that causes sexual dimorphism of metastasis in a mouse model. In the human disease, which also shows sexual dimorphism for metastasis, clinically advanced tumors expressed more complement C5 than less advanced tumors.

  6. The FGFR4-G388R single-nucleotide polymorphism alters pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor progression and response to mTOR inhibition therapy.

    PubMed

    Serra, Stefano; Zheng, Lei; Hassan, Manal; Phan, Alexandria T; Woodhouse, Linda J; Yao, James C; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), also known as islet cell tumors, exhibit a wide range of biologic behaviors ranging from long dormancy to rapid progression. Currently, there are few molecular biomarkers that can be used to predict recurrence/metastasis or response to therapy. This study examined the predictive and prognostic value of a single nucleotide polymorphism substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in codon 388 of the FGFR4 transmembrane domain. We established the FGFR4 genotype of 71 patients with pNETs and correlated genotype with biologic behavior. We created an in vivo model of pNET with BON1 cells and transfected them with either FGFR4-G388 or FGFR4-R388 to determine the mechanism of action and to examine response to the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. We then validated the predictive results of experimental studies in a group of patients treated with everolimus. FGFR4-R388 is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior in patients with pNETs with a statistically significant higher risk of advanced tumor stage and liver metastasis. Using an orthotopic mouse xenograft model, we show that FGFR4-R388 promotes tumor progression by increasing intraperitoneal spread and metastatic growth within the liver. Unlike FGFR4-G388, FGFR4-R388 BON1 tumors exhibited diminished responsiveness to everolimus. Concordantly, there was a statistically significant reduction in response to everolimus in patients with FGFR4-R388. Our findings highlight the importance of the FGFR4 allele in pNET progression and identify a predictive marker of potential therapeutic importance in this disease.

  7. PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Buddha; Hua, Xianxin; Runske, Melissa; Bennett, Bonita; LiVolsi, Virginia; Roses, Robert; Fraker, Douglas A; Metz, David C

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the HH signaling pathway is similarly upregulated in human PNETs. We performed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PTCH1 in human fresh and archival PNET specimens to examine whether human sporadic and MEN-1-associated PNETs revealed similar abnormalities as in our mouse model and correlated the results with clinical and demographic factors of the study cohort. PTCH1 staining was positive in 12 of 22 PNET patients (55%). Four of 5 MEN-1 patients stained for PTCH1 (p = 0.32 as compared with sporadic disease patients). Nine of 16 patients with metastatic disease stained for PTCH1 as compared with zero of 3 with localized disease only (p = 0.21). No demographic or clinical features appeared to be predictive of PTCH 1 positivity and PTCH 1 positivity per se was not predictive of clinical outcome. PTCH1, a marker of HH pathway up regulation, is detectable in both primary and metastatic tumors in more than 50% of PNET patients. Although no clinical or demographic factors predict PTCH1 positivity and PTCH1 positivity does not predict clinical outcome, the frequency of expression alone indicates that perturbation of this pathway with agents such as Vismodegib, an inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO), should be examined in future clinical trials.

  8. hERG1 channels drive tumour malignancy and may serve as prognostic factor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lastraioli, E; Perrone, G; Sette, A; Fiore, A; Crociani, O; Manoli, S; D'Amico, M; Masselli, M; Iorio, J; Callea, M; Borzomati, D; Nappo, G; Bartolozzi, F; Santini, D; Bencini, L; Farsi, M; Boni, L; Di Costanzo, F; Schwab, A; Onetti Muda, A; Coppola, R; Arcangeli, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: hERG1 channels are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. The expression, functional role and clinical significance of hERG1 channels in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is lacking. Methods: hERG1 expression was tested in PDAC primary samples assembled as tissue microarray by immunohistochemistry using an anti-hERG1 monoclonal antibody (α-hERG1-MoAb). The functional role of hERG1 was studied in PDAC cell lines and primary cultures. ERG1 expression during PDAC progression was studied in Pdx-1-Cre,LSL-KrasG12D/+,LSL-Trp53R175H/+ transgenic (KPC) mice. ERG1 expression in vivo was determined by optical imaging using Alexa-680-labelled α-hERG1-MoAb. Results: (i) hERG1 was expressed at high levels in 59% of primary PDAC; (ii) hERG1 blockade decreased PDAC cell growth and migration; (iii) hERG1 was physically and functionally linked to the Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor pathway; (iv) in transgenic mice, ERG1 was expressed in PanIN lesions, reaching high expression levels in PDAC; (v) PDAC patients whose primary tumour showed high hERG1 expression had a worse prognosis; (vi) the α-hERG1-MoAb could detect PDAC in vivo. Conclusions: hERG1 regulates PDAC malignancy and its expression, once validated in a larger cohort also comprising of late-stage, non-surgically resected cases, may be exploited for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in PDAC either ex vivo or in vivo. PMID:25719829

  9. Small pancreatic insulinoma: Successful endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in a single session, using a 22G fine needle.

    PubMed

    Bas-Cutrina, Francesc; Bargalló, Domingo; Gornals, Joan B

    2017-03-14

    A 63-year-old woman, morbidly obese, with clinical symptoms of periodic hypoglycemic episodes, was diagnosed with an insulinoma in pancreatic body that had not been detected by previous computed tomography and magnetic resonance. This neuroendocrine tumour was identified by EUS as a hypoechoic lesion with some iso-hyperechoic tracts, measuring 9 x 10 mm, and 4-5 mm from splenic vessels (Figure 1a). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Calcium-dependent photodynamic action of di- and tetrasulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine on normal and tumour-derived rat pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    al-Laith, M.; Matthews, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Important differences exist in the responses to photodynamic agents of normal and tumour-derived pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study amylase release has been used to assess the mechanisms by which the photodynamic drugs tetra- and disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS4, A1PcS2) act on pancreatic cells via energy and calcium-dependent activation and transduction pathways. The photodynamic release of amylase was found to be energy dependent and inhibited by the chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium but not by the removal of extracellular calcium. In contrast to their effects on normal acinar cells, the photodynamic action of A1PcS4 and A1PcS2 was to inhibit amylase secretion from pancreatoma AR4-2J cells. Removal of extracellular calcium reversed this inhibitory effect on AR4-2J cells and produced a significant increase in amylase release, but chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium did not affect the inhibitory photodynamic action of the phthalocyanines on amylase release from the tumour cells. Overall, these results demonstrate further important distinctions between the photodynamic action of sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines on normal versus tumour exocrine cells of the pancreas and indicate that calcium plays an important role in photodynamic drug action, since these agents affected intracellular calcium mobilisation at some distal point in the membrane signal transduction pathway for regulated secretion. Furthermore, the photodynamic inhibition of constitutive secretion in tumour cells may involve a calcium-dependent membrane target site or modulation of membrane calcium channels by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:7524603

  11. Rationale and protocol of the MetNET-1 trial, a prospective, single center, phase II study to evaluate the activity and safety of everolimus in combination with octreotide LAR and metformin in patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; de Braud, Filippo; Concas, Laura; Bregant, Cristina; Leuzzi, Livia; Formisano, Barbara; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway signalling and autocrine activation of the mTOR pathway, mediated through insulin-like growth factor-1, have been implicated in the proliferation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) cells. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, has shown antitumor benefit in pNETs alone and in combination with octreotide LAR in RADIANT-1 and RADIANT-3 studies. Although everolimus-based phase II/III trials have improved progression-free survival for pNET, its use has not impacted on prolonging overall survival. Metformin has recently shown some anti-cancer activity in both in vitro and in vivo studies by its indirect properties to decrease insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels and by its antitumour effect to promote AMPK activation and consequently inhibition to TSC1-2/mTOR complex. In light of even more retrospective evidence of metformin's anticancer activity, a prospective evaluation is required to either confirm or discard these preliminary findings. With the aim to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of metformin in combination with everolimus and octreotide LAR in pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor patients, a single arm, prospective, single center phase II study was designed (MetNET-1 trial, NCT 02294006). Forty-three patients are expected to be evaluated. The study is ongoing, and recruitment is estimated to be completed in August 2016. The results will be anticipated in 2017.

  12. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  13. Grading of well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is improved by the inclusion of both Ki67 proliferative index and mitotic rate.

    PubMed

    McCall, Chad M; Shi, Chanjuan; Cornish, Toby C; Klimstra, David S; Tang, Laura H; Basturk, Olca; Mun, Liew Jun; Ellison, Trevor A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Choti, Michael A; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; Hruban, Ralph H

    2013-11-01

    The grading system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) adopted in 2010 by the World Health Organization (WHO) mandates the use of both mitotic rate and Ki67/MIB-1 index in defining the proliferative rate and assigning the grade. In cases when these measures are not concordant for grade, it is recommended to assign the higher grade, but specific data justifying this approach do not exist. Thus, we counted mitotic figures and immunolabeled, using the Ki67 antibody, 297 WHO mitotic grade 1 and 2 PanNETs surgically resected at a single institution. We quantified the Ki67 proliferative index by marking at least 500 cells in "hot spots" and by using digital image analysis software to count each marked positive/negative cell and then compared the results with histologic features and overall survival. Of 264 WHO mitotic grade 1 PanNETs, 33% were WHO grade 2 by Ki67 proliferative index. Compared with concordant grade 1 tumors, grade-discordant tumors were more likely to have metastases to lymph node (56% vs. 34%) (P<0.01) and to distant sites (46% vs. 12%) (P<0.01). Discordant mitotic grade 1 PanNETs also showed statistically significantly more infiltrative growth patterns, perineural invasion, and small vessel invasion. Overall survival was significantly different (P<0.01), with discordant mitotic grade 1 tumors showing a median survival of 12 years compared with 16.7 years for concordant grade 1 tumors. Conversely, mitotic grade 1/Ki67 grade 2 PanNETs showed few significant differences from tumors that were mitotic grade 2 and either Ki67 grade 1 or 2. Our data demonstrate that mitotic rate and Ki67-based grades of PanNETs are often discordant, and when the Ki67 grade is greater than the mitotic grade, clinical outcomes and histopathologic features are significantly worse than concordant grade 1 tumors. Patients with discordant mitotic grade 1/Ki67 grade 2 tumors have shorter overall survival and larger tumors with more metastases and more aggressive histologic

  14. Prospective Study of 68Ga-DOTATATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Detecting Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Unknown Primary Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M.; Neychev, Vladimir; Millo, Corina; Shih, Joanna; Nilubol, Naris; Herscovitch, Peter; Pacak, Karel; Marx, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) are increasing in incidence, and accurate staging is important for selecting the appropriate treatment. 68Ga-DOTATATE imaging is a promising approach for detecting GEPNETs and could help in selecting optimal therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the clinical utility of 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in detecting unknown primary and metastatic GEPNETs. Patients and Methods One hundred thirty-one patients were enrolled in a prospective study of patients undergoing 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 111In-pentetreotide single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and multiphasic CT scan, and/or magnetic resonance imaging in a blinded fashion with comprehensive biochemical testing. The primary outcome measure was the detection of lesions by each imaging study. Results 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging detected 95.1% of lesions (95% CI, 92.4% to 96.8%) with an average maximum standardized uptake value of 65.4 ± 47 (range, 6.9 to 244), anatomic imaging detected 45.3% of lesions (95% CI, 37.9% to 52.9%), and 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT detected 30.9% of lesions (95% CI, 25.0% to 37.5%), with a significant difference between imaging modalities (P < .001). In four of 14 patients (28.6%), 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT found a previously unknown primary tumor, and detected primary GEPNET, lymph node, and distant metastases correctly in 72 of 113 lesions (63.7%) when compared with histopathology, with 22.1% and 38.9% detected by using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and anatomic imaging, respectively. On the basis of findings with 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 43 of 131 patients (32.8%) had a change in management recommendation. In patients with carcinoid symptoms but negative biochemical testing, 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT detected lesions in 65.2% of patients, 40% of which were detected neither by anatomic imaging nor by 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT. Conclusion

  15. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal carcinoma of the pancreas: a tale of three lineages.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark J; Kwong, Christina A; Atieh, Mohammed; Pappas, Sam G

    2016-06-02

    Most pancreatic cancers arise from a single cell type, although mixed pancreatic carcinomas represent a rare exception. The rarity of these aggressive malignancies and the limitations of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) pose significant barriers to diagnosis and appropriate management. We report a case of a 54-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and a hypodense lesion within the uncinate process on CT. FNA suggested poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was subsequently resected via pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological analysis yielded diagnosis of invasive mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal pancreatic carcinoma. Given the rare and deadly nature of these tumours, clinicians must be aware of their pathophysiology and do practice with a high degree of clinical suspicion, when appropriate. Surgical resection and thorough pathological analysis with immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy remain the standards of care for mixed pancreatic tumours without gross evidence of metastasis. Diligent characterisation of the presentation and histological findings associated with these neoplasms should continue in order to promote optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Clinical experience in appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Caglar K.; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dibekoglu, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse the incidence of appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms in appendectomy specimens and establish the epidemiological and histopathological features, treatment, and clinical course. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2013, 975 patients who underwent appendectomy in Ankara Oncology Education and Research Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results Neuroendocrine neoplasm was detected in the nine of 975 (0.9%) patients. Neuroendocrine neoplasms were diagnosed in eight patients by appendectomy, which was performed because of the prediagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in one patient by the suspicious mass detection during surgical procedures that were done in the appendix for a different reason. Eight of the patients’ tumours were in the tip of the appendix, and one of the patients’ tumours was at the base of appendix. Tumour size in 77.8% of patients was equal or less than 1 cm, in 22.2% patients it was 1–2 cm. There was tumour invasion in the muscularis propria layer in four patients, in the serosa layer in three patients, and in the deep mesoappendix in two patients. Patients were followed for a median of 78 months. In the follow-up of patients who were operated because of colon cancer, metachronous colon tumour evolved. This patient died due to progressive disease. Other patients are still disease-free. Conclusions The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasm is often incidentally done after appendectomy. Tumour size is important in determining the extent of disease and in the selection of the surgical method during operation. PMID:26793027

  17. Stages of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... illnesses and treatments will also be taken. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ... checked to measure the amount of VIP. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ...

  18. Pancreatic endocrine tumours: mutational and immunohistochemical survey of protein kinases reveals alterations in targetable kinases in cancer cell lines and rare primaries

    PubMed Central

    Corbo, V.; Beghelli, S.; Bersani, S.; Antonello, D.; Talamini, G.; Brunelli, M.; Capelli, P.; Falconi, M.; Scarpa, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Kinases represent potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs). Patients and methods: Thirty-five kinase genes were sequenced in 36 primary PETs and three PET cell lines: (i) 4 receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), tyrosine-protein kinase KIT (KIT), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha); (ii) 6 belonging to the Akt/mTOR pathway; and (iii) 25 frequently mutated in cancers. The immunohistochemical expression of the four RTKs and the copy number of EGFR and HER2 were assessed in 140 PETs. Results: Somatic mutations were found in KIT in one and ATM in two primary neoplasms. Among 140 PETs, EGFR was immunopositive in 18 (13%), HER2 in 3 (2%), KIT in 16 (11%), and PDGFRalpha in 135 (96%). HER2 amplification was found in 2/130 (1.5%) PETs. KIT membrane immunostaining was significantly associated with tumour aggressiveness and shorter patient survival. PET cell lines QGP1, CM and BON harboured mutations in FGFR3, FLT1/VEGFR1 and PIK3CA, respectively. Conclusions: Only rare PET cases, harbouring either HER2 amplification or KIT mutation, might benefit from targeted drugs. KIT membrane expression deserves further attention as a prognostic marker. ATM mutation is involved in a proportion of PET. The finding of specific mutations in PET cell lines renders these models useful for preclinical studies involving pathway-specific therapies. PMID:21447618

  19. Lung neuroendocrine tumours: deep sequencing of the four World Health Organization histotypes reveals chromatin-remodelling genes as major players and a prognostic role for TERT, RB1, MEN1 and KMT2D.

    PubMed

    Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Sikora, Katarzyna O; Fassan, Matteo; Barbi, Stefano; Corbo, Vincenzo; Mastracci, Luca; Rusev, Borislav; Grillo, Federica; Vicentini, Caterina; Ferrara, Roberto; Pilotto, Sara; Davini, Federico; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Lawlor, Rita T; Chilosi, Marco; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bria, Emilio; Fontanini, Gabriella; Volante, Marco; Scarpa, Aldo

    2017-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to 148 lung neuroendocrine tumours (LNETs) comprising the four World Health Organization classification categories: 53 typical carcinoid (TCs), 35 atypical carcinoid (ACs), 27 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 33 small-cell lung carcinomas. A discovery screen was conducted on 46 samples by the use of whole-exome sequencing and high-coverage targeted sequencing of 418 genes. Eighty-eight recurrently mutated genes from both the discovery screen and current literature were verified in the 46 cases of the discovery screen, and validated on additional 102 LNETs by targeted NGS; their prevalence was then evaluated on the whole series. Thirteen of these 88 genes were also evaluated for copy number alterations (CNAs). Carcinoids and carcinomas shared most of the altered genes but with different prevalence rates. When mutations and copy number changes were combined, MEN1 alterations were almost exclusive to carcinoids, whereas alterations of TP53 and RB1 cell cycle regulation genes and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway genes were significantly enriched in carcinomas. Conversely, mutations in chromatin-remodelling genes, including those encoding histone modifiers and members of SWI-SNF complexes, were found at similar rates in carcinoids (45.5%) and carcinomas (55.0%), suggesting a major role in LNET pathogenesis. One AC and one TC showed a hypermutated profile associated with a POLQ damaging mutation. There were fewer CNAs in carcinoids than in carcinomas; however ACs showed a hybrid pattern, whereby gains of TERT, SDHA, RICTOR, PIK3CA, MYCL and SRC were found at rates similar to those in carcinomas, whereas the MEN1 loss rate mirrored that of TCs. Multivariate survival analysis revealed RB1 mutation (p = 0.0005) and TERT copy gain (p = 0.016) as independent predictors of poorer prognosis. MEN1 mutation was associated with poor prognosis in AC (p = 0.0045), whereas KMT2D mutation correlated with longer survival in SCLC

  20. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  1. Estimating prognosis and palliation based on tumour marker CA 19-9 and quality of life indicators in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, J; Dietrich, D; Glimelius, B; Hess, V; Bodoky, G; Scheithauer, W; Herrmann, R

    2010-01-01

    Background: To investigate the prognostic value of quality of life (QOL) relative to tumour marker carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, and the role of CA 19-9 in estimating palliation in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy. Methods: CA 19-9 serum concentration was measured at baseline and every 3 weeks in a phase III trial (SAKK 44/00–CECOG/PAN.1.3.001). Patients scored QOL indicators at baseline, and before each administration of chemotherapy (weekly or bi-weekly) for 24 weeks or until progression. Prognostic factors were investigated by Cox models, QOL during chemotherapy by mixed-effect models. Results: Patient-rated pain (P<0.02) and tiredness (P<0.03) were independent predictors for survival, although less prognostic than CA 19-9 (P<0.001). Baseline CA 19-9 did not predict QOL during chemotherapy, except for a marginal effect on pain (P<0.05). Mean changes in physical domains across the whole observation period were marginally correlated with the maximum CA 19-9 decrease. Patients in a better health status reported the most improvement in QOL within 20 days before maximum CA 19-9 decrease. They indicated substantially less pain and better physical well-being, already, early on during chemotherapy with a maximum CA 19-9 decrease of ⩾50% vs <50%. Conclusion: In advanced pancreatic cancer, pain and tiredness are independent prognostic factors for survival, although less prognostic than CA 19-9. Quality of life improves before best CA 19-9 response but the maximum CA 19-9 decrease has no impact on subsequent QOL. To estimate palliation by chemotherapy, patient's perception needs to be taken into account. PMID:20877359

  2. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  3. Tumour-derived Interleukin 35 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell extravasation and metastasis by inducing ICAM1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chongbiao; Li, Na; Li, Zengxun; Chang, Antao; Chen, Yanan; Zhao, Tiansuo; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiuchao; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhimin; Luo, Lin; Shi, Jingjing; Yang, Shengyu; Ren, He; Hao, Jihui

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is a novel member of the IL-12 family, consisting of an EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) subunit and a P35 subunit. IL-35 is an immune-suppressive cytokine mainly produced by regulatory T cells. However, the role of IL-35 in cancer metastasis and progression is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that IL-35 is overexpressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues, and that IL-35 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in PDAC patients. IL-35 has critical roles in PDAC cell extravasation and metastasis by facilitating the adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial extravasation. Mechanistically, IL-35 promotes ICAM1 overexpression through a GP130-STAT1 signalling pathway, which facilitates endothelial adhesion and transendothelial migration via an ICAM1–fibrinogen–ICAM1 bridge. In an orthotopic xenograft model, IL-35 promotes spontaneous pancreatic cancer metastasis in an ICAM1-dependent manner. Together, our results indicate additional functions of IL-35 in promoting PDAC metastasis through mediating ICAM1 expression. PMID:28102193

  4. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McGinness, Sam; Coleman, Hedley; Varikatt, Winny; da Cruz, Melville

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours. PMID:27429819

  5. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  6. [A Case of Von Hippel-Lindau Disease with Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Treated by Duodenum-Preserving Resection of the Head of the Pancreas and Spleen-Preserving Resection of the Tail of the Pancreas].

    PubMed

    Umehara, Yutaka; Umehara, Minoru; Tokura, Tomohisa; Yachi, Takafumi; Takahashi, Kenichi; Morita, Takayuki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented to our department with a diagnosis of multiple nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. She had a family history of pheochromocytoma and a medical history of bilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma at the age of 25 years. During follow-up treatment for adrenal insufficiency after the surgery, highly enhanced tumors in the pancreas were detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Other examinations found that the patient did not satisfy the clinical criteria for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Considering her age and risk of developing multiple heterotopic and heterochronous tumors, we performed a duodenum-preserving resection of the head of the pancreas and spleen-preserving resection of the tail of the pancreas with informed consent. The histopathological findings revealed that all of the tumors were NET G1. She underwent genetic testing postoperatively and was diagnosed with VHL disease. This diagnosis meant that we were able to create an optimal treatment plan for the patient. If a tumor predisposition syndrome is suspected, VHL disease should be borne in mind and genetic testing after genetic counseling should be duly considered.

  7. [Anorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma: observations on a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Messinetti, S; Giacomelli, L; Drudi, F M; Innocenzi, D; Porcelli, C; Fabrizio, G; Finizio, R; Manno, A; Granai, A V

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours of the anorectum are rare (0.7% of malignant rectal tumours). Because of this rarity several aspects of the management of these tumours remain controversial. Diagnosis may be delayed because of failure to recognize their morphological characteristics and histological appearance may not reflect their biological behaviour. Immunocytochemistry for neuroendocrine-cells are essential to identify different types of carcinoid tumours and to do differential diagnosis from other malignant tumours. All that allow an exact therapeutic approach to these tumours. The tumours less than cm 1 in diameter can be safely treated by local excision; the tumours more than cm 1 in diameter are treated by radical surgery (AAP).

  8. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  9. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  11. Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    V, Pavithra; Shalini, C.N. Sai; Priya, Shanmuga; Rani, Usha; Rajendiran, S; Joseph, Leena Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare and a very aggressive tumour. Once being considered to be a rare type of squamous cell carcinoma, evidence has proven that most of the tumours express one or more markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. The behaviour of this rare malignancy is different from that of squamous cell carcinomas, with a high propensity for nodal and distant metastases. Hence, there is a need to highlight this histopathological entity. PMID:24701511

  12. Endoscopy-guided ablation of pancreatic lesions: Technical possibilities and clinical outlook.

    PubMed

    Signoretti, Marianna; Valente, Roberto; Repici, Alessandro; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Capurso, Gabriele; Carrara, Silvia

    2017-02-16

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-guided ablation procedures are emerging as a minimally invasive therapeutic alternative to radiological and surgical treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs), and pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). The advantages of treatment under endoscopic control are the real-time imaging guidance and the possibility to reach a deep target like the pancreas. Currently, radiofrequency probes specifically designed for ERCP or EUS ablation are available as well as hybrid cryotherm probe combining radiofrequency with cryotechnology. To date, many reports and case series have confirmed the safety and feasibility of that kind of ablation technique in the pancreatic setting. Moreover, EUS-guided fine-needle injection is emerging as a method to deliver ablative and anti-tumoral agents inside the tumuor. Ethanol injection has been proposed mostly for the treatment of PCLs and for symptomatic functioning PNETs, and the use of gemcitabine and paclitaxel is also interesting in this setting. EUS-guided injection of chemical or biological agents including mixed lymphocyte culture, oncolytic viruses, and immature dendritic cells has been investigated for the treatment of LAPC. Data on the long-term efficacy of these approaches, and large prospective randomized studies are needed to confirm the real clinical benefits of these techniques for the management of pancreatic lesions.

  13. Endoscopy-guided ablation of pancreatic lesions: Technical possibilities and clinical outlook

    PubMed Central

    Signoretti, Marianna; Valente, Roberto; Repici, Alessandro; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Capurso, Gabriele; Carrara, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-guided ablation procedures are emerging as a minimally invasive therapeutic alternative to radiological and surgical treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs), and pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). The advantages of treatment under endoscopic control are the real-time imaging guidance and the possibility to reach a deep target like the pancreas. Currently, radiofrequency probes specifically designed for ERCP or EUS ablation are available as well as hybrid cryotherm probe combining radiofrequency with cryotechnology. To date, many reports and case series have confirmed the safety and feasibility of that kind of ablation technique in the pancreatic setting. Moreover, EUS-guided fine-needle injection is emerging as a method to deliver ablative and anti-tumoral agents inside the tumuor. Ethanol injection has been proposed mostly for the treatment of PCLs and for symptomatic functioning PNETs, and the use of gemcitabine and paclitaxel is also interesting in this setting. EUS-guided injection of chemical or biological agents including mixed lymphocyte culture, oncolytic viruses, and immature dendritic cells has been investigated for the treatment of LAPC. Data on the long-term efficacy of these approaches, and large prospective randomized studies are needed to confirm the real clinical benefits of these techniques for the management of pancreatic lesions. PMID:28250896

  14. The Impact of Phosphohistone-H3-Assisted Mitotic Count and Ki67 Score in the Determination of Tumor Grade and Prediction of Distant Metastasis in Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ozturk Sari, Sule; Taskin, Orhun Cig; Gundogdu, Gokcen; Yegen, Gulcin; Onder, Semen; Keskin, Metin; Saglam, Sezer; Ozluk, Yasemin; Gulluoglu, Mine; Mete, Ozgur

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the impact of phosphohistone-H3 (PHH3)-assisted mitotic count by comparing its performance with conventional mitotic count and Ki67 score as well as the status of distant metastasis. A total of 43 surgically resected pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (panNET) with complete follow-up information has been subjected to a standardized assessment with respect to mitotic count (both conventional and PHH3-assisted) and Ki67 score. Five participants assessed mitotic count and the time spent was recorded in both methods. All tumors were assigned to a G1 category of mitotic rate on conventional mitotic count that failed to identify three tumors with a G2 category of mitotic rate on PHH3. Near-perfect and fair agreements were achieved among observers when using PHH3 and conventional method, respectively. The mean time spent to determine mitotic count on PHH3-stained slides was significantly shorter (p < 0.001). The performance of PHH3-assisted mitotic grade category was significant as the three cases with a G2 mitotic category were associated with distant metastasis (p = 0.01). Despite its performance, the PHH3-assisted mitotic count downgraded 17 cases that were classified as G2 based on Ki67 scores in this series. The Ki67 grade category was either the same or higher than the mitotic grade category. Ten patients developed distant metastasis. Eleven tumors exhibited vascular invasion characterized by intravascular tumor cells admixed with thrombus. Our results indicate that PHH3-assisted mitotic count facilitates an accurate mitotic count with a perfect agreement among observers. The small size of this cohort is an important limitation of the current study, a G2 mitotic grade category based on PHH3 immunohistochemistry was one of the correlates of panNETs with distant metastasis. While the prognostic impact of PHH3-assisted mitotic count needs to be clarified in larger cohorts, Ki67 scores designated higher grade category in all cases; thus, it

  15. Biology and Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R.; Nasir, Aejaz; Kvols, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine malignancies of the gastroenteropancreatic axis include carcinoid and pancreatic endocrine tumors. These heterogeneous neoplasms arise from the enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract and the islet cells of the pancreas. Histologically, most well-differentiated endocrine tumors consist of small, round, monomorphic cells, arranged in islands or trabeculae, with a distinct “salt-and-pepper” pattern of nuclear chromatin. Chromogranin and synaptophysin are useful as immunohistochemical markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. Other common features include the capacity to secrete peptide hormones and biogenic amines. A relatively indolent growth rate is characteristic of most gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, with the exception of poorly differentiated tumors which are usually aggressive. Treatment strategies are designed to limit tumor progression and palliate hormonal syndromes. This article reviews the diverse biologic characteristics of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors and current treatment options for metastatic disease. PMID:19259290

  16. Angiogenesis: a prognostic determinant in pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Jill A; van Eijck, Casper H J; Hop, Wim C J; van Dekken, Herman; Dicheva, Bilyana M; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Koning, Gerben A; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-11-01

    Angiogenesis has been associated with disease progression in many solid tumours, however the statement that tumours need angiogenesis to grow, invade and metastasise seems no longer applicable to all tumours or to all tumour subtypes. Prognostic studies in pancreatic cancer are conflicting. In fact, pancreatic cancer has been suggested an example of a tumour in which angiogenesis is less essential for tumour progression. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure angiogenesis in two anatomically closely related however prognostically different types of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic head and periampullary cancer, and investigate its relation with outcome. Vessels were stained by CD31 on original paraffin embedded tissue from 206 patients with microscopic radical resection (R0) of pancreatic head (n=98) or periampullary cancer (n=108). Angiogenesis was quantified by microvessel density (MVD) and measured by computerised image analysis of three randomly selected fields and investigated for associations with recurrence free survival (RFS), cancer specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS) and conventional prognostic factors. MVD was heterogeneous both between and within tumours. A higher MVD was observed in periampullary cancers compared with pancreatic head cancers (p<.01). Furthermore, MVD was associated with lymph node involvement in pancreatic head (p=.014), but not in periampullary cancer (p=.55). Interestingly, MVD was not associated with RFS, CSS or with OS. In conclusion, angiogenesis is higher in periampullary cancer and although associated with nodal involvement in pancreatic head cancer, pancreatic cancer prognosis seems indeed angiogenesis independent.

  17. Multimodal management of neuroendocrine liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Frilling, Andrea; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Li, Jun; Kornasiewicz, Oskar; Plöckinger, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Background: The incidence of neuroendocrine tumours (NET) has increased over the past three decades. Hepatic metastases which occur in up to 75% of NET patients significantly worsen their prognosis. New imaging techniques with increasing sensitivity enabling tumour detection at an early stage have been developed. The treatment encompasses a panel of surgical and non-surgical modalities. Methods: This article reviews the published literature related to management of hepatic neuroendocrine metastases. Results: Abdominal computer tomography, magnetic resonance tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are widely accepted imaging modalities. Hepatic resection is the only potentially curative treatment. Liver transplantation is justified in highly selected patients. Liver-directed interventional techniques and locally ablative measures offer effective palliation. Promising novel therapeutic options offering targeted approaches are under evaluation. Conclusions: The treatment of neuroendocrine liver metastases still needs to be standardized. Management in centres of expertise should be strongly encouraged in order to enable a multidisciplinary approach and personalized treatment. Development of molecular prognostic factors to select treatment according to patient risk should be attempted. PMID:20662787

  18. [Biological aspects of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tonel, E; Carbone, A; Scirelli, T; Bellone, G; Emanuelli, G

    2005-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma still is an aggressive disease with a fatal prognosis due to late diagnosis and resistance to pharmacological and surgical treatments. Molecular investigations of pancreatic cancer are complicated by the restricted accessibility of the organ for biopsies. However, recent studies have indicated that pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. These molecular alterations, including overexpression of receptor-ligand systems, oncogene activation and loss of tumour suppressor genes, leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The molecular findings are now integrated in a pancreatic tumour progression model, with genetically and morphological defined precursor lesions. However, it remains unclear whether the initial target cells of this cancer develop from ductal or acinar cells. This review will present recent emerging questions on the biology of pancreatic cancer with particular emphasis on the cell origin and tumour microenvironment.

  19. Alteration of the exDNA profile in blood serum of LLC-bearing mice under the decrease of tumour invasion potential by bovine pancreatic DNase I treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Evgenyi V.; Kurilshikov, Alexander M.; Patutina, Olga A.; Zenkova, Marina A.

    2017-01-01

    Taking into account recently obtained data indicating the participation of circulating extracellular DNA (exDNA) in tumorigenesis, enzymes with deoxyribonucleic activity have again been considered as potential antitumour and antimetastatic drugs. Previously, using murine Lewis lung carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma A1 tumour models, we have shown the antimetastatic activity of bovine DNase I, which correlates with an increase of DNase activity and a decrease of exDNA concentration in the blood serum of tumour-bearing mice. In this work, using next-generation sequencing on the ABS SOLiD™ 5.500 platform, we performed a search for molecular targets of DNase I by comparing the exDNA profiles of healthy animals, untreated animals with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and those with LLC treated with DNase I. We found that upon DNase I treatment of LLC-bearing mice, together with inhibition of metastasis, a number of strong alterations in the patterns of exDNA were observed. The major differences in exDNA profiles between groups were: i) the level of GC-poor sequences increased during tumour development was reduced to that of healthy mice; ii) levels of sequences corresponding to tumour-associated genes Hmga2, Myc and Jun were reduced in the DNase I-treated group in comparison with non-treated mice; iii) 224 types of tandem repeat over-presented in untreated LLC-bearing mice were significantly reduced after DNase I treatment. The most important result obtained in the work is that DNase I decreased the level of B-subfamily repeats having homology to human ALU repeats, known as markers of carcinogenesis, to the level of healthy animals. Thus, the obtained data lead us to suppose that circulating exDNA plays a role in tumour dissemination, and alteration of multiple molecular targets in the bloodstream by DNase I reduces the invasive potential of tumours. PMID:28222152

  20. Treatment Options for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... illnesses and treatments will also be taken. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ... checked to measure the amount of VIP. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ...

  1. [Perineural pseudoinvasion in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, K; Hauptmann, S

    2000-09-01

    The occurrence of perineural epithelial complexes within the pancreas cannot always be regarded as evidence of malignancy. Chronic pancreatitis can induce alterations in the anatomy of the organ with a histological picture comparable to that of neural invasion. The important criteria for differential diagnosis are neuroendocrine differentiation of these cells or their ductular morphology without atypia.

  2. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  3. Atypical carcinoid presenting as dumb-bell-shaped tumour in the normal kidney.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Gupta, Pallav

    2013-09-24

    Carcinoid tumours are low-grade malignant neoplasms with neuroendocrine differentiation and occur frequently in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Primary carcinoid tumours of the kidney are rare and a majority of these tumours occur in anomalous kidney and exhibit typical renal carcinoid morphology. We reported a middle-aged man with primary atypical carcinoid tumour occurring in a normal kidney. The patient was diagnosed as having renal cell carcinoma owing to a lack of neuroendocrinal clinical features. Immunohistochemical staining of the nephrectomy specimen helped in the diagnosis of atypical renal carcinoid.

  4. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals throughout the day that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes ... the Pancreas NPF Centers Pancreatitis Centers Pancreatitis Center Application Pancreatic Cancer Centers Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas ...

  5. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  6. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  7. Insulinoma--a deceptive endocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Abdul

    2011-09-01

    Insulinoma is a deceptive endocrine tumour that can easily mislead even an astute clinician because of its bizarre and nonspecific symptom complex. A 45 year old woman presented with altered behaviour, seizures and spells of coma and was being treated as a case of hysterical neurosis. Biochemical and radiological investigations revealed fasting hypoglycaemia, endogenous hyperinsulinism, and a pancreatic parenchymal lesion. Removal of the pancreatic lesion resulted in abrupt restoration of euglycaemia and complete disappearance of patients' symptoms.

  8. Nine cases of Merkel cell tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, A

    1997-01-01

    Merkel cell tumour is an aggressive neuroendocrine neoplasm arising in the dermis. Although only a few hundred cases have been reported worldwide, nine were seen in Nottingham between 1985 and early 1994. The patients were five women and four men age 63-88. One was the first Afro-Caribbean reported to have such a tumour. In no case was the diagnosis made clinically; histological and histochemical examination was necessary. Three of the patients died quickly with metastatic disease. The primary treatment is surgical excision. For advanced disease, radiotherapy is commonly beneficial. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9306997

  9. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  10. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... hospital for: Pain medicines Fluids given through a vein (IV) Stopping food or fluid by mouth to ...

  11. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early stage colon neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Uedo, Noriya; Ishihara, Ryu; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Early stage colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. A small colon tumour was found in a 56-year-old man during diagnostic colonoscopy performed after a positive faecal occult blood test, and he was referred for treatment. A slightly reddish superficial elevated lesion with a shallow depression 10 mm in size was found in the transverse colon. Magnifying narrow-band imaging revealed disrupted irregular microvessels and the absence of a surface pattern in the depressed area. En bloc endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the tumour was undertaken. The tumour was positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, and had a mitotic rate of >20/10 high-power fields and a Ki-67 proliferative index of >50%; it was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumour minimally invaded the submucosa (300 μm) without lymphovascular involvement. The patient was followed up carefully, and at 1 year after EMR, no recurrence was found using colonoscopy and CT scans. PMID:25737221

  12. Neuroendocrine Role for VGF

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jo E.; Brameld, John M.; Jethwa, Preeti H.

    2015-01-01

    The vgf gene (non-acronymic) is highly conserved and was identified on the basis of its rapid induction in vitro by nerve growth factor, although can also be induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial-derived growth factor. The VGF gene gives rise to a 68 kDa precursor polypeptide, which is induced robustly, relatively selectively and is synthesized exclusively in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Post-translational processing by neuroendocrine specific prohormone convertases in these cells results in the production of a number of smaller peptides. The VGF gene and peptides are widely expressed throughout the brain, particularly in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, in peripheral tissues including the pituitary gland, the adrenal glands, and the pancreas, and in the gastrointestinal tract in both the myenteric plexus and in endocrine cells. VGF peptides have been associated with a number of neuroendocrine roles, and in this review, we aim to describe these roles to highlight the importance of VGF as therapeutic target for a number of disorders, particularly those associated with energy metabolism, pain, reproduction, and cognition. PMID:25699015

  13. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes.

  14. Duodenal leiomyosarcoma mimicking a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Sperti, C; Pasquali, C; Di Prima, F; Baffa, R; Pedrazzoli, S

    1994-01-01

    A case of duodenal leiomyosarcoma presenting as a cystic mass is reported. Amylase, tumour markers levels in the cyst fluid and radiological findings suggested an inflammatory pancreatic pseudocyst. Exploratory laparotomy and frozen section examination showed a smooth muscle tumour of the duodenum. Pancreatoduodenectomy with pylorus-preser vation was performed and the patient remained symptom-free at 8 months follow-up.

  15. [Various neuroendocrine tumors in a family with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1].

    PubMed

    Sepp, Krisztián; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna

    2013-12-22

    When multiple endocrine tumors are detected more tests are required to diagnose endocrine tumor syndromes. The authors report the case history of a patient with clinical manifestation of multiplex endocrine neoplasia type 1 (parathyroid adenoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, pituitary tumor, adrenal gland tumors and thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma). Genetic screening proved a novel stop codon mutation of the MEN1 gene in the patient and in two other members of the family. The son of the index patient showed clinical symptoms of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (insulinoma) and parathyroid adenoma. One of the two daughters was also positive for the same mutation, however, she had no clinical symptoms. The authors review current knowledge on the genetic background of multiple endocrine syndrome type 1, the role of menin and the usefulness of gene mutation screening.

  16. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Demes, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors may develop throughout the human body with the majority being found in the gastrointestinal tract and bronchopulmonary system. Neuroendocrine tumors are classified according to the grade of biological aggressiveness (G1–G3) and the extent of differentiation (well-differentiated/poorly-differentiated). The well-differentiated neoplasms comprise typical (G1) and atypical (G2) carcinoids. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas as well as small cell carcinomas (G3) are poorly-differentiated. The identification and differentiation of atypical from typical carcinoids or large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and small cell carcinomas is essential for treatment options and prognosis. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are characterized according to the proportion of necrosis, the mitotic activity, palisading, rosette-like structure, trabecular pattern and organoid nesting. The given information about the histopathological assessment, classification, prognosis, genetic aberration as well as treatment options of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are based on own experiences and reviewing the current literature available. Most disagreements among the classification of neuroendocrine tumor entities exist in the identification of typical versus atypical carcinoids, atypical versus large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas versus small cell carcinomas. Additionally, the classification is restricted in terms of limited specificity of immunohistochemical markers and possible artifacts in small biopsies which can be compressed in cytological specimens. Until now, pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors have been increasing in incidence. As compared to NSCLCs, only little research has been done with respect to new molecular targets as well as improving the classification and differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. PMID:24213466

  17. Tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, F.

    1985-01-01

    Tumours induce the growth of host blood vessels to support their proliferation. This process of angiogenesis is evoked by specific chemical signals. Recognition of these angiogenic factors has led to experimental methods for cancer diagnosis and for inhibiting malignant growth by specifically blocking neovascularisation. The clinical potential of these techniques is discussed. PMID:2413796

  18. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  19. Neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas in a patient with tuberous sclerosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Díaz Díaz, Delissa; Ibarrola, Carolina; Goméz Sanz, Ramón; Pérez Hurtado, Bladimir; Salazar Tabares, Johny; Colina Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2012-08-01

    A rare case of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm in a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex is described. The patient was a 31-year-old man who had multiple congenital subependymal nodules, bilateral cortical tubers, and seizures of difficult control. A 2.3 cm × 2 cm well-delimitated solid tumor in the tail of the pancreas was discovered during a monitoring abdominal computed tomography. A distal pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, the tumor was formed by uniform cells with moderated cytoplasm arranged in a combined trabecular and nested pattern. The nuclear features were bland, and mitosis was infrequent. There was no vascular invasion. Immunoreactivity for cytokeratine AE1/AE3, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin confirmed the neuroendocrine nature of this neoplasia. Pancreatic hormones were negatives. One of the 5 lymph nodes isolated from the peripancreatic adipose tissue was positive for metastases. Small series and case reports have documented that in tuberous sclerosis many endocrine system alterations might occur, affecting the function of the pituitary, parathyroid, and other neuroendocrine tissue, including islet cells of the pancreas. However, the true association of these pathological conditions remains uncertain. As far as we know, there are 10 cases reported of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in a setting of tuberous sclerosis complex, in which 2 cases resulted in malignant, nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  20. ACTH-producing neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Justin; Kim, Sung Hyun; Jeong, Hyang Sook; Rhee, Yumie; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    Tumors that arise from the endocrine pancreas, or the islets of pancreas, are called pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Pancreatic NET have an incidence of <0.1 per one million persons, and can lead to secretion of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Herein, we presented a case of patient with Cushing's syndrome as a result of ACTH-producing pancreatic NET, who underwent successful laparoscopic distal pancreatosplenectomy. A 40-year-old Korean female patient with ophthalmologic discomfort, osteoporosis, and unexplained hypokalemia was admitted to our hospital. Under the suspicion of ACTH producing pancreatic NET after the diagnostic workup, we decided to perform surgical resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatosplenectomy was performed; and the pathological examination revealed a 1.5 cm-sized grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas, which was encapsulated within the pancreatic parenchyma. After the operation, the patient no longer displayed cushingoid features. ACTH-producing pancreatic NET is rare, but can be one of the causes of Cushing's syndrome. Surgical resection is a feasible option in treating ACTH-producing pancreatic NET. PMID:28317048

  1. Gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Ritter, J M; Garner, M M; Chilton, J A; Jacobson, E R; Kiupel, M

    2009-11-01

    This article describes a newly recognized highly malignant neoplastic entity in young bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps), gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas, which readily metastasize. Ten bearded dragons with histories of anorexia (8), vomiting (3), hyperglycemia (2), and anemia (3) were included in this study. All animals had neoplastic masses in their stomach, with metastasis to the liver. Microscopically, 6 of these neuroendocrine carcinomas were well-differentiated and 4 were poorly differentiated. For further characterization, immunohistochemistry for protein gene product 9.5, neuron-specific enolase, endorphin, chromogranins A and B, synaptophysin, somatostatin, insulin, glucagon, gastrin, pancreatic polypeptide, and vasoactive intestinal peptide was performed on 5 animals. Because only immunolabeling for somatostatin was consistently observed in all neoplasms, a diagnosis of somatostatinoma was made for these 5 bearded dragons. Some neoplasms also exhibited multihormonal expression. Electron microscopy performed on 1 tumor confirmed the presence of neuroendocrine granules within neoplastic cells. Gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas, and specifically somatostatinomas, have not been previously reported in bearded dragons, or other reptiles, and may be underdiagnosed due to inconsistent, ambiguous clinical signs. In humans, pancreatic somatostatinomas are associated with a syndrome of hypersomatostatinemia, which includes hyperglycemia, weight loss, and anemia, as observed in some of these bearded dragons. Somatostatinomas in humans are commonly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (Von Recklinghausen's disease), caused by a mutation in the tumor suppressor gene NF1, which results in decreased expression of neurofibromin. In all 5 animals examined, neoplasms exhibited decreased neurofibromin expression compared with control tissues, suggesting that decreased functional neurofibromin may play a role in the pathogenesis of somatostatinomas in bearded dragons.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  3. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Acute pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis Pancreatic abscess Shock Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  4. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  5. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  6. Pancreatic stellate cell: Pandora's box for pancreatic disease biology

    PubMed Central

    Bynigeri, Ratnakar R; Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Subramanyam, Chivukula; Sasikala, Mitnala; Rao, G Venkat; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were identified in the early 1980s, but received much attention after 1998 when the methods to isolate and culture them from murine and human sources were developed. PSCs contribute to a small proportion of all pancreatic cells under physiological condition, but are essential for maintaining the normal pancreatic architecture. Quiescent PSCs are characterized by the presence of vitamin A laden lipid droplets. Upon PSC activation, these perinuclear lipid droplets disappear from the cytosol, attain a myofibroblast like phenotype and expresses the activation marker, alpha smooth muscle actin. PSCs maintain their activated phenotype via an autocrine loop involving different cytokines and contribute to progressive fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Several pathways (e.g., JAK-STAT, Smad, Wnt signaling, Hedgehog etc.), transcription factors and miRNAs have been implicated in the inflammatory and profibrogenic function of PSCs. The role of PSCs goes much beyond fibrosis/desmoplasia in PDAC. It is now shown that PSCs are involved in significant crosstalk between the pancreatic cancer cells and the cancer stroma. These interactions result in tumour progression, metastasis, tumour hypoxia, immune evasion and drug resistance. This is the rationale for therapeutic preclinical and clinical trials that have targeted PSCs and the cancer stroma. PMID:28210075

  7. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huangying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (g-NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors arising from the endocrine cells of stomach. Most g-NENs progresses slowly and have a long disease course; however, some other g-NENs grow rapidly, similar to the progression of gastric adenocarcinoma. g-NENs have complex and diverse clinical manifestations and their prognosis and treatment strategies depend highly on clinical subtype, pathological grade, tumour stage, and other factors. Due to their low prevalence, most clinicians have limited knowledge about g-NENs. Missed diagnosis and excessive/inadequate treatment is common in clinical settings. Thus, the diagnosis and treatment of g-NENs needs to be further standardized.

  8. Endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donato Alessandro; Ruggiero, Simona; Russo, Teresa; Amato, Maurizio; Bianco, Tommaso; Amato, Bruno; Formisano, Cesare; Avellino, Manuela; Napolitano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The authors evaluated the role of endoscopic techniques in the diagnosis and in the potential treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) localized in the gastro-entero-pancreatic system, on the basis of their experience and of the international literature. NET are rare tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. It is a possibility that both the digestive endoscopy and EUS play an important role in the diagnosis, staging and surveillance of this disease. In some cases, especially in the early stages, surgical endoscopy allows the treatment of such tumors. PMID:28352822

  9. Neuroendocrine System of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the skin can serve as a peripheral neuroendocrine organ. The skin neuroendocrine activities are predominantly independent of regulation from the central level (which controls classical hormone secretion) but are rather regulated by local cutaneous factors. These endocrine factors would represent an exquisite regulatory layer addressed at restricting maximally the effect of noxious agents in the skin to preserve local and consequently global homeostasis. PMID:16205064

  10. Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wai-Ping; Berneman, Zwi N.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24382974

  11. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis mimicking pancreatic cancer and neck metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhou, Qiang; Brigstock, David R; Yan, Su; Xiu, Ming; Piao, Rong-Li; Gao, Yan-Hang; Gao, Run-Ping

    2014-12-14

    Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner's tumour) is an uncommon disorder that has recently been confirmed as an IgG4-related disease. Here, we describe a rare case of a 53-year-old male patient who primarily presented with pancreatic body mass, left neck mass and several lumps in his lower lip mimicking pancreatic cancer (PC) and neck metastasis. The patient underwent pancreatic body mass and labial gland lumps resection as well as an ultrasound-guided biopsy of the left neck mass. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related focal type of AIP (f-AIP) and Küttner's tumour by immunohistochemistry. The patient responded well to corticosteroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at one year follow-up. The differentiation of f-AIP from PC is very important to avoid unnecessary pancreatic resection.

  12. Neuroendocrine control of satiation.

    PubMed

    Asarian, Lori; Bächler, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Eating is a simple behavior with complex functions. The unconscious neuroendocrine process that stops eating and brings a meal to its end is called satiation. Energy homeostasis is mediated accomplished through the control of meal size via satiation. It involves neural integrations of phasic negative-feedback signals related to ingested food and tonic signals, such as those related to adipose tissue mass. Energy homeostasis is accomplished through adjustments in meal size brought about by changes in these satiation signals. The best understood meal-derived satiation signals arise from gastrointestinal nutrient sensing. Gastrointestinal hormones secreted during the meal, including cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and PYY, mediate most of these. Other physiological signals arise from activation of metabolic-sensing neurons, mainly in the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem. We review both classes of satiation signal and their integration in the brain, including their processing by melanocortin, neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide, serotonin, noradrenaline, and oxytocin neurons. Our review is not comprehensive; rather, we discuss only what we consider the best-understood mechanisms of satiation, with a special focus on normally operating physiological mechanisms.

  13. Morphological and functional investigations of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Philippe L; Wiskirchen, Jakub

    2003-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas are rare neoplasms arising predominantly from the pancreatic islets of Langerhans and are thus known as islet cell tumors. More than the half of all neuroendocrine tumors are called functioning islet cell tumors because they secrete one or more biologically active peptides that may produce clinical symptoms. Clinical diagnosis of non-functioning, i.e., biologically inactive, tumors is often delayed and patients tend to present with advanced tumors (size greater than 5 cm) that are easily localized by using conventional imaging modalities. On the other hand, symptoms of functioning islet cell tumors usually appear early in the clinical course, rendering the preoperative localization of these small hormone-producing tumors (size less than 2 cm) difficult with non-invasive methods. Since functioning islet cell tumors can often be cured by surgical resection, invasive procedures are warranted when necessary for localization diagnosis. Failure to search for, detect, and resect these small tumors will invariably result in persistent symptoms. Regarding the unsatisfactory results of morphological imaging methods, functional studies, especially arterial stimulation with hepatic venous samplings, may provide a preoperative regionalization of the pancreatic adenoma, regardless of its size.

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  15. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  16. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  17. Biomarker discovery for neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Hsun; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Lin, Meng-Wei; Lin, Szu-Ting; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Lai, Zih-Yin; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2014-07-01

    Neuroendocrine cervical cancer is an aggressive but rare form of cervical cancer. The majority of neuroendocrine cervical cancer patients present with advanced-stage diseases. However, the limited numbers of neuroendocrine tumor markers are insufficient for clinical purposes. Thus, we used a proteomic approach combining lysine labeling 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF MS to investigate the biomarkers for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. By analyzing the global proteome alteration between the neuroendocrine cervical cancer line (HM-1) and non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer lines (CaSki cells, ME-180 cells, and Hela cells), we identified 82 proteins exhibiting marked changes between HM-1 and CaSki cells, and between ME-180 and Hela cells. Several proteins involved in protein folding, cytoskeleton, transcription control, signal transduction, glycolysis, and redox regulation exhibited significant changes in abundance. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses indicated respective 49.88-fold and 25-fold increased levels of transgelin in HM-1 cells compared with that in other non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer cell lines, implying that transgelin is a biomarker for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. In summary, we used a comprehensive neuroendocrine/non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer model based proteomic approach for identifying neuroendocrine cervical cancer markers, which might contribute to the prognosis and diagnosis of neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

  18. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owain Peris; Melling, James Daniel; Ghaneh, Paula

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer related death worldwide with an overall five-year survival of less than 5%. Potentially curative surgery, which alone can improve 5-year survival to 10%, is an option for only 10%-20% of patients at presentation owing to local invasion of the tumour or metastatic disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve 5-year survival to 20%-25% but conflicting evidence remains with regards to chemoradiation. In this article we review the current evidence available from published randomised trials and discuss ongoing phase III trials in relation to adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  19. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, cystic pancreatic neoplasms, and other nonendocrine pancreatic tumors. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ... by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ...

  20. Multimodality treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from pancreatic glucagonoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Villani, Laura; Bernardo, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Glucagonomas are pancreatic islet cell tumors arising from the alpha cells which belong to neuroendocrine tumors. They frequently metastasize to the liver. We report the case of a 52- year old man with a pancreatic glucagonoma with synchronous multiple liver metastases treated by surgery, transarterial chemoembolization, percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation and long-acting octreotide. Our report confirms that a multimodal approach is very effective in patients with unresectable liver metastases from pancreatic endocrine tumors providing long-lasting palliation and probably prolonging survival. PMID:21139900

  1. Molecular classification of urothelial carcinoma: global mRNA classification versus tumour-cell phenotype classification.

    PubMed

    Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Eriksson, Pontus; Liedberg, Fredrik; Höglund, Mattias

    2017-02-13

    Global mRNA expression analysis is efficient for phenotypic profiling of tumours and has been used to define molecular subtypes for almost every major tumour type. A key limitation is that most tumours are communities of both tumour and non-tumour cells. This problem is particularly pertinent when analysing advanced invasive tumours, known to induce major changes and responses in both the tumour and the surrounding tissue. To identify bladder cancer tumour-cell phenotypes and compare classification by tumour-cell phenotype with classification by global gene expression analysis, we analysed 307 advanced bladder cancers (cystectomised) both by genome gene expression analysis and by immunohistochemistry using antibodies for 28 proteins. By systematic analysis of gene and protein expression data, focusing on key molecular processes, we describe five tumour-cell phenotypes of advanced urothelial carcinoma; Urothelial-like, Genomically Unstable, Basal/SCC-like, Mesenchymal-like, and Small cell/Neuroendocrine like. We provide molecular pathological definitions for each subtype. Tumours expressing urothelial differentiation factors show inconsistent and abnormal protein expression of terminal differentiation markers, suggesting pseudo-differentiation. Cancers with different tumour-cell phenotypes may co-cluster (converge), and cases with identical tumour-cell phenotypes may cluster apart (diverge) in global mRNA analyses. This divergence/convergence suggests that broad global commonalities related to the invasive process may exist between muscle-invasive tumours regardless of specific tumour-cell phenotype. Hence, there is a systematic disagreement in subtype classification determined by global mRNA profiling and by IHC profiling at the tumour-cell level. We suggest that a combination of molecular pathology (tumour cell phenotype) and global mRNA profiling (context) is required for adequate subtype classification of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  2. Altered Glycosylation in Tumours Focused to Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Peracaula, Rosa; Barrabés, Sílvia; Sarrats, Ariadna; Rudd, Pauline M.; de Llorens, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The lack of specific and sensitive tumour markers for early detection of cancer is driving a search for new approaches that could identify biomarkers. Markers are needed to alert clinicians at the early stages of tumourogenesis, before the cancer has metastasized, when the therapeutic drugs are more effective. Most tumour markers currently used in clinics are serum glycoproteins, frequently highly glycosylated mucins. Typically, the disease marker is the protein and not the glycan moiety of the corresponding glycoprotein or mucin. The increasing knowledge of the role of glycans in cancer suggests that further studies may assist both in determining their role in every step of tumour progression, and in the design of new therapeutic and diagnosic approaches. Detection of the altered glycans in serum tumour glycoproteins could be a way to achieve specificity in tumour detection. In this review, we focus on the glycan changes of two serum glycoproteins, prostate specific antigen - currently used as a tumour marker of prostate cancer - and human pancreatic ribonuclease in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The detection of glycan changes, associated with subsets of glycoforms in serum glycoproteins that are specific to the tumour situation, could be the basis for developing more specific biomarkers. PMID:19126965

  3. Immunohistochemical Localization of Chromostatin and Pancreastatin, Chromogranin A-Derived Bioactive Peptides, in Normal and Neoplastic Neuroendocrine Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Noriko; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Aunis, Dominique; Tateishi, Kayoko; Miura, Wakako; Nagura, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    Despite the widespread distribution of chromogranin A (CgA) in neuroendocrine tissues, the biological function of CgA has not yet been elucidated. The primary amino acid sequence of CgA, elucidated by cDNA analysis, has been revealed to include several pairs of basic amino acid residues that are homologous to the bioactive peptides, such as pancreastatin (PST) and chromostatin (CST). Using antibodies for human PST and CST, the immunohistochemical localization of these peptides was investigated in neuroendocrine tissues, including human pituitary glands, pancreas, adrenal medulla, various types of neuroendocrine neoplasms (13 pheochromocytomas, 10 medullary thyroid carcinomas, 11 pancreatic endocrine tumors, and 19 carcinoid tumors), and the cell line QGP-1N derived from human somatostatin-producing pancreatic endocrine tumor. Variable immunoreactive intensities of PST and CST were seen, but both peptides were detectable in all neuroendocrine tissues and in most of the neoplasms. Immunoreactivity for both PST and CST was observed in 100 and 73%, respectively, of pancreatic endocrine tumors, all pheochromocytomas, and 80 and 40%, respectively, of medullary thyroid carcinomas, as well as all nonrectal carcinoid tumors. In rectal carcinoids, cells immunoreactive for PST and CST were sparse. The distribution of PST and CST was similar to that of CgA, and it is considered that these peptides are simultaneously processed from CgA, and may play roles in autocrine and paracrine regulation on various hormones in addition to their previously known functions.

  4. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with soft tissue metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhe; Huang, Xin-Yu; Yuan, Zhou; Tang, Juan

    2012-12-07

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the pancreas is rare. We report the case of a 34-year-old man with pancreatic NEC with soft tissue metastasis. The patient presented with right upper abdominal discomfort. Computed tomography revealed a low-density heterogeneous mass in the tail and body of the pancreas that encroached on the greater curvature of the stomach and spleen. We performed exploratory laparotomy and total pancreatectomy with splenectomy and total gastrectomy. Histopathological analysis showed spindle-shaped cells with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei, confirming a primary pancreatic NEC. One month after the surgery, the patient experienced leg swelling. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed high uptake of fludeoxyglucose in the left leg, and the leg was amputated. Histopathological analysis confirmed metastasis of pancreatic NEC. The patient was followed up and received chemotherapy (etoposide and cisplatin). One month after amputation, the level of tumor marker neuron-specific enolase was 142.70 μg/L and computed tomography scan revealed an aggravated metastatic lesion. The patient suffered from unbearable pain and we treated him with odynolysis. Four months postoperatively, the patient died of respiratory failure.

  5. Imaging tumours of the ampulla of Vater.

    PubMed

    Zbar, Andrew P; Maor, Yaakov; Czerniak, Abraham

    2012-12-01

    Although comparatively rare, ampullary tumours tend to be more readily curable than periampullary lesions and pancreatic carcinomas, consequent upon an earlier presentation, a lower likelihood of involved lymph nodes or vascular infiltration and a less aggressive histology. Recently, selected early cases have been able to resected endoscopically making accurate preoperative tumour (T) staging critical in such decision making. The most commonly available imaging methods are endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and CT scanning where in the former case there is variable accuracy for larger (T2/T3) ampullary tumours particularly where the patient has undergone preoperative common bile duct stenting. CT scanning has consistent shown inferior T staging of ampullary tumours when compared with EUS, although it provides information concerning visceral and nodal metastatic disease. Transpapillary intraductal ultrasound (where available) has shown high accuracy for early T1 tumours potentially suitable for endoscopic or local ampullary excision with the added advantage that it may be conducted without preliminary sphincterotomy. Recently, our group has been using intraoperative transduodenal ultrasound which assists surgical decision making concerning local excision or radical pancreaticoduodenal resection. Very recent images using 3-dimensional endoduodenal ultrasound has provided exquisite images of the ampulla and remain to be validated in ampullary neoplasms.

  6. Safety and Tolerability of Everolimus as Second-line Treatment in Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma / Neuroendocrine Carcinoma G3 (WHO 2010) and Neuroendocrine Tumor G3 - an Investigator Initiated Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 1 [Well-differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 2 [Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Tumor, Grade 3 and Disease Progression as Measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1.)

  7. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  8. Structure, expression, and biological function of INSM1 transcription factor in neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Michael S.; Breslin, Mary B.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc-finger transcription factors are DNA-binding proteins that are implicated in many diverse biological functions. INSM1 (formerly IA-1) contains five zinc-finger motifs and functions as a transcription factor. INSM1 protein structure is highly conserved in homologues of different species. It is predominantly expressed in developing neuroendocrine tissues and the nervous system in mammals. INSM1 represents an important player in early embryonic neurogenesis. In pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation, Ngn3 first activates INSM1 and subsequently NeuroD/β2. Conversely, INSM1 exerts a feedback mechanism to suppress NeuroD/β2 and its own gene expression. INSM1 gene ablation in the mouse results in the impairment of pancreatic endocrine cell maturation. Further, deletion of INSM1 severely impairs catecholamine biosynthesis and secretion from the adrenal gland that results in early embryonic lethality. Genetically, INSM1 acts as a downstream factor of Mash 1 and Phox2b in the differentiation of the sympatho-adrenal lineage. In the developing neocortex, mouse embryos lacking INSM1 expression contain half the number of basal progenitors and show a reduction in cortical plate radial thickness. Cell signaling studies reveal that INSM1 contributes to the induction of cell cycle arrest/exit necessary to facilitate cellular differentiation. INSM1 is highly expressed in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. Hence, its promoter could serve as a tumor-specific promoter that drives a specific targeted cancer gene therapy for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. Taken together, all of these features of INSM1 strongly support its role as an important regulator during neuroendocrine differentiation.—Lan, M. S., Breslin, M. B. Structure, expression, and biological function of INSM1 transcription factor in neuroendocrine differentiation. PMID:19246490

  9. RNF43 is a tumour suppressor gene mutated in mucinous tumours of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Georgina L; Hunter, Sally M; Doyle, Maria A; Rowley, Simone M; Christie, Michael; Allan, Prue E; Bowtell, David D L; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2013-02-01

    Mucinous carcinomas represent a distinct morphological subtype which can arise from several organ sites, including the ovary, and their genetic characteristics are largely under-described. Exome sequencing of 12 primary mucinous ovarian tumours identified RNF43 as the most frequently somatically mutated novel gene, secondary to KRAS and mutated at a frequency equal to that of TP53 and BRAF. Further screening of RNF43 in a larger cohort of ovarian tumours identified additional mutations, with a total frequency of 2/22 (9%) in mucinous ovarian borderline tumours and 6/29 (21%) in mucinous ovarian carcinomas. Seven mutations were predicted to truncate the protein and one missense mutation was predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. Six tumours had allelic imbalance at the RNF43 locus, with loss of the wild-type allele. The mutation spectrum strongly suggests that RNF43 is an important tumour suppressor gene in mucinous ovarian tumours, similar to its reported role in mucinous pancreatic precancerous cysts.

  10. Neuroendocrine regulation of maternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female's lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential processes that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female's lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals.

  11. Notch Signaling in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Judy S.; Singleton, Ciera S.; Miele, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoids and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from the neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract, endocrine pancreas, and the respiratory system. NETs remain significantly understudied with respect to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, particularly the role of cell fate signaling systems such as Notch. The abundance of literature on the Notch pathway is a testament to its complexity in different cellular environments. Notch receptors can function as oncogenes in some contexts and tumor suppressors in others. The genetic heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the roles and the potential therapeutic implications of Notch signaling in NETs, a comprehensive analysis of Notch expression patterns and potential roles across all NET subtypes is required. PMID:27148486

  12. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  13. Neuroendocrine activity of the melanocyte

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    More than 15 years ago, we have proposed that melanocytes are sensory and regulatory cells with computing capability, which transform external and/or internal signals/energy into organized regulatory network(s) for the maintenance of the cutaneous homeostasis. This concept is substantiated by accumulating evidence that melanocytes produce classical stress neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones, express corresponding receptors and these processes are modified and/or regulated by ultraviolet radiation, biological factors or stress. Examples of the above are catecholamines, serotonin, N-acetyl-serotonin, melatonin, proopiomelanocortin-derived adrenocorticotropic hormone, β-endorphin or melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptides, corticotropin releasing factor, related urocortins and corticosteroids including cortisol and corticosterone as well as their precursors. Furthermore, their production is not random, but hierarchical and follows the structures of classical neuroendocrine organizations such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, serotoninergic, melatoninergic and catecholaminergic systems. An example of an intrinsic but overlooked neuroendocrine activity is production and secretion of melanogenesis intermediates including L-DOPA or its derivatives that could enter circulation and act on distant sites. Such capabilities have defined melanocytes as neuroendocrine cells that not only coordinate cutaneous but also can affect a global homeostasis. PMID:19558501

  14. Taurine's effects on the neuroendocrine functions of pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Guariglia, Sara R; Idrissi, Abdeslem El; L'amoreaux, William J

    2013-01-01

    Taurine plays significant physiological roles, including those involved in neurotransmission. Taurine is a potent γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist and alters cellular events via GABA(A) receptors. Alternately, taurine is transported into cells via the high affinity taurine transporter (TauT), where it may also play a regulatory role. We have previously demonstrated that treatment of Hit-T15 cells with 1 mM taurine for 24 h significantly decreases insulin and GABA levels. We have also demonstrated that chronic in vivo administration of taurine results in an up-regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the key enzyme in GABA synthesis. Here, we wished to test if administration of 1 mM taurine for 24 h may increase release of another β cell neurotransmitter somatostatin (SST) and also directly impact up-regulation of GAD synthesis. Treatment with taurine did not significantly alter levels of SST (p > 0.05) or GAD67 (p > 0.05). This suggests that taurine does not directly affect SST release, nor does it directly affect GAD synthesis. Taken together with our observation that taurine does promote GABA release via large dense-core vesicles, the data suggest that taurine may alter membrane potential, which in turn would affect calcium flux. We show here that 1 mM taurine does not alter intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations from 20 to 80 s post treatment (p > 0.05), but does increase Ca(2+) flux between 80 and 200 s post-treatment (p < 0.005). This suggests that taurine may induce a biphasic response in β cells. The initial response of taurine via GABA(A) receptors hyperpolarizes β cell and sequesters Ca(2+). Subsequently, taurine may affect Ca(2+) flux in long term via interaction with K(ATP) channels.

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ...

  16. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... illnesses and treatments will also be taken. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ... checked to measure the amount of VIP. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ...

  17. Extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, A K; Reddy, M K; Javvadi, V; Kannan, T

    2011-06-01

    We report an unusual case of extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour in a 15-month-old male child. The tumour was retroperitoneal in location and consisted of triphasic Wilms' tumour elements, along with the presence of heterologous components. The heterologous teratoid elements were composed of predominantly glandular epithelium with the presence of focal skeletal muscle, adipose and neuroglial tissues. Although extrarenal Wilms' tumours have been documented in the literature, only a few cases have been noted to date. We present the relevant clinical, radiological, histomorphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical features of this rare tumour, and discuss the various theories of its histogenesis.

  18. Expression of dopamine receptors and transporter in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, K; Ahnert-Hilger, G; Höpfner, M; Hoegerle, S; Faiss, S; Grabowski, P; Jockers-Scherübl, M; Riecken, E O; Zeitz, M; Scherübl, H

    2002-06-28

    C-11- or F-18-DOPA positron emission tomography (DOPA PET) is a new sensitive imaging technique for small neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors which evaluates the decarboxylase activity. To further characterize the dopaminergic system in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells, we investigated the expression of both dopamine receptors and the transmembrane dopamine transporter (DAT) in the human neuroendocrine pancreatic cell line BON and in the neuroendocrine gut cell line STC-1. Both BON and STC-1 cells expressed mRNA of the dopamine receptors D2-D5 and DAT. mRNA of the dopamine receptor D1 was detected in BON cells only. Both in BON and STC-1 cells, expression of D2 and D5 receptors and DAT was also demonstrated immunocytochemically. For functional receptor characterization intracellular cAMP levels ([cAMP]i) were determined. Whereas in STC-1 cells dopamine and the D1-like (D1/D5) receptor agonist SKF 38393 increased [cAMP]i, [cAMP]i was decreased by dopamine or the D2-like (D2-D4) receptor agonist quinpirole in BON cells. Functional DAT activity was, however, not detected in either cell line. The presence of both dopamine receptors and of the DAT suggests an autocrine and/or paracrine function of dopamine in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells. Yet neither the transmembrane dopamine transporter nor dopamine receptors are likely to contribute to positive DOPA PET imaging of neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors. However, these molecules may be of diagnostic importance when applying other dopaminergic system tracers.

  19. New therapeutic approaches to metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: A glimpse into the future

    PubMed Central

    Cidon, Esther Una

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) gastroenteropancreatic tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasias arising from neuroendocrine cells of the embryological gut. Their incidence have increased significantly over the past 3 decades probably due to the improvements in imaging and diagnosis. The recent advances in molecular biology have translated into an expansion of therapeutic approaches to these patients. Somatostatin analogs, which initially were approved for control of hormonal syndromes, have recently been proven to inhibit tumor growth. Several new drugs such as antiangiogenics and others targeting mammalian target of rapamycin pathways have been approved to treat progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) although their role in non-pancreatic is still controversial. The treatment of NETs requires a coordinated multidisciplinary approach. The management of localized NETs primarily involves surgical resection followed by surveillance. However, the treatment of unresectable and/or metastatic disease may involve a combination of surgical resection, systemic therapy, and liver-directed therapies with the goal of alleviating symptoms of peptide release and controlling tumor growth. This article will review the current therapeutic strategies for metastatic gastroenteropancreatic NETs and will take a glimpse into the future approaches. PMID:28144395

  20. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  1. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-03

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

  2. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  3. Reliability of commercially available immunocytochemical markers for identification of neuroendocrine differentiation in bronchoscopic biopsies of bronchial carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gosney, J. R.; Gosney, M. A.; Lye, M.; Butt, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although neuroendocrine differentiation occurs quite commonly in non-small cell bronchial malignancies, its biological significance and implications for management remain uncertain. Determining these facts requires its recognition early, ideally at diagnosis, which is usually made on tissue from bronchoscopy, but the best means of its detection in such material is unclear. A prospective comparative study was performed of 10 commercially available antisera to a series of markers of neuroendocrine differentiation, to test their efficacy when applied to fibreoptic bronchoscopy biopsy specimens. METHODS--Expression of chromogranin A, synaptophysin, neurone-specific enolase, protein gene product 9.5, the BB isoenzyme of creatine kinase, gastrin releasing peptide, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, calcitonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, and leucine enkephalin was sought by immunolabelling of bronchoscopic biopsy tissue from 83 primary bronchial carcinomas, 22 of them of small cell type. RESULTS--Only synaptophysin and chromogranin were sensitive and specific enough for neuroendocrine differentiation to discriminate between small cell and non-small cell lesions, whereas protein gene product 9.5 and creatine kinase were neither particularly sensitive nor specific and neurone-specific enolase actually labelled more non-small cell tumours than small cell lesions. Of the five secretory products sought, only gastrin releasing peptide was detectable in just one tumour. Three squamous and two morphologically undifferentiated tumours immunolabelled for synaptophysin and chromogranin, almost certainly indicating neuroendocrine differentiation in the absence of small cell morphology. CONCLUSIONS--Of the markers studied, only synaptophysin and chromogranin were sufficiently specific and sensitive for neuroendocrine differentiation to justify their inclusion in any panel of antibodies used in its detection in tissue obtained at fibreoptic brochoscopy. Images PMID:7701447

  4. Endolymphatic sac tumour.

    PubMed

    Zulkarnaen, Mohammad; Tang, Ing Ping; Wong, Siong Lung

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a papillary tumour at the cerebellopontine angle in a 41-year-old man. He presented with left-sided facial and ear pain associated with dizziness, nystagmus and hearing loss. CT scan of the temporal bone showed a destructive tumour at the left cerebellopontine angle. Surgical excision was performed and the diagnosis of the endolymphatic sac tumour was made. Endolymphatic tumour is a low grade adenocarcinoma that originates from the endolymphatic sac. The definitive diagnosis requires a combination of clinical features, radiological finding and pathological correlation.

  5. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  7. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Keith J

    2006-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis leading eventually to destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and loss of exocrine and endocrine function. A model of interactions between environmental triggers of pancreatic inflammation and disease susceptibility or modifying genes (including PRSS1, SPINK1 and CFTR) provides a framework within which to understand disease pathogenesis. Early in the disease, when fibrosis is mild and pancreatic damage limited, it is difficult to distinguish CP from recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) although it is likely these represent opposite ends of a spectrum of disease with a common aetiology in which CP represents either a later disease stage or disease in individuals predisposed to generate a chronic fibrogenic inflammatory response. Pain is a dominant feature resulting in part from neuroimmune interactions within the pancreas. Diagnosis at an early stage of disease is challenging, though in later stages is dependent upon the demonstration of pancreatic fibrosis and duct ectasia using one or more imaging modalities including transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasound, CT and MRCP or ERCP. Current treatments are largely supportive and reactive. The challenge for pediatricians is to achieve diagnosis at an early stage of the disease and to develop treatments that can alter its natural history.

  8. Pancreatic cancer chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal gastrointestinal tumour. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy in the majority of the patients whereas resection is the only chance of cure but only possible in 15-20% of all patients. The integration of radiotherapy into multimodal treatment concepts is heavily investigated. It is now commonly accepted that induction chemotherapy should precede radiotherapy. When fractionated conventionally it should be given as chemoradiotherapy. Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy emerged as an alternative, but will have to be carefully investigated in clinical trials. This review aims to give an overview of radiotherapeutic strategies with a focus on the latest developments in the field in the context of chemotherapy and surgery.

  9. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Myeloid cells are required for PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint activation and the establishment of an immunosuppressive environment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqing; Velez-Delgado, Ashley; Mathew, Esha; Li, Dongjun; Mendez, Flor M; Flannagan, Kevin; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Beatty, Gregory L; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is characterised by the accumulation of a fibro-inflammatory stroma. Within this stromal reaction, myeloid cells are a predominant population. Distinct myeloid subsets have been correlated with tumour promotion and unmasking of anti-tumour immunity. Objective The goal of this study was to determine the effect of myeloid cell depletion on the onset and progression of pancreatic cancer and to understand the relationship between myeloid cells and T cell-mediated immunity within the pancreatic cancer microenvironment. Methods Primary mouse pancreatic cancer cells were transplanted into CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) mice. Alternatively, the iKras* mouse model of pancreatic cancer was crossed into CD11b-DTR mice. CD11b+ cells (mostly myeloid cell population) were depleted by diphtheria toxin treatment during tumour initiation or in established tumours. Results Depletion of myeloid cells prevented KrasG12D-driven pancreatic cancer initiation. In pre-established tumours, myeloid cell depletion arrested tumour growth and in some cases, induced tumour regressions that were dependent on CD8+ T cells. We found that myeloid cells inhibited CD8+ T-cell anti-tumour activity by inducing the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in tumour cells in an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results show that myeloid cells support immune evasion in pancreatic cancer through EGFR/MAPK-dependent regulation of PD-L1 expression on tumour cells. Derailing this crosstalk between myeloid cells and tumour cells is sufficient to restore anti-tumour immunity mediated by CD8+ T cells, a finding with implications for the design of immune therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27402485

  11. Pancreatic Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid can be collected from the cyst for analysis in a laboratory for possible signs of cancer. The characteristics and location of the pancreatic cyst, with your age and sex, can help doctors pinpoint the type of cyst ...

  12. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... mg/dL Injury to the pancreas from an accident Other causes include: After certain procedures used to ... pressure Rapid heart rate Rapid breathing (respiratory) rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes ...

  13. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ or bone marrow transplant Cystic fibrosis Crohn disease and other disorders when the body's immune system ... lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase ...

  14. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... high. Possible Complications Complications may include: Multiple abscesses Sepsis When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... 2016:chap 144. Read More Abscess Pancreatic pseudocyst Sepsis Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh ...

  15. Progressive dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Hamish; Tannenburg, Anthony; Walker, David G; Coyne, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is a benign tumour characterised by cortical location and presentation with drug resistant partial seizures in children. Recently the potential for malignant transformation has been reported, however progression without malignant transformation remains rare. We report a case of clinical and radiologic progression of a DNET in a girl 10 years after initial biopsy.

  16. Neuroendocrine-immune circuits, phenotypes, and interactions.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Noah T; Demas, Gregory E

    2017-01-01

    Multidirectional interactions among the immune, endocrine, and nervous systems have been demonstrated in humans and non-human animal models for many decades by the biomedical community, but ecological and evolutionary perspectives are lacking. Neuroendocrine-immune interactions can be conceptualized using a series of feedback loops, which culminate into distinct neuroendocrine-immune phenotypes. Behavior can exert profound influences on these phenotypes, which can in turn reciprocally modulate behavior. For example, the behavioral aspects of reproduction, including courtship, aggression, mate selection and parental behaviors can impinge upon neuroendocrine-immune interactions. One classic example is the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis (ICHH), which proposes that steroid hormones act as mediators of traits important for female choice while suppressing the immune system. Reciprocally, neuroendocrine-immune pathways can promote the development of altered behavioral states, such as sickness behavior. Understanding the energetic signals that mediate neuroendocrine-immune crosstalk is an active area of research. Although the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) has begun to explore this crosstalk from a biomedical standpoint, the neuroendocrine-immune-behavior nexus has been relatively underappreciated in comparative species. The field of ecoimmunology, while traditionally emphasizing the study of non-model systems from an ecological evolutionary perspective, often under natural conditions, has focused less on the physiological mechanisms underlying behavioral responses. This review summarizes neuroendocrine-immune interactions using a comparative framework to understand the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape these complex physiological interactions.

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  18. Carcinoid and neuroendocrine tumors: building on success.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Pamela L

    2015-06-01

    We have come a long way in our understanding and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors since the term "karzinoide" was coined in 1907. Neuroendocrine tumors are a group of biologically and clinically heterogeneous neoplasms that most commonly originate in the lungs, GI tract, and pancreas. The selection of initial and subsequent therapies requires careful consideration of both tumor and treatment characteristics. With recent advances, we now have more tools for the diagnosis and treatment of our patients. This comprehensive review article summarizes recent advances in the field of neuroendocrine tumors and places them into context for best management practices.

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  20. Investigative approaches to the problem of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moossa, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    A prospective study of 134 patients suspected of having pancreatic cancer is reported. Ultrasonography and duodenal drainage studies are the best initial investigations. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytological examination is the test most likely to provide a definitive diagnosis. Arteriography is essential before laparotomy to delineate anomalies in the foregut vasculature. Pancreatic oncofetal antigen is the only tumour marker that is useful in diagnosis and in monitoring therapy. Images FIG. 5 FIG. 7 PMID:434747

  1. Soluble metalloendopeptidases and neuroendocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, Corie N; Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A

    2002-10-01

    Peptidases play a vital and often highly specific role in the physiological and pathological generation and termination of peptide hormone signals. The thermolysin-like family of metalloendopeptidases involved in the extracellular processing of neuroendocrine and cardiovascular peptides are of particular significance, reflecting both their specificity for particular peptide substrates and their utility as therapeutic targets. Although the functions of the membrane-bound members of this family, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase, are well established, a role for the predominantly soluble family members in peptide metabolism is only just emerging. This review will focus on the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology of the soluble metalloendopeptidases EC 3.4.24.15 (thimet oligopeptidase) and EC 3.4.24.16 (neurolysin), as well as presenting evidence that both peptidases play an important role in such diverse functions as reproduction, nociception, and cardiovascular homeostasis.

  2. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of pancreas; second case from Asia.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Mir, Mohmad Hussain; Azaz, Sheikh Aejaz; Qadri, Sumyra Khurshid; Lone, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs) are malignant tumours composed of small round cells of neuroectodermal origin that affect soft tissue and bone. PNETs originating in the pancreas are extremely rare; previous to this report, only 14 cases were reported worldwide, making this case the fifteenth in the world and the second in Asia. We present the case of a painful pancreatic lump diagnosed as PNET of the pancreas after a thorough workup. The diagnosis of PNET is made according to the overall clinical picture, imaging, histopathology, cytogenetics, and immunohistochemistry, as in the case we present. It is essential to differentiate primary pancreatic PNET from a secondary involvement. A review of all of the cases diagnosed worldwide thus far is also provided.

  3. Neuroendocrine Cancer of Rectum Metastasizing to Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Kumaran, Aswathy; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Vasudeva, Akhila; Udupa, Kartik; Venkateshiah, Dinesh Bangalore; Bhat, Shaila T.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) are rare malignancies that originate from the hormone-producing cells of the body's neuroendocrine system. Rectal high grade NEC (HG-NEC) constituting less than 1% of colorectal cancers can cause large ovarian metastasis that may be the initial presenting complaint. Ovarian Krukenberg tumor from a primary rectal HG-NEC is a very unusual and exceedingly uncommon differential diagnosis for secondary ovarian malignancy. This case report describes one such extremely rare case of a woman who had presented to the gynecology department with features suggestive of ovarian malignancy and was ultimately diagnosed to have Krukenberg tumor originating from neuroendocrine cancer of rectum. We felt this is a good opportunity to spread more light on neuroendocrine neoplasms that are very rare in gynecological practice. PMID:27293931

  4. [Submucosal gastric tumour: heterotopic pancreas. A case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Carlos; Ballario, Federico; García, Sebastián; Giraudo, Pedro; Esteban Granero, Lucas

    2011-09-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is the presence of pancreatic tissue outside the anatomical location of the pancreas. It is a rare condition and can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract with the stomach and small bowel as the most common sites. It is usually asymptomatic but may become clinically evident when complicates by pathologic changes such as inflammation, bleeding, obstruction and malignant transformation. We report the case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a submucosal tumour in the antrum. The histopathology study after surgery showed a heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a submucosal gastric tumour.

  5. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-08-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial.

  6. Synchronous neuroendocrine tumors in both the pancreas and ileum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsunenari, Takazumi; Aosasa, Suefumi; Ogata, Sho; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Nishikawa, Makoto; Noro, Takuji; Shinto, Eiji; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Ueno, Hideki; Hamabe, Fumiko; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Hase, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although it is well-known that in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) disease, multiple endocrine lesions frequently occur, synchronous or metachronous neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in non-MEN 1 patients are extremely rare. Presentation of case An asymptomatic 72-year-old woman with an ileal NET was referred to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography revealed another circular tumor within the pancreatic head. She was classified as a non-MEN 1 patient. An operative procedure was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of synchronous NET, which was confirmed by pathological examination. Discussion Both morphologic and immunophenotypic findings were different between in the ileum and pancreas. Therefore, it was reasonable to consider that both tumors were primary tumors. The synchronous occurrence of these tumors is unusual, and it may be considered as a chance occurrence. Conclusion We here report the first case of synchronous pancreatic NET and ileal NET in a non-MEN 1 patient. PMID:27046104

  7. Diagnostic challenges and management of a patient with acromegaly due to ectopic growth hormone-releasing hormone secretion from a bronchial carcinoid tumour

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakakis, Nikolaos; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Dang, Mary N; Lynch, Julie; Belchetz, Paul; Korbonits, Márta

    2017-01-01

    , mainly from neuroendocrine tumours of pancreatic or bronchial origin. Differentiating between acromegaly of pituitary origin and ectopic acromegaly can cause diagnostic challenges due to similarities in clinical presentation and biochemistry. Serum GHRH can be a useful diagnostic tool to diagnose ectopic acromegaly. Pituitary imaging is crucial to differentiate between a pituitary adenoma and pituitary hyperplasia, which is a common finding in ectopic acromegaly. Diagnosing ectopic acromegaly is pivotal to avoid unnecessary interventions to the pituitary and preserve normal pituitary function. PMID:28203372

  8. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  9. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  10. FAK-inhibition opens the door to checkpoint immunotherapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Symeonides, Stefan N; Anderton, Stephen M; Serrels, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy has had remarkable success in the treatment of some cancer types. However, pancreatic cancer has remained largely refractory to immunotherapy, including immune checkpoint inhibitors. Recently, Jiang and colleagues identified a key role for FAK in regulating the composition of the fibrotic and immuno-suppressive pancreatic tumour niche, and showed that FAK inhibitors can be used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade and gemcitabine chemotherapy to significantly delay pancreatic tumour progression. This study further supports the use of FAK inhibitors in combination with immunotherapy.

  11. [Therapeutic management of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine lung tumors and neuroendocrine carcinomas of the digestive system].

    PubMed

    Pellat, Anna; Wislez, Marie; Svrcek, Magali; Hammel, Pascal; Afchain, Pauline; André, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors are rare but their incidence is rising. High-grade neuroendocrine lung tumors, including small-cell lung cancer, are part of this group. Outside of the lung, they most often arise within the gastrointestinal tract (oesophagus, guts and pancreas) and are called neuroendocrine carcinomas. Due to their rarity, very little is known about neuroendocrine carcinomas of the pancreas and the gastrointestinal tract and few studies have been done. Therefore, most therapeutic recommendations are issued from studies on small-cell lung cancers. Histological scores have grown more accurate these past few years: poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors regroup various entities such as small-cells, large-cells and mix tumors, which seem to have different prognosis. They are diagnosed at a metastatic state in more than 50 % of cases. In localised disease, surgery is performed on selected patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy is administered in poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the lung and is an option in neuroendocrine carcinomas, without proof of efficacy. If not operable, radiochemotherapy is done for tumors of the lung, rectum, and eosophagus. If the disease is diagnosed at a metastatic state, chemotherapy is administered with a combination of platin salts (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide. In poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the lung, prophylactic cranial irradiation is performed in localized disease if there is a good response to chemotherapy. Even if these therapies have improved the overall survival, no improvement has been made during the past four decades and the prognosis remains low.

  12. Tackling pancreatic cancer with metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Marchetti, Paolo

    2017-05-28

    Pancreatic tumours, the majority of which arise from the exocrine pancreas, have recently shown an increasing incidence in western countries. Over the past few years more and more new selective molecules directed against specific cellular targets have become available for cancer therapy, leading to significant improvements. However, despite such advances in therapy, prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains disappointing. Metronomic chemotherapy (MCT), which consists in the administration of continuous, low-dose anticancer drugs, has demonstrated the ability to suppress tumour growth. Thus, it may provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for counteracting the progression of the tumour. Here we discuss evidence arising from preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of MCT in pancreatic cancer. Good results have generally been achieved in preclinical studies, particularly when MCT was combined with standard dose chemotherapy or antinflammatory, antiangiogenic and immunostimolatory agents. The few available clinical experiences, which mainly refer to retrospective data, have reported good tolerability though mild activity of metronomic schedules. Further studies are therefore awaited to confirm both preclinical findings and the preliminary clinical data.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Kristóf; Salamon, Ferenc; Taller, András; Teknős, Dániel; Bursics, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease of unknown pathomechanism. It belongs to the IgG4-related disease family and responds well to steroids, although the relapse rate can reach up to 20–30%. Differentiating AIP from the more common pancreatic cancer can be very challenging. About 20% of AIP is diagnosed postoperatively during final histological examination. Each of the investigative tools can add something to the definitive diagnosis; the question remains whether it is possible to prevent an unnecessary resection. Through our case we would like to demonstrate the differential diagnostic opportunities and present the literary background of this issue. In conclusion, we can state that whenever a focal pancreatic lesion is encountered AIP should always be considered. PMID:24968399

  14. Pancreatic stellate cells respond to inflammatory cytokines: potential role in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mews, P; Phillips, P; Fahmy, R; Korsten, M; Pirola, R; Wilson, J; Apte, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: It is now generally accepted that chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis may result from repeated episodes of acute pancreatic necroinflammation (the necrosis-fibrosis sequence). Recent studies suggest that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), when activated, may play an important role in the development of pancreatic fibrosis. Factors that may influence PSC activation during pancreatic necroinflammation include cytokines known to be important in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, such as tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and the interleukins 1, 6, and 10 (IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10). Aim: To determine the effects of these cytokines on PSC activation, as assessed by cell proliferation, α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and collagen synthesis. Methods: Cultured rat PSCs were incubated with cytokines for 24 hours. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring 3H thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA, α-SMA expression by western blotting, and collagen synthesis by incorporation of 14C proline into collagenase sensitive protein. mRNA levels for procollagen α1(1) in PSCs were determined by northern and dot blotting methods. Results: Expression of α-SMA by PSCs was increased on exposure to each of the cytokines used in the study. Stellate cell proliferation was stimulated by TNF-α but inhibited by IL-6, while IL-1 and IL-10 had no effect on PSC proliferation. Collagen synthesis by PSCs was stimulated by TNF-α and IL-10, inhibited in response to IL-6, and unaltered by IL-1. Changes in collagen protein synthesis in response to TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-6 were not regulated at the mRNA level in the cells. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that PSCs have the capacity to respond to cytokines known to be upregulated during acute pancreatitis. Persistent activation of PSCs by cytokines during acute pancreatitis may be a factor involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. PMID:11889076

  15. Histological characterisation and prognostic evaluation of 62 gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Ye, Yuhong; Shi, Xi; Zhu, Kunshou; Huang, Liming; Zhang, Sheng; Ying, Mingang; Lin, Xuede

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To determine the significance of expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67 and their association with clinicopathological parameters, and to find out the possible prognostic factors in gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma (G-NEC). Material and methods We investigated the immunohistochemical features and prognosis of 62 G-NECs, and evaluated the association among expressions of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67, clinicopathological variables, and outcome. Results Chromogranin A expression was found more commonly in small-cell NECs (9/9, 100%) than in large-cell NECs (27/53, 51%) (p = 0.008). No statistical significance was found in Ki-67 (p = 0.494) or synaptophysin (p > 0.1) expression between NEC cell types. Correlation analyses revealed that Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with mid-third disease of stomach (p = 0.005) and vascular involvement (p = 0.006), and had a trend of significant correlation with tumour relapse (p = 0.078). High expression of chromogranin A was significantly associated with histology of small-cell NECs (p = 0.008) and lesser tumour greatest dimension (p = 0.038). The prognostic significance was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests, and as a result, early TNM staging and postoperative chemotherapy were found to be correlated with longer overall survival (p < 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed associations between poor prognosis in NECs and several factors, including high TNM staging (p = 0.048), vascular involvement (p = 0.023), relapse (p = 0.004), and microscopic/macroscopic residual tumour (R1/2, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, relapse was identified as the sole independent prognostic factor. Conclusions No significant correlation between survival and expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, or Ki-67 has been determined in G-NECs. Our study indicated that early diagnosis, no-residual-tumour resection, and postoperative chemotherapy were

  16. Spontaneous Rupture of the Main Pancreatic Duct Synchronous With a Multi-Focal Microscopic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Katerina; Kessel, Boris; Gal, Oren; Zeina, Abdel Rauf

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal types of malignant tumours, commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage. The only curative treatment for this fatal disease is surgery and early diagnosis is the key to a better outcome and prognosis. In this case report we present a 57-year-old woman presenting to the emergency room with abdominal pain and weight loss. Computer Tomography (CT) imaging showed a rupture of the main pancreatic duct and a peri-pancreatic fluid collection with no evidence of a pancreatic mass. An Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) guided Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) did not show any malignant cells and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Carbohydrate Antigen (CA) 19-9 markers were in the normal range. The patient then underwent pancreatectomy that revealed multiple microscopic foci of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with evidence of massive perineural and vascular invasion. PMID:28208932

  17. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation ... the incidence of recurrent attacks minimized. Timothy Gardner, MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

  19. A bipartite graph of Neuroendocrine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhong-Wei; Zou, Sheng-Rong; Peng, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Ta; Gu, Chang-Gui; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    We present an empirical investigation on the neuroendocrine system and suggest describe it by a bipartite graph. In the net the cells can be regarded as collaboration acts and the mediators can be regarded as collaboration actors. The act degree stands for the number of the cells that secrete a single mediator. Among them bFGF (the basic fibroblast growth factor) has the largest node act degree. It is the most important mitogenic cytokine, followed by TGF-beta, IL-6, IL1-beta, VEGF, IGF-1and so on. They are critical in neuroendocrine system to maintain bodily healthiness, emotional stabilization and endocrine harmony. The act degree distribution shows a shifted power law (SPL) function forms [1]. The average act degree of neuroendocrine network is h=3.01, It means that each mediator is secreted by three cells on average. The similarity, which stands for the average probability of secreting the same mediators by all neuroendocrine cells, is observed as s=0.14. Our results may be used in the research of the medical treatment of neuroendocrine diseases. [1] Assortativity and act degree distribution of some collaboration networks, Hui Chang, Bei-Bei Su, Yue-Ping Zhou, Daren He, Physica A, 383 (2007) 687-702

  20. Preoperative computed tomography measurements of pancreatic steatosis and visceral fat: prognostic markers for dissemination and lethality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Abhishek; Hernandez, Jonathan; Shaheen, Fawad; Shroff, Miloni; Dahal, Sujat; Morton, Connor; Farrior, Thomas; Kedar, Raj; Rosemurgy, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased visceral fat and pancreatic steatosis promote lymphatic metastases and decreased survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). Objectives We aim to determine the utility of preoperative computed tomography (CT) measurements of pancreatic steatosis and visceral fat as prognostic indicators in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods High-resolution CT scans of 42 patients undergoing PD for pancreatic adenocarcinoma were reviewed. Attenuation in CT of the pancreas, liver and spleen were measured in Hounsfield units and scored by two blinded investigators. Perirenal adipose tissue was measured in mm. Results Lymphatic metastases were present in 57% of patients. Age, gender, tumour size and margin status were similar in patients with and without nodal metastases. Node-positive patients had increased visceral but not subcutaneous fat pads compared with node-negative patients and decreased CT attenuation of the pancreatic body and tail and liver. Node-positive patients stratified by visceral adiposity (≥10 mm vs. <10 mm) demonstrated poorer survival (7 ± 1 months vs. 16 ± 2 months; P < 0.01). Conclusions In resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma, increased pancreatic steatosis and increased visceral fat stores are associated with lymphatic metastases. Furthermore, increased visceral fat is associated with abbreviated survival in patients with lymphatic metastases. Hence, increased visceral fat may be a causative factor of abbreviated survival and serves a prognostic role in patients with pancreatic malignancies. PMID:21609373

  1. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Female Reproductive Tract: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Yi Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the female reproductive tract are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that display various histologic findings and biologic behaviors. In this review, the classification and clinicopathologic characteristics of neuroendocrine tumors of the female reproductive tract are described. Differential diagnoses are discussed, especially for non-neuroendocrine tumors showing high-grade nuclei with neuroendocrine differentiation. This review also discusses recent advances in our pathogenetic understanding of these disorders. PMID:26459408

  2. A new PDAC mouse model originated from iPSCs-converted pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCcm)

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Anna Sanchez; Nair, Neha; Oo, Aung KoKo; Prieto-Vila, Marta; Koga, Megumi; Khayrani, Apriliana Cahya; Hussein, Maram; Hurley, Laura; Vaidyanath, Arun; Seno, Akimasa; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Calle, Malu; Kasai, Tomonari; Seno, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most representative form of pancreatic cancers. PDAC solid tumours are constituted of heterogeneous populations of cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs), differentiated cancer cells, desmoplastic stroma and immune cells. The identification and consequent isolation of pancreatic CSCs facilitated the generation of genetically engineered murine models. Nonetheless, the current models may not be representative for the spontaneous tumour occurrence. In the present study, we show the generation of a novel pancreatic iPSC-converted cancer stem cell lines (CSCcm) as a cutting-edge model for the study of PDAC. The CSCcm lines were achieved only by the influence of pancreatic cancer cell lines conditioned medium and were not subjected to any genetic manipulation. The xenografts tumours from CSCcm lines displayed histopathological features of ADM, PanIN and PDAC lesions. Further molecular characterization from RNA-sequencing analysis highlighted primary culture cell lines (1st CSCcm) as potential candidates to represent the pancreatic CSCs and indicated the establishment of the pancreatic cancer molecular pattern in their subsequent progenies 2nd CSCcm and 3rd CSCcm. In addition, preliminary RNA-seq SNPs analysis showed that the distinct CSCcm lines did not harbour single point mutations for the oncogene Kras codon 12 or 13. Therefore, PDAC-CSCcm model may provide new insights about the actual occurrence of the pancreatic cancer leading to develop different approaches to target CSCs and abrogate the progression of this fatidic disease. PMID:28042501

  3. The determinants of tumour immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Blankenstein, Thomas; Coulie, Pierre G.; Gilboa, Eli; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Many standard and targeted therapies, as well as radiotherapy, have been shown to induce an anti-tumour immune response, and immunotherapies rely on modulating the host immune system to induce an anti-tumour immune response. However, the immune response to such therapies is often reliant on the immunogenicity of a tumour. Tumour immunogenicity varies greatly between cancers of the same type in different individuals and between different types of cancer. So, what do we know about tumour immunogenicity and how might we therapeutically improve tumour immunogenicity? We asked four leading cancer immunologists around the world for their opinions on this important issue. PMID:22378190

  4. The aging reproductive neuroendocrine axis.

    PubMed

    Brann, Darrell W; Mahesh, Virendra B

    2005-04-01

    It is well known that the reproductive system is one of the first biological systems to show age-related decline. While depletion of ovarian follicles clearly relates to the end of reproductive function in females, evidence is accumulating that a hypothalamic defect is critical in the transition from cyclicity to acyclicity. This minireview attempts to present a concise review on aging of the female reproductive neuroendocrine axis and provide thought-provoking analysis and insights into potential future directions for this field. Evidence will be reviewed, which shows that a defect in pulsatile and surge gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion exists in normal cycling middle-aged female rats, which is thought to explain the significantly attenuated pulsatile and surge luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion at middle-age. Evidence is also presented, which supports the age-related defect in GnRH secretion as being due to a reduced activation of GnRH neurons. Along these lines, stimulation of GnRH secretion by the major excitatory transmitter glutamate is shown to be significantly attenuated in middle-aged proestrous rats. Corresponding age-related defects in other major excitatory regulatory factors, such as catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, and astrocytes, have also been demonstrated. Age-related changes in hypothalamic concentrations of neurotransmitter receptors, steroid receptors, and circulating steroid hormone levels are also reviewed, and discussion is presented on the complex interrelationships of the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis during aging, with attention to how a defect in one level of the axis can induce defects in other levels, and thereby potentiate the dysfunction of the entire HPO axis.

  5. Role of menin in neuroendocrine tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lairmore, Terry C; Chen, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The menin protein encoded by the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved evolutionarily. The combination of findings from current in vitro and in vivo studies has not yielded a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of menin's tumor suppressor activity or the specific role for menin in endocrine tumorigenesis, although its diverse interactions suggest possible pivotal roles in transcriptional regulation, DNA processing and repair and cytoskeletal integrity. This manuscript summarizes recent research findings including studies of global gene expression in MEN1-associated neuroendocrine tumors and pivotal changes in intracellular signaling pathways associated with neuroendocrine tumorigenesis. Finally, the clinical applications provided by the understanding of the effects of MEN1 gene mutations on neuroendocrine tumor development in patients with this familial cancer syndrome are discussed.

  6. [Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: concepts and related issues].

    PubMed

    Lai, Maode

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has been gradually increasing and most of NENs are located in gastroenteropancreatic system. With the application of target therapeutic drugs in recent years, the precise pathological diagnosis is required critically for effective clinical treatment: target therapy needs targeted pathological diagnosis. In this article, the definition of NENs, and the century-long evolution of diagnostic terms and grades are reviewed. The eight steps of pathological diagnosis of NENs for clinical needs are described. Four inconsistent concepts in NENs diagnosis are also discussed, that is immunohistochemical biomarkers of pathological diagnosis, subpopulation of neuroendocrine neoplasms with high proliferative activity, general adenocarcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation and molecular genetics characteristics. To correctly understand these issues would be of great value for diagnosis and treatment of NENs.

  7. [Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and preneoplasic lesions].

    PubMed

    Rouquette Lassalle, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    In the recently published 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the lungs, all neuroendocrine tumors of the lungs are presented for the first time in one single chapter. In this classification, high-grade small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) are differentiated from intermediate grade atypical carcinoids (AC) and low-grade typical carcinoids as well as from preinvasive lesion diffuse neuroendocrine hyperplasia DIPNECH. In the 2004 WHO classification, SCLC and carcinoids each had a separate chapter and LCNEC was listed in the chapter on large cell carcinoma of the lungs. The new WHO classification also gives some recommendations for the diagnosis on small biopsies. This review describes morphological, immunohistochemical, and genomic characteristic of these tumors according to the new classification.

  8. Type 2 gastric neuroendocrine tumor: report of one case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanliang; Su, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this article we reported a female patient with type 2 gastric neuroendocrine tumor (NET). The patient developed upper abdominal pain, acid reflux, heartburn, nausea, and vomiting without obvious cause 16 years ago. Later, a tumor was found in her stomach. Two years ago, a solid mass was found at the pancreatic head. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy showed positive result. Puncture biopsy showed the presence of a NET. The serum gastrin level was significantly increased (3,527 pg/mL) at presentation. A second gastroscopy showed polypoid uplifts in gastric body. Puncture biopsy confirmed the presence of a G2 NET in gastric body. The patient previously had received a pituitary tumor surgery and thyroid gland resection. The diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). The treatments included sutent, lanreotide, and traditional Chinese herbs. In this article we described the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with MEN-1 accompanied with type 2 gastric NET, which may be clinically informative. PMID:28138653

  9. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: focus on bronchial neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Pusceddu, Sara; Prinzi, Natalie; Imbimbo, Martina; Proto, Claudia; Signorelli, Diego; Vitali, Milena; Ganzinelli, Monica; Maccauro, Marco; Buzzoni, Roberto; Seregni, Ettore; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Well-differentiated bronchial neuroendocrine tumors (B-NETs) are rare. They represent 1-5 % of all lung cancers. The incidence of these neoplasms has risen over the past 30 years and, especially for advanced or metastatic disease, management is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) is the most important first-line therapy, in particular in well-differentiated NETs with high somatostatin type receptor (SSTR) expression. In these tumors, the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) inhibitors and the potential utility of other target therapies remain unclear while chemotherapy represents the gold standard treatment only for aggressive forms with low SSTR expression. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an emerging treatment modality for advanced NETs. There are many cumulative evidences about the effectiveness and tolerability of this therapeutic approach, especially in gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP)-NETs. For B-NETs, scientific research is moving more slowly. Here, we performed a review in order to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of PRRT with a focus on patients with inoperable or metastatic well-differentiated B-NETs.

  10. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  11. Pancreatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Shi, E C; Yeo, B W; Ham, J M

    1984-09-01

    This paper presents the clinical features and problems in the management of 34 patients with pancreatic abscesses. In the majority of patients the abscesses developed following an attack of pancreatitis due to alcohol or gallstones. The abscesses were usually multilocular, and often had spread widely in the retroperitoneal space. Invasion into surrounding viscera or the peritoneal cavity occurred in 12 instances, and eight patients developed major bleeding into the abscess cavity. Obstructive complications (affecting bowel, common bile duct and large veins) occurred in eight patients. Twelve of the 34 patients (35 per cent) died, most deaths being due to failure to control sepsis (seven patients) or to massive bleeding from the abscess cavity (three patients). The mortality of this condition is likely to remain high, but may be reduced by better drainage techniques at the initial exploration. The importance of the infra-mesocolic approach for drainage is emphasized.

  12. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  13. Neuroendocrine Disruption: More than Hormones are Upset

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  14. Neuroendocrine disruption: more than hormones are upset.

    PubMed

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  15. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  16. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  17. Concepts of neuroendocrine cardiology and neuroendocrine immunology, chemistry and biology of signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Galoyan, Armen

    2010-12-01

    Discovery of neurosecretion of cardioactive neurohormones produced by hypothalamic nuclei (NSO and NPV), as well as the biosynthesis of several immunomodulators (signal molecules of the neuroendocrine immune system of brain), deciphering of their chemical structure and study of their biological properties led to the foundation of two important trends of neurobiology: neuroendocrine immunology and cardiology. Hormone formation by atrium ganglionary nerve cells and auriculum establishment of neurohumoral interactions between hypothalamic and atrium neurosecretion indicated the existence of the system neuroendocrine hypothalamus--endocrine heart. Study of their biological properties promoted creation of powerful neurohormonal preparations for the treatment of immune, cardio-vascular, neurodegenerative, infectious and tumor diseases. Concepts suggested by us on neuroendocrine cardiology and immunology, create large perspectives for development of the theory and its implementation in medicine.

  18. Bilateral symmetrical adrenal hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT due to Cushing syndrome in well differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aktas, G E; Soyluoglu Demir, S; Sarikaya, A

    2016-01-01

    The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan has been suggested for whole-body imaging to identify ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting tumours, but there are some challenges involved. The case of a patient is presented, who was admitted with the pre-diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome. On the CT, a nodular lesion was detected in the medial segment of the right lung. The FDG uptake of the lesion seemed to be increased visually, but was not pathological quantitatively (SUVmax: 1.8) on the PET/CT. There was also diffuse increased uptake (SUVmax: 14.2) in the enlarged adrenal glands. The lesion was reported as a possible malignant lesion with low FDG affinity, such as a low grade neuroendocrine tumour, while the diffuse enlarged adrenal glands with high uptake were interpreted as diffusely hyperplasic, due to Cushing's syndrome. The patient was treated with a surgical wedge resection. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed that the tumour was a grade 1 well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  19. Neuroendocrine Disorders in Pediatric Craniopharyngioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daubenbüchel, Anna M. M.; Müller, Hermann L.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood-onset craniopharyngiomas are partly cystic embryonic malformations of the sellar/parasellar region. The therapy of choice in patients with favorable tumor localization is complete resection with a specific focus on maintaining optical and hypothalamic neuroendocrine functions. In patients with unfavorable tumor localization (i.e., hypothalamic involvement), a limited hypothalamus-sparing surgical strategy followed by local irradiation is recommended. Involvement and/or surgical lesions of posterior hypothalamic areas cause major neuroendocrine sequelae. The overall survival rates are high (92%) but neuroendocrine disorders such as obesity and metabolic syndrome due to involvement and/or treatment-related hypothalamic lesions have major negative impact on survival and quality of life. Recurrences and progressions are frequent post-surgical events. Because irradiation is efficient in preventing tumor progression, appropriate timing of post-surgical irradiation is currently under investigation in a randomized multinational trial (KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007). Childhood-onset craniopharyngioma should be recognized as a chronic disease requiring treatment and constant monitoring of the clinical and quality of life consequences, frequently impaired due to neuroendocrine disorders, by experienced multidisciplinary teams in order to provide optimal care of surviving patients. PMID:26239246

  20. NEUROENDOCRINE AND REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuroendocrine and Reproductive Effects of Pesticides

    1Stoker, TE, Goldman 2, JM and Cooper 2, RL.

    1Gamete and Early Embryogenesis Biology Branch and 2 Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborat...

  1. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  2. Liver transplantation for metastatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, H; Oldhafer, K J; Weimann, A; Schlitt, H J; Scheumann, G F; Flemming, P; Ringe, B; Pichlmayr, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the experience with liver transplantation in patients with irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver transplantation has become an established therapy in primary liver cancer. On contrast, there is little experience with liver transplantation in secondary hepatic tumors. So far, in the majority of patients being transplanted for irresectable liver metastases, long-term results have been disappointing because of early tumor recurrence. Because of their biologically less aggressive nature, the metastases of neuroendocrine tumors could represent a justified indication for liver grafting. METHODS: In a retrospective study, the data of 12 patients who underwent liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases were analyzed regarding survival, tumor recurrence, and symptomatic relief. RESULTS: Nine of 12 patients currently are alive with a median survival of 55 months (range, 11.0 days to 103.5 months). The operative mortality was 1 of 12, 2 patients died because of septic complications or tumor recurrences or both 6.5 months and 68.0 months after transplantation. all patients had good symptomatic relief after hepatectomy and transplantation. Four of the nine patients who are alive have no evidence of tumor with a follow-up of 2.0, 57.0, 58.0, and 103.5 months after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases may provide not only long-term palliation but even cure. Regarding the shortage of donor organs, liver grafting for neuroendocrine metastases should be considered solely in patients without evidence of extrahepatic tumor manifestation and in whom all other treatment methods are no longer effective. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:9114792

  3. Arterio-Pancreatic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ser Yee; Ng, Kheng Hong; Sebastian, Mathew George

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a single-organ disorder that has multi-organ sequelae. As a result, it can have varied presentations. Acute pancreatitis presenting as acute limb ischemia is rare. We present a patient with acute pancreatitis presenting with bilateral lower limb ischemia. The episode of acute pancreatitis resolved but the acute lower limb ischemia precipitated as the pancreatitis progressed, and necessitated bilateral above-knee amputations. We review the literature and discuss the pathogenesis of such a phenomenon. PMID:22347150

  4. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  5. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:28078281

  6. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  7. Tumours of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Mackey, L. J.; Misdorp, W.

    1976-01-01

    The most frequent renal tumours of animals are renal cell carcinoma and nephroblastoma. Renal cell carcinomas are seen mainly in dogs and cattle and nephroblastoma is encountered in pigs, puppies, and calves. Renal cell carcinomas are usually papillary in the dog. They show a marked propensity for vascular invasion, penetration of the posterior vena cava, and subsequent pulmonary metastasis. Nephroblastoma, which is morphologically identical to Wilms' tumour of children, is almost always a benign tumour in animals. It is one of the most frequent neoplasms of pigs, possibly owing to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered (and examined) when a few months old. Lymphosarcoma involving the kidney is particularly frequent in the cat, but is also seen in other species as part of a generalized disease. ImagesFig. 5,6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 1,2Fig. 3,4Fig. 16,17,18,19Fig. 9,10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14,15 PMID:1086154

  8. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography of solid pancreatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Ang, Tiing Leong; Seo, Dong Wan; Imazu, Hiroo

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography is the best modality for pancreatic lesion evaluation as its superior spatial resolution allows small lesions to be identified and fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology performed under ultrasound-guidance. Despite this, differentiating benign from malignant lesions remains a challenge as conventional ultrasound imaging is unable to differentiate lesions accurately and tissue yield is poorly diagnostic or limited in patients with the chronic inflammation. Contrast-harmonic technology uses a wide-band transducer capable of inducing sufficient acoustic energy to create harmonic microbubble oscillations of the newer second-generation ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). These microbubbles are more stable, remaining within the intravascular component longer and emit significantly more harmonic content than surrounding tissue, thus allowing pancreatic parenchymal differentiation and microvascular architecture visualization. The use of UCAs is generally safe, but should be especially avoided in patients with unstable ischemic heart disease. During CH endosonography, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is commonly seen as an inhomogenous hypoenhancing lesion, focal pancreatitis as a hypo- or iso-enhancing lesion and neuroendocrine tumor as a hyperenhancing lesion. The presence of hyperenhancement is a strong predictor of non-adenocarcinoma etiology. Furthermore, in patients with the chronic pancreatitis or biliary stents that may obscure pancreatic inspection, the addition of contrast-harmonic endosonography to guide FNA cytology improves its diagnostic yield and accuracy. Quantitative analysis of perfusion through the time intensity curve is promising as an objective and accurate method to differentiate pancreatic lesions. Furthermore, studies are required to fully determine the role of contrast harmonic endosonography in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions.

  9. [Contemporary nuclear medicine diagnostics of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The new positron emission tomography (PET/CT) methods for neuroendocrine tumors detection are presented and compared with classic, conventional methods. Conventional methods use a gamma scintillation camera for patients with neuroendocrine tumor imaging, after intravenous injection of one of the following radiopharmaceuticals: 1) somatostatin analogues labeled with indium-111 (111In-pentetreotide) or technetium-99m (99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC); 2) noradrenaline analogue labeled with iodine-131 or -123 (131/123I-MIBG); or 3) 99mTc(V)-DMSA. Contemporary methods use PET/CT equipment for patients with neuroendocrine tumor imaging, after intravenous injection of pharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters [fluorine-18 (18F), galium-68 (68Ga), or carbon-11 (11C)]: 1) glucose analogue (18FDG); 2) somatostatin analogue (68Ga-DOTATOC/68Ga-DOTATATE/68Ga-DOTANOC); 3) aminoacid precursors of bioamines: [a) dopamine precursor 18F-DOPA (6-18F-dihydroxyphenylalanine), b) serotonin precursor 11C-5HTP (11C-5-hydroxytryptophan)]; or 4) dopamine analogue 18F-DA (6-18F-fluorodopamine). Conventional and contemporary (PET/ CT) somatostatin receptor detection showed identical high spe- cificity (92%), but conventional had very low sensitivity (52%) compared to PET/CT (97%). It means that almost every second neuroendocrine tumor detected by contemporary method cannot be discovered using conventional (classic) method. In metastatic pheochromocytoma detection contemporary (PET/ CT) methods (18F-DOPA and 18F-DA) have higher sensitivity than conventional (131I/123I-MIBG). In medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnostics contemporary method ([18F-DOPA) is more sensitive than conventional 99mTc(V)-DMSA method, and is similar to 18FDG, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. In carcinoid detection contemporary method (18F-DOPA) shows similar results with contemporary somatostatin receptor detection, while for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors it is worse. To conclude, contemporary (PET

  10. [Phyllodes tumour: a rare, rapidly growing breast tumour].

    PubMed

    den Exter, Paul L; Hornstra, Bonne J; Vree, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented at the breast outpatient clinic with a giant tumour of her left breast. The size, rapid growth and radiological characteristics of the lesion led us to suspect a phyllodes tumour. A histological examination of a needle biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. An additional CT scan revealed no signs of metastases. We performed a mastectomy during which a tumour measuring 48 x 33 x 25 cm was resected. Histological examination revealed a borderline phyllodes tumour. Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast and pre-operatively these are often difficult to differentiate from fibroadenomas. Phyllodes tumours have a variable clinical course with the ability to metastasize and a propensity to recur locally. Complete excision with wide margins is essential to prevent local recurrence. In our case, the surgical margins were limited and our patient was therefore treated with postoperative radiation therapy.

  11. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    PubMed

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    2017-01-01

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  12. Superficial necrolytic dermatitis in a dog with an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isidoro-Ayza, M; Lloret, A; Bardagí, M; Ferrer, L; Martínez, J

    2014-07-01

    A 10-year-old dog presented with convulsive crisis and symmetrical hyperkeratotic cutaneous lesions affecting the abdomen, inguinal area, eyelids, muzzles, both pinnae, and all the paw pads. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were the main biochemical findings. A mass 2 cm in diameter was detected within the left pancreatic lobe by ultrasonography. It was surgically removed and histologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. The animal was eventually euthanized due to lack of clinical improvement. At necropsy, metastatic nodules were observed in the pancreatic lymph nodes and liver. Histopathological findings of cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of superficial necrolytic dermatitis and were interpreted as a paraneoplastic syndrome derived from the islet cell carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of superficial necrolytic dermatitis associated with an insulin-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma in dogs.

  13. Neuroendocrine Causes of Amenorrhea—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Lindsay T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Secondary amenorrhea—the absence of menses for three consecutive cycles—affects approximately 3–4% of reproductive age women, and infertility—the failure to conceive after 12 months of regular intercourse—affects approximately 6–10%. Neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility, including functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia, constitute a majority of these cases. Objective: In this review, we discuss the physiologic, pathologic, and iatrogenic causes of amenorrhea and infertility arising from perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, including potential genetic causes. We focus extensively on the hormonal mechanisms involved in disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility is critical for properly assessing patients presenting with these complaints. Prompt evaluation and treatment are essential to prevent loss of bone mass due to hypoestrogenemia and/or to achieve the time-sensitive treatment goal of conception. PMID:25581597

  14. Pancreatic cancer and its stroma: a conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Pothula, Srinivasa P; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by a prominent desmoplastic/stromal reaction that has received little attention until recent times. Given that treatments focusing on pancreatic cancer cells alone have failed to significantly improve patient outcome over many decades, research efforts have now moved to understanding the pathophysiology of the stromal reaction and its role in cancer progression. In this regard, our Group was the first to identify the cells (pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) that produced the collagenous stroma of pancreatic cancer and to demonstrate that these cells interacted closely with cancer cells to facilitate local tumour growth and distant metastasis. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that stromal PSCs may also mediate angiogenesis, immune evasion and the well known resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This review will summarise current knowledge regarding the critical role of pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma in pancreatic cancer biology and the therapeutic approaches being developed to target the stroma in a bid to improve the outcome of this devastating disease.

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in the Developing Neuroendocrine Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-San; Brooks, Leah R.; Rochester, Johanna R.; Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Chung, Wilson C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is pivotal to the formation of numerous central regions. Increasing evidence suggests FGF signaling also directs the development of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus, a collection of neuroendocrine neurons originating primarily within the nose and the ventricular zone of the diencephalon. This review outlines evidence for a role of FGF signaling in the prenatal and postnatal development of several hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems. The emphasis is placed on the nasally derived gonadotropin- releasing hormone neurons, which depend on neurotrophic cues from FGF signaling throughout the neurons' lifetime. Although less is known about neuroendocrine neurons derived from the diencephalon, recent studies suggest they also exhibit variable levels of dependence on FGF signaling. Overall, FGF signaling provides a broad spectrum of cues that ranges from genesis, cell survival/death, migration, morphological changes, to hormone synthesis in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus. Abnormal FGF signaling will deleteriously impact multiple hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems, resulting in the disruption of diverse physiological functions. PMID:21129392

  16. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-06-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  17. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level1. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice. PMID:23727729

  18. Neuroendocrine regulation of appetitive ingestive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Ondek, Katelynn; Schneider, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    Food availability in nature is often irregular, and famine is commonplace. Increased motivation to engage in ingestive behaviors increases the chance of survival, providing additional potential opportunities for reproduction. Because of the advantages conferred by entraining ingestive behavior to environmental conditions, neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating the motivation to acquire and ingest food have evolved to be responsive to exogenous (i.e., food stored for future consumption) and endogenous (i.e., body fat stores) fuel availability. Motivated behaviors like eating occur in two phases. The appetitive phase brings animals into contact with food (e.g., foraging, food hoarding), and the more reflexive consummatory phase results in ingestion (e.g., chewing, swallowing). Quantifiable appetitive behaviors are part of the natural ingestive behavioral repertoire of species such as hamsters and humans. This review summarizes current knowledge about neuroendocrine regulators of ingestive behavior, with an emphasis appetitive behavior. We will discuss hormonal regulators of appetitive ingestive behaviors, including the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, which potently stimulates foraging and food hoarding in Siberian hamsters. This section includes a discussion of the hormone leptin, its relation to endogenous fat stores, and its role in food deprivation-induced increases in appetitive ingestive behaviors. Next, we discuss how hormonal regulators interact with neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of ingestive behaviors, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), to regulate ingestive behavior. Finally, we discuss the potential impact that perinatal nutrient availability can have on the neuroendocrine regulation of ingestive behavior. Understanding the hormonal mechanisms that connect metabolic fuel availability to central appetite regulatory circuits should provide a better understanding of the

  19. Neuroendocrine regulation of appetitive ingestive behavior.

    PubMed

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Ondek, Katelynn; Schneider, Jill E

    2013-11-15

    Food availability in nature is often irregular, and famine is commonplace. Increased motivation to engage in ingestive behaviors increases the chance of survival, providing additional potential opportunities for reproduction. Because of the advantages conferred by entraining ingestive behavior to environmental conditions, neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating the motivation to acquire and ingest food have evolved to be responsive to exogenous (i.e., food stored for future consumption) and endogenous (i.e., body fat stores) fuel availability. Motivated behaviors like eating occur in two phases. The appetitive phase brings animals into contact with food (e.g., foraging, food hoarding), and the more reflexive consummatory phase results in ingestion (e.g., chewing, swallowing). Quantifiable appetitive behaviors are part of the natural ingestive behavioral repertoire of species such as hamsters and humans. This review summarizes current knowledge about neuroendocrine regulators of ingestive behavior, with an emphasis appetitive behavior. We will discuss hormonal regulators of appetitive ingestive behaviors, including the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, which potently stimulates foraging and food hoarding in Siberian hamsters. This section includes a discussion of the hormone leptin, its relation to endogenous fat stores, and its role in food deprivation-induced increases in appetitive ingestive behaviors. Next, we discuss how hormonal regulators interact with neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of ingestive behaviors, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), to regulate ingestive behavior. Finally, we discuss the potential impact that perinatal nutrient availability can have on the neuroendocrine regulation of ingestive behavior. Understanding the hormonal mechanisms that connect metabolic fuel availability to central appetite regulatory circuits should provide a better understanding of the

  20. Neuroendocrine marker expression in thyroid epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Satoh, F; Umemura, S; Yasuda, M; Osamura, R Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue sections from 50 cases with thyroid tumors, composed of 11 follicular adenomas, 10 follicular carcinomas, 14 papillary carcinomas, 10 anaplastic carcinomas, and 5 medullary carcinomas, were immunohistochemically analyzed for representative neuroendocrine markers. Immunoexpression ratios of these neuroendocrine markers were as follows: Follicular adenomas, neuron-specific enolase (NSE)63.6%, synaptophysin (SynP) 45.5%, Leu7 27.3%, NCAM 45.5%, chromogranin A (CgA) 0%, SNAP25 0%; follicular carcinomas, NSE 90.0%, SynP 80.0%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; papillary carcinomas, NSE 85.7%, SynP 78.6%, Leu7 100%, NCAM 7.0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25.0%; anaplastic carcinomas, NSE 10.0%, SynP 0%, Leu7 0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; medullary carcinomas, NSE 100%, SynP100%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 40.0%, CgA 100%, SNAP25 100%. The two follicular carcinomas, which were morphologically characterized by "insular" (or "alveolar") arrangements, showed distinct immunoexpression of NSE and SynP at the same time. By in situ hybridization (ISH), expression of mRNA for NSE was confirmed in cases with marked immunoexpression of NSE. Although no endocrine granules were found, our results suggested that a specific type of follicular carcinoma, i.e., insular variant, may be immaturely neuroendocrine-differentiated.

  1. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  2. Treatment of lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Pusceddu, Sara; Proto, Claudia; Macerelli, Marianna; Signorelli, Diego; Vitali, Milena; Ganzinelli, Monica; Gallucci, Rosaria; Zilembo, Nicoletta; Platania, Marco; Buzzoni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-06-01

    Lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (L-LCNEC) is a rare, aggressive, and difficult-to-treat tumor. It is classified as a neuroendocrine subtype of large cell lung carcinoma (LCLC) belonging to the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) group, but it is also included in the neuroendocrine tumor (NET) group. Most of the available data related to its treatment derive from retrospective analyses or small case series. For patients with L-LCNEC, prognosis is generally very poor. In early stages (I-II-III), surgery is recommended but does not seem to be sufficient. Platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy may be useful while the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is still not well defined. In patients with advanced L-LCNEC, the chemotherapy regimens used in SCLC still remain the standard of treatment, but results are not satisfactory. Due to their peculiar clinical and biological features and the lack of literature data, there is an emerging need for a consensus on the best treatment strategy for L-LCNEC and for the identification of new therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the key aspects of L-LCNEC management with the aim to clarify the most controversial issues.

  3. Preclinical models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat. The 5-year survival rate of PDA patients is 7% and PDA is predicted to become the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the USA. Despite intensive efforts, the translation of findings in preclinical studies has been ineffective, due partially to the lack of preclinical models that faithfully recapitulate features of human PDA. Here, we review current preclinical models for human PDA (eg human PDA cell lines, cell line-based xenografts and patient-derived tumour xenografts). In addition, we discuss potential applications of the recently developed pancreatic ductal organoids, three-dimensional culture systems and organoid-based xenografts as new preclinical models for PDA.

  4. Current and future systemic treatment options in metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Cagatay

    2014-01-01

    Although pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death, only modest improvement has been observed in the past two decades, single agent gemcitabine has been the only standard treatment in patients with advanced disease. Recently newer agents such as nab-paclitaxel, nimotuzumab and regimens such as FOLFIRINOX have been shown to have promising activity being superior to gemcitabine as a single agent. With better understanding of tumour biology coupled with the improvements in targeted and immunotherapies, there is increasing expectation for better response rates and extended survival in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25083302

  5. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  6. Invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Keleg, Shereen; Büchler, Peter; Ludwig, Roman; Büchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2003-01-22

    Pancreatic cancer remains a challenging disease with an overall cumulative 5-year survival rate below 1%. The process of cancer initiation, progression and metastasis is still not understood well. Invasion and tumor metastasis are closely related and both occur within a tumour-host microecology, where stroma and tumour cells exchange enzymes and cytokines that modify the local extracellular matrix, stimulate cell migration, and promote cell proliferation and tumor cell survival. During the last decade considerable progress has been made in understanding genetic alterations of genes involved in local and systemic tumor growth. The most important changes occur in genes which regulate cell cycle progression, extracellular matrix homeostasis and cell migration. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that epigenetic factors including angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis may participate in the formation of tumor metastasis. In this review we highlight the most important genetic alterations involved in tumor invasion and metastasis and further outline the role of tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in systemic tumor dissemination.

  7. Exome-level comparison of primary well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors and their cell lines.

    PubMed

    Boora, Ganesh K; Kanwar, Rahul; Kulkarni, Amit A; Pleticha, Josef; Ames, Matthew; Schroth, Gary; Beutler, Andreas S; Banck, Michaela S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine cancer cell lines are used to investigate therapeutic targets in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and have been instrumental in the design of clinical trials targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways, VEGF inhibitors, and somatostatin analogues. It remains unknown, however, whether the genomic makeup of NET cell lines reflect that of primary NET since comprehensive unbiased genome sequencing has not been performed on the cell lines. Four bronchopulmonary NET (BP-NET)-NCI-H720, NCI-H727, NCI-H835, and UMC11-and two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (panNET)-BON-1 and QGP1-were cultured. DNA was isolated, and exome sequencing was done. GATK and EXCAVATOR were used for bioinformatic analysis. We detected a total of 1,764 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants at a rate of 8 per Mb in BP-NET and 4.3 per Mb in panNET cell lines, including 52 mutated COSMIC cancer genes in these cell lines, such as TP53, BRCA1, RB1, TSC2, NOTCH1, EP300, GNAS, KDR, STK11, and APC but not ATRX, DAXX, nor MEN1. Our data suggest that mutation rate, the pattern of copy number variations, and the mutational spectra in the BP-NET cell lines are more similar to the changes observed in small cell lung cancer than those found in primary BP-NET. Likewise, mutation rate and pattern including the absence of mutations in ATRX/DAXX, MEN1, and YY1 in the panNET cell lines BON1 and QGP1 suggest that these cell lines do not have the genetic signatures of a primary panNET. These results suggest that results from experiments with BP-NET and panNET cell lines need to be interpreted with caution.

  8. Gene expression accurately distinguishes liver metastases of small bowel and pancreas neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Scott K; Maxwell, Jessica E; Carr, Jennifer C; Wang, Donghong; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sue O'Dorisio, M; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Howe, James R

    2014-12-01

    Small bowel (SBNETs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) often present with liver metastases. Although liver biopsy establishes a neuroendocrine diagnosis, the primary tumor site is frequently unknown without exploratory surgery. Gene expression differences in metastases may distinguish primary SBNETs and PNETs. This study sought to determine expression differences of four genes in neuroendocrine metastases and to create a gene expression algorithm to distinguish the primary site. Nodal and liver metastases from SBNETs and PNETs (n = 136) were collected at surgery under an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol. Quantitative PCR measured expression of bombesin-like receptor-3, opioid receptor kappa-1, oxytocin receptor, and secretin receptor in metastases. Logistic regression models defined an algorithm predicting the primary tumor site. Models were developed on a training set of 21 nodal metastases and performance was validated on an independent set of nodal and liver metastases. Expression of all four genes was significantly different in SBNET compared to PNET metastases. The optimal model employed expression of bombesin-like receptor-3 and opioid receptor kappa-1. When these genes did not amplify, the algorithm used oxytocin receptor and secretin receptor expression, which allowed classification of all 136 metastases with 94.1 % accuracy. In the independent liver metastasis validation set, 52/56 (92.9 %) were correctly classified. Positive predictive values were 92.5 % for SBNETs and 93.8 % for PNETs. This validated algorithm accurately distinguishes SBNET and PNET metastases based on their expression of four genes. High accuracy in liver metastases demonstrates applicability to the clinical setting. Studies assessing this algorithm's utility in prospective clinical decision-making are warranted.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  10. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  11. Pancreatic pseudocysts and aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2010-01-01

    A number of methods are available for the drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts, including percutaneous, endoscopic and open approaches. The author reviewed the most rently reports, and and summarized the latest advances in the pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:22558566

  12. Imaging biomarkers of brain tumour margin and tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Price, S J; Gillard, J H

    2011-12-01

    Invasion of tumour cells into the normal brain is one of the major reasons of treatment failure for gliomas. Although there is a good understanding of the molecular and cellular processes that occur during this invasion, it is not possible to detect the extent of the tumour with conventional imaging. However, there is an understanding that the degree of invasion differs with individual tumours, and yet they are all treated the same. Newer imaging techniques that probe the pathological changes within tumours may be suitable biomarkers for invasion. Imaging methods are now available that can detect subtle changes in white matter organisation (diffusion tensor imaging), tumour metabolism and cellular proliferation (using MR spectroscopy and positron emission tomography) occurring in regions of tumour that cannot be detected by conventional imaging. The role of such biomarkers of invasion should allow better delineation of tumour margins, which should improve treatment planning (especially surgery and radiotherapy) and provide information on the invasiveness of an individual tumour to help select the most appropriate therapy and help stratify patients for clinical trials.

  13. A novel approach in the treatment of neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors: Additive antiproliferative effects of interferon-γ and meta-iodobenzylguanidine

    PubMed Central

    Höpfner, Michael; Sutter, Andreas P; Huether, Alexander; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Scherübl, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Background Therapeutic options to effectively inhibit growth and spread of neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors are still limited. As both meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and interferon-γ (IFNγ) cause antineoplastic effects in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells, we investigated the antiproliferative effects of the combination of IFNγ and non-radiolabeled MIBG in neuroendocrine gut STC-1 and pancreatic carcinoid BON tumor cells. Methods and results IFNγ receptors were expressed in both models. IFNγ dose- and time-dependently inhibited the growth of both STC-1 and of BON tumor cells with IC50-values of 95 ± 15 U/ml and 135 ± 10 U/ml, respectively. Above 10 U/ml IFNγ induced apoptosis-specific caspase-3 activity in a time-dependent manner in either cell line and caused a dose-dependent arrest in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, IFNγ induced cytotoxic effects in NE tumor cells. The NE tumor-targeted drug MIBG is selectively taken up via norepinephrine transporters, thereby specifically inhibiting growth in NE tumor cells. Intriguingly, IFNγ treatment induced an upregulation of norepinephrine transporter expression in neuroendocrine tumors cells, as determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Co-application of sub-IC50 concentrations of IFNγ and MIBG led to additive growth inhibitory effects, which were mainly due to increased cytotoxicity and S-phase arrest of the cell cycle. Conclusion Our data show that IFNγ exerts antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The combination of IFNγ with the NE tumor-targeted agent MIBG leads to effective growth control at reduced doses of either drug. Thus, the administration of IFNγ alone and more so, in combination with MIBG, is a promising novel approach in the treatment of neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors. PMID:15154969

  14. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-02-06

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  15. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  16. Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumour- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Tolgay Tuyan; Gül, Ayhan; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Çelik, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumours (UTROSCTs) are an extremely rare type of uterine body tumours arising from the endometrial stroma. Epidemiology, aetiology, pathogenesis, management and natural history of UTROSCTs are still a question of debate, as there is little available data in the literature. Although rare, the possibility of UTROSCTs should be kept in mind, when a patient presents with abnormal bleeding and an enlarged uterus. UTROSCTs appear dirty white/cream-coloured, gelatinous, well-circumscribed mass with smooth surface on macroscopic examination. We present a rare case of endometrial stromal tumour with sex-cord-like differentiation which was successfully treated by hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The clinical manifestations, pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and management of these tumours are reviewed here. PMID:28208949

  17. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible tissue damage such as acinar cell atrophy and pancreatic fibrosis that results in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Recently, many studies of chronic pancreatitis have been prompted by the discovery of the pancreatic stellate cell, which has been identified and distinguished as the key effector cell of pancreatic fibrosis. However, investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of pancreatitis face many obstacles because of its anatomical location and disparate clinical course. Due to these difficulties, most of our knowledge on pancreatitis is based on research conducted using experimental models of pancreatitis. In this review, several experimental models of pancreatitis will be discussed in terms of technique, advantages, and limitations. PMID:24944983

  18. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivatable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities. PMID:26780659

  19. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways.

    PubMed

    Spring, Bryan Q; Bryan Sears, R; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E; Schoenfeld, David A; Pogue, Brian W; Pereira, Stephen P; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)--a multikinase inhibitor--encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  20. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  1. α3 Chains of type V collagen regulate breast tumour growth via glypican-1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guorui; Ge, Gaoxiang; Izzi, Valerio; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    Pericellular α3(V) collagen can affect the functioning of cells, such as adipocytes and pancreatic β cells. Here we show that α3(V) chains are an abundant product of normal mammary gland basal cells, and that α3(V) ablation in a mouse mammary tumour model inhibits mammary tumour progression by reducing the proliferative potential of tumour cells. These effects are shown to be primarily cell autonomous, from loss of α3(V) chains normally produced by tumour cells, in which they affect growth by enhancing the ability of cell surface proteoglycan glypican-1 to act as a co-receptor for FGF2. Thus, a mechanism is presented for microenvironmental influence on tumour growth. α3(V) chains are produced in both basal-like and luminal human breast tumours, and its expression levels are tightly coupled with those of glypican-1 across breast cancer types. Evidence indicates α3(V) chains as potential targets for inhibiting tumour growth and as markers of oncogenic transformation. PMID:28102194

  2. Collision of extensive exocrine and neuroendocrine neoplasms in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 revealed by cytogenetic analysis of loss of heterozygosity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moriyoshi, Koki; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kawaguchi, Michiya; Haga, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    The combination of exocrine and neuroendocrine neoplasms is rarely found in the pancreas. These combined lesions vary from a clonal tumor with mixed differentiation to the incidental co-existence of two or more independent tumors, but the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Here we report a case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) with extensive ductal and neuroendocrine neoplastic changes. These two types of tumors admixed markedly in some parts, which made it difficult to determine the pathological diagnosis based on histological findings. Cytogenetic analysis showed that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the MEN1 locus exists in neuroendocrine but not in exocrine neoplasms, indicating that independent mechanisms of tumorigenesis may occur in these two types of tumors. This case shows the usefulness of cytogenetic analysis for the diagnosis of combined tumors of the pancreas. Extensive exocrine neoplastic change, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) in virtually all pancreatic ducts and a focus of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with focal invasion, was a distinguishing feature of the present case. The possible association of ductal tumorigenesis and a MEN1 background is discussed.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis: relation to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uomo, G; Rabitti, P G

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and other pancreatic diseases, such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and pancreatic cancer (PK), remains a fairly debated question. The progression from alcoholic AP to CP is controversial, and some long-term epidemiological studies suggest that alcoholic CP might be the result of recurrent alcoholic AP (necrosis-fibrosis sequence) and a subgroup of alcoholics may present recurrent AP without progression to CP. Other predisposing factors (genetic, nutritional, environmental) seems to be important in inducing different outcomes of pancreatic damage due to alcohol. However, recurrent episodes of AP are clearly involved in pathophysiology of CP in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. A relationship between CP and subsequent PK development has long been suspected, but we actually don't know whether this association is direct or is the result of confounding factors, such as alcohol intake or cigarette smoking. Many issues should be considered as indicators of a causal association, and several of them are not fulfilled. Nonetheless, epidemiological studies (case-control or cohort studies) showed that the risk of PK is increased in patients with CP; the risk is significantly higher in tropical calcifying CP and hereditary pancreatitis. Studies on growth factors, oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and angiogenesis suggest that the sequence PC-KP is plausible from the biological standpoint.

  4. Heterogeneity of colorectal cancer risk by tumour characteristics: Large prospective study of UK women

    PubMed Central

    Burón Pust, Andrea; Alison, Rupert; Blanks, Roger; Pirie, Kirstin; Gaitskell, Kezia; Barnes, Isobel; Gathani, Toral; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Associations between behavioural and other personal factors and colorectal cancer risk have been reported to vary by tumour characteristics, but evidence is inconsistent. In a large UK‐based prospective study we examined associations of 14 postulated risk factors with colorectal cancer risk overall, and across three anatomical sites and four morphological subtypes. Among 1.3 million women, 18,518 incident colorectal cancers were identified during 13.8 (SD 3.4) years follow‐up via record linkage to national cancer registry data. Cox regression yielded adjusted relative risks. Statistical significance was assessed using correction for multiple testing. Overall, colorectal cancer risk was significantly associated with height, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, parity and menopausal hormone therapy use. For smoking there was substantial heterogeneity across morphological types; relative risks around two or greater were seen in current smokers both for signet ring cell and for neuroendocrine tumours. Obese women were also at higher risk for signet ring cell tumours. For adenocarcinomas, the large majority of colorectal cancers in the cohort, all risk factor associations were weak. There was little or no heterogeneity in risk between tumours of the right colon, left colon and rectum for any of the 14 factors examined. These epidemiological findings complement an emerging picture from molecular studies of possible different developmental pathways for different tumour types. PMID:27859268

  5. DKK3 blocked translocation of β-catenin/EMT induced by hypoxia and improved gemcitabine therapeutic effect in pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cell.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingqu; Qin, Wenjie

    2015-12-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is activated in pancreatic cancer initiation and progression. Dickkopf-related protein 3 (DKK3) is a member of the human Dickkopf family and an antagonist of Wnt ligand activity. However, the function of DKK3 in this pathway in pancreatic cancer is rarely known. We examined the expression of DKK3 in six human pancreatic cancer cell lines, 75 pancreatic cancer and 75 adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Dickkopf-related protein 3 was frequently silenced and methylation in pancreatic cancer cell lines (3/6). The expression of DKK3 was significantly lower in pancreatic cancer tissues than in adjacent normal pancreas tissues. Further, ectopic expression of DKK3 inhibits nuclear translocation of β-catenin induced by hypoxia in pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cell. The forced expression of DKK3 markedly suppressed migration and the stem cell-like phenotype of pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cell in hypoxic conditions through reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The stable expression of DKK3 sensitizes pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cell to gemcitabine, delays tumour growth and augments gemcitabine therapeutic effect in pancreatic cancer xenotransplantation model. Thus, we conclude from our finding that DKK3 is a tumour suppressor and improved gemcitabine therapeutic effect through inducing apoptosis and regulating β-catenin/EMT signalling in pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cell.

  6. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J.-Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes. PMID:28241470

  7. Pancreatic solitary fibrous tumor causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keigo; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Felizola, Saulo J A; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Takanami, Kentaro; Katakami, Hideki; Hirota, Seiichi; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-Ichi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-11-15

    Solitary fibrous tumors occasionally present with hypoglycemia because of the excessive release of insulin-like growth factor II. We report the first case of pancreatic solitary fibrous tumor causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. An 82-year-old Japanese man presented with lower limb edema, uncontrolled hypertension, hypokalemia, and baseline hypercortisolism. Distal pancreatectomy was performed after the clinical diagnosis of a neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone. On histological examination, the tumor showed spindle cells in a fascicular arrangement. The diagnosis of the solitary fibrous tumor was confirmed by the identification of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene and positive immuno-histochemical staining for STAT6 and CD34. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, mRNA that encoded proopiomelanocortin, precursor of adrenocorticotropic hormone, was detected. Proopiomelanocortin production through the demethylation of the promoter region Domain IV was detected. Pancreatic solitary fibrous tumors represent a new cause of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome.

  8. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  9. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  10. The expression of S100A8 in pancreatic cancer-associated monocytes is associated with the Smad4 status of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Adnan A; Vimalachandran, Dale; Thompson, Christopher C; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Nedjadi, Taoufik; Shekouh, Ali; Campbell, Fiona; Dodson, Andrew; Prime, Wendy; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Costello, Eithne

    2007-06-01

    The cross-talk between tumour cells and the surrounding supporting host cells (stroma) is a key regulator of cancer growth and progression. By undertaking 2-DE analysis of laser capture microdissected malignant and stromal components of pancreatic tumours and benign ductal elements, we have identified high levels of S100A8 and S100A9 in tumour-associated stroma but not in benign or malignant epithelia. Immunohistochemical analysis (n = 71 patients) revealed strong expression of both proteins in stromal myeloid cells, subsequently identified as CD14(+)/CD68(- )monocytes/macrophages. Co-immunofluorescence revealed that S100A8 was expressed in a subset of S100A9-positive cells. Correlation of the expression of S100A8 and S100A9 to patient parameters revealed that the microenvironments of tumours which lacked expression of the tumour suppressor protein, Smad4, had significantly reduced numbers of S100A8-immunoreactive (p = 0.023) but not S100A9-immunoreactive (p = 0.21) cells. The ratio of S100A8- to S100A9-positive cells within individual tumours was significantly lower in Smad4-negative tumours than in Smad4-positive tumours (p<0.003). Pancreatitic specimens also contained S100A8- and S100A9-expressing cells, although this was not observed in regions displaying extensive fibrosis. In conclusion, our study provides an extensive analysis of S100A8 and S100A9 in pancreatic disease and highlights a potentially important relationship between pancreatic cancer cells and their surrounding microenvironment.

  11. Small amounts of tissue preserve pancreatic function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zipeng; Yin, Jie; Wei, Jishu; Dai, Cuncai; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Xu, Qing; Dai, Hao; Li, Qiang; Guo, Feng; Chen, Jianmin; Xi, Chunhua; Wu, Pengfei; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Middle-segment preserving pancreatectomy (MPP) is a novel procedure for treating multifocal lesions of the pancreas while preserving pancreatic function. However, long-term pancreatic function after this procedure remains unclear. The aims of this current study are to investigate short- and long-term outcomes, especially long-term pancreatic endocrine function, after MPP. From September 2011 to December 2015, 7 patients underwent MPP in our institution, and 5 cases with long-term outcomes were further analyzed in a retrospective manner. Percentage of tissue preservation was calculated using computed tomography volumetry. Serum insulin and C-peptide levels after oral glucose challenge were evaluated in 5 patients. Beta-cell secreting function including modified homeostasis model assessment of beta-cell function (HOMA2-beta), area under the curve (AUC) for C-peptide, and C-peptide index were evaluated and compared with those after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and total pancreatectomy. Exocrine function was assessed based on questionnaires. Our case series included 3 women and 2 men, with median age of 50 (37–81) years. Four patients underwent pylorus-preserving PD together with distal pancreatectomy (DP), including 1 with spleen preserved. The remaining patient underwent Beger procedure and spleen-preserving DP. Median operation time and estimated intraoperative blood loss were 330 (250–615) min and 800 (400–5500) mL, respectively. Histological examination revealed 3 cases of metastatic lesion to the pancreas, 1 case of chronic pancreatitis, and 1 neuroendocrine tumor. Major postoperative complications included 3 cases of delayed gastric emptying and 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula. Imaging studies showed that segments representing 18.2% to 39.5% of the pancreas with good blood supply had been preserved. With a median 35.0 months of follow-ups on pancreatic functions, only 1 patient developed new-onset diabetes mellitus of the 4

  12. Programming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in the development of neuroendocrine autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Geenen, Vincent; Bodart, Gwennaëlle; Henry, Séverine; Michaux, Hélène; Dardenne, Olivier; Charlet-Renard, Chantal; Martens, Henri; Hober, Didier

    2013-01-01

    For centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus was considered as only a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus first appeared in cartilaginous fishes some 500 million years ago, at the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was a necessity for the survival of species, given the potent evolutionary pressure imposed by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent in the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. A new paradigm of “neuroendocrine self-peptides” has been proposed, together with the definition of “neuroendocrine self.” Neuroendocrine self-peptides are secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) not according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but are processed for presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells, which emerge during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). At the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that can inhibit, in the periphery, those self-reactive T cells that escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments indicate that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands results primarily from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic

  13. Programming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in the development of neuroendocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Geenen, Vincent; Bodart, Gwennaëlle; Henry, Séverine; Michaux, Hélène; Dardenne, Olivier; Charlet-Renard, Chantal; Martens, Henri; Hober, Didier

    2013-10-16

    For centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus was considered as only a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus first appeared in cartilaginous fishes some 500 million years ago, at the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was a necessity for the survival of species, given the potent evolutionary pressure imposed by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent in the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. A new paradigm of "neuroendocrine self-peptides" has been proposed, together with the definition of "neuroendocrine self." Neuroendocrine self-peptides are secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) not according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but are processed for presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells, which emerge during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). At the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that can inhibit, in the periphery, those self-reactive T cells that escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments indicate that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands results primarily from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic or

  14. Benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions in men.

    PubMed Central

    Karhunen, P J

    1986-01-01

    In a consecutive medicolegal necropsy series benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions occurred in 52% of the 95 men aged 35-69 years. The incidence increased with age, mainly due to small bile duct tumours (n = 26; mean age 56.7 years; p less than 0.01; mean size 1.3 mm). The next most common tumours were cavernous hemangiomas (n = 19; mean age 53.9 years; mean size 5.2 mm) that were not related to age. Focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 3; mean size 8.0 mm) tended to occur in a younger age group (mean age 40.3 years; p less than 0.001). Multiple bile duct tumours were present in 46% and hemangiomas in 50% of the men studied. Liver cell adenoma, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis were incidental findings (one case of each). Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was associated with the consumption of alcohol and a total dose of 21.5 g of testosterone. These results indicate that benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions are not rare in men but may remain undetected because of their small size. Images PMID:3950039

  15. Global gene expression in neuroendocrine tumors from patients with the MEN1 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dilley, William G; Kalyanaraman, Somasundaram; Verma, Sulekha; Cobb, J Perren; Laramie, Jason M; Lairmore, Terry C

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1, OMIM 131100) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by endocrine tumors of the parathyroids, pancreatic islets and pituitary. The disease is caused by the functional loss of the tumor suppressor protein menin, coded by the MEN1 gene. The protein sequence has no significant homology to known consensus motifs. In vitro studies have shown menin binding to JunD, Pem, Smad3, NF-kappaB, nm23H1, and RPA2 proteins. However, none of these binding studies have led to a convincing theory of how loss-of-menin leads to neoplasia. Results Global gene expression studies on eight neuroendocrine tumors from MEN1 patients and 4 normal islet controls was performed utilizing Affymetrix U95Av2 chips. Overall hierarchical clustering placed all tumors in one group separate from the group of normal islets. Within the group of tumors, those of the same type were mostly clustered together. The clustering analysis also revealed 19 apoptosis-related genes that were under-expressed in the group of tumors. There were 193 genes that were increased/decreased by at least 2-fold in the tumors relative to the normal islets and that had a t-test significance value of p < = 0.005. Forty-five of these genes were increased and 148 were decreased in the tumors relative to the controls. One hundred and four of the genes could be classified as being involved in cell growth, cell death, or signal transduction. The results from 11 genes were selected for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. The average correlation coefficient was 0.655 (range 0.235–0.964). Conclusion This is the first analysis of global gene expression in MEN1-associated neuroendocrine tumors. Many genes were identified which were differentially expressed in neuroendocrine tumors arising in patients with the MEN1 syndrome, as compared with normal human islet cells. The expression of a group of apoptosis-related genes was significantly suppressed, suggesting that these genes may

  16. Diffuse Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cansız Ersöz, Cevriye; Cangır, Ayten Kayı; Dizbay Sak, Serpil

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is a rare pulmonary disorder characterised by a proliferation of neuroendocrine cells within the lung. It is believed that a minority of the patients with DIPNECH can develop carcinoid tumors. Here, we report two new cases of DIPNECH with coexisting carcinoid tumors. PMID:27293939

  17. SIRT3 & SIRT7: Potential Novel Biomarkers for Determining Outcome in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Liane M.; McCluney, Simon; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Thomson, Jackie; MacDonald, Alasdair I.; Oien, Karin; Dickson, Euan J.; Carter, C. Ross; McKay, Colin J.; Shiels, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The sirtuin gene family has been linked with tumourigenesis, in both a tumour promoter and suppressor capacity. Information regarding the function of sirtuins in pancreatic cancer is sparse and equivocal. We undertook a novel study investigating SIRT1-7 protein expression in a cohort of pancreatic tumours. The aim of this study was to establish a protein expression profile for SIRT1-7 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and to determine if there were associations between SIRT1-7 expression, clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. Material and Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of SIRT1-7 protein levels was undertaken in a tissue micro-array comprising 77 resected PDACs. Statistical analyses determined if SIRT1-7 protein expression was associated with clinical parameters or outcome. Results Two sirtuin family members demonstrated significant associations with clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. Low level SIRT3 expression in the tumour cytoplasm correlated with more aggressive tumours, and a shorter time to relapse and death, in the absence of chemotherapeutic intervention. Low levels of nuclear SIRT7 expression were also associated with an aggressive tumour phenotype and poorer outcome, as measured by disease-free and disease-specific survival time, 12 months post-diagnosis. Conclusions Our data suggests that SIRT3 and SIRT7 possess tumour suppressor properties in the context of pancreatic cancer. SIRT3 may also represent a novel predictive biomarker to determine which patients may or may not respond to chemotherapy. This study opens up an interesting avenue of investigation to potentially identify predictive biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer, a disease that has seen no significant improvement in survival over the past 40 years. PMID:26121130

  18. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in pregnancy and parturition.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Felice; Imperatore, Alberto; Challis, John R G

    2010-12-01

    The complex mechanisms controlling human parturition involves mother, fetus, and placenta, and stress is a key element activating a series of physiological adaptive responses. Preterm birth is a clinical syndrome that shares several characteristics with term birth. A major role for the neuroendocrine mechanisms has been proposed, and placenta/membranes are sources for neurohormones and peptides. Oxytocin (OT) is the neurohormone whose major target is uterine contractility and placenta represents a novel source that contributes to the mechanisms of parturition. The CRH/urocortin (Ucn) family is another important neuroendocrine pathway involved in term and preterm birth. The CRH/Ucn family consists of four ligands: CRH, Ucn, Ucn2, and Ucn3. These peptides have a pleyotropic function and are expressed by human placenta and fetal membranes. Uterine contractility, blood vessel tone, and immune function are influenced by CRH/Ucns during pregnancy and undergo major changes at parturition. Among the others, neurohormones, relaxin, parathyroid hormone-related protein, opioids, neurosteroids, and monoamines are expressed and secreted from placental tissues at parturition. Preterm birth is the consequence of a premature and sustained activation of endocrine and immune responses. A preterm birth evidence for a premature activation of OT secretion as well as increased maternal plasma CRH levels suggests a pathogenic role of these neurohormones. A decrease of maternal serum CRH-binding protein is a concurrent event. At midgestation, placental hypersecretion of CRH or Ucn has been proposed as a predictive marker of subsequent preterm delivery. While placenta represents the major source for CRH, fetus abundantly secretes Ucn and adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone in women with preterm birth. The relevant role of neuroendocrine mechanisms in preterm birth is sustained by basic and clinic implications.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, De-Bing; Wei, Bing; Abraham, Susan C; Huo, Lei; Albarracin, Constance T; Zhang, Hong; Babiera, Gildy; Caudle, Abigail S; Akay, Catherine L; Rao, Pulivarthi; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Lu, Xinyan; Wu, Yun

    2014-09-01

    Primary mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is an uncommon entity that accounts for 2% to 5% of breast carcinomas. Recent reports have shown that NEC of the breast is an aggressive subtype of mammary carcinoma that is distinct from invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified, and have suggested that these tumors have a poorer prognosis than invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified. In this study, we provide the first cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC using both conventional G-banding and spectral karyotype on a group of 7 tumors. We identified clonal chromosomal aberrations in 5 (71.4%) cases, with 4 of them showing complex karyotypes. Of these, recurrent numerical aberrations included gain of chromosome 7 (n = 2) and loss of chromosome 15 (n = 2). Recurrent clonal structural chromosomal aberrations involved chromosomes 1 (n = 3), 3 (n = 2), 6q (n = 3), and 17q (n = 3). Of the 4 (57.1%) cases with complex karyotypes, 2 showed evidence of chromothripsis, a phenomenon in which tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements occur in a one-off cellular crisis. One of these had evidence of chromothripsis involving chromosomes 1, 6, 8, and 15. The other also had evidence of chromosome 8 chromothripsis, making this a recurrent finding shared by both cases. We also found that mammary NEC shared some cytogenetic abnormalities--such as trisomy 7 and 12--with other neuroendocrine tumors in the lung and gastrointestinal tract, suggesting trisomy 7 and 12 as potential common molecular aberrations in neuroendocrine tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first report on molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC.

  20. Laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation of neuroendocrine liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Berber, Eren; Flesher, Nora; Siperstein, Allan E

    2002-08-01

    We previously reported on the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) for treating hepatic neuroendocrine metastases. The aim of this study is to report our 5-year RFA experience in the treatment of these challenging group of patients. Of the 222 patients with 803 liver primary and secondary tumors undergoing laparoscopic RFA between January 1996 and August 2001, a total of 34 patients with 234 tumors had neuroendocrine liver metastases. There were 25 men and 9 women with a mean +/- SEM age of 52 +/- 2 years who underwent 42 ablations. Primary tumor types included carcinoid tumor in 18 patients, medullary thyroid cancer in 7, secreting islet cell tumor in 5, and nonsecreting islet cell tumor in 4. There was no mortality, and the morbidity was 5%. The mean hospital stay was 1.1 days. Symptoms were ameliorated in 95%, with significant or complete symptom control in 80% of the patients for a mean of 10+ months (range 6-24 months). All patients were followed for a mean +/- SEM of 1.6 +/- 0.2 years (range 1.0-5.4 years). During this period new liver lesions developed in 28% of patients, new extrahepatic disease in 25%, and local liver recurrence in 13%; existing liver lesions progressed in 13%. Overall 41% of patients showed no progression of their cancer. Nine patients (27%) died. Mean +/- SEM survivals after diagnosis of primary disease, detection of liver metastases, and performance of RFA were 5.5 +/- 0.8 years, 3.0 +/- 0.3 years, and 1.6 +/- 0.2 years, respectively. Sixty-five percent of the patients demonstrated a partial or significant decrease in their tumor markers during follow-up. In conclusion, RFA provides excellent local tumor control with overnight hospitalization and low morbidity in the treatment of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors. It is a useful modality in the management of these challenging group of patients.

  1. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  2. Clinical Trial Design in Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Daniel M; Yao, James C

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) present tremendous opportunities for productive clinical investigation, but substantial challenges as well. Investigators must be aware of common pitfalls in study design, informed by an understanding of the history of trials in the field, to make the best use of available data and our patient volunteers. We believe the salient issues in clinical trial design and interpretation in the NET field are patient homogeneity, standardized response assessment, and rigorous design and execution. Whether designing or interpreting a study in patients with NET, these principles should drive assessment.

  3. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  4. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  5. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D; Tischler, Arthur S

    2017-03-01

    Updated editions of The World Health Organization Classification of Tumours Pathology & Genetics for both Head and Neck Tumours and Tumours of Endocrine Organs took place in 2016 based on consensus conferences. These editions present unification of concepts in paragangliomas and highlight expanding knowledge of their etiology. There is a major emphasis in the new bluebooks on familial/syndromic paragangliomas, representing ~40% of all head and neck paragangliomas. Ancillary use of immunohistochemical evaluation, specifically of SDHB, allows the pathologist to screen for a large subset of these potentially hereditary cases. In addition, similarly to other neuroendocrine tumors, paragangliomas are now considered to represent a continuum of risk, and are assessed in terms of risk stratification. Tumors with SDHB mutations pose the highest risk for metastasis. There is currently no validated or endorsed histologic grading system. Paragangliomas remain tumors of undetermined biologic potential and should not be termed benign.

  6. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  7. Murine Bioluminescent Hepatic Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the establishment of liver metastases in a mouse model that can be subsequently analysed by bioluminescent imaging. Tumour cells are administered specifically to the liver to induce a localised liver tumour, via mobilisation of the spleen and splitting into two, leaving intact the vascular pedicle for each half of the spleen. Lewis lung carcinoma cells that constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc1) are inoculated into one hemi-spleen which is then resected 10 minutes later. The other hemi-spleen is left intact and returned to the abdomen. Liver tumour growth can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS whole body imaging system. Quantitative imaging of tumour growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation of viable tumour cells. Tumour cell death and necrosis due to drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This mouse model allows for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastatic tumour-cell survival and growth and can be used for the evaluation of therapeutics of liver metastasis. PMID:20689502

  8. An Intraoperative beta (-) Detecting Probe for Radio-Guided Surgery in Tumour Resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomando, Andrea; Bellini, Fabio; Bocci, Valerio; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Chiodi, Giacomo; Patera, Vincenzo; Recchia, Luigi; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Paramatti, Riccardo; Voena, Cecilia; Donnarumma, Raffaella; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Morganti, Silvio

    2016-10-01

    The development of the $\\beta^-$ based radio-guided surgery aims to extend the technique to those tumours where surgery is the only possible treatment and the assessment of the resection would most profit from the low background around the lesion, as for brain tumours. Feasibility studies on meningioma, glioma, and neuroendocrine tumors already estimated the potentiality of this new treatment. To validate the technique, prototypes of the intraoperative probe required by the technique to detect $\\beta^-$ radiation have been developed. This paper discusses the design details of the device and the tests performed in laboratory. In such tests particular care has to be taken to reproduce the surgical field conditions. The innovative technique to produce specific phantoms and the dedicated testing protocols is described in detail.

  9. Review of endoscopic radiofrequency in biliopancreatic tumours with emphasis on clinical benefits, controversies and safety.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2016-10-07

    Most pancreatic cancers and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are unresectable at the time of diagnosis, and even in case of a resectable cancer, for elderly or patients with coexistent comorbidities, surgery is not an option. Current treatment alternatives in these scenarios are very limited. Biliary stenting with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is the mainstay palliative treatment of biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma. Nevertheless, more than 50% of SEMS become occluded after 6 mo due to tumour over- and ingrowth, leading to hospital readmissions and reinterventions that significantly impair quality of life. Regimes of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy also provide minimal survival benefits. Therefore, novel therapies are eagerly awaited. Radiofrequency (RF) energy causes coagulative necrosis leading to local destruction of the accessed malignant tissue and has an established role in the treatment of malignancies in several solid organs, especially liver cancers. However, pancreatic and extrahepatic biliary cancers are not easily accessed by a percutaneous route, making the procedure dangerous. Over the past five years, the development of dedicated devices compatible with endoscopic instruments has offered a minimally invasive option for RF energy delivery in biliopancreatic cancers. Emerging experience with endoscopic RF ablation (RFA) in this setting has been reported in the literature, but little is known about its feasibility, efficacy and safety. A literature review makes it clear that RFA in biliopancreatic tumours is feasible with high rates of technical success and acceptable safety profile. Although available data suggest a benefit of survival with RFA, there is not enough evidence to draw a firm conclusion about its efficacy. For this reason, prospective randomized trials comparing RFA with standard palliative treatments with quality-of-life and survival endpoints are required. Anecdotal reports have also

  10. Review of endoscopic radiofrequency in biliopancreatic tumours with emphasis on clinical benefits, controversies and safety

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are unresectable at the time of diagnosis, and even in case of a resectable cancer, for elderly or patients with coexistent comorbidities, surgery is not an option. Current treatment alternatives in these scenarios are very limited. Biliary stenting with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is the mainstay palliative treatment of biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma. Nevertheless, more than 50% of SEMS become occluded after 6 mo due to tumour over- and ingrowth, leading to hospital readmissions and reinterventions that significantly impair quality of life. Regimes of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy also provide minimal survival benefits. Therefore, novel therapies are eagerly awaited. Radiofrequency (RF) energy causes coagulative necrosis leading to local destruction of the accessed malignant tissue and has an established role in the treatment of malignancies in several solid organs, especially liver cancers. However, pancreatic and extrahepatic biliary cancers are not easily accessed by a percutaneous route, making the procedure dangerous. Over the past five years, the development of dedicated devices compatible with endoscopic instruments has offered a minimally invasive option for RF energy delivery in biliopancreatic cancers. Emerging experience with endoscopic RF ablation (RFA) in this setting has been reported in the literature, but little is known about its feasibility, efficacy and safety. A literature review makes it clear that RFA in biliopancreatic tumours is feasible with high rates of technical success and acceptable safety profile. Although available data suggest a benefit of survival with RFA, there is not enough evidence to draw a firm conclusion about its efficacy. For this reason, prospective randomized trials comparing RFA with standard palliative treatments with quality-of-life and survival endpoints are required. Anecdotal reports have also

  11. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  12. Radical resection and enucleation in Chinese adolescents with pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Jin, Chen; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Li, Ji; Yang, Feng; Lin, Quan-Jun; Fu, De-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic tumors rarely occur in adolescents, and the appropriateness of radical resection for these patients remains controversial. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for patients younger than 19 years who underwent radical resection or limited resection (enucleation) between 2000 and 2015. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, operative details, growth, and survival were analyzed. During the study period, 11 adolescents (mean age, 16.18 years; standard deviation, 1.99; interquartile range, 15.0–18.0) underwent radical resection (n = 7) or enucleation (n = 4) to treat solid pseudopapillary tumors (n = 5), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n = 5), or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 1). None of the 7 patients who underwent radical resection experienced recurrence or serious complications, while 3 of 4 patients who underwent enucleation experienced recurrence (P = 0.02). Recurrence-free survival was slightly longer in patients who underwent radical resection, and this procedure did not appear to affect adolescent growth and development. Radical resection might be safe and effective for adolescents with pancreatic tumors. PMID:28328854

  13. Metastatic Insulinoma Following Resection of Nonsecreting Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ilyssa O.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented to our clinic for recurrent hypoglycemia after undergoing resection of an incidentally discovered nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumor 6 years ago. She underwent a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, after which she developed diabetes and was placed on an insulin pump. Pathology showed a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm with negative islet hormone immunostains. Two years later, computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver lesions. Biopsy of a liver lesion showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm, consistent with pancreatic origin. Six years later, she presented to clinic with 1.5 years of recurrent hypoglycemia. Laboratory results showed elevated proinsulin, insulin levels, and c-peptide levels during a hypoglycemic episode. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen redemonstrated multiple liver lesions. Repeated transarterial catheter chemoembolization and microwave thermal ablation controlled hypoglycemia. The unusual features of interest of this case include the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumor to a metastatic insulinoma and the occurrence of atrial flutter after octreotide for treatment. PMID:26425568

  14. Sublingual apomorphine as a neuroendocrine probe.

    PubMed

    Brunerova, Ludmila; Potockova, Jana; Horacek, Jiri; Koprivova, Helena; Rehula, Milan; Andel, Michal

    2012-07-30

    Subcutaneous apomorphine, a dopaminergic agonist, is used as a neuroendocrine probe for assessing central dopaminergic activity. The aim of our study was to test sublingual apomorphine for the same purpose. We administered sublingual apomorphine in a weight-dependent dose (0.033 mg/kg) to 42 healthy men. Prolactin and growth hormone levels were measured before and after the administration at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. Subjects filled in Zung's self-assessment scores of anxiety (SAS) and depression (SDS) questionnaires before and after the test. Areas under the curve for prolactin and growth hormone levels were calculated using the trapezoidal rule. All subjects showed decreased prolactin, and 40/42 subjects showed increased growth hormone, in response to sublingual apomorphine. Average peak value for prolactin was -4.6±1.8 μg/l. Average peak value for growth hormone was 8.1±8.5 ng/ml for the whole group, and 9.6±8.1 ng/ml after exclusion of two negative growth hormone responders. Sublingual apomorphine produced no major side effects. Significant decreases in SAS (21.5±5.7 vs. 20.6±5.5) and SDS (9.7±7.8 vs. 7.8±6.8) scores were observed after the test. Sublingually administered apomorphine appears to be well tolerated and useful as a neuroendocrine marker of central dopaminergic activity.

  15. Neuroendocrine changes with reproductive aging in women.

    PubMed

    Hall, Janet E

    2007-09-01

    Aging has dramatic effects on the reproductive system in women. Undoubtedly, the most notable changes in the neuroendocrine axis arise from the loss of ovarian function, and thus, the loss of negative feedback on the hypothalamus and pituitary. Progressive decreases in inhibin B and inhibin A result in an early increase in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which initially maintains folliculogenesis and estradiol secretion. Over time, regular ovulatory cycles give way to inconsistent folliculogenesis and ovulation, dramatic swings in estradiol and gonadotropin levels, and markedly irregular cycles. Changes in estrogen positive feedback may contribute to cycle disruption. Studies in younger and older postmenopausal women indicate that changes in the neuroendocrine axis occur with aging that are independent of the changing ovarian hormonal milieu of the menopausal transition. Luteinizing hormone and FSH decrease progressively after the menopause, as does gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse frequency. However, the overall amount of GnRH increases with aging, consistent with a significant degree of adaptability in the aging brain in women, and suggesting that aging alters pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. Estrogen negative feedback is not altered by aging; studies of the effects of aging on estrogen positive feedback are ongoing.

  16. Neuroendocrine effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Maureen E; Kasturi, Badrinarayanan S; Barber, Matthew; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; MohanKumar, Puliyur S; MohanKumar, Sheba M J

    2003-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a degradation product of sulfonyl-based fluorochemicals that are used extensively in industrial and household applications. Humans and wildlife are exposed to this class of compounds from several sources. Toxicity tests in rodents have raised concerns about potential developmental, reproductive, and systemic effects of PFOS. However, the effect of PFOS on the neuroendocrine system has not been investigated thus far. In this study, adult female rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0, 1, or 10 mg PFOS/kg body weight (BW) for 2 weeks. Food and water intake, BW, and estrous cycles were monitored daily. At the end of treatment, PFOS levels in tissues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) interfaced with electrospray mass spectrometry. Changes in brain monoamines were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and serum corticosterone and leptin were monitored using radioimmunoassay. Treatment with PFOS produced a dose-dependent accumulation of this chemical in various body tissues, including the brain. PFOS exposure decreased food intake and BW in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with PFOS affected estrous cyclicity and increased serum corticosterone levels while decreasing serum leptin concentrations. PFOS treatment also increased norepinephrine concentrations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These results indicate that exposure to PFOS can affect the neuroendocrine system in rats. PMID:12948888

  17. Gestational dexamethasone alters fetal neuroendocrine axis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-06

    This study tested whether the maternal transport of dexamethasone (DEXA) may affect the development of the neuroendocrine system. DEXA (0.2mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injection) was administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In the DEXA-treated group, a decrease in maternal serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and increase in thyrotropin (TSH) levels (hypothyroid status) were observed at GDs 15 & 20 with respect to control group. The reverse pattern (hyperthyroid status) was observed in their fetuses at embryonic days (EDs) 15 & 20. Although the maternal body weight was diminished, the weight of the thyroid gland was increased at studied GDs as compared to the control group. The fetal growth retardation, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinism, and cytokines distortions (transforming growth factor-beta; TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF-α, and interferon-γ; IFN-γ) were noticed at examined EDs if compared to the control group. Alternatively, the maternofetal thyroid dysfunctions due to the maternal DEXA administration attenuated the levels of fetal cerebral norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), and elevated the levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) at considered days. These alterations were age-dependent and might damage the nerve transmission. Finally, maternal DEXA might act as neuroendocrine disruptor causing dyshormonogenesis and fetal cerebral dysfunction.

  18. CAM 17.1--a new diagnostic marker in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gansauge, F.; Gansauge, S.; Parker, N.; Beger, M. I.; Poch, B.; Link, K. H.; Safi, F.; Beger, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    CAM 17.1-Ab is a recently described monoclonal antibody that detects a mucus glycoprotein with high specificity for intestinal mucus, particularly in the colon, small intestine, biliary tract and pancreas. We investigated the expression and release of CAM 17.1 in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and tissue specimens of normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. CAM 17.1 was weakly expressed on normal ductal cells and chronic pancreatitis, whereas it was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Serum analysis using a new enzyme-linked antibody sandwich assay (CAM 17.1/WGA) of patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer or other gastrointestinal cancer and of healthy blood donors revealed a high sensitivity (67%) and excellent specificity (90%) of CAM 17.1/WGA assay in pancreatic cancer. In comparison with the tumour marker CA19-9, the sensitivity of the CAM 17.1/WGA assay was similar to the sensitivity of CA 19-9 (67% and 76%, P = 0.22), whereas the specificity of CAM 17.1/WGA assay was higher than in CA 19-9 (90% compared with 78% in chronic pancreatitis, P > 0.05). Images Figure 2 PMID:8980403

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  1. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  2. Overexpression of Id-1 is significantly associated with tumour angiogenesis in human pancreas cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, K T; Lee, Y W; Lee, J K; Choi, S H; Rhee, J C; Paik, S S; Kong, G

    2004-03-22

    It has been suggested that Id-1 has a critical role in the tumour progression and aggressiveness of several human cancers. However, the clinicopathological and biological significance of Id-1 overexpression remains unclear in human primary cancer. To investigate the association between Id-1 expression and cell proliferation or tumour angiogenesis, we examined the cell cycle kinetic indices (the proliferation and apoptotic indices, PI and AI) and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) in 65 human pancreatic cancers. We also investigated the relationship between its expression and various clinicopathological factors to determine the clinical significance of Id-1 overexpression. Out of a total 65 cases, 32 (49.3%) showed overexpression of Id-1 vs normal tissues. Id-1 expression was found to be significantly associated with MVD (P=0.002). In further analysis of subgroups with higher and lower Id-1 expression, tumours with higher Id-1 expression (scores 4 and 5) showed significantly higher MVD than tumours with lower expression of Id-1 (scores 2 and 3) (111.18+/-57.14 vs 64.13+/-28.19, P<0.001). However, no significant association was found between Id-1 overexpression and patient survival rate. No significant association was also found between Id-1 expression and cell cycle kinetic indices (PI or AI) in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the overexpression of Id-1 protein was not correlated with any significant clinicopathologic factors. These findings indicate that Id-1 overexpression is closely related with tumour angiogenesis and a higher density of intratumoral vessel, but that it is not associated with a poorer prognosis of survival or a higher cell proliferative potential in human pancreatic cancer.

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  4. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  5. AAVP displaying octreotide for ligand-directed therapeutic transgene delivery in neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tracey L.; Yuan, Ziqiang; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Sanchez Claros, Carmen; Adem, Asha; Cui, Min-Hui; Branch, Craig A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Libutti, Steven K.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inoperable or unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have limited treatment options. These rare human tumors often express somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and thus are clinically responsive to certain relatively stable somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide. Unfortunately, however, this tumor response is generally short-lived. Here we designed a hybrid adeno-associated virus and phage (AAVP) vector displaying biologically active octreotide on the viral surface for ligand-directed delivery, cell internalization, and transduction of an apoptosis-promoting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) transgene specifically to NETs. These functional attributes of AAVP-TNF particles displaying the octreotide peptide motif (termed Oct-AAVP-TNF) were confirmed in vitro, in SSTR type 2-expressing NET cells, and in vivo using cohorts of pancreatic NET-bearing Men1 tumor-suppressor gene KO mice, a transgenic model of functioning (i.e., insulin-secreting) tumors that genetically and clinically recapitulates the human disease. Finally, preclinical imaging and therapeutic experiments with pancreatic NET-bearing mice demonstrated that Oct-AAVP-TNF lowered tumor metabolism and insulin secretion, reduced tumor size, and improved mouse survival. Taken together, these proof-of-concept results establish Oct-AAVP-TNF as a strong therapeutic candidate for patients with NETs of the pancreas. More broadly, the demonstration that a known, short, biologically active motif can direct tumor targeting and receptor-mediated internalization of AAVP particles may streamline the potential utility of myriad other short peptide motifs and provide a blueprint for therapeutic applications in a variety of cancers and perhaps many nonmalignant diseases as well. PMID:26884209

  6. [Pancreatic tumors--pessimism, optimism or realism?].

    PubMed

    Leffler, J; Dvorák, J

    1998-08-01

    Among 35 patients with the preoperative diagnosis of a tumour of the head of the pancreas who had a radical operation at the Surgical Clinic of the Second Medical Faculty Charles University in Prague-Motol between January 1995 and March 1998 a malignant tumour was confirmed in 24 instances. Another nine patients had a histological finding of chronic pancreatitis and the remaining two patients a benign cystadenoma of the pancreas. The 30-day mortality in the whole group is 5.7% (2/35). Both deaths within 30 days after surgery were due to massive haemorrhage into the upper GIT in patients with pancreatic cancer. The haemorrhage developed within 21 and 30 days after surgery. The source of haemorrhage was not proved unequivocally, neither clinically nor post mortem. Obviously late haemorrhage from some gastrointestinal anastomosis was involved. From a total of 24 patients after Whipple's operation on account of a malignant tumour of the head of the pancreas nine died. The mean survival period was seven months after surgery. Fifteen patients survive and after a mean follow-up period of 14 months the median of survival calculated to the date of March 31 1998 is 17 months for stage UICC I and five months for stage UICC III. Because of the short follow-up period the results cannot be compared properly with data in the contemporary literature but they are promising for further work in this sphere of surgery and evidence that it is correct to refute the nihilist view held in the past. Hitherto achieved therapeutic results in this country and abroad certainly do not justify yet an optimistic view as regards the perspective of patients with carcinoma of the pancreas.

  7. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  8. S100A6 binds to annexin 2 in pancreatic cancer cells and promotes pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Nedjadi, T; Kitteringham, N; Campbell, F; Jenkins, R E; Park, B K; Navarro, P; Ashcroft, F; Tepikin, A; Neoptolemos, J P; Costello, E

    2009-01-01

    Background: High levels of S100A6 have been associated with poor outcome in pancreatic cancer patients. The functional role of S100A6 is, however, poorly understood. Methods: Immunoprecipitation followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were undertaken to identify S100A6 interacting proteins in pancreatic cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry and coimmunofluorescence were performed to examine expression or colocalisation of proteins. siRNA was used to deplete specific proteins and effects on motility were measured using Boyden Chamber and wound healing assays. Results: Our proteomic screen to identify S100A6 interacting proteins revealed annexin 11, annexin 2, tropomyosin β and a candidate novel interactor lamin B1. Of these, annexin 2 was considered particularly interesting, as, like S100A6, it is expressed early in the development of pancreatic cancer and overexpression occurs with high frequency in invasive cancer. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between annexin 2 and S100A6 and the proteins colocalised, particularly in the plasma membrane of cultured pancreatic cancer cells and primary pancreatic tumour tissue. Analysis of primary pancreatic cancer specimens (n=55) revealed a strong association between high levels of cytoplasmic S100A6 and the presence of annexin 2 in the plasma membrane of cancer cells (P=0.009). Depletion of S100A6 was accompanied by diminished levels of membrane annexin 2 and caused a pronounced reduction in the motility of pancreatic cancer cells. Conclusion: These findings point towards a functional role for S100A6 that may help explain the link between S100A6 expression in pancreatic cancer and aggressive disease. PMID:19724273

  9. A Rare Entity of Breast Cancer: Primary Neuroendocrin Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Mehmet Abdussamet; Kocataş, Ali; Özkan, Yasemin; Kalaycı, Mustafa Uygar; Alış, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer throughout the world, however neuroendocrine tumors of the breast are rarely encountered. Herein we present a 75-year-old patient who was admitted to our clinic due to a mass in her breast and was operated on with a preliminary diagnosis of invasive breast carcinoma, However she was diagnosed with a neuroendocrine tumor after pathologic evaluation. The patient is the oldest one among others with a neuroendocrine tumor in the breast reported in the literature.

  10. Pancreatic paraganglioma - a rare and dangerous entity. Vascular anatomy and impact on management

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Martin; Soumarova, Renata; Migrova, Martina; Vojtek, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic paragangliomas are extremely rare with less than 20 cases ever described in the world literature. There is no detailed report of the vascular anatomy in this entity and its possible impact on patient management. We present a case of large pancreatic head paraganlioma in a 53-year-old woman. The tumour had a predominant arterial blood supply via both the hepatic artery and the superior mesenteric artery. Complex inflow was complemented by supplementary branches from the right renal artery. The arteriovenous communications within the lesion represented the most dangerous aspect of excision and the tumour removal was accompanied with a considerable blood loss. After pancreaticoduodenectomy, patient experienced transient elevation of liver function tests with no other identifiable cause than a change in portal haemodynamics. It is advisable that the precise knowledge of vascular anatomy in pancreatic head paraganglioma should be obtained prior to any intervention. PMID:25056378

  11. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Update on management of midgut neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mehrvarz Sarshekeh, Amir; Halperin, Daniel M; Dasari, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Midgut neuroendocrine tumors are typically indolent but can be fatal when advanced. They can also cause significant morbidity due to the characteristic carcinoid syndrome. Somatostatin analogs continue to be the mainstay of treatment given their antiproliferative properties, as well as inhibitory effects on hormones that cause carcinoid syndrome. There have been several recent advances in the systemic therapy of these tumors including consolidation of somatostatin analogs as the cornerstone of therapy, completion of pivotal trials with mTOR inhibitors, and the establishment of novel approaches including peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and oral inhibitors of peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase in tumor and symptom control, respectively. In this review article, the recent advances are summarized and an updated approach to management is proposed. PMID:27347369

  13. Neuroendocrine activation after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, H M; Morton, J J; Leckie, B; Rumley, A; Gillen, G; Dargie, H J

    1988-01-01

    The extent of neuroendocrine activation, its time course, and relation to left ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias were investigated in 78 consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. High concentrations of arginine vasopressin were found within six hours of symptoms, even in the absence of myocardial infarction (n = 18). Plasma catecholamine concentrations also were highest on admission, whereas renin and angiotensin II concentrations rose progressively over the first three days, not only in those with heart failure but also in patients with no clinical complications. Heart failure, ventricular tachycardia, and deaths were associated with extensive myocardial infarction, low left ventricular ejection fraction, and persistently high concentrations of catecholamines, renin, and angiotensin II up to 10 days after admission, whereas in uncomplicated cases concentrations had already returned to normal. PMID:3415870

  14. New drug development in digestive neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Durán, I; Salazar, R; Casanovas, O; Arrazubi, V; Vilar, E; Siu, L L; Yao, J; Tabernero, J

    2007-08-01

    The traditional cytotoxic agents are of limited efficacy in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (NETs). Recent investigations have brought up a number of biological features in this family of neoplasms that could represent targets for anticancer treatment. NETs seem to have an extraordinary tumor vascularization with high expression of proangiogenic molecules such as the vascular endothelial growth factor along with overexpression of certain tyrosine kinase receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the insulin growth factor receptor (IGFR) and their downstream signaling pathway components (PI3K-AKT-mTOR). The rationale of an antiangiogenic approach in the treatment of NETs and the use of other pharmacological strategies such as EGFR, IGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are discussed. Additionally, the emerging results of recent clinical trials with these targeted drugs are presented.

  15. Microsatellite instability in thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzereschi, D; Palmirotta, R; Ranieri, A; Ottini, L; Verì, M C; Cama, A; Cetta, F; Nardi, F; Colletta, G; Mariani-Costantini, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-one thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions were analysed for instability at ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci and at two coding mononucleotide repeats within the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptor (IGFIIR) genes respectively. Microsatellite instability (MI) was detected in 11 out of 51 cases (21.5%), including six (11.7%) with MI at one or two loci and five (9.8%) with Ml at three or more loci (RER+ phenotype). No mutations in the TβRII and IGFIIR repeats were observed. The overall frequency of MI did not significantly vary in relation to age, gender, benign versus malignant status and tumour size. However, widespread MI was significantly more frequent in follicular adenomas and carcinomas than in papillary and Hürthle cell tumours: three out of nine tumours of follicular type (33.3%) resulted in replication error positive (RER+), versus 1 out of 29 papillary carcinomas (3.4%, P = 0.01), and zero out of eight Hürthle cell neoplasms. Regional lymph node metastases were present in five MI-negative primary cancers and resulted in MI-positive in two cases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888478

  16. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  17. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  18. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on

  19. Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H.; Bornfeld, N.; Vij, O.; Coupland, S.; Bechrakis, N.; Kellner, U.; Foerster, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina (VPTR) are benign tumours of unknown origin, occurring mostly in otherwise healthy patients. VPTR may be associated with other chorioretinal diseases, such as uveitis. The tumours, which histologically represent reactive gliovascular proliferations, are characterised by a pink to yellow appearance on funduscopy and are accompanied by exudative and haemorrhagic changes of the retina.
METHODS—22 cases of VPTR in 21 patients were examined with a follow up period between 1 month and 6 years. Ophthalmological changes associated with VPTR were intraretinal and subretinal exudations (n=18), exudative detachments of the surrounding sensory retina (n=13), intraretinal and subretinal haemorrhages (n=10), exudative changes within the macula (n=10), hyperpigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium at the border of the exudative retinal changes (n=9), and vitreous haemorrhages (n=4). Tumour biopsy was performed in two cases. Treatment consisted of plaque radiotherapy (n=14), plaque radiotherapy and cryotherapy (two), cryotherapy only (two), observation (three), and enucleation in one case of a blind and painful eye.
RESULTS—Regression of the tumour and the associated exudative changes could be observed in all treated cases. Visual acuity at last follow up improved two lines or more in two cases, remained within two lines of the initial visual acuity in 15 cases, and worsened in the remaining five. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens and the tumour of the enucleated eye showed massive capillary proliferation with perivascular spindle-shaped glial cells of retinal origin.
CONCLUSION—The correct diagnosis of VPTR is of importance as these lesions may lead to visual loss. Further, VPTR must be differentiated from angiomas associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease as well as from ocular and systemic malignancies. Regression of tumour thickness and associated retinal changes can be achieved with

  20. Reducing Tumour Hypoxia via Oral Administration of Oxygen Nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Joshua; McEwan, Conor; Nesbitt, Heather; Bovornchutichai, Phurit; Averre, Raymond; Borden, Mark; McHale, Anthony P.; Callan, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be a key factor inhibiting the successful treatment of solid tumours. Existing strategies for reducing hypoxia, however, have shown limited efficacy and/or adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for reducing tumour hypoxia using an orally delivered suspension of surfactant-stabilised oxygen nanobubbles. Experiments were carried out in a mouse xenograft tumour model for human pancreatic cancer (BxPc-3 cells in male SCID mice). A single dose of 100 μL of oxygen saturated water, oxygen nanobubbles or argon nanobubbles was administered via gavage. Animals were sacrificed 30 minutes post-treatment (3 per group) and expression of hypoxia-inducible-factor-1α (HIF1α) protein measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis of the excised tumour tissue. Neither the oxygen saturated water nor argon nanobubbles produced a statistically significant change in HIF1α expression at the transcriptional level. In contrast, a reduction of 75% and 25% in the transcriptional and translational expression of HIF1α respectively (p<0.001) was found for the animals receiving the oxygen nanobubbles. This magnitude of reduction has been shown in previous studies to be commensurate with an improvement in outcome with both radiation and drug-based treatments. In addition, there was a significant reduction in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in this group and corresponding increase in the expression of arrest-defective protein 1 homolog A (ARD1A). PMID:28036332

  1. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (autoimmune pancreatitis): evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Satomi; Siegelman, Stanley S; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that centers on the pancreatic ducts. It is a cause of benign pancreatic disease that can clinically mimic pancreatic cancer. Preoperative detection of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is important because patients usually respond to steroid therapy. Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are often referred for computed tomography (CT) when they are suspected of having a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm; therefore, it is important to search for potential findings suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis when typical findings of a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm are not found. Typical CT findings include diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas without dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Focal enlargement is most commonly seen in the head of the pancreas, and the involved pancreas on contrast material-enhanced CT images may be iso-attenuating relative to the rest of the pancreas, or hypo-attenuating, especially during the early postcontrast phase. Thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the common bile duct and gallbladder may reflect inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. There are several features seen at CT that may help to differentiate lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer, such as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with minimal peripancreatic stranding in patients with obstructive jaundice, an absence of significant pancreatic atrophy, and an absence of significant main pancreatic duct dilatation. When these findings are encountered, clinical, other imaging, and serologic data should be evaluated.

  2. Circulating Epithelial Cells in Patients with Pancreatic Lesions: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Christy E; Pitman, Martha B; Zhou, Jiahua; Perkins, James; Kuleman, Birte; Liss, Andrew S; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Warshaw, Andrew L; Lillemoe, Keith D; Thayer, Sarah P

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating epithelial cell (CEC) isolation has provided diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of cancers, previously supporting their identity as circulating tumor cells in the literature. However, we report CEC findings in patients with benign, pre-malignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions using a size-selective filtration device. Study Design Peripheral blood samples were drawn from patients found to have pancreatic lesions on preoperative imaging at a surgical clinic. Blood was filtered using ScreenCell® devices, which were evaluated microscopically by a pancreatic cytopathologist. Pathological data and clinical outcomes of these patients were obtained from medical records over a one year follow-up period. Results Nine healthy volunteers formed the control group and were found to be negative for CECs. There were 179 patients with pancreatic lesions that formed the study cohort. CECs were morphologically similar in patients with a variety of pancreatic lesions. Specifically, CECs were identified in 51 of 105 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) (49%), 7 of 11 neuroendocrine tumors (64%), 13 of 21 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (62%), and 6 of 13 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Rates of CEC identification were similar in patients with benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions (p=0.41). In addition, CECs findings in PDAC patients were not associated with poor prognosis. Conclusions While CECs were not identified in healthy volunteers, they were identified in patients with benign, premalignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions. The presence of CECs in patients presenting with pancreatic lesions is not diagnostic of malignancy, nor is it prognostic for patients with PDAC. PMID:26209458

  3. Simultaneous Occurrence of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Brunner's Gland Adenoma in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Gombač, M; Dolenšek, T; Jaušovec, D; Kvapil, P; Švara, T; Pogačnik, M

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma in an 18-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) from the Ljubljana Zoo. The tiger was humanely destroyed due to weakness and progressive weight loss. Necropsy examination revealed a large, grey, predominantly necrotic mass replacing the major part of the pancreatic body. Microscopically, the mass was unencapsulated, poorly demarcated, highly cellular and composed of highly pleomorphic, cuboidal to tall columnar cells with basal, round or oval, moderately anisokaryotic nuclei with prominent nucleoli and moderate to large amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumour was diagnosed as pancreatic tubular adenocarcinoma with infiltration into the duodenum and mesentery. There were tumour emboli in mesenteric blood vessels and hepatic metastases. The non-affected part of the pancreas exhibited severe chronic pancreatitis. In addition, one firm white neoplastic nodule was observed in the duodenal wall. The nodule was set in the tunica muscularis and was unencapsulated, well demarcated and highly cellular, and consisted of a closely packed layer of normal Brunner's glands and a centrally positioned group of irregularly branched tubules with small amounts of debris in the lumen. The neoplastic nodule was diagnosed as Brunner's gland adenoma. The present case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of concurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma, most probably induced by chronic pancreatitis, either in man or animals.

  4. Benign gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three snow leopards (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Dobson, Elizabeth C; Naydan, Dianne K; Raphael, Bonnie L; McAloose, Denise

    2013-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells that are distributed throughout the body and are predominant in the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes benign, well-differentiated gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia). All tumors were well circumscribed, were within the gastric mucosa or submucosa, and had histologic and immunohistochemical features of neuroendocrine tumors. Histologic features included packeted cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells that were arranged in palisades or pseudorosettes and contained finely granular cellular cytoplasm with centrally placed, round nuclei. Cytoplasmic granules of neoplastic cells strongly expressed chromogranin A, variably expressed neuron-specific enolase, and did not express synaptophysin or gastrin. Each leopard died or was euthanatized for reasons unrelated to its tumor.

  5. Inhibition of human pancreatic cancer growth in nude mice by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagië, H; Tomita, T; Kobayashi, H; Fujii, Y; Nonaka, Y; Saegusa, Y; Hasumi, K; Eriguchi, M; Kobayashi, T; Ono, K

    1997-01-01

    Immunoliposomes were prepared by conjugating anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody with liposomes containing [10B]compound. These immunoliposomes were shown to bind selectively to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) bearing CEA on their surface. The cytotoxic effects of locally injected [10B]compound, multilamellar liposomes containing [10B]compound or [10B]immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with [10B]solution, 10B-containing liposomes or [10B]immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of [10B]immunoliposomes caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in 10B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with intratumoral injection of immunoliposomes is able to destroy malignant cells in the marginal portion between normal tissues and cancer tissues from the side of 4He generation.

  6. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  7. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Aarthi; Morton, Jennifer P; Jodrell, Duncan I; Sansom, Owen J

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the first stages of the drug development pipeline, prior to their transition to the clinical arena. GEMMs carry mutations in genes that are associated with specific human diseases and they can thus accurately mimic the genetic, phenotypic and physiological aspects of human pathologies. Here, we discuss different GEMMs of human pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the Lox-Stop-Lox (LSL)-Kras(G12D); LSL-Trp53(R172H); Pdx1-cre (KPC) model, one of the most widely used preclinical models for this disease. We describe its application in preclinical research, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, its potential for predicting clinical outcomes in humans and the factors that can affect such outcomes, and, finally, future developments that could advance the discovery of new therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  9. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Aarthi; Morton, Jennifer P.; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the first stages of the drug development pipeline, prior to their transition to the clinical arena. GEMMs carry mutations in genes that are associated with specific human diseases and they can thus accurately mimic the genetic, phenotypic and physiological aspects of human pathologies. Here, we discuss different GEMMs of human pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the Lox-Stop-Lox (LSL)-KrasG12D; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx1-cre (KPC) model, one of the most widely used preclinical models for this disease. We describe its application in preclinical research, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, its potential for predicting clinical outcomes in humans and the factors that can affect such outcomes, and, finally, future developments that could advance the discovery of new therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26438692

  10. Metronomic chemotherapy following the maximum tolerated dose is an effective anti-tumour therapy affecting angiogenesis, tumour dissemination and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vives, Marta; Ginestà, Mireia M; Gracova, Kristina; Graupera, Mariona; Casanovas, Oriol; Capellà, Gabriel; Serrano, Teresa; Laquente, Berta; Viñals, Francesc

    2013-11-15

    In this article, the effectiveness of a multi-targeted chemo-switch (C-S) schedule that combines metronomic chemotherapy (MET) after treatment with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is reported. This schedule was tested with gemcitabine in two distinct human pancreatic adenocarcinoma orthotopic models and with cyclophosphamide in an orthotopic ovarian cancer model. In both models, the C-S schedule had the most favourable effect, achieving at least 80% tumour growth inhibition without increased toxicity. Moreover, in the pancreatic cancer model, although peritoneal metastases were observed in control and MTD groups, no dissemination was observed in the MET and C-S groups. C-S treatment caused a decrease in angiogenesis, and its effect on tumour growth was similar to that produced by the MTD followed by anti-angiogenic DC101 treatment. C-S treatment combined an increase in thrombospondin-1 expression with a decrease in the number of CD133+ cancer cells and triple-positive CD133+/CD44+/CD24+ cancer stem cells (CSCs). These findings confirm that the C-S schedule is a challenging clinical strategy with demonstrable inhibitory effects on tumour dissemination, angiogenesis and CSCs.

  11. Tumour banking: the Spanish design.

    PubMed

    Morente, M M; de Alava, E; Fernandez, P L

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade the technical advances in high throughput techniques to analyze DNA, RNA and proteins have had a potential major impact on prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many human diseases. Key pieces in this process, mainly thinking about the future, are tumour banks and tumour bank networks. To face these challenges, diverse suitable models and designs can be developed. The current article presents the development of a nationwide design of tumour banks in Spain based on a network of networks, specially focusing on its harmonization efforts mainly regarding technical procedures, ethical requirements, unified quality control policy and unique sample identification. We also describe our most important goals for the next years. This model does not correspond to a central tumour bank, but to a cooperative and coordinated network of national and regional networks. Independently from the network in which it is included, sample collections reside in their original institution, where it can be used for further clinical diagnosis, teaching and research activities of each independent hospital. The herein described 'network of networks' functional model could be useful for other countries and/or international tumour bank activities.

  12. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Jose Antonio; Colonna, Jorge; Vitellas, Kenneth M; Frankel, Wendy L

    2005-10-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a rare entity that has been described under many different names and constitutes a diagnostic challenge as it may simulate a neoplastic process. Herein, we report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented to our institution complaining of left flank pain and was found to have normal levels of amylase and lipase. An abdominal magnetic resonance image showed thickening of the pancreatic tail and compression of the pancreatic duct. The radiographic differential included both chronic pancreatitis and a neoplastic process. She underwent an exploratory laparotomy, during which a pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Grossly, the pancreas contained a yellowish white, firm homogeneous mass measuring 6.5 x 3.3 x 2.9 cm involving the entire pancreatic tail and hilum of the spleen. Histologically, pancreatic sections showed extensive fibrosis admixed with an inflammatory infiltrate. This infiltrate was composed mainly of lymphocytes with multiple germinal centers, as well as plasma cells and eosinophils that surrounded pancreatic ducts and extended into the peripancreatic adipose tissue. No malignancy was identified, and the process was diagnosed as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis.

  13. Neuroendocrine Transdifferentiation in Human Prostate Cancer Cells: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Cerasuolo, Marianna; Paris, Debora; Iannotti, Fabio A; Melck, Dominique; Verde, Roberta; Mazzarella, Enrico; Motta, Andrea; Ligresti, Alessia

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is highly sensitive to hormone therapy because androgens are essential for prostate cancer cell growth. However, with the nearly invariable progression of this disease to androgen independence, endocrine therapy ultimately fails to control prostate cancer in most patients. Androgen-independent acquisition may involve neuroendocrine transdifferentiation, but there is little knowledge about this process, which is presently controversial. In this study, we investigated this question in a novel model of human androgen-dependent LNCaP cells cultured for long periods in hormone-deprived conditions. Strikingly, characterization of the neuroendocrine phenotype by transcriptomic, metabolomic, and other statistically integrated analyses showed how hormone-deprived LNCaP cells could transdifferentiate to a nonmalignantneuroendocrine phenotype. Notably, conditioned media from neuroendocrine-like cells affected LNCaP cell proliferation. Predictive in silico models illustrated how after an initial period, when LNCaP cell survival was compromised by an arising population of neuroendocrine-like cells, a sudden trend reversal occurred in which the neuroendocrine-like cells functioned to sustain the remaining androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. Our findings provide direct biologic and molecular support for the concept that neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cell populations influences the progression to androgen independence.

  14. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  15. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Clinicopathologic study of neuroendocrine tumors of gastroenteropancreatic tract: a single institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Uppin, Shantveer G.; Sunil, Chittiboyina Shiva Prasada Venkata; Hui, Monalisa; Paul, Tara Roshni; Bheerappa, Nagari

    2017-01-01

    Background The gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNET) have a characteristic histologic appearance unrelated of the exact site of origin. However the behavior of these tumors are different in each of these sites. In this article we study the clinicopathological features of GEPNET. These tumors were classified and graded according to WHO 2010 criteria. The immunohistochemical (IHC) features were evaluated and the grade of the tumor was correlated with Ki67. Methods A total of 40 cases of GEPNET diagnosed on biopsies as well as resected specimens were analyzed from January 2012 to June 2015. Results There were 28 resected specimens and 12 biopsies. Majority of the gastric neuroendocrine tumors (NET) showed classic morphology of cells arranged in islands. There were 3 cases each of grade 1 and grade 2 and one was diagnosed as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). All the duodenal NET were well differentiated (grade 1). There were 8 cases in colon and rectum, of which 4 cases were grade 3 and 3 cases were grade 2. Majority of the pancreatic tumors were grade 1. The mean mitotic count along with ki67 had good correlation in NET of stomach, duodenum colon and rectum. Conclusions The most common site was small intestine followed by pancreas. Majority of the tumors were NET G1. Tumors from colorectal region were mostly NEC G3. There was a strong correlation by spearman correlation analysis between Ki67 and mitotic count and moderate correlation between ki67 and tumor grade as well as mitotic rate and tumor grade. Ki67 was helpful in grading these tumors. PMID:28280618

  17. Tumour-associated eosinophilia in the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Fletcher, C D; Gower, R L

    1984-01-01

    Tumour eosinophilia is an uncommon but striking phenomenon which has been found in many tumours, mostly of large cell type or squamous differentiation. The incidence, appearance and importance of tumour eosinophilia in the bladder are described. Eosinophilia is commoner in deeply invasive tumours and in tumours showing squamous metaplasia. Transitional cell carcinomas with eosinophilia have a better prognosis than those without, but this improvement is not seen in squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. When eosinophilia is found on superficial biopsies of a bladder tumour, the possibility of muscle invasion should be considered. PMID:6725595

  18. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  19. Nuclear translocation of FGFR1 and FGF2 in pancreatic stellate cells facilitates pancreatic cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Stacey J; Chioni, Athina-Myrto; Ghallab, Mohammed; Anderson, Rhys K; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Kocher, Hemant M; Grose, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by desmoplasia, driven by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Over-expression of FGFs and their receptors is a feature of pancreatic cancer and correlates with poor prognosis, but whether their expression impacts on PSCs is unclear. At the invasive front of human pancreatic cancer, FGF2 and FGFR1 localise to the nucleus in activated PSCs but not cancer cells. In vitro, inhibiting FGFR1 and FGF2 in PSCs, using RNAi or chemical inhibition, resulted in significantly reduced cell proliferation, which was not seen in cancer cells. In physiomimetic organotypic co-cultures, FGFR inhibition prevented PSC as well as cancer cell invasion. FGFR inhibition resulted in cytoplasmic localisation of FGFR1 and FGF2, in contrast to vehicle-treated conditions where PSCs with nuclear FGFR1 and FGF2 led cancer cells to invade the underlying extra-cellular matrix. Strikingly, abrogation of nuclear FGFR1 and FGF2 in PSCs abolished cancer cell invasion. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic approach, where preventing nuclear FGF/FGFR mediated proliferation and invasion in PSCs leads to disruption of the tumour microenvironment, preventing pancreatic cancer cell invasion. PMID:24503018

  20. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, T H; Amin, M R; Bashar, M A; Ahmed, Z; Matin, A; Hasan, G Z; Islam, M D; Hossain, M Z

    2011-04-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour in infancy is rare, mainly benign with little tendency to recur after excision or effective curettage. This pigmented neoplasm of neural crest origin occurring in infants before 1 year of age. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge (70%), following by the skull, brain and mandible. The genital organ is the most frequent extra cranial site. We report a 6 months old male baby with a similar tumour arising from right half of cheek involving the maxilla. We diagnosed the case after histological report. We remove the tumour through a sub-labial incision. The mass was blackish in colour, and was mobilized from all side including from the maxillary sinuses. The author thought that this should be reported for improving the clinical awareness and treatment of pigmented soft tissue mass in children. Almost one year follow up of the patients showed no recurrence.

  1. PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D A; Giaccia, A J

    2010-01-01

    Originally identified as the enzymes responsible for catalysing the oxidation of specific, conserved proline residues within hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), the additional roles for the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins have remained elusive. Of the four identified PHD enzymes, PHD2 is considered to be the key oxygen sensor, as knockdown of PHD2 results in elevated HIF protein. Several recent studies have highlighted the importance of PHD2 in tumourigenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence as to the exact role of PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis. The divergence seems to be because of the contribution of stromal-derived PHD2, and in particular the involvement of endothelial cells, vs tumour-derived PHD2. This review summarises our current understanding of PHD2 and tumour angiogenesis, focusing on the influences of PHD2 on vascular normalisation and neovascularisation. PMID:20461086

  2. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  3. Identification of novel vascular projections with cellular trafficking abilities on the microvasculature of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saiyin, Hexige; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Wu, Yanhua; Wei, Youheng; Fang, Yuan; Han, Xu; Li, Jianang; Zhou, Ping; Yi, Qing; Maitra, Anirban; Liu, Jun O; Tuveson, David A; Lou, Wenhui; Yu, Long

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a nearly lethal neoplasm. It is a remarkably stroma-rich, vascular-poor and hypo-perfused tumour, which prevents efficient drug delivery. Paradoxically, the neoplastic cells have robust glucose uptake, suggesting that the microvasculature has adopted an alternative method for nutrient uptake and cellular trafficking. Using adapted thick tumour section immunostaining and three-dimensional (3D) construction imaging in human tissue samples, we identified an undiscovered feature of the mature microvasculature in advanced PDAC tumours; long, hair-like projections on the basal surface of microvessels that we refer to as 'basal microvilli'. Functionally, these basal microvilli have an actin-rich cytoskeleton and endocytic and exocytic properties, and contain glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1)-positive vesicles. Clinically, as demonstrated by PET-CT, the tumour microvasculature with the longest and most abundant basal microvilli correlated with high glucose uptake of the PDAC tumour itself. In addition, these basal microvilli were found in regions of the tumour with low GLUT-1 expression, suggesting that their presence could be dependent upon the glucose concentration in the tumour milieu. Similar microvasculature features were also observed in a K-Ras-driven model of murine PDAC. Altogether, these basal microvilli mark a novel pathological feature of PDAC microvasculature. Because basal microvilli are pathological features with endo- and exocytic properties, they may provide a non-conventional method for cellular trafficking in PDAC tumours.

  4. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  5. EUS-Guided Antitumor Therapy for Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very useful modality for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic masses. With the advent of EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration technology, this modality has made a tremendous leap from imaging modality to histologic diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. EUS offers high-resolution images of and unparalleled access to the pancreas. After locating the tip of the echoendoscope in the duodenum or stomach, several drugs or local treatment modalities can be delivered directly into the pancreas. EUS-guided ethanol lavage with/without paclitaxel injection has been tested for the treatment of cystic tumors of the pancreas, with complete resolution of cystic tumor being observed in up to 70-80% of patients. Ethanol injection is also performed for the management of solid neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas. Various type of EUS-guided injection have also been investigated for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. An activated allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture (Cytoimplant) was injected in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. A replication-deficient adenovirus vector carrying the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene was also delivered intratumorally by EUS. ONYX-015 is an oncolytic attenuated adenovirus that exhibits replication preferentially in malignant cells, causing cell death, and this has also been injected into pancreatic cancers under EUS guidance. EUS-guided local ablation therapies such as radiofrequency ablation, photodynamic therapy, and brachytherapy are also under investigation. EUS-guided fine-needle injection for various solid or cystic lesions is a rapidly expanding field. This article reviews the various applications of EUS for the treatment of pancreatic tumors. PMID:21103299

  6. Parp-1 genetic ablation in Ela-myc mice unveils novel roles for Parp-1 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Iglesias, Mar; Munné-Collado, Jessica; Martínez-Cáceres, Carlos; Moreno, Mireia; Guerra, Carmen; Yélamos, Jose; Navarro, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. The inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1), the major protein responsible for poly(ADP-ribosy)lation in response to DNA damage, has emerged as a promising treatment for several tumour types. Here we aimed to elucidate the involvement of Parp-1 in pancreatic tumour progression. We assessed Parp-1 protein expression in normal, preneoplastic and pancreatic tumour samples from humans and from K-Ras- and c-myc-driven mouse models of pancreatic cancer. Parp-1 was highly expressed in acinar cells in normal and cancer tissues. In contrast, ductal cells expressed very low or undetectable levels of this protein, both in a normal and in a tumour context. The Parp-1 expression pattern was similar in human and mouse samples, thereby validating the use of animal models for further studies. To determine the in vivo effects of Parp-1 depletion on pancreatic cancer progression, Ela-myc-driven pancreatic tumour development was analysed in a Parp-1 knock-out background. Loss of Parp-1 resulted in increased tumour necrosis and decreased proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Interestingly, Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice displayed fewer ductal tumours than their Ela-myc:Parp-1(+/+) counterparts, suggesting that Parp-1 participates in promoting acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a key event in pancreatic cancer initiation. Moreover, impaired macrophage recruitment can be responsible for the ADM blockade found in the Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice. Finally, molecular analysis revealed that Parp-1 modulates ADM downstream of the Stat3-MMP7 axis and is also involved in transcriptional up-regulation of the MDM2, VEGFR1 and MMP28 cancer-related genes. In conclusion, the expression pattern of Parp-1 in normal and cancer tissue and the in vivo functional effects of Parp-1 depletion point to a novel role for this protein in pancreatic carcinogenesis and shed light

  7. Prenatal androgens time neuroendocrine sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Wood, R I; Ebling, F J; I'Anson, H; Bucholtz, D C; Yellon, S M; Foster, D L

    1991-05-01

    The present study determined whether exposure to gonadal steroids in utero dictates the postnatal control of gonadotropin secretion in the lamb. There is a marked sex difference in the timing of neuroendocrine sexual maturation in sheep; while male lambs undergo a reduction in sensitivity to inhibitory gonadal steroid feedback by 10 weeks of age, females remain hypersensitive until 30 weeks. The hypothesis was tested that prenatal androgens advance the time of the decrease in feedback sensitivity, and hence the pubertal increase in pulsatile gonadotropin secretion. Pregnant ewes were injected each week with 100 mg testosterone cypionate im from 30-90 days of gestation (term is approximately 150 days). Five female lambs were born with masculinized external genitalia (penis and scrotum). These females, together with eight androgenized males, eight control males, and eight control females, were gonadectomized at 2 weeks of age and implanted with a Silastic capsule of estradiol to produce a constant steroid feedback signal. Blood samples were collected twice weekly to monitor trends in LH secretion. For determination of LH pulse frequency, samples were collected frequently (every 12 min for 4 h) at various intervals between 5 and 32 weeks of age. In males, a sustained increase in LH from biweekly blood samples, indicative of reduced sensitivity to inhibitory steroid feedback, began at 10.1 +/- 1.4 weeks (mean +/- SE) of age in control males and at 5.4 +/- 0.1 weeks in androgenized males. By contrast, control females remained hypersensitive much longer as evidenced by the delay in the LH rise until 27.2 +/- 0.8 weeks. The response of the five androgenized females was intermediate; LH increased at 4, 7, 16, 20, and 21 weeks of age with an early increase of LH being associated with more pronounced masculinization of the genitalia. Patterns of pulsatile LH secretion reflected differences in serum LH measured from biweekly blood samples. For example, at 20 weeks of age

  8. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  9. Evolution in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine neoplasms, focus on systemic therapeutic options: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; De Braud, Filippo; Festinese, Fabrizio; Bregant, Cristina; Lorenzoni, Alice; Maccauro, Marco; Milione, Massimo; Concas, Laura; Formisano, Barbara; Leuzzi, Livia; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors. The present review discusses current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of gastro-entero-pancreatic NEN. Several systemic options are currently available, including medical systemic chemotherapy, biological drugs, somatostatin analogs and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The carcinoid syndrome can be adequately controlled with somatostatin analogs; chemotherapy has shown positive outcomes in poor prognosis patients, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment based on the use of radioisotopes for advanced disease expressing somatostatin receptors. Targeted therapies, such as multikinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are also recommended or under evaluation for the treatment of advanced NENs, but some critical issues in clinical practice remain unresolved. Depending upon the development of the disease, a multimodal approach is recommended. The treatment strategy for metastatic patients should be planned by a multidisciplinary team in order to define the optimal sequence of treatments.

  10. Interplay between menin and Dnmt1 reversibly regulates pancreatic cancer cell growth downstream of the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Wang, Yun-Feng; Li, Gang; Yang, Sheng-sheng; Liu, Che; Hu, Hao; Jin, Gang; Hu, Xian-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Menin, the product of the Men1 gene, which is frequently mutated in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, acts as a chromatin-remodeling factor to modulate the transcription of cell cycle regulators by interacting with histone modification factors. However, the function of menin and its underlying mechanisms in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remain unknown. Here, we found that menin inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and that its expression was gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis. Menin overexpression significantly activated the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p18 and p27, accompanied with a decrease in DNA methylation levels of p18 and p27 promoters. Mechanistically, we found that interaction of menin with DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) competitively pulled down Dnmt1 from p18 and p27 promoters, leading to the downregulation of DNA methylation levels. Moreover, menin expression was suppressed by Dnmt1 downstream of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and menin overexpression strongly antagonized the promotion effect of hedgehog signaling on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, the interaction between menin and Dnmt1 reversibly regulates pancreatic cancer cell growth downstream of Hedgehog pathways with complex mutual modulation networks, suggesting that the Hedgehog/Dnmt1/menin axis is a potential molecular target for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  11. The Identification of Gut Neuroendocrine Tumor Disease by Multiple Synchronous Transcript Analysis in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Irvin M.; Drozdov, Ignat; Kidd, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are increasing in both incidence and prevalence. A delay in correct diagnosis is common for these lesions. This reflects the absence of specific blood biomarkers to detect NENs. Measurement of the neuroendocrine secretory peptide Chromogranin A (CgA) is used, but is a single value, is non-specific and assay data are highly variable. To facilitate tumor detection, we developed a multi-transcript molecular signature for PCR-based blood analysis. NEN transcripts were identified by computational analysis of 3 microarray datasets: NEN tissue (n = 15), NEN peripheral blood (n = 7), and adenocarcinoma (n = 363 tumors). The candidate gene signature was examined in 130 blood samples (NENs: n = 63) and validated in two independent sets (Set 1 [n = 115, NENs: n = 72]; Set 2 [n = 120, NENs: n = 58]). Comparison with CgA (ELISA) was undertaken in 176 samples (NENs: n = 81). 51 significantly elevated transcript markers were identified. Gene-based classifiers detected NENs in independent sets with high sensitivity (85–98%), specificity (93–97%), PPV (95–96%) and NPV (87–98%). The AUC for the NEN gene-based classifiers was 0.95–0.98 compared to 0.64 for CgA (Z-statistic 6.97–11.42, p<0.0001). Overall, the gene-based classifier was significantly (χ2 = 12.3, p<0.0005) more accurate than CgA. In a sub-analysis, pancreatic NENs and gastrointestinal NENs could be identified with similar efficacy (79–88% sensitivity, 94% specificity), as could metastases (85%). In patients with low CgA, 91% exhibited elevated transcript markers. A panel of 51 marker genes differentiates NENs from controls with a high PPV and NPV (>90%), identifies pancreatic and gastrointestinal NENs with similar efficacy, and confirms GEP-NENs when CgA levels are low. The panel is significantly more accurate than the CgA assay. This reflects its utility to identify multiple diverse biological components

  12. Laparoscopic long sleeve pancreaticogastrostomy (LPG): a novel pancreatic anastomosis following central pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Tamara M. H.; Sodergren, Mikael H.; Fan, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    Background Central pancreatectomy (CP) is preferred to distal pancreatectomy (DP) for the excision of benign tumours at the neck or body of the pancreas, in order to preserve pancreatic function and the spleen. However, the pancreaticoenterostomy is technically difficult to perform laparoscopically and the postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) rate is high. Methods A novel laparoscopic reconstruction of the pancreatic stump during CP is described, the laparoscopic long sleeve pancreaticogastrostomy (LPG). Results Two males and two females with a median age of 49 years had a laparoscopic CP with LPG. After a median follow-up of 27.5 months, there was no mortality. One patient had a grade A POPF, managed conservatively. Conclusions The LPG is a safe and technically less demanding method to reconstruct pancreatic drainage laparoscopically. PMID:27275466

  13. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11th most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied considerably in the world. A known cause of pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking. This risk factor is likely to explain some of the international variations and gender differences. The overall five-year survival rate is about 6% (ranges from 2% to 9%), but this vary very small between developed and developing countries. To date, the causes of pancreatic cancer are still insufficiently known, although certain risk factors have been identified, such as smoking, obesity, genetics, diabetes, diet, inactivity. There are no current screening recommendations for pancreatic cancer, so primary prevention is of utmost importance. A better understanding of the etiology and identifying the risk factors is essential for the primary prevention of this disease. PMID:27956793

  14. Pancreatic groove cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Shih-Chin; Shyr, Bor-Uei; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Shin-E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic groove cancer is very rare and can be indistinguishable from groove pancreatitis. This study is to clarify the characteristics, clinical features, managements, and survival outcomes of this rare tumor. Brief descriptions were made for each case of pancreatic groove cancer encountered at our institute. Individualized data of pancreatic groove cancer cases described in the literature were extracted and added to our database to expand the study sample size for a more complete analysis. A total of 33 patients with pancreatic groove cancer were included for analysis, including 4 cases from our institute. The median tumor size was 2.7 cm. The most common symptom was nausea or vomiting (89%), followed by jaundice (67%). Duodenal stenosis was noted by endoscopy in 96% of patients. The histopathological examination revealed well differentiated tumor in 43%. Perineural invasion was noted in 90%, and lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement in 83%. Overall 1-year survival rate was 93.3%, and 3- or 5-year survival rate was 62.2%, with a median survival of 11.0 months. Survival outcome for the well-differentiated tumors was better than those of the moderate/poorly differentiated ones. Early involvement of duodenum causing vomiting is often the initial presentation, but obstructive jaundice does not always happen until the disease progresses. Tumor differentiation is a prognostic factor for survival outcome. The possibility of pancreatic groove cancer should be carefully excluded before making the diagnosis of groove pancreatitis for any questionable case. PMID:28079795

  15. Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Wong, Fei Ling; Cao, Yang; Lau, Hon Yen; Huang, Jiali; Puneet, Padmam; Chevali, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common clinical condition. It is a disease of variable severity in which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. It is generally believed that the earliest events in acute pancreatitis occur within acinar cells. Acinar cell injury early in acute pancreatitis leads to a local inflammatory reaction. If this inflammatory reaction is marked, it leads to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). An excessive SIRS leads to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). MODS associated with acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and the resultant MODS. At the same time, recent research has demonstrated the importance of acinar cell death in the form of apoptosis and necrosis as a determinant of pancreatitis severity. In this review, we will discuss about our current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  16. Pancreatitis following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J A; Demetrius, A J; Gavaler, J S; Makowka, L; Starzl, T E; Van Thiel, D H

    1988-06-01

    Since 1981, when the liver transplantation program was initiated at the University of Pittsburgh, we have been impressed with the prevalence of pancreatitis occurring following liver transplantation in patients transplanted for hepatitis B-related liver disease. To either confirm this clinical impression or refute it, the records of the 27 HbsAg+ patients and those of an additional 24 HbsAg- but HbcAb and/or HbsAb+ patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation were reviewed to determine the prevalence of clinical pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia (biochemical pancreatitis) following liver transplantation (OLTx). Post-OLTx hyperamylasemia occurred significantly more frequently in HbsAg+ patients (6/27) than it did in the HbsAg- patients (0/24) (P less than 0.05). More importantly, clinical pancreatitis occurred in 14% (4/27) of the HbsAg+ patients and 0% (0/24) of the HbsAg- patients. Interestingly, in each case, the pancreatitis was associated with the occurrence of acute hepatitis B infection of the allograft. Based upon these data, we conclude that pancreatitis occurring after liver transplantation is more common in patients transplanted for active viral liver disease caused by hepatitis B than in those with inactive viral liver disease. These observations suggest that pancreatitis occurring in, at least some cases following liver transplantation for viral liver disease, may result from hepatitis B virus infection of the pancreas.

  17. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-28

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP).

  18. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  19. Discovery of a novel tumour metastasis-promoting gene, NVM-1.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Wilko; Novac, Natalia; Mink, Sigrun; Schreiber, Caroline; Plaumann, Diana; Fritzmann, Johannes; Cremers, Natascha; Rothley, Melanie; Schwager, Christian; Regiert, Thomas; Huber, Peter E; Stein, Ulrike; Schlag, Peter; Moll, Jürgen; Abdollahi, Amir; Sleeman, Jonathan P

    2011-09-01

    We have previously reported that over-expression of a panel of 119 genes correlates with the metastatic potential of pancreatic carcinoma cells. We sought to identify and functionally characterize candidate tumour metastasis promoting genes among this library using a secondary phenotype-assisted screen. Here we report the discovery of the metastasis-promoting function of a hitherto not characterized gene located on chromosome 14 (ORF138), which we have named 'novel metastasis-promoting gene 1' (NVM-1). The NVM-1 transcript is extensively alternatively spliced, is expressed endogenously in a number of different tissues, and is strongly over-expressed at the protein level in a variety of human tumour types. Importantly, NVM-1 expression stimulates the migratory and invasive behaviour of tumour cells and promotes metastasis formation in experimental animals in vivo. Up-regulation of FMNL2 and MT1E and down-regulation of TIMP4 and MHC-I is observed as a consequence of NVM-1 expression. Together these data identify NVM-1 as a gene that is functionally involved in tumour metastasis, and suggest that NVM-1 may constitute a promising therapeutic target for inhibition of tumour metastasis.

  20. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  1. ADAM8 as a drug target in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlomann, Uwe; Koller, Garrit; Conrad, Catharina; Ferdous, Taheera; Golfi, Panagiota; Garcia, Adolfo Molejon; Höfling, Sabrina; Parsons, Maddy; Costa, Patricia; Soper, Robin; Bossard, Maud; Hagemann, Thorsten; Roshani, Rozita; Sewald, Norbert; Ketchem, Randal R.; Moss, Marcia L.; Rasmussen, Fred H.; Miller, Miles A.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Tuveson, David A.; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a grim prognosis with less than 5% survivors after 5 years. High expression levels of ADAM8, a metalloprotease-disintegrin, are correlated with poor clinical outcome. We show that ADAM8 expression is associated with increased migration and invasiveness of PDAC cells caused by activation of ERK 1/2 and higher MMP activities. For biological function, ADAM8 requires multimerisation and associates with β1-integrin on the cell surface. A peptidomimetic ADAM8 inhibitor, BK-1361, designed by structural modelling of the disintegrin domain, prevents ADAM8 multimerisation. In PDAC cells, BK-1361 affects ADAM8 function leading to reduced invasiveness, and less ERK 1/2 and MMP activation. BK-1361 application in mice decreased tumour burden and metastasis of implanted pancreatic tumour cells and provides improved metrics of clinical symptoms and survival in a KrasG12D-driven mouse model of PDAC. Thus, our data integrate ADAM8 in pancreatic cancer signalling and validate ADAM8 as a target for PDAC therapy. PMID:25629724

  2. Low-dose pancreatic polypeptide inhibits food intake in man.

    PubMed

    Jesudason, David R; Monteiro, Mariana P; McGowan, Barbara M C; Neary, Nicola M; Park, Adrian J; Philippou, Elena; Small, Caroline J; Frost, Gary S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a gut hormone released from the pancreas in response to food ingestion and remains elevated for up to 6 h postprandially. Plasma levels are elevated in patients with pancreatic tumours. An intravenous infusion of PP has been reported to reduce food intake in man, suggesting that PP is a satiety hormone. We investigated whether a lower infusion rate of PP would induce significant alterations in energy intake. The study was randomised and double-blinded. Fourteen lean fasted volunteers (five men and nine women) received 90 min infusions of PP (5 pmol/kg per min) and saline on two separate days. The dose chosen was half that used in a previous human study which reported a decrease in appetite but at supra-physiological levels of PP. One hour after the end of the infusion, a buffet lunch was served and energy intake measured. PP infusion was associated with a significant 11 % reduction in energy intake compared with saline (2440 (se 200) v. 2730 (se 180) kJ; P<0 x 05). Preprandial hunger as assessed by a visual analogue score was decreased in the PP-treated group compared to saline. These effects were achieved with plasma levels of PP within the pathophysiological range of pancreatic tumours.

  3. Pathology and genetics of pancreatic neoplasms with acinar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Klimstra, David S

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms with acinar differentiation, including acinar cell carcinoma, pancreatoblastoma, and carcinomas with mixed differentiation, are distinctive pancreatic neoplasms with a poor prognosis. These neoplasms are clinically, pathologically, and genetically unique when compared to other more common pancreatic neoplasms. Most occur in adults, although pancreatoblastomas usually affect children under 10 years old. All of these neoplasms exhibit characteristic histologic features including a solid or acinar growth pattern, dense neoplastic cellularity, uniform nuclei with prominent nucleoli, and granular eosinophilic cytoplasm. Exocrine enzymes are detectable by immunohistochemistry and, for carcinomas with mixed differentiation, neuroendocrine or ductal lineage markers are also expressed. The genetic alterations of this family of neoplasms largely differ from conventional ductal adenocarcinomas, with only rare mutations in TP53, KRAS, and p16, but no single gene or neoplastic pathway is consistently altered in acinar neoplasms. Instead, there is striking genomic instability, and a subset of cases has mutations in the APC/β-catenin pathway, mutations in SMAD4, RAF gene family fusions, or microsatellite instability. Therapeutically targetable mutations are often present. This review summarizes the clinical and pathologic features of acinar neoplasms and reviews the current molecular data on these uncommon tumors.

  4. Hegemony and cost-effectiveness of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the field of gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    De Angelis, C; Manfrè, S F; Bruno, M; Pellicano, R

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a group of neoplasms arising from the diffuse neuroendocrine system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They often represent a diagnostic challenge because of their little dimensions, the deep localization into the retroperitoneum or in extramucosal sites, the possibility to be multilocated and the heterogeneous patterns of presentation. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a cost-effective technique that enables to look very definitely at a suspicious mass and at the surrounding area both within the GI wall and in the pancreas, allowing to precisely assess T and N stage. Under EUS-guidance it is possible to obtain tissue samples in order to reach a definitive diagnosis and to establish the tumor grade. In the therapeutic field, EUS is crucial to assess the safety and the feasibility of resective endoscopic techniques for the GI-wall NETs and it can guide local ablative techniques for pancreatic NETs. After treatment, EUS can be successfully useful to assess complete endoscopic resection and to follow-up resected or ablated patients. It is so evident that EUS has a role in the whole route of NETs management, from diagnosis, evaluation, grading and staging assessment, to therapy and consequent follow-up.

  5. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  6. Expression of Neuroendocrine Markers in Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, David L.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Bayer, Christian M.; Agaimy, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background. Carcinomas of the breast with neuroendocrine features are incorporated in the World Health Organization classification since 2003 and include well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas/small cell carcinomas, and invasive breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation. Neuroendocrine differentiation is known to be more common in certain low-grade histologic special types and has been shown to mainly cluster to the molecular (intrinsic) luminal A subtype. Methods. We analyzed the frequency of neuroendocrine differentiation in different molecular subtypes of breast carcinomas of no histologic special type using immunohistochemical stains with specific neuroendocrine markers (chromogranin A and synaptophysin). Results. We found neuroendocrine differentiation in 20% of luminal B-like carcinomas using current WHO criteria (at least 50% of tumor cells positive for synaptophysin or chromogranin A). In contrast, no neuroendocrine differentiation was seen in luminal A-like, HER2 amplified and triple-negative carcinomas. Breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation presented with advanced stage disease and showed aggressive behavior. Conclusions. We conclude that neuroendocrine differentiation is more common than assumed in poorly differentiated luminal B-like carcinomas. Use of specific neuroendocrine markers is thus encouraged in this subtype to enhance detection of neuroendocrine differentiation and hence characterize the biological and therapeutic relevance of this finding in future studies. PMID:24701575

  7. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team About Pancreatic Cancer? Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to find early. The pancreas is deep inside the body, so early tumors ...

  8. SerpinB2 regulates stromal remodelling and local invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Harris, N L E; Vennin, C; Conway, J R W; Vine, K L; Pinese, M; Cowley, M J; Shearer, R F; Lucas, M C; Herrmann, D; Allam, A H; Pajic, M; Morton, J P; Biankin, A V; Ranson, M; Timpson, P; Saunders, D N

    2017-03-27

    Pancreatic cancer has a devastating prognosis, with an overall 5-year survival rate of ~8%, restricted treatment options and characteristic molecular heterogeneity. SerpinB2 expression, particularly in the stromal compartment, is associated with reduced metastasis and prolonged survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and our genomic analysis revealed that SERPINB2 is frequently deleted in PDAC. We show that SerpinB2 is required by stromal cells for normal collagen remodelling in vitro, regulating fibroblast interaction and engagement with collagen in the contracting matrix. In a pancreatic cancer allograft model, co-injection of PDAC cancer cells and SerpinB2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in increased tumour growth, aberrant remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and increased local invasion from the primary tumour. These tumours also displayed elevated proteolytic activity of the primary biochemical target of SerpinB2-urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In a large cohort of patients with resected PDAC, we show that increasing uPA mRNA expression was significantly associated with poorer survival following pancreatectomy. This study establishes a novel role for SerpinB2 in the stromal compartment in PDAC invasion through regulation of stromal remodelling and highlights the SerpinB2/uPA axis for further investigation as a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.Oncogene advance online publication, 27 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.63.

  9. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  10. Recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Vishal; Ganguly, Ishita

    2014-09-28

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is commonly encountered, but less commonly understood clinical entity, especially idiopathic RAP, with propensity to lead to repeated attacks and may be chronic pancreatitis if attacks continue to recur. A great number of studies have been published on acute pancreatitis, but few have focused on RAP. Analysing the results of clinical studies focusing specifically on RAP is problematic in view due to lack of standard definitions, randomised clinical trials, standard evaluation protocol used and less post intervention follow-up duration. With the availability of newer investigation modalities less number of etiologies will remains undiagnosed. This review particularly is focused on the present knowledge in understanding of RAP.

  11. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma.

  12. Neuroendocrine factors distinguish juvenile psychopathy variants.

    PubMed

    Kimonis, Eva R; Goulter, Natalie; Hawes, David J; Wilbur, Rhonda R; Groer, Maureen W

    2017-03-01

    The characteristic pattern of emotional hypo-reactivity observed in primary psychopathy is not evident in secondary psychopathy, which is thought to originate from childhood adversity and co-occurring anxiety. The main aim of this study was to test whether salivary afternoon cortisol, Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and cortisol-to-DHEA concentrations, which at high levels indicate risk for chronic stress and poor mental health, distinguished secondary from primary variants of callous-unemotional (CU) traits-the affective component of psychopathy. This aim was achieved by first identifying psychopathy variants using latent profile analysis of CU, anxiety, and aggression scores among 232 incarcerated adolescent boys (M age = 16.75). Based on a subset with neuroendocrine data (n = 201), aggressive secondary CU variants had lower afternoon DHEA concentrations and higher cortisol-to-DHEA ratios and comorbid psychopathology compared with all other groups. In contrast, two primary CU variants (aggressive and non-aggressive types) emerged with profiles characterized by low to average psychopathology and high DHEA levels. Findings contribute to a growing literature base suggesting that biomarkers may distinguish youth on separable developmental pathways to psychopathy.

  13. Chemosensory Functions for Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaoling; Karp, Philip H.; Brody, Steven L.; Pierce, Richard A.; Welsh, Michael J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian airways are sensitive to inhaled stimuli, and airway diseases are characterized by hypersensitivity to volatile stimuli, such as perfumes, industrial solvents, and others. However, the identity and function of the cells in the airway that can sense volatile chemicals remain uncertain, particularly in humans. Here, we show that solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which are morphologically distinct and physiologically undefined, might serve as chemosensory cells in human airways. This conclusion is based on our finding that some human PNECs expressed members of the olfactory receptor (OR) family in vivo and in primary cell culture, and are anatomically positioned in the airway epithelium to respond to inhaled volatile chemicals. Furthermore, apical exposure of primary-culture human airway epithelial cells to volatile chemicals decreased levels of serotonin in PNECs, and the led to the release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to the basal medium. These data suggest that volatile stimulation of PNECs can lead to the secretion of factors that are capable of stimulating the corresponding receptors in the lung epithelium. We also found that the distribution of serotonin and neuropeptide receptors may change in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting that increased PNEC-dependent chemoresponsiveness might contribute to the altered sensitivity to volatile stimuli in this disease. Together, these data indicate that human airway epithelia harbor specialized cells that respond to volatile chemical stimuli, and may help to explain clinical observations of odorant-induced airway reactions. PMID:24134460

  14. Psychological and neuroendocrine reactivity to ostracism.

    PubMed

    Zwolinski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This study used the ostracism detection theory to investigate how ostracism impacts individuals in two ways: (1) immediate poststressor needs, mood, ruminative thoughts, and desire to affiliate, and (2) short-term affective and cortisol reactivity. A total of 58 college students were randomly assigned to the inclusion or ostracism conditions of Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing game. Immediately following the experimental manipulation, ostracized participants reported more thwarted psychological need states, more negative mood, and fewer positive ruminative thoughts, relative to their included counterparts. Ostracized participants reported a greater interest in affiliating with others in online or in-person settings. In the short-term, ostracized males reported more hostility than included males, although the scores were within expected norms for most males. There was no relation between Cyberball condition and gender across time for depression, anxiety, or positive affect. Approximately 20 min after the onset of the stressor, women in the luteal phase and women taking oral contraceptives in the ostracized group displayed higher cortisol than their counterparts in the included group. Relative to baseline, however, cortisol did not reliably increase after the onset of the stressor. Ostracized females taking oral contraceptives showed the greatest decline in cortisol, compared to included oral contraceptive users. Overall, results suggest that most of the negative effects of ostracism are immediate and limited to psychological, not neuroendocrine, responses.

  15. Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Appendix in Children.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Chintagumpala, Murali; Hicks, John; Nuchtern, Jed G; Okcu, M Fatih; Venkatramani, Rajkumar

    2017-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the appendix is the most common gastrointestinal epithelial tumor in children. The utility of serum markers or the indication for hemicolectomy has not been established in children. In 45 children diagnosed with appendiceal NET, 89% NETs were incidentally found following appendectomy performed for suspected acute appendicitis. The median age was 12 years, and 56% patients were female. Postoperative somatostatin scan (n=5), serum chromogranin A (n=4), and urine 5-HIAA (n=9) were all within normal limits. Pathology slides of 35 patients showed mesoappendiceal invasion in 29% patients, and vascular invasion in 6% patients. Seven patients (16%) underwent hemicolectomy for invasion of mesoappendix (n=5), tumor near the resection margin (n=1), and tumor size 1.5 cm with vascular invasion (n=1). Only 2 hemicolectomy specimens showed disease: one in the appendiceal stump and the other as a micrometastasis in a mesenteric lymph node. There were no recurrences and all patients were alive and without evidence of disease at last follow-up. Pediatric appendiceal NET tends to have a benign clinical course with excellent prognosis. In the absence of carcinoid syndrome, postoperative scans and serum biomarkers do not seem to be useful. With completely resected tumors, the indication for hemicolectomy is unclear.

  16. Observational study of patients with gastroenteropancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors in Argentina: Results from the large database of a multidisciplinary group clinical multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, JUAN MANUEL; MARMISSOLLE, FABIANA; BESTANI, CLAUDIA; PESCE, VERONICA; BELLI, SUSANA; DOMINICHINI, ENZO; MENDEZ, GUILLERMO; PRICE, PAOLA; GIACOMI, NORA; PAIROLA, ALEJANDRO; LORIA, FERNANDO SÁNCHEZ; HUERTAS, EDUARDO; MARTIN, CLAUDIO; PATANE, KARINA; POLERI, CLAUDIA; ROSENBERG, MOISES; CABANNE, ANA; KUJARUK, MIRTA; CAINO, ANALIA; ZAMORA, VICTOR; MARIANI, JAVIER; DIOCA, MARIANO; PARMA, PATRICIA; PODESTA, GUSTAVO; ANDRIANI, OSCAR; GONDOLESI, GABRIEL; ROCA, ENRIQUE

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) include a spectrum of malignancies arising from neuroendocrine cells throughout the body. The objective of this clinical investigation of retrospectively and prospectively collected data was to describe the prevalence, demographic data, clinical symptoms and methods of diagnosis of NET and the treatment and long-term follow-up of patients with NET. Data were provided by the participating centers and assessed for consistency by internal reviewers. All the cases were centrally evaluated (when necessary) by the pathologists in our group. The tissue samples were reviewed by hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining techniques to confirm the diagnosis of NET. In total, 532 cases were documented: 461 gastroenteropancreatic-NET (GEP-NET) and 71 bronchial NET (BNET). All the tumors were immunohistochemically defined according to the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society criteria. The most common initial symptoms in GEP-NET were abdominal pain, diarrhea, bowel obstruction, flushing, gastrointestinal bleeding and weight loss. The most common tumor types were carcinoid (58.0%), non-functional pancreatic tumor (23.0%), metastatic NET of unknown primary (16.0%) and functional pancreatic tumor (3.0%). Of the BNET, 89.0% were typical and 11.0% atypical carcinoids. Of the patients with GEP-NET, 59.2% had distant metastasis at diagnosis. The locations of the primary tumors in GEP-NET were the small bowel (26.9%), pancreas (25.2%), colon-rectum (12.4%), appendix (7.6%), stomach (6.9%), esophagus (2.8%), duodenum (2.0%) and unknown primary (16.3%). The histological subtypes based on the WHO classification were well-differentiated NET (20.1%), well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (66.5%) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (10.3%). Overall, 67.3% of the patients underwent surgery, 41.2% with curative intent and 26.1% for palliative purposes. The 5-year survival rates were 65.1% (95

  17. Defective regulation of insulin release and transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes by human islet cell tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Flatt, P. R.; Swanston-Flatt, S. K.; Powell, C. J.; Marks, V.

    1987-01-01

    Regulation of insulin release and transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes was examined using pieces of 3 benign medullary-type insulinomas removed from the pancreas of female patients at surgery. Immunocytochemical staining confirmed the presence of insulin-containing cells with no demonstrable glucagon, somatostatin or pancreatic polypeptide. After 3 days of culture in RPMI-1640, tumour pieces released 11-158 mg insulin kg-1 dry wt during acute 60 min incubations with the concomitant uptake of 2-47 mmol 45Ca kg-1 into the intracellular lanthanum-nondisplaceable pool. At 2.56 mM Ca2+, glucose alone or in combination with glyceraldehyde, mannoheptulose or diazoxide did not modify insulin release or 45Ca uptake. Theophylline significantly increased insulin release from 2 tumours with a small stimulatory effect on the third. A depolarising concentration of K+ enhanced insulin release from one tumour but this was not associated with an increase of 45Ca uptake. Calcium antagonists, (verapamil, D-600 and trifluoroperazine) and calcium ionophores (A23187 and Br-X537A) failed to modify insulin release or 45Ca uptake by each of the two tumours tested. Evaluation of 45Ca efflux from one tumour confirmed the unresponsiveness to glucose, K+, verapamil and A23187. Prolonged culture of 2 tumours for up to 16 days was associated with the gradual decline of insulin release to a steady output of 2-15 ng 24 h-1. Addition of verapamil to the cultures inhibited insulin output from one tumour, but mannoheptulose or diazoxide were without effect. The results indicate that inappropriate insulin release from these 3 benign medullary-type insulinomas is associated with disturbances in the regulation of transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes. Images Figure 1 PMID:2825749

  18. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute